Operations Guide
®
Intelligent Power System
Operating Instructions
&
Installation Guide
Dimmers
Distribution Amplifiers
Status Monitor
Auxiliary Control (AC-100)
Before attempting to connect or operate this equipment, please read these instructions completely.
CONTENTS
Safety Information................................................................................................................................................................3
I. Installation Guide..............................................................................................................................................................5
Connector Strip Dimmer Systems ........................................................................................................5
Plugging Box Dimmer Systems ..........................................................................................................10
Status Monitor .....................................................................................................................................13
Portable Distribution Amplifiers.........................................................................................................15
Wall Box Distribution Amplifiers ........................................................................................................16
Auxiliary Control Unit .........................................................................................................................17
Control Signal Cabling for DMX512 ...................................................................................................19
Control Signal Cabling for AMX192 ...................................................................................................23
Control Signal Cabling for 0 - 10VDC Analog ...................................................................................24
II. IPS Dimmer User's Guide.......................................................................................................................................... 25
Dimmer System Fundamentals...........................................................................................................25
Head-End Processor Operation & Programming ...............................................................................26
Dimmer Operation...............................................................................................................................30
III. Status Monitor User's Guide................................................................................................................................. 33
Status Monitor Fundamentals ............................................................................................................33
Status Monitor Functions....................................................................................................................34
Using a Status Monitor to Troubleshoot Your System......................................................................37
IV. Auxiliary Control Unit User's Guide ................................................................................................................. 41
Auxiliary Control Unit Fundamentals ................................................................................................41
Auxiliary Control Unit Features..........................................................................................................42
Auxiliary Control Unit Programming .................................................................................................43
V. Troubleshooting............................................................................................................................................................ 47
Checklist ..............................................................................................................................................47
Symptoms & Causes............................................................................................................................48
Appendices............................................................................................................................................................................. 49
A. Cables, Connectors, & Pinouts.......................................................................................................49
B. Dimmer System Enclosures ............................................................................................................52
C. Other References ............................................................................................................................54
D. Glossary...........................................................................................................................................55
2
Safety Information
The lightning flash symbol within an equilateral triangle is intended
to alert the user to the presence of uninsulated "dangerous voltage"
within the product's enclosure that may be of sufficient magnitude
to constitute a risk of electric shock to persons.
!
The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is intended to
alert the user of the presence of important operating and
maintenance (servicing) instructions in the literature accompanying
the appliance.
WARNING
TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FIRE OR SHOCK HAZARD, DO NOT
EXPOSE THIS EQUIPMENT TO RAIN OR MOISTURE.
WARNING
to Service Personnel
!
The IPS dimmer electronics operate at line voltage potential! They are
electrically isolated by optically coupling the input and output data
streams. DO NOT connect non-isolated test equipment to the circuit
common point in the dimmers. Destruction of the dimmer and test
equipment and possible injury to personnel will result. Measurements
of input and output voltages must be referenced to Power Line
Neutral only.
The IPS dimmer electronics operate at line voltage potential! They are
electrically isolated by optically coupling the input and output data
streams. DO NOT connect non-isolated test equipment to the circuit
common point in the dimmers. Destruction of the dimmer and test
equipment and possible injury to personnel will result. Measurements
of input and output voltages must be referenced to Power Line
Neutral only.
3
4
Safety Information
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a
commitment on the part of Entertainment Technology, Inc.
Written by Jon R. Farley and Steven B. Carlson
Compiled and Edited By Jon R. Farley.
Copyright 1993 by Entertainment Technology, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Preliminary Edition, February 1993.
Second Preliminary Edition, May 1993.
First Printing, October 1993.
Current Edition November 1, 2001
This document contains information for the following IPS products:
IPS-AC-100
IPS-DB-1206, IPS-DB-2403, IPS-DB-6003
IPS-DS-1206, IPS-DS-2403
IPS-SA-104, IPS-SA-104-WB, IPS-SA-108, IPS-SA-108-WB
IPS-SM-101
"WARNING: This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed
and used in accordance with this instruction manual may cause interference to radio communications. It
has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device pursuant to
Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such
interference when operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential
area is likely to cause interference in which case the user, at his own expense, will be required to take
whatever measures may be required to correct the interference."
If you need help, consult your dealer. You may also find the following booklet helpful: How to Identify
and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems. This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, DC 20402, stock no. 004-000-00345-4.
5
Connector Strip
Dimmer Systems
This section applies to Connector Strip Dimmer Systems
IPS-DS-1206, and IPS-DS-2403.
Controls and Components
➊ Field Wiring Compartment.
➋ Head-End Processor.
➌ Dimmer (Typical of 6 or 3).
Field Wiring Compartment
➊ 3/4" Knock-out for power wiring
➋ Grounding Lug
➌ Phase terminals
➍ Neutral terminals.
➎ Neutral bus jumpers
The inside of the Field Wiring Compartment cover has a wiring diagram.
7
I
Installation
Guide
Connector Strip
Dimmer Systems
Power Requirements
Head-End Processor
IPS 1200 and 2400 Watt dimmer systems
are designed to operate on a 50 or 60
Hertz, 20 Amp, 120/208 VAC, three phase
"WYE" power service. However, they will
tolerate a wide variety of input voltages.
For these systems to function normally the
Phase to Neutral voltage must be in the
range of 90 to 140 VAC.
If a system is miswired to voltages greater
than 180 VAC, the dimmers will shut down
and flash the 'Mis-Wire' warning. It will not
attempt to bring up loads when in overvoltage shutdown. IPS is designed to safely
tolerate a 230 VAC line indefinitely, and a
280 VAC line for 15 minutes. Line voltages
greater than 280 VAC may destroy the over
voltage protection components in the
dimmers and the Head-End Processor.
➊ Blank knockout for analog input option.
➋ DMX512 Input Connector.
➌ DMX512 Pass-Through Connector.
➍ Red LED Error Indicators.
➎ DMX512 Termination Switch.
➏ Four-digit LED Display.
➐ Function Select Push Buttons.
Connecting Power
Dimmers
!
WARNING
Wiring must comply with all applicable
building codes. If the information in this
section is not consistent with the
electrical code in your area, you must
disregard this section and follow the
dictates of your code!
Field wiring of the IPS DS series dimming
system is a straight forward matter. A total
of 5 wires need to be brought to the unit:
The three "phase" wires, a Neutral, and a
Ground. The "phase" wires carry up to 20
amps each, and the Neutral carries the
"unbalanced" current.
➊ Heat Sink.
➋ Load Receptacle (Theatrical Pin
Connector, NEMA L5-20R "Twist-Lock", or
NEMA 5-20R duplex Straight Blade.)
➌ Focus Button.
➍ Green LED.
➎ Red LED.
If the unit is being set up for portable use,
10/5 SO cable should be used to make the
power connections. In permanent
installations, 20 amp rated conductors,
such as 12 gage THHN, should be used for
the "phase" conductors and Ground, and
8
Connector Strip
Dimmer Systems
the next size larger conductor, i.e. 10
gage THHN, for the Neutral.
All connections are made in the Field
Wiring Terminal Compartment at the left
end of the enclosure. The terminals are
revealed by removing the Field Wiring
Compartment Cover.
The connections are made as follows: The
Ground (Green) wire connects to the
grounding lug at the left of the terminal
block; The Neutral (White) wire connects to
any one of the three Neutral terminals,
retaining the jumpers which bus these
terminals together; and the three "phase"
wires (Black, Red, and Blue or Orange)
connect one to each of the three "phase"
terminals. Since each dimmer is a separate
single phase load, there is no requirement
that the phases be connected in any
particular order.
Cross section of DS system enclosure.
➊ Track to capture 1/2" hex head bolt.
➋ Track to capture 5/16" carriage bolt.
➌ Unistrut compatible track.
➍ Dimmer protection fin.
➎ Dimmer heat sinks.
In situations in which the dimmer system
is to be mounted below a pipe, possibly
with fixtures hung from it, the most
convenient mounting means is two "C"
clamps bolted into the top extruded track.
The IPS System Status Monitor includes a
function which can report the total load on
each phase of your power service. For this
function to work, you must ensure that the
wires feeding all dimmers and dimmer
outlets are wired in the same order. The
following scheme is suggested:
Connector
"X"
"Y"
"Z"
"W"
"G"
Wire
Black
Red
Blue or
Orange
White
Green
Conductor
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
IPS
"A"
"B"
"C"
Neutral
Ground
"N"
Lug
The heads of the 1/2" bolts are slid into
the track from the end, and then the "C"
clamp stud is screwed down onto the
captured bolt. It is important when doing
this to securely tighten the stud against
the top of the dimmer enclosure so it does
not rotate. Set the angle of the "C" clamp
by loosening the smaller set screw on the
side of the clamp. Do not use a clamp
whose set screw is missing or has been
sheared off.
The 5/16" carriage bolt track is useful for
attaching the dimmer system to vertical
surfaces, or to clamp it to a set of
vertically running pipes. Again the heads
of the bolts are slid into the track, and the
mounting means are securely tightened
against the system enclosure.
Securely tighten all terminals, and replace
the Field Wiring Compartment Cover when
done.
Mounting
The innovative design of the IPS connector
strip enclosure allows a wide range of
installation options. This section discusses
the basic ground rules of installation, but
cannot cover every conceivable variation.
9
Connector Strip
Dimmer Systems
NOTE: If fixtures are to be hung from the
dimmer enclosure when it is mounted from
the back extruded track, a minimum of six
carriage bolts must be used in mounting
the unit. These bolts should be evenly
spaced along the length of the track.
Connecting to the
DMX512 Network
Basic DMX512 installation consists of
connecting IPS units together in "daisychain" fashion. A cable runs from the
control console to the "DMX IN" connector
on the first IPS unit. Another cable runs
from the "DMX OUT" connector on the first
unit to the "DMX IN" connector on the
second unit. All units are connected
together in this fashion.
The most versatile of the DS enclosure's
extruded mounting tracks is the
"Unistrut" compatible track on the unit's
bottom surface. This track accepts a wide
variety of standard hardware which may be
used for mounting the dimmer system
itself, or for the attachment of lighting
fixtures. A particularly useful configuration
mounts the dimmer system above a pipe
batten with "Unistrut" pipe clamps, and
then hangs lighting fixtures from the
batten with conventional "C" clamps.
!
Setting the Termination
Switch
WARNING
In all cases where an IPS dimmer system
is hung above personnel, it must be
equipped with safety cables or chains to
prevent it from falling should the
mounting means fail!
In addition to connecting the cables, the
termination switches must be set correctly
on each IPS unit. The rules for setting
these switches are as follows:
Thermal Environment
• If a unit has cable plugged into its "DMX
OUT" connector which runs to another IPS
unit, the switch should be in the left hand
(unterminated) position.
Since IPS connector strip dimmers are
convection cooled, it is imperative that
they be mounted with their heat-sink fins
running vertically. It is not acceptable to
mount the dimmer system lying on its face
or back, or to hang it so that its long
dimension runs vertically. DS series
dimming systems are designed primarily
for pipe, beam, and truss mounting, they
are not as well suited for boom or
tormentor lighting positions. Use IPS
Plugging Box Dimming System in these
applications.
• If a unit does not have a cable plugged
into its "DMX OUT" connector, the switch
should be set to the right hand
(terminated) position.
• No more than 1 termination switch may
be set to the right hand position on any
one cable run.
See the "Control Signal Cabling" section for
a full discussion of DMX512 issues.
10
Connector Strip
Dimmer Systems
To verify the address, or make a change,
press the 'L' button several more times
until the "Display/Set Address" mode
shows again. For full information about
Head-End Processor menus, see the
Dimmer System User's Guide.
Setting the Dimmer Address
Each IPS dimmer package must have an
unique starting address within the
DMX512 network. IPS system addresses are
set electronically in the Head-End
Processor and retained indefinitely in nonvolatile memory.
IPS addresses represent the DMX ID
number of the first dimmer in the IPS
package. For instance, if the address is set
to 007, then the first dimmer in the unit
will be dimmer 7, the second will be
dimmer 8, etc. For talkback to work
properly, each IPS package must decode a
unique range of addresses and must not
overlap with other IPS units. If the unit
mentioned above at address 007 contains
six dimmers, the next unit must be set to
address 013 to avoid overlapping address
ranges.
IPS addresses are set with the buttons and
display on the Head-End Processor.
Buttons are identified as 'L', 'C', and 'R'
(short for Left, Center, and Right).
Set the IPS starting address as follows:
1. Press the 'L' button once. This places
the display in the "Display/Set Address"
mode (indicated by "A" in left most digit).
2. Press the 'C' button to increase the
address by three. Press the 'R' button to
decrease the address by three.
3. When the display shows the correct
address, press the 'L' button again. (The
display will blank after about one minute)
11
Plugging Box
Dimmer Systems
This section applies to Plugging Box
Dimmer Systems IPS-DB-1206, IPS-DB2403, and IPS-DB-6003.
➋ DMX512 Pass-Through Connector.
➌ DMX512 Input Connector.
➍ Red LED Error Indicators.
➎ DMX512 Termination Switch.
➏ Four-digit LED Display.
➐ Function Select Push Buttons.
Controls and Components
Dimmers
➊ Carry Handle.
➋ Head-End Processor & DMX512 connectors.
➌ Fan. (Air Inlet)
➍ Power inlet connector.
➎ Dimmer heat sink. (Typical of 6 or 3)
➏ Dimmer focus button and indicator
➊ Load Receptacle (Theatrical Pin
Connector, NEMA L5-20R "Twist-Lock", or
NEMA 5-20R duplex Straight Blade.)
➋ Heat Sink. (Air Exhaust)
➌ Green LED.
➍ Red LED.
➎ Focus Button.
LEDs. (Typical of 6 or 3)
➐ Load Receptacle. (Typical of 6 or 3)
Head-End Processor
Power Requirements
IPS 1200 and 2400 Watt dimmer systems
are designed to operate on a 50 or 60
Hertz, 20 Amp, 120/208 VAC, three phase
"WYE" power service. IPS 6000 Watt dimmer
systems are designed to operate on a 50
or 60 Hertz, 50 Amp, 120/208 VAC, three
phase "WYE" power service.These systems,
however, will tolerate a wide variety of
input voltages. For them to function
normally the Phase to Neutral voltage must
be in the range of 90 to 140 VAC.
If a system is miswired to voltages greater
than 180 VAC, the dimmers will shut down
and flash the 'Mis-Wire' warning. Dimmers
➊ Blank knockout for analog input option.
12
Plugging Box
Dimmer Systems
will not attempt to bring up loads when in
over-voltage shutdown. IPS is designed to
safely tolerate a 230 VAC line indefinitely,
and a 280 VAC line for 15 minutes. Line
voltages greater than 280 VAC may
destroy the over voltage protection
components in the dimmers and the HeadEnd Processor.
Mounting
IPS DB series dimmer systems may be
mounted in any orientation, provided that
the front and back panels are kept open to
allow air flow. The handle of the DB
enclosure is drilled to accept two standard
"C" clamps to allow the unit to be hung
from a pipe.
Connecting Power
Field wiring of the IPS DB series dimming
system is a straight forward matter. A total
of 5 wires need to be brought to the unit:
The three "phase" wires, a Neutral, and a
Ground. The "phase" wires carry up to 20
(or 50) amps each, and the Neutral carries
the "unbalanced" current.
!
All IPS-DB series dimmer systems use
flanged inlets for power connections. 1200
and 2400 Watt systems use a NEMA type
L21-20P connector. 6000 Watt systems use
a VEAM CIR065GRH Connector.
Recommended cable is 10/5 type SO for
1200 and 2400 Watt systems and 6/5 type
SO for 6000 Watt systems.
In all cases where an IPS dimmer system
is hung above personnel, it must be
equipped with safety cables or chains to
prevent it from falling should the
mounting means fail!
The IPS System Status Monitor includes a
function which can report the total load on
each phase of your power service. For this
function to work, you must ensure that the
wires feeding all dimmers and dimmer
outlets are wired in the same order. The
following scheme is suggested:
Connector
"X" or "A"
"Y" or "B"
"Z" or "C"
"W" or "N"
"G"
Wire
Black
Red
Blue or
Orange
White
Green
WARNING
Thermal Environment
IPS DB series dimming systems are fan
cooled. Air inlet and exhaust ports must
be kept open and free of obstruction at all
times. Fan operates in one of two modes
set in the Head-End Processor, and runs
only when needed.
Conductor
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
See the Dimmer System User's Guide for
full information on fan operation.
Neutral
Ground
Connecting to the
DMX512 Network
Basic DMX512 installation consists of
connecting IPS units together in "daisychain" fashion. A cable runs from the
control console to the "DMX IN" connector
13
Plugging Box
Dimmer Systems
IPS addresses represent the DMX ID
number of the first dimmer in the IPS
package. For instance, if the address is set
to 007, then the first dimmer in the unit
will be dimmer 7, the second will be
dimmer 8, etc. For talkback to work
properly, each IPS package must decode a
unique range of addresses and must not
overlap with other IPS units. If the unit
mentioned above at address 007 contains
six dimmers, the next unit must be set to
address 013 to avoid overlapping address
ranges.
on the first IPS unit. Another cable runs
from the "DMX OUT" connector on the first
unit to the "DMX IN" connector on the
second unit. All units are connected
together in this fashion.
Setting the Termination
Switch
IPS addresses are set with the buttons and
display on the Head-End Processor.
Buttons are identified as 'L', 'C', and 'R'
(short for Left, Center, and Right).
In addition to connecting the cables, the
termination switches must be set correctly
on each IPS unit. The rules for setting
these switches are as follows:
Set the IPS starting address as follows:
1. Press the 'L' button once. This places
the display in the "Display/Set Address"
mode (indicated by "A" in left most digit).
• If a unit has cable plugged into its "DMX
OUT" connector which runs to another IPS
unit, the switch should be in the left hand
(unterminated) position.
• If a unit does not have a cable plugged
into its "DMX OUT" connector, the switch
should be set to the right hand
(terminated) position.
2. Press the 'C' button to increase the
address by three. Press the 'R' button to
decrease the address by three.
• No more than 1 termination switch may
be set to the right hand position on any
one cable run.
3. When the display shows the correct
address, press the 'L' button again. (The
display will blank after about one minute)
See the "Control Signal Cabling" section for
a full discussion of DMX512 issues.
To verify the address, or make a change,
press the 'L' button several more times
until the "Display/Set Address" mode
shows again. For full information about
Head-End Processor menus, see the
Dimmer System User's Guide.
Setting the Dimmer Address
Each IPS dimmer package must have an
unique starting address within the
DMX512 network. IPS system addresses are
set electronically in the Head-End
Processor and retained indefinitely in nonvolatile memory.
14
Status Monitor
The IPS Status Monitor is a data display
and analysis system which reports the
operational status of IPS dimming systems.
It collects status information from IPS
dimmers over the DMX512 data network.
➏ Talkback Termination Switch.
This section applies to Status Monitor
model IPS-SM-101.
Plug the external wall-mount power supply
into a convenient AC wall outlet.
Connecting the Power
Supply
Plug the 1/8" mini-phone plug into the
Power Inlet Jack on the rear of the Status
Monitor.
Controls and
Components
Power Supply Rating:
12 Volts DC Output
800 mA
Output on 1/8" mini-phone plug,
center terminal positive.
For replacement order Entertainment
Technology inventory number Y05-5210.
Connecting the Video
Monitor
Plug the video monitor into a convenient
AC wall outlet.
➊ Video Display.
➋ Status Monitor Enclosure.
➌ Number Keypad.
➍ Function Keys.
➎ Cursor Keys.
Connect the 9 pin video cable from the
video monitor to the video output
connector on the rear of the Status
Monitor.
Switch on the video monitor.
Rear Panel
Monitor Type
The Status Monitor requires an IBM MDA
compatible TTL monochrome display with
9 pin "D" connector.
For replacement, call Entertainment
Technology at 972-840-1640.
➊ Power Inlet Jack.
➋ Power Indicator.
➌ Video Output Connector.
➍ DMX from Console Connector.
➎ DMX to Dimmers Connector.
Connecting to the
DMX512 Network
Install the Status Monitor between the
lighting control console and the IPS
dimmers.
15
Status Monitor
Plug the DMX512 cable from the lighting
console into the "DMX from Console"
connector.
Using Multiple Status
Monitors on one DMX Link
On occasion it may be useful to install
more than one IPS Status Monitor on a
single DMX512 data link. The rules for
such an installation are only a slight
extension of those for a singe monitor.
Plug the DMX512 cable from the dimmers
into the "DMX to Dimmers" connector.
If a Distribution Amplifier is part of the
system, install the Status Monitor between
the lighting console and the Distribution
Amplifier.
When deciding where to connect the Status
Monitors in the DMX network, treat the
group of Status Monitors as though they
were one unit. Connect this group
according to the rules in the previous
sections.
If an Auxiliary Control Unit is part of the
system, install the Status Monitor between
the Auxiliary Control Unit and the
Dimmers.
If both an Auxiliary Control Unit and a
Distribution Amplifier are included in the
system, install the Status Monitor between
the Auxiliary Control Unit and the
Distribution Amplifier.
Set the Talkback Termination switch on
the unit closest to the console according
to the rules in the previous section.
Set the Talkback Termination switch on all
other Status Monitors to the Pass-Thru
position.
Refer to the "Control Signal Cabling for
DMX512" section for a full discussion of
DMX system layouts.
Position of Talkback
Termination Switch
If the lighting console in the system is IPS
compatible (for example ACCESS or
ACCESS-Pro) or if an Auxiliary Control Unit
is installed, set the Talkback Termination
switch in the pass-thru position.
If the lighting console is not IPS
compatible, or if you are not sure, set the
Talkback Termination switch in the
terminate position. This setting correctly
terminates the talkback pair from the
dimmers, and disconnects it from the
control console.
16
Portable
Distribution Amplifiers
IPS Portable Distribution Amplifiers
facilitate the connection of large numbers
of IPS dimmer units to one control console,
and help simplify cabling when dimmers
are being installed in widely separated
parts of a building.
Connecting Power
Attach the standard IEC power cord
(provided) to the power inlet connector on
the Distribution Amplifier rear panel. Plug
the cord into a convenient AC wall outlet.
This section applies to Distribution
Amplifiers IPS-SA-104, and IPS-SA-108.
Selecting Input Voltage
Controls and
Components
IPS portable distribution amplifiers may be
modified to operate on 240 VAC by
changing an internal plug connection. To
make this change, follow these steps:
1. Turn the unit over and remove the four
screws which retain the enclosure bottom.
Lift the bottom away from the top.
2. Note that the cable from the power inlet
connector to the printed circuit board has
two connectors on it, one marked 120V
and the other marked 240V. Unplug the
120V connector from the printed circuit
board and plug the 240V connector in its
place.
➊ "From Console" connector.
➋ "To Dimmers" connector. Typical of
3. Replace the enclosure bottom and its
screws.
eight (four).
4. Change the fuse to the appropriate size
for 240 volt operation.
➌ Channel status indicators. Typical of
nine (five).
5. Mark the outside of the enclosure to
indicate that the unit is set for 240 volt
operation.
➍ Power inlet connector and fuse holder.
Channel Status Indicators
Fuse Ratings
Slo-Blow Type
0.5 Amp for 120 Volt operation
0.25 Amp for 240 Volt operation.
Connecting to the
DMX512 Network
➊ Red power indicator LED.
➋ Green DMX512 data indicator LED.
➌ Yellow Talkback data indicator LED.
See the "Control Signal Cabling for
DMX512" section for a full discussion of
the use of IPS distribution amplifiers.
17
Wall Box
Distribution Amplifiers
wiring to the Amplifier should be run in
conduit.
IPS Wall Box Distribution Amplifiers
facilitate the connection of large numbers
of IPS dimmer units to one control console,
and help simplify cabling when dimmers
are being installed in widely separated
parts of a building.
Connecting Power
Connect line and neutral respectively to
the black and white wires provided in the
Field Wiring Compartment. Connect
ground to the green chassis screw in the
Field Wiring Compartment. Power may be
fed from any convenient utility circuit.
This section applies to Distribution
Amplifiers IPS-SA-104-WB, and IPS-SA-108WB.
Controls and
Components
Connecting to the
DMX512 Network
All DMX512 connections to IPS Wall Box
Distribution Amplifiers are made through
terminal strips. Route the DMX512 cable
through a knock-out to its appropriate
connection point. Strip back only about
one inch of cable jacketing and shield
when making the connection.
➊ Main printed circuit board.
➋ Field wiring compartment.
➌ "DMX from Console" terminal strip.
➍ "DMX to Dimmers" terminal strip.
Make the connections according to the
following table:
Terminal
GND
TALKTALK+
DMXDMX+
Typical of eight (four).
Phy sical Installation
IPS Wall Box Distribution Amplifiers are
built into standard utility enclosures and
designed primarily for surface mounting.
Signal Name
Common
Talkback Talkback +
Dimmer Drive Dimmer Drive +
Wire
Shield (drain)
White w/ Orange
Orange w/ White
White w/ Blue
Blue w/ White
IMPORTANT: Note that the numbering
scheme on the terminal strip is not the
same as that for XLR connectors!
Securely anchor the box to a wall in a
convenient dry location. Do not block
access to the cover of the box.
See the "Control Signal Cabling for
DMX512" section for a full discussion of
the use of IPS distribution amplifiers.
Power is admitted to the field wiring
compartment. DMX cabling is brought into
the main section of the enclosure. All
18
Auxiliary Control Unit
This section applies to Auxiliary Control
Unit IPS-AC-100.
Field Wiring Compartment
Controls and
Components
➊ Line & Neutral for Processor Board.
➋ Grounding Terminal.
Controls and Indicators
➊ Controls and Indicators.
➋ Field wiring compartment.
➌ Processor board power cable.
➍ I/O Board.
➎ Processor board.
➊ Four digit LED display.
➋ Special indicator LEDs.
➌ Control buttons.
I/O Board
Phy sical Installation
The IPS-AC-100 is housed in a 10" x 12" x
4" surface mount junction box with
standard knock-outs for conduit
connections. Securely mount the enclosure
to a wall or equipment panel with screws
or bolts through its four mounting holes.
➊ Panic, Work Light and Take-Control station
Install the AC power conduit into one of
the three knock-outs in the lower left
corner of the enclosure which open into
the field wiring compartment. Install
control wiring conduit into any of the
knock-outs which open into the main body
of the enclosure.
button terminals.
➋ Panic, Work Light and Take-Control station
LED terminals.
➌ Preset station button terminals.
➍ Preset station LED terminals.
➎ Slider station terminals.
➏ DMX from Console terminals.
➐ DMX to Dimmers terminals.
➑ Connections to Processor Board.
If loose wiring is brought directly into the
enclosure, make sure appropriate bushings
and strain reliefs are used.
19
Auxiliary Control Unit
Connecting Power
Connecting Button Stations
Connect line and neutral respectively to
the black and white wires provided in the
Field Wiring Compartment. Connect
ground to the green chassis screw in the
Field Wiring Compartment. Power may be
fed from any convenient utility circuit.
Make sure the Processor Board Power
Cable is plugged into its corresponding
connector on the Processor Board.
Connect the signal wire from each button
to one of the switch inputs. Connect the
signal wire from each LED to one of the
LED outputs. Keep Button Common and
LED Common separate from each other.
Connecting Control
Stations
Connecting Slider Stations
+5V and COMM provide power to all slider
stations. The output signal of each slider
is connected to one of the fader inputs.
The function of the input terminals
changes depending on which Analog Input
mode has been selected. In the following
table, each column represents one Analog
Input mode. The numbers in parenthesis
indicate which Take-Control button
enables each input.
Term.
P1-1
P1-2
P1-3
P1-4
P1-5
P1-6
P1-7
P1-8
P1-9
Mode 1
Fader 1
Fader 2
Fader 3
Fader 4
Fader 5
Fader 6
Fader 7
Fader 8
+5V
Mode 2
Fader 1 (1)
Fader 2 (1)
Fader 3 (1)
Fader 4 (1)
Fader 5 (1)
Fader 6 (1)
Fader 7 (1)
Fader 8 (1)
+5V
Mode 3
Fader 1 (1)
Fader 2 (1)
Fader 3 (1)
Fader 4 (1)
Fader 1 (2)
Fader 2 (2)
Fader 3 (2)
Fader 4 (2)
+5V
P2-1
P2-2
P2-3
P2-4
P2-5
P2-6
P2-7
P2-8
P2-9
Fader 9
Fader 10
Fader 11
Fader 12
Fader 13
Fader 14
Fader 15
Fader 16
COMM
Fader 1 (2)
Fader 2 (2)
Fader 3 (2)
Fader 4 (2)
Fader 5 (2)
Fader 6 (2)
Fader 7 (2)
Fader 8 (2)
COMM
Fader 1 (3)
Fader 2 (3)
Fader 3 (3)
Fader 4 (3)
Fader 1 (4)
Fader 2 (4)
Fader 3 (4)
Fader 4 (4)
COMM
Term.
P10-1
P10-2
P10-3
P10-4
P10-5
P10-6
P10-7
P10-8
P10-9
Button
Panic
Switch 1
Switch 2
Switch 3
Take-Con 1
Take-Con 2
Take-Con 3
Take-Con 4
Common
Term.
P7-1
P7-2
P7-3
P7-4
P7-5
P7-6
P7-7
P7-8
P7-9
LED
Panic
Switch 1
Switch 2
Switch 3
Take-Con 1
Take-Con 2
Take-Con 3
Take-Con 4
Common
P11-1
P11-2
P11-3
P11-4
P11-5
P11-6
P11-7
P11-8
P11-9
Preset Off
Preset A
Preset B
Preset C
Preset D
Preset E
Preset F
Preset G
Common
P8-1
P8-2
P8-3
P8-4
P8-5
P8-6
P8-7
P8-8
P8-9
Preset Off
Preset A
Preset B
Preset C
Preset D
Preset E
Preset F
Preset G
Common
Connecting to the
DMX512 Network
All DMX512 connections to IPS Auxiliary
Control Units are made through terminal
strips. Remove only about one inch of
cable jacketing and shield when making
the connection.
Terminal
P3-1
P3-2
P3-3
P3-4
P3-5
From
Console
Common
DMX In DMX In +
Terminal
P4-1
P4-2
P4-3
P4-4
P4-5
To
Dimmers
Common
Talkback Talkback+
DMX Out DMX Out+
See the "Control Signal Cabling for
DMX512" section for a full discussion of
DMX512 cabling issues.
20
Control Signal Cabling
for DMX512
constructed as a simple daisy chain, with no
branching runs and with both ends of the cable
terminated in its characteristic impedance. If
branching runs are required, each must be
driven from a distribution amplifier and must be
constructed as a simple daisy chain with proper
termination. Any other layout invites unreliable
operation. These rules are doubly important
with IPS, because dimmer talkback will not
function if they are violated.
DMX512 Fundamentals
DMX512 is a digital data transmission protocol
for lighting consoles and dimmers published by
USITT. Since its introduction in 1986, it has
seen wide acceptance in the theatrical and
entertainment lighting industries, and has been
applied and extended in ways hardly foreseen
by its originators. As a distributed dimming
system with full status reporting back to the
console, IPS has itself stretched the boundaries
of DMX while still remaining absolutely
consistent with the original specification.
The Network Architecture diagram on this page
represents the layout which all IPS systems
must follow. Subsequent paragraphs refer to
this diagram in discussing each system
element.
All IPS system elements are designed to be part
of an extensive, bi-directional, DMX512 data
network. Output levels are transmitted to
dimmers and other devices on the Primary DMX
data channel, and dimmer status is transmitted
back to the console or Status Monitor on the
secondary channel. The physical network
interface for IPS units consists of "DMX-IN" and
"DMX-OUT" connectors, and possibly a
termination switch. The basic network is
constructed by "daisy chaining" units together.
Basic IPS Sy stem
The most basic IPS system consists of an IPS
compatible console (such as ACCESS) and a
single IPS dimmer system. The console, item ➀
in the architecture drawing, produces DMX512
data, and the dimmer system, item ➇,
consumes it. Talkback data is returned to the
console over the second DMX512 wire pair, and
the console and dimmer system respectively
terminate each end of the cable.
The DMX512 issue which is least understood is
that of cable layout and termination. For a
DMX512 network to function reliably it must be
DMX512 Network Architecture
➊ Control Console (DMX512 Source)
➋ Auxiliary Control Unit
➌ Status Monitor
➍ Additional Status Monitors
➎ Distribution Amplifier
➏ Additional Distribution Amplifiers
➐ Dimmer System, Daisy Chain connection
➑ Dimmer System, Terminated connection
21
Control Signal Cabling
for DMX512
The idea of DMX consumers and producers
logically divides a system into two halves which
can be discussed separately. The producing half
consists of the control console and its
associated accessories. The consuming half
consists of dimmers and other devices which
respond to DMX data, as well as distribution
amplifiers and the bulk of the DMX wiring. Draw
a line, if you will, dividing items ➃ and ➄.
Consider everything to the left of the line a DMX
producer, and every thing to the right a DMX
consumer.
possibility that subtleties like propagation delay
and wave form distortion will affect the system.
"DMX Consumer" Half of
Sy stem
Adding Non-IPS Equipment
The only real restrictions on the use of IPS
distribution amplifiers is their placement in the
DMX network. Because these amplifiers collect
talkback data from each of their output cables
and actively drive it back to the console, they
must be placed electrically nearest the console
in the DMX Consumer half of the system. If
dimmers are placed between the distribution
amplifier and the console, a talkback conflict
will occur.
The next level of complexity in a DMX system is
the one which is required to fully benefit from
DMX512's promise, namely the free mixing of
equipment from different manufacturers.
Unfortunately the reality of DMX is somewhat
more chilling than its promise, and there are
substantial differences in implementation and
many possible conflicts.
The consumer half contains most of the
complexity (and equipment) of a DMX system.
The first addition to the basic IPS system is
likely to be more dimmers ➆. As stated before,
additional dimmers are connected to the DMX
network in Daisy Chain fashion: the data cable
runs from the console to DMX-IN of the first
unit, from DMX-OUT of the first to DMX-IN of the
second, and so on until the last unit. All
termination switches are set for Pass-Thru
except the one on the last unit on the cable. Up
to 32 units may be connected in this fashion.
Outside of signal timing, which the end user
can't control anyway, DMX conflicts usually have
to do with the following:
Integrity (and presence) of pins 4 and 5.
Conflicting uses of pins 4 and 5.
Line termination issues, especially:
Re-amplified DMX-OUT connectors.
Incorrect termination resistor value.
No termination/permanent termination
Distribution Amplifiers
If more than 32 dimmer systems are to be used
in an installation, or if Daisy Chain cabling is
inconvenient, a distribution amplifier ➄ needs
to be added to the system. In fact, most IPS
installations should include a distribution
amplifier to simplify cable runs.
Mixing IPS and non-IPS equipment in a Daisy
Chain configuration may range in difficulty from
"Plug and go" to "Nightmare". If the foreign
unit's DMX receiver is RS-485 compliant and
pins 4 and 5 are passed through, then no
problems should be encountered. However
many popular products avoid the issue of line
termination and unit loading by re-amplifying
the signal in every unit. This makes each daisy
chain cable a separate RS-485 link starting at
one unit and ending at the next. Many units
which re-amplify also terminate their input with
values other than 120 ohms (Typically 100 to
2000 ohms) and fail to support pins 4 and 5. It
is nearly impossible to use equipment with
these failings in a daisy chained IPS system.
The most efficient use of distribution amplifier
capacity is obtained by providing separately
amplified DMX data lines to each distinct
mounting position in a venue and then using
Daisy Chain connections within each position. It
is easy to Daisy Chain units within one
mounting position as they are typically all
together in a row.
If more than eight runs are required to service
the various mounting positions, additional
distribution amplifiers ➅ may be added. Good
practice dictates that all additional distribution
amplifiers should be fed directly from the first
distribution amplifier ➄.This minimizes the
In a system with a distribution amplifier the
situation is eased somewhat by the use of a
separate DMX link for each different equipment
22
Control Signal Cabling
for DMX512
type. By putting all the moving lights, say, on a
separate cable driven directly from a
distribution amplifier issues of electrical
compatibility are limited to the connection to
the first device on the cable where they may be
easily solved. This first link then serves as a
gateway to the foreign system.
Recommended Cable
"DMX Producer" Half of
Sy stem
For plenum applications use Belden 88102.
Mfg.
Alpha
Belden
Belden
TMB
Associates
Type
3492
8132
9842
Color Code
Belden
Western Electric
Western Electric
Pro-Plex
ICEA
Wiring Color Codes
The producer half of a DMX system is somewhat
less complicated, often consisting simply of the
control console. Virtually any DMX512 control
console may be used with IPS provided that it
does not use pins 4 and 5 for anything other
than IPS Talkback, or that if it does, pins 4 and
5 are not connected. The Talkback Termination
switch on the IPS-SM-101 Status Monitor
automatically isolates pins 4 and 5 from the
console when set to the terminate position.
First
Pair
Second
Pair
The addition of a status monitor ➂ gives the
user access to a wealth of information about
system performance. The status monitor goes
in line after the console and before the first
dimmer system or distribution amplifier. If
additional status monitors ➃ are required, they
should be installed after the first status monitor
and before the first dimmer system or
distribution amplifier. If a status monitor needs
to terminate the talkback line, it must be the
one closest to the console.
ICEA
Belden
Black
Black
White
Red
Red
Black
Green
White
WE
White w/ Blue
Stripe
Blue w/ White
Stripe
White w/
Orange Stripe
Orange w/
White Stripe
ICEA = Insulated Cable Engineers Assn.
WE = Western Electric.
Connectors
Type: XLR-5
Transmitter: Female Receiver: Male
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
If an Auxiliary Control Unit ➁ is part of the
system it must be located electrically closest to
the control console, ahead of any status
monitors. Because of its special function, the
Auxiliary Control Unit does not pass Talkback
data thru to the console. If status monitoring is
required in a system with auxiliary control, it
must be accomplished with an IPS-SM-101.
Signal Name
Common (Shield)
Dimmer Drive Dimmer Drive +
Talkback Talkback +
Type: IPS terminal strips
Used in wall box distribution amplifiers and
connector plates.
Terminal
GND
TALKTALK+
DMXDMX+
DMX Cabling and
Termination
As you can see, the DMX network is as distinct a
system entity as the dimmers and console. For
it to function well, it must be planned as
carefully as the power distribution. This section
summarizes some of the technical details
necessary for planning a DMX512 data network.
23
Signal Name
Common (Shield)
Talkback Talkback +
Dimmer Drive Dimmer Drive +
Control Signal Cabling
for DMX512
Other things to avoid when planning an IPS
installation include the following:
Terminating Network
In cases where an IPS peripheral is not the last
node on a DMX512 data cable, it may be
necessary to hand terminate the cable to obtain
proper operation.
Multiple terminations/No terminations
Each DMX data link should be terminated once
at each end of the cable run. The control
console should automatically take care of its
end. On the dimmer end, the termination switch
must be set in the last unit on the cable only!
All others must be set for Pass-Thru.
Talkback interrupted by non-IPS device.
Many supposedly DMX compatible products do
not support pins 4 and 5 of the data connector.
When units of this type are used with IPS, downstream IPS units are cut off from the Talkback
wire pair and that pair is left unterminated
which will likely prevent Talkback from working
at all.
DMX Pitfalls
While there are many ways to construct a
reliable DMX512 network, there are probably
more ways to construct one which is nonfunctional, or worse, partially functional or
intermittent.
Non-standard signals on Pins 4 & 5.
This section presents some examples of BAD
PRACTICE in constructing a DMX512 network.
These configurations should be AVOIDED!!
The inverse problem of that mentioned above is
competing uses of the second DMX data
channel. Different manufacturers have used this
wire pair for a variety of functions, including:
Dimmer Talkback (like IPS), Levels for additional
dimmers, Multiplexed analog levels for AMX192
converters, Dimmer over-temp contact closures,
Power for dimmer fans, and Power for the
control console. Not all of these uses are
consistent with the DMX512 specification and
some might even destroy the talkback line
drivers in IPS dimmers. Be very cautious when
mixing IPS and non-IPS equipment!
Bad grounding practice.
It is unlikely that you will have a grounding
problem in an all IPS system due to its extensive
use of optical isolation. When adding other
equipment, look for and eliminate the following:
Shorts between ground and neutral.
Connections of DMX shield to XLR connector
case, conduit, or faceplate metal. (Grounding
should occur within equipment only!)
Common-mode voltage between units in excess
of 5V RMS. (Solve w/ optical isolation)
Ungrounded metal panels.
24
Control Signal Cabling
for AMX192
IPS dimmers are factory adjusted to
operate on AMX control signals ranging
from 0 to +5 VDC. Since the output of
analog consoles can drift with age, the IPS
Head-End can be re-trimmed by the user to
match the actual console output. See the
"Analog Input Trim" function in the
Dimmer System User's Guide.
Fundamentals
Any IPS dimmer system may be supplied
from the factory fitted to receive USITT's
AMX192 multiplexed analog dimmer
control protocol instead of DMX512. When
so fitted, 4 pin XLR connectors replace the
normal DMX connectors. Like DMX512,
AMX192 is designed to be daisy chained
from unit to unit. Unlike DMX, however,
AMX192 signals are not digital in nature.
They consist of one signal line carrying
time-multiplexed analog levels, and a
signal pair carrying a differential clock
which synchronizes the whole system to
the analog data.
Cables and Connectors
Recommended Cable
AMX192 cable has two twisted pairs and
no shield. Typical choices are:
Mfg.
Alpha
Belden
Belden
There is no provision for secondary data
channels in AMX192, so Talkback data is
not available when this protocol is used.
Type
1132
9156
8723
Connectors
Basic Connections
The AMX192 specification allows either of
two connectors to be used. Nearly all
current equipment which supports this
protocol uses the full size 4 pin XLR
connector. However, older equipment may
be encountered which still uses the miniXLR connector.
To a large extent, connecting AMX192 is a
"Plug and Go" process. The standard allows
data for up to 192 dimmers on one cable,
and connections for up to 16 receiving
units. Distribution amplifiers are generally
not available, so cabling is limited to a
basic daisy chain.
Connector: XLR-4
Transmitter: Male Receiver: Female
Since AMX is a multiplexed protocol (like
DMX), each receiver needs to have an
address so it knows which portion of the
transmitted data to use. The AMX address
for an IPS dimming system is set exactly
the same as the DMX address. The largest
valid AMX address is 190.
Pin
1
2
3
4
Signal Name
Analog Common
Clock +
Analog Level
Clock -
Connector: Mini-XLR
Equipment: Female Cables: Male
One of the limitations of AMX192 is its
lack of optical isolation between different
system elements. This leaves the system
more vulnerable to common mode voltage
problems than a well laid out DMX system.
All of the problems normally associated
with AMX192 distribution may occur with
IPS.
Pin
1
2
3
4
25
Signal Name
ClockAnalog Common
Clock +
Analog Level
Control Signal Cabling
for 0 - 10VDC Analog
need to be built. Since it is unlikely that
the control signals from your console are
bundled in groups of six, it may be useful
to build a junction box with terminal strips
in which the control signals may be rerouted. By providing a terminal for each
control signal and a common bus for all of
the return connections it becomes a
simple matter to group the signals for
each cable run.
Fundamentals
Any IPS dimmer system may be supplied
from the factory fitted to receive 6 discrete
0-10 VDC analog control inputs in addition
to either DMX512 or AMX192. When so
fitted, a female 9 pin 'D' sub-miniature
connector is installed in the blank opening
on the Head-End Processor.
IPS dimmers are factory adjusted to
operate on analog control signals ranging
from 0 to +10 VDC. Since the output of
analog consoles can drift with age, the IPS
Head-End can be re-trimmed by the user to
match the actual console output. See the
"Analog Input Trim" function in the
Dimmer System User's Guide.
Analog control inputs interact with either
of the other two protocols in a "Highest
level takes precedence" fashion.
Basic Connections
Though extremely simple in principle,
analog control systems can be very
complex in execution. The idea, simply
put, is that a dedicated wire carries the
control signal for each dimmer in the
system. For small numbers of dimmers this
is extremely easy to set-up, however
complexity increases proportionally as the
number of dimmers increases. In addition,
there are many opportunities for handwired custom connections which may be
hard to decipher after they are in place.
Cables and Connectors
Recommended Cable
The cable to each IPS unit with analog
control should be seven wire, 20 gage,
stranded multi-conductor, with no shield.
Typical choices are:
Mfg.
Alpha
Belden
If the output of your controller is a
terminal strip, it should be relatively easy
to connect the cable running to the IPS. If
the output of your controller uses some
kind of multi-pin connector an adapter will
Type
1896/7
9439
Connectors
Connector: DB-9
Source: Male Receiver: Female
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7,8,9
26
Signal Name
Control 1
Control 2
Control 3
Control 4
Control 5
Control 6
Signal Common
Dimmer System
Fundamentals
This chapter applies to all IPS Dimmer Systems.
The Intelligent Power System dimmer represents the most significant advance
in dimming technology since the introduction of electronic dimming over 40
years ago. By applying microprocessors, the latest in power handling
semiconductors, and a systems engineering design approach, IPS redefines
the state of the art. Your lighting system will never be the same again!
The IPS dimmer is a multi-mode unit which automatically analyzes its
connected load and picks the most appropriate dimming technique.
Depending on the load, the dimmer will use either Reverse Phase Control (RPC)
or Forward Phase Control (FPC). Whenever possible, the dimmer will choose
RPC because of the advantages it offers in terms of reduced lamp noise and
increased regulation accuracy. Both techniques control the average power
applied to the load by limiting current flow to only certain portions of each
power line half cycle.
Forward Phase Control is the technique used by all previous electronic
dimmers, although earlier implementations have been far less sophisticated
than IPS. This scheme only allows current to flow during the latter portion of
each half cycle. As the relative duration of the conducting portion is increased,
so is the average power applied to the load, and hence its brightness.
Reverse Phase Control, on the other hand, limits current flow to the early
portions of each half cycle. The dimmer monitors the power applied to the
load in real time during the half cycle and adjusts its switch-off point as
needed to regulate the light output.
When switching-off the output in each half cycle, it is important to control the
slope of the falling wave form so as to minimize the acoustic noise made by
the lamp filament, and the radio frequency noise radiated by the dimmer.
Previous dimming technologies accomplished this by placing a large coil of
wire in series with the output of the dimmer. The unique power stage in IPS
dimmers allows this function to be performed directly in the dimmer. By
stretching this fall time out to 450 or even 800 µS, IPS dimmers achieve
exceptionally quiet operation without high insertion losses, and without the
line distortion caused by inductors.
As you can see, IPS is a unique and highly sophisticated dimmer which frees
you from many of the limitations of previous systems.
27
II
IPS
Dimmer
User's
Guide
Head-End Processor
Operation and Programming
Head-End Processor
Menus
Basic Concepts
The Head-End Processor is the
communications manager for the IPS
dimmer system. It receives the DMX512
data stream, determines which portion of
the data is applicable and then instructs
the dimmers to go to output levels
accordingly. It queries the dimmers for
operating status, and makes this data
available both on the local 4 digit display
and over the DMX512 network. It accepts
control input from its three push buttons
to allow operating modes to be selected
and data to be displayed.
Normal
Display reads: [- - - -]
Dashes march through digits.
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display/Set
Address" menu.
C Button: No action.
R button: No action.
This is the state the dimmer system will
maintain during normal remote control
operation.
"Display/Set Address" menu
Display reads: [A x x x]
A = Menu indicator.
x x x = Address in decimal.
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Playback Preset"
menu.
C Button: Increase Address by 3.
R Button: Decrease Address by 3.
The 4 digit display is the primary indicator
of the Head-End operating state. In normal
operation it displays a dash "-" character
which repeatedly marches across the digit
positions. Head-End menus are selected
with the 'L' button and are indicated by
letter or number codes on the display. No
matter what menu is selected, after a
couple of minutes the Head-End
automatically returns to the "Normal"
state.
This menu allows the DMX512 or AMX192
network address of the first dimmer in the
unit to be examined and set. To set the
address, change the number in the display
with the 'C' and 'R' buttons, and then exit
the menu by pressing the 'L' button.
"Playback Preset" menu
The two individual LEDs (1 and 2) are used
to indicate special conditions. LED 1
indicates that a DMX512 or AMX192 data
stream is not present, and LED 2 indicates
that the dimmer system is in Preset
Playback mode.
Display reads: [P L A x]
P L A = Menu indicator.
x = Preset number. (1 - 6 or "-")
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Local Dimmer
Control" menu.
C Button: No Action.
R Button: Select next Preset.
All parameters which may be set in the
Head-End menus may also be set by a
command data stream on the DMX512
network. Refer to the controller's users
guide for information on the remote
setting of dimmer parameters.
This menu allows one of the six internal
presets to be selected for playback. To
choose a preset, change the number in the
display with the 'R' button, and then exit
28
Head-End Processor
Operation and Programming
the menu by pressing the 'L' button. A
preset selected in this manner will
automatically come on any time the
dimmer system is powered. To disable
preset playback, press the 'R' button until
the display shows a dash "-" and then exit
the menu as above.
internal presets for later playback. To
record a preset, first set the desired levels,
then enter this menu. Select the preset
number to record with the 'R' button and
then exit the menu with the 'L' button. If
the dash "-" is displayed when the menu is
exited, no preset record will take place.
"Local Dimmer Control"
menu
"Display/Set Dimmer
Preheat" menu
Display reads: [L x y y]
L = Menu indicator.
x = Dimmer number. (1 - 6)
y y = Locally set level in Decimal.
(00 - 99, FL)
Display reads: [P = x x]
P = = Menu indicator.
x x = Preheat mode. ("- -" or "On")
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display/Set
Dimmer Response Speed"
menu.
C Button: No Action.
R Button: Toggle Preheat Setting.
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Record Preset"
menu.
C Button: Select next dimmer.
R Button: Increase level of selected
dimmer.
This menu allows dimmer preheat
operation to be enabled or disabled for all
dimmers in the unit . Change the setting
with the 'R' button, then exit the menu
with the 'L' button.
This menu allows individual dimmer levels
to be set from the Head-End keyboard.
Select the dimmer to set with the 'C'
button. Set the dimmer's level with the 'R'
button. Exit the menu with the 'L' button. If
no DMX512 or AMX192 data stream is
present, and the discrete analog inputs are
at zero, these locally set levels will remain
on indefinitely. If console data is present,
the levels will be terminated as soon as the
menu is exited.
When preheat is set to "On", the dimmers
will automatically apply a small voltage to
lamps which are off to keep them from
getting "cold". This is useful when it is
necessary to get large wattage lamps to
come on as quickly as possible.
It is not a good idea to enable preheat in
all of the dimmers in a venue as this will
cause tremendous amounts of current to
be drawn from the power service even
though no lights are on. Use the preheat
function judiciously on the lamps which
really need it, but otherwise leave it off.
"Record Preset" menu
Display reads: [r E C x]
r E C = Menu indicator.
x = Preset number. (1 - 6 or "-")
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display/Set
Dimmer Preheat" menu.
C Button: No Action.
R Button: Next Preset.
This menu allows levels which have been
set from the console, by the "Local Dimmer
Control" menu, or by the individual
dimmer Focus Buttons to be saved into
29
Head-End Processor
Operation and Programming
This menu only appears on IPS-DB series
dimmer systems. It allows the fan
operation mode in these units to be set.
Select the mode with the 'R' button, then
exit the menu with the 'L' button. When
the mode indicator reads "°C" the fan will
come on if any dimmer in the box exceeds
45°C and will go off again when all
dimmers are below 35°C. When it reads
"On", the fan will come on any time a
DMX512 or AMX192 signal is present, and
will go off again when the signal is
removed and all dimmers are below 35°C.
"Display/Set Dimmer
Response Speed" menu
Display reads: [S P x x]
S P = Menu indicator.
x x = Speed Indicator. (20 - 55 or "FA")
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display/Set Fan
Mode" or "Display Console
Data" menu.
C Button: Next Response Selection.
R Button: Enable Controlled Response.
This menu allows the dimmer response
time for all dimmers in the package to be
set to one of 9 values. Enable controlled
response with the 'R' button. Select the
response time with the 'C' button, then
exit the menu with the 'L' button.
"Display Console Data"
menu
Display reads: [d x y y]
d = Menu indicator.
x = Dimmer number. (1 - 6)
y y = Console level in Hexadecimal.
(00 - FF)
The Speed indicator is decoded as follows:
FA = As fast as possible
20 = 200mS
25 = 250mS
30 = 300mS
35 = 350mS
40 = 400mS
45 = 450mS
50 = 500mS
55 = 550mS.
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display/Set NonDims" menu.
C Button: Select next dimmer.
R Button: No action.
This menu displays the actual DMX512,
AMX192 or Analog level which has been
set for each dimmer.
Controlled response time is used to
normalize the amount of time different
sized lamps take to come on. The factory
default setting is 350mS. When set to "FA",
low wattage lamps will come on noticeably
faster than high wattage lamps.
"Display/Set Non-Dims"
menu
Display reads: [n x y y]
n = Menu indicator.
x = Dimmer number. (1 - 6)
y y = Non-Dim threshold level in decimal
("--", 01 - 98)
"Display/Set Fan Mode"
menu
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Analog Input
Trim" menu, "Display/Set
Demo Unit Input Mode"
menu, or "Display/Set
Address" menu.
C Button: Select next dimmer.
R Button: Increase threshold level.
Display reads: [F = x x]
F = = Menu indicator.
x x = Mode indicator. ("°C" or "On")
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display Console
Data" menu.
C Button: No Action.
R Button: Toggle Fan Mode.
30
Head-End Processor
Operation and Programming
This menu allows individual dimmers to be
configured for "Non-Dim" operation. Select
the dimmer to configure with the 'C'
button, set the "Non-Dim" threshold level
with the 'R' button, then exit the menu
with the 'L' button. The "Non-Dim"
threshold is the input level at which the
dimmer will switch from full off to full on.
Select a threshold of "- -" to convert a
dimmer back to normal operation. When
selected as a "Non-Dim", a dimmer will not
attempt to regulate its output.
"Display/Set Demo Unit
Input Mode" menu
Display reads: [- x x -]
- = Menu indicator.
x x = Input mode indicator.
("CO", or "PC")
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display/Set
Address" menu.
C Button: No action.
R Button: Toggle input mode.
This menu only appears on IPS
demonstrator units. It allows the DMX512
input to be configured for either normal
console operation (-CO-), or for connection
to the IPS demonstration program running
on a personal computer (-PC-). Press the 'R'
button to toggle the mode selection, then
press the 'L' button to exit the menu.
"Analog Input Trim" menu
Display reads: [A n x x]
A n = Menu indicator.
x x = Trim operation to perform.
("--", "FL", "00")
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display/Set Demo
Unit Input Mode" menu, or
"Display/Set Address" menu.
C Button: Select trim operation.
R Button: Execute trim operation.
Diagnostic Error Report
Display reads: [E r r x]
E r r = Menu indicator.
x = Error Code. (1 - 7)
This menu only appears on IPS dimmer
systems which have an AMX192 or Analog
input option Installed. It allows the analog
input section to be calibrated to the actual
control voltage used by the control
console.
Operation:
L Button: Change to "Display/Set
Address" menu.
C Button: No action.
R Button: No action.
For AMX, set the first dimmer on the data
link to FULL. For Discrete Analog set all
control inputs to FULL. Select the "FL" trim
function with the 'C' button, then execute
the function with the 'R' button. Return all
control levels to Zero. Select the "00" trim
function with the 'C' button, then execute
the function and the 'R' button. Exit the
menu with the 'L' button.
This display will only be seen if the dimmer
system detects an internal error upon
power-up. Error codes are:
Code
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
31
Definition
Head-End ROM Checksum error.
E2PROM was blank, or invalid and
has been re-initialized.
One or more dimmers are absent
or not responding.
Reserved.
Head-End and dimmers are not all
configured for the same voltage.
One or more dimmers have
reported a fatal error.
Unit is miswired to high voltage.
Dimmer Operation
LEDs
Controls and Indicators
The two LEDs associated with each dimmer
report various operating conditions. The
indications are as follows:
Each dimmer in an IPS system is a self contained
micro-computer system having a power supply,
a micro-processor, memory, and a
communication channel as well as power
control and sensing electronics. Each dimmer is
capable of determining both the line and load
voltage, the load current, and its own operating
temperature, and adjusts its operation
accordingly.
Red LED
Off
Off
Off
Flashing
Quickly
Flashing
Slowly
On
Green LED
Off
Flashing
On
Off
Flashing
Flashing
Off
Off
Condition
Normal Operation
No Load
Focus Mode
Over-sized Load or
Overload
Over Temperature
Other error (Query
Status Monitor)
Mis-Wire to Line
Voltage
Load Types
IPS dimmers are designed to operate a wide
variety of lighting loads of up to their rated
capacity. The range of load types which may be
connected includes incandescent lamps, and a
number of "well-behaved" inductive loads such
as low-voltage (step-down transformer)
incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and
most types of small motors.
Focus Button
IPS dimmers normally operate under the control
of the Head-End processor. When conditions
require an operator to locally turn on a circuit,
the "Focus" button is used. The action of this
button is a function of the current state of the
dimmer.
IPS dimmers are NOT designed to drive large
motor loads (3 Amps or greater), or motors with
start-up capacitors. Attempting to drive such
loads may damage the dimming electronics.
If the dimmer is set to a level of zero by the
control console ( or the Head-End processor)
then the Focus button behaves as follows: If the
dimmer is presently off, a tap on the button will
take it to full on. If the dimmer is presently on,
a tap will turn it off. Whether on or off, pressing
and holding the button will cause the dimmer to
ramp up in intensity. Releasing the button will
then cause the dimmer to hold an intermediate
level.
When operating low-voltage type fixtures,
observe the following precautions: If the fixture
has a conventional magnetic transformer, be
sure it has internal fusing and is approved for
dimming by its manufacturer. Load the IPS
dimmer to only 80% of its capacity (960VA for a
1.2KW dimmer) to compensate for losses in the
transformers. If the fixture has an "electronic
transformer", make sure it is approved for
dimming by its manufacturer.
Lights turned on in this fashion will remain on
indefinitely. However, when the control console
(or Head-End) subsequently sets a non-zero
level for a dimmer, the focus level will be
canceled, and the dimmer will once again follow
the higher priority control.
Neon signs can be particularly difficult to dim
as they tend to reflect back nearly all of the
energy which is applied to them. For best
results with neon, an IPS dimmer should be
loaded to no more than 50% of its capacity
(600VA for a 1.2KW dimmer), should be
configured for Forward Phase Control operation,
and should have an incandescent load of 100 to
If the dimmer is already set to a non-zero level
by the control console (or Head-End) the Focus
button becomes a "Flash-to-Full" control ,
overriding the set level only while the button is
pressed.
32
Dimmer Operation
200 watts added to help absorb the reflected
energy. Failure to take these precautions may
result in damage to the dimming electronics.
When coming up from a level of zero, the
dimmer is in the Trial mode and makes an
initial determination of the character of the
load. If it appears to be a normal incandescent
lamp which is already warm, the dimmer will
move immediately to the Normal RPC dimming
mode. Otherwise it moves to the Warm-up
mode.
Also, for best results, increase the neon
transformer voltage 50% over the normal
requirements for the selected length and
diameter of the tube. Use only Low Power Factor
(without power factor compensation), current
limiting, high-voltage transformers. Mount the
transformer with the lamp it operates. This will
increase lamp stability and dimming range.
Neon tubes must be pumped for a hard vacuum
to minimize impurities in the lamp to insure
flicker-free operation at low light levels.
In Warm-up mode the dimmer applies power to
the load in a current limited fashion bringing it
to the point of incandescence as rapidly as
possible. When the voltage and current on the
load indicate that it is thoroughly heated, the
dimmer moves to the Normal RPC dimming
mode.
To place a dimmer into Forced Forward Phase
Control mode, follow this procedure:
In normal RPC mode the dimmer handles the
load with a reverse phase control wave form
which is optimal for normal incandescent lamps.
Unless the load exhibits some aberrant
behavior, the dimmer will stay in this mode
until the level is returned to zero. If the load or
the service shows a significant inductive
characteristic, the dimmer will switch to Normal
FPC mode as this is the best way to handle an
inductive load.
On the Head-End Processor, press the 'L' button
until you are in the "Playback Preset" menu.
Press and hold the 'C' button until the left hand
digit changes to 'H'. Press the 'L' button three
more times until the left hand digit changes to
'C'. Press the 'C' button until the second digit
shows the number of the dimmer you wish to
modify (1 - 6). Press the 'R' button until the
third digit shows '2'. Press the 'L' button three
more times until the left hand digit changes to
'A'.
In Normal FPC mode, the dimmer behaves much
like a conventional SCR based dimmer, handling
the load with a forward phase control wave
form.
To return a dimmer to normal dimming
operation, follow the same procedure as
outlined above, except when pressing the 'R'
button change the third digit to '0', instead of
'2'.
Non-Dim Operation
When set for Non-dim operation, the IPS dimmer
bypasses the dimming modes mentioned above,
and simply switches into full conduction.
Normal overload protection is still active, but
the dimmer does not attempt to regulate its
output voltage. Non-dim mode is intended to
control small motors and fans such as those
found in color scrollers and scenic projectors. It
is NOT designed to run large loads or flash
pots!
Dimming Modes
The IPS dimmer is capable of several operational
modes, and automatically selects the one which
is best suited to the particular load and power
service to which it is connected. As the dimmer
brings a load up from zero it performs an
analysis of its output voltage and current to
determine which mode to use. The operator will
never be aware that this has occurred, except
by noting the reported dimming mode on the
Status Monitor.
Thermal Protection
The portion of the IPS output wave form which
generates the most heat is the transition from
on to off (off to on for FPC). This portion is
known as the transition time, and its duration
directly affects the amount of heat generated.
Unlike any other dimmer, the IPS dimmer can
control the duration of this portion of its output
The four modes in which the dimmer may
operate are Trial, Warm-up, Normal FPC, and
Normal RPC. In each mode the dimmer analyzes
its operating parameters to determine if it is
permissible to move to the next mode.
33
Dimmer Operation
wave form and thus, to a certain degree, its
operating temperature.
Lamp Response controls
If the dimmer is in its normal operating
temperature range, it will use the longest
transition time available (800 µS for 2.4KW and
6.0KW dimmers, 450 µS for 1.2KW dimmers).
Should its operating temperature reach 85°C
(likely only if the ambient temperature is very
high), it will automatically select a shorter
transition time to reduce the amount of heat
generated. In many cases this will be sufficient
to stabilize the temperature. Should the
temperature continue to rise, and reach 95°C,
the dimmer will completely shut down to
prevent an over temperature failure. After an
over temperature shut-down the temperature
must drop to 50°C and the level must be reset
to zero to resume normal operation.
In almost all cases it is desirable to have lamps
of different wattages and types respond to level
changes at the same rate. Yet the intrinsic
physical properties of different lamp types
cause each one to respond differently. The IPS
system contains two features which help blend
across these differences, Controlled Response
Time, and Lamp Preheat. While these are
technically Head-End functions, they
significantly affect the perceived performance of
the dimmer and so warrant discussion here.
Controlled Response Time sets the maximum
rate at which changes in level can occur. This
has the effect of "slowing down" small lamps so
they behave more like larger ones. Studies in an
actual production environment showed that a
response time of 350 mS adequately blends all
typical theatrical lamps without adding
significant "lag" to the system. IPS units may be
set to any of nine values from "as fast as
possible" up to 550 mS. An example which
would use a setting of "as fast as possible" is
the traditional "marquee" chase in which small
wattage lamps are switched on and off in rapid
succession. A long response time will tend to
blur the individual steps of this kind of effect.
Overload Protection
The IPS dimmer can detect an overload in one of
two ways, either by calculating the load size
from the measured voltage and current, or by
the hardware current limiter tripping and
shutting down the output. The former protects
the dimmer from mis-sized loads, such as 2000
watts connected to a 1.2KW dimmer. The latter
protects the dimmer from catastrophic faults
like short circuits. The Over-sized load
threshold is about 35% above the nominal
dimmer capacity, roughly 1600 Watts for a 1.2K,
3200 Watts for a 2.4K, and 8000 Watts for a
6.0K. This gives enough latitude for lamp
manufacturing tolerances and load shift with
temperature, yet still protects the dimmer from
gross loading errors.
As somewhat the inverse of controlled
response, Lamp Preheat is used to "speed up"
large wattage lamps so they behave more like
smaller ones. This function applies a very small
voltage to a lamp when it is set to a level of
zero to warm its filament and hence shorten the
time it takes to come on. This would be used to
make a few 6K loads in a rig respond more like
the 1K and 2K loads.
Please Note: It is a bad idea to preheat every
lamp in a venue because a tremendous amount
of current will be consumed even though no
light is being produced. If you have a few small
lamps in a rig composed mostly of 6Ks, set a
long response time on the small lamps rather
than preheating all the big ones.
Once an overload has been detected, the
dimmer spends about 5 seconds monitoring the
load before deciding to shut down. If the
hardware current limit caused the fault, the load
is monitored at extremely low voltages. If the
fault has not cleared at the end of this time, the
dimmer shuts down and reports the error.
Depending on the cause, the Status Monitor will
show either "Over-sized Load", or "Overload".
The load must be reduced to the correct size
and the level must be reset to zero before the
dimmer will resume normal operation.
34
Status Monitor
Fundamentals
This chapter applies to Status Monitor model IPS-SM-101.
The IPS-SM-101 Status Monitor is a data display and analysis unit for reporting
the operational status of an IPS dimmer system. It passively monitors both the
console's DMX512 data and the IPS talkback data to build a complete record of
system activity. This collected information is then processed into a number of
status displays which allow the operator to check any operational aspect at a
glance. In addition, the unit is sensitive to changes in reported status and
alerts the operator when such changes occur.
Keypad
➊ Function Keys: Select status display modes and initiate special functions .
Current definition shown at bottom of video screen.
➋ Number Keys: Allow selection of specific dimmers for study in Dimmer
Detail display.
➌ Cursor Keys: Move dimmer pointer through Status Overview display,
selecting dimmer for study in Dimmer Detail display.
➍ Additional Cursor Keys: Left key = Home. Right key = End.
Status Display
➊ System Message area. Data link status and operator alerts.
➋ Dimmer Status Overview area.
➌ Status Detail area.
➍ Function key definitions.
35
III
Status
Monitor
User's
Guide
Status Monitor Functions
high inductance in the building wiring or
service transformer.
Status Overview
The Alerts display shows any exceptional
conditions which have been reported by
the dimmer. These reports include such
conditions as No Load, Focus Mode, Over
Temperature, and Overload.
When the unit powers up, it is in the Status
Overview display in which the bottom half
of the display contains a key to Status
Overview symbols and the function keys
may be used to select each display mode.
The normal 'Status OK' indicator is a solid
block so that a group of good dimmers
simply appears as a solid band. This
causes any dimmer with a special condition
to call attention to itself.
Sy stem Load
Status Detail area contains a connected
load analysis display showing utilization of
available mains power and load balance
among phases. Information is divided into
three categories, On Line, Connected Load,
and On Line Capacity
Dimmer Detail
Status Detail area contains complete status
information for one dimmer. Dimmer is
selected with cursor keys or number pad.
Information is divided into three
categories, Dimmer Configuration,
Operating Status, and Alerts.
The On Line area shows the total number
of IPS dimmer packages connected to the
system along with the total number of
dimmers.
Dimmer Configuration shows the actual
number of the dimmer displayed, the DMX
address of the package which contains it,
It's offset within the package, and its
rating in Kilowatts.
The Connected Load area shows totals of
the actual connected load wattage on the
system. Totals are shown for the entire
system and also for each power line phase.
The percentage of the connected load on
each phase is shown in tabular and graphic
form.
The Toggle Detail function (F5) changes
the display to additionally show The total
number of dimmers in the package, the
package firmware revision, the full output
voltage, the fall/rise time mode, and the
load/source mode (Review the Dimmer
System User's Guide for an explanation of
these modes).
The On Line Capacity area shows the sum
of the capacities of all dimmers in the
system. This sum is also broken out by
power line phase. This area also shows the
percentage of the system capacity which is
presently in use. These percentages are
presented in both tabular and graphic
form.
The Operating Status display shows the
dimmer's present heatsink temperature in
degrees C, its present output level, its
connected load in Kilowatts and the load
type, and the present power line voltage.
Note: For the values presented in this
display to be accurate, all dimmers in the
system must be connected to the power
line in the same fashion, and have been
brought up to a non-zero level for at least
30 seconds. Refer to the Installation Guide
for recommended wiring practice.
The load size report is accurate to
approximately +/- 20%. The load type is an
indication of whether the dimmer is
operating in reverse or forward phase
control mode. Sometimes an incandescent
load will be reported as inductive due to
Also Note: Wattage numbers in this
display are rounded to the nearest 1000
watts. Sometimes the total of the three
36
Status Monitor Functions
phases appears to be off by 1000 watts
due to this rounding.
Phase
A
B
C
Total
Actual
Value
1200
1200
1200
3600
F2
F3
F4
F5
Rounded
Value
1000
1000
1000
4000
Record Snap 1
Record Snap 2
Record Snap 3
Cancel Record.
Selecting a Snapshot for
Comparison
To select one of the previously recorded
Snapshots for comparison to the present
system configuration, press the following
keys while in the Snapshot Config menu:
Configuration Snapshot
Status Detail area contains a comparison
display revealing discrepancies between
the present system configuration and
connected load, and the values previously
stored. This display is divided into three
areas, one for checking individual
dimmers, one for system wide totals, and
one for comparison analysis.
F5 Select Snapshot
to start the process, and then one of the
four following to complete the process:
F2
F3
F4
F5
Select
Select
Select
Select
Snap 1
Snap 2
Snap 3
None.
Any time a Snapshot is selected for
comparison, the Status Monitor will
automatically alert the operator to changes
in system configuration or connected load.
The dimmer area shows all the present
information and all the stored information
about any single dimmer in the system.
Dimmers are selected for examination with
the cursor keys and number pad as in the
Dimmer Detail display. The F2 Next
Change and F3 Next Dimmer functions
may also be used to select dimmers.
DMX512 Analyzer
Status Detail area contains a DMX512
traffic analysis display. This display is
divided into three areas, Received DMX,
Console Data statistics, and Dimmer Data
statistics.
The totals area shows the present number
of IPS packages and dimmers connected to
the system compared to stored counts.
The comparison area reports the total
number of discrepancies found, and the
nature of each.
The Received DMX area displays the actual
levels transmitted by the console for three
or six dimmers and a traveling bar graph
representing the talk back data for these
same dimmers.
Recording a Snapshot
The Status Monitor will record up to three
"Snapshots" of the system configuration
and connected load for later use. To
record one of these Snapshots, press the
following keys while in the Snapshot
Config menu:
Compare the DMX levels to those shown
on the console's screen to verify correct
data transmission. Check the smoothness
of the bar graphs' movement to verify
successful talkback data transmission.
Jerky or uneven movement of the bargraph
indicates a likely DMX address conflict.
F4 Record Snapshot
to start the process, and then one of the
four following to complete the process:
37
Status Monitor Functions
The Console Statistics area presents three
characteristics of the data transmission:
Dimmers per Packet, Packets per Second,
and Framing Error count.
The selected field will be highlighted in
reverse video. Use ! and " to select a
character in the title to modify. Use # and
$ to change the value of the selected
character. F2 RESET TO BLANKS clears the
title. F3 CENTER TEXT moves the text to
the center of the title line. F4 CANCEL EDIT
quits the title editor with no changes
made. F5 RECORD EDIT quits the editor
and saves the new title.
Dimmers per Packet indicates the number
of data bytes the console is sending in
each repetition of the DMX512 data
packet. Packets per Second indicates the
number of times a second a complete DMX
packet is transmitted. Framing Errors is a
running total of the number of DMX data
bytes received from the console which
generated framing errors.
Options
F4 NEXT OPTION and F5 CHANGE VALUE
are used to set the values of the operator
preference parameters.
The Dimmer Statistics area presents three
characteristics of the dimmer talkback
data transmission: Framing Error count,
Last DMX address at which an error
occurred, and Protocol Error count.
DMX Starting Address sets the name of
first dimmer displayed. If your system has
only one DMX link, set this value to '0001'.
If you have more than one DMX link, set
this value to one higher than the last
dimmer on the previous link. Use the
number pad to enter the value (enter all
four digits), or use F5 CHANGE VALUE to
select one of the standard values.
Framing and Protocol errors typically occur
when two IPS units are set to the same
DMX address, or when the DMX data cable
is improperly terminated. These running
counts provide a good indication of the
general health of the DMX512 network.
The DMX address of the last error is useful
in tracking down IPS units set to
overlapping addresses.
Dimmers to Display selects whether 256
or 512 dimmers are shown in the Dimmer
Overview display. Choose the setting which
best suits your system.
The "Zero Errors" function (F5) resets all
running error counts to zero.
Auto Detail on Alert when set to ON
causes the display to automatically change
to Dimmer Detail any time an alert
condition is received from a dimmer.
Option Select
Status Detail area shows current settings
of all operator preference parameters and
screen titles.
Snapshot Load Size ∆ selects the
minimum amount a load value must
change before it generates an alert. The
preferred setting is 200W. Some large
lamps, however, may actually shift more
than 200 Watts as they warm up and
generate false alerts. If this occurs, change
the setting to 400W
Titles
F2 EDIT TITLES starts the title editor.
Function keys change to allow selection of
title to edit. Press one of the following to
start editing a title:
F2
F3
F4
F5
Edit
Edit
Edit
Edit
Screen Saver when set to ON causes the
screen to blank after 5 minutes of no
keyboard activity. This helps prevent
image burn-in on the video screen. Any
keystroke will restore the screen.
Main
Snap 1
Snap 2
Snap 3
38
Using a Status Monitor to
Troubleshoot Your System
the SM-101 to the SA-108 just yet. Press
F4, DMX ANALYZER on the Status Monitor.
The CONSOLE DATA area will give you the
console's vital statistics. It will tell you that
valid DMX is being received, the refresh
rate, and whether framing errors are
occurring. If these fields are blank, or
show numbers that jump all over the place,
check that the console is set up to send
DMX, and that it has a valid patch. If you
have data errors, check the data cable.
To understand the uses of the Status
Monitor, let's look at a large hypothetical
touring system and see how the SM-101
can make installation and troubleshooting
much easier. The features of our rig are a
mix of those found in several real-world IPS
Installations. They include:
• One console with 512
channels/dimmers, DMX output, profiles,
24 Submasters, and patching
• One SM-101 Status Monitor
The RECEIVED DMX area displays the actual
DMX levels transmitted by the console.
Verify that the console patch is correct by
selecting dimmers or channels and
watching the levels. Remember, the Status
Monitor doesn't operate on or change the
data stream in any way. It is simply a
viewport into your DMX data. If it says that
dimmer 263 is at 27% when you think it
should be at FULL, trust the SM-101 and
check the console setup.
• One SA-108 Distribution Amplifier Each
SA-108 output drives one part of the
system.
• 50 IPS DS-1206 strips (300 1.2kW
dimmers) for on-stage electrics and
towers
• 24 DMX color scrollers
• 48 2.4kW conventional DMX dimmers in
a rack for front of house circuits (This
rack belongs to the house)
Problems in console setup (patching,
Submasters, profiles, etc.) is one of the
major sources of trouble in a DMX
installation!
• 24 motorized pattern wheels powered
from IPS dimmer outputs
• 2 fog machines powered from rack
dimmer outputs
We will return to this screen later when it's
time to set up the scrollers, fog machines,
and moving lights.
• 4 DMX moving lights
• Low-voltage special effects lights
The Distribution Amp
• Lots of DMX cable
The console DMX output connects to the
input of the SM-101 Status Monitor. The
output of the SM-101 connects to the SA108 Distribution Amp. The SA-108 drives
eight separate DMX cable runs which carry
DMX512 data to all parts of the theatre. In
wringing-out the system, we will "de-bug"
each element in turn.
Turn on the SA-108 with nothing plugged
in. Make sure that all the red POWER LEDS
are on. Make sure the green and yellow
data LEDS are off, showing an idle (no
data) link. Connect the DMX cable from the
SM-101 to the FROM CONSOLE input. The
green DMX LEDS should be on. A fast
console sending all levels at zero might
show a steady on, while a slower console
sending all levels at FULL might pulse. Get
a feel for the "typical" look of the DMX LED.
The Console
IPS Dimmers
Start by turning on the console and
connecting it to the SM-101. Don't connect
These are the easiest to set up, so we'll do
them first. Power up the bar at DMX
Each piece of equipment has been checked
out "stand-alone" and works.
39
Using a Status Monitor to
Troubleshoot Your System
Most likely, two bars are set at the same
address, causing talkback collisions. Press
F4, DMX ANALYZER. The DIMMER DATA
display shows a continuously increasing
error count. Press F5, ZERO ERRORS. The
errors reset to zero and immediately
increase. The system may be reporting the
address where the overlap has occurred. If
so, selectively power down bars until
normal operation is restored. Or, since
bars set at duplicate addresses will both
respond to levels, step through the
dimmers at the console until two dimmers
come up simultaneously. Correct the
address on the offending dimmer system
and continue.
address 001. Set the termination switch to
the TERMINATE position.
Connect the DMX cable from the first
output of the SA-108 to the dimmer's DMX
input. Plug in a test load. Tap the local
focus button on the dimmer to verify that
the dimmer and load are OK.
When the DMX was connected to the IPS
dimmer, the yellow TLK LED on the SA-108
output started to pulse, showing the
presence of talkback data. The yellow LED
on the TO CONSOLE link is also pulsing,
showing talkback data on the link. The
talkback data is synchronized to the DMX,
so faster consoles make the TLK LED flash
more rapidly.
If duplicate addressing is not the problem,
then improper termination is the next
most likely suspect. If the last bar on the
link is not terminated, talkback data may
not be reliably transmitted. The DMX cable
acts as an antenna for noise that can
garble all talkback transmissions, not just
those on that particular link.
On the SM-101 main screen a solid white
block representing the first six dimmers
should have appeared. Press F1, DIMMER
DETAIL, and look at the vital signs. Raise
and lower the dimmer level at the console
and watch the level display change.
Disconnect the load, and watch the NO
LOAD warnings appear. Press the focus
button and the indicator will change.
The opposite case is too many
terminations. The signal is swamped out
by the excessive loading. In either case,
check each unit and make sure that the
terminations are correct.
Move the termination switch on 001 to the
unterminated position and power up and
connect the dimmer at address 007.
Terminate it, and verify that it is reporting
back correctly.
The next possibility is a bad cable. If
talkback is fine on a link, up to a point,
and gone after that, check the cable.
At this point, flushed with success,
unterminate 007, connect and power-up
the remaining eight bars on this link,
which have been preset to the correct
addresses. Make sure the last bar on the
link is terminated. The screen shows solid
white for the first 60 dimmers. Perfect!
Problems with incorrect addressing and
termination are probably the single largest
cause of problems in DMX installations!
In this case, the bar intended for address
102 was really set to address 105, and
overlapped with the unit at address 107.
The SM-101 pinpointed the collision
address. It's worth noting that bringing
units on-line one at a time when a rig is
first set up can catch these sorts of
problems very quickly. It is often faster to
do this than to turn everything on and
then try to chase down why nothing seems
to work.
This process continues uneventfully
through the second and third SA-108 links.
The fourth link is powered up and . . .
disaster! ALL the talkback data has gone
berserk. Whole sections of the screen are
coming and going, and every kind of weird
error is being reported . . . what
happened?
40
Using a Status Monitor to
Troubleshoot Your System
The SM-101 again can be helpful in making
sure that the console is sending the
correct hex values for the various moving
light attributes.
Let's assume that the rest of the IPS
dimmers come on-line without incident.
Conventional Dimmers
All we can do is set the starting address of
the rack. It can't talk back, so we won't
know about overloads, burn-outs, and the
like. The SM-101 will tell us that the
console is patched correctly, at least.
Motorized Pattern Wheels
A nice thing about IPS dimmers is their
ability to control inductive loads, like small
motors. The wheels plug into the dimmers
and the speed is set by the console in the
cue. Two wheels were plugged into the
wrong dimmers. Since the load type for
these dimmers was reported as "inductive,"
it was easy to spot the error and get them
replugged.
Color Scrollers
The color scrollers have been mounted and
connected into the DMX links. A few
scrollers have been set to the wrong
address, which takes a while to find since
they can't talkback. Some scrollers have
been having some problems getting to the
correct color. The SM-101 DMX ANALYZER
screen will display the hex value the
console is transmitting, along with the
percentage level. Here, the console used
an odd translation that caused certain hex
values to be missed. The cues were rewritten to take this into account.
Low-Voltage Special Effects
Lights
A number of set pieces have several
hundred 12 volt lamps driven from stepdown transformers. The first time these
were turned on, two of the six dimmers
controlling them reported "overload
shutdowns." The problem was traced to a
short-circuit in the wiring in the set. The
combination of an overload-protected
dimmer and status reporting made this
potentially dangerous problem easy to find
and fix.
One scroller killed the talkback data from
all dimmers downstream when plugged in.
It was an older model that didn't pass DMX
pins 4 & 5 back through. If you have many
scrollers like this, drive them from a
separate SA-108 output with no IPS units
sharing the link. This can also happen with
dimmer banks, or any DMX device that
plays fast and loose with the DMX
specification.
Fog Machines
The fog machine motors were powered
from the house dimmer bank.
Unfortunately, these dimmers cannot
control a motor load. The operation was
erratic, and after a short time the motors
burned out and the dimmers were
damaged. Since these dimmers don't talk
back, the fault wasn't noticed until the
dimmer circuit breaker tripped. The fog
machines were repaired and moved to IPS
dimmers and now work fine.
Moving Lights
Moving lights have the same issues as
scrollers, only worse. Many of them don't
pass DMX pins 4 & 5 back. Some of them
use completely non-standard electrical
interfaces to the DMX link and re-transmit
the data from fixture to fixture. It is
strongly suggested, unless you know
otherwise, that moving lights be placed on
their own separate link on the SA-108.
41
Using a Status Monitor to
Troubleshoot Your System
recorded in a snapshot and will have to be
checked manually.
Maintenance
During the load-in, the SM-101 SYSTEM
LOAD function was used to make sure that
the connected load was evenly balanced
across the power line phases, and did not
exceed the service rating. The SM-101
detects how many IPS dimmers are
connected and their power capacity, and
shows this information in the ONLINE
CAPACITY display. As the load is increased,
it's easy to see not only the phase balance,
but also the percentage of total capacity in
use. In the early stages of set-up, SYSTEM
LOAD was used to verify that the feeders
were correctly connected to the
distribution system. Several IPS bars had
power input cables that had been
miswired, placing loads on the wrong
phases. This error was easily found and
corrected.
To perform the lamp check (system check,
really), the three check cues and
corresponding snapshots are loaded in
turn. The SM-101 will flag any differences
between the live rig and the snapshot. The
complete rig, except for FOH, is checked in
about three minutes. Why did we use three
cues and snapshots? Because the power
service in our venue isn't up to having
everything in the rig turned on at once.
Most aren't, in fact. Remember that lamp
in-rush currents are fifteen to twenty times
greater than the rated current.
During the show, a master snapshot can
be used to monitor the show in real-time.
Thresholds for alarms, either 200 W or 400
W of load change can be used. This can
catch a burn-out the instant it happens,
but you still have to send somebody up to
change the lamp. Watch out for small
loads, such as practicals and small
inductive loads. These may report as NO
LOAD all the time (because they are so
small), or they may only report as a load
when set to FULL. This can cause false
LOAD CHANGE alarms in the snapshots as
a dimmer is faded in or out.
During dress rehearsals, a number of
specials were added, and some dimmers
were repatched to overcome DMX
addressing problems in the console.
Again, SYSTEM LOAD made it easy to
redistribute the loads and keep the phases
balanced.
Once the show was in, the SM-101
SNAPSHOT function was used to reduce
lamp check time to a minimum. Here's how
it was done. First, the overhead electrics
were brought to a level of 30% for about
thirty seconds. This gave the lamps time to
warm-up and provided an accurate load
report. SNAPSHOT 1 was then stored and
titled "Stage Electrics" using the snapshot
title function. Snapshots store everything
about the state of the system at the
instant they are recorded. Dimmer
addresses, dimmer type, dimmer capacity,
load type, load size, dimmer operating
mode. . . it's all recorded. Then two other
snapshots, "Tower Left" and "Tower Right"
were recorded in the same manner. Since
the front of house circuits are on
conventional dimmers, they cannot be
As you can see, the SM-101 is a powerful
diagnostic tool designed to save you time
and money, and keep your system in top
operating condition. You will undoubtedly
find many new and useful ways to utilize it
in your work.
42
Auxiliary Control Unit
Fundamentals
This chapter applies to Auxiliary Control Unit IPS-AC-100.
The IPS-AC-100 Auxiliary Control Unit adds secondary manual control
into a DMX512 based lighting system. It is installed between the main
lighting control console and the dimmers and merges levels from a
variety of manual control stations into the primary DMX data stream.
This greatly simplifies the implementation of house and work light
controls in a variety of venues.
The IPS-AC-100 supports a wide range of control options. It merges
levels from 16 pots, 4 switch closures, and an incoming DMX512 data
stream to create an output DMX512 data stream. In this way House
Light, Work Light, and Stage dimmers are all serviced from one DMX
data cable, and all of the various control points have equal access to
the entire lighting system. In addition, the IPS-AC-100 supports the
storing and playing back of presets in IPS dimmers.
The relationships between the system inputs and the dimmers they
control are all programmable by the system user. Each DMX address in
the output stream may be programmed to follow any pot or switch
input, the panic input, and the DMX512 input. The output level will be
the highest of the three. In addition, up to seven presets may be
stored in IPS dimmers for playback from AC-100 inputs. Again, output
levels are the higher of the DMX512 and the preset levels.
For further versatility, the pot inputs may be partitioned in one of
three ways: as sixteen separate inputs, as eight inputs with two
control points, or as four inputs with four control points.
43
IV
Auxiliary
Control
Unit
User's
Guide
Auxiliary Control Unit Features
room illumination or work lighting. A DMX
address cannot simultaneously be
assigned to a slider and a General Purpose
Switch.
From the end-user's standpoint, an AC-100
system may include any combination of the
following control features. The details of
each are discussed in turn.
Panic Switch
Slider Stations
The Panic Switch is a latching push button
control which takes assigned DMX
addresses to full regardless of other
control assignments and settings. This
control might be used to bring house and
aisle lights to full brightness in the case of
an emergency.
Slider stations are used to manually fade
lighting levels up and down and to
individually balance lighting levels in a
particular room. A slider station contains
from 1 to 16 linear potentiometers (pots)
for setting levels, and optionally a "Master"
slider and/or a "Take-Control" push
button.
Preset Select Stations
Each slider may have any number of DMX
output addresses assigned to it. The
output level of a DMX address so assigned
will follow the setting of the slider.
If the AC-100 is connected to IPS dimmers,
it can be used to record and play back up
to seven complete presets. An eighth
preset called "Off" is also available which
has all levels permanently set to zero. A
Preset Select stations has from 2 to 8
buttons. Presets are selected simply by
pressing one of these buttons. An
illuminated LED indicates the currently
selected preset. Lights fade from the old
to the new preset levels.
Take Control
The AC-100 may be configured to have one
station of up to 16 sliders, two stations of
up to 8 sliders each, or four stations of up
to 4 sliders each. When configured for
multiple stations, the AC-100 activates its
"Take-Control" push button inputs. One
"Take-Control" button is associated with
each slider station. Control of the lights is
granted to the station whose "TakeControl" button was most recently pressed.
When control passes from one station to
another, the AC-100 fades the lighting
levels from the old to the new levels. An
LED indicates the active station.
Presets are normally recorded from the AC100 front panel as described in the
programming section, however it is also
possible to record a preset by pressing
and holding one of the preset select
buttons for 5 seconds.
DMX512 Input
A theatrical style lighting control console
may be connected to the DMX512 input on
the AC-100. Addresses on the incoming
DMX line are automatically connected to
the corresponding addresses on the
outgoing DMX line. If desired, the console
may be blocked from controlling certain
DMX addresses. See the "Console Enable"
option in the programming section.
Switch Stations
General Purpose Switches
General Purpose Switches are latching
push button controls to which any DMX
address may be assigned. When so
assigned, the level of the DMX address will
go to full anytime the switch is activated.
These controls might be used for general
44
Auxiliary Control Unit
Programming
Programming
Overview of
Programming
This section describes how to program the
control options for each DMX address in
the output data stream. Select each output
address in turn, then step through the
three option menus to review or set the
control options for that address.
Idle
Display reads:
[= = = =]
'=' marches thru digits.
Operation:
OK:
Change to "DMX Select"
➊ Four digit LED display.
➋ Special Indicator LEDs.
Press "OK" to change to the first menu.
"DMX Select" Menu
LED 1 = No DMX data.
LED 2 = Undefined.
Display reads:
[d x x x]
d = Menu Indicator.
xxx = DMX address in decimal
➌ Up/Down arrow buttons.
➍ "OK" Select button.
Operation:
#,$: Select DMX Address
OK:
Accept Selection and Change
to "Assign Control"
Programming the AC-100 is accomplished
thru the 4 digit LED display and three push
buttons. In general, the up and down
arrows are used to enter a value for a
parameter, and "OK" is used to accept the
value and move on to the next parameter.
Sixty seconds after a programming
operation the unit returns to the idle state.
With the Up and Down arrow keys, select
the DMX512 output address to be
programmed. Press "OK" to accept the
selection and change to the next menu.
"Assign Control" Option Menu
Display reads:
[A x x x]
A = Menu Indicator.
xxx = Control Selection
("S-1" - "S-3", "P-1" - "P16", "- no")
DMX512 Control Options
Each DMX512 address in the output data
stream has several control options which
may be set through the AC-100 front
panel. These options are "Control
Assignment", "Panic Enable", and "Console
Enable".
Operation:
#,$: Select Control Assignment.
OK:
Accept Selection and Change
to "Panic Enable".
With the Up and Down arrow keys, select
the Fader (P1 - 16) or Switch (S1 - 3) input
which will control the selected DMX
address. "-no" = not assigned. Press "OK"
to make the control assignment and
change to the next menu.
The "Control Assignment" option selects
which of the 16 faders and 3 General
Purpose switches will have control of the
address. The "Panic Enable" option selects
whether the Panic switch will also have
control of the address. The "Console
Enable" option selects whether a
connected DMX512 control console will
also have control of the address.
45
Auxiliary Control Unit
Programming
Idle
"Panic Enable" Option Menu
Display reads:
[P x x x]
P = Menu Indicator.
xxx = Enable Choice
("yES", "no")
Operation:
#,$: Select Enable Choice.
OK:
Accept Selection and Change
to "Console Enable".
Display reads:
[= = = =]
'=' marches thru digits.
Operation:
OK:
Change to "DMX Select"
Press "OK" to change to the next menu.
"DMX Select" Menu
Display reads:
[d x x x]
d = Menu Indicator.
xxx = DMX address in decimal.
With the Up and Down arrow keys, select
whether or not the Panic Switch will control
the selected DMX address. Press "OK" to
accept the selection and change to the
next menu.
Operation:
Press and Hold OK: Change to
"Learn Preset".
"Console Enable" Option Menu
Press and hold "OK" to change to the
"Learn Preset" menu.
Display reads:
[C x x x]
C = Menu Indicator.
xxx = Enable Choice
("yES", "no")
Operation:
#,$: Select Enable Choice.
OK:
Accept Selection and return
to "DMX Select".
"Learn Preset" Menu
Display reads:
[L r P x]
L r P = Menu Indicator.
x = Preset number (1 - 7, "-").
Operation:
#,$: Select Preset Number.
OK:
Accept the selection and
change to "Fade Time"
With the Up and Down arrow keys, select
whether or not the corresponding address
on the DMX input data stream will control
the selected DMX output address. Press
"OK" to accept the selection and return to
the "DMX Select" menu.
With the Up and Down arrow keys, select
the Preset number to record. Press "OK" to
accept the selection and change to the
next menu. If Preset number is "-", the
function is canceled with no changes
made.
Recording Presets
"Fade Time" Menu
This section describes the process of
saving levels into each of the seven
presets. Before starting, set the desired
lighting levels on the DMX control console
or on the fader stations.
Display reads:
[F x x x]
F = Menu Indicator.
xxx = Fade time in seconds
("-00" - "240", "- - -")
NOTE: Presets only function with IPS
dimmers. If you have a mix of IPS and nonIPS dimmers, only the IPS dimmers will
respond to preset commands.
Operation:
#,$: Select fade time.
OK:
Record preset and fade time
and return to "Learn Preset"
With the Up and Down arrow keys, select
the fade time for the previously selected
preset. Fade times may be set to 00, 01,
02, 05, 10, 15, 30, 60, 120, or 240
seconds. Press "OK" to store the fade time
46
Auxiliary Control Unit
Programming
and all current levels into the preset and
return to the "DMX Select" menu. If fade
time is "- - -", the function is canceled with
no changes made.
"Learn Preset" Menu
Display reads:
[L r P x]
L r P = Menu Indicator.
x = Preset number (1 - 7, "-")
Operation:
Press and Hold OK: Change to
"Set-Up".
Recording from a Preset
Select Station
Presets may also be recorded from a Preset
Select button station. As before, the
lighting levels should be set before
starting. Press and hold the Preset Select
button for the preset that is to be
recorded. After about 5 seconds, the LED
for that preset will illuminate indicating
that new levels have been recorded.
Presets recorded from a Preset Select
station always have a fade time of 2
seconds. It is not possible to record levels
for the "Off" preset.
Press and hold "OK" to change to the
"Set-Up" menu.
"Set-Up" Menu
Display reads:
[S U x x]
[A n A ]
S U = Menu Indicator.
xx = Set-Up option ("-1" - "-3").
A n A = Analog Trim function.
Operation:
#,$: Select Set-Up option or
Analog Trim function.
OK:
Accept selection and change
to "DMX Select", or execute
Analog Trim function.
Changing Analog Input
Configuration
With the Up and Down arrow keys, select
the Set-Up option to use. Press "OK" to
accept the selection and return to the
"DMX Select" menu. See the following
section for a list of set-up options. If menu
reads "AnA" when "OK" is pressed, the
Analog Trim function is executed.
This section describes how to change the
configuration of the Analog pot and TakeControl inputs.
Idle
Display reads:
[= = = =]
'=' marches thru digits.
Set-Up Options
Operation:
OK:
Change to "DMX Select"
Press "OK" to change to the next menu.
There are three valid configuration set-ups
for the pots and Take-Control inputs. They
are:
"DMX Select" Menu
Mode 1: 16 Faders, No Take-Control.
Display reads:
[d x x x]
d = Menu Indicator.
xxx = DMX address in decimal.
In this configuration any DMX address may
be assigned to any one of the 16 pot
inputs. Take-Control inputs are not active.
Operation:
Press and Hold OK: Change to
"Learn Preset".
Mode 2: 8 Faders, 2 Take-Controls.
In this configuration any DMX address may
be assigned to any one of the first 8
faders. Pot inputs 9 thru 16 provide a
second set of levels for faders 1 thru 8.
Take-Control button 1 selects inputs 1
thru 8. Take-Control 2 selects inputs 9
Press and hold "OK" to change to the
"Learn Preset" menu.
47
Auxiliary Control Unit
Programming
"Analog Trim for Full" Function
thru 16. Take-Control inputs 3 and 4 are
not active.
Display reads:
[A n F L]
A n F L = Menu Indicator.
Mode 3: 4 Faders, 4 Take-Controls.
Operation:
#,$: No Action.
OK:
Set High end calibration for
analog inputs and change
to "DMX Select".
In this configuration any DMX address may
be assigned to any one of the first 4
faders. Pot inputs 5 thru 8, 9 thru 12, and
13 thru 16 provide three additional sets of
levels for faders 1 thru 4. Take-Control
button 1 selects inputs 1 thru 4. TakeControl button 2 selects inputs 5 thru 8.
Take-Control button 3 selects inputs 9
thru 12. Take-Control button 4 selects
inputs 13 thru 16.
Set all individual channel pots and master
pots connected to the AC-100 to their
maximum position. Press "OK" to store the
Full calibration values and return to the
"DMX Select" menu. For the system to trim
properly the Full levels must be between
2.8 volts DC and 5.0 volts DC.
Analog Trim
This function is initiated from the "Set-Up"
menu. It is used to calibrate the AC-100 to
the actual voltages supplied from the
system faders. The Analog Trim function
should be executed at the time a system is
first installed. It should only need to be
repeated if there is a change in system
configuration.
"Analog Trim for Zero" Function
Display reads:
[A n 0 0]
A n 0 0 = Menu Indicator.
Operation:
#,$: No Action.
OK:
Set Low end calibration for
analog inputs and change
to "Analog Trim for Full".
Set all individual channel pots connected
to the AC-100 to their minimum position.
Set all master pots to their maximum
position. Press "OK" to store the Zero
calibration values and change to the
"Analog Trim for Full" function. For the
system to trim properly, the Zero levels
must be less than 0.78 volts DC.
48
Checklist
Many apparent faults in complex systems such as a lighting control
installation are due to operator error or to conditions which have
occurred outside of the equipment itself. In cases where operating
problems have been encountered, run through the following checklist
before searching for defective equipment.
•
Check the power at the outlet. Is it present and of correct
voltage?
•
Are the console, status monitor, and distribution amplifiers
plugged in and turned on?
•
Is the console configured and patched correctly? Is the grand
master up?
•
Are all the DMX512 cables in good condition and installed
correctly?
•
Are the DMX512 termination switches set to the left hand
position in all units except the last one on each cable?
•
Are non-IPS peripherals on the network properly terminated
according to their position in the network?
•
Do all non-IPS peripherals support the IPS talkback protocol
on the second data link? Do they pass the wiring for the
second link through?
•
Are there more than 32 DMX512 receivers on the network?
(Note: An accessory such as a color scroller counts as one
receiver.)
•
Is the DMX512 common line (Pin 1) connected to earth
ground at more than one point? IPS does not ground this
wire, but other equipment might!
•
Has an IPS-AC-100 been programmed to lock out console
control of certain dimmers?
•
If analog or AMX192 controls are in use, has the Analog Trim
function been executed to calibrate the inputs? (This applies
to both the Head-End Processor and the Auxiliary Control
Unit.)
49
V
Troubleshooting
Symptoms and Causes
The following list of possible symptoms may help you isolate certain system problems:
The dimmers don't seem
to respond correctly to
the console.
Is the console patched? Are all the data cables connected? Are
the termination switches set correctly? Is there power to the
dimmers and to the distribution amplifier? Is a Head-End
Processor in the Playback Preset or Local Dimmer Control state?
Is an IPS-AC-100 setting the dimmer level or locking out the
consle? Have the dimmers been correctly configured for Normal
or "Non-Dim" operation? Has a dimmer shut down due to
overload? Has a dimmer shut down due to over temperature?
The Status Monitor data is Are the termination switches set correctly? Have two IPS dimmer
systems been set to the same DMX512 network address? Has a
garbled.
non-IPS distribution amplifier been used? (IPS distribution
amplifiers incorporate special circuitry to combine the multiple
talkback data streams.) Is a non-IPS peripheral using a different
talk-back protocol on the second DMX512 channel? Is DMX512
data being correctly transmitted from the control console?
The dimmer forgot a
configuration change.
Configuration changes are saved when the Head-End menus are
exited. If power is removed from the dimmer system before a
menu is exited, any changes which have been made will be lost.
The no-load report is
wrong.
The IPS dimmer detects load size by measuring the current
drawn by the load circuit. For very small loads set to low output
levels this current may be of a very small value. Sometimes an IPS
dimmer will see this small current as being below its No-Load
detection threshold and make an erroneous report. It will,
however, continue to control the load correctly.
The load size report is
wrong.
Most incandescent lamps are manufactured to a +/-20%
tollerence. A lamp marked as 1000 watts may actually range
from 800 to 1200 watts. The value reported by the Status
Monitor is the actual value of the lamp rounded to the nearest
100 watts. For low-voltage lamps with transformer ballasts, the
reported load may be slightly low due to the phase shift
introduced by the transformer.
Sometimes talkback
response is slow.
Talkback is timed to the console update rate. If a console slows
its update rate sometimes (like during a disk transfer), talkback
response will slow down also.
Analog or AMX192
controls don't work
correctly.
Is the analog Common wire grounded at more than one place? Is
the analog Common wire missing, damaged or shorted to
another conductor? Are any of the analog conductors shorted to
the conduit or to a connector shell? Is there excessive commonmode voltage between the control point and the dimmers?
(Analog inputs do not have optical isolation!) Has the Analog
Trim function been executed? Any time analog controls are
connected to an IPS product, the Analog Trim function should be
executed to calibrate the inputs to the actual control signals. See
sections on the Head-End Processor and the Auxiliary Control
Unit for details on the Analog Trim function.
50
A. Cables, Connectors,
and Pinouts
Power Cables
IPS DS Series Power Cable
NEMA L21-20P
Connector
"X"
"Y"
"Z"
"W"
"G"
10/5 SO Cable
IPS DS series
Terminal Block
"A"
"B"
"C"
"N"
Lug
Black
Red
Blue or Orange
White
Green
IPS DB 12/24 Series Power Cable
NEMA L21-20P
Connector
"X"
"Y"
"Z"
"W"
"G"
10/5 SO Cable
NEMA L21-20R
Connector
"X"
"Y"
"Z"
"W"
"G"
Black
Red
Blue or Orange
White
Green
IPS DB 60 Series Power Cable
Terminated by
User
6/5 SO Cable
Black
Red
Blue or Orange
White
Green
VEAM CIR065GRH
Connector
"A"
"B"
"C"
"N"
"G"
2 Pair + Shield
RS-485 Cable
Common (Shield)
Dimmer Drive Dimmer Drive +
Talkback Talkback +
5 Pin XLR Female
To Dimmer System
1
2
3
4
5
Data Cables
DMX512 Cable
5 Pin XLR Male
From Console
1
2
3
4
5
51
A
Appendices
A. Cables, Connectors,
and Pinouts
AMX192 Cable
4 Pin XLR Female
From Console
1
2
3
4
2 Pair Unshielded
Cable
Analog Common
Clock +
Analog Level
Clock -
4 Pin XLR Male
To Dimmer System
1
2
3
4
9 Wire Multi-Conductor
Cable
Control 1
Control 2
Control 3
Control 4
Control 5
Control 6
Signal Common
9 Pin 'D' Male
To Dimmer System
1
2
3
4
5
6
7,8,9
Analog Cable
Console Connector
Connector Pinouts
DMX512
Connector: XLR-5 DMX Source: Female DMX Receiver: Male
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
Signal
Common (Shield)
Dimmer Drive Dimmer Drive +
Talkback Talkback +
AMX192
Connector: XLR-4 AMX Source: Male AMX Receiver: Female
Pin
1
2
3
4
Signal
Analog Common
Clock +
Analog Level
Clock -
52
A. Cables, Connectors,
and Pinouts
IPS Analog Input
Connector: DB-9 Analog Source: Male Analog Receiver: Female
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7,8,9
Signal
Control 1
Control 2
Control 3
Control 4
Control 5
Control 6
Signal Common
NEMA L21-20 4 Pole, 5 Wire Twistlock
Pole
"X"
"Y"
"Z"
"W"
"G"
Signal
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
Neutral
Ground
VEAM CIR065GRH-32A-5S
Pole
"A"
"B"
"C"
"N"
"G"
Signal
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
Neutral
Ground
IPS-SA-104/108-WB DMX512 Terminal Strip
Terminal
GND
TALKTALK+
DMXDMX+
Signal
Common (Shield)
Talkback Talkback +
Dimmer Drive Dimmer Drive +
IPS-SW-101/102/103 Connector Plate Terminal Strips
Terminal
GND
TALKTALK+
DMXDMX+
Signal
Common (Shield)
Talkback Talkback +
Dimmer Drive Dimmer Drive +
53
B. Dimmer System Enclosures
Focus Button which is captured below the
dimmer outlet face plate.
Connector Strip
4. Reach behind the dimmer when you are
able, and unplug the Mate-N-Lok or
Anderson power connector and the MTA156 control input connector.
The DS Series enclosure is constructed
from a number of extruded aluminum
pieces and stamped face plates. The
primary structural member of the
enclosure is the extruded channel to which
all other pieces are screwed. If all of the
heat sinks and face plates are removed,
this channel carries nothing but two wiring
harnesses and a terminal block. To
maintain the integrity of the dimmer
system during servicing or repair, only
remove the items being serviced from the
dimmer enclosure.
5. Remove the dimmer from the enclosure.
Reverse the preceding steps to re-install
the dimmer.
Removing the Head-End
Processor:
The Head-End Processor is constructed in a
manner similar to the dimmers. To remove
this assembly, take the following steps:
Important: Many of the enclosure screws
require lock-washers and/or flat washers.
Note the location of these washers as you
disassemble the unit so they may correctly
reinstalled during reassembly.
1. Disconnect power from the dimmer
system and unplug any DMX cables.
2. Remove the four Phillips head screws
which retain the Head-End face plate.
3. Slowly pull the Head-End assembly away
from the enclosure.
WARNING
4. Reach behind the face plate when you
are able, and unplug the Mate-N-Lok power
connector and the MTA-156 control signal
connector.
The IPS dimmer system contains High
Voltage! Disconnect power from the unit
before opening any panels.
5. Remove the Head-End assembly from
the enclosure.
Removing a Dimmer:
Reverse the preceding steps to re-install
the assembly.
The electronics for each dimmer are
constructed on a single printed wiring
board which is attached to back of the
dimmer heat sink. To remove the
electronics, take the following steps:
1. Disconnect power from the dimmer
system. High voltage is present inside the
enclosure when the system is powered.
2. Remove the four cap screws which retain
the dimmer heat sink. These screws
require a 9/64" hex screwdriver.
3. Slowly rock the right side of the heat
sink away from the system enclosure
taking particular care not to damage the
54
B. Dimmer System Enclosures
5. Slide the dimmer away from the back
panel and unplug the MTA-156 data
connector.
Plugging Box
The IPS DB series enclosure is constructed
from four pieces of sheet aluminum: 1.
Bottom/Sides, 2. Front Panel, 3. Rear
Panel, 4. Top/Handle. Access to the
interior of the enclosure is gained by
removing the Top/Handle panel.
6. Lift the dimmer out of the enclosure.
Reverse the preceding steps to re-install
the dimmer.
Removing the Head-End
Processor:
Important: Many of the enclosure screws
require lock-washers and/or flat washers.
Note the location of these washers as you
disassemble the unit so they may correctly
reinstalled during reassembly.
The Head-End Processor is attached to the
front panel of the unit. To remove the
Head-End Processor, you must first remove
this panel.
1. Open the Enclosure.
WARNING
2. Remove the three pan-head screws and
two flat head screws which retain the front
panel.
The IPS dimmer system contains High
Voltage! Disconnect power from the unit
before opening any panels.
3. Carefully lift the front panel away from
the enclosure.
Opening the Enclosure:
4. Unplug the Mate-N-Lok power
connector.
1. Disconnect power from the unit.
5. Unplug the MTA-156 data connector.
2. Remove the eight flat-head screws which
hold the top to the side panels.
6. Unplug the two MTA-100 DMX512
connectors.
3. Remove the four pan-head screws and
lock-washers which hold the handle to the
left side panel. Notice that the screw
closest to the front is longer than the
other three.
7. Unplug the fan connector on the fly
lead.
8. Unplug any leads connected to any
optional input boards.
4. Lift the Top/Handle away from the
enclosure.
9. Remove the five pan-head screws which
hold the Head-End Processor to the front
panel.
Removing a Dimmer:
1. Open the Enclosure.
10. Lift the Head-End Processor away from
the front panel.
2. Remove the dimmer hold-down bracket
which is retaining the dimmer you wish to
remove.
Reverse the preceding steps to re-install
the assembly.
3. Remove the two pan head screws in the
rear panel which are anchoring the
dimmer's heat sink.
4. Unplug the dimmer's power connector.
55
C. Other References
USITT Standards
The following standards documents may
be obtained from United States Institute
for Theatre Technology, 6443 Ridings
Road, Syracuse, NY 13206-1111. They
describe electrical and communication
protocol standards for communications
between lighting control consoles and
dimmer systems.
DMX512/1990
Digital Data Transmission Standard for
Dimmers and Controllers.
AMX192
Analog Multiplex Data Transmission
Standard for Dimmers and Controllers.
Other
National Electric Code
A publication of the National Fire
Protection Association which is the basis
for most electrical building codes in the
United States.
56
D. Glossary
AMX: Short for AMX192.
AMX192: Multiplexed
analog dimmer control
protocol standard published
by USITT.
Analog: In the context of
dimmer control, this usually
refers to a scheme in which
a low voltage circuit is used
to control the output level
of a dimmer.
DMX: Short for DMX512.
DMX512: Serial data
transmission protocol
standard published by
USITT.
Fader: A lighting control
device which gradually
raises or lowers the levels of
a number of dimmers.
Fall Time: The duration of
the portion of an RPC wave
form in which the control
device is switching off.
Longer fall times produce
quieter lamps and generate
less electronic noise.
Forward Phase Control: A
technique for dimming
lights in which the power
line wave form is chopped
by delaying some amount of
time into each half cycle,
and then switching on a
control device. This
technique is used in all SCR
based dimmers.
FPC: Short for Forward
Phase Control.
Half Cycle: The portion of a
sinusoidal wave form in
which the signal is of one
polarity only. Every full cycle
is composed of two Half
Cycles. Electronic dimmers
control the amount of
current conducted in each
Half Cycle of the power line.
RS-485: The underlying
communications protocol
standard on which DMX512
is based.
µS: Abbreviation for
microsecond.
Take-Control: A lighting
control function in which
turning-on one control
station, turns-off all other
control stations.
mS: Abbreviation for
millisecond.
Microsecond: One millionth
of a second.
Millisecond: One
thousandth of a second.
Non-Dim: A power circuit
which switches instantly
from off to on.
Pot: Short for
Potentiometer. An electrical
device for manually setting
a voltage level.
Reverse Phase Control: A
technique for dimming
lights in which the power
line wave form is chopped
by delaying some amount of
time into each half cycle,
and then switching off a
control device. This
technique is used in IPS
dimmers.
Rise Time: The duration of
the portion of an FPC wave
form in which the control
device is switching on.
Longer rise times produce
quieter lamps and generate
less electronic noise. In SCR
based dimmers, the rise
time is controlled by an
inductor (choke).
RPC: Short for Reverse
Phase Control.
57
Talk-Back: A data
transmission from a
controlled device (like a
dimmer) to its controller.
Termination: Circuit added
at the end of a data cable to
prevent signal reflections.
For DMX512, this is a 120
ohm resistor.
USITT: United States
Institute for Theatre
Technology. A professional
organization serving the
live theatre and
entertainment industries.
2413 S Shiloh Rd.
Garland, Texas 75041
972-840-1640 Phone
972-278-9152 Fax
www.etdimming.com
Printed in the United States of America
P/N 85-1160
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