FactoryTalk eProcedure Getting Results Guide

FactoryTalk eProcedure Getting Results Guide
Getting Results Guide
FactoryTalk eProcedure
Important User Information
Solid-state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines for the Application,
Installation, and Maintenance of Solid State Controls (publication SGI-1.1 available from your local Rockwell Automation sales office or online at
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/literature/) describes some important differences between solid-state equipment and hard-wired
electromechanical devices. Because of this difference, and also because of the wide variety of uses for solid-state equipment, all persons responsible for
applying this equipment must satisfy themselves that each intended application of this equipment is acceptable.
In no event will Rockwell Automation, Inc. be responsible or liable for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or application of this
equipment.
The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for illustrative purposes. Because of the many variables and requirements associated
with any particular installation, Rockwell Automation, Inc. cannot assume responsibility or liability for actual use based on the examples and
diagrams.
No patent liability is assumed by Rockwell Automation, Inc. with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software described in this
manual.
Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part, without written permission of Rockwell Automation, Inc., is prohibited.
Throughout this manual, when necessary, we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations.
WARNING: Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can cause an explosion in
a hazardous environment, which may lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or
economic loss.
ATTENTION: Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal
injury or death, property damage, or economic loss. Attentions help you identify a hazard, avoid a
hazard, and recognize the consequence
SHOCK HAZARD: Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to
alert people that dangerous voltage may be present.
BURN HAZARD: Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to alert
people that surfaces may reach dangerous temperatures.
Important:
Identifies information that is critical for successful application and understanding of the product.
Allen-Bradley, Rockwell Software, and Rockwell Automation ControlLogix, eProcedure, FactoryTalk, RSBizWare, RSBizWare BatchHistorian, RSBizWare Historian, RSBizWare MaterialTrack, and RSLinx are
trademarks of Rockwell Automation, Inc.
Trademarks not belonging to Rockwell Automation are property of their respective companies.
Table of contents
Chapter 1
Welcome
Document organization .......................................................................................................5
Document conventions........................................................................................................5
Chapter 2
FactoryTalk
eProcedure
introduction
What is eProcedure? .............................................................................................................8
Benefits of eProcedure..........................................................................................................8
FactoryTalk Batch Components .................................................................................... 10
FactoryTalk Batch Server ......................................................................................... 10
FactoryTalk Batch View ........................................................................................... 10
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor............................................................................ 11
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor ................................................................... 11
FactoryTalk Event Archiver ..................................................................................... 12
FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor ....................................................................... 12
FactoryTalk eProcedure Client ............................................................................... 12
FactoryTalk eProcedure Server ............................................................................... 13
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager .................................................................... 13
Chapter 3
The eProcedure
Server
Set up sample demonstrations ......................................................................................... 16
Add sample FactoryTalk Security users ................................................................. 16
Configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users ......................... 18
Configure the sample FactoryTalk Batch Server ................................................. 21
Rebuild the recipe directory ..................................................................................... 23
Start the Batch and eProcedure Servers ......................................................................... 24
Start the sample FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator ................................................. 26
Open the sample demonstration in the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator 27
Verify PCD communications .......................................................................................... 28
Effects of warm boot on control steps............................................................................ 29
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 30
Chapter 4
The eProcedure
Client
Run a recipe using eProcedure ......................................................................................... 32
Check the event journal .................................................................................................... 36
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 37
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Table of contents
Chapter 5
Create instruction-based phases ...................................................................................... 39
Create an instruction file .......................................................................................... 39
Custom tags ......................................................................................................... 41
Assign an instruction file to a phase ............................................................................... 42
Include a step verification signature template ...................................................... 44
Summary .............................................................................................................................. 44
Introduction to
instruction-based
phases
Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
Legal Notices
Index
4
Glossary ................................................................................................................................ 45
Legal Notices ....................................................................................................................... 53
Index ..................................................................................................................................... 55
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Chapter 1
Welcome
This guide was developed to explain the basics of FactoryTalk® eProcedure®.
Document
organization
The following subjects are presented in this document:
•
eProcedure documentation
•
eProcedure components
•
eProcedure Server
•
eProcedure Client
•
Introduction to instruction based phases
•
HTML-Based instruction files
•
Glossary
See also
Document conventions on page 5
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
The eProcedure Server on page 15
The eProcedure client on page 31
Introduction to instruction-based phases on page 39
Document
conventions
Text that appears in the eProcedure software interface, such as dialog box titles,
buttons, and menu commands, is presented in bold type. Text typed in response
to a prompt is presented in bold type. Windows security items are also in bold
type, such as batchsvr_group.
File names, extensions, paths and directories are presented in italics, such as
C:\Winnt\Win.ini.
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Chapter 1
Welcome
Examples of source code, computer files or reports are presented in a mono-spaced
font.
Tip:
Tips provide additional information to help you effectively use
the software.
Warnings provide messages about a potentially hazardous
situation.
Important:
Important notes provides required configuration
parameters or important information about the
software.
See also
Welcome on page 5
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Chapter 2
FactoryTalk eProcedure
introduction
FactoryTalk® eProcedure® is an integral part of Rockwell’s FactoryTalk Batch suite
of software components. As part of the FactoryTalk family, the FactoryTalk Batch
components increase overall plant efficiency by delivering the visibility, control,
and reporting needed to optimize manufacturing. Coordinated execution reduces
rework and improves product quality and consistency. Real-time management of
equipment utilization maximizes return on assets. Implementing optimized
recipes and procedures, increases plant capacity. Using electronic, paperless
operations improves productivity. Reduce compliance costs by using electronic
batch record implementation, paperless manufacturing, and quality sign-offs.
Lifting the compliance burden from manufacturing reduces inventory levels and
cycle times, which greatly improves customer service.
The FactoryTalk Batch components ensure that plant floor operations are
optimized, giving quick returns on net assets. New product definitions are
deployed quickly into manufacturing. Production order information is accurate.
Business and plant-level control systems are tightly coordinated and multiple sites
operate as a team. Our completely open, configurable set of products helps you
define, manage, monitor, and control manufacturing at local, remote, or
contractor plants. Best of all, deploy the FactoryTalk Batch components wherever
needed — one at a time or all at once — to improve productivity and plant
control. The FactoryTalk Batch components include:
•
FactoryTalk Batch
•
FactoryTalk eProcedure
•
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager
See also
What is eProcedure? on page 8
Benefits of eProcedure on page 8
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What is
eProcedure?
As one of the FactoryTalk Batch components, FactoryTalk eProcedure manages,
sequences and documents the execution of manual operations. Automating batch
sheets and standard operating procedures (SOPs) through interactive web
documents, eProcedure provides the control needed to rapidly deploy new
products into manufacturing and the data collection necessary to achieve true
plant floor to enterprise-wide integration. FactoryTalk eProcedure provides the
benefits of procedure automation without the expense of equipment automation.
The FactoryTalk Batch components incorporate the principles of batch and
procedure automation, an approach defined by ISA’s S88.01 standard.
FactoryTalk eProcedure automation provides a means to automate the execution
of procedural logic associated with recipes, product grade changes, computer setup,
and computer shutdown procedures. Operators perform the actions on the
equipment, but they are prompted and guided by eProcedure. The procedure
specifies the sequence and timing of actions that can be manually performed or
performed by automation equipment.
Typical procedures that can be automated using FactoryTalk eProcedure include:
•
Batch execution
•
Equipment startup and shutdown
•
Product changeover
•
Abnormal condition handling
See also
Benefits of eProcedure on page 8
Benefits of
eProcedure
FactoryTalk eProcedure reduces the amount of effort required to create and
maintain recipes, as well as minimizes the time required to collect and report
Batch data.
The following describes a typical recipe execution process, with and without
eProcedure:
8
Without eProcedure
With eProcedure
A master recipe (a collection of SOPs) is
maintained in written form. The master
recipe includes instructions for the operator,
places to enter data, and places for any
required signatures.
A master recipe is created and maintained
electronically with the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe
Editor. The master recipe includes operator
instructions, report data, and prompts for required
approvals.
When a batch needs to be run, the recipe is
printed and given to the operator, who reads
the instructions, manually sequences the
process and enters the required information
on the printout.
When a batch needs to be run, the operator adds a
batch using the eProcedure Client, steps through
the instructions, and enters the required data into
the system.
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When the batch is complete, the completed
recipe document is filed.
When the batch is complete, the electronic batch
record contains a complete record of the entire
batch process.
The data can be manually entered into a
database for recording and reporting
purposes.
The electronic batch record can be automatically
transferred to any ODBC-compliant database using
the FactoryTalk Event Archiver.
FactoryTalk eProcedure can be implemented in a completely manual
manufacturing facility or in a partially automated facility. With eProcedure, use all
manual phases or a combination of manual and automated phases within a single
recipe. Regardless of the state of automation, the implementation process is the
same.
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor is used to define the process
equipment, both manual and automated. The modular approach in defining
equipment is as appropriate with manual facilities as it is in automated facilities.
As part of the configuration process, attach instruction files to each of the manual
equipment modules.
Instruction files are HTML files that include all of the required control steps for a
phase. Each control step can include textual instructions, embedded parameter
values, report fields for operator input, and submit buttons. Control steps may
also include any valid HTML component.
Once the equipment is defined, and the instruction files are created, create recipes
in the same fashion as a completely automated facility.
FactoryTalk eProcedure allows the operator to create and command batches from
remote computers using Microsoft Internet Explorer. With eProcedure, the
operator no longer needs to write processing information on a piece of paper for
submission. The operator enters the data directly into the computer where the
data is stored in an electronic batch record, which can later be downloaded into
your ODBC-compliant database.
See also
What is eProcedure? on page 8
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FactoryTalk Batch
Components
FactoryTalk Batch comes with several components that interact with each other
to design, create, configure and run batch recipes.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Server on page 10
FactoryTalk Batch View on page 10
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor on page 11
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor on page 11
FactoryTalk Event Archiver on page 12
FactoryTalk Batch
Server
The FactoryTalk Batch Server is the engine that runs FactoryTalk Batch. It is the
component that controls system information, phases and recipes. The server
allows integration with process-connected devices (PCDs) and third-party
software packages. Prior to opening FactoryTalk Batch View, the FactoryTalk
Batch Server must be running and remain active during all batch functions.
The FactoryTalk Batch Server operates as a Windows service, which means that
the FactoryTalk Batch Server can be configured to start automatically and that
control of the FactoryTalk Batch Server can be given to the Windows Service
Manager. Because the FactoryTalk Batch Server runs as a service, it does not
require an operator to log on to run. Therefore, logging on or off Windows during
operation does not disrupt the performance of the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
FactoryTalk Batch
View
The FactoryTalk Batch View is the batch recipe initiation and execution program
used by the operator of the FactoryTalk Batch automation solution system. It is
used to initiate and control the batch process. It also displays a graphical
representation of a running batch and its associated data. The FactoryTalk Batch
View is intended to be used in conjunction with an HMI.
Each FactoryTalk Batch View window can be customized to suit the needs of a
specific station.
10
•
Specify the columns to display as well as the size of columns and rows.
•
Sort and filter on one field in certain windows, and set the font for each
FactoryTalk Batch View window.
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FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor
•
Use the password protection option to limit the information that is
displayed, as well as specify the commands allowed at a particular station (If
the security is enabled for the View).
•
Respond to electronic signature requests that have been generated by report
and recipe parameter deviations or by a command execute request.
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor is used to graphically create and configure
recipes.
•
The interface is based on IEC 61131-3 sequential function charts (SFC)
that graphically organizes recipes into procedures, unit procedures,
operations and phases along with any applicable comments.
•
In addition to the SFC view, the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor offers a
table view. Table-based recipes provide a mechanism for creating simple
recipes that do not require a complex recipe structure or elaborate transition
expressions. Additionally, you can view table-based recipes and edit all
recipe parameters without having to navigate between steps.
•
The FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor allows you to specify sequences of
phases. The actual phase logic must be configured in the process-connected
device (PCD) while the interface to the PCD must be configured in the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor.
•
Recipe reports can be generated in SFC and/or descriptive format.
•
If Recipe Approvals are enabled in the underlying area model, approval
signoffs are executed in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
•
When Recipe Version Control is enabled, a version of a recipe (a read-only,
numbered snapshot of a recipe) can be saved and protected from further
editing. New work-in-progress (WIP) copies of a version allow the recipe
author to continue to make changes and updates to a recipe. When a
versioned recipe no longer matches the underlying area model, or references
a deleted or non-existent sub-recipe, it is marked as obsolete.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor
The FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor is a graphical interface through which a
database of process equipment is defined and maintained. The components
defined in the Equipment Editor are used to interface with the process-connected
devices (PCDs) in the facility. During recipe configuration, the area model
provides a list of available units and phases. You can also configure phases and
commands to trigger an electronic signature request when a report or recipe
parameter is out of range (parameter deviation), or when specific commands are
executed on a batch (i.e. Abort Batch, Active Step Change, etc.). Later, during
recipe verification, it ensures that the designated equipment is capable of executing
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the procedures. During recipe execution, resource arbitration functions use this
database to allocate equipment based on recipe and operator requests. The area
model is available to all other FactoryTalk Batch applications.
In addition to the area model, the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor allows
configuration of communication functions, equipment phases, enumeration sets,
data servers, and Batch Archiver functions.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
FactoryTalk Event
Archiver
The FactoryTalk Event Archiver’s purpose is to translate the FactoryTalk Batch
tab-delimited ASCII electronic batch record files to a user-specified file type.
These electronic batch record files are maintained separately for each batch
created and viewed with a word processor or spreadsheet. Many plants have
standardized on one of the many commercially available Relational Database
Management System (RDBMS) software packages. We recommend using a
high-performance database, such as SQL Server, due to their superior robustness
and performance. The Archiver collects data from each electronic batch record file
and stores it in the specified RDBMS database format.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
FactoryTalk Batch
Network Editor
The FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor is a utility that indicates where other
FactoryTalk Batch and FactoryTalk Batch Material servers are located on the
network. This network configuration allows for ease of integration with other
FactoryTalk Batch components and simplifies the process of reconfiguring a
multi-computer system. If FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager is also installed
the FactoryTalk Batch Network Editor is also used to indicate the location of the
material database.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
FactoryTalk
eProcedure Client
The FactoryTalk eProcedure Client computer uses Internet Explorer to enable
operators to run batch recipes.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
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FactoryTalk
eProcedure Server
The FactoryTalk eProcedure Server provides the services to the FactoryTalk Batch
Server to enable the use of HTML instruction files. Prior to opening FactoryTalk
eProcedure Client, FactoryTalk eProcedure Server must be running and remain
active during all batch functions.
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
FactoryTalk Batch
Material Manager
FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager is used to track material consumption in
batch recipes. It consists of two components: Material Server and Material Editor.
The Material Editor provides an interface to help you create the material database,
which consists of material, lot, sublot, container, and storage location data. The
Material Server provides the communication between the material database and
the FactoryTalk Batch Server. During a batch run, information about available
containers is presented to the operator for binding decisions. Binding is the
process of mapping steps within a control recipe to actual equipment in a plant.
After a batch is run, quantities consumed or distributed are updated in the
material database for use in inventory tracking.
The Material Server consists of a group of components that work together to
service various applications. The primary applications that the Material Server
services are the Material Editor, FactoryTalk Batch Server, FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor, FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor, and the Storage Container
ActiveX control. Any third-party application can also use custom solutions based
on the exposed Material Object Model (MOM).
See also
FactoryTalk Batch Components on page 10
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For ease of understanding, and for tutorial purposes, this guide refers to
configuring and using the sample files installed with FactoryTalk Batch. The
SampleDemo folders contain complete area models and recipes for a simulated
plant. Before running the demonstrations, you must add a FactoryTalk Security
user, configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server to recognize the required project
directories, select the initialization path and file name, and then start the
FactoryTalk Batch Server, the FactoryTalk eProcedure Server, and the
FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator.
Tip:
This guide outlines the configuration and use of the SampleDemo
demonstration files. It is recommended that you follow the directions
for using this demonstration step by step.
The FactoryTalk eProcedure Server provides the services to the FactoryTalk Batch
Server to enable the use of HTML instruction files. Communication from the
eProcedure Client to the eProcedure Server is HTTP for web content.
FactoryTalk eProcedure uses OLE for Process Control (OPC) for
communications between the eProcedure Server and the FactoryTalk Batch
Server.
The eProcedure Server coordinates the following functions:
•
Provides the services to the FactoryTalk Batch Server to enable the use of
HTML instruction files.
•
Formats parameters and report parameters from material-based recipes into
instruction files.
This section assumes that the FactoryTalk eProcedure Client and Server have been
installed and configured. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Components Upgrade and
Installation Guide for more information.)
See also
Set up sample demonstrations on page 16
Start the Batch and eProcedure Servers on page 24
Start the sample FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator on page 26
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Verify PCD communications on page 28
Effects of warm boot on control steps on page 29
The installation process placed the SampleDemo1 and SampleDemo2 folders in
the BATCHCTL share on your hard drive. Within each of these SampleDemo
folders are four subfolders that contain the files for the area model.
Set up sample
demonstrations
To set up sample demonstrations:
1. Add a FactoryTalk Security user.
2. Configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server to locate the area model.
3. Verify the recipes in the area model.
See also
Add FactoryTalk Security users on page 16
Configure permissions for FactoryTalk Security users on page 18
Rebuild the recipe directory on page 23
Add sample
FactoryTalk Security
users
For the sample demonstrations file, create FactoryTalk user accounts for an
operator and an engineer. Create these user accounts in the FactoryTalk
Directory.
To add sample FactoryTalk Security users:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software, and then select
FactoryTalk Administration Console. The Select FactoryTalk
Directory dialog box opens.
Important:
On Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008, right-click
FactoryTalk Administration Console and select Run as
administrator.
2. Select Network to add this user account to the FactoryTalk Network
Directory, and select OK.
3. If not already logged on to the FactoryTalk Network Directory, the Log On
to FactoryTalk dialog box opens. In User name, type the user name for the
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Administrator that was configured when the FactoryTalk Services Platform
was installed.
4. In Password, type the password for the Administrator.
5. Verify the Directory and select OK. The FactoryTalk Administration
Console window opens and displays the specified FactoryTalk Directory.
6. Expand Users and Groups.
7. Right-click the Users folder, and select New > User to create a new
FactoryTalk Security user account in FactoryTalk Directory.
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8. The New User dialog box opens and displays the General tab. In the User
name box, type OPER.
9. In Full name, type Operator.
10. In Password, type password, and confirm it by re-entering password in the
Confirm Password box.
11. Select Create.
12. Repeat steps 7-11, but this time in the User Name field, enter ENG and in
the Full Name field, enter Engineer.
13. Keep the FactoryTalk Administration Console open to configure
permissions for these FactoryTalk Security users in the next exercise.
See also
Configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users on page 18
Configure sample
permissions for
FactoryTalk Security
users
After creating the FactoryTalk security users, set up access modes for each
FactoryTalk Batch component to specify which users are permitted to view or
perform actions. Configure security settings in the FactoryTalk Administration
Console. To tighten security in the eProcedure Client, remove the All Users
group from the Full Edit policy setting.
To configure sample permissions for FactoryTalk Security users:
1. In the FactoryTalk Administration Console Explorer pane, navigate to
System > Policies > Product Policies > Batch > Equipment Editor >
Access Modes.
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2. Right-click Access Modes, and then select Properties. The Access Modes
Properties dialog box opens.
3. In the Full Edit row, select the Configure Security browse button. The
Configure Securable Action dialog box opens.
4. Select Add. The Select User and Computer dialog box opens.
5. In the Filter Users box, select Show All.
6. In Users, select ENG.
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7. Select OK. The Configure Securable Action dialog box is updated,
showing ENG in the list of Users with the Allow check box selected.
8. Select OK to close the Configure Securable Action dialog box.
9. In the Access Modes Properties dialog box, select View Only.
10. In the View Only row, select the Configure Security browse button. The
Configure Securable Action dialog box opens.
11. Select Add. The Select User and Computer dialog box opens.
12. In the Filter Users box, select Show All.
13. In Users, select OPER.
14. Select OK. The Configure Securable Action dialog box is updated,
showing OPER in the list of Users with the Allow check box selected.
15. Select OK to close the Configure Securable Action dialog box.
16. Select OK to close the Access Modes Properties dialog box.
See the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide for more information on security.
See also
Configure the sample Batch Server on page 21
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Configure the sample
FactoryTalk Batch
Server
To set up the sample demonstrations, configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server to
locate the folders that contain the demonstration files and to the \Restart and bin
folders where the FactoryTalk Batch Server writes data upon system failure.
Configure the FactoryTalk Batch Server in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor.
To configure the sample FactoryTalk Batch Server:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Equipment Editor. The
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor opens (log on to FactoryTalk if
prompted).
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008,
right-click Equipment Editor and select Run as
administrator.
2. Select Options > Server Options. The Server Options dialog box opens to
the Project Settings tab.
3. In the Project Directories area, select the Primary Journal browse button.
The Select Directory dialog box opens.
4. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Journals folder, and then
select Open.
5. Select the Error Logging browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
6. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Logs folder, and then
select Open.
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7. Click the Instructions browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
Important:
In order for the eProcedure Server to start, you must define the
instruction path and an instruction file for each
instruction-based phase in the area model. (See the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide for instructions
on defining instruction-based phases.)
8. Select the Equipment Database browse button. The Select Equipment
Database dialog box opens.
9. From the Look in list, open the SampleDemo1\ Recipes folder, select the
ice_cream1.cfg file, and then select Open.
10. In the Store Recipes Using area, select Binary Files, and then select the
Recipe Directory browse button. The Select Directory dialog box opens.
11. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Recipes folder, and then
select Open.
12. Select the Restart Control tab.
13. Select the Primary Path browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
14. From the Look in list, select the SampleDemo1\Restart folder, and then
select Open.
15. Select the Secondary Path browse button. The Select Directory dialog box
opens.
16. From the Look in list, select the Bin folder.
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17. Select the Batch Reporting tab. Leave Never (No Queue) as the default
reporting application.
18. Select OK to close the Server Options dialog box.
19. From the File menu, select Exit to exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment
Editor.
Tip:
These steps set up the FactoryTalk Batch Server to run the
tutorial steps in this manual. There are many other settings to
consider when setting up the FactoryTalk Batch system. (See
the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide for more information
on the Server Options dialog box.)
See also
Rebuild the recipe directory on page 23
Rebuild the recipe
directory
To run the demonstration recipes, rebuild the recipe directory and verify the
recipes in the area model using the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
To rebuild the recipe directory:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Recipe Editor. The
Recipe Editor reads the area model. Log on to FactoryTalk if prompted.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click
Recipe Editor and select Run as administrator.
If a message to verify the recipes displays, select Cancel.
2. Select File > Rebuild Recipe Directory. When the rebuild is complete,
select OK, and then select Yes to verify the recipes.
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3. When the recipe verification is complete, select Accept to save the recipes,
and then select Close.
4. Select File > Exit to exit the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
See also
Set up sample demonstrations on page 16
Start the Batch and
eProcedure Servers
The FactoryTalk Batch and FactoryTalk eProcedure Servers may start
automatically when the computer starts. By default the FactoryTalk Batch Server
starts in production mode. If FactoryTalk Batch is not activated, run the tutorial
in demo mode. While in demo mode, the FactoryTalk Batch Server runs for a
two-hour period and then stops.
Tip:
The FactoryTalk Batch Server does not start in production mode without
activation. (See the Activate Rockwell Software Products insert included
with the software CD.)
To start the Batch and eProcedure Servers:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Batch Service Manager.
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager opens.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click
Batch Service Manager and select Run as administrator.
2. If the FactoryTalk Batch Server is not already listed in the Service box,
select it from the list.
3. If the FactoryTalk Batch Server is running, select Stop.
4. If the name of the computer where the FactoryTalk Batch Server is installed
does not display in the Computer box, select the Select Computer button.
The Select Computer dialog box opens.
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5. In the Enter the object name to select area, type the name of the computer
where the Batch Server is installed (or select Advanced to search for a
computer). Select OK.
Tip:
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager must communicate with the
Windows Service Manager of the selected computer to determine what
services are available. There may be a noticeable delay as
communications are established. If the Service Manager cannot
communicate with the Windows Service Manager of the selected
computer, a message displays.
6. From the Service list, select FactoryTalk Batch Server.
Tip:
If No Batch Services displays in the list, the FactoryTalk Batch
Server is not installed on the selected computer. (See the
FactoryTalk Batch Components Upgrade and Installation Guide for
instructions.)
7. To start the FactoryTalk Batch Server in Demo mode, select Allow Demo
Mode.
8. Select the method to use for booting the server.
Cold Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server in a cold state. All
journal data or recipe content is erased upon startup.
Warm Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server, restoring the set of
batches that were on the batch list when the server
previously terminated.
Warm All Boot
Restarts the FactoryTalk Batch Server only if it is able to
restore all of the batches to the batch list.
9. Select Start/Continue. The Service State area changes from STOPPED to
START PENDING. After a few moments, RUNNING displays and the
light changes to green.
The FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator may start automatically and open a
window. If so, minimize the window.
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10. Select the eProcedure Server from the Service list.
11. Select the method to use for booting the server.
Cold Boot checked
Restarts the FactoryTalk eProcedure Server in a cold state. All
control steps, plus all signatures and previously-entered values
associated with the control step due to parameter deviation or
cancelled step verification signatures, are removed.
Cold Boot unchecked
Restarts the FactoryTalk eProcedure Server, restoring the
control steps that were active when the server previously
terminated (the control step is restarted with a new reactivation
number).
(See Effects of warm boot on control steps for more information.)
12. Select Start/Continue. The eProcedure Server starts running.
13. Click Close to close the FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager.
Tip:
If conversation becomes LOST while running in Demo mode, make sure
that the Simulator is running and try starting the server(s) again. (See Start
the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator for more information.)
See also
Effects of warm boot on control step on page 29
Start the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator on page 26
Start the sample
FactoryTalk Batch
Phase Simulator
26
FactoryTalk Batch comes with a phase logic simulation program, referred to as the
FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator used to simulate the batch process without
connecting to a PCD. The Phase Simulator imitates the functionality of a data
server and can communicate with the FactoryTalk Batch Server using OPC
communication protocol. The Phase Simulator is a powerful tool for testing,
experimentation and demonstration purposes. In this guide, run the sample
demonstration using the Phase Simulator.
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Tip:
If the Phase Simulator is required and OPC protocol is used for
communications, the FactoryTalk Batch Server automatically starts the
Phase Simulator. Check the Windows taskbar to see if the Phase Simulator
is started.
To run the sample demonstration correctly, open the ice_cream1.sim file in the
Phase Simulator.
To start the sample FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator:
1. If the Phase Simulator is already running, maximize it from the Windows
taskbar. If the Phase Simulator is not running, select the Start button, point
to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk Batch Suite >
FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Simulator. The FactoryTalk Batch
Phase Simulator opens.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008,
right-click Simulator and select Run as administrator.
2. Select File > Open. The Open Simulator Configuration File dialog box
opens.
3. From the Look in list, open the Program Files > Rockwell Software >
Batch > SampleDemo1 > Recipes folder. Select the ice_cream1.sim file,
and then select Open.
4. Minimize the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator window.
See also
Verify PCD communications on page 28
Open the sample
demonstration in the
FactoryTalk Batch
Phase Simulator
To open the sample demonstration, you must open the ice_cream1.sim file in the
Phase Simulator.
To open the sample demonstration in the FactoryTalk Batch Phase
Simulator:
1. From the File menu, select Open. The Open Simulator Configuration
File dialog box opens.
2. From the Look in list, open the Program Files (x86)\Rockwell
Software\Batch\SampleDemo1\Recipes folder. Select the
ice_cream1.sim file, and then select Open.
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3. Minimize the Phase Simulator window.
See also
Start the FactoryTalk Batch Phase Simulator on page 26
Verify PCD
communications
Use the following instructions to verify PCD communications.
To verify PCD communications:
1. Select Start, point to All Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk
Batch Suite > FactoryTalk Batch, and then select Batch Service Manager.
The FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager opens.
Important:
If running on Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008, right-click
Batch Service Manager and select Run as administrator.
2. Make sure FactoryTalk Batch Server is selected in the Service box.
3. Select Server Statistics. The FactoryTalk Batch Server Statistics dialog
box opens.
4. Select the PCD Communications tab. The Data Server Status area displays
the status of the conversation with the OPC_SIM data server (Phase
Simulator), which should be PHASES GOOD, and the
INSTRUCTIONBASEDSERVER, which should be INSTRUCTIONS
GOOD.
5. In the Tag Verify area, select Start to begin the verify process. The tag
verification process takes several minutes.
6. When the Status box shows COMPLETED, select OK to close the
FactoryTalk Batch Server Statistics dialog box.
See also
Effects of warm boot on control steps on page 29
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Effects of warm
boot on control
steps
A warm restart (boot) of the eProcedure Server has the following effects on
control steps:
•
Reactivated steps are not active after a warm boot. Instead, the previously
active control step is active. The left column in Past instructions contains
the usual information (the reactivation number is remembered). The
middle column displays Reactivated Control Step Terminated by
eProcedure Server shutting down and the right column has a check mark.
An InstructionComplete event record containing the step’s HTML is
created. In addition, a ControlStepStop event record is added. These
control steps are not eligible for reactivation.
•
Control steps that were active during a warm boot of the eProcedure Server
are still active when the server starts again, but the control step is restarted
with a new reactivation number. All signatures and previously-entered
values associated with the control step due to parameter deviation or
canceled step verification signatures are removed. A Past control step is
added, which states Control Step Terminated by eProcedure Server
shutting down.
The example below shows a reactivated control step (first of the Past instructions
below) that was active when the eProcedure Client was shut down and the
eProcedure Server was then warm booted. The reactivated control step was a
reactivation of the first control step, as indicated by the arrow.
It also shows a control step (the second of the Past instructions in the example
below) that was active when the warm boot occurred.
See also
Set up sample demonstrations on page 16
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Summary
In this chapter, you:
•
Set up the FactoryTalk Batch Server to run the sample demonstration
•
Started the FactoryTalk Batch and eProcedure Servers in demo mode
•
Opened the .sim file in the Phase Simulator to run the sample
demonstration
•
Verified PCD communications status
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the FactoryTalk Batch
and eProcedure Servers. (See the FactoryTalk Batch Administrator Guide for more
information about the FactoryTalk Batch Server. See the FactoryTalk eProcedure
Administrator Guide for more information about the eProcedure Server.)
Tip:
30
The rest of this document is designed to give you a tour through
eProcedure using the sample demonstration. Follow the step-by-step
instructions to learn how to run instruction-based recipes using
eProcedure.
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Chapter 4
The eProcedure Client
The eProcedure Client is a web-based application used to create and command
batches. A batch is composed of a combination of process-connected phase logic
and instruction files that step you, the operator, through the manual process of
producing a batch of product.
The eProcedure Client makes use of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer along with
Active Server Pages (ASPs). The eProcedure Server acts as the process-connected
device and provides the information to the web pages seen in Internet Explorer.
The eProcedure Client has five views that you can access by selecting their
respective buttons.
•
Equipment view
The Equipment view provides a graphical view of your facility’s equipment,
and displays run-time information that is relevant to the type of equipment
displayed. You can use the predefined hyperlinks to access custom web
pages, documents, or applications.
•
Instructions view
The Instructions view provides the ordered list of control steps for the
selected filter. You can view current, past, and/or future control steps, as
well as add a comment to a particular control step.
•
Batch List view
The Batch List view is used to create and command a batch. A batch
remains on the batch list until the operator removes it or until the
FactoryTalk Batch Server is re-started with a cold boot command.
•
Procedure view
The Procedure view provides SFC and table views of the selected batch, unit
procedure, or operation. You can command any portion of the batch, from
the procedure level down to the phase level.
•
Signature List view
The Signature List view displays a list of pending signatures and their
related commands, report parameters, etc., which are maintained on the
FactoryTalk Batch Server.
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Run a recipe using
eProcedure
The eProcedure Client works much the same as the FactoryTalk Batch View
client except that the operator interacts with the instruction files associated with
the phases in the area model. You will create an instruction file in the next
chapter.
Tip:
When you run eProcedure for the first time, the Microsoft Installer may
also start. You can either follow the prompts on the installer or press
Cancel until it closes. This does not affect eProcedure’s performance
in any way.
To run a recipe using eProcedure:
1. Open the FactoryTalk Batch Service Manager and make sure the
FactoryTalk Batch and eProcedure Servers are running.
2. Open Internet Explorer. The eProcedure client opens to the FactoryTalk
Batch List view. (If prompted, select OK.) The authenticated user’s name,
the default user name, or <No authenticated user> displays as the Current
User.
3. Select the Log In button. The Log on to FactoryTalk dialog box opens.
Tip:
When Single-SignOn is enabled and there is no Single-SignOn
user established, the eProcedure Client also logs the user onto
the FactoryTalk Directory.
4. Type your user name in the Name box and your password in the Password
box.
5. Select OK to log on. Otherwise, select Cancel to return to the eProcedure
Client. The name of the logged on user is displayed as the Current User. If
the logon is not successful, or if you log off without logging on a new user,
the default user is logged on or <No authenticated user> displays.
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6. Select the Add button. The Master Recipe List dialog box opens.
7. Select the CLS_FRENCHVANILLA recipe, and then select OK. The
Batch Creation dialog box opens.
8. In the Batch ID box, type BATCH_200.
9. In the Formula Values area, enter the following amounts in the Values
column:
Parameter
Value
CREAM_AMOUNT
1800
EGG_AMOUNT
180
FLAVOR_AMOUNT
48
MILK_AMOUNT
1500
SUGAR_AMOUNT
700
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10. In the Unit Binding area, select SP_FREEZER1 for the Freezer and
SP_MIXER1 for the Mixer, and then select Create. The batch is added to
the FactoryTalk Batch List view.
11. Select the batch, and then select the Start button. The batch enters the
RUNNING state.
12. Select the Procedure button. The Procedure view displays the recipe in an
SFC. The phases change color as they activate. Use the side scroll bar to
move up and down through the SFC.
When the operator is required to interact with the instruction files, the
INSTRUCTIONS button starts flashing.
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13. Select the Instructions button. The first instruction steps display.
14. Select OK to acknowledge the prompts. When asked for the amount of
each item to add, use the same amounts you entered when you created the
batch.
15. One of the prompts asks you to supply the agitation speed for the mixer.
16. In the SP_MIXER1 box, type 25, and then select OK. The information
uploads to the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
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17. Select the Show Future button to see all of the instructions. As a phase
activates, the instruction changes from gray to white and the OK button
activates.
18. Respond to the remaining prompts until the recipe completes.
19. Select the BATCHES button. Select the batch in the batch list, and then
select the Remove button. The batch is removed from the list.
See also
Check the event journal on page 36
Check the event
journal
The operator actions1 in eProcedure are captured in the Batch Event Journal,
which can be viewed from the FactoryTalk Batch View.
To check the event journal:
1. Open the FactoryTalk Batch View.
2. Select the Event Journal button. The Event Journal view opens.
Tip:
If the Filtering area does not display, select the left split bar and drag to
the right.
3. Select the Journal button. The Event Data Files dialog box opens.
4. In the Event Data Files list, select the BATCH_200 batch, and then select
OK. The event data displays on the right side of the window.
action. An organized activity performed on a resource in order to accomplish an
objective. Actions are grouped into categories, with some actions common to multiple
products.
1
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5. From the Column 1 list, select Time.
6. From the Column 2 list, select Event Type.
7. In the Filter 2 box, type Report.
8. From the Column 3 list, select (None).
9. Select the Refresh button. The data is filtered to show the entries the
operator made in the BATCH_200 batch. You may need to adjust the
column headings to view the entire message as shown in this figure.
10. Exit the FactoryTalk Batch View.
See also
Summary on page 37
Summary
In this chapter you,
•
Configured the eProcedure Client
•
Ran a recipe using eProcedure
•
Filtered the event journal to see the operator input
This chapter provided a brief overview of the capabilities of the eProcedure Client.
(See the FactoryTalk eProcedure Client User Guide for more information on the
eProcedure Client. See the FactoryTalk Batch View User Guide for more
information on the Event Journal.)
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Chapter 5
Introduction to instruction-based
phases
An instruction-based phase is a phase that is linked to an instruction file — when
the phase executes, the contents of the instruction file display in a browser
window.
See also
Create instruction-based phases on page 39
Create
instruction-based
phases
An instruction-based phase consists of an instruction file that is assigned to the
phase.
To create instruction-based phases:
1. Create the instruction file.
2. Assign the instruction file to a phase
See also
Create an instruction file on page 39
Assign an instruction file to a phase on page 42
Create an instruction
file
An instruction file contains the series of steps, such as operation instructions and
operator feedback entries that present to the operator though Internet Explorer.
All the actions performed are recorded in the Event Journal for a permanent
record of the process. For example, you can add a step in the instruction file that
prompts the operator to verify a temperature; the temperature value and the
approval indication appears in the Event Journal.
For this exercise you will use Microsoft® Notepad to view an existing HTML-based
web page that uses standard HTML tags and custom HTML tags designed for use
with the eProcedure Server. To understand how the instructions are written, see
Custom tags.
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Introduction to instruction-based phases
To create an instruction file:
1. Open Notepad.
2. From the File menu, select Open. Navigate to C:\Program Files\Rockwell
Software\Batch\SampleDemo1\instructions (if you did not use the default
install path, navigate to the correct location).
3. Select add_egg_1.htm and select Open.
4. Select File > Save As, and save the htm file with the name
add_egg_demo.htm.
The file consists of several short forms, designated by the <form> and
</form> HTML tags.
5. Locate the text highlighted in the first form in the following illustration:
6. The highlighted line tells the eProcedure client to:
Prepare <sop>UNIT</sop> for delivery of
<sop>ADD_AMOUNT</sop> KG of Egg.
This line appears as the first step in the manual phase and at run time
replaces <sop>ADD_AMOUNT</sop> with the actual amount to add to
the recipe.
7. The code and text in the second form tells the eProcedure client to:
Begin charging <sop>ADD_AMOUNT</sop> KG of Egg into
<sop>UNIT</sop>.
Press OK when complete.
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Introduction to instruction-based phases
8. Locate the third form in the file. Change the word Egg to Egg_Demo, as
shown here:
Note that this form also contains a text box (<INPUT TYPE="TEXT"
SIZE="20" NAME="AMOUNT_ADDED">). At run time the operator
enters the amount of Egg that was added to the recipe.
9. Select File > Save. Be sure to save the file in the SampleDemo1/Instructions
folder for the project.
The full path is
c:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\Batch\SampleDemo1\Instructions or
\\computername\BATCHCTL\SampleDemo1\Instructions if you are
developing on a remote computer.
10. Close the file and exit Notepad.
See also
Custom tags on page 41
The instructions are written using plain text. To obtain specific server-related
information, use the custom tags shown in this table.
Custom tags
Data Type
HTML Code
Display Value
Batch Data
<sop>BatchID</sop>
Batch ID of the running recipe
<sop>Unit</sop>
Unit name for the current phase
<sop>Cell</sop>
Process cell
<sop>Phase</sop>
Current phase name
<sop>parameter.Name</sop>
Parameter name
<sop>parameter.EU</sop>
Parameter engineering units
<sop>parameter.Min</sop>
Parameter minimum allowed
value
Parameter Data
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Chapter 5
Introduction to instruction-based phases
Data Type
Parameter
Data
(continued)
Report Data
Electronic
Signatures
Assign an
instruction file to a
phase
HTML Code
Display Value
<sop>parameter.Max</sop>
Parameter maximum allowed
value
<sop>parameter.LowLowLowLimit</sop>
Parameter Low-Low-Low limit
<sop>parameter.LowLowLimit</sop>
Parameter Low-Low limit
<sop>parameter.LowLimit</sop>
Parameter Low limit
<sop>parameter.HighLimit</sop>
Parameter High limit
<sop>parameter.HighHighLimit</sop>
Parameter High-High limit
<sop>parameter.HighHighHighLimit</sop>
Parameter High-High-High limit
<sop>parameter.Value</sop>
Parameter value
<sop>parameter.Default</sop>
Parameter default value
<sop>report.Name</sop>
Report Name
<sop>report.EU</sop>
Report engineering units
<sop>report.Value</sop>
Report value
<sop>report.LowLimit</sop>
Report low limit
<sop>report.LowLowLimit</sop>
Report low-low limit
<sop>report.LowLowLowLimit</sop>
Report low-low-low limit
<sop>report.HighLimit</sop>
Report high limit
sop>report.HighHighLimit</sop>
Report high-high limit
<sop>report.HighHighHighLimit</sop>
Report high-high-high limit
<sop>VERIFICATIONSIG=SignatureTemplat Signature template to be used
e</sop>
for a verification signature
After you create the instruction file you must assign it to a phase in the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor. When the phase is activated in the recipe,
the FactoryTalk Batch Server runs the instruction file.
To assign an instruction file to a phase:
1. Start the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor and open the
ice_cream1ep.cfg area model.
2. Double-click the South Parlor process cell.
3. Double-click SP_MIXER1.
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Introduction to instruction-based phases
4. Double-click SP_ADD_EGG_M1. The Edit Equipment Module dialog
box opens to the General tab.
The Instruction File box indicates that an instruction file is already
assigned to this phase. You will replace it with the instruction file that you
just created.
5. Select the Browse button next to the Instruction File box. The
Instruction Selection box opens to display the HTML code within the file.
6. Select add_egg_demo.htm, and then select OK twice.
7. Save the area model and exit the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor.
Tip:
Since you made changes to the area model, you need to stop and
restart the FactoryTalk Batch and eProcedure Servers at this
point if you want to run any batches.
See also
Include a step verification signature template on page 44
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Chapter 5
Introduction to instruction-based phases
Include a step
verification signature
template
You can require a step verification signature using a specific signature template for
a control step. You can add a step verification signature to any control step that
must be signed off before recipe execution can continue. The verification
signature template is defined in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor. The
signature must be completed before recipe execution can continue.
To include a step verification signature template:
1. Open or create a blank instruction file. (See Create an instruction file for
more information.)
2. Place your cursor at the beginning of the first cell.
3. Using the correct naming conventions, enter the tagged data item.
Example:
<sop>VERIFICATIONSIG=SignatureTemplate</sop>
where SignatureTemplate is the name of the desired template.
See also
Create an instruction file on page 39
Summary
In this chapter, you:
•
Created an instruction file using Microsoft Word and FrontPage.
•
Assigned the instruction file to a phase using the FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor.
This chapter provided a brief overview of instruction-based phases. (See the
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor User Guide for more information on
instruction-based phases.)
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Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
Acquiring
Acquiring is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Acquiring state, it has made non-binding related
arbitration requests for resources needed by one or more steps following the
transition.
Activation file
A text file that contains all of the activation information that is required to
license a software product and allow it to properly function. While the file is
simply plain text, the contents of the file are protected by a signature.
Binding
Binding is the process of mapping steps within a control recipe to actual
equipment in a plant.
Binding (in transitions)
Binding is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Binding state, it is in the process of attempting to bind
one or more of the steps following the transition. The binding process may
involve the generation of binding prompts and/or the generation of
arbitration requests.
Comm Err
Comm Err is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When
the transition is in the Comm Err state, a communications error with phase
logic has been detected while the transition was in the
Stopping/Resetting/Pending states of the firing process. The transition has
rolled back to the beginning of the Stopping/Resetting/Pending process
and is awaiting good communications and a RESTART command before
re-initiating the firing process.
Comment descriptor
In a signature dialog, the text in parentheses that indicates if the comment
field is optional, required, or not allowed.
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Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
Committed
Committed is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When
the transition is in the Committed state, it has committed to the firing
process, but is not in the process of firing because either the transition is in
the HELD state or the parent procedure is in MANUAL mode.
Control step
One instruction in an eProcedure phase. An eProcedure phase consists of
one or more control steps. Also referred to as step, eProcedure step, or
instruction step.
Control step reactivation
Making a completed control step in an eProcedure phase active again so that
mistakenly entered values can be re-entered.
Dedicated resource
A resource used by only one step at a time inside a recipe structure.
Deviation event
A deviation event is a probable new event type for the event journals that
records the deviation information.
Diagnostics client
System components that retrieve diagnostic information from FactoryTalk
Diagnostics. Clients can be FactoryTalk system elements or applications.
Diagnostics destinations
Storage or destinations of diagnostics messages such as the FactoryTalk
Diagnostics native store, RSMACC, etc. The FactoryTalk Diagnostics
framework was designed to be extensible to allow additional message
destinations to be defined and added to the system.
Diagnostics native store
Persistent storage of data logged by the FactoryTalk Diagnostics subsystem.
In a distributed system, these logs can reside local to the machine. When
diagnostic data is retrieved, all information from diagnostic logs within a
system can be merged. There is no implied implementation or format of
diagnostic logs in this specification.
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Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
Diagnostics message
Diagnostics information furnished by a diagnostic client with
self-describing internal structure and content.
Dynamic unit allocation
The process of binding a specific unit to a class-based unit procedure or
operation. Dynamic unit allocation can be defined only at the procedural
level.
Dynamic HTML elements
Elements, such as text areas, buttons, etc., that are used for user interaction,
or ele\-ments in which one or more event handlers are defined. For example:
<IMG src=./images/Earl.JPG>
would not be a dynamic element, but
<IMG src=./images/Earl.JPG onclick=’msgbox "Kaboooooom!"’'>
would be a dynamic element. Clicking on it displays a message box
containing the text "Kaboooooom!".
Electronic signature
An electronic representation of a signature, including all associated data.
Can consist of one or two signoffs. Associated data includes meanings for
the signoffs, comments, security requirements, and timestamps.
Equipment phase
An equipment phase is the S88 terminology for the equipment phase and
equipment phase interface. In FactoryTalk Batch, equipment phases are
configured in the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor as instances of the
recipe phases. Equipment phases are bound to the recipe at
runtime.
FactoryTalk Asset Centre
Formerly RSMACC (Rockwell Software Maintenance Automation
Control Center).
Firing attribute
The Firing Attribute (formerly the Acquiring attribute) has nine legal
states, defined as follows:
"0": Not Firing - The transition is not in the firing process.
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Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
"1": Acquiring - The transition is in the process of acquiring resources for
the following steps.
"2": Binding - The transition is in the process of binding one or more of the
following steps.
"3": Committed - The transition is committed to the firing process, but is
not proceeding due to either a HELD state, or the parent procedure being
in MANUAL mode.
"4": Stopping - The transition is waiting for one or more prior steps to
achieve a terminal state after having been issued STOP commands.
"5": Resetting - The transition is waiting for one or more prior steps to
transition to IDLE after having been issued RESET commands.
"6": Pending - The transition is waiting for one or more prior steps to
transition into a legal state for a Transfer of Control operation.
"7": Paused - The transition is waiting for a RESUME command or a
return of the parent procedure to AUTO mode.
First Available binding
This is one of the ways that units are selected for binding. This is called late
unit binding or dynamic unit allocation. When automatically selecting a
unit for binding, the FactoryTalk Batch Server tries to use the unit that the
recipe can acquire first. The unit selected must meet two criteria:
•
The acquired unit must belong to the unit class of the unit procedure
step.
•
Recipes can configure upstream and/or downstream dependencies
defining a series of unit classes that a recipe requires as a recipe executes.
The acquired unit supports the flow path to other units.
Formula
A category of recipe information that includes process inputs, process
parameters and process outputs.
Formula value
A value that is assigned to a parameter defined for a specific step of a phase,
operation or unit procedure. A formula value may have a literal value
assigned to it or it may receive a value from the next higher recipe level when
the batch is run.
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Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
Initial step
The logical start of a sequential function chart (SFC).
Late binding
This is a binding method where a step is bound to equipment just before it
is used.
•
For unit procedure steps, this is also called dynamic unit allocation. Two
types of late unit binding are supported: First Available and Prompt
binding.
Manual binding
Manual binding is the process an operator can use to select steps in a control
recipe and interactively bind them to equipment. This can be performed
before or during a recipe’s execution.
Mode
The manner in which the transition of sequential functions are carried out
within a procedural element and the accessibility for manipulating the states
(manually or by other control functions) of equipment.
Not Firing
Not Firing is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When
the transition is in the Not Firing state, it is not in the process of firing and
not committed to the firing process.
Parameter deviation
A parameter deviation exists when a parameter value is not within the limits
defined in the recipe.
Paused
Paused is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Paused state, its expression has evaluated to TRUE and it
is ready to fire. It is suspended the firing process due to the parent procedure
being in SEMI-AUTO mode. It is awaiting either a RESUME command or
a transition of the parent procedure to AUTO mode before continuing
with the firing process.
Pending
Pending is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Pending state, it is waiting for one or more prior steps to
transition into a legal state for a Transfer of Control operation.
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49
Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
Providers
System components that provide diagnostic information to the FactoryTalk
Diagnostics system. Providers can be FactoryTalk system elements or
applications such as the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor and
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor.
Reactivation number
Every active eProcedure control step is given a Reactivation Number. If the
step has never been reactivated, the value is 0. If the step has been
reactivated once, the value is 1, etc. The recipe path, step index, and
reactivation number form a unique identifier for a control step.
Recipe path
Every active eProcedure control step has a recipe path. It describes, to the
phase level, what part of the recipe the step is from.
Resetting
Resetting is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Resetting state, it has issued RESET commands to the
preceding steps and is waiting for them to transition to IDLE states in
response to the command.
SFC Validation
A function of the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor, this error check looks
for "logic" errors in the SFC structure defined within a recipe.
Shared resource
A resource used in parallel by an unlimited number of steps at a time inside
a recipe structure.
Signature event
A probable new event type for the event journals that records the signatures
and the comment entered for the verification signature.
Signature ID
A 32-bit unsigned integer that uniquely identifies a Signature Request
within the FactoryTalk Batch system.
Signature list
A list of pending signatures and their related commands, report parameters,
etc. maintained on the FactoryTalk Batch Server.
50
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Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
Signature list UI
User interface for accessing all types of signatures not associated with
eProcedure phases.
Signature template
A collection of all the data needed to define a signature - number of signoffs,
signoff meanings, signoff security requirements, and signoff comment
requirements. Signature templates will be defined centrally, and are referred
to whenever defining signature requirements.
Signature states
A signature can be in one of the following states: Incomplete (the signature
is still pending one or two signoffs), Complete (all signature signoffs have
been completed), Cancelled (a user has cancelled the signature), or System
Cancelled (the FactoryTalk Batch Server has cancelled the signature).
Signoff
A component of an electronic signature in which a user enters his username
and password and optionally a comment. An electronic signature can
require one, two, or three signoffs.
Signoff meaning
A short phrase describing the meaning attached to a given signoff. For
example, "Done By" or "Checked By".
Static binding
A binding method where a step or set of steps is bound to equipment when
the recipe is built in the FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor (equipment
bindings are specified in the master recipe). Material phase steps are never
statically bound.
Step index
Every active eProcedure control step has a step index. The step index
represents the position of the step within the phase, e.g. the first step has a
step index of 1, the second step has a step index of 2, etc.
Stopping
Stopping is a possible state of the Firing attribute of a transition. When the
transition is in the Stopping state, it has issued STOP commands to one or
more of the preceding steps and is waiting for them to transition to terminal
states.
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51
Appendix A
eProcedure Glossary
System cancelled
A Signature is considered to be System Cancelled when the signature is
cancelled by FactoryTalk Batch Server logic instead of through operator
action.
Target Parameter
The target parameter is the recipe parameter used in calculating the limit
when the limit type is percent or value.
Terminal signature state
All signature states except Incomplete are terminal states - once the
signature is in any of those states it cannot change to any other state.
Viewing context
eProcedure users can define a viewing context for the instructions they view.
The viewing context defines the set of equipment or recipes for which they
are shown instructions. For example, a user can view instructions for a given
unit, for an entire area, or for a specific operation.
52
Publication Number: BWEPRO-GR011C-EN-P - February 2017
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
Copyright notice
© 2017 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in
USA.
This document and any accompanying Rockwell Software products are
copyrighted by Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. Any reproduction
and/or distribution without prior written consent from Rockwell Automation
Technologies, Inc. is strictly prohibited. Please refer to the license agreement for
details.
End User License Agreement (EULA)
You can view the Rockwell Automation End-User License Agreement ("EULA")
by opening the License.rtf file located in your product's install folder on your hard
drive.
Trademark Notices
Allen-Bradley, CompactLogix, ControlLogix, Connected Components
Workbench, eProcedure, FactoryTalk, GuardLogix, GuardPLC, Micro800,
MicroLogix, MobileView, MobileView Guard, PanelBuilder, PanelView,
PhaseManager, PlantLink, PlantPAx, PLC-2, PLC-3, PLC-5, PowerMonitor,
RSBizWare, RSBizWare BatchHistorian, RSBizWare Historian, RSBizWare
MaterialTrack, RSLinx, Rockwell Automation, Rockwell Software, SLC,
SoftLogix, Studio 5000, and XMare trademarks of Rockwell Automation, Inc.
Any Rockwell Automation software or hardware not mentioned here is also a
trademark, registered or otherwise, of Rockwell Automation, Inc.
For a complete list of products and their respective trademarks, go to:
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/rockwellautomation/legal-notices/overvie
w.page?#tab4
Warranty
This product is warranted in accordance with the product license. The product’s
performance may be affected by system configuration, the application being
performed, operator control, maintenance, and other related factors. Rockwell
Automation is not responsible for these intervening factors. The instructions in
this document do not cover all the details or variations in the equipment,
Publication Number: BWEPRO-GR011C-EN-P - February 2017
53
Legal Notices
procedure, or process described, nor do they provide directions for meeting every
possible contingency during installation, operation, or maintenance. This
product’s implementation may vary among users.
This document is current as of the time of release of the product; however, the
accompanying software may have changed since the release. Rockwell Automation,
Inc. reserves the right to change any information contained in this document or
the software at any time without prior notice. It is your responsibility to obtain the
most current information available from Rockwell when installing or using this
product.
Environmental compliance
Rockwell Automation maintains current product environmental information on
its website at
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/rockwellautomation/about-us/sustainabili
ty-ethics/product-environmental-compliance.page
Contact Rockwell Automation
Customer Support Telephone — 1.440.646.3434
Online Support — http://www.rockwellautomation.com/support/
54
Publication Number: BWEPRO-GR011C-EN-P - February 2017
Index
A
Archiver 11
I
B
Batch Server 10
starting in demo mode 24
stopping 24
Batch View 10
BATCHCTL 16
boot
cold 24
warm 24
warm-all 24
C
cold boot 24
eProcedure Server 24
configuring
sample demonstrations 16
instruction files
step verification template 44
M
MS Word
step verification 44
O
OPC (OLE for Process Control)
communication protocol 26
opening
simulator demonstration file 26
P
phase logic simulation 26
Phase Simulator 26
starting 26
D
demo mode
starting the Batch Server 24
document conventions 5
R
rebuilding
recipe directory 23
recipe
execution 8
maintenance 8
recipe directory
rebuilding 23
recipe maintenance and execution
simplify 8
E
eProcedure
introduction 7
eProcedure Client 12, 31
eProcedure Server 12
Equipment Editor 11
F
FactoryTalk Batch components 8
G
glossary 45
S
sample demonstrations 16
servers
Batch Server 10
eProcedure 12
signature list 31
signature template 44
Publication Number: BWEPRO-GR011C-EN-P - February 2017
55
Index
simulator 26
opening sample demonstration files 26
starting
Phase Simulator 26
stopping
Batch Server 24
V
View 10
W
warm all boot 24
warm boot 24
eProcedure Server 24
removes reactivated steps 28
Windows Service Manager 24
56
Publication Number: BWEPRO-GR011C-EN-P - February 2017
Rockwell Automation support
Rockwell Automation provides technical information on the web to assist you in using its products. At
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/support you can find technical and application notes, sample code, and links to software service packs. You
can also visit our Support Center at https://rockwellautomation.custhelp.com for software updates, support chats and forums, technical
information, FAQs, and to sign up for product notification updates.
In addition, we offer multiple support programs for installation, configuration, and troubleshooting. For more information, contact your local
distributor or Rockwell Automation representative, or visit http://www.rockwellautomation.com/services/online-phone.
Installation assistance
If you experience a problem within the first 24 hours of installation, review the information that is contained in this manual. You can contact
Customer Support for initial help in getting your product up and running.
United States or Canada
1.440.646.3434
Outside United States or Canada
Use the Worldwide Locator available at http://www.rockwellautomation.com/locations,
or contact your local Rockwell Automation representative.
New product satisfaction return
Rockwell Automation tests all of its products to ensure that they are fully operational when shipped from the manufacturing facility. However, if
your product is not functioning and needs to be returned, follow these procedures.
United States
Contact your distributor. You must provide a Customer Support case number (call the
phone number above to obtain one) to your distributor to complete the return process.
Outside United States
Please contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for the return procedure.
Documentation feedback
Your comments will help us serve your documentation needs better. If you have any suggestions on how to improve this document, complete the
feedback form, publication RA-DU002.
Publication Number: BWEPRO-GR011C-EN-P - February 2017
Supersedes Publication Number BWEPRO-GR011B-EN-P
Copyright © 2017 Rockwell Automation Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
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