Seagate NAS OS 4 User Manual

Seagate NAS OS 4 User Manual
Seagate NAS OS 4 User Manual
Seagate Technology LLC. All rights reserved. Seagate, Seagate Technology, the 2014 ©
Wave logo, and FreeAgent are trademarks or registered trademarks of Seagate
Technology LLC, or one of its affiliates. All other trademarks or registered trademarks
are the property of their respective owners. When referring to hard drive capacity,
one gigabyte, or GB, equals one billion bytes and one terabyte, or TB, equals one
thousand billion bytes when referring to hard drive capacity. In addition, some of the
listed capacity is used for formatting and other functions, and thus will not be available
for data storage. Quantitative usage examples for various applications are for
illustrative purposes. Actual quantities will vary based on various factors including file
size, file format, features, and application software. Seagate reserves the right to
.change, without notice, product offerings or specifications
Seagate Technology LLC
S. De Anza Boulevard 10200
Cupertino, CA 95014 U.S.A
:‫اﻟﻄﺮاز‬
‫ا ﻧ ﻘ ﺮ ﻫﻨﺎ ﻟ ﻠﻮ ﺻﻮ ل إ ﻟﻰ إ ﺻ ﺪ ا ر ﻣ ﺤ ﺪث ﻋ ﻠﻰ ا ﻹ ﻧﺘ ﺮ ﻧ ﺖ‬
ً ‫ ﺳﺘ ﺠ ﺪ أﻳ‬.‫ﻟﻬ ﺬا اﻟﻤﺴﺘﻨ ﺪ‬
.‫ﻀﺎ أﺣ ﺪث اﻟﻤ ﺤﺘﻮﻳﺎت واﻟﺮﺳﻮم اﻟﺘﻮﺿﻴ ﺤﻴﺔ اﻟﻘﺎﺑﻠﺔ ﻟﻠﺘﻮﺳﻴﻊ وﺗﺘﻤﺘﻊ ﺑﺴﻬﻮﻟﺔ اﻟﺘﻨﻘ ﻞ و إ ﻣﻜﺎﻧﻴﺎت اﻟﺒ ﺤﺚ‬

Contents
Contents2
Regulatory Compliance13
Trademarks13
Licenses and Free Software13
Precautions15
Data15
Disk capacity15
Seagate NAS OS 416
Introduction16
New feature: App-based management16
Content for this manual16
Minimum system requirements16
Client OS:16
Web browsers:17
Network:17
NAS OS 4.2 New Features18
Features added for NAS OS 418
Apps18
Sdrive: remote access19
Network discovery19
Volume encryption19
Internet protocol version 6 (IPv6)19
Jumbo frames19
Network and cloud backup20
Cloud sync20
Web distributed authoring and versioning (WebDAV)20
Distributed file system namespaces (DFS-N)20
Simple network management protocol (SNMP)21
Network recycle bin (NRB)21
iSCSI logical unit number (LUN) export/import/clone21
Expand existing volumes beyond 16TB21
Network uninterruptible power supply (UPS)21
Export/Import NAS OS 4 settings22
Secure shell (SSH)22
Process monitoring22
Search22
Event log22
LED Behavior and Device Buttons24
LEDs24
Rackmount Seagate NAS24
Seagate NAS and Seagate NAS Pro24
Buttons25
Power button25
Power button: short push25
Power button: long push (select models)25
Identification buttons: front and rear (select models)25
Mute button (select models)26
Mute button: short push26
Mute button: long push26
NAS OS Setup27
First use: Enclosure with disks27
Next steps28
First Use: Empty enclosure28
Choose compatible hard drives29
Install Seagate NAS OS29
Next steps30
First Use: Update from NAS OS 3 to NAS OS 431
NAS OS 3 and volume encryption31
Seagate Network Assistant31
Install Seagate Network Assistant32
Launch Seagate Network Assistant32
Windows:32
Mac:32
Find your Seagate NAS's address information33
Access NAS OS with Seagate Network Assistant33
Mount shares34
Quick access34
Mount35
Authenticate private shares35
Auto-mount35
Shares: Access and Transfer Files37
About shares37
Access shares37
Windows38
Mac38
Creating Shortcuts to Shares38
Create shortcuts using Seagate Network Assistant38
Create shortcuts using the operating system: Windows 738
Windows 8 and 1039
Create shortcuts using the operating system: Mac40
Mount40
Mount at boot40
Backup: Seagate NAS and PC/Mac40
Back up your NAS40
Back up your computers41
Media Server41
UPnP/DLNA41
Re-index the media server41
iTunes42
Share music with iOS 9 devices43
FTP43
Local FTP access44
Public Access Folders (non-password protected)44
Private Access Folders (password protected)44
Remote FTP access44
SFTP45
NFS45
Wake on LAN (WOL)45
NAS OS Login and Navigation47
Log in to NAS OS47
Seagate Network Assistant47
Internet browser47
First login47
Login48
Recover a Lost Password49
Launch NAS OS using Sdrive49
NAS OS Navigation50
Login: administrator and user51
Administrator51
User51
Device Manager52
Launch Device Manager52
Device Manager navigation52
Toggle to another app53
Shares54
Shares, Users, and Groups54
Sample setup: Shares, Users, and Groups54
Public and private shares55
Existing shares55
Add share56
Add remote share: distributed file system namespaces (DFS-N)57
Add remote share57
Adding remote shares on offsite networks58
Share tabs58
Managing remote shares/volumes58
Accessing remote shares/volumes58
Revise share settings60
Users/Groups: change access rights60
Private and public: change the share’s network status61
Services: change the services for a specific share61
Delete62
Users62
Shares, Users, and Groups62
Sample setup: Shares, Users, and Groups62
Existing users63
Add a user64
User: access to shares and rights64
Revise user settings65
Groups/Shares: change groups and access rights65
Delete a user66
Change NAS OS management rights: administrator and user66
Set storage quotas66
Importing users from an active directory67
Managing users imported from an active directory67
Groups67
Shares, Users, and Groups67
Sample setup: Shares, Users, and Groups68
Existing groups68
Add a group69
Revise group settings69
Users/Shares: change user membership to the group and access rights to shares70
Delete a user71
Importing groups from an active directory71
Managing groups imported from an active directory71
Settings71
General71
Time72
Workgroup/Domain72
Connect to an Active Directory72
Synchronize Users/Groups73
Leave the domain73
NAS OS73
Services74
Status colors74
Service options: start/stop, share access, advanced parameters74
Start/Stop a service75
Share access: services for a specific share75
Services summary76
File services76
Application services76
SSH Access77
Printer server77
Network77
Connections tab77
IPv6 mode77
Connections table77
LAN Edit menu78
LAN Edit menu: Edit78
LAN Edit menu: Define as primary79
LAN Edit menu: Disable/Enable79
Port aggregation and linking LAN ports79
Port aggregation: Bridge the data on your NAS OS device between two networks80
Port aggregation: Enhance your NAS’s performance with load balance80
Port aggregation: Failover protection using fault tolerance81
Port aggregation: LAN failover for load balancing versus fault tolerance81
Proxy tab81
Remote access tab82
Port forwarding tab82
Power83
NAS power management83
Power conservation83
Power saving mode83
Wake the NAS from power saving mode85
UPS management85
Single NAS: Direct connection85
Multiple NAS devices A: A NAS OS device is the network UPS server86
Multiple NAS devices B: The UPS is the network UPS server87
Security88
Auto Block88
Certificate89
DDOS89
Services on LAN Ports89
Monitoring90
System tab90
Upper pane: General health, temperature, and fans90
Upper middle pane: Casing (select NAS OS devices only)91
Middle pane: Resources91
Lower pane: Process92
Temperature and fan warnings92
Drive tab93
Notifications94
Notifications tab94
Email notifications94
Recent activity95
SNMP tab96
Storage96
NAS OS volume and RAID management96
Enhanced data protection: NAS OS SimplyRAID96
Standard disk configuration: Manual RAID96
Storage overview97
Manage97
Internal and External volumes98
Volume settings98
RAID102
Get help choosing your RAID103
Tooltip: star ratings for RAID103
RAID comparisons104
RAID levels104
NAS OS SimplyRAID104
JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks)105
RAID 0105
RAID 1106
RAID 5106
RAID 6107
RAID 10108
RAID 1+Spare(s), RAID 5+Spare(s), RAID 6+Spare, and RAID 10+Spare108
New network volume wizard109
New network volume wizard steps110
Quick setup111
Custom111
Adding a spare111
Build a RAID volume:111
Custom+Spare112
Single-disk volume113
SimplyRAID113
RAID 1 or JBOD113
Multiple volumes114
Create the first volume (RAID 5):114
Create the second volume (SimplyRAID):114
Synchronizing times115
Single-disk and unprotected volumes: Expansion115
Removing healthy hard drives from an unprotected volume115
Volume expansion116
SimplyRAID116
RAID 1116
JBOD117
Protected volumes: Expansion and hard drive replacement117
Removing healthy hard drives from a protected volume117
Hard drive expansion and replacement118
Expand a volume's storage capacity: add hard drives to the enclosure118
SimplyRAID118
Custom RAID: RAID 1, RAID 5, and RAID 6119
Repair a failed hard drive or expand storage capacity119
Hot-swapping120
Hard drive replacement and expansion120
SimplyRAID120
Custom: RAID 1, RAID 5, and RAID 6121
No replacement disk: reset the volume's RAID122
Advanced Storage: Direct-Attached Storage and iSCSI123
NAS ports and direct-attached storage123
Direct-attached storage (DAS)123
Connect123
DAS share123
Disconnect123
Ingest or back up DAS content124
Multimedia indexing124
USB printer124
iSCSI124
Setting up an iSCSI target125
SimplyiSCSI125
Create LUN126
New LUN126
Import LUN126
Exporting a LUN126
Importing a LUN127
Create a Target127
iSCSI initiator: Example127
iSNS: Internet Storage Name Service131
Enable iSNS server and enter its IP address:132
iSNS: iSCSI initiator132
App Manager135
Overview135
How to Install Apps135
Maintenance136
Advanced136
Backup Manager138
Backup138
Restore139
Sync139
Network Backup disk139
Backup, Sync, and Restore examples139
Back up to a USB storage device (DAS)139
Back up to a Seagate network storage device on the local network140
Back up to a network storage device outside the local network (offsite)140
Back up to a cloud service (offsite)140
Restore140
Create a backup140
Back up using USB storage141
Back up using network storage141
Backups with network storage141
Enable Network Backup server142
Network Backup server settings142
Backups with third-party network storage143
Backups to network storage devices143
Local network143
Remote network143
Advanced parameters for backups to network storage devices144
Back up using cloud storage144
Advanced parameters for backups to cloud storage144
Sync folders145
Create a sync:145
Restore a backup145
Backup and sync job options and start/stop145
Options145
Starting/stopping jobs146
Download Manager147
Enable the download machine147
Create a download job147
Download settings148
Filebrowser150
Upload files150
Share files150
Viewing or listening to files151
Manage content151
Create a Folder151
Ingest from an external drive151
Remote Access152
Sdrive152
Sdrive and Seagate Access152
Sdrive: PC/Mac152
How do I get started?153
Create a Seagate Access account in NAS OS153
Download and install Sdrive155
Connect to your Seagate NAS155
Sdrive volume156
Mac: missing Sdrive volume158
Sdrive application158
Windows: move the Sdrive application icon to the system tray159
Sdrive features160
Accept an invitation160
Change your Seagate Access password163
Manage your Seagate NAS devices (administrator)163
MyNAS163
Set up MyNAS remote access163
Failed connection164
Router164
Using MyNAS remote access165
Getting Help166
Software updates166
The NAS's automatic update does not seem to be working.166
Q: Does your NAS OS device have access to the Internet? Do you use a proxy server to
access the Internet?166
Troubleshooting topics166
Troubleshooting the network connection166
Shares do not appear on the network.166
A user does not have access to NAS OS or shares.167
I cannot access my account. I enter my login and password and receive an error
message.167
I've noticed a delay in accessing the shares.167
Troubleshooting the multimedia server168
I cannot see the media files stored on the NAS OS device.168
iTunes168
UPnP/DLNA-Compatible Game Consoles and Set Top Boxes168
Troubleshooting expansion devices168
I connected a USB hard drive to the enclosure, but it does not appear on the Storage
page.168
I can't copy a file from a share to the DAS connected to my NAS.168
Hard drive noise and VGA monitor169
I think that the hard drive is making unusual noises.169
The VGA monitor that I connected to the NAS appears to be receiving a signal but the
screen is black (applies to select NAS).169
Troubleshooting the active directory (AD)169
NAS OS169
Active directory170
Maximum Elements by Feature and NAS170
NAS OS Rescue and Repair171
Rackmount NAS171
Prepare for a rescue and repair171
VGA monitor171
Seagate Network Assistant172
Rescue and repair steps172
Step 1: Update the USB key172
Step 2: Back up and power off the NAS OS device172
Step 3: Connect the USB key and boot the NAS173
Step 4: Launch the NAS OS Installer173
Desktop NAS173
Prepare for a rescue and repair173
Back up the NAS device173
Recovery button173
MAC address173
Perform a rescue173
Regulatory Compliance
Trademarks
Apple, Mac, Time Machine, and Macintosh are registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Microsoft,
Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
.Other trademarks mentioned in this manual are the property of their respective owners
Licenses and Free Software
Your Seagate product ships with copyrighted software that are licensed under the GPL, AFL, Apache, Apple,
BSD, GNU LGPL, MIT, OpenLDAP, OpenSSL, PHP, Python, and Creative Common. It also includes free software,
/the source code for which can be downloaded from the Seagate website: www.seagate.com/support
:krb5
Copyright, OpenVision Technologies, Inc., 1996, All Rights Reserved
.Copyright © 1985-2006 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
.Copyright 2000 by Zero-Knowledge Systems, Inc
.Copyright © 2001, Dr Brian Gladman, Worcester, UK. All rights reserved
.Copyright © 2004 Sun Microsystems, Inc
:bzip2
.Copyright © 1996-2006 Julian R Seward. All rights reserved
:berkeleydb
.Copyright © 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved
.Copyright © 1990-2003 Sleepycat Software. All rights reserved
.Copyright © 1995, 1996 The President and Fellows of Harvard University. All rights reserved
:libnatpmp
Copyright © 2007-2008, Thomas BERNARD
:python-flup
.Copyright © 2005, 2006 Allan Saddi All rights reserved
:net-snmp
.Copyright © 1990, 1991, 1992 by Carnegie Mellon University. All rights reserved
:lighttpd
.Copyright © 2004, Jan Kneschke, incremental. All rights reserved
:python-transmissionrpc
Copyright © 2008-2010 Erik Svensson
:libfreetype2
Copyright 1996-2002, 2006 by David Turner, Robert Wilhelm, and Werner Lemberg
:cyrus-sasl
.Copyright © 1998-2003 Carnegie Mellon University. All rights reserved
:openssl
.Copyright © 1995-1998 Eric Young. All rights reserved
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.Copyright © 1998-2008 The OpenSSL Project. All rights reserved
:miniupnpc
Copyright © 2005-2011, Thomas BERNARD
:python-werkzeug
.Copyright © 2011 by the Werkzeug Team, see AUTHORS for more details
:openldap
.Copyright 1999-2003 The OpenLDAP Foundation, Redwood City, California, USA. All Rights Reserved
:uefishell
Copyright © 2004, Intel Corporation
:python-simplejson
Copyright © 2006 Bob Ippolito
:libevent
Copyright 2003 Michael A. Davis
Copyright © 2007 Niels Provos
Copyright © 1998 Todd C. Miller
.Copyright © 2007 Sun Microsystems. All rights reserved
Copyright © 2005 Nick Mathewson
Copyright © 2000 Artur Grabowski
Copyright © 2006 Maxim Yegorushkin
Copyright © 2000 Dug Song
:ajaxplorer
Copyright 2007-2011 Charles du Jeu
:php
.Copyright © 1999 - 2006 The PHP Group. All rights reserved
:python-webpy
.Copyright © 2004-2007, CherryPy Team All rights reserved
:python-pydispatch
.Copyright © 2001-2006, Patrick K. O'Brien and Contributors. All rights reserved
”. This list of licenses can evolve over time and can be found on the user interface under the heading “Credits
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Seagate NAS OS 4
Precau ons
Data
Any loss, corruption or destruction of data while using a Seagate drive or Seagate drive system or Seagate
network storage is the sole responsibility of the user, and under no circumstances will Seagate be held liable for
the recovery or restoration of this data. To help prevent the loss of your data, Seagate highly recommends that
you keep TWO copies of your data; one copy on your external hard disk, for instance, and a second copy either
on your internal hard disk, another external hard disk or some other form of removable storage media. If you
.would like more information on backup, refer to our website
Disk capacity
1TB (Terabyte) = 1,000GB. 1GB = 1000MB. 1MB = 1,000,000 Bytes. Total accessible capacity varies depending
. ( upon operating environment (typically up to 10% less per TB
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Seagate NAS OS 4
Seagate NAS OS 4
Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of Seagate Business Storage featuring Seagate NAS OS. Designed to satisfy
the data sharing and backup needs of small, medium, and branch offices, Seagate NAS OS is an intuitive
interface accessible to a wide range of administrators. Additionally, NAS OS offers a rich set of collaborative
.and data protection tools to help manage your content
New feature: App-based management
Among the many features added to NAS OS 4.2, experienced administrators will notice a new look to the
interface as well as a critical update to NAS management: apps. Core NAS OS 3 features have been divided into
:default apps for NAS OS 4.2
Backup Manager: Formerly the Backup setting for NAS OS 3. Launch Backup Manager to create and manage
.backup jobs
Device Manager: Formerly the NAS OS 3 interface. Launch Device Manager to change the settings, add
.users, create shares, and much more
Download Manager: Formerly the Download setting for NAS OS 3. Launch Download Manager to create and
.manage download jobs
Filebrowser: Formerly the File Browser setting for NAS OS 3 and NAS OS 4. The new Filebrowser is a web.based file viewer. Launch it to view and share files stored on your NAS device
.The administrator can add new apps to the Seagate NAS device using the all-new App Manager
.See NAS OS 4.2 New Features for further information on features added to NAS OS 4
Content for this manual
This manual will guide you through the process of configuring NAS OS on your Seagate NAS and assist you in
troubleshooting any issues that might arise. If you encounter problems, check Getting Help and the Seagate
support page. Note that most problems can be resolved by resetting the product to factory conditions (see
. ( NAS OS Rescue and Repair
Minimum system requirements
:Client OS
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Seagate NAS OS 4
(Windows 10 (32-bit/64-bit
(Windows 8 (32-bit/64-bit
(Windows 7 (32-bit/64-bit
Windows Server 2012
Windows Server 2008 R2
Windows Server 2008
Mac OS 10.6 and later
Linux 2.6 and later
:Web browsers
Internet Explorer™ 7.0 or higher
Firefox™ 3.0 or higher
Safari™ 3.0 or higher
Chrome 2.0 or higher
:Network
Computer with an Ethernet network adapter
(Ethernet switch or router 10/100/1000 (Mb/s
:Important info
External forces such as network activity, hardware, distance, and setup can affect your NAS’s
.performance
.For optimal performance, use Gigabit Ethernet equipment
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
Seagate NAS OS 4
NAS OS 4.2 New Features
NAS OS 4.2 has new features for enhanced data access, sharing and security. Review the list below to learn
.more
Filebrowser app for NAS OS
.Browse files anywhere: Use the Filebrowser app to access your files via a web browser
.Easy USB ingest: Copy files stored on USB devices with Filebrowser ingest
.Share using web links: Share files and folders via secure web links in the Filebrowser
Backup Manager
Support for more cloud services: Back up files stored on your Seagate network storage to new cloud
.services, including OneDrive and Baidu
.Restore from the cloud: Restore backups saved to your cloud storage
Back up your cloud storage: Back up files and folders stored on your cloud storage to your Seagate network
.storage
Security in Device Manager
.New Security tab: Manage DDOS filtering, Block and White lists, and SSL certificate upload
iSCSI Targets and LUNs
.iSCSI enhancements: Use the new iSCSI setup to create multiple targets and LUNs or, a SimplyiSCSI volume
NAS OS Web Board
.New look: Check out NAS OS’s new, modern interface
Features added for NAS OS 4
.Below is a list of the new features available when updating from NAS OS 3 to NAS 4
Apps
The Home page for NAS OS 4 presents apps from Seagate and third party developers. The administrator can
.add new apps to a Seagate NAS OS device using the App Manager
:Core NAS OS 3 features have been divided into default apps for NAS OS 4
Backup Manager: Formerly the Backup setting for NAS OS 3. Launch Backup Manager to create and manage
.backup jobs
Device Manager: Formerly the NAS OS 3 interface. Launch Device Manager to change the settings, add
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.users, create shares, and much more
Download Manager: Formerly the Download setting for NAS OS 3. Launch Download Manager to create and
.manage download jobs
File Browser: Formerly the File Browser setting for NAS OS 3. File Browser is a web-based file viewer.
.Launch it to view files stored on your NAS device. File Browser requires Java
Sdrive: remote access
Sdrive gives users remote access to data stored on their NAS OS 4 devices. The Sdrive service is available on
:your NAS OS 4 network storage with separate apps available for
:Desktop
Windows® 7 and higher
Mac® OS 10.7 and higher
:Mobile
iOS® 6.1.2 and higher
Android® 4.0 and higher
Upon launching the desktop app for the first time, users can create a Seagate Access account and link it to any
.Seagate NAS OS 4 device
Network discovery
Configuring new NAS OS 4 devices is now easier using a web-based network discovery tool. Once the new NAS
OS 4 device is connected to the network, the administrator can launch a browser and enter the URL:
.http://discover.seagate.com
Volume encryption
Protect new and existing volumes from unauthorized access using NAS OS 4 encryption. The administrator can
choose the level of encryption: a password or a file key to unlock the volume. The file key is stored on a USB key
.or thumb drive
To prevent access to a volume’s shares across a network, the administrator can lock an encrypted volume.
Further, data is safe in case the hard drives are moved to a different enclosure. The encrypted volumes will
prompt the user for the password or file key when first using the hard drives in the foreign enclosure. This can
.become important if hard drives are stolen or moved without permission
(Internet protocol version 6 (IPv6
.Administrators now have the option to add IPv6 addresses to NAS OS 4 devices
Jumbo frames
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Seagate NAS OS 4
A frame is a packet of data that carries hardware identifiers for network devices such as a source server, a
destination NAS, and a router. The router uses frame data to facilitate communication between computers
and network devices. Also known as an Ethernet frame, a frame’s size is generally limited to 1500 bytes. Such a
.limitation in frame size can have a negative impact upon network devices
Most modern Gigabit Ethernet routers and switches support jumbo frames, which are frames larger than 1500
bytes. Enabling jumbo frames on your router can improve performance among devices on the network,
.including your NAS OS 4 network storage
Network and cloud backup
In addition to NAS OS and rsync-compatible servers, administrators now have the option to choose backup
:destination servers that use the following protocols
FTP
SMB
(Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDav
NFS
.NAS OS 4 also supports backup to cloud storage such as AmazonS3, Box and more
Cloud sync
.NAS OS 4 supports sync to Google Drive and Dropbox
(Web distributed authoring and versioning (WebDAV
WebDAV is a standard for collaborative workflows and data sharing. You can give remote servers access to
.shares by enabling the WebDAV service on your NAS OS 4 device
(Distributed le system namespaces (DFS-N
During the course of a day, a user may access multiple files stored on many shares connected to your local
network (local area network or, LAN). To find all the shares and volumes spread about the network, a user can
.hunt through a long list of NAS devices and servers
NAS OS 4 DFS-N allows administrators to add compatible shares to a single NAS OS 4 device. Accessing shares
on a single device simplifies data management for the administrator and the user. Similar to creating a new
share, the administrator adds remote shares to the Seagate NAS OS 4 device. The shares can come from any
.NAS OS device or server on the LAN
.NAS OS 4 DFS-N supports NAS OS shares and SMB volumes
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(Simple network management protocol (SNMP
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Seagate NAS OS 4
(Simple network management protocol (SNMP
NAS OS 4 supports SNMP, a standard Internet protocol for managing network devices such as printers, routers,
servers, and computers. Enable the SNMP agent in Notifications to give an SNMP server access your NAS OS 4
device. Additionally, the administrator has the option to turn on SNMP traps so that the NAS OS 4 device
.contacts the SNMP server
.Administrators have the option to choose SNMP v1/v2 or v3
(Network recycle bin (NRB
Deleting data on a share permanently removes all associated files. By enabling the NRB service, deleted files
will be moved to the share’s recycle bin. This can be very helpful if a user accidentally removes data that a coworker is using on a project. The data is easily recovered from the recycle bin rather than desperately
.searching through the last NAS backup
.NRB is compatible with shares that use the SMB protocol, which is also a service
iSCSI logical unit number (LUN) export/import/clone
A logical unit number (LUN) is addressable data on an iSCSI target. Some versions of iSCSI management support
multiple LUNs on a single target. While NAS OS gives the administrator the ability to create one or more iSCSI
.targets on a volume, each iSCSI target supports only one LUN
However, NAS OS 4 gives administrators additional options to help create and manage iSCSI targets. Rather
than creating new targets each time iSCSI is required, the administrator can export the LUN from an existing
.target and import the LUN’s data. Additionally, NAS OS 4 includes the option to clone an existing target
Expand existing volumes beyond 16TB
NAS OS 3 prevented users from expanding an existing volume beyond 16TB. For example, a 14TB volume could
.not accept an additional 3TB for expansion. This limitation has been removed for NAS OS 4
(Network uninterruptible power supply (UPS
Previous versions of NAS OS support connecting an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) to a NAS OS device via
the power and USB connections. UPS management is performed on the USB connection. If the working
environment experiences a loss of power, the UPS allows the NAS to save data before automatically shutting
.down
NAS OS 4 gives the administrator greater flexibility in power management with network UPS. A single UPS can
now be used as a backup power solution for multiple NAS OS 4 devices. For example, the first NAS is connected
to the UPS via power and USB. This is the master NAS to the UPS and it acts as the UPS server on the network.
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.NAS devices on the network access the UPS server and add their power connections to the UPS
. NAS OS 4 also supports connection to select UPS devices that have an Ethernet port and are SNMP compliant
Export/Import NAS OS 4 settings
:NAS settings include the following
Shares
Users
Groups
Services
Network
Power
Monitoring
Notifications
NAS OS 4 settings can be exported from one NAS OS 4 device and imported into another NAS OS 4 device.
:Exporting settings is also a great tool for
.Backup: Essential metadata is kept safe in case a NAS fails
.Cloning: Use the same settings on additional NAS OS devices
(Secure shell (SSH
Administrators with advanced networking skills can log in to NAS OS 4 using secure shell (SSH), an encrypted
protocol used for communication between devices. Using a command-line interface, the administrator can
automate data management and backups as well as review the NAS’s settings. The administrator also has the
.right to access data stored on the NAS via SSH
Process monitoring
:The Monitoring page now features a list of processes with the following data
.Application: The application using the process
(Status: The process state (e.g. running, sleeping, disk sleeping
.CPU Usage: The percent of the CPU being used for the process
.Memory: The amount of RAM being used for the process
Search
NAS OS 4 has a magnifying glass icon on the top right of the interface. Click on the magnifying glass to enable an
.empty field and enter a search term. Results are limited to NAS OS
Event log
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Seagate NAS OS 4
A bell icon on the top right of the interface provides instant access to NAS events. Click on the bell icon to see
.recent activity
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Seagate NAS OS 4
LED Behavior and Device Bu ons
:NAS OS manages your device's
Status LEDS
Hard drive LEDs
Buttons
LEDs
Rackmount Seagate NAS
State
Color
Startup; shutdown;
activity
Blinking blue
RAID synchronization;
software update
Blinking red
and blue
Warning
Blinking red
Error
Solid red
Updating hardware
Solid purple
Communication has been
lost
Blinking
purple
Seagate NAS and Seagate NAS Pro
State
Color
Ready
Solid white
Startup; shutdown; activity
Blinking white
RAID synchronization; software update
Alternating red and white
Warning or notice
Blinking red
Error
Solid red
The status and hard drive LEDs work together to provide up-to-date details on your NAS device's health. For
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Seagate NAS OS 4
:specific information on the meaning of the LED indications, see the user manual for your device
Seagate Business Storage 8-Bay Rackmount NAS
Seagate Business Storage 4-Bay Rackmount NAS
Seagate NAS Pro
Seagate NAS
Buttons
All Seagate NAS have a power button on the face of the device. Certain models also have identification and
.mute buttons. Check the user manual for your Seagate NAS to locate the buttons
:NAS OS manages the buttons via push types
.Short push: A depression upon the button for one second or less
.Long push: A depression upon the button for four seconds or more
Power button
The power button turns your NAS on when it is powered off. It can also help you power down the NAS without
.the need to launch NAS OS. Always make certain that no one is accessing the NAS before turning it off
Power button: short push
A short push is no longer than two seconds. When the product is powered on, a short push of the power button
:will
.Turn the NAS off
Place it into deep sleep mode if the option has been configured in NAS OS. See Power for details on deep
.sleep mode
(Power button: long push (select models
A long push is longer than four seconds. Applying a long push will cut the power from the NAS, forcing it to shut
. down immediately. A long push is not recommended since it can result in data loss
(Identi cation buttons: front and rear (select models
.Only use a short push on the identification buttons
Pushing the identification button will cause the identification LEDs in the front and rear of the device to flash
amber and the alarm to sound. The flashing LEDs allows you to identify the NAS among a group of racked
devices. There is another identification button on the rear of the device that can also be pushed to turn on the
identification LEDs and sound the alarm. Both buttons work in tandem, allowing you to turn the visual and audio
identifications on and off. For example, you can use the identification button on the front of the device to turn
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.them on and then turn them off via the rear identification button
.A third identification option is available in NAS OS Monitoring
(Mute button (select models
An audible alarm will sound when someone pushes an identification button or chooses the option in the NAS OS
administration tool. It will also sound if the unit senses a problem with the hardware, such as a faulty power
.supply unit or elevated temperatures
Mute button: short push
A short push will turn off an existing audio alarm. When it is pushed, its LED will turn amber, indicating that the
.alarm has been muted
Mute button: long push
:Apply a long push on the mute button to
.Turn off an existing audio alarm off
.Prevent the system from sounding an audio alarm
Following a long push, the mute LED will turn amber, indicating the audible alarm is off. Even if a problem is found
in the hardware, the alarm will remain muted. Examples of hardware problems include, but are not limited to,
.high temperatures, a faulty power supply unit, and fan failure
The mute button can be pushed if the alarm is not ringing, guaranteeing that it will remain off. To turn the
.audible alarm back on, apply another long push
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Seagate NAS OS 4
NAS OS Setup
Once your Seagate NAS has been configured per the instructions of the included quick start guide, the NAS OS
Setup Wizard will guide you through the remainder of the installation. The NAS’s administrator must complete
the setup wizard since a password will be created to access the NAS OS management features. The time to
complete the setup wizard varies based upon your NAS. Choose the option below that matches your Seagate
:NAS
.Enclosure with disks: If you purchased an enclosure with disks, go to First Use: Enclosures with Disks
Enclosure without disks: If you purchased an enclosure that did not include disks, go to First Use: Empty
.Enclosure
First use: Enclosure with disks
Before connecting to NAS OS, configure the Seagate NAS on your network. For instructions, review your NAS's
.user manual and quick start guide
Enclosure without disks: If you purchased an empty enclosure, go to First use: Empty enclosure for
.instructions on how to set up Seagate NAS OS

:Consider the following before installing Seagate NAS OS
.The NAS OS device's administrator should complete the installation steps
NAS OS checks for software updates during the installation. An error message informs you if it cannot check
for updates due to a missing Internet connection. You have the option to search for updates after the
.installation
.Power on the device. The device is ready to be accessed once the status LED turns solid .1
From a PC/Mac connected to the same network as your NAS, launch an Internet browser and type .2
http://discover.seagate.com
.Follow the on-screen instructions .3
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Seagate NAS OS 4
:During the setup, you can
.Create or change the name of the device
. ( Create or change the administrator login (the default is admin
.Create a Seagate Access account for remote access
.Configure or change the RAID level
.Adjust the time zone
.Make certain to note your login and password for future use
Next steps
Simplify NAS access: Seagate recommends that you install the software utility Seagate Network Assistant
before moving forward with the device configuration. Seagate Network Assistant gives you instant
information on your Seagate NAS, such as firmware version, IP address, and MAC address. It will also
.provide quick access to shares and NAS OS. See Seagate Network Assistant for instructions
Configure your NAS: For details on how to configure and use your Seagate NAS, go to Shares: Access and
.Transfer Files and Device Manager
Install Sdrive for local and remote access: Sdrive gives you easy access to shares and NAS OS on local and
.offsite networks. For more information, see Remote Access
First Use: Empty enclosure
Before connecting to NAS OS, configure the Seagate NAS on your network. For instructions, review your NAS's
.user manual and quick start guide
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Seagate NAS OS 4
Enclosure with disks: If you purchased an enclosure with disks, go to First Use: Enclosures with
.Disks for instructions on how to set up Seagate NAS OS

Choose compatible hard drives
Seagate NAS are compatible with most SATA I, SATA II, and SATA III hard drives. Older hard drives that are not
constructed for NAS can experience reduced performance or failure. If you have any questions regarding hard
.drive compatibility, contact Seagate customer support
Seagate hard drives are specially prepared for use with your Seagate NAS. Choose the link below to view hard
:drives that are optimized for your Seagate NAS
Seagate 8-bay Rackmount NAS
Seagate 4-bay Rackmount NAS
Seagate NAS Pro
Seagate NAS
Install Seagate NAS OS
Important info: The Seagate NAS OS installer must format the hard drives inserted into the NAS.
Data stored on the hard drives will be deleted. Make certain to back up data on the hard drives
.before installing them in the Seagate NAS enclosure

:Consider the following before installing Seagate NAS OS
.The NAS OS device's administrator should complete the installation steps
Make certain to boot the NAS before inserting new hard drives. Since the boot order for the NAS starts
with the hard drives, you can encounter a problem if it detects an earlier version of NAS OS or another
.operating system
.Insert the hard drives once the diskless enclosure is powered on and the status LED is blinking
The NAS checks for software updates during the installation. An error message informs you if it cannot
check for updates due to a missing connection to the Internet. You have the option to search for updates
.after the installation
The instructions for hardware installation are available on the quick start guide and user manual for your
.Seagate NAS. Make certain to follow the instructions before continuing with the steps below
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.Power on your Seagate NAS device. The device is ready to be accessed once the status LED turns solid .1
From a PC/Mac connected to the same network as your NAS, launch an Internet browser and type .2
http://discover.seagate.com
Follow the on-screen instructions. The setup formats the drives and installs NAS OS. During the installation, .3
:you can
.Create or change the name of the device
. ( Create or change the administrator login (the default is admin
.Create a Seagate Access account for remote access
.Configure or change the RAID level
.Adjust the time zone
Make certain to note your login and password for future use. Upon completion, you are prompted to restart the
.NAS
Note on USB keys: If your Seagate NAS requires a USB key to boot to the NAS OS installer, you
must remove the USB key before rebooting the device. The NAS will use the USB key as the boot disk
.if it is not removed
Upon reboot, the status LED turns on and begins to blink. The device is ready to be accessed once
.the status LED has turned solid and the welcome page appears on the NAS Setup Wizard

Next steps
Simplify NAS access: Seagate recommends that you install the software utility Seagate Network Assistant
before moving forward with the device configuration. Seagate Network Assistant gives you instant
information on your Seagate NAS, such as firmware version, IP address, and MAC address. It will also
.provide quick access to shares and NAS OS. See Seagate Network Assistant for instructions
Configure your NAS: For details on how to configure and use your Seagate NAS, go to Shares: Access and
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.Transfer Files and Device Manager
Install Sdrive for local and remote access: Sdrive gives you easy access to shares and NAS OS on local and
.offsite networks. For more information, see Remote Access
First Use: Update from NAS OS 3 to NAS OS 4
Your NAS OS 3 device alerts you when an update is available to NAS OS 4 or higher. You can update your
Seagate NAS device by following the prompts to download and install NAS OS 4. The last step for the NAS OS
.update is rebooting the NAS OS device
NAS OS 3 and volume encryption
The first time you log into NAS OS 4, a pop-up window appears with important information regarding support for
volume encryption. Since NAS OS 3 does not recognize volume encryption and other new features, you can
.lose important data when attempting to restore a NAS OS 4 device with NAS OS 3
.For further information, go to: Seagate NAS OS Installer
You can find software downloads and instructions on how to update the USB rescue key from the NAS OS 3
.installer to the NAS OS 4 installer
Seagate Network Assistant
Install Seagate Network Assistant on one or more computers connected to the same network as your NAS OS
device. It is a software utility that helps you detect and access NAS OS devices on the network. Seagate
:Network Assistant gives you instant information on the NAS OS device's
IP address
Version of software/firmware
(MAC address (hardware ID number
:Seagate Network Assistant can also help you
Launch NAS OS
Mount one or more shares
Auto-mount one or more shares
Important info on Seagate Network Assistant and NAS LAN Ports: Seagate Network Assistant will
always provide information on LAN 1, even if you have connected the NAS to your network using
.LAN 2
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
Seagate NAS OS 4
Note on LaCie NAS OS devices: Seagate Network Assistant recognizes LaCie NAS devices running
.LaCie NAS OS 2.0 or higher

Install Seagate Network Assistant
To avoid NAS detection conflicts, make certain that you are running the latest version of Seagate Network
.Assistant
:Download the Seagate Network Assistant installer for your operating system .1
Windows
Mac
.Follow the wizard to complete the installation .2
Launch Seagate Network Assistant
:Windows
Select Seagate Network Assistant in Start > All Programs/Programs. The application icon will appear in the .1
.taskbar
.Right-click on the icon in the taskbar .2
:Mac
Select Seagate Network Assistant at Go > Applications > Seagate Network Assistant. The application icon .1
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.will appear in the menu bar
.Select the icon in the menu bar .2
Find your Seagate NAS's address information
.Launch Seagate Network Assistant .1
Windows users: Right-click on the Seagate Network Assistant icon and choose Open Seagate Network .2
Assistant. Mac users: Choose the Seagate Network Assistant icon in the menu bar to select Open Seagate
.Network Assistant
If you have multiple NAS OS devices, select the NAS you wish to access from the list on the left-hand .3
.column
.Choose the Configuration tab .4
:Review the device's .5
IP address
Version of software/firmware
(MAC address (hardware ID number
Access NAS OS with Seagate Network Assistant
.Launch Seagate Network Assistant .1
:Choose your device .2
.Windows: Right-click on the Seagate Network Assistant icon in the taskbar to select your Seagate NAS
.Mac: Choose the Seagate Network Assistant icon in the menu bar to select your Seagate NAS
.Select Web access to the NAS OS .3
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.The NAS OS login page will launch in an Internet browser .4
Mount shares
.Seagate Network Assistant gives you many options to access your Seagate NAS's public and private shares
Quick access
.Launch Seagate Network Assistant
:Choose your device
Windows: From the taskbar, right-click on the Seagate Network Assistant icon and move the cursor to
.your Seagate NAS. Available shares will be listed
Mac: From the menu bar, select the Seagate Network Assistant icon and move the cursor to your
.Seagate NAS. Available shares will be listed
.Choose the share you want to access
The share will open in an Explorer window (Windows) or a Finder window (Mac). Public shares are available
. to everyone on the network. Private shares will prompt a user for a username and password
.Administrator: Use the credentials created during the initial setup or NAS OS login
. ( User: Type the login and password prepared by the administrator (see Users
Transfer files normally between your computer and the share. Mac users: If the share does not open in a
. [ Finder window, navigate in the Finder to SHARED > [machine name] > [share name
.Note on Quick Access to shares: Private shares require a valid username and password
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.1
.2
.3
.4
.5

Mount
Seagate NAS OS 4
Mount
.Launch Seagate Network Assistant
Right-click on the icon in the taskbar (Windows) or choose the icon in the menu bar (Mac) and select Open
.Seagate Network Assistant
If you have multiple NAS OS devices, select the NAS you wish to access from the list on the left-hand
.column
.Choose the Volume tab
Double-click the share you wish to access. The share will open in an Explorer window (Windows) or a Finder
.window (Mac). Transfer files normally from your computer to the share
Technical note: Mac users: If the share does not open in a Finder window, navigate in the Finder to
. [ SHARED > [machine name] > [share name

.Note on mounting shares: Private shares require a valid username and password

.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
Authenticate private shares
.Launch Seagate Network Assistant
Right-click on the icon in the taskbar (Windows) or choose the icon in the menu bar (Mac) and select Open
.Seagate Network Assistant
If you have multiple NAS OS devices, select the NAS you wish to access from the list on the left-hand
.column
.Choose the Volumes tab
.Select Authentication
.In the pop-up window, choose Registered User and enter your Username and Password. Select OK
All available shares will appear in the list of volumes. If you do not see your volume, confirm that you have
.access to it (see Shares). Only the NAS administrator can set access rights to shares
.Select Mount as drive (Windows) or Mount (Mac) to open the share
. ( The share will be available in an Explorer window (Windows) or a Finder window (Mac
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
.8
.9
Auto-mount
.Launch Seagate Network Assistant
Right-click on the icon in the taskbar (Windows) or choose the icon in the menu bar (Mac) and select Open
.Seagate Network Assistant
If you have multiple NAS OS devices, select the NAS you wish to access from the list on the left-hand
.column
.Choose the Volumes tab
If the shares you wish to auto-mount is private, choose Authentication to enter your credentials. In the
.pop-up window, choose Registered User and enter the Username and Password for the share
.Choose OK. All available shares will appear in the list of volumes
Select the checkbox for Auto to open the share. The share will now mount each time you boot the
35
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.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
Seagate NAS OS 4
.computer. To cancel auto-mount, uncheck the box for Auto
Windows: The share will mount in Computer/My Computer automatically when the computer detects it on .8
the network. Mac users: The share icon will appear in your Finder automatically when the computer detects
.it on the network
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Seagate NAS OS 4
Shares: Access and Transfer Files
About shares
A share is a network volume that you can configure to store and share data. Your Seagate NAS has two shares
by default: admin and Public. Following the initial login, the share admin changes to the name used by the
.administrator
:The following table lists the differences between private and public shares
Default
share
Availability
Login
Accessibility
Type
admin or user
defined
Computers on the network and remote
(access (must be enabled
Passwordprotected
Login and password
required
Private
Public
Computers on the network and remote
(access (must be enabled
None
Available to any user
on the network
Public
.For instructions on how to create and manage shares, see Shares
Access shares
.You have several options for accessing shares
Option 1: Seagate Network Assistant - quick share access
.Use Seagate Network Assistant for quick access to public shares. See Seagate Network Assistant for details
Option 2: Seagate Network Assistant - authenticate for private shares
Use Seagate Network Assistant to enter your username and password. See Seagate Network Assistant for
.details
Option 3: Operating system
.Use your operating system to open your NAS's shares
Option 4: Sdrive
Sdrive gives users and administrators easy access to shares and NAS OS on local and remote networks.
Sdrive’s unique file integration places a volume in an Explorer window (Windows) or on the desktop (Mac). The
volume contains all public shares and the private shares allotted to the user by the administrator. See Remote
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.Access for details
Windows
.In an Explorer window address field, type the \\[machine name] or \\[IP address]] for your Seagate NAS .1
.Double click on the share you want to open .2
.Private shares will prompt you for your NAS OS username and password .3
.Alternatively, from the Start menu, select Run then type \\[machine name] or \\[IP address]]. Choose OK
Note on Bonjour: If your Windows computer is running Bonjour, the address name must include
..local. For example, \\[machine name].local

Mac
.From the desktop, navigate to Go > Connect to Server .1
:In the dialogue window, type one of the following .2
afp://[machine name].local
smb://[machine name].local
[afp://[IP address
[smb://[IP address
Creating Shortcuts to Shares
Create shortcuts to shares for quick access to your data
Create shortcuts using Seagate Network Assistant
Seagate Network Assistant can be configured to automatically mount shares on your computer. See Seagate
.Network Assistant for details
Create shortcuts using the operating system: Windows
7
.Open an Explorer window and navigate to Computer .1
.Choose Map Network Drive .2
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Seagate NAS OS 4
Browse to and select the share you want to access (private shares will prompt you for your NAS OS user .4
.name and password). Choose OK
.Select a drive letter in the pull-down menu and make certain that Reconnect at logon is selected .5
.Choose Finish .6
Windows 8 and 10
.In an Explorer window address field, type the \\[machine name] or \\[IP address]] for your Seagate NAS .1
.Right click on the share you want to access and choose Map Network Drive .2
.Select a drive letter in the pull-down menu and make certain that Reconnect at sign-in is selected .3
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.Choose Finish. Private shares will prompt you for your NAS OS user name and password .4
Create shortcuts using the operating system: Mac
Mount
Open a new Finder window and choose your NAS in SHARED > [machine name]. All public shares will appear. .1
.To access private shares, choose Connect As and enter your NAS OS username and password
.Choose Connect .3
Mount at boot
.Before following the steps below, make certain to mount the shares as described above .1
.From the Apple icon in the menu bar, select System Preferences > Accounts > Login Items .2
.Choose the "+" sign to add a new item to the list and browse for the shares that you mounted .3
When you log on to the Mac operating system, the shares will automatically mount on your desktop. If the
shares do not mount on the desktop, open a Finder window and check SHARED. If the shares are available in
SHARED but are not visible on the desktop, go to the Finder preferences and change the settings to display
.connected servers on your desktop
Backup: Seagate NAS and PC/Mac
Back up your NAS
See Backup Manager for a complete explanation on how to automate backups of data stored on your NAS. You
:can back up your data to
. ( Direct-attached storage (DAS
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Seagate NAS OS 4
.Another Seagate NAS OS device or compatible server on your local network
.Another Seagate NAS OS device or compatible server on a remote/offsite network
(Cloud storage (Amazon S3, Box, and more
Important info on NAS backup and RAID: RAID is a great solution to keep your NAS running in case
of disk failure. However, RAID is not a backup solution and it does not offer protection against all
types of hardware failure. Therefore, administrators should back up NAS data to DAS or another
.NAS on a regular basis. See Backup Manager for details

Back up your computers
:Your NAS is fully compatible with popular backup solutions such as
Windows Backup and Windows File History
®Apple Time Machine
A share on your NAS can be set as a backup target for these and other backup software. Make certain that the
user has access to the target share. Keep in mind that deleting the target share will also delete all associated
.computer backups
Note on Time Machine: Time Machine must be enabled in NAS OS before a NAS share can be used
as a backup destination. Go to Device Manager > Services to enable the Time Machine service. See
.Services for further details

Media Server
UPnP/DLNA
Configure your NAS to be a media server for UPnP/DLNA devices. To get started, enable UPnP/DLNA at Device
Manager > Services (see Services). Once enabled, UPnP/DLNA-certified players connected to your network
can play files located on your NAS. Examples of UPnP/DLNA players include Xbox, PlayStation, Smart TVs and
.many more
Media files stored on public shares are identified without the need to enter a login and password. If you keep
.media files on private shares, make certain that your playback device is capable of requesting the credentials
Re-index the media server
To take an inventory of available multimedia files, you can re-index your NAS shares and desktop attached
.storage (DAS) connected to the NAS's ports
.If applicable, make certain that your DAS are connected to the NAS OS device .1
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Seagate NAS OS 4
. ( Confirm that UPnP/DLNA is enabled at Device Manager > Services (see Services .2
.Pass the cursor to the right side of the UPnP/DLNA row to enable the pull-down menu and select Edit .3
.Choose Re-index .4
Start a re-index as described above if files appear to be missing on your multimedia shares or connected
.devices
The time for indexing to complete depends upon the total capacity of your storage and the size of your
multimedia library. If you have created many shares on your NAS, re-indexing can tax the CPU's resources.
Before starting the re-index, consider shutting off multimedia support for shares that do not store media files.
.See Services and Shares for further information on how to manage services
iTunes
Your NAS can act as an iTunes music server. Copy your iTunes library to a share on your NAS and audio files will
be available to compatible devices on the network. For easy access on the entire network, use a public share.
To limit access to an iTunes library, use a private share with Seagate Network Assistant's Authentication (see
. ( Seagate Network Assistant
.To turn on network sharing, follow the steps below for your version of iTunes
. ( Enable the iTunes service on your NAS OS device. Go to Device Manager > Services (see Services .1
.Pass the cursor to the right side of the iTunes row and enable the Edit pull-down menu .2
.Choose Start .3
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Seagate NAS OS 4
To access the iTunes library, computers on the network should launch the iTunes application and choose the .4
.NAS OS device as the source for music
Technical note: The iTunes Server Service supports the following file types: .mp3, .wav, .aac, .pls,
.and .m3u

Share music with iOS 9 devices
:To share the iTunes library with iOS mobile devices
.Mount the share with the iTunes library on a computer on the network .1
.Launch the iTunes application on the computer .2
.Enable sharing in iTunes Preferences .3
.On the iOS device, launch the Music app and tap the category pulldown menu .4
.Tap the home sharing option to view the iTunes library on your NAS .5
.Use public shares with iOS devices
FTP
FTP (file transfer protocol) is used to transfer files from one computer to another via the local network or the
Internet. This protocol allows you to exchange files with your colleagues, clients, or business partners securely,
.as only people with a user account will have access
. ( The FTP service is disabled by default but you can start it at Device Manager > Services page (see Services
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Seagate NAS OS 4
Once FTP is enabled, your NAS can be accessed using an Internet browser or FTP client software. FTP client
software is very helpful if you wish to share, download, and upload data within a dedicated application rather
.than an Internet browser. Examples of FTP client software include Filezilla and Cyberduck
Local FTP access
To use the FTP service on your local network, enter your NAS's IP address or device name in the FTP client's
address field or in an Internet browser's address field. Your NAS's IP address is available on the Network page
. ( or Seagate Network Assistant (see Network and Seagate Network Assistant
(Public Access Folders (non-password protected
(ftp://[IP-address]/ (For example, ftp://192.168.10.149
( ftp://[machine name]/ (For example, ftp://seagate-r8 or ftp://seagate-r8.local
(Private Access Folders (password protected
When following the directions below, usernames and passwords can vary depending upon the user. For
.example, the administrator's username and password are not the same as another user's name and password
,ftp://[username:password@IP-address] (For example
(ftp://admin:adminpassword@192.168.10.149
,ftp://[username:password@machine name]/ (For example
ftp://admin:adminpassword@seagate-r8/ or
( /ftp://admin:adminpassword@seagate-r8.local
Remote FTP access
You can access and share your NAS's files from a computer outside of your network. To use FTP, you will need
.to know your router's public IP address
From a computer on the same local network as the NAS, visit this page to learn your public IP address: .1
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Seagate NAS OS 4
From a computer on the same local network as the NAS, visit this page to learn your public IP address: .1
/http://www.whatismyip.com
.Note your public IP address .2
Launch an Internet browser or FTP client software. Within the Internet browser or FTP client's address .3
:field, type
(Public folders only: ftp://[Public IP-address (For example, ftp://94.10.72.149
Public and private folders: ftp://[username:password@Public IP-address (For example,
(ftp://admin:adminpassword@94.10.72.149
For further information on the public IP address for your router, see your router's user manual or your Internet
.service provider
SFTP
SFTP is a secure version of the FTP service. Data is more secure when using SFTP but transfer rates are slower.
.Similar to FTP, SFTP is disabled by default but you can start it at Device Manager > Services
Note on Network Backup Server and SFTP: Activating Network Backup server will disable SFTP (see
. ( Backup Manager for details

NFS
p>Network File System (NFS) is a distributed file system protocol allowing the NAS to share directories and
.files with others over a network. Like SMB, NFS grants file-level access to users and programs
.NFS is widely distributed to host VMWare datastores or shared network folders in a Linux/UNIX environment
When enabling the NFS service on a share, it can be accessed with the following path:
[[NAS_NAME_OR_IP_ADDRESS]:/shares/[SHARE_NAME
:The NFS protocol is not active by default. To activate it
. ( Go to Device Manager > Services (see Services .1
.Pass the cursor to the right side of the NFS row to enable the Edit pull-down menu .2
.Choose Start .3
.Important info: All NFS shares are public and available to everyone on the network

(Wake on LAN (WOL
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Your Seagate NAS can conserve energy by entering power saving mode. Use NAS OS to schedule power saving
mode when no one accesses the Seagate NAS and wake it up when your office is ready to work. See Power for
.more information on power saving modes
Seagate Network Assistant can wake your NAS if you require access before it is scheduled to exit power saving
:mode. This feature is called Wake on LAN (WOL). Follow the steps below
. ( Right-click the Seagate Network Assistant icon in the taskbar (Windows) or choose it in the menu bar (Mac .1
.Select Wake Up a Device .2
.Choose the NAS from the pull-down menu .3
.Choose Wake up .4
Note on the MAC address list: If the list is empty the first time you launch Wake Up a Device,
enter the device's MAC address in the field and select Wake up. Once entered, Seagate
.Network Assistant will keep the device's MAC address on the list

.You can also wake up a NAS by applying a short push to its power button
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NAS OS Login and Naviga on
Seagate NAS OS is a browser-based administration tool. Launch NAS OS to access apps, manage storage, add
.users, create shares, and much more
Log in to NAS OS
:Access the NAS OS login page with one of the following
Seagate Network Assistant
An Internet browser
Seagate Network Assistant
.See Seagate Network Assistant for instructions on software installation
.Windows: Right-click on the Seagate Network Assistant icon in the system tray .1
.Mac: Choose the Seagate Network Assistant icon in the menu bar
.Select [machine name] > Web Access .2
The login page will open in a new browser window or tab. If your browser is not open, Seagate Network .3
.Assistant will open it for you
Internet browser
:Launch an Internet browser and type the default address for the NAS OS device
Windows without Bonjour: http://seagate-r4 or http://seagate-dp6
.Windows with Bonjour and Mac: http://seagate-r4.local or http://seagate-dp6.local
You can also type your NAS's IP address in the browser's URL (web address) field. For example: http://[IP. ( address]. The IP address may be found in Seagate Network Assistant (see Seagate Network Assistant
First login
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:For most users, the first NAS OS login is the final step of the setup wizard. You are prompted to
Create a device name. The default name of your NAS is based upon the product model. You can change it to
.meet the needs of your environment
Create an administrator login name. The default is admin but you have the option to change it. A login name
.should be from 1-20 alphanumeric characters
Create and confirm the administrator’s password. The password should be from 4-20 alphanumeric
.characters and symbols. Consider using a strong password that is difficult for others to guess
.Create or reconfigure the RAID level
.Set the time zone
.Read and agree to Seagate’s Terms and Conditions. The box must be checked to complete the installation
Important info on login credentials: Make certain to note your login credentials. NAS OS can help
users create a new password if the original password is not available. However, the option to
recover a password requires that the administrator add settings to Notifications and Users.
.Further information on how to set up password recovery is listed below

Login
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NAS OS prompts you for your login name and password. To avoid entering your credentials with each login,
.check the box next to Remember me
For added security when logging in, choose Switch to HTTPS at the NAS OS login page. While it offers more
.protection than HTTP, using HTTPS can affect your NAS’s performance
Recover a Lost Password
The administrator can configure NAS OS to help users recover forgotten or lost passwords. The administrator
:must
. ( Assign an email server (see Notifications
. ( Enter an email address for users (see Users
If the above conditions have been met, the administrator or user can follow the steps below to recover a
:password
?On the login page, choose Can’t access your account .1
. ( Enter the login and type the Word verification (this ensures that the request is coming from a person .2
.Choose Send .3
.A recovery email arrives in the user's inbox. In the email, choose the Click here link .4
.In the Reinitialize your password window, type your login and new password .5
.Choose Send .6
Launch NAS OS using Sdrive
Install Seagate Sdrive on your PC/Mac to access your device’s home page. You must have a Seagate Access
.account to use Sdrive. See Sdrive for instructions on how to download and install the application
:Make certain that Sdrive has been launched before following the directions below
.Choose the device you want to access .1
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.Windows: Right click the Sdrive icon in the system tray to choose the Seagate device
.Mac: Click the Sdrive icon in the system tray to choose the Seagate device
.Choose Manage device .2
NAS OS Navigation
NAS OS provides options to access apps, get help, review events, and much more. While the central pane
interface will adjust to the app that you select, the framed options remain available for easy access. The central
.pane is number 6 in the graphic below
:Menu: Select the menu to
Choose an app
Quit an open app
Logout
Restart
Shut down
Search: Choose the magnifying glass icon to enable the search field. Type a search term that applies to your
.NAS OS device
.Help: Choose the question mark to review the NAS OS user manual or create a support case
Notifications: Choose the bell icon to review the latest events on your NAS OS device. Event options
include All, Warning, and Error. You can also select View all notifications to be directed to the Notifications
.page
Apps: The Home page’s central pane presents apps from Seagate and third party developers. Choose an app
to be directed to its interface. Only the central pane will change based upon the app you have selected.
:Core NAS OS features are divided into default apps
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.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
Seagate NAS OS 4
.App Manager: Add and manage apps
.Backup Manager: Create and manage backup jobs
.Device Manager: Change the settings, add users, create shares, and much more
.Download Manager: Create and manage download jobs
Hardware state: A green light indicates that the NAS ‘s hardware is operating as expected. Click it to see a
.pop-up window with additional details regarding the hardware
.LAN connection and IP address: The LAN ports connected to the network and their IP addresses
Copyright
.Credits: Click Credits to see the open source licensing information
.6
.7
.8
.9
Login: administrator and user
Administrator
An administrator has access to all NAS OS management functions. However, an administrator does not have
. access to all shares by default. The administrator must assign access to himself, similar to standard users
User
:The default apps for a user are
.Filebrowser: Internet-based browser for shares that the user has been granted access to
Device Manager (limited): The user can change his language and password preferences. The administrator
.has the right to change a user’s password at any time
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Device Manager
The Device Manager app is the heart of NAS OS management. Use Device Manager to configure important
.settings such as users, shares, storage, and much more
Launch Device Manager
.Launch Device Manager from the Home page by choosing its app icon
Device Manager navigation
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The left pane lists the NAS OS management pages. Choose a page to manage its settings. The central pane
.changes to reflect the selected page
For example, click Network to review or revise settings for the Ethernet ports, port forwarding, MyNAS, and
.more. Upon choosing Network, the central pane changes to the interface for the page
Overview is the default page when first launching Device Manager. It gives you a summary of the NAS’s health
.and shortcuts to important settings
.Review the storage capacity, health and processor/RAM consumption
.Get quick summaries of the settings Shares, Users, Groups, Network, Services and Power
Click on a summary to go to its page. You can also add Shares, Users, and Groups from the Overview page by
.choosing +Add at the applicable setting
Toggle to another app
On the upper left of the window, click the menu icon (three horizontal lines) and then choose Device Manager
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. [ or the down arrow > [App name
Shares
Your NAS's storage is divided into shares, also known as network folders. The Shares page allows you to create
new shares, assign access rights to users and groups, and to adjust services by share. By default, your NAS OS
device has two shares, admin and Public. You can begin working with these shares immediately and create new
.shares as needed
Note on the admin share name: The name of the share admin will update automatically if the
administrator changes the login name from the default admin. For example, if the administrator
.used her name, Sally, during the installation, admin becomes Sally

Important info: In text fields, you can enter 1 to 20 characters using letters, numbers, hyphens, and
underscores. No other symbols, special characters, punctuation, or spaces may be used. Do not
.begin or end with a hyphen or underscore

Shares, Users, and Groups
Allotting storage and network permissions for multiple departments and users in a branch office or corporate
network can be complicated. It takes forethought and planning to configure which user is part of what group with
access to how many shares. For this reason, the settings Shares, Users, and Groups are closely related in NAS OS.
The cross-functionality between these three settings allows the administrator to add users to groups in the
Users or Groups settings as well as shares to users and groups in the Users and Groups settings. The wizard for
each setting prompts the administrator to choose shares, users, and groups. Additionally, users and groups can
.be added to a new share when following the Add share wizard
However, creating a new share, user, or group requires that the administrator use its respective setting. For
example, the administrator must choose the Shares setting to add a new share and the Users setting to add a
new user. Though each setting can be revised at any time, it is highly recommended that the administrator plan
ahead when first adding shares, users, and groups to NAS OS. With a map of users, groups, and shares, the
.administrator can simplify access rights. See the example below
Sample setup: Shares, Users, and Groups
.An administrator has mapped permissions for 40 shares, 20 users, and 10 groups
To get started, the administrator adds the 20 shares using the Add share wizard on the Shares page. The
administrator ignores the prompts to add users and groups to each share since new users and groups have yet
.to be created
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Next, the administrator adds the 20 users using the Add user wizard on the Users page. The administrator
.ignores the prompts to add users to shares and groups since new groups have yet to be created
Finally, the administrator adds the 10 groups using the Add group wizard on the Groups page. In this step, the
:administrator will assign
Each user to a specific group
Share permissions for each group
The Groups setting is the last step since it can cover more users at one time rather than assigning share
.permissions for each new user
The generic sample setup may not apply to all environments. However, NAS OS gives the administrator free
.reign to configure permissions on the Shares, Users, and Groups pages
Public and private shares
:The following table shows the differences between private and public shares
Default
share
Availability
Login
Accessibility
Type
admin or user
defined
Computers on the network and remote
(access (must be enabled
Passwordprotected
Login and password
required
Private
Public
Computers on the network and remote
(access (must be enabled
None
Available to any user
on the network
Public
Existing shares
:Shares are organized in a table
.Click on the text in the Name column to change the share name
. ( Click on the empty space or text in the Description column to add or revise details for the share (optional
The number in the Groups column (two silhouettes) shows how many groups have access to the share. Click
on the number to view and edit the group. Public indicates that the share is available to everyone on the
.network
The number in the Users column (one silhouette) shows how many users have access to the share. Click on
the number to view and edit user access. Public indicates that the share is available to everyone on the
.network
Click on the text in the Services column to add or remove services. Only active services are available. See
below for instructions on how to adjust services on a share and Services for details on how to enable and
.disable services in NAS OS
To review and edit the options for a share, pass the cursor to the far right of its row to make the Edit pulldown menu visible. Most of the options are explained above. Additional options include changing network
.access (public or private) and deleting the share
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Add share
:Choose Add share and follow the wizard to completion. Consider the following when creating your share
The Add share wizard features four steps: name the share, Set group permissions, Set user permissions, and
.Summary
Name the share: A share must have a name from 1 to 20 characters using letters, numbers, hyphens, and
.underscores. Do not begin or end with a hyphen or an underscore
Name the share: If your NAS OS device has more than one volume, a pull-down menu allows you to select the
.volume for the share
.Name the share: Checking the box next to Public gives everyone on the local network access to the share
Set group permissions/Set user permissions: The administrator can skip these steps if permissions will be
.assigned in the Users or Groups settings. Choose Next to reach the Summary
Set group permissions/Set user permissions: When adding groups or user permissions, you must drag selected
items to the Read access column or the Read+write access column. To add multiple items, make all your
.selections before dragging them to a column
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Set group permissions/Set user permissions: If a user or group is mistakenly dragged to the Read access column
.or Read+write access column, you can drag it back to the No access column
Set user permissions: Checking the box next to Enable Read access to guests on the network allows all users
.on the network to view files on the share. However, they cannot modify files or write data to the share
Add remote share: distributed le system namespaces
((DFS-N
During the course of a day, a user may access multiple files stored on many shares connected to your local area
network (LAN). To find all the shares and volumes spread about the network, a user can hunt through a long list
.of NAS devices and servers
NAS OS DFS-N allows administrators to add compatible shares to a single NAS OS device. Accessing shares on
a single device simplifies data management for the administrator and the user. Similar to creating a new share,
the administrator adds remote shares from other NAS OS devices or servers on the LAN. The other NAS OS
.device or server is called the Host
NAS OS DFS-N supports NAS OS shares and SMB shares/volumes. SMB or, server message block, is a standard
.protocol for sharing network volumes. It is native to Windows and supported on Mac OS
Add remote share
:Choose Add remote share and follow the instructions below for your Host type
NAS OS Host
The wizard searches the local network for NAS OS devices. Select the host NAS OS device for the shares .1
.you want to add and choose Next
Enter your credentials for the host NAS OS device and choose Next. In most instances, you will use a login .2
.with administrator rights. You can choose Guest when adding public shares
Select the shares to add and choose Next. If you do not see the shares you want to add, make certain that .3
.the credentials you entered in step 2 have access rights to the shares on the host NAS OS device
.Review the Summary page and choose Finish .4
Third party NAS or server Host
Enter the IP address for the host in the empty field and choose Next. Though an IP address is generally .1
.more reliable, you can also enter the NAS’s/server’s network name
Important info: Even if you succeed in adding the share/volume using the Host’s name, you can
experience problems when attempting to access the volume on a PC/Mac. This may be due to
the network’s naming service. Should you encounter issues with the network name, it is
.recommended that you try again using the IP address
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.Enter the name of the share on the host NAS/server and choose Next .2
.Review the Summary page and choose Finish .3
Adding remote shares on offsite networks
NAS OS gives you the option to add shares/volumes from NAS OS and third party NAS/server devices that are
located outside the LAN (offsite network). When choosing the Host NAS, follow the instructions for Third party
NAS or server Host, even if you want to access a NAS OS device. When choosing the NAS, you must enter its
.public IP address and use the proper credentials
Seagate cannot guarantee the stability and performance of remote shares/volumes from offsite networks.
There are many factors that can affect the connection including, but not limited to: firewalls, security settings,
.routers, Internet service providers, and administration
Share tabs
:Adding remote shares to the NAS changes the Shares page. There are two tabs
.Local: Access all shares created on the NAS
.Remote: Access all shares added from other NAS devices
Managing remote shares/volumes
The host NAS/server manages its shares. Only the administrator for the host NAS device can adjust the
.remote shares’ credentials, access rights, quotas, etc
To avoid potential conflicts with accessing remote shares, administrators should use the same credentials on
the NAS OS device and the host NAS/server. For example, Logan is a user on the NAS OS device Seagate-DP6.
The administrator for Seagate-DP6 has added a remote volume called Data. The host server for Data is called
Seagate-DWSS4, a Windows server. The administrator for Seagate-DWSS4 must create a login and password for
Logan. To make the login experience to Data easier for Logan, the administrators for Seagate-DP6 and Seagate.DWSS4 agree to use the same credentials on both NAS devices
The administrator for the NAS OS device can revise how the name appears on the Shares page and users on the
:network
Choose the Remote tab .1
.Locate the remote share you want to rename and click on the words in its name column .2
.Enter the name in the field .3
Accessing remote shares/volumes
Accessing remotes shares is similar to accessing shares created on the NAS OS device. There are minor
differences that administrators should consider before authorizing users to access remote shares. Review the
.information below before adding remote shares to your NAS OS device
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The host NAS/server manages the remote share/volume. Since management includes credentials, make
certain that applicable usernames and passwords have been added to the host NAS/server. For example,
Logan is a user on the NAS OS device Seagate-DP6. The administrator for Seagate-DP6 has added a remote
volume called Data. The host server for Data is called Seagate-DWSS4, a Windows server. The administrator for
Seagate-DWSS4 must create a login and password for Logan. To make the login experience to Data easier for
Logan, the administrators for Seagate-DP6 and Seagate-DWSS4 agree to use the same credentials on both
.NAS/server devices
SMB is native to Windows. Users with Windows computers can access remote shares/volumes using the
operating system or Seagate Network Assistant. For further details, see Shares: Access and Transfer Files.
When first accessing the remote share, the user will be prompted for the username and password created on
.the host NAS/server
SMB is supported on Mac OS. The native protocol for Mac OS is Apple File Protocol (AFP). Each time that a Mac
user attempts to access a network drive, it will automatically use AFP rather than SMB. Therefore, a Mac user
cannot access remote shares with Seagate Network Assistant since the application uses the operating system’s
default network settings. Mac users should follow the instructions below when accessing a remote
:share/volume
.Go to Finder > Go > Connect to server .1
In the Server Address field, enter smb://[name of NAS OS device] and choose Connect. Entering smb is very .2
important since it tells the operating system to use the SMB protocol when searching for shares/volumes on
.the NAS
The user is prompted for a Name and Password. As recommended above, the administrators for the NAS OS .3
and host devices should use the same credentials for users. Enter the username and password created on
.both devices. Choose Connect
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.The remote share/volume is ready to use .4
Revise share settings
To revise a share’s settings, pass the cursor to the far right of its row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible.
:Options on the Edit pull-down menu differ for public and private shares
Public: Change to private share, Services, and Delete
Private: Users, Groups, Change share to public, Services, and Delete
Since public shares are available to everyone on the network, there is no need to manage user and group
.access
Important info regarding remote shares: Settings for remote shares can be revised on the host
.NAS/server

Users/Groups: change access rights
From the Edit pull-down menu, choose Users or Groups. The pop-up window includes three tabs for Users,
.Groups, and Overview
.Select the tab you wish to manage .1
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.Select the tab you wish to manage .1
The left-hand column lists the users or groups with No access to the share. Select the user or group to be .2
granted access and drag it to the Read access column or the Read+write access column. You can enable read
access for everyone on the network by checking the box next to Enable Read access to guests on the
.network
.Choose Close to confirm the changes .3
Private and public: change the share’s network status
:Select the applicable setting to
Change a public share into a private share
Change a private share into a public share
Services: change the services for a speci c share
File protocols and service applications can be enabled and disabled on the Services page. A service is available
to all shares when it is enabled and not available when it is disabled. However, an administrator may want to
.enable a service for certain shares but turn it off for others
Example 1: The administrator creates a share called Time Machine to use as the backup destination for a Mac on
the network. Since the Mac runs Time Machine® for its backups, the share must have Apple File Protocol (AFP)
and Time Machine services. Both services can be enabled on the NAS’s Services page. However, all other
computers on the network are PCs. Therefore, the administrator disables AFP and Time Machine on all other
.shares
Example 2: A doctor’s office wants to use a share called Entertainment to store media files. A player in the
waiting room that is UPnP/DLNA compatible will access the media files. All other shares store patient
information and office files. The administrator knows that enabling UPnP/DLNA on all shares can tax the
processor. It will also slow down Re-Indexing the media. Therefore, the administrator disables UPnP/DLNA on
.all shares except Entertainment
Enable/Disable a service on a specific share
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the share's row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Services .2
:Perform one of the following .3
Deselect the check box next to the service you want to disable
Select the check box next to the service you want to enable
If you do not see the service you want enable/disable, confirm that it has been enabled on the NAS’s
.Services page
.Choose Save .4
.Important info: Services must be enabled on the Services page for them to appear on a share
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
Delete
Seagate NAS OS 4
Delete
Deleting a share and data: Deleting a share also deletes all files on the share and will cause any
.associated backup jobs to fail

.Pass the cursor to the far right of the share's row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Delete .2
.Confirm in the dialogue window .3
Users
.Choose the Users page to add and manage user accounts
Shares, Users, and Groups
Allotting storage and network permissions for multiple departments and users in a branch office or corporate
network can be complicated. It takes forethought and planning to configure which user is part of what group with
access to how many shares. For this reason, the settings Shares, Users, and Groups are closely related in NAS OS.
The cross-functionality between these three settings allows the administrator to add users to groups in the
Users or Groups settings as well as shares to users and groups in the Users and Groups settings. The wizard for
each setting prompts the administrator to choose shares, users, and groups. Additionally, users and groups can
.be added to a new share when following the Add share wizard
However, creating a new share, user, or group requires that the administrator use its respective setting. For
example, the administrator must choose the Shares setting to add a new share and the Users setting to add a
new user. Though each setting can be revised at any time, it is highly recommended that the administrator plan
ahead when first adding shares, users, and groups to NAS OS. With a map of users, groups, and shares, the
.administrator can simplify access rights. See the example below
Sample setup: Shares, Users, and Groups
.An administrator has mapped permissions for 40 shares, 20 users, and 10 groups
To get started, the administrator adds the 20 shares using the Add share wizard on the Shares page. The
administrator ignores the prompts to add users and groups to each share since new users and groups have yet
.to be created
Next, the administrator adds the 20 users using the Add user wizard on the Users page. The administrator
.ignores the prompts to add users to shares and groups since new groups have yet to be created
Finally, the administrator adds the 10 groups using the Add group wizard on the Groups page. In this step, the
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:administrator will assign
Each user to a specific group
Share permissions for each group
The Groups setting is the last step since it can cover more users at one time rather than assigning share
.permissions for each new user
The generic sample setup may not apply to all environments. However, NAS OS gives the administrator free
.reign to configure permissions on the Shares, Users, and Groups pages
Existing users
.User data is organized in a table
:The icons in the far left column indicate a user's rights
.Blue user with plus sign: Administrative privileges
.Blue user: Standard user privileges
.Grey user: The user was imported from an active directory with no administrative privileges
.Choose the text in the Login column to change the user name
Choose the text in the Password column to change the user's password. A password is created during the
.setup for the first administrator and in Manage users for additional users
Passwords can only be changed for users created on the NAS. Contact the administrator for the active
.directory to change settings for imported users
Passwords that are linked to Seagate Access accounts can be changed for signing into the NAS.
However, changes to the password on the NAS are not taken into account by the user’s Seagate Access
account. Therefore, users must continue to enter the original password that was created for the
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.Seagate Access account. It is highly recommended to keep passwords as consistent as possible
The email address can be filled in automatically when associating a user with a Seagate Access account.
With or without a Seagate Access account, the administrator can click the text in the Email column to
change a user's email address. However, if a user is associated with a Seagate Access account, it is highly
.recommended to keep the email address unchanged
The light in the Seagate Access column is green if the user is associated with a Seagate Access account. It is
.grey if the user does not have a Seagate Access account
.Click a green light to log out of the Seagate Access account
.Click a grey light to create a Seagate Access account for a user
The number in the Shares column (folder icon) indicates how many shares the user can access. Choose the
.number to view the assigned shares
The number in the Groups column (double silhouette icon) shows to how many groups the user belongs.
.Choose the number to view the groups
To set a storage capacity limit for a user, click on the white circle in the Quota column. Once the quota is set,
.the white circle will turn green
Add a user
:Choose Manage users and follow the wizard to completion. You can
Invite users: invite local and remote users to join your NAS and to create a Seagate Access account. Use
this option for users who require remote access to the NAS. You must enter an email address for a user to
create a Seagate Access account. The user receives the invitation via email with instructions on how to
.complete the account
.See invites: review pending user invitations
Create user: create a user for local access to the NAS. You can create a local user and add the Seagate
.Access account later
:Consider the following when completing the fields in this step
A login can have from 1 to 20 characters using letters, numbers, hyphens, and underscores. Do not begin or
.end with a hyphen or an underscore
.A password can have from 4 to 20 characters and is case-sensitive
An email address is optional when creating a local user. It can be helpful for quota notifications and
.password recovery
.To give the user administration privileges to the NAS, check the box next to Administrator
Set group permissions: To add a user to a group, drag the group name from the No access column to the
Access column. To add the user to multiple groups, make all your selections before dragging them to the
Access column. The administrator can skip the group membership step if membership will be assigned in the
.Groups settings
Set share permissions: To give the user access to a share, drag the share to the Read access column or the
Read+write access column. To give access to multiple shares, make all your selections before dragging them
to one of the columns. If a share is mistakenly dragged to the Read access column or Read+write access
column, you can drag it back to the No access column. The administrator can skip this step if access will be
.assigned in the Shares or Groups settings
User: access to shares and rights
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A user can access NAS shares that have been assigned to him by the administrator (see Shares ). When
accessing the shares for the first time, the user is prompted for the password created by the administrator on
the Users page (see Shares: Access and Transfer Files). In addition, a user can log on to NAS OS using his login
and password, which is very helpful with Seagate MyNAS remote access. However, NAS OS management rights
.are limited for standard users
. ( Access the Filebrowser app to upload, download, and share files via the Internet (see Filebrowser
An administrator has access to all NAS OS management features, including the ability to revise a password that
.has been changed by a user
Revise user settings
To revise a user’s settings, pass the cursor to the far right of its row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible.
:Options on the Edit pull-down menu differ for users and administrators
Users: Groups, Shares, Delete, Set Administrator, and Quota
Administrator: Groups, Shares, and Quota
Groups/Shares: change groups and access rights
From the Edit pull-down menu, choose Groups or Shares. The pop-up window includes three tabs for Shares,
.Groups, and Overview
Edit access rights to shares
.Select the Shares tab .1
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.The column No access lists the shares that the user cannot open .2
Add access to shares: Select the applicable shares in the No access column and drag them to the Read
.access column or the Read+write access column
Remove access to shares: Select the applicable shares in the Read access column or the Read+write
.access column and drag them to the No access column
.Choose Close to confirm the changes .3
Edit group membership
.Select the Groups tab .1
.The column No access lists the groups that the user has not joined .2
Add a user to groups: Select the applicable groups in the No access column and drag them to the Access
.column
Remove a user from groups: Select the applicable groups in the Access column and drag them to the No
.Access column
.Choose Close to confirm the changes .3
Delete a user
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the user's row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Delete .2
.Confirm in the dialogue window .3
Change NAS OS management rights: administrator and user
.An administrator can be changed to a standard user and a standard user can be elevated to an administrator
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the user's row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
:Select the applicable setting to .2
Set Administrator
Set local user
Important info on the first administrator: The original administrator who configured the NAS OS
.device remains an administrator. It is not possible to delete or change the original administrator

Set storage quotas
:Limit the user’s storage capacity by following the steps below
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the user's row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Quota .2
.Click on the text in the Quota column .3
. ( Choose the radio button next to Set limit and enter the quota in gigabytes (GB .4
.Choose Save .5
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Importing users from an active directory
If you have successfully connected to an active directory domain, you will see a button on the Users page
labeled Import from domain. Go to Settings for instructions on how to join your NAS OS device to an active
.directory
:To add users from the active directory
.Choose Import from domain .1
.At the prompt, type a few characters in the text field to find the users you want to import .2
.Hold down the control key (Windows users) or command key (Mac users) to select multiple users .3
.Choose Import .4
The imported users will appear in the table. You can identify users imported from the domain by their grey .5
.icons
Managing users imported from an active directory
The administrator of the original domain manages users imported from an active directory. For example,
passwords, email accounts, and groups are all determined within the original domain. See Settings for
.instructions on synchronizing changes from an active directory to NAS OS
:The administrator of the NAS OS device can adjust the following settings for imported users
Access rights to shares on the NAS OS device
Delete an imported user from the NAS OS device
Set quotas for storage capacity on NAS OS volumes
Groups
.Administrators can use Groups to set access rights for many users at once rather than individually
Shares, Users, and Groups
Allotting storage and network permissions for multiple departments and users in a branch office or corporate
network can be complicated. It takes forethought and planning to configure which user is part of what group with
access to how many shares. For this reason, the settings Shares, Users, and Groups are closely related in NAS OS.
The cross-functionality between these three settings allows the administrator to add users to groups in the
Users or Groups settings as well as shares to users and groups in the Users and Groups settings. The wizard for
each setting prompts the administrator to choose shares, users, and groups. Additionally, users and groups can
.be added to a new share when following the Add share wizard
However, creating a new share, user, or group requires that the administrator use its respective setting. For
example, the administrator must choose the Shares setting to add a new share and the Users setting to add a
new user. Though each setting can be revised at any time, it is highly recommended that the administrator plan
ahead when first adding shares, users, and groups to NAS OS. With a map of users, groups, and shares, the
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.administrator can simplify access rights. See the example below
Sample setup: Shares, Users, and Groups
.An administrator has mapped permissions for 40 shares, 20 users, and 10 groups
To get started, the administrator adds the 20 shares using the Add share wizard on the Shares page. The
administrator ignores the prompts to add users and groups to each share since new users and groups have yet
.to be created
Next, the administrator adds the 20 users using the Add user wizard on the Users page. The administrator
.ignores the prompts to add users to shares and groups since new groups have yet to be created
Finally, the administrator adds the 10 groups using the Add group wizard on the Groups page. In this step, the
:administrator will assign
Each user to a specific group
Share permissions for each group
The Groups setting is the last step since it can cover more users at one time rather than assigning share
.permissions for each new user
The generic sample setup may not apply to all environments. However, NAS OS gives the administrator free
.reign to configure permissions on the Shares, Users, and Groups pages
Existing groups
.Group data is organized in a table
.A blue icon on the far left indicates that the group has been created in NAS OS
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.A blue icon on the far left indicates that the group has been created in NAS OS
.A grey icon on the far left indicates that the group has been imported from a domain
Choose the text in the Name column to change the group name. The name of a group from a domain cannot
.be changed in NAS OS
. ( Choose the empty space or text in the Description column to add or revise details for the group (optional
The number in the Shares column (folder icon) shows how many shares the group has access to. Choose the
.number to view the shares
The number in the Users column (user icon) shows how many users belong to the group. Choose the number
.to view the users
To review settings for the group, pass the cursor to the right of the group's row to make the Edit pull-down
.menu visible
Add a group
.NAS OS provides two default groups, Administrators and Users
.All Administrators are automatically added to the Administrators group
.All users are automatically added to the Users group
.Default groups: The default shares Administrators and User cannot be deleted

To create a new group, choose Add group and follow the wizard to completion. Consider the following when
:creating a user
The Add group wizard features the following steps: name the group, set share permissions, set user membership
.to the group, set app permissions and Summary
Name the group: A group name can have from 1 to 20 characters using letters, numbers, hyphens, and
.underscores. Do not begin or end with a hyphen or an underscore
Set share permissions: The administrator can skip this step if access will be assigned in the Shares or Users
.settings. To skip the step, choose Next
Set share permissions: To give the group access to a share, drag the share to the Read access column or the
Read+write access column. To give access to multiple shares, make all your selections before dragging them
.to the one of the columns
Set share permissions: If a share is mistakenly dragged to the Read access column or Read+write access column,
you can drag it back to the No access column. The administrator can skip this step if membership will be
.assigned in the Users settings. To skip the step, choose Next
Set user membership to the group: To add a user to the group, drag the user’s name from the No access column
to the Access column. To add multiple users to the groups, make all your selections before dragging them to
.the Access column
.Set app permissions: Drag the apps that the group can access
Revise group settings
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To revise a group’s settings, pass the cursor to the far right of its row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible.
:Options on the Edit pull-down menu include
Users
Shares
Delete
Users/Shares: change user membership to the group and access
rights to shares
From the Edit pull-down menu, choose Users or Shares. The pop-up window includes two tabs for Shares and
.Users
Edit user membership to the group
.Select the Users tab .1
.The column No access lists the users that are not members of the group .2
.Add a user to groups: Select the users in the No access column and drag them to the Access column
.Remove a user from the group: Select users in the Access column and drag them to the No Access column
.Choose Close to confirm the changes .3
Edit access rights to shares
.Select the Shares tab .1
.The column No access lists the shares that the group cannot open .2
Add access to shares: Select the applicable shares in the No access column and drag them to the Read
.access column or the Read+write access column
Remove access to shares: Select the applicable shares in the Read access column or the Read+write
.access column and drag them to the No access column
.Choose Close to confirm the changes .3
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Delete a user
Seagate NAS OS 4
Delete a user
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the user's row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Delete .2
.Confirm in the dialogue window .3
Importing groups from an active directory
If you have successfully connected to an active directory domain, you will see a button on the Groups page
labeled Import from domain. (Go to Settings for instructions on how to join your NAS OS device to an active
( . directory
:To add users from the active directory
.Choose Import from domain .1
.At the prompt, type a few characters in the text field to find the users you want to import .2
.Hold down the control key (Windows users) or command key (Mac users) to select multiple users .3
.Choose Import .4
The imported users will appear in the table. You can identify users imported from the domain by their grey .5
.icons
Managing groups imported from an active directory
The administrator of the original domain manages groups imported from an active directory. For example,
passwords, email accounts, and users are all determined within the original domain. See Settings for
.instructions on synchronizing changes from an active directory to NAS OS
:The administrator of the NAS OS device can adjust the following settings for imported users
.Access rights to shares on the NAS OS device
.Delete an imported group from the NAS OS device
Settings
.Configure your NAS’s basic settings on the Settings page
General
Device name: The device name identifies the Seagate NAS OS device on your network. You can change it
from the default by passing the cursor to the right of the name. Choose the pencil icon when it appears and
.enter a new name
The device name is limited to 15 characters and is case-sensitive. Use alphanumeric characters without
.spaces or hyphens. Do not begin or end the name with a hyphen
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If a NAS OS device is connected to the network with a name that already exists, an alternate name is
automatically created to avoid conflicts. For example, a second Seagate 8-bay Rackmount NAS on your
.network will automatically be called Seagate-R8-1 if Seagate-R8 is present
.Language: Pass the cursor to the right and choose the pencil icon to change the NAS OS language
.Temperature unit: To change the unit, pass the cursor to the right and choose the pencil icon
Time
.You can set the time manually or, synchronize with a local or network time server
Synchronization: Use the slider to turn time synchronization on or off. It also enables a pop-up window to
.choose a time server or enter your own
On: If synchronization is on or off and you want to change the time server, click on the slider. The
Synchronization pop-up window includes a pull-down menu in Registered and a field for Custom. Use the
Registered pull-down menu to select a popular time server. For a local time server or a network time
server that is not on the Registered pull-down menu, enter the URL in the Custom field. Choose Save to
.update the time server
.Off: Click on the slider and choose Cancel in the Synchronization pop-up window
Date/Time: The date and time are set automatically if you assign a time server in synchronization. If a time
server is not selected, you can change the date and time by passing the cursor to the right and choosing the
.pencil icon
Zone: Pass the cursor to the right and select the pencil icon. You can choose your time zone from the drop.down window
Workgroup/Domain
:Your NAS can join a Windows Workgroup or a Windows Active Directory
Workgroup: Select the radio button for Workgroup and choose the pencil icon to type its name (use from 1
. ( to 15 alphanumeric characters
Domain: Select the radio button for Domain to join a Windows Active Directory on your network (see the
next paragraph for instructions on entering your Active Directory credentials). Joining an Active Directory
.allows the administrator to import existing users and groups, foregoing the need to re-enter credentials
Active Domain Troubleshooting: The information below provides general information on joining
.and leaving a domain. For additional information, see Getting Help

Connect to an Active Directory
.Select the Domain radio button .1
At the prompt, fill in the Fully-qualified domain name, Administrator login, and Administrator password. For .2
more complex network configurations, choose the Advanced Criteria arrow and fill in the Server name and
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.Server IP fields
.Once connected, you can import users and groups from the domain. See Users and Groups for details .3
Synchronize Users/Groups
Except for access rights to shares on the NAS OS device, the domain’s administrator manages all users and
groups imported from the domain. If a user's/group's account has been changed by the domain administrator
within the Windows Active Directory server (e.g. password revision, deleted from the domain, etc.), you can
update the account in NAS OS by choosing the button Synchronize imported users/groups. The button only
.appears once you have joined a domain
Leave the domain
:To remove the NAS's connection to a domain
.Choose the Leave button .1
.Authenticate by entering the domain administrator's username and password .2
Users and groups that were imported may still be listed on the Users and Groups pages. To remove all .3
imported users and groups from the NAS, choose the button Remove the imported users/groups (this
. ( button replaces Synchronize imported users/groups once you leave a domain
NAS OS
This section of the Settings page provides basic hardware and software information. NAS OS automatically
checks for updates to the software. You can change the frequency by passing the cursor to the right and
.choosing the pencil icon. To manually check for an update to NAS OS, choose Check now
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Services
The Services page provides a list of file protocols and application services available to the NAS OS device.
Based upon the needs of computers on the network, the administrator can choose to maintain certain services
.while leaving others turned off
:Examples
The administrator may wish to turn AFP (Apple Filing Protocol) off if there are no Apple computers on the
.network
The administrator can enable the FTP service in order to provide access to the NAS via a third-party FTP
.application. See FTP for details
Status colors
.The Status column provides details on the state of the service
State
Color
Started
Green
Stopped
White
Ready for use
Orange
Service options: start/stop, share access, advanced
parameters
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Options for a service are available in the Edit pull-down menu. Service options can include: Start/Stop, Share
access, and Advanced parameters. Some services have options specific to its features. For example, the iTunes
.and UPnP services include Re-Index to take inventory of media files
.To enable the Edit pull-down menu, pass the cursor to the far right of a service
Start/Stop a service
.Pass the cursor to the far right of its row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Start or Stop .2
Share access: services for a speci c share
A service is available to all shares when Start is selected and not available when Stop is selected. However, an
.administrator may want to enable a service for certain shares but turn it off for others
Example 1: The administrator creates a share called Time Machine to use as the backup destination for a Mac on
the network. Since the Mac runs Time Machine® for its backups, the share must use the Apple File Protocol
(AFP) and Time Machine services. Both services can be enabled on the Services page. However, all other
computers on the network are PCs. Therefore, the administrator disables AFP and Time Machine on all other
.shares
Example 2: A doctor’s office wants to use a share called Entertainment to store media files. A player in the
waiting room that is UPnP/DLNA compatible will access the media files. All other shares store patient
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information and office files. The administrator knows that enabling UPnP/DLNA on all shares can tax the
processor and slow down Re-Indexing the media. Therefore, the administrator disables UPnP/DLNA on all
.shares except Entertainment
The administrator can enable or disable services on specific shares on the Services page or the Shares page.
. For details on managing services on the Shares page, see Shares
:Follow the directions below to enable/disable an active service on specific shares
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the share’s row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Share access .2
:Select an option below .3
.Enabled on all shares: Click on the radio button next to Enabled on shares by default and choose Save
Enabled on specific shares: Click on the radio button next to Specific shares. In the window, click on the
check boxes next to the shares that will use the service. Choose Save once you have selected the
.shares
Services summary
.Review the types of services below
File services
SMB: SMB (server message block) is enabled by default since it is native to Windows and supported on Mac
.OS
NRB: Deleting data on a share permanently removes all associated files. By enabling the NRB (network
recycle bin) service, deleted files will be moved to the share’s recycle bin. This can be very helpful if a user
accidentally removes data that a co-worker is using on a project. The data is easily recovered from the
recycle bin rather than desperately searching through the last NAS backup. NRB is only compatible with
.shares that use SMB and it appears as a folder on the share
AFP: AFP can be started manually for computers running Mac OS. AFP must be started if the Time Machine
.service will be enabled
.NFS: See NFS
.FTP/SFTP: See FTP
WebDAV: WebDAV (Web-based distributed authoring and versioning) is a standard format for
collaborative workflows and data sharing. You can give local and remote servers access to shares by
.enabling the WebDAV service on your NAS OS device
Application services
Seagate Access: See Remote Access
Time Machine: See Backup: Seagate NAS and PC/Mac
UPnP/DLNA: See Media Server
iTunes: See Media Server
.Network Backup: See Backup Manager. Note: Activating Network Backup server will disable SFTP
Download machine: See Download Manager
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SSH Access
Administrators with advanced networking skills can log in to NAS OS using secure shell (SSH), an encrypted
protocol used for communication between devices. Using a command-line interface, the administrator can
automate data management and backups as well as review the NAS’s settings. The administrator also has the
.right to access data stored on the NAS via SSH
Printer server
Printer server is enabled by default. An orange light means that NAS OS does not detect a printer connected to
one of the NAS’s USB ports. The light will turn green once a compatible printer is found. Follow the directions
:below to share a printer on the network via the NAS OS device
.Connect your printer to a USB port on your NAS .1
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the printer row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible and choose Start .2
.Check the status of the Printer server .3
Computers on your network may require specific drivers to use the printer. See your printer’s user manual for
.details
Important info: For multi-function printers, only the print feature is supported. If your printer has a
scan feature, it will not work when connected to the NAS. In addition, only PostScript printers are
supported. If your printer does not appear in the printer service, it is likely that it does not support
PostScript printing. This is frequently the case with multi-function and photo printers. Seagate
.cannot guarantee that your printer supports the proper protocols to make it a networked printer

Network
.The Network page features four tabs to manage the NAS’s network settings
.Connections: Review or change settings for the LAN ports; link aggregation; and IPv4 or IPv6 addresses
.Proxy: Assign a proxy server for Internet access
Remote access: Configure remote access using Seagate MyNAS or DynDNS. Details on Seagate’s remote
.access solutions are available at Remote access
.Port forwarding: Review and adjust the router’s port numbers for select services
Connections tab
IPv6 mode
.You can turn on IPv6 addressing by clicking on the IPv6 mode slider
Connections table
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The Connections table lists the general network settings for the LAN ports. The number of LAN ports depends
.upon your NAS model
.Star icon: The star appears on the primary LAN. See the note below regarding the primary LAN
Name: The default names for the LAN ports are LAN 1, LAN 2, etc. Click on the name to enter a new name
.for the LAN port
.Type: The type of cable attached to the LAN port
IP address: This column shows the NAS’s IPv4 addresses. If your network is DHCP-enabled for IPv4, the
.LAN ports are automatically assigned IPv4 addresses
IPv6 address: This column shows the NAS’s IPv6 addresses. If IPv6 is turned on and your network is DHCP.enabled, the LAN ports are automatically assigned IPv6 addresses
Status: A green circle means that the LAN port is connected to an active network. A white circle shows
.there is no connection to a network
.Speed: The speed of the network
Icons representing the LAN ports sit below the Connections table. An icon will become highlighted when the
:cursor is passed over the port’s row. The icons also indicate the following
.Connected Ethernet end: The port is connected to a network
.Disconnected Ethernet end: The port is not connected to a network
LAN Edit menu
To review or modify settings for a LAN port, pass the cursor to the far right of its row to make the Edit pull-down
menu visible. Available settings in the pull-down menu differ based upon the NAS’s LAN connections.
Specifically, Define as primary will only appear if the NAS has more than one LAN connection
LAN Edit menu: Edit
.Choose Edit to review and update important settings on the LAN port
.Name: Type a new name in the LAN port's Name field
IPv4 tab: The default IP configuration setting for the LAN port is Automatic (DHCP). To use a static IP, click on
the pull-down menu and choose Manual. For the static IP address to take effect, all fields (including Default
gateway and DNS server) must be completed before choosing Save. Check the box next to Default gateway
.to enter or revise the gateway address. The LAN port will revert to automatic if a field is left blank
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IPv6 tab: This tab is available when the IPv6 slider is turned on. The default IP configuration setting for the
LAN port is Automatic (DHCP). To change the LAN port’s address, click on the pull-down menu and choose
Manual. For the new address to take effect, complete the Global IPv6 address and IPv6 default gateway
.fields before choosing Save
Advanced tab: Click on the pull-down menu to adjust the frame size for your NAS. Note: Changing the size of
the frames can affect the NAS’s performance. It is highly recommended that administrators confirm that
the router and other network devices support jumbo frames before choosing a higher frame size on the
.NAS
Important info on static IP addresses: Changes to the IP address must be consistent with the values
of the router and network. You can lose contact with your NAS by typing addresses that are not
.available on your network

LAN Edit menu: De ne as primary
:A star next to the LAN’s name marks it as the primary Ethernet port. The primary Ethernet port
.Carries the data when the NAS is configured for fault tolerance
.Acts as the gateway to the Internet when the NAS is bridged across two separate networks
.You can reassign the role of primary port
Pass the cursor to the far right of the secondary LAN port (no star) to make the Edit pull-down menu .1
.visible
.Choose Define as primary .2
.The star icon will move to the port to reflect the change .3
The primary LAN and Seagate Network Assistant: If you experience problems with Seagate
.Network Assistant, confirm that LAN 1 is connected to the network and that it is the primary LAN

LAN Edit menu: Disable/Enable
.Turn the LAN port off/on
Port aggregation and linking LAN ports
Seagate NAS OS supports port aggregation for NAS devices equipped with two or more LAN ports. Review the
.instructions below to learn how to configure your NAS for port aggregation
Important info on connecting multiple LAN ports: When connecting both LAN ports to one or more
routers, make certain to configure your NAS OS device for multiple networks, load balancing, or
fault tolerance. Leaving all ports active without creating a bridge or bond can create problems with
.the NAS OS device’s network identification, potentially losing its IP address
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Port aggregation: Bridge the data on your NAS OS device between
two networks
Two separate networks can share the NAS. Connect LAN 1 to the router on the first network and LAN 2 to the
.router on the second network
Both LANs should have green circles in the Status column. If one of the LAN ports is not active, try to enable it in
.the Edit menu
With a bridged connection, each LAN port should have its own unique IP address to reflect separate networks.
You can confirm the bridge by checking the subnets of the IP addresses. The subnet is the third segment of
.numbers in an IP address. For example, the subnet of the address 192.168.3.20 is 3
Port aggregation: Enhance your NAS’s performance with load
balance
Configure both Ethernet ports to act together for speeds up to 1.5 times faster than a single LAN connection.
.You also get added security should one of the Ethernet cables or ports fail
.Before following the directions below, make certain that your switch or router supports link aggregation
.Connect LAN 1 and LAN 2 to the same switch or router .1
:If one LAN is listed as inactive .2
.Confirm that it is securely connected to the device and to your router
Pass the cursor to the far right of the LAN port to make the Edit pull-down menu visible. If the option is
.available, choose Enable
.With both LANs enabled, choose Link .3
.Select Load balancing and choose Next .4
.Check the boxes next to each LAN port and choose Next .5
You can give a unique name to the load balance bond in the Name field. This type of Ethernet bonding will .6
create a unified IP address (DHCP or static). To use a static address, choose Manual in the IPv4 or IPv6
pull-down menus and complete all the fields. The manual IP address must be consistent with the values of
.your network
.Choose Finish .7
The two LAN ports are listed as one on the Connections tab. Note that the number in the Speed column has
.also changed
:Break the load balance bond
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the LAN’s row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Remove link and Continue at the prompt .2
Removing the link can disable the secondary LAN interface. Pass the cursor to the far right of the disabled .3
.LAN port to make the Edit pull-down menu visible and choose Enable
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Port aggregation: Failover protection using fault tolerance
Configure fault tolerance to keep your NAS connected to the network even if one Ethernet port or cable fails.
Before following the directions below, make certain that your network switch or router supports link
.aggregation
.Connect LAN 1 and LAN 2 to the same switch or router .1
:If one LAN is listed as inactive .2
.Confirm that it is securely connected to the device and to your router
Pass the cursor to the far right of the LAN port to make the Edit pull-down menu visible. If the option is
.available, choose Enable
.With both LANs enabled, choose Link .3
.Select Fault tolerance and choose Next .4
.Check the boxes next to each LAN port and choose Next .5
Fault tolerance automatically switches to the secondary LAN if it cannot detect the primary LAN. In this .6
step, click on the pull-down menu and choose the type of fault detection for the bond: Physical (e.g. a bad
Ethernet cable or Ethernet port) or Logical (e.g. contact with another IP address). For logical fault tolerance,
enter the IP address that the NAS OS device will ping to confirm the stability of the primary LAN, as well as
the frequency of the ping. The IP address should target a separate server, a computer on the network, or
.another device that can manage the task
.Choose Next .7
You can give a unique name to the fault tolerance bond in the Name field. This type of Ethernet bonding will .8
create a unified IP address (DHCP or static). To use a static address, choose Manual in the IPv4 or IPv6
pull-down menus and complete all the fields. The IP address must be consistent with the values of your
.network
.Choose Finish .9
.The two LAN ports are listed as one on the Connections tab
:Break the fault tolerance bond
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the LAN’s row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .1
.Choose Remove link and Continue at the prompt .2
Removing the link can disable the secondary LAN interface. Pass the cursor to the far right of the disabled .3
.LAN port to make the Edit pull-down menu visible and choose Enable
Port aggregation: LAN failover for load balancing versus fault
tolerance
Both bonding and fault tolerance can save you from losing productivity should a single LAN fail (e.g. NAS port,
router port, or cable). In the event of LAN failure in a load balance bond, it can take a few minutes for the NAS
to switch to single LAN mode. Fault tolerance will make the switch instantly, allowing for uninterrupted
.communication with the NAS
Proxy tab
A proxy server is used to connect network devices to the Internet. If necessary, your NAS can be configured to
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.use a proxy server
.Click on the Internet access pull-down menu and choose Proxy server .1
.Complete the fields for the proxy server's IP address, port, and optional authentication information .2
.Choose Apply .3
Remote access tab
.See Remote Access
Port forwarding tab
.Use this tab to manage the port forwarding rules for your NAS
Port numbers on the NAS and the network router are used to direct traffic for diverse features such as
Internet access, file services (e.g. SMB, AFP, NFS), and application services (e.g. remote access, Download
Manager, etc.). Automatic port forwarding is turned on by default and the port numbers are the same for both
.the NAS port and Router port columns
In most instances, automatic port forwarding should help you access services on the NAS. However,
enterprise-level network security or port availability on a router can prevent access to ports. Therefore, it may
be necessary to change the router port numbers manually for one or more services. Before adjusting numbers
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in the port forwarding table, confirm that the ports are available on your router. For example, if you intend to
change download machine to router port number 8800, you must make certain that port 8800 is available on
your router and assigned to your NAS. Additionally, your router must be compatible with UPnP-IGD/NAT-PMP
.protocols. See your router's user manual for details
.To change the router port for a service on the NAS, choose its value in the Router port column
To disable port forwarding for a service, pass the cursor to the far right of its column to make the Edit pull-down
.menu visible and choose Disable
Power
:Use the Power page to review and change settings for
NAS power management
UPS management
NAS power management
:The NAS OS Power page provides two levels of energy economy
Power conservation
Power saving mode
Power conservation
During periods of inactivity, NAS OS spins down the hard drives. In addition to conserving energy, spinning
.down the hard drives when they are not in use can help to extend their life spans
The default period of inactivity before spinning down the hard drives is 20 minutes. To revise this time, click on
.the pull-down menu for Turn off the hard drives
Power saving mode
Many work environments may not require the NAS to be active all hours of the day or even the entire week.
The administrator can take advantage of anticipated down time by scheduling the NAS to power off and power
.on as needed
While in power saving mode, the NAS suspends all activity, including spinning down the hard drives and turning
off its fans and LEDs. All processes enabled in NAS OS, including downloads and backups, will be terminated.
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Since the shares are not accessible and the device cannot be managed via NAS OS, power saving mode should
.be used when no one is accessing the NAS's data
Example 1: The six employees of a small printing company arrive at the office no earlier than 6:00 AM and all
activity stops after 10:00 PM. To save power and extend the life of the NAS’s hardware, the administrator
.schedules the NAS to power on at 5:00 AM and power off at 11:00 PM
Example 2: The 50 employees at a branch office require 24-hour access to the NAS Monday through Friday.
However, the branch office manager prefers that employees do not work during the weekend. Therefore, the
.administrator decides to schedule the NAS to power on Monday at 6:00 AM and power off Friday at 11:00 PM
Schedule power saving mode
.Click the slider for Power saving mode to enable the schedule
Set the time of day that the NAS will wake from power saving mode. Click on the day of the week in the
.Power on column
.In the pop-up window, choose the radio button next to Scheduled and set the time
.Choose Save
Set the time of day that the NAS will enter power saving mode. Click on the day of the week in the Power off
.column
.In the pop-up window, choose the radio button next to Scheduled and set the time
.Choose Save
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
Wake the NAS from power saving mode
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Wake the NAS from power saving mode
To wake the NAS from power saving mode, apply a short press to the power button. You can also use the Wake
. ( (on LAN function in Seagate Network Assistant (see Wake on LAN (WOL
UPS management
:NAS OS supports three types of UPS (uninterruptible power source) management
Single NAS device: Direct connection to a UPS
Multiple NAS devices A: One NAS OS device takes the role of Network UPS server
Multiple NAS devices B: The UPS connects directly to the router and acts as the Network UPS server
Important info: Seagate cannot guarantee that all UPS devices are compatible with NAS OS UPS
.management

Important info: Make certain to review the UPS’s documentation before connecting it to your NAS
.devices

Single NAS: Direct connection
.Follow the directions below when connecting a single NAS OS device to a UPS
.Confirm that no one is accessing the NAS OS device and power it off .1
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Connect the NAS to a supported UPS via power and USB cables. The USB cable is required for the UPS .2
.management information
. Power on the NAS and go to the Power page. The UPS should appear in the UPS management section .3
Battery threshold level refers to the percentage of power available to the UPS’s battery. In the event that a
working environment loses power, the NAS automatically powers off when the UPS reaches the threshold level.
Without the UPS’s threshold level, power is suddenly cut off to the NAS, potentially causing the loss and
.corruption of data
.The administrator can adjust the threshold by clicking on the pencil icon
Multiple NAS devices A: A NAS OS device is the network UPS
server
The instructions below suggest adding all NAS OS devices to the UPS at once. However, you can connect each
.NAS OS device as required by your working environment
Confirm that no one is accessing the first NAS OS device and power it off. This NAS will become Network .1
.UPS server
Connect the first NAS to a supported UPS via power and USB cables. The USB cable is required for the UPS .2
.management information
.Power on the first NAS and go to the Power page. The UPS should appear in the UPS management section .3
.Check the box next to Network UPS server .4
.Confirm that no one is accessing the other NAS OS devices on the same network and power them off .5
.Connect the other NAS devices to the UPS via power cables only and power them on .6
.For each NAS OS device, go to the Power page and choose Add a network UPS server .7
.In the pull-down menu for Network UPS type, select Seagate NAS UPS server .8
.Select the first NAS and choose Save .9
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Battery threshold level refers to the percentage of power available to the UPS’s battery. In the event that a
working environment loses power, the NAS devices automatically power off when the UPS reaches the
threshold level. Without the UPS’s threshold level, power is suddenly cut off to the NAS devices, potentially
.causing the loss and corruption of data
The administrator can adjust the threshold on the first NAS by clicking on the pencil icon. Unlike the first NAS,
.the other NAS devices cannot adjust the battery threshold level
Remove the network UPS server
.Choose Remove the network server to disconnect a NAS from the network UPS server
Multiple NAS devices B: The UPS is the network UPS server
The following configuration requires a UPS with an Ethernet port to connect to the same router as the NAS OS
devices. Additionally, the UPS must support SNMP to communicate with the NAS OS devices on the network.
.Refer to your UPS’s documentation for further details
The instructions below suggest adding all NAS OS devices at once. However, you can connect each NAS OS
.device as required by your working environment
Connect the UPS to a power source and the network router according to the instructions provided in the .1
.UPS’s documentation
.Confirm that no one is accessing the NAS OS devices and power them off .2
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.Connect the NAS OS devices to the UPS via power cables only and power them on
.For each NAS OS device, go to the Power page and choose Add a network UPS server
.In the pull-down menu for Network UPS type, select SNMP UPS
Enter the UPS’s IP address and, if applicable, SNMP community. Refer to the UPS’s administration tool for
.its IP address
.Choose Save
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
NAS OS cannot adjust the battery threshold level when connecting to a UPS server via the network. Check the
.documentation for your UPS to learn more on how to manage the device
Remove the network UPS server
.Choose Remove the network server to disconnect a NAS from the network UPS server
Security
Use the Security tab to prevent potential attackers from reaching your NAS OS device. You can also control
.access to your NAS OS device using Ban and White lists
Auto Block
Enable auto block to block IP addresses that have made numerous failed attempts to log into the device and
automatically add them to the Ban list. IP addresses on the ban list are prevented from accessing your NAS OS
.device
:Click the switch to enable auto block. See below for the default settings for auto block
Maximum failed logins: 3
Failed logins within (minutes): 2
Block for (minutes): 2
.The settings can be changed when auto block is enabled
To prevent users from losing access due to failed logins, add their IP addresses to the Whitelist. Click Whitelist
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.and then enter the IP addresses
Auto block is optimized for FTP and SSH protocols. You can manage the ban list by clicking Ban list and manually
.entering or removing IP addresses
Certi cate
An SSL Certificate is a data file with an encrypted key targeted for use by your company or organization. While
your NAS OS device’s default certificate offers high security, you can create a unique certificate for use with
.your NAS OS device. Costs for SSL Certificates vary by third-party provider
Custom SSL Certificates can be uploaded to your NAS OS device to replace the default certificate. To take
advantage of the security provided by an SSL Certificate, make certain to choose Switch to HTTPS at the NAS
.OS login page
DDOS
Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) is a type of attack in which multiple devices target a single device. The
multiple devices can attack from local and wide area networks or via the Internet and are often infected with a
Trojan. The end result is a denial of service for the target device. You can improve your NAS OS device’s
.chances of avoiding such an attack by clicking the switch to enable DDoS protection
Services on LAN Ports
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.Enable or disable select services on one or both of your NAS OS device’s LAN ports
Monitoring
.Monitoring provides a summary of the NAS OS device's hardware and the health of its components
System tab
System details will vary based upon your NAS OS device. For example, an enclosure with a single Ethernet port
.can only list one LAN. Also, NAS OS devices with audible alarms include the option to turn the sound on or off
When reviewing the System tab, place your cursor over the charts and graphics on the page for additional
readings. Moving the cursor over the graphic for the fan shows its current revolutions per minute (RPM).
.Additional readings are available with RAM, CPU, and Network
Upper pane: General health, temperature, and fans
A green check mark on the upper left indicates that your hardware is operational and there are no
problems. A red "X" alerts you to potential problems with the hardware. It is accompanied by an error
.message, such as the device has reached a critical temperature
The running time below the check mark indicates consecutive hours and minutes of operation. The clock will
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restart each time the device is powered on, restarted, or wakes up from power saving or deep sleep
.modes
The temperatures of the device's CPU and casing are located on the upper right
(Upper middle pane: Casing (select NAS OS devices only
Click on the ID light slider to make the identification LED blink. This is helpful when locating a rackmount NAS
.on a rack with many devices
.Click on the Sound slider to enable or disable the audible alert
Casing: A green circle means that the enclosure’s top cover is closed. Check the cover if the circle is not
.green
Power: A green circle indicates that the power supplies are working as expected. Check the power supplies if
.the circle is not green
Middle pane: Resources
The Resources pane shows dynamic graphics of the demands placed upon the CPU and RAM. To the right, a
real-time graph offers constant updates on the NAS’s network transfer rates. For an expanded look at CPU,
.RAM, and network performance, click Details in the Resources pane
A green circle next to the LAN means that it is connected to the network. A white circle means that the LAN
.is not connected to the network
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Lower pane: Process
The Process pane lists the five processes that are placing the highest demands upon the CPU. Click on
.Details in the Process pane to see the full list of processes
Temperature and fan warnings
Temperature error: Check the placement of your NAS to make certain that it is not receiving an abnormal
amount of heat from external sources (e.g. sun from a window, heating duct, exhaust from other
.electronics, etc.). If the problem persists, see Getting Help for links to contact customer support
.Fan error: Check the fan performance line graph to determine if the fans are running too high or not at all
.Drive error: Select the Drive tab to review the status for the NAS's hard drives
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Drive tab
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Review basic information for each hard drive in the enclosure, including the model number, capacity,
temperature, and SMART status. SMART stands for Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology. SMART
status should be used for informational purposes only, specifically when diagnosing hard drives. It lets you know
if the hard drive is reporting or experiencing errors. If a hard drive has an error, run a SMART test by selecting
.the Autotest button
:Additional notes on the Drive tab
.Acceptable Temperature values may differ based upon the make and model of the hard drive
.The dynamic photo of your NAS will highlight the hard drive selected in the hard drive table
.Choose SMART status to review the full SMART report on the selected hard drive
Noti cations
Use the Notifications page to manage how the administrator receives updates on the health of the NAS OS
:device. The page has two tabs
Notifications: NAS OS alerts and activity
SNMP: Monitoring and managing the NAS using the Simple Network Management Protocol
Noti cations tab
Email noti cations
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NAS OS can send important activity updates to the administrator via email. See the table below for events that
.trigger email notifications
Email notification triggers
Recipient
Description
Event
identifier
Administrator
The total available capacity is less than 10%
Capacity
Administrator
The user has reached 90% of his storage quota
Quota
Administrator
A download job has completed or a download job
error has occurred
Download
Administrator
A backup job has failed
Backup
Administrator
The fan has stopped
Fan
Administrator
The product has remained at maximum
temperature for at least one minute
Temperature
Administrator or user, depending on
who made the request
A user has recovered his/her password
Password
recovery
Turn Email notifications on or off by clicking on its slider. The default server for email notifications is Seagate, a
.secure email system
Administrators have the option to use an alternative email server. Pass the cursor over Seagate and click on the
:pencil icon. Choose Custom in the pull-down menu and complete the fields in the pop-up window
Enter the SMTP address for your email server. You can use an in-house SMTP server or third-party
.providers such as Gmail, Outlook, and Yahoo
.You have the option to enable SSL by checking its box
If your email server requires verification, check the box next to SMTP authentication to enter the
.username and password
.Test the connection by checking the box next to Send a verification email
Recent activity
Review the events for the NAS OS device. To parse the events list into categories and sub-categories, choose
.Filter
The events list is important when troubleshooting the NAS OS device with Seagate technical support. A full log
.of events is available for download by choosing Download System Log
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.To purge all events from the log list, choose Clear logs
SNMP tab
Administrators with advanced networks that include SNMP can add the NAS OS device as an agent. NAS OS
.supports SNMP versions v1/v2 and, for enhanced security, v3
Turn on the SNMP agent by clicking on its slider. To make changes to the SNMP configuration, pass the cursor
.over a setting and click on it
Storage
The information below identifies and explains the functions on the Storage page. For directions on how to
.configure RAID for your NAS OS device, go to RAID
NAS OS volume and RAID management
NAS OS supports multiple volumes, each with its own level of RAID. The maximum number of supported
volumes depends upon the amount of disks in the NAS's enclosure. For example, a NAS OS device with eight
.hard drives can have up to eight volumes
Enhanced data protection: NAS OS SimplyRAID
No matter the capacity of your hard drives, NAS OS SimplyRAID will prepare the storage for immediate use as
:well as future expansion. SimplyRAID allows you to
Install disks of varying capacities
Replace smaller capacity hard drives with larger capacity hard drives
Upgrade storage capacity without deleting or moving data
Protect data without compromising performance
When using hard drives of varying capacities, SimplyRAID will attempt to optimize available storage for your
.data
Standard disk con guration: Manual RAID
While the benefits of SimplyRAID are highly recommended, the Storage page also gives you the option to
:manually configure your hard disks as
JBOD
(RAID 0 (minimum two hard drives
(RAID 1 (minimum two hard drives for data protection
(RAID 1+Spare (minimum three hard drives
(RAID 5 (minimum three hard drives
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(RAID 5+Spare (minimum four hard drives
(RAID 6 (minimum four hard drives
(RAID 6+Spare (minimum five hard drives
(RAID 10 (minimum four hard drives
(RAID 10+Spare (minimum five hard drives
Storage overview
:Choose Storage > Overview to
.Review the list of the NAS's volumes and their current state
.Configure new hard drives added to the NAS
Manage
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The Manage button is available when the enclosure has new or unused hard drives. Choose Manage on the
.Storage Overview page to create a new volume. For further information, see RAID
Internal and External volumes
Internal volumes are the volumes created from the disks inserted into the NAS’s enclosure. External volumes
.are storage devices connected to the USB or eSATA ports. Click on a volume to review and adjust its settings
Volume settings
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.Choose a volume’s name on the left to view the tools to manage it
Name
The default name for the first new volume is Volume 1. The number will rise incrementally when adding new
:volumes, Volume 2, Volume 3, etc. To change the name
.Pass the cursor over the name of the volume and choose the pencil icon .1
Type the new name in the pop-up window .2
.Choose Save .3
.Due to the high level of security, an encrypted volume retains its default name
Manage
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:Choose Manage on the volume page to
.Add hard drives to the volume
.Add a spare hard drive to the volume
.Repair the volume
.Expand the volume’s storage capacity
. ( Change the encryption settings (if applicable
.Upgrade the volume from single-disk security to double-disk security
. ( Format the volume (delete all data without deleting the volume
. ( Delete the volume (permanently remove the volume and all of its data
Capacity
:A quick reference of the volume's
.Total storage capacity
.Available storage capacity
An i tooltip appears in the capacity row following the creation of an iSCSI target. Pass the cursor over the tooltip
.to view the amount of storage assigned to the volume's iSCSI target
Status
:Status gives you immediate feedback on the health of the volume's RAID configuration
.OK. The RAID is operational and no problems have been detected
No data protection. Data is intact but one or more hard drives are missing or reporting errors. The amount
.of hard drives that can fail before this message appears is contingent upon the level of RAID
Protected if one disk fails. RAID configurations with double-disk security will see this message if a single
.hard drive is missing or reporting errors
.Broken. The RAID is broken resulting in a loss of data
.Synchronizing. The system is synchronizing data across all the hard drives in the volume
.The volume is available for use while the RAID is synchronizing but NAS performance may be affected
.RAID data protection will be available once synchronizing is complete
.Choose the tooltip next to Synchronizing for details on its progress
Mode
Mode lists the volume's RAID level. Pass the cursor over the tooltip for details on the RAID's level of data
.protection
Storage graph
.A multicolor circle shows how the RAID distributes the volume's storage
.Dark blue: Storage capacity for your data
Light blue: Protection in case one or two hard drives fail. The light blue indicator will vary in size depending
.upon single or double disk protection
Green: Disk capacity that spans beyond the level of RAID. This space is reserved for expansion should you
.add new or, larger capacity hard drives
:Factors that determine the storage capacities for data, protection, and expansion
.The amount of hard drives in the enclosure
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. ( The storage capacity of each hard drive (see note below on mixed capacities
RAID mode
Single-disk or double-disk security
:Examples
.RAID 0 with five hard drives. The only color is dark blue for data capacity since RAID 0 has no protection
SimplyRAID with two hard drives of equal capacity. Dark and light blue for data and protection,
.respectively
RAID 6 with five hard drives of mixed capacities. All colors are represented since the RAID 6 uses double.disk security and the hard drives are of mixed capacities
Volume list and dynamic photo
:Review the hard drives’ capacities and status. The dynamic photo of the NAS highlights
.The hard drives associated with the volume
.Hard drives available for a new or existing volume
.Empty slots available for expansion
.Failed or missing disks
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RAID
Refer to the table below for an overview of the RAID modes available to your NAS OS device. Note that the
levels of performance and protection will differ based upon the number of drives in the volume. The NAS OS
New network volume wizard includes a helpful tooltip with star ratings for performance and protection based
.upon the amount of disks in the volume
Minimum hard drives
RAID mode
(no data protection) or 2 (with data protection) 1
SimplyRAID
3
SimplyRAID dual
1
JBOD
2
RAID 0
(no data protection) or 2 (with data protection) 1
RAID 1
3
RAID 5
4
RAID 6
4
RAID 10
:The factory default RAID for a NAS OS device varies upon the amount of hard drives in the enclosure
.hard drives: SimplyRAID with single-disk protection will be configured during the NAS OS installation 0
hard drives: SimplyRAID with single-disk protection 2
hard drives: SimplyRAID with single-disk protection 4
hard drives: SimplyRAID dual with double-disk protection 8
.Single-disk protection: data is safe if one hard drive fails
.Double-disk protection: data is safe if two hard drives fail
Note on enclosures with one hard drive: You can create a SimplyRAID or a RAID 1 volume with a
single hard drive. However, there is NO DATA PROTECTION when the volume has only one hard
drive. Therefore, when new hard drives in the enclosure are available, it is highly recommended
that you expand the single-disk volume to protect your data (see Single-disk and unprotected
. ( volumes:expansion
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Important info on NAS backup: To further protect data against the loss of a hard drive or secondary
points of failure (e.g. hardware, network, etc.), it is recommended that all users back up data to a
.DAS or another NAS. See Backup Manager for details

Get help choosing your RAID
Tooltip: star ratings for RAID
Understanding NAS OS RAID is critical when deciding how best to apportion the hard drives in your NAS. To
help administrators configure RAID volumes, the NAS OS New network volume wizard provides a star rating
system with an intuitive storage capacity bar. The star ratings are available within the tooltip on the RAID
.selection step. Click on the i next to Select your choice to review the ratings
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Note: Step-by-step instructions on how to create a new volume are available in New network
.volume wizard

RAID comparisons
The level of RAID available to a volume is contingent upon the amount of hard drives in the enclosure. For
example, a volume with four hard drives supports all levels of RAID except for RAID 1, which is not compatible
with volumes greater than three hard drives. The New network volume wizard offers star ratings for each RAID
at the RAID selection step. Choose a RAID's radio button to review its strengths and weaknesses in the center
.of the window
Example 1: When making comparisons in a volume with four hard drives, RAID 0 is the best choice for storage
capacity. However, it has a major weakness: no data protection. Further, RAID 0 performance approximates
.that of RAID 5, which provides data protection if a hard drive fails
Example 2: Both RAID 6 and SimplyRAID Dual offer data protection even if two hard drives fail. However,
.SimplyRAID will optimize storage capacity far better than RAID 6 in mixed capacity configurations
RAID levels
NAS OS SimplyRAID
Most RAID modes use equal disk capacities among the pool of hard drives to protect data. Rather then lose
storage capacity overhead in mixed hard drive environments, SimplyRAID preserves the extra space for use
when new hard drives are added to the enclosure. This means that, unlike standard RAID models, you can
easily expand the array without losing data. For example, two 1TB hard drives will create a RAID 1 array
without any storage capacity overhead. However, one 1TB hard drive paired with one 2TB hard drive only
creates 1TB of protection since data cannot surpass the storage capacity of the smallest hard drive.
.SimplyRAID will calculate the overhead and prepare it for future expansion
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(JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks
Seagate NAS OS 4
(JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks
Hard drives in a JBOD configuration store data sequentially. For example, data is written to Disk 1 first. Once
:Disk 1 is full, data will be written to Disk 2, then Disk 3, etc. Two advantages to this level of RAID are
availability of the hard drives' total storage capacity 100%
Easy expansion
.JBOD’s weakness is that it has no data protection. Should a hard drive fail, all data on that hard drive will be lost
RAID 0
RAID 0 is the fastest RAID mode since it writes data across all of the volume's hard drives. Further, the
capacities of each hard drive are added together for optimal data storage. However, RAID 0 lacks a very
important feature: data protection. If one hard drive fails, all data becomes inaccessible. A recommended
option is SimplyRAID or RAID 5, which offer comparable performance and data protection in case a single hard
.drive fails
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Seagate NAS OS 4
RAID 1
RAID 1 provides enhanced data security since all data is written to each hard drive in the volume. If a single
hard drive fails, data remains available on the other hard drive in the volume. However, due to the time it
takes to write data multiple times, performance is reduced. Additionally, RAID 1 cuts storage capacity by 50%
.or more since each bit of data is stored on all disks in the volume
Note on RAID 1 hard drive requirements: A standard RAID 1 configuration includes two hard drives
of equal capacity. However, NAS OS allows you to create a RAID 1 volume with up to three hard
drives or, three hard drives plus a spare. It is also possible to create a RAID 1 volume using a single
hard drive. While a volume with one hard drive cannot provide data protection, it is ready for
expansion when new hard drives are available. Data protection would become available once a
.second hard drive is added to the RAID 1 volume

RAID 5
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RAID 5 writes data across all hard drives in the volume and a parity block for each data block. If one hard drive
fails, the data can be rebuilt onto a replacement hard drive. No data is lost if a single hard drive fails. However,
if a second hard drive fails before data can be rebuilt on the replacement hard drive, all data in the array is lost.
.A minimum of three hard drives is required to create a RAID 5 volume
RAID 5 offers performance that can approach RAID 0. The strong advantage that RAID 5 gives you is data
protection. Additionally, you still have approximately 75% of the storage capacity of a RAID 0 array (based
:upon total available hard drives and storage capacities). The equation for determining the storage is
. ( The size of the hard drive with the smallest capacity in the array)*(Total hard drives-1)
.Example 1: An array is assigned five 3TB hard drives for a total of 15TB. The equation is: 3TB * 4= 12TB
Example 2: An array is assigned three 2TB hard drives and one 3TB hard drive for a total of 9TB. The equation
.is: 2TB * 3= 6TB
RAID 6
RAID 6 writes data across all hard drives in the volume and two parity blocks for each data block. If one hard
drive fails, the data can be rebuilt onto a replacement hard drive. With two parity blocks per data block, RAID 6
.supports up to two hard drive failures with no data loss
RAID 6 synchronizing from a failed hard drive is slower than RAID 5 due to the use of double parity. However, it
is far less critical due to double-disk security. A minimum of four hard drives is required to create a RAID 6
.volume
.RAID 6 offers very good data protection with a slight loss in performance compared to RAID 5
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RAID 10
RAID 10 combines the protection of RAID 1 with the performance of RAID 0. Consider a volume with four hard
drives. RAID 10 creates two RAID 1 segments, and then combines them into a RAID 0 stripe. With eight hard
drives, the RAID 0 stripe will include four RAID 1 segments. Such configurations offer exceptional data
protection, allowing for two hard drives to fail across two RAID 1 segments. Additionally, RAID 10 writes data
at the file level and, due to the RAID 0 stripe, gives users higher performance when managing greater amounts
. ( of smaller files. This means a more generous input/output per second for data (IOPS
RAID 10 is a great choice for database managers that need to read and write many small files across the
volume. The impressive IOPS and data protection offered by RAID 10 gives database managers impressive
.reliability both in keeping files safe and rapid access
RAID 1+Spare(s), RAID 5+Spare(s), RAID 6+Spare, and RAID
10+Spare
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Maximum Spare Drives
RAID Mode
5
RAID 1
4
RAID 10
5
RAID 5
4
RAID 6
RAID 1: The same data is written across all hard drives in the volume, protecting data against the loss of one
.hard drive
RAID 10: Comprised of two or more RAID 1 segments, RAID 10 allows for single-disk failure in each
.segment
RAID 5 and RAID 6: Data is written in parity blocks on all hard drives in the volume. Files are protected
.against single- or double-disk failure, respectively
A RAID+Spare volume gives you a "hot-spare" that is ready to synchronize data immediately should a hard
drive fail. If a hard drive fails, the data starts to synchronize with the spare. The clear advantage for a RAID
.volume with a spare is that you do not have to wait for a replacement hard drive
.When the failed hard drive is replaced, the replacement hard drive becomes the new hot spare
To create a volume with a spare hard drive, you must choose Custom in the New network volume wizard.
Selecting Quick setup in the New network volume wizard will automatically configure a volume with SimplyRAID
and single disk protection. SimplyRAID optimizes disk space across all hard drives to maximize data storage.
Therefore, it does not include the option to add a spare drive. See New network volume wizard for instructions
.on creating volumes
Important info: For RAID+Spare volumes, data remains intact when a single disk fails and the spare
begins synchronizing automatically. If a second disk in the volume fails before synchronization is
.complete, all data in the volume will be lost. RAID 6 allows for two disks to fail

New network volume wizard
:Build one or more volumes using the New network volume wizard. You can select
Quick setup: Skip multiple configuration steps with NAS OS SimplyRAID, Seagate's smart RAID. SimplyRAID
will review the amount of hard drives in the volume and the total storage to optimize data capacity and
protect your data. To provide the most storage space for your data, Quick setup configures a SimplyRAID
volume with single-disk security. For additional protection, SimplyRAID is also available with double-disk
.security when selecting Custom
Custom: Configure a volume using NAS OS SimplyRAID or standard RAID models. Custom offers a wide
:range of RAID configurations
(SimplyRAID with single-disk protection (minimum of two hard drives for data protection
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SimplyRAID Dual with double-disk protection (minimum of three hard drives) JBOD
(RAID 0 (minimum of two hard drives
(RAID 1 (minimum of two hard drives for data protection
RAID 1+Spare (minimum of three hard drives). Additional steps required for the spare. RAID 5
(minimum of three hard drives)
RAID 5+Spare (minimum of four hard drives) Additional steps required for the spare. RAID
(minimum of four hard drives ) 6
RAID 6+Spare (minimum of five hard drives). Additional steps required for the spare. RAID
(minimum of four hard drives ) 10
.RAID 10+Spare (minimum of five hard drives). Additional steps required for the spare
SimplyRAID and spare disks: NAS OS optimizes storage capacity using all the hard drives in a SimplyRAID
.volume. Therefore, a spare hard drive is not supported with SimplyRAID
:Important note on SimplyRAID Dual
.You must use Custom to configure SimplyRAID Dual
The New network volume wizard does not offer a migration path from SimplyRAID to SimplyRAID
.Dual

Important info regarding NAS backup : As further protection against the loss of a hard drive or
secondary points of failure (e.g. hardware, network, etc.), it is recommended that all users back up
.data to a DAS or another NAS. See Backup Manager for details

Important info on creating a single-disk volume : Single-disk volumes can be created with expansion
in mind. For example, you can launch the New network volume wizard to create a single-disk volume
using SimplyRAID, JBOD, or RAID 1. Though the volume will not provide data protection in a singledisk configuration, it is prepared for expansion when you add one or more hard drives. If you intend
to expand the volume to four or more hard drives, consider using SimplyRAID since RAID 1 cannot
.reach beyond three hard drives

New network volume wizard steps
:Consider the following when creating a new volume
Volume names: The default names for newly created volumes are Volume 1, Volume 2, etc. For instructions
on how to change the name of the volume, see Storage. An encrypted volume retains the default name and
.it cannot be changed
:Planning for volume expansion
Apart from RAID 0 and RAID 10, RAID volumes can be expanded with new hard drives. However, it is
not possible to add new hard drives with inferior capacities. For example, a RAID 5 or SimplyRAID
.volume with three 2TB hard drives supports the addition of a fourth hard drive that is 2TB or higher
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Quick setup
.Go to Device Manager > Storage > Storage Overview .1
NAS OS detects new hard drives in the enclosure. Choose Manage to launch the New network volume .2
.wizard
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for the new volume. An .3
existing volume is using hard drives with grey checkboxes. Select the white checkbox under the hard drives
.you want to use for the new volume and choose Next
.Important : All data on the selected hard drives is deleted to create the RAID volume

Select Quick setup to create a SimplyRAID volume. With two or more hard drives, SimplyRAID creates a .4
.RAID volume using single security. If you choose Custom, refer to the instructions below
.Choose Next .5
Review the summary window then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the .6
.selected hard drives will be deleted to create the volume. Select Yes to build the SimplyRAID volume
You can start using the volume immediately. See Shares for instructions on how to create new shares on the
.volume to store and share data
Custom
Your options to select the level of RAID are predicated upon the number of hard drives in the array. For
example, a three-disk configuration allows you to select from SimplyRAID, JBOD, RAID 0, RAID 1, and RAID 5. A
.four-disk configuration offers SimplyRAID, JBOD, RAID 0, RAID 5, RAID 6, and RAID 10
Adding a spare
If you intend to create a volume with a spare hard drive, you must leave at least one hard drive free. For
example, a four-disk RAID 6+Spare would require that you create the RAID 6 volume with the first four hard
.drives before adding the fifth hard drive as the spare. See the next section for details on adding the spare
:Build a RAID volume
.Go to Device Manager > Storage > Storage Overview .1
NAS OS detects new hard drives in the enclosure. Choose Manage to launch the New network volume .2
.wizard
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for the new volume. An .3
existing volume is using hard drives with grey checkboxes. Select the white checkboxes under the hard
.drives you want to use for the new volume and choose Next
.Important info: All data on the selected hard drives is deleted to create the RAID volume

.Select Custom and choose Next .4
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The RAID selection window helps you choose the optimal configuration for your environment: Select a .5
.RAID mode's radio button to view an explanation of its strengths and weaknesses
Use the cursor to choose the i tooltip to see a graphic summary of the strengths and weaknesses of
.each RAID level
.Select your level of RAID and choose Next .6
Choose No encryption to move to the summary page or, Encrypt the volume. When choosing encryption, you .7
have two options to unlock the volume: password only or, a password plus a USB device. Enter the password
.and/or insert a USB device into one of the NAS's USB ports. Choose Next
.Important info: An encrypted volume can experience a reduction in performance

.Choose Next .8
Review the summary window then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the .9
.selected hard drives will be deleted to create the volume. Select Yes to build the volume
Custom+Spare
A spare drive can be added to RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, and RAID 10 volumes. Before adding a spare hard drive,
you must follow the instructions above (Custom) to create the RAID volume. When creating the volume, leave
a minimum of one hard drive free for the spare. For example, a four-disk RAID 6+spare would require that you
create the RAID 6 volume with the first four hard drives. Once the RAID has been synchronized, review the
steps in this section to add the fifth hard drive as the spare. A spare hard drive must have a capacity equal to or
.greater than the largest hard drive in the RAID volume
.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the volume add a spare disk .1
.Choose Manage .2
.Select Add drive and choose Next .3
NAS OS detects hard drives in the enclosure that are not in use by other volumes. Check the box under the .4
.hard drive to use as the spare. You can add more than one spare
.Choose Next .5
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.Select Custom and choose Next .6
.Select Add spare drives and choose Next .7
Review the summary and choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the selected hard .8
.drives will be deleted. Choose Yes to continue
Single-disk volume
NAS OS allows you to create a volume with only one hard drive and then expand as you add hard drives to the
enclosure. A volume with a single hard drive can be configured for SimplyRAID (single-disk security only), JBOD,
.or RAID 1. Each level of RAID has its own advantages, as described in RAID Modes
SimplyRAID
.Go to Storage > Storage Overview .1
.Choose Manage to launch the New network volume wizard .2
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for a new volume. Hard drives .3
with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Select the box under a free hard
.drive for the new volume and choose Next
.Important : All data on the selected hard drive is deleted to create the RAID volume

.Select Quick setup and then choose Next .4
Choose No encryption to move to the summary page or, Encrypt the volume. When choosing encryption, you .5
have two options to unlock the volume: password only or, a password plus a USB device. Enter the password
.and/or insert a USB device into one of the NAS's USB ports. Choose Next
Review the summary window and then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the .6
.selected hard drive will be deleted to create the volume. Select Yes to build the SimplyRAID volume
Important : A volume with only one hard drive cannot protect data. Consider adding new hard
.drives as soon as possible

.To expand a single-disk volume, see Single-disk and unprotected volumes: expansion
RAID 1 or JBOD
.Go to Storage > Storage Overview .1
.NAS OS detects new hard drives in the enclosure. Choose Manage to launch the New network volume wizard .2
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for a new volume. Hard drives .3
with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Select the box under a free hard
.drive for the new volume and choose Next
.Important : All data on the selected hard drive will be deleted to create the RAID volume

.Select Custom and then choose Next .4
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.Select JBOD or RAID 1 and then choose Next .5
Choose No encryption to move to the summary page or, Encrypt the volume. When choosing encryption, you .6
have two options to unlock the volume: password only or, a password plus a USB device. Enter the password
.and/or insert a USB device into one of the NAS's USB ports. Choose Next
Review the summary window and then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the .7
.selected hard drive will be deleted to create the volume. Select Yes to build the SimplyRAID volume
Important : A volume with only one hard drive cannot protect data. Consider adding new hard
.drives as soon as possible

.To expand a single-disk volume, see Single-disk and unprotected volumes: expansion
Multiple volumes
You can create multiple volumes on one NAS OS device. While this manual cannot list every option for multiple
.volumes, you can use the steps below as a guide
This example demonstrates the creation of two volumes using RAID 5 (performance and protection) and
. ( SimplyRAID (protection
:(Create the first volume (RAID 5
.Go to Storage > Storage Overview
NAS OS detects new hard drives in the enclosure. Choose Manage to launch the New network volume
.wizard
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for a new volume. Hard
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Select the boxes under
the hard drives for the new volume and choose Next. Important: All data on the hard drives that you select
.is deleted to create the RAID volume
.Select Custom and then choose Next
.Select your preferred level of RAID and choose Next. In this example, it is RAID 5
Choose No encryption to move to the summary page or, Encrypt the volume. When choosing encryption, you
have two options to unlock the volume: password only or, a password plus a USB device. Enter the password
.and/or insert a USB device into one of the NAS's USB ports.Choose Next
Review the summary window then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the
.selected hard drives will be deleted. Choose Yes to build the volume
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
.7
:(Create the second volume (SimplyRAID
.Go to Storage > Storage Overview .1
.NAS OS detects new hard drives in the enclosure. Choose Manage to launch the New network volume wizard .2
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for a new volume. Hard .3
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Select the boxes under
the hard drives for the new volume and choose Next. Important: All data on the hard drives that you select
.is deleted to create the RAID volume
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Select Quick setup to create a SimplyRAID volume. With two or more hard drives, SimplyRAID creates a .4
.RAID volume using single security. Choose Next
Choose No encryption to move to the summary page or, Encrypt the volume. When choosing encryption, .5
you have two options to unlock the volume: password only or, a password plus a USB device. Enter the
.password and/or insert a USB device into one of the NAS's USB ports. Choose Next
Review the summary window then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the .6
.selected disks will be deleted to create the volume. Select Yes to build the SimplyRAID volume
Synchronizing times
:Synchronizing a volume can take from five minutes to many hours, depending on
The level of RAID
The capacities of the hard drives in the volume
(The NAS's available resources (concurrent tasks such as backups or downloads will slow synchronizing
For example, creating an unprotected RAID volume takes less than five minutes while RAID 6 with large
.capacity hard drives can run for many days. You can access the volume while it is synchronizing
:It is important to note that during synchronization
NAS performance is reduced due to a heavier demand upon the CPU RAID
protection is not available until the synchronization is complete
Older hard drives can fail, especially models that are not constructed for NAS
Single-disk and unprotected volumes: Expansion
Important info on NAS backup: It is recommended that all users back up data to DAS or another
NAS as further protection against the loss of a hard drive and secondary points of failure (e.g.
.hardware, network, etc.). See Backup Manager for details

Removing healthy hard drives from an unprotected
volume
:An unprotected volume can be
SimplyRAID single-disk
RAID 1 single-disk
JBOD
RAID 0
Removing a healthy hard drive from an unprotected volume while the NAS OS device is powered on will delete
all of the volume's data. While removing healthy hard drives is not recommended, you can avoid losing data by
.shutting down the NAS first. Return the hard drives to their proper bays before powering on the NAS
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Additionally, powering on the NAS with a missing hard drive in an unprotected volume will break its RAID and all
.data will be lost
Volume expansion
Apart from RAID 0, RAID volumes can be expanded with new hard drives. However, it is not possible to add
new hard drives with inferior capacities. For example, a RAID 5 or SimplyRAID volume with three 2TB disks
.supports the addition of a fourth hard drive that is 2TB or higher
Choose your RAID and follow the instructions on expanding the volume. RAID 0 does not support volume
.expansion
.Encrypted volume: Unlock the volume before following the steps below
SimplyRAID
.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the SimplyRAID volume you want to expand
.Choose Manage
.Choose Add drive and Next
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for the existing volume. Hard
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Select the boxes under
.the hard drives that you want to add to the existing volume and choose Next
.Important : All data on the selected hard drives is deleted
.1
.2
.3
.4

Review the summary and then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the selected .5
.hard drives will be deleted. Choose Yes to continue
.You can use the volume during the RAID synchronization
RAID 1
:When adding a hard drive to a RAID 1 volume, you can
.Increase security to protect data
.Change the RAID to SimplyRAID
.Important: Data stored on the volume is deleted when changing RAID levels

.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the RAID 1 volume you want to expand
.Choose Manage
.Choose Add drive and then Next
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for the existing volume. Hard
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Select the boxes under
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.the hard drives that you want to add to the existing volume and choose Next
.Important : All data on the selected hard drives is deleted

:Select one of the following .5
.Increase security to enable protection on the RAID 1 volume
.Custom to change the RAID to SimplyRAID
.Important : Data stored on the volume is deleted when changing RAID levels

.Choose Next .6
Review the summary page and then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the .7
.selected hard drives will be deleted. Choose Yes to continue
.You can use the volume during the RAID synchronization
JBOD
.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the JBOD volume you want to expand
.Choose Manage
.Choose Add drive and Next
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected for the existing volume. Hard
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Select the boxes under
.the hard drives that you want to add to the existing volume and choose Next
.Important : All data on the selected hard drives is deleted
.1
.2
.3
.4

Review the summary page and then choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the .5
.selected hard drives will be deleted. Choose Yes to continue
Protected volumes: Expansion and hard drive
replacement
Removing healthy hard drives from a protected
volume
:A protected volume can be
(SimplyRAID (single-disk or double-disk security
(RAID 1/RAID 1+Spare (two hard drives minimum
RAID 5/RAID 5+Spare
RAID 6/RAID 6+Spare
RAID 10/RAID 10+Spare
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Removing a healthy hard drive from a protected volume while the NAS OS device is powered on will render the
volume unprotected. If the volume has double-disk security, removing two healthy hard drives while the device
is powered on will render the volume unprotected. While removing healthy hard drives is not recommended,
you can avoid breaking the RAID by shutting down the NAS first. Return the hard drives to their proper slots
.before powering on the NAS
If a healthy hard drive has been removed while the NAS is powered on, you can reinsert it into its slot. NAS OS
synchronizes the RAID following the reinsertion of the hard drive. It is important to note that during
:synchronization
NAS performance is reduced due to a heavier demand upon the CPU
RAID protection is not available until the synchronization is complete
Older hard drives can fail, especially models that are not constructed for NAS
Important info on NAS backup: It is recommended that all users back up data to DAS or another
NAS as further protection against the loss of a hard drive and secondary points of failure (e.g.
.hardware, network, etc.). See Backup Manager for details

Hard drive expansion and replacement
Apart from RAID 10, protected RAID volumes can be expanded with new hard drives. However, it is not
possible to add new hard drives with inferior capacities. For example, a RAID 5 or SimplyRAID volume with
.three 2TB hard drives supports the addition of a fourth hard drive that is 2TB or higher
Expand a volume's storage capacity: add hard drives to the
enclosure
The instructions below pertain to storage expansion in a NAS OS device with available or empty drive slots. If
you are exchanging an existing hard drive in your enclosure for a hard drive of greater capacity or, repairing a
.failed hard drive, follow the instructions in Repair a failed hard drive or expand storage capacity
NAS OS gives you the freedom to configure RAID volumes for your network. While it is not possible to list
.every option for expansion, review the examples below and apply them to your NAS OS device
Important info on adding hard drives: Make certain to add a new hard drive without data. While
data on the NAS OS volume is safe, performing the steps below will delete files stored on the new
.hard drive you are adding to the volume

.Encrypted volume: Unlock the volume before following the steps below
SimplyRAID
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Insert one or more hard drives into available bays on your NAS. Review your NAS’s hardware user manual
.for instructions
.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the SimplyRAID volume you want to expand
.Choose Manage
.Choose Add drive and then Next
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected to expand the volume. Hard
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Check the boxes under the
.hard drives you want to use and choose Next
.Important : All data on the selected hard drives is deleted when expanding the volume
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5

Review the summary and choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the selected disks .6
.will be deleted. Choose Yes to continue
You can use the volume while it synchronizes the data. NAS performance can be affected during
synchronization
Custom RAID: RAID 1, RAID 5, and RAID 6
Insert one or more hard drives into available hard drive slots on your NAS. Review your NAS’s hardware
.user manual for instructions
.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the volume you want to expand
.Choose Manage
.Choose Add drive and Next
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected to expand the volume. Hard
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by volumes and cannot be selected. Check the boxes under the
.hard drives you want to use and choose Next
.Important: All data on the selected hard drives is deleted when expanding the volume
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5

:You can select .6
Expand storage capacity to add the new hard drives to the RAID. Data is synchronized with the new
.hard drives
Increase security to migrate the RAID to another level. For example, upgrade the level from RAID 1 to
.RAID 5/6 or, RAID 5 to RAID 6. Data is synchronized to the new hard drives
Custom to create a new RAID volume. All data on the existing volume is deleted to create the new RAID
.volume
Review the summary and choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the selected disks .7
.will be deleted. Choose Yes to continue
.The total capacity of the volume will be available once the synchronization is complete
Repair a failed hard drive or expand storage capacity
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:Follow the instructions below to
.Replace a failed hard drive
.Expand a volume's total storage capacity by replacing a hard drive with a larger capacity hard drive
Important info: If a hard drive that you purchased from Seagate fails, contact Seagate customer
.support

Hot-swapping
:When replacing or expanding hard drives in a protected RAID volume
.Perform the operation while the NAS is powered on, also known as hot swapping
.Use hard drives that do not contain important data, also known as clean hard drives
If a volume is protected, you can remove an existing hard drive and replace it with a new hard drive while the
product is turned on. This process is referred to as hot swapping. It is highly recommended that you hot swap
.when replacing or expanding hard drives
:Important info
.It is not possible to replace existing hard disks with lower capacity hard disks
.All data stored on the replacement hard drive will be deleted

Hard drive replacement and expansion
Important info on expanding storage capacity on more than one hard drive: A volume can be
expanded one hard drive at a time. Follow the steps below for each hard drive that you add to the
.volume. Performing the steps on multiple hard drives at the same time will break the RAID

.Encrypted volume: Unlock the volume before following the steps below
SimplyRAID
.Remove the hard drive that you want to replace .1
.Go to Device Manager > Storage Overview .2
.Important: Do not choose Manage on the Storage Overview page

On the Storage Overview page, choose the volume that you want to expand or repair with the new hard .3
.drive. If you are replacing a failed or missing disk, the NAS’s image shows the missing hard drive
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Insert the replacement hard drive into the enclosure per the instructions provided in the NAS's hardware
.user manual
.Choose Manage on the volume’s storage page
.Select Repair and choose Next
In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected to expand the volume. Hard
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by existing volumes and cannot be selected. Select the box
.under the hard drive that you want to use to expand or repair the volume and choose Next
Important : All data on the selected hard drive is deleted when repairing or expanding the
.volume
.4
.5
.6
.7

Review the summary and choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the selected hard .8
.drive will be deleted. Choose Yes to continue
:You can access files stored on the volume while it synchronizes data. Consider the following
The time to synchronize depends upon the amount of hard drives in the volume and its total capacity. NAS
.performance can be reduced due to a heavier demand upon the CPU
.RAID protection is not available until the synchronization is complete
.Older hard drives can fail, especially models that are not constructed for NAS
.The volume’s storage page will update its capacity following the synchronization
Custom: RAID 1, RAID 5, and RAID 6
Use the instructions below when swapping an existing hard disk in your custom RAID for a failed or higher
.capacity hard drive
Important info on expanding storage capacity on more than one hard drive: A volume can be
expanded one hard drive at a time. Follow the steps below for each hard drive that you add to the
.volume. Performing the steps on multiple hard drives at the same time will break the RAID

Important info on Custom RAID (1, 5, and 6) expansion and synchronizing: The volume must
synchronize twice when expanding capacity on a Custom RAID volume. SimplyRAID expansion
.requires a single synchronization

.Encrypted volume: Unlock the volume before following the steps below
Remove the hard drive that you want to replace according to the instructions on the NAS’s hardware user .1
.manual
.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the volume you want to repair .2
If you are replacing a failed or missing disk, the NAS’s image shows the missing hard drive. Insert the .3
replacement hard drive into the enclosure per the instructions provided in the NAS's hardware user
.manual
.Choose Manage .4
.Select Repair and choose Next .5
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In the Select disks window, hard drives with white checkboxes can be selected to expand the volume. Hard .6
drives with grey checkboxes are being used by existing volumes and cannot be selected. Select the box
.under the hard drive that you want to use to expand or repair the volume and choose Next
Important : All data on the selected hard drive is deleted when repairing or expanding the
.volume

Review the summary and choose Finish. A popup window cautions you that all data on the selected hard
.drive will be deleted. Choose Yes to continue
Depending upon the amount of hard drives and the total capacity, the synchronization can run for a few
hours to several days. The synchronization is complete once the Status is OK. If you inserted a larger
capacity hard drive, the volume’s storage page does not reflect the additional storage. Continue with the
.next steps to optimize the additional capacity
.On the Storage Overview page, click on the volume. The volume's storage page will load in the browser
.Choose Manage
.Select Optimize storage capacity and choose Next
.Choose Finish
.The volume will synchronize once more to update the storage capacity
.7
.8
.9
.10
.11
.12
.13
.You can access files stored on your NAS during the RAID synchronization
No replacement disk: reset the volume's RAID
If a hard drive in a protected volume fails and you do not have a replacement hard drive, you can reset the
RAID using the New network volume wizard. Resetting the RAID deletes all data stored on the volume. Make
.certain to back up your files before you reset the RAID
:To reset the RAID
.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the volume you want to reset .1
.Choose Manage .2
.Choose Delete and select Yes at the popup window .3
.Go to the New network volume wizard for instructions on how to create a new RAID volume .4
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Advanced Storage: Direct-A ached Storage
and iSCSI
You can use your NAS OS device to share direct-attached storage (DAS) on the network and to create iSCSI
:volumes. For details and instructions, see
NAS Ports and Direct-Attached Storage
iSCSI
NAS ports and direct-attached storage
Use the USB and, if applicable, eSATA ports on your NAS OS device to connect external storage and compatible
.peripherals
(Direct-attached storage (DAS
Connect
A DAS connected to the NAS OS device via USB is listed at Device Manager > Storage Overview. If you do not
:see your DAS, confirm that it has been formatted using one of the following file systems
FAT32
NTFS
+HFS
EXT2, EXT3, EXT4
XFS
.Unlike volumes created within NAS OS, the name of the DAS cannot be changed on its storage page
DAS share
.By default, a DAS becomes a public share when it is connected to the NAS OS device
:You can change the DAS from a public share to a private share
.Choose Shares .1
.Pass the cursor to the far right of the DAS share's row to make the Edit pull-down menu visible .2
.Choose Change to private share .3
.Configure access to the share by following the instructions in Shares .4
Disconnect
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To avoid damaging your DAS's file system, follow the instructions below to properly disconnect the device from
.the NAS OS device
.On the Storage section at the lower left, choose the volume you want to eject .1
.Choose Eject .2
.Disconnect the DAS .3
Ingest or back up DAS content
:You can copy content on a connected DAS using
Filebrowser ingest. Use the Filebrowser to copy data from your USB storage to the NAS. Ingest is a good
.option when copying select files or images. For example, ingest images from a camera. See Filebrowser
Backup Manager backup. Use Backup Manager to back up all or select files stored on your USB storage.
.Backup Manager is a good option for large and recurring backups. See Backup Manager
Multimedia indexing
You can take an inventory of available multimedia files on your NAS and all connected DAS. See Media Server
.for details
USB printer
.Your NAS OS device features a printer server service. See Services for details
iSCSI
iSCSI (Internet Small Computer System Interface) provides local storage performance for network shares
similar to that of a traditional direct attached storage device (DAS). A DAS can be an external hard drive such
as a disk that connects via USB. NAS OS can reserve all or part of a volume as an iSCSI volume for a computer to
use via the network. The computer that connects to the iSCSI volume is called the initiator. The iSCSI volume is
called the target. When the initiator connects to the target, the computer reads and writes to the iSCSI volume
.the same way it would access a DAS
iSCSI works on top of the Transport Control Protocol (TCP) and allows SCSI commands to be sent along a local
area networks (LAN), wide area network (WAN) or the Internet. It transports block-level data between an
iSCSI initiator (client computer) and an iSCSI target (storage device). The iSCSI protocol is made of SCSI
.commands and, to send them on a network, assembles the data in packets
Since it accesses data at the block level, iSCSI can offer enhanced performance for your NAS. Further, iSCSI
writes data directly to the volume rather than at the file level placing a lower demand upon the NAS OS device.
.Managing IP and networking protocols such as AFP and SMB places a burden upon the processor
:Review the list below to determine the capacity you can assign to iSCSI volumes
Seagate NAS: up to 8TB
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Seagate NAS: up to 8TB
Seagate NAS Pro and rackmounts: up 16TB
Target volumes can be simple iSCSI volumes called SimplyiSCSI. Use SimplyiSCSI when creating an iSCSI target
that does not require multiple LUNs, or logical unit numbers. A LUN is an allotment of virtual storage that can be
created from the NAS OS device’s pool of available space. It is highly recommended to create iSCSI targets on
.protected volumes, such as SimplyRAID or RAID 5
NAS OS supports advanced iSCSI configurations that allow you to assign several LUNs to a single target. The
iSCSI wizard guides you through the configuration to help create iSCSI volumes suitable for your working
.environment
Additionally, you can boost iSCSI performance by creating the target on a RAID 5 volume and configuring the
.LAN ports as bonding. See Network for further information
Once an iSCSI initiator has connected to an iSCSI target, the target volume must be formatted as would happen
.with standard DAS. An iSCSI volume cannot be accessed through the NAS OS Filebrowser
Note on Mac and Windows operating systems and iSCSI initiators: Windows professional and
business editions offer native support to act as iSCSI initiators. The Mac operatng system does not
offer native support to act as an iSCSI initiator. However, third-party applications are available to
.add support for the Mac operating system

Setting up an iSCSI target
A volume must be available before using the iSCSI wizard. For instructions on how to create a volume, see
.Storage
.Go to Device Manager and click iSCSI on the lower left .1
.Click Manage to launch the iSCSI wizard .2
:Follow the iSCSI wizard to create one of the following .3
(SimplyiSCSI (simple iSCSI volume
(LUN (the virtual volume
(Target (what the Initiator connects to
.Review the descriptions below for further information regarding the iSCSI options
SimplyiSCSI
.Create one LUN associated with one target and limited options
:Select SimplyiSCSI and click Next. Choose .1
.A name for the iSCSI volume
. ( Capacity. Use the slider or fill it in manually (GB
Select Thin provisioning to allocate more space than the volume’s current storage capacity. Use thin
provisioning if you expect to add more storage to your device in the future. The new hard drive capacity
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.can be integrated into the iSCSI volume once it is added to the enclosure
To password protect your iSCSI volume, you can configure CHAP (Challenge Handshake Authentication
Protocol). CHAP restricts iSCSI access to initiators that supply the correct account name and password
.for the target
Select and configure Mutual CHAP to implement two-way authentication for both the initiator and
.target
.Complete the wizard to create the SimplyiSCSI volume .2
.The time to create the iSCSI volume depends upon its capacity
Create LUN
.Create a new LUN that can be mapped to a target
.Choose Create LUN .1
:Choose how you want to create the LUN .2
.New LUN creates a new LUN
Import LUN imports a LUN file from a share on the NAS OS device. The LUN must have been previously
.exported on the same NAS OS device
.Clone LUN clones an existing LUN on the NAS OS device
.Review the details for each type of LUN below
New LUN
.Choose New LUN and click Next
:You can choose
.A name for the LUN
. ( Capacity. Use the slider to configure its capacity or fill it in manually (in GB
Select Thin provisioning to allocate more space than the volume’s current storage capacity. Use thin
provisioning if you expect to add more storage to your device in the future. The new hard drive capacity
.can be integrated into the iSCSI volume once it is added to the enclosure
Click Next
Choose the target you want to associate with the LUN., You can also leave the LUN empty by not
.associating it with a target. However, the LUN cannot be used until it is associated with a target. Click Next
.Review the summary and click Finish
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
Import LUN
Exportin g a LUN
Before importing a LUN, you must export an existing LUN on the NAS OS device. Follow the steps below to
:export a LUN
.Go to Device Manager and choose iSCSI. A table lists available iSCSI targets .1
.Click the LUNs tab .2
.Hover to the right of an existing LUN and click Edit > Export .3
.Browse and choose the share and folder to store the LUN file .4
.Choose a name for the .iscsi file and then click Save .5
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Importin g a LUN
A LUN can only be imported if it is stored on one of the NAS OS device’s shares. See the instructions above for
.exporting an existing LUN to a share
.Go to Device Manager and then choose iSCSI .1
.Click Manage and then select Create LUN. Click Next .2
.Select Import LUN and then click Next .3
.Browse for the LUN file (.iscsi) and then click Next .4
.Choose a target to map the LUN and then click Finish .5
Create a Target
.Go to Device Manager and then choose iSCSI
.Click Manage and then select Create a Target. Click Next
.Review the options for your target. Only configure options that match your needs
.Name the iSCSI Target
Password protect your iSCSI volume. Select CHAP (Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol) to
restrict iSCSI access to initiators that supply the correct account name and password. Select Mutual
.CHAP for two-way authentication between the initiator and target
Data digest. Increases data integrity. When data digest is enabled, the system performs a checksum
.over each PDU's data part and verifies using the CRC32C algorithm
Header digest. Increases data integrity. When header digest is enabled, the system performs a
checksum over each iSCSI Protocol Data Unit’s (PDU’s) header part and verifies using the CRC32C
.algorithm
Multiple Sessions. Select this option only if your iSCSI target will be managed within a SAN cluster
.environment. The SAN cluster allows multiple iSCSI initiators to access the iSCSI target at once
.Authorized initiator. Configure which iSCSI initiators are allowed to connect to this target
.Click Next
.Choose LUNs to map to this target and click Next
.Click Finish
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
iSCSI initiator: Example
The steps below demonstrate a single connection to an iSCSI target using Windows 7 as the initiator. For the
example, a CHAP has been configured on the iSCSI target only. Configurations will vary but you can review the
.instructions below and make adjustments for your operating system and network
.Search for and launch iSCSI Initiator or equivalent .1
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Enter the network name or IP address of the server that hosts the iSCSI target. In this example, the NAS .2
.OS device
.Choose Quick connect or equivalent .3
:Without and with CHAP .4
If the iSCSI target does not include a CHAP, the connection is immediate. If it is the first time that the
.iSCSI target has connected to an initiator, you are prompted to format the disk
If the iSCSI target includes a CHAP, a prompt alerts you that a connection is not possible. Close the
.prompt
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.Select the NAS's iSCSI target in the list of discovered agents and choose Connect .5
.Choose Advanced .6
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.Select Enable CHAP log on and enter the Name and Target secret (password) for the iSCSI target .7
.A window may appear prompting you to add the target to your favorites. Make your selection and exit .8
If it is the first time that the iSCSI target has connected to an initiator, you are prompted to format the .9
.disk
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.The iSCSI target appears in Computer/My Computer as a local disk
iSNS: Internet Storage Name Service
The Internet Storage Name Service (iSNS) manages multiple iSCSI targets on a network. Certain versions of
Windows Server include the iSNS feature. Using an iSNS can save time for each iSCSI initiator. For example,
rather than searching the network for an iSCSI target, the initiator can look for a connection in a single location,
the iSNS server. The iSNS server keeps tabs on all the iSCSI targets on the network, thus allowing the initiator
.to connect to one that is available
.Configure iSNS on your network server then review the instructions below to add your NAS's iSCSI target
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:Enable iSNS server and enter its IP address
.Go to Device Manager and then click iSCSI .1
.Click the slider on the top right to enable iSNS .2
.Enter the IP address for the iSNS and then click Save .3
Important info regarding iSCSI volume sharing : Mounting an iSCSI volume on multiple computers at
the same time leads to serious file corruption. An exception can be found with SAN cluster
environments that include servers and software dedicated to managing iSCSI volume sharing. An
.iSNS server is not considered to be a SAN cluster environment

iSNS: iSCSI initiator
The steps below demonstrate a single connection to an iSNS server using Windows 7 as the initiator.
Configurations will vary but you can review the instructions below and make adjustments for your operating
.system and network
.Search for and launch iSCSI Initiator or equivalent .1
.Choose Discovery and Add server .2
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.Enter the iSNS server’s IP address .3
.The list of discovered targets shows the iSCSI targets that are connected to the iSNS server .4
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.To connect to the iSCSI target, follow the instructions in iSCSI initiator .5
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App Manager
Use the App Manager to install and manage apps on your device. Apps give your device additional functions and
features. The App Manager includes apps that are Seagate branded as well as apps that are developed by third
.parties specifically for Seagate network devices
Overview
:Review the list below to learn about the App Manager categories
.My Apps: Your installed apps
.Updates: Available updates for installed apps
.All: All available apps
.Backup: Apps used to back up your data
.Business: Apps used to for commercial purposes
.Multimedia: Apps used for sorting your media
.Security: Antivirus apps
.Utilities: Utility apps
.Advanced: Install third party apps that are not available in the App Manager
How to Install Apps
.Follow the steps below to install an app
.From the Categories menu select a category .1
.Hover the cursor over the desired app and click Install .2
Once the app is installed, a new button called Action is available. Click the button and select the action you .3
:would like to perform from the drop down menu
.Open: Opens the app so that you can use it
.Note: You can also open the app from the Home screen

Details: Shows the app’s details and allows you to set permissions. Note: Third party apps provide
.support details on this page
.Stop: Stops the app. You must return to this option to turn it back on
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.Uninstall: Uninstalls the app
Maintenance
.Check for updates regularly in Maintenance
.Open App Manager .1
.Check Installed > Updates .2
If one or more updates are available, a number appears next to Updates. The number represents the .3
.number of updates that are available for the apps you have installed
.Click Updates to see a list of apps that are ready for updates .4
.Click the Update button that corresponds with the app you want to update .5
Note: There are two buttons at the top right corner of the Updates screen, Check Apps and Update
all. Use Check Apps to check for updates. Use the Update all to update all your apps at once. Update
.all can take some time to finish

Advanced
The advanced section is used for installing third party apps and updates that are not available in the App
.Manager. Follow the instructions below to use the advanced section
Note: Seagate does not provide support for third party apps. If you have trouble with a third party
.app, contact the app’s vendor

To install an app, review the instructions below. Note that apps must have been created specifically for NAS OS
.and have the file extension .rbw
.Click Advanced .1
.Turn Manual install mode to ON .2
.Note the status of the Dependencies. They should be OK .3
.Click Install .4
.Browse to the app you wish to install and accept the terms .5
.Note: The app file type must be .rbw

.Click Install .6
.Once the app has installed it is located under My Apps
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Note: Seagate only provides support for Seagate branded apps. If you need support with a third
.party app, contact the app manufacturer
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Backup Manager
The Backup Manager has four options: Backup, Restore, Sync and Network Backup server. Backup, Restore, and
.Sync feature intuitive setup wizards
Backup
:Use Backup Manager to perform the following types of backups
:Back up the Seagate storage device to
(External storage (USB direct attached storage
(Network storage (Seagate or third-party
Cloud storage
.Back up external storage (USB direct attached storage) to the Seagate storage device
.Back up network storage (Seagate or third-party) to the Seagate storage device
.Back up cloud storage to the Seagate storage device
:Cloud services supported by Backup include
Amazon S3
Baidu
Box
Dropbox
Google Drive
Strato HiDrive
Yandex.disk
OneDrive
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Note on computer backups: You can back up your computers to the Seagate storage device. Backup
applications such as Seagate Dashboard, Windows File History and Apple Time Machine manage
how the computer backups are performed. Use your preferred backup application and choose a
shared folder on your Seagate storage device as the destination for the computer backup. When
.performing a backup to a private share, make certain that a user can access the share

Restore
.Restore a backup that has been performed by the Backup
Sync
Choose one or more folders on your Seagate storage device to sync with your cloud storage account. Cloud
:services supported by Sync include
Baidu
Dropbox
Google Drive
OneDrive
Network Backup disk
Enable Network Backup so that other Seagate network storage devices can back up to your primary Seagate
.network storage device
Important info on backups: It is recommended that all users back up data to a DAS, another
network storage device or cloud storage as further protection against a missing hard drive or
( . secondary points of failure (e.g. hardware, network, etc

Note on backup job order: To conserve processing resources, the Seagate network device runs one
job at time. If more than one job is scheduled for the same time or started manually, Backup
.Manager places them in a queue

Backup, Sync, and Restore examples
(Back up to a USB storage device (DAS
An administrator keeps important files on her private share. Since remote access is not always available when
.she travels, the administrator backs up her share to a portable USB storage device
Back up to a Seagate network storage device on the local network
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Back up to a Seagate network storage device on the local network
To prevent data loss due to hardware failure, the administrator schedules regular backups of Seagate Network
Device 1 to Seagate Network Device 2. They are both on the same local network. Alternatively, the
.administrator can back up Seagate Network Device 1 to a compatible third-party network storage device
(Back up to a network storage device outside the local network (offsite
To prevent data loss due to onsite fire, flood, or theft, the administrator backs up data on Seagate Network
Device 1 in her company's headquarters to Seagate Network Device 2 at a branch office. A compatible third.party storage device can also act as the destination storage
(Back up to a cloud service (offsite
To prevent data loss due to onsite fire, flood, or theft, the administrator backs up data on Seagate Network
.Device 1 to the company’s Amazon S3 account
Restore
Someone in the office accidentally deleted an important spreadsheet from his personal share. Fortunately, the
administrator backs up to another storage solution, such as USB storage, another Seagate network storage
:device or cloud storage. The administrator can
.Restore a backup to revert the share to an earlier state
.Connect to the destination storage device from a computer and browse for the missing file
Important info: The time to complete the first backup job can vary based upon the amount of data
and the speed of your network. It can take several hours or, if it is an offsite or cloud backup,
.several days

Create a backup
:To create a backup
.Launch the Backup Manager app .1
.Choose Backup .2
.Click Add backup to launch the Backup Wizard .3
:Follow the Backup Wizard to perform one of the following types of backup
:Back up the Seagate storage device to
(External storage (USB direct attached storage
(Network storage (Seagate or third-party
Cloud storage
.Back up external storage (USB direct attached storage) to the Seagate storage device
.Back up network storage (Seagate or third-party) to the Seagate storage device
.Back up cloud storage to the Seagate storage device
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Review the topics below to better understand the settings and requirements for the type of backup you want
.to perform
Back up using USB storage
:Perform the following types of backups with USB storage connected to your Seagate storage device
.The Seagate storage device to USB storage
.USB storage to the Seagate storage device
You can optimize backups to and from a USB storage device connected to one of the USB ports on your Seagate
storage device. Refer to the table below for the file formats that work best with your Seagate device. When
configuring a backup with a USB device, the Backup Wizard gives you the option to format your USB storage for
.optimized backups. By using an optimized format, you have the option to perform incremental backups
An incremental backup allows you to back up new or modified files following the first backup. If the format is not
optimized, you must perform full backups each time a job is run. A full backup copies everything on the source
.each time the backup is run
( Optimized backup (incremental
Hard disk file system
Operating systems
Yes
EXT2, EXT 3, EXT 4, and XFS
Linux
Yes
HFS Non-Journaled
Mac
No
HFS+ Journaled
Mac
No
FAT32
Windows/Mac
No
NTFS
Windows
Back up using network storage
Perform the following types of backup with a second Seagate network storage device or a third-party network
:storage device
The primary Seagate storage device to a second Seagate network storage device or third-party network
.storage device
A second Seagate network storage device or third-party network storage device to the primary Seagate
.storage device
The second Seagate network storage device or third-party network storage device can be located on the same
. ( network as the primary Seagate storage device or, on a network at a different location (offsite
Backups with network storage
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.Backups to and from Seagate network devices require a unique destination share called Network Backup server
.Backups to and from third-party network devices can use an existing shared folder
For example, the administrator wants to back up shares on Seagate Device A to Seagate Device B. Seagate
Device A is the source network device and Seagate Device B is the destination network device. To receive the
backup data from Seagate Device A, the destination device, Seagate Device B, must enable its Network Backup
.server. Refer to the table below for examples of backups to and from Seagate and third-party network devices
Destination folder
Destination
device
Source device
Type of
network
backup
Network Backup server
Seagate Device B
on the local or
remote network
. ( (offsite
Seagate Device A on the local network
Backup to a
Seagate
network
storage
device
Shared folder on the thirdparty network device that
supports a compatible
network protocol (see
. ( below
Third-party
network device
on the local or
remote network
. ( (offsite
Seagate Device on the local network
Backup to a
third-party
network
storage
device
Shared folder on the
.Seagate network device
Seagate Device
on the local
.network
Third-party network device on the local or
remote network (offsite). The device’s
shared folders must support a compatible
. ( network protocol (see below
Backup from
a thirdparty
network
storage
device
Enable Network Backup server
Before configuring network backups between Seagate devices, the administrator must enable the Network
.Backup server on the destination device
.Go to Backup Manager > Network Backup server .1
.Choose Enable .2
At the prompt, enter and confirm a password. The password can be different from the password you use for .3
your Seagate Access login (between 4 and 20 characters). Your Network Backup password will be needed
.when you set up a network backup
If you have more than one volume, select the Location pull-down menu to choose a volume for the Network .4
Backup server. It is highly recommended that you use a volume with RAID protection (SimplyRAID, RAID 1,
. ( RAID 5, RAID 6, or RAID 10
.Choose Save .5
Network Backup server settings
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The Network Backup server table provides a summary of its settings. You can return to the Network Backup
.server page if you forget the password or you want to disable it
.Only the administrator can access the Network Backup server settings
The administrator can find the Network Backup password if it is forgotten. Go to Backup Manager >
.Network Backup server and click on the magnifying glass icon
To change the Network Backup server password, pass the cursor to the right of the asterisks and choose the
. ( configuration icon (pencil
For offsite backups, administrators must confirm that the ports used by NAS OS backup jobs are available
:on the network router. The default port numbers are
Port 22
(Port 873 (encrypted backups
To delete the Network Backup server, choose Disable. A prompt will ask if you wish to keep data or delete
.all files within the share
Backups with third-party network storage
The Backup Wizard can help you create backups to and from third-party network storage devices that support
:the following protocols
Rsync
SMB
FTP
NFS
(WebDav (Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning
Backups to network storage devices
Local network
:When performing network backups on a local network, make certain that
.The source and destination network devices are powered on
.The destination network storage device is connected to the same network as your source device
.Seagate network storage) The Network Backup server has been enabled and you have the password)
Third-party network storage) The third-party network device supports one of the five network protocols)
.listed above
Third-party network storage) You have noted the third-party network device’s IP address or network)
.name. Network naming services are not as reliable as IP addressing
Third-party network storage) You have the username and password for the network device’s backup)
.service
Similar to Seagate network devices, many third-party network devices have separate credentials for login and
.backup
Remote network
:When performing network backups to a remote network, make certain that
.The source and destination network devices are powered on
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You have the network device’s public IP address. You can find the public IP address by visiting
http://www.whatismyip.com/ or by accessing your remote network’s router management software. When
searching for the public IP address, use a computer connected to the same router as the destination
network storage device. For further information, review the user manual for the offsite network router or
.contact your Internet service provider
The ports are open for the backup. You may need to open ports using your router's management software.
The ports to open are listed at Backup Manager > Network Backup server. Review your router’s user
.manual for instructions on how to open ports for a device on the network
Seagate network storage) The Network Backup server has been enabled on the destination device and you)
.have the password
Third-party network storage) The third-party network storage device supports one of the five network)
.protocols listed above
Third-party network storage) You have the username and password for the network device’s backup)
service. Similar to Seagate network devices, many third-party network devices have separate credentials
.for login and backup
Advanced parameters for backups to network storage devices
The Backup Wizard includes four options for your backup. See the explanations below for each option. It is not
:mandatory to select one or more of the parameters to continue with the backup
Secure data transfers uses encryption during the data transfer. The data is not encrypted once it is stored on
.the destination NAS. This option is ideal for offsite backups
Compressing data during a transfer optimizes data transmission rates. Data is compressed during the
.transfer only. While this option is good for low bandwidth networks, it can affect the NAS's performance
Send only modified parts of files is best used with backups that include files larger than 50MB. For example, if
you edit a document that has already been backed up, only the edits will be copied during the next backup.
.This option can affect the NAS's performance
Never delete files on the destination folder keeps files on the destination NAS even if they are deleted from
.the original NAS's source folder
Back up using cloud storage
:Before performing a backup to or from cloud storage, make certain
:You have an account with one of the following services
Amazon S3
Baidu
Box
Dropbox
Google Drive
Strato HiDrive
Yandex.disk
OneDrive
You have the necessary login and access credentials for your account. You cannot create a backup without
.your credentials
Advanced parameters for backups to cloud storage
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The Backup Wizard includes one or more options for your backup. See the explanations below. It is not
:mandatory to select one or more options to continue with the backup
Secure data transfers uses encryption during the data transfer. The data is not encrypted once it is stored on
.the destination NAS. This option is ideal for offsite backups
Never delete files on the destination folder keeps files on the destination even if they are deleted from the
.source's folder
Sync folders
Use Sync to keep data in one or more folders on your Seagate storage device consistent with a folder in a cloud
storage service. For example, you run a Sync job for Folder A on your Seagate storage device. It has 25 files
when the Sync job is first created with a similarly named folder on OneDrive. Soon after, you copy file 26 to
Folder A on your Seagate storage device. The same file 26 is automatically uploaded to OneDrive to keep both
.folders in sync. You can also add files to the folder on OneDrive and they will automatically sync with Folder A
:Before performing a sync to cloud storage, make certain
:You have an account with one of the following services
Baidu
Dropbox
Google Drive
OneDrive
You have the necessary login and access credentials for your account. You cannot create a sync without
.your credentials
:Create a sync
.Launch the Backup Manager app .1
.Choose Sync .2
.Click Add sync job to launch the Sync Wizard and follow it to completion .3
Restore a backup
Backups to or from your Seagate storage device can be restored. You can restore a backup to the original
source folder or choose another folder for your backed up files. Follow the directions below to restore a
.backup
.Launch the Backup Manager app
.Choose Restore
.Click Add restore to launch the Restore Wizard and follow it to completion
Backup and sync job options and start/stop
Options
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.Follow the steps below to review and change options for a backup or sync job
.Launch the Backup Manager app .1
For backups, locate the backup you want to modify and then pass the cursor to the far right of its row to .2
.enable the Edit pull-down menu
For sync jobs, click Sync and locate the sync you want to modify then pass the cursor to the far right of its .3
.row to enable the Edit pull-down menu
:You can choose .4
Details
(Enable/Disable the OneTouch button (if applicable
Edit authentication
Edit description
Edit schedule
Disable
Restore
Delete
.If you disable a scheduled job, it will not run until it is enabled again
Starting/stopping jobs
Locate the backup or sync job you wish to stop or start and pass the cursor to the far right of its row to view the
:triangular and square icons
.Start a job: choose the triangular icon
.Stop a job that is in progress: choose the square icon
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Download Manager
:Use your NAS OS device as a download server to
. ( Download files from the Internet (PDF, Torrent, Binary
. ( Upload files from the local disk (Torrent
Enable the download machine
.The download machine service must be enabled to use the Download Manager
.Go to the Download Manager .1
Click the slider on the upper right .2
Create a download job
.Go to the Download Manager .1
.Choose Add download .2
:At the prompt, choose file's location .3
.URL: Type or paste the web address
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.Local File: Select Browse to search for the file
Select the destination share by clicking inside the Destination field. Choose the share in the pop-up .4
.window
.To better organize your downloads, you can choose Create folder at the prompt to add a folder .5
. Choose Save to begin the download .6
Download settings
Go to Download Manager > Settings to review and change settings. You can edit a setting by passing the cursor
. ( to its right and clicking on the configuration icon (pencil
.Maximum active downloads: Enter the number of download jobs that can run simultaneously
Download rate limit: Select the pull-down menu and choose Custom. Enter a number from 1KB/s to
.102400KB/s
Upload limit rate: Select the pull-down menu and choose Custom. Enter a number from 1KB/s to
.102400KB/s
. TCP Listening port: Enter a router port number through which the download service can operate
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Technical note: Multiple simultaneous downloads can impact your NAS's performance. In some
instances, even after a download has completed, the download service may continue to use
.system resources
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Filebrowser
:Use Filebrowser to view, share and manage your files on your Seagate storage device. You can
Upload files
View files
Share files with family, friends and colleagues
Play back audio and video files supported by your web browser
Create folders
Organize content
Ingest from external drives
Upload les
.Go to the destination folder for your files
.Click the Plus Sign on the top right and choose Upload
.Select the files you want to upload
.Click Choose
.1
.2
.3
.4
Share les
.Navigate to the item you want to share .1
:Click Share link.You can .2
.Email the link from the Filebrowser’s native email client or copy the link to your preferred email client
.Add a password or expiration date by clicking Add password and expiration date
Note on the share link: The link to share a file or folder is created when you click Share link. Even if
you do not send the link using the Filebrowser email client or copy it to your email client, the link has
been created. If you mistakenly created the link or you do not want to keep it, click Remove the link
.in the Share link pop-up window
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Viewing or listening toSeagateles
NAS OS 4
Viewing or listening to les
You can play media content in Filebrowser. If your browser supports the file type you should be able to play,
.view and listen to your content within the Filebrowser app
Manage content
.Select the file or folder you want to manage .1
.Click Actions .2
:You can .3
Download: Allows you to download the file
Copy: Allows you to navigate another folder and paste the item
Rename: Allows you to rename the file or folder
Delete: Deletes the selected item
Create a Folder
.Choose a share or folder to create the new folder.Click the Plus Sign choose New Folder .1
.Type the name of the new folder and click Save .2
Ingest from an external drive
Connect your external USB hard drive to one of the Personal Cloud's USB ports. Use the USB 3.0 port if your
.hard drive supports USB 3.0
.Open Filebrowser
The following message appears: External storage connected. Copy to Seagate [device name]. Click Copy to
.Seagate [device name]. Note: The [device name] is the name of your Seagate storage device
.Click Copy to Seagate Device Name
.Select the folders and files you want to copy and click Copy
.Select the destination folder and click Copy
.Choose how you would like to manage file conflicts and click Save
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.2
.3
.4
.5
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Seagate NAS OS 4
Remote Access
:Remote access to your NAS OS device is available using
Sdrive
MyNAS
(FTP (see FTP
While Sdrive and MyNAS are easy to configure, they differ in accessing data and managing the NAS from
:remote locations
Sdrive is an application with file system integration. Once Sdrive is launched, a separate volume becomes
.available on your computer similar to a standard DAS or NAS. Sdrive also gives you access to NAS OS
MyNAS provides direct access to NAS OS using an Internet browser and does not require additional
software. However, file integration is not available with MyNAS so files must be uploaded and downloaded
. ( via the File Browser (see File Browser
Sdrive
Sdrive and Seagate Access
Sdrive is now linked to a Seagate Access account. Generally, an administrator creates a Seagate Access
account for a user. The administrator’s Seagate Access account is created automatically when first configuring
the NAS. Administrators who upgrade the NAS from earlier versions of NAS OS can create Seagate Access
.accounts in Device Manager > Users
A standard user can also create a Seagate Access account using Sdrive. See Invitation sent to a user without a
.Seagate Access account for instructions
:Your Seagate Access account can be used with the following applications
.Sdrive–Available for Windows and Mac
.Seagate Media app (Seagate Personal Cloud only) –Available for Android and iOS mobile devices
Important info: Professional NAS devices do not support using the Seagate Media app as a playback
.app for media. Use Seagate Media with the Seagate Personal Cloud for your home

Sdrive: PC/Mac
Sdrive is an application for your PC/Mac in the office, at home and anywhere with a connection to the Internet.
It creates a special Sdrive volume with all the files stored on your compatible Seagate NAS devices. The Sdrive
.volume is easy to access since it appears on your computer like a standard hard drive
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.Administrators can also use Sdrive to access the NAS’s management tool
Example: You have important work files that you backed up to your Seagate NAS at the office. Only upon
arriving home do you realize that you forgot to copy them to make final edits. Fortunately, Sdrive is installed on
your work and home computers and both are linked to your Seagate Access account. You open the Sdrive
.volume and copy the important files from your NAS to your home computer
?How do I get started
I started with NAS OS 4.1 and higher
The NAS OS setup wizard for version 4.1 prompts the administrator to create a Seagate Access account. If you
.created the account, skip to Download and install Sdrive
If you did not create a Seagate Access account during the setup wizard, go to Create a Seagate Access account
.in NAS OS
I upgraded from NAS OS 4.0.x
Administrators upgrading from an earlier version of NAS OS, 4.0 and below, can begin with Create a Seagate
.Access account in NAS OS
Create a Seagate Access account in NAS OS
Administrators can create Seagate Access their accounts from the Users page. Once an administrator has a
Seagate Access account, invitations to join the device can be sent to users. Follow the applicable instructions
.below to add Seagate Accounts for administrators and users
NAS OS administrator: create a Seagate Access account
.Go to Device Manager > Users .1
.Find the administrator’s Login name and then click the white circle in the Seagate Access column .2
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.Complete the fields in the Seagate Access wizard and then click Next .3
An email has been sent to the address that you entered in the previous step. Open your email and check for .4
.the confirmation code. If you do not see an email, check your spam folder
.Copy the confirmation code in the email and paste it to the Confirm email window in NAS OS .5
.Click Finish .6
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NAS OS user: invite to join the device
The administrator can invite a user to join the NAS. An invitation is sent to the user with instructions on how to
.create a Seagate Access account
Important info: The administrator must have a Seagate Access account to invite users to join the
NAS. Make certain to follow the steps in NAS OS administrator: create a Seagate Access account
.before following the steps below

.Go to Device Manager > Users
.Find the user’s Login name and then click the white circle in the Seagate Access column
.Enter the user’s email address
.Enter the administrator’s Seagate Access password
An email is sent to the user. The user follows the directions below based upon having or not having a
:Seagate Access account
Has an account: see Invitation sent to a user with a Seagate Access account
Does not have an account : see Invitation sent to a user without a Seagate Access account
.1
.2
.3
.4
.5
Download and install Sdrive
.Follow the directions below to install Sdrive
:Download Sdrive for your device .1
Seagate NAS
Seagate NAS Pro
Seagate 4-bay Rackmount NAS
Seagate 8-bay Rackmount NAS
.Check the Downloads folder for the Sdrive installer and open it .2
.Follow the Sdrive installer to completion. You are prompted to restart your computer .3
Connect to your Seagate NAS
Important info for users: Your Seagate Access account must be associated with your Seagate NAS
before you use Sdrive to access files and media. The administrator should have sent you an
invitation email with instructions on how to link your account to the NAS. Contact the administrator
.if you do not know your Seagate Access credentials

The Sdrive login window launches automatically each time you boot your computer. You can enter your Seagate
.Access account to mount the Sdrive volume or close the window
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:Once it is launched, Sdrive takes on two roles
Administrator and users: an Sdrive volume to access content at the file level. This means that you can open
.your NAS’s folders and see your files on any computer with a connection to the Internet
.Administrator: an application to manage your compatible Seagate NAS devices
Forgotten password
If you forgot your password, enter your Seagate Access sign-in and click “Can’t access your account?” An email is
.sent with a link to reset your password
Sdrive volume
:Following a successful login, the Sdrive volume is available in the following locations
PC: Explorer window > Network location
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Mac: Desktop
:The Sdrive volume gives users quick access to their files on the NAS. Users can access
Public shares
(Shares they have been given permission to open (read or read+write
Users with Seagate Access accounts associated with multiple Seagate NAS devices can access all of them in the
.Sdrive volume
Mac: missing Sdrive volume
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Mac: missing Sdrive volume
If the Sdrive volume does not appear on your desktop after you successfully log in with your Seagate Access
.account, there may be a setting to change. Review the instructions below
.On your Mac desktop, go to Finder > Preferences .1
.Make certain that the box next to Connected servers is checked .2
Sdrive application
Click the Sdrive application icon to access its features. The application icon location differs by operating
:system
Windows: System tray > Hidden icons (up arrow in the system tray). See below for instructions on how to
.move the Sdrive application icon to the system tray for easy access
.Mac: Menu bar
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Similar to most applications in the system tray or menu bar, actions are dependent upon the operating system.
For example, Windows users must apply a right click on the Sdrive application icon to access most of its
features. A left click in Windows launches the Sdrive volume in an Explorer window. Mac users can use a
.standard left click
Windows: move the Sdrive application icon to the system tray
. ( In the system tray, click Hidden icons (up arrow .1
.Choose Customize .2
.Click the pull-down menu for Sdrive and choose Show icon and notifications .3
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.Choose OK .4
.Sdrive is available in the system tray. Right click it to access folders or manage your Seagate NAS devices .5
Sdrive features
:Sdrive can help administrators and users perform the following actions
Accept invitations to join Seagate NAS devices
Change the Seagate NAS / Seagate Access password
(Manage Seagate NAS (administrator
Accept an invitation
An administrator can invite users who work inside and outside the office to join the NAS. An email is sent to the
user with instructions on how to confirm the invitation. The instructions below offer the same steps found in
.the email
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.Note: If the email does not appear in your Inbox, check your Spam

:Invitation sent to a user with a Seagate Access account
. ( Click Sdrive in the system tray (PC) / menu bar (Mac .1
.Choose Add device. If you do not see the Add device window, look behind open applications or windows .2
The pending invitation should be listed. Choose Add device to add the NAS or Do not add Device to refuse .3
.the invitation
Invitation sent to a user without a Seagate Access account
A user who does not have a Seagate Access account must first create one. Once the Seagate Access account is
.created, the user can accept the invitation using the code sent in the email
.Note: If the email does not appear in your Inbox, check your Spam

.Download and install Sdrive per the instructions in the invitation email
.Upon reboot, the Sdrive sign in window opens. Choose Create a new Seagate Access account
.Complete all fields and choose Create account. An email has been sent to the address you entered
The verification window opens. Check your email for the confirmation code and copy it to the applicable
.field. If the email does not appear in your Inbox, check your Spam
.Choose Verify to create your Seagate Access account
.At the sign in window, enter your Seagate Access credentials and choose Sign in
.Choose Sdrive and select Add device. Sdrive is available in the following locations
Windows: hidden icons (up arrow in the system tray). Right click Sdrive to choose Add device. For
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.2
.3
.4
.5
.6
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Seagate NAS OS 4
instructions on how to move Sdrive to the system tray for easy access, see Windows: move the Sdrive
.icon to the system tray
.Mac: menu bar. Left click Sdrive to choose Add device
.Note: If you do not see the Add device window, look behind open applications or windows

.Copy the code found in the invitation email to the field in the Add device window .8
.Choose Add device .9
Invitation sent to a user with a Seagate Account but to the wrong email address
Many people have multiple email accounts but only one is linked to Seagate Access. Follow the directions below
.if you receive an invitation at an email account that is not linked to Seagate Access
.Note: If the email does not appear in your Inbox, check your Spam

.Click Sdrive and select Add device .1
Windows: hidden icons (up arrow in the system tray) or system tray. Right click Sdrive to choose Add
device. For instructions on how to move Sdrive to the system tray for easy access, see Windows: move
.the Sdrive icon to the system tray
.Mac: menu bar. Left click Sdrive to choose Add device
.Copy the code found in the invitation email .2
.Choose Add device .3
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Change your Seagate Access password
You can change your Seagate Access password in Sdrive. The change does not apply to the password that you
.use when signing into NAS OS, also known as the web board
.Click Sdrive and select Change password .1
Windows: hidden icons (up arrow in the system tray) or system tray. Right click Sdrive to choose Add
device. For instructions on how to move Sdrive to the system tray for easy access, see Windows: move
.the Sdrive icon to the system tray
.Mac: menu bar. Left click Sdrive to choose Add device
.Complete all the fields .2
.Choose Change password .3
(Manage your Seagate NAS devices (administrator
.Use Sdrive to access your NAS’s management tool, also known as the web board
.Click Sdrive and select [NAS Name] > Manage Device or [NAS Name] > Users .1
Windows: hidden icons (up arrow in the system tray) or system tray. Right click Sdrive to choose [NAS
Name] > Manage Device. For instructions on how to move Sdrive to the system tray for easy access,
.see Windows: move the Sdrive icon to the system tray
.Mac: menu bar. Left click Sdrive to choose [NAS Name] > Manage Device
.Choose your NAS and select Manage device or Users .2
.Manage device: your default browser opens to the NAS’s Overview page
MyNAS
Important info: MyNAS is not compatible with NAS OS 4.2 and higher. You can use Sdrive to access
.the NAS OS web board as well as your files from remote locations

MyNAS provides direct access to NAS OS using an Internet browser. However, MyNAS does not offer the type
of file integration found with Sdrive. Therefore, files must be uploaded and downloaded via the File Browser
. ( (see File Browser
Set up MyNAS remote access
Important info: In order to prevent unauthorized access, it is critical to protect user and
administrator accounts registered to your NAS OS device with a strong password BEFORE setting
up remote access. Since MyNAS lets you access your data with a simple URL, unwanted users could
access the NAS's files unless each authorized user is protected by a strong password. For added
protection, a user can select secure authentication by choosing Switch to HTTPS at the NAS OS
.login

.Go to NAS OS > Device Manager > Network > Remote access .1
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.In the Remote access drop-down menu, choose Seagate MyNAS .2
Type a name for the NAS OS device in the Name field. The name should be different than the NAS OS .3
.device’s network name
Choose Apply. NAS OS will query the MyNAS server to see if the name is available. If so, a message appears .4
.confirming the connection
. If the name is already chosen, type a new one and choose Apply
Failed connection
:If you receive an error that the NAS is unable to connect to the Internet
Check if a proxy server is required to access the Internet. Contact your network administrator or Internet
.provider then review Network for further instructions on how to add your proxy server's address
. Port forwarding may be required on your router. See the steps below
Router
If the issue is related to your router, you will need to access its administration page in order to forward a port
(by default, 8080). Once the port is opened for the NAS, MyNAS can gain access to it anywhere with a
connection to the Internet. From the router's administration page, select its port forwarding tab to assign a
.port to the NAS. Refer to your router's documentation for details
:Once a port has been selected on your router, you must assign the port on the NAS
.Go to NAS OS > Device Manager > Network > Remote access .1
.Pass the cursor next to the Name field to enable the edit pull-down menu .2
.Choose Advanced settings .3
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.In the dialogue window, choose Manual .4
.Enter the port you forwarded on your router .5
. Choose Apply .6
Using MyNAS remote access
.Once MyNAS is configured, type your NAS's URL into any browser: http://mynas.seagate.com/name
.The name is the name selected on the remote access page and not the NAS's network name
After entering the URL, you are prompted to log in to NAS OS. Enter the username and password created by
.the administrator in NAS OS > Users
Once logged in, an administrator can access NAS OS to administer the NAS. Users and administrators can use
. ( File Browser to upload and download files (see File Browser
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Ge ng Help
Review the list of troubleshooting topics below for answers to questions that might arise during the installation
.and operation of your Seagate product
. Additional technical assistance for Seagate products is available online at Seagate support
Software updates
.The NAS's automatic update does not seem to be working
Q: Does your NAS OS device have access to the Internet? Do you use a proxy
?server to access the Internet
A: Seagate frequently releases firmware updates to improve the functionality of products. The automatic
update on the Settings page will alert you to update your device when new firmware is available. In order to
search for and download the most recent firmware, the NAS OS device must have access to the Internet.
Confirm that it has access to the Internet or, if necessary, add your proxy server to the NAS OS device's
. ( Network settings (see Network for further details
:If automatic update is not available or experiencing problems, the administrator can follow the steps below
.Create a private share with read+write access for the administrator .1
Download the most recent NAS OS capsule for your product. Go to the Seagate support page and enter .2
.your product. The most recent firmware capsule should be available for download
.While the capsule is downloading, mount the private share on your computer .3
. ( On the root level of the private share, create a folder called Update (case-sensitive .4
.Copy the capsule into the folder Update .5
.Reboot the NAS OS device .6
. The update will run automatically
Troubleshooting topics
Troubleshooting the network connection
.Shares do not appear on the network
?Q: Is the NAS's power supply connected and is the status light on
A: Make sure that the power supply is properly connected; that the system has been powered on; and that the
.outlet is powered on or has a sufficient supply of power
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?Q: Is the status light on the front of the device flickering for an inordinate period of time
.A: See LED Behavior and Device Buttons for details
?Q: Did you follow the correct installation steps
.A: Review your NAS OS device's user manual and quick start guide
?Q: Are both ends of the Ethernet cable firmly connected
:A
.Disconnect the Ethernet cable, wait 10 seconds and then reconnect it
.Ensure that the interface connectors are properly aligned. The Ethernet cable can only be inserted one way
.Check that the Ethernet connectors are straight and fully seated in the Ethernet ports
?Q: IP address problem
A: By default the NAS OS device is configured to retrieve its IP address from a DHCP server. If a DHCP server
manages your network and you cannot access your NAS, try checking your DHCP server's log. To find the IP
address for your NAS, run Seagate Network Assistant (see Seagate Network Assistant). If no DHCP server is
detected, the product will run APIPA to assign itself an IP address. Additionally, confirm that your computer is
.connected to the same network as the NAS OS device
?Q: How can I find the public IP address for advanced features such as offsite backups and remote FTP access
A: You can find the public IP address at http://www.whatismyip.com/. You must use a computer connected to
.the same router as the NAS
.A user does not have access to NAS OS or shares
?Q: Has the administrator created an account for the user
:A: In order for a user to access NAS OS, two conditions must be met
The administrator must create and provide the user with a username and password .1
.The NAS OS device must be connected to the network via Ethernet for users to access the shares .2
I cannot access my account. I enter my login and password and receive an error
.message
?Q: Is your password correct
A: If you added an email address (see Users) and configured the SMTP server (see Notifications ), you can
reset your password. To do this, click on the Can't access your account? link on the login page. Follow the
instructions to complete the reset. User: If you cannot recover the password, contact the NAS OS device’s
administrator. Administrator: If you cannot recover the password, contact the alternate NAS administrator. If
you are the sole administrator for the NAS, you can revert the NAS to its factory settings (see NAS OS Rescue
. ( and Repair
.I've noticed a delay in accessing the shares
?Q: Are you transferring multiple files simultaneously, using the download feature, or synchronizing the RAID
A: Running all or some of the following operations at once can impact NAS performance: accessing shares; file
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transfers; downloads; synchronizing the RAID. Enabling the UPnP service can also slow performance due to
media indexing. For information on services, see Services. To review CPU performance, go to Monitoring (see
. ( Monitoring
Troubleshooting the multimedia server
.I cannot see the media les stored on the NAS OS device
?Q: Are the media files stored on a public share? Is the multimedia service active
A: UPnP AV devices can discover media files stored on public shares. Certain devices may have difficulty
locating files on a private share or, you will be prompted for a password. Make certain that the multimedia
. ( service is enabled in NAS OS (see Media Server and Services
iTunes
.Q: Some files appear in my iTunes™ shared playlist, but some do not
A: The iTunes Server Service supports certain file types. See the iTunes website for further
/details:http://www.apple.com/itunes
.Q: I've activated the NAS OS device's iTunes service in Services, but I don't see its machine name in iTunes
.A: In iTunes preferences, make certain that the box next to Shared Libraries is checked
?Q: Why aren't files stored on the NAS OS device appearing in iTunes
A: iTunes Server Service will only access public folders. Therefore, put your music on public folders if you wish to
.play it using iTunes
UPnP/DLNA-Compatible Game Consoles and Set Top Boxes
.Q: Some files stored on the NAS OS device appear on my UPnP/DLNA compatible device, but others do not
A: Each UPnP/DLNA media player has unique file type restrictions. See their respective websites and
. documentation for complete lists of compatible file types
Troubleshooting expansion devices
I connected a USB hard drive to the enclosure, but it does not appear on the
.Storage page
?Q: Is the hard drive's file system supported by NAS OS
A: NAS OS recognizes external hard drives with the following file systems: FAT32, NTFS, HFS+, EXT2, EXT3, EXT,
.and XFS. If your hard drive's file system is not listed here, reformat it and reconnect it to the NAS
.I can't copy a le from a share to the DAS connected to my NAS
?Q: Is the DAS formatted in FAT32 and is the file larger than 4GB
.A: Files larger than 4GB cannot be transferred to a FAT32 volume
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Hard drive noise and VGA monitor
.I think that the hard drive is making unusual noises
?"Q: Is the sound "soft clicking" or "hard clicking
:A
Soft clicking can be the normal sound of the hard drive working. If the hard drive is functional, this is normal.
Hard drives do not typically give an indication of any problems prior to failure, so it does not mean it is
about to fail if the hard drive is making a clicking sound and still functioning. You can check the status of your
. ( hard drives by running a SMART test (see Monitoring
Hard clicking is a very noticeable sound, and is akin to hearing metal-on-metal impacts. This behavior is
usually indicative of a physical failure. If nothing traumatic happened to the hard drive prior to this starting,
.consider it to be soft clicking, and troubleshoot the problem as suggested above
The VGA monitor that I connected to the NAS appears to be receiving a signal but
.(the screen is black (applies to select NAS
?Q: How long has the VGA monitor been connected to the NAS
A: The VGA signal reverts to energy saving mode within a few minutes. If the monitor appears to be receiving a
signal but no image is present, try to connect a USB keyboard to one of the NAS's USB ports. Tap on one of the
.keys to view the NAS's VGA signal
(Troubleshooting the active directory (AD
.The numbered list below provides general troubleshooting recommendations to resolve problems with AD
NAS OS
.Confirm that your NAS is running the latest NAS OS firmware
Check Monitoring to review CPU usage (see Monitoring). You can experience AD connection problems if the
:CPU is running high. Actions or jobs that can burden the CPU include
(RAID synchronization (in this case, wait until the RAID is built
(Multiple download jobs are running (stop or wait until download is finished
(Multimedia re-indexing (disable UPnP
(Backup jobs are running (stop or wait until backup jobs are finished
Multiple simultaneous data transfers to/from the NAS from computers on the network (wait until the
(transfers are complete
Make sure the product is assigned the correct date, time, and time zone. A time discrepancy of more than
five minutes between the domain and the product may prevent or cause disruptions to the AD connection.
.This tolerance is defined in Domain Controller Policy, and the default value is usually five minutes
Make sure that the DNS server address provided to the NAS is a domain DNS, not an Internet DNS
provided by an Internet service provider (see Network). The NAS must connect to the local network
domain, not to a server on the Internet. Therefore, make certain that the NAS is assigned an IP address by
the DNS server on the local network. To verify that the NAS is using a DNS IP address, try to ping the DNS
:server from a computer on the same network. Settings > Workgroup/Domain
Enter the domain's Full Qualified Domain Name (FQDN). For example: directory-example.domain.com
((Active Directory Users and Computers Tool on Primary Domain Controller
.Administrator login: The AD's administrator username
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.Administrator password: The AD's administrator password
. ( Advanced criteria (optional
Server Name is the Domain Controller Host Name
Server IP is the Domain Controller IP
Active directory
:The AD administrator can check the following
Verify if Kerberos Server and Time Server are registered in the domain DNS, allowing the NAS to connect.
Kerberos Server and Time Server need to be accessible to the NAS, as these servers are involved in the
.joining process
Confirm that the machine name object is placed in the right container (not the default "computer"
container) and check access rights for the machine name (such as who can log on). If necessary, delete the
machine name in order to reset the object in AD. The domain administrator can create a computer account
in AD and place it in the right container prior to joining the NAS to the domain (the computer account name
. ( is the NAS's name
Sub-domains can create problems when joining a domain. Confirm that the proper domain is being used and
review the machine name object location/rights. As well, see if the user belongs to a different sub-domain.
If so, review the user's rights to determine if there is an authorization conflict that prevents access to the
.NAS
Maximum Elements by Feature and NAS
. The table below provides the maximum amount of elements allowed for specific features
bay NAS Rackmount-8
NAS
NAS Pro 2bay | 4 bay |
6bay
NAS 2bay | 4
bay
bay Rackmount-4
NAS
Feature
4096
2048
2048
2048
Users
512
256
256
256
Groups
512
256
256
256
Shares
64
32
10
32
iSCSI
Targets
8
6|4|2
4|2
4
Volumes
108TB
108TB
16TB
108TB
Volume
size
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NAS OS Rescue and Repair
The NAS OS Rescue tool is preconfigured on a USB key for Rackmount NAS OS devices and on the motherboard
for Desktop NAS OS devices. In addition to installing NAS OS, it can act as a bootable rescue tool to help you
:troubleshoot technical problems. The NAS OS Rescue includes three recovery options
Recover data: Enable FTP Access to the data on your NAS OS device. Once enabled, you can use FTP client
.software or a web browser to back up the data stored on your NAS
Restore to factory settings: Reset your NAS OS device to its factory default while attempting to preserve
the shares and data. Seagate cannot guarantee that all your data will be saved. Factory default includes the
.reversion of all NAS OS parameters (e.g. Users, Shares, Network, etc.) to their original states
Format the drives and install NAS OS: The Installer will format the NAS's hard drives before reinstalling NAS
OS. Since all data will be deleted during the format, Seagate highly recommends that you back up your files
. before selecting this option
Rackmount NAS
Note for NAS OS devices shipped with NAS OS 3: The NAS OS 3 installer is available on the USB key
shipped with your NAS OS device. You must download the most recent version onto the USB key
before following the steps below. Running the NAS OS 3 installer on a device that runs NAS OS 4 can
. have unwanted consequences. See the instructions below to update the USB key

Prepare for a rescue and repair
To connect to the Installer, you will need the NAS OS device’s MAC address. Your NAS OS device has two MAC
addresses, one for each LAN port (see the hardware user manual for your device). You may use either MAC
.address for the installer
:You have multiple options for finding the MAC address
.Check the MAC address label on the NAS OS device
.Connect a VGA monitor to the NAS's VGA port
. ( Launch Seagate Network Assistant (see Seagate Network Assistant
VGA monitor
While not obligatory, you can connect a compatible monitor to the NAS before following the recovery steps.
Doing so will help you confirm that the NAS boots from the USB key. You can also review the device's IP and
.MAC addresses
The VGA signal reverts to energy saving mode within a few minutes. If the monitor appears to be receiving a
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signal but no image is present, try to connect a USB keyboard to one of the NAS's USB ports. Tap on one of the
. keys to view the NAS's VGA signal
Seagate Network Assistant
:If you do not see the NAS OS device in Seagate Network Assistant, confirm that your NAS is
Connected to the same network as the computer you are using. In certain configurations, the NAS is
.connected to two separate networks
Connected to the same network as the computer you are using via the LAN 1 Ethernet port. Seagate
.Network Assistant requires that LAN 1 act as the primary Ethernet port for your NAS
:If you still do not see your device in Seagate Network Assistant, follow the instructions below
.Launch Seagate Network Assistant .1
Select Preferences .2
.Windows: Right-click on the Seagate Network Assistant icon in the system tray
.Mac: Click on the Seagate Network Assistant icon in the menu
. Enable IPConf Support by clicking on Activate .3
Rescue and repair steps
Step 1: Update the USB key
The included USB key allows you to boot the NAS OS device and run the NAS OS installer. However, before
using the USB key, it is highly recommended that you download a more recent version of the Installer as it may
. have been updated since you received your NAS
Note on download: The software that you download is not NAS OS. Rather, it is a utility to install the
. NAS OS Installer onto the key so that you can install or repair the NAS OS

:To update the USB key
.Insert it into a USB port on a computer with a connection to the Internet .1
.Launch an Internet browser and enter the following address: http://www.seagate.com/naskey .2
.Follow the on-screen directions to update the software on the key .3
.Eject the key from your computer .4
Step 2: Back up and power off the NAS OS device
The NAS OS installer will attempt to repair or reset the NAS OS. To guarantee that data stored on the NAS is
preserved, Seagate highly recommends that you back up all shares before moving forward with the Installer. If
.you cannot access the NAS OS volumes, the Rescue provides an option to retrieve data via FTP
Following the backup (if applicable), turn the NAS off. If you have access to NAS OS, use the power icon on the
.upper right of the window to select Shut down. Otherwise, apply a short push to the power button
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Step 3: Connect the USB key and boot the NAS
.Connect the USB key to one of the USB ports on the NAS .1
.Push the power button to boot the NAS .2
Step 4: Launch the NAS OS Installer
.Go to http://discover.seagate.com
.Choose Find
.Select your NAS and choose Connect
.Enter the NAS’s MAC address and choose Connect
.1
.2
.3
.4
Select an option and follow the on-screen prompts to complete the Rescue. The NAS OS Installer may perform
a file system check (fsck) to determine if the device was improperly powered off or crashed, causing an
. inconsistent state for NAS OS. The fsck will attempt to repair or recover damaged system files
Desktop NAS
Prepare for a rescue and repair
Back up the NAS device
The NAS OS Rescue will attempt to repair or reset NAS OS. To guarantee that data stored on the NAS is
preserved, Seagate highly recommends that you back up all shares before moving forward with the Installer. If
.you cannot access the NAS volumes, the Rescue provides an option to retrieve data via FTP
Following the backup (if applicable), turn the NAS off. If you have access to NAS OS, use the power icon on the
.upper right of the window to select Shutdown. Otherwise, apply a short push to the power button
Recovery button
The NAS OS Rescue tool is enabled upon booting the NAS by simultaneously pushing the Recovery and power
buttons. The recovery button is located on the back of the NAS within a small recessed niche. To push the
recovery button, you will need a thin pointed object such as a paperclip or a small screwdriver. See your NAS
. OS device's hardware user manual for details
MAC address
Once it is enabled, the NAS OS Rescue prompts you for the NAS OS device's MAC address. Your NAS OS device
has two MAC addresses, one for each LAN port. Check the MAC address labels on the back of your device and
. note one for the rescue
Perform a rescue
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.Confirm that users on the network are not accessing the NAS
.If the NAS is powered on, use NAS OS to shut down the NAS
.Use a thin pointed object (e.g. paperclip, thin screwdriver, etc.) to push the recovery button
Hold the recovery button while pushing the power button. Continue to push the recovery button for five
.seconds
.Wait for the LED to turn solid
.From a computer on the network, launch a web browser and enter http://discover.seagate.com
.Choose Find
.Select your NAS and choose Connect
.Enter the NAS’s MAC address and choose Connect
.Choose an option and follow the on-screen prompts to complete the Rescue
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