Digital Wireless Microphone System

Digital Wireless Microphone System
Digital Wireless
Microphone System
System Integration Guide
Table of Contents
Outline
Digital Wireless Outline
Ou
3
4
Network System Configuration .............................57
Sony st
System Configuration .................................................57
soon fo
Equipment Features ...................................................60
Sony in
Installation of Remote Control Unit RMU-01 ..............61
What is DWX? ...........................................................4
What Is WiDIF-HP? ....................................................5
What Is Cross Remote? ...........................................6
Network Device Connections ....................................63
Making and Checking Network Settings .............64
2.4 GHz area operation check ..................................65
Step 1 Network Setup ................................................66
Technology
7
WiDIF-HP Technology ...............................................7
Key Features of WiDIF-HP .......................................10
WiDIF-HP Precautions .............................................16
Cross Remote Technology....................................20
Cross Remote Features .........................................26
Cross Remote Precautions....................................30
Configuring a DWX System
31
DWX System Configuration ...................................31
Audio Equipment Selection ..................................33
Equipment Features ...................................................33
UHF System Configuration ....................................37
System Configuration .................................................37
Equipment Features ...................................................38
Antenna Installation Requirements ...........................40
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF).............44
Checking the RF Level (UHF)......................................45
Step 1 Channel Plan Selection .................................46
Step 2 Antenna Installation and Setup ....................48
Step 3 Checking the Service Area With
One Channel............................................................51
Step 4 Checking Third-order Intermodulation
Distortion ...................................................................52
Step 5 Checking Simultaneous Multi-channel
Operation .................................................................53
Troubleshooting ..........................................................55
Quick Check ...............................................................56
2
Wireles
42 ope
of Sony
and re
broadc
Step 2 Checking Equipment Connections ..............69
Step 3 Checking for 2.4 GHz Interference................71
Sony h
Step 4 Checking the Monitor Function ....................71
 Supe
 High
Step 5 Checking the Control Function ....................71
Sample System Configaration
 Flexib
74
Sample Minimum System Configuration
(2 channels) .............................................................74
Sample Small-Scale System Configuration Using
Remote Control Unit RMU-01 (7 – 16 channels) .....74
Sample Medium-Scale System Configuration Using
Antenna Divider WD-850 (17 channels or more) ...75
Sample Maximum System Configuration
(82 channels) ...........................................................76
System Sections and Configuration Flow .................31
System Limitations ......................................................32
in 1991
While S
popula
develo
these i
that ca
increa
Sony is
range
References
77
suppo
List of Supported Frequencies ...................................77
wireles
Equipment Specifications ..........................................78
Outline
Sony started in the wireless microphone business in 1974 with the introduction of a 40-MHz band VHF system. This was
.......57
soon followed by an industry-first PLL Synthesized VHF system in 1983. Continually enhancing its wireless products line,
.......60
Sony introduced a groundbreaking 800-MHz band PLL Synthesized UHF Wireless Microphone system at the NAB event
.......61
.......63
......64
.......65
.......66
Outline
......57
in 1991. Throughout this period, Sony has been at the forefront of technology -- offering the first UHF PLL Synthesized
Wireless Microphone system with 282 selectable channels, introducing a space diversity RF reception system, realizing
42 operational channels with a 36-MHz band width, and more. These technologies have been adopted for the range
of Sony wireless microphone systems available today. Providing superb audio performance, operational flexibility,
and reliability, these systems have been widely accepted in a broad range of professional audio applications from
broadcasting, production, and theater to entertainment and conferences.
.......69
.......71
Sony has consistently developed these systems with the following in mind:
.......71
 Superb audio performance with wide dynamic range
 Highly stable signal transmission
.......71
 Flexible simultaneous multi-channel operation
74
While Sony wireless microphone systems have greatly innovated professional audio operations, the growth in
.......74
g
) .....74
sing
e) ...75
.......76
popularity of high-definition (HD) content creation and digital audio recording/transmission has called for the
development of large-scale, multi-channel wireless microphone systems with improved sound quality. In response to
these important requirements, Sony continues to strive to develop a digital audio wireless transmission technology
that can match the quality and performance of a wired transmission technology and that can also cope with the
increasing need for simultaneous multi-channel operation.
Sony is offering a broad lineup of digital wireless products available as options for various audio systems. Solutions
range from electronic news gathering (ENG) systems with a bundled camcorder to full-fledged studio/concert systems
77
.......77
supporting simultaneous multi-channel operation. This provides users with the flexibility to configure exactly the digital
wireless microphone system they need.
.......78
3
Digital Wireless Outline
What is DWX?
W
DWX refers to Sony’s new digital wireless microphone system. The DWX series reflects Sony’s extensive expertise in
WiDIF-H
professional microphones and sound design. It represents a successful blend of Sony know-how, wireless technology
by Son
renowned for stability, and cutting-edge digital audio technology.
It enab
In addition to realizing the high sound quality possible with a digital system, the DWX series supports multi-channel
chann
simultaneous operation, encrypted transmission, and metadata transmission for monitoring the status of multiple
transmitters. Using a main link and a separate additional link, remote control of transmitters from the receiver is also
possible. With its many advanced features, the system has the potential to revolutionize the workflow of professional
applications.
System Configuration Example (Conceptual Diagram)
High
WiDIF-H
CD qua
of 20 Hz
perform
than is
* Unless o
BNC Cable
LAN Cable
UHF Accessories (Option)
DWX Microphone Series
DWX Receiver Series
Simu
DWM-01/F31
Digital Wireless
Microphone
DWR-R01D
Digital Wireless Receiver
AN-01
UHF Antenna
Becaus
analog
Anal
DWM-01/C31
Digital Wireless
Microphone
Inter
WiDIF-HP
DWX Transmitter Series
DWR-S01D
Digital Wireless Receiver
WD-850
UHF Antenna
Divider
Wireless
transmission
DWX Adapter
DWT-B01
Digital Wireless
Transmitter
DWT-P01
Digital Wireless
Transmitter
“Cross Remote”
Wireless
Communication
AN-820
UHF Antenna
DWA-01D
Digital Wireless Adapter
Status Monitor & Parameter Control
Status Monitor & Parameter Control
Computer on
which Wireless
Studio installed
Computer on
which Wireless
Studio installed
“Cross Remote” Protocol
Hub
RMU-01
Remote Control Unit
4
What is DWX?
Hub
Network Accessories (Option)
Encry
Security
system,
audio s
wireless
transmi
Anal
What Is WiDIF-HP?
n
by Sony.
It enables highly secure transmission with high sound quality and low system latency, and supports simultaneous multi-
el
channel operation.
lso
High Sound Quality Wireless Transmission
nal
WiDIF-HP uses 24 bit/48 kHz sampling, resulting in superb sound that surpasses
CD quality. Dynamic range of more than 106 dB, wide frequency response
of 20 Hz to 22 kHz, and a low system latency of 3.4 ms** ensure excellent
performance. Additionally, there is no compander, resulting in faster response
than is possible with conventional analog wireless systems.*
* Unless otherwise specified, this refers to analog wireless systems that include a compander.
Cable
WiDIF-HP Specifications
Sampling frequency
Quantization
Frequency response
Dynamic range
THD
Occupied bandwidth
Modulation principle
Audio latency
48 kHz
24 bit
20 Hz – 22 kHz
106 dB typ. (A-weighted)
0.03% or better
192 kHz or less
π/4 Shift QPSK
3.4 milliseconds **
** When DWM-01, DWT-B01, and DWR-R01D are used in
combination. When analog output is combined with the
DWR-S01D, the latency rating is 3.6 milliseconds.
Cable
es
Simultaneous Multi-Channel Operation
ver
Because WiDIF-HP is highly resistant to interference, about 50 percent more channels can be operated simultaneously, compared to
analog systems.
Analog Wireless System
Digital Wireless System (WiDIF-HP)
Intermodulation free special channel allocation is necessary.
Equally spaced easy channel allocation is available.
ver
Encrypted Transmission Provides Security
er
Security is an important requirement for wireless systems handling the transmission of audio signals. In an analog wireless transmission
system, the transmitted audio signal is at risk of being intercepted by a receiver of an outside system. When using FM modulation,
audio signals can be received by anyone with the right equipment and some technical knowledge. By contrast, the digital audio
wireless transmission system transmits encrypted audio data, which mitigates the risk of such interception and provides highly secure
transmission for even the most critical applications.
Analog Wireless System
Digital Wireless System (WiDIF-HP)
Digitally modulated
coded audio
FM-modulated
audio signal
The risk of being intercepted by
a receiver of an outside system.
Encrypted data
What Is WiDIF-HP?
5
Digital Wireless Outline
ogy
WiDIF-HP (WiDIF: Wireless Digital Interface Format, HP: High Profile) is a wireless digital audio interface format developed
Digital Wireless Outline
Tec
What Is Cross Remote?
W
Cross Remote is a system that allows transmitters to be monitored and controlled from a receiver and the Wireless
A new
Studio control software installed on a computer connected to the receiver. For example, the settings of a transmitter
This se
worn under clothing can be easily changed over the wireless link.
WiDI
Cross Remote Functions
A digita
convert
Monitor function
Control function
Allows you to monitor transmitter setting and status
information sent as metadata in WiDIF-HP format. Monitoring
can be performed on the receiver display, camcorder menu
screen, or multiple computers on which Wireless Studio is
installed that are connected to the network.
Allows remote control of the transmitter from the receiver and
Wireless Studio application via a 2.4 GHz band IEEE802.15.4
wireless communication standard that is separate from the
main communication line of the UHF. This is done without
affecting the battery life, audio quality, and other features
of the wireless microphone. Nearly all of the parameters of a
transmitter including those for the attenuator, low-cut filter,
power, and frequency can be controlled from the receiver.
In conv
dynami
Howeve
to the p
By cont
short, d
Trans
Scalable Wireless Remote Control System
The tran
then wi
Two types of wireless remote control systems can be configured, to fit the system size and requirements.
ST mode (Standalone mode)
NT mode (Network mode)
Transmitter and receiver communicate directly in a one-onone configuration.
When the receiver is placed within a main link service area,
Cross Remote can be used within a range of about 10 meters
from the receiver. To control more than six transmitters, the NT
mode system should be used.
The DWR-S01D can be used as a receiver only in ST mode.
Transmitters and receivers communicate via the Remote
Control Unit RMU-01 connected to a network.
One remote control unit can control up to 82 transmitters,
which allows network-based system management regardless
of receiver location. The service area range is about 10 meters
from the control unit.
An ana
techniq
coding
data ar
over the
required
Configuration for NT mode
RMU-01
AN-01
DWM-01
Meta Data
on WiDIF-HP
DWR-R01D
BNC Cable
Control Data
on 2.4GHz
DWT-B01
Ethernet Hub
Control Data
on Ethernet
Ethernet Hub
LAN Cable
PC
LAN Cable
Stage
Control Software Wireless Studio
Wireless Studio is a dedicated software application supplied with the Digital
Wireless Receiver DWR-R01D.
Wireless Studio can be used both in ST mode and NT mode.
Wireless Studio provides the following functions.
Monitor and control up to 82 transmitters simultaneously.
 Display the status of the receiver and remote control unit, in addition to that of
the transmitter, on the computer monitor.
 Save configuration data and monitor setting data. Return configuration data
to an earlier state.
 Create an error log, which can be useful, for example, in identifying the cause
of reception problems.

6
What Is Cross Remote?
Status Monitor & Parameter Control
Control Room
Rece
Upon re
an ana
occur w
In the R
in the si
After re
transmi
expand
digital a
corresp
Technology
WiDIF-HP Technology
s
A new high-profile format for the digital audio interface on UHF – WiDIF-HP -- has been developed for the DWX series.
tter
This section provides further details on WiDIF-HP technology.
Technology
WiDIF-HP Technology Outline
A digital audio wireless transmission system handles audio after the analog signal has been converted into digital form by an A/D
converter.
er and
15.4
the
ut
res
s of a
ter,
iver.
In conventional analog wireless systems, the compander providing compression and expansion is a key component for enabling wide
dynamic range. The compander system uses complex analog circuitry for maintaining sound quality and response characteristics.
However, this analog system requires advanced techniques to keep performance levels constant, because analog circuits are subject
to the performance instability and adjustment tolerances of parts.
By contrast, the digital audio wireless transmission system is free from such instabilities as it does not require a compander system. In
short, digital audio wireless transmission is an optimum system to transmit high-quality audio signals without deterioration.
Transmitter
The transmitter in the digital audio wireless transmission system digitizes analog audio signal inputs from microphones and mixers and
then wirelessly transmits them as a digital signal. This section describes the processes that occur within the transmitter.
e
ers,
ardless
meters
An analog audio signal is first amplified in the amplifier and digitized in the A/D converter. The codec then applies data reduction
techniques to the digital signal from the A/D converter and transcodes it into a digital bit stream with a lower bit rate. In the channel
coding section, sync data and error processing data required for wireless transmission are added to the audio data, and the resulting
data are encrypted. The digital modulator generates the π/4 QPSK modulation signal used to transmit the channel coded digital stream
over the digital wireless link. The modulated signal is supplied to the RF block which amplifies the modulated carrier to the power level
required for transmission.
Microphone
Full digital processing
Amp.
A/D
24 bit
CODEC
48 kHz
Digital
Modulator
Channel
Coder
RF Block
Mixer
Digital modulation
Receiver
Upon receiving the modulated carrier wave from the transmitter, the receiver reproduces the digital audio signal and outputs it as either
an analog or digital signal to audio equipment such as an audio mixer or a power amplifier. This section describes the processes that
occur within the receiver.
In the RF block, the received signal is digitized by the A/D converter. Similar to the transmitter, three main processes are then performed
in the signal processing block: digital demodulation, channel decoding, and codec processing.
After receiving the signal from the RF block, the digital demodulator reproduces the digital stream that was channel coded at the
transmitter. Then the channel decoder performs synchronization, decryption, error processing, and audio data extraction. The codec
expands the signal that was data reduced to a low bit rate in the transmitter and reconstitutes the digital audio signal. The reconstituted
digital audio signal is routed through the D/A converter and amplifier to be output as an analog audio signal or as a digital signal
corresponding to standard audio interface specifications such as AES/EBU.
Mixer
Full digital processing
Amp.
RF Block
Digital
Demodulator
Channel
Decoder
CODEC
24 bit
D/A
48 kHz
AES/EBU
Camcorder
WiDIF-HP Technology
7
Technology
Sony’s Proprietary WiDIF-HP Codec
Digit
In the wireless system, audio signals have to be transmitted within a limited wireless bandwidth. Transmitting
the highest possible quality audio in this limited bandwidth is the major issue for wireless microphone
development. In addition, low-latency audio transmission is another requirement of microphone applications.
To transmit the best quality audio within limited bandwidth, Sony developed a digital wireless transmission
system that employs a proprietary WiDIF-HP codec, which realizes both outstanding sound quality and low
latency.
 Transmitter
AF
A/D
24 bit
@48-kHz fs
1152 kb/s
CODEC
Down Sampling
&
Bit Compression
Audio Data
Encrypted
&
Channel Coding
192 kb/s
Digital
Modulator
Packetized
Data
RF
 Receiver
RF
Digital
De-modulator
De-modulated
Data
Channel Decoding
Decripted
Audio Data
CODEC
Up Sampling
&
Bit Expansion
24 bit
@48-kHz fs
D/A
AF
1152 kb/s
The WiDIF-HP codec is characterized by the following key features.
 Outstanding sound quality with 24-bit/48-kHz sampling
 Low latency
 Secure transmission
The Sony digital audio codec achieves an optimum balance between sound quality, bit rate, and latency,
while having the redundant bit assignment necessary for wireless transmission.
Channel Coding and Decoding
In order to ensure high quality audio signal transmission within the given bit rate limits, WiDIF-HP employs
synchronization technology to keep the error count as low as possible, along with error processing technology
that minimizes the risk of noise when an error occurs. These techniques were developed and optimized using
extensive simulation and field testing programs covering all wireless system operation aspects such as RF
signal attenuation, Doppler effect, RF reflections, and more. Signal encryption is also handled at the coding
stage.
 Transmitter
AF
A/D
24 bit
@48-kHz fs
1152 kb/s
CODEC
Down Sampling
&
Bit Compression
Audio Data
Channel Coding
192 kb/s
Encrypted
&
Packetized
Data
Digital
Modulator
RF
 Receiver
RF
8
WiDIF-HP Technology
Digital
De-modulator
De-modulated
Data
Channel Decoding
Decripted
Audio Data
CODEC
Up Sampling
&
Bit Expansion
24 bit
@48-kHz fs
1152 kb/s
D/A
AF
Digital Modulator and Demodulator (QPSK)
ting
 Transmitter
AF
A/D
24 bit
@48-kHz fs
1152 kb/s
RF
Audio Data
Channel Coding
192 kb/s
Encrypted
&
Packetized
Data
Digital
Modulator
RF
 Receiver
RF
AF
CODEC
Down Sampling
&
Bit Compression
Technology
ations.
on
ow
Digital
De-modulator
De-modulated
Data
Decripted
Audio Data
Channel Decoding
CODEC
Up Sampling
&
Bit Expansion
24 bit
@48-kHz fs
D/A
AF
1152 kb/s
Sony has developed a new digital modulator and demodulator that allows large-scale simultaneous multichannel operations.
In addition to benefiting from advanced RF technology know-how in the field of analog wireless transmission
systems, the digital audio wireless transmission system also incorporates a digital modulation system that is
less vulnerable to wave interference. These technologies allow highly stable wireless transmission even for a
large number of simultaneous multi-channel operations. The newly developed Sony digital modulator and
demodulator enables up to 12 channels of simultaneous multi-channel operation in a bandwidth of just 6
MHz. Using a unique algorithm optimized for wireless microphone applications, the digital modulator and
demodulator are small enough to be integrated into an FPGA for portable devices.
cy,
Digital modulator on the one-chip IC
DATA
Modulated signal
Filter
I
Filter
Q
Mapping
QPSK modulation
Digital modulator on the one-chip IC
nology
using
F
ding
RF
I
Demodulator
Q
Detector
DATA
RF
AF
WiDIF-HP Technology
9
Technology
Key Features of WiDIF-HP
This section describes the advantages of WiDIF-HP technology.
Stab
High-Quality Sound Transmission on a Par With Wired Microphones
High sound quality is the most important aspect for a wireless transmission. This is achieved through wide
dynamic range, flat frequency response, and excellent transient response performance, factors that are
essential for high-performance broadcasting and PA systems.
Analog systems make use of companders to provide the required dynamic range. However, while compander
systems have improved over time, their inherent problems with regard to sound quality and transient response
performance have not been completely solved.
WiDIF-HP technology was developed by Sony to fundamentally improve the transient response performance
and therefore further enhance sound quality. It employs 24-bit/48-kHz sampling and provides:
 Wide dynamic range of more than 106 dB
 Wide frequency response of 20 Hz to 22 kHz
 Superb transient response performance
Dynamic Response
Response [dB]
Frequency Response
Frequency [kHz]
Analog Wireless System
Digital Wireless System
(WiDIF-HP)
Low latency audio transmission
The second key aspect of the WiDIF-HP codec is low latency. In a digital device, signal delays can often occur
due to the sampling, synchronization and calculation process. In particular, when wireless microphones are
used for vocals or speech applications, keeping this delay short is crucial.
In a commonly used codec such as the MPEG AAC, more than 20 milliseconds are required just for decoding.
The high processing speed of WiDIF-HP provides a fundamental solution to this problem and further enhances
sound quality by realizing a total delay of only 3.4 milliseconds* over the entire path from A/D converter in the
transmitter to D/A converter in the receiver.
 High-speed response approaching linear systems
 Low latency of only 3.4 milliseconds* in send/receive path
Low latency
Total latency (A/D to D/A): 3.4 msec.*
Converted to spatial distance:
1.2 m
Note
When digital mixers or similar
equipment are used along with the
digital wireless system, their latency
values will be added. It is therefore
necessary to consider the overall
latency of the system.
* This is the combined latency of the Digital Wireless Microphone DWM-01, Digital Wireless Transmitter DWT-B01, and Digital Wireless
Receiver DWR-R01D.
When analog output is combined with the Digital Wireless Receiver DWR-S01D, the latency rating is 3.6 milliseconds.
10
Key Features of WiDIF-HP
Stable Wireless Operation Highly Resistant to Interference
pander
ponse
nce
Analog system
The D/U (Desired/Undesired) signal ratio will be the S/N ratio of the demodulated audio signal. Because
interference will be reproduced as noise, the higher the undesired signal level, the higher the noise will be in
the modulated signal. Typically, analog systems require a D/U signal ratio of 40 dB or more.
Digital wireless system
Provided that there are no errors, the audio signal quality will not be degraded. In the Sony digital wireless
system, an error does not occur provided the D/U signal ratio is 20 dB or more. Therefore sound quality will not
be impaired as long as this condition is met.
Digital modulation
FM modulation
CH 1
CH 1
Desired
Analog system
usually needs
D/U > 40 dB
Undesired
System
P)
Spectrum
D/U > 20 dB
Error Free
CH 2
CH 3
CH 4
Desired
Undesired
Spectrum
* D/U ratio: Desired/Undesired ratio
occur
s are
oding.
ances
in the
The Sony DWX series of digital wireless microphones employing the WiDIF-HP format provides interference
rejection that surpasses conventional analog systems by 20 dB or more (more than 10 times better in terms of
reception voltage level), resulting in improved operation stability.
he
cy
re
ess
Key Features of WiDIF-HP
11
Technology
e
e
Compared to conventional analog systems, the DWX series employing the WiDIF-HP format provides
significantly better rejection of noise, third-order intermodulation, same-frequency interference and other
forms of interference. The improvement is on the order of 20 dB or more (more than 10 times better in terms of
reception voltage level). This results in improved operation stability.
Technology
Simultaneous Multi-Channel Operation
Com
With WiDIF-HP, the number of transmitters that can be used within the same band frequency is 1.5 times that of
an analog system, allowing for greater operability.
RF and third-order intermodulation
The RF related circuit design is an important aspect for realizing multi-channel operation. In wireless systems
with multiple channels, the intermodulation that is generated in the RF amplifier of the transmitter/receiver
often causes interference between the wireless channels. The RF block of an analog wireless system must be
designed carefully to deal with intermodulation. However, intermodulation cannot be eliminated completely,
either in an analog or digital system, as long as the RF part is composed of analog circuits.
RF spectrum
CH 1
CH 2
Third-order intermodulation signals will occur
at 639.500 MHz and 641.000 MHz
CH1: 640.000 MHz
CH2: 640.500 MHz
Frequency
CH 1
CH 2
CH 3
Third-order intermodulation signals
Wireless channel cannot be allocated
due to the intermodulation noise
CH 1 & 3
CH 2 & 3 CH 1 & 2
CH 1 & 2
Frequency
Why are digital wireless systems advantageous to simultaneous multi-channel operation?
In an analog system, the D/U (Desired/Undesired) signal ratio will be the S/N ratio of the demodulated audio
signal. The higher the undesired signal level, the higher the noise will be in the modulated signal. Typically,
analog systems require a D/U signal ratio of 40 dB or more.
In the Sony digital wireless system on the other hand, an error does not occur provided the D/U signal ratio
is 20 dB or more. Therefore sound quality will not be impaired as long as this condition is met. The digital
wireless system provides interference rejection that surpasses conventional analog systems by 20 dB or more,
and is therefore much less prone to problems caused by intermodulation and is more efficient in handling
frequencies within a limited frequency range.
Application Example: Reality TV Show Production
Frequency environment: Clear channels are TV33, TV42, and TV55 only.
ANALOG
DIGITAL
TV33: 8ch, TV42: 8ch, TV55: 8ch
TV33 4ch
TV55 2ch
TV33 4ch
TV55 2ch
TV42 4ch
TV55 2ch
TV42 4ch
TV55 2ch
Total 24 channels
4-camcorder system
Intermodulation free
special channel allocation
TV33: 12ch, TV42: 12ch, TV55: 12ch
TV33 4ch
TV55 2ch
TV33 4ch
TV55 2ch
TV33 4ch
TV55 2ch
TV42 4ch
TV55 2ch
TV42 4ch
TV55 2ch
TV42 4ch
TV55 2ch
Total 36 channels
6-camcorder system
CH 1
CH 2
CH 3
CH 4
CH 9
...
12
Key Features of WiDIF-HP
CH 10
CH 11
CH 12
Equally spaced easy
channel allocation
Comm
Common Frequency Reuse Configuration
that of
Technology
ems
ver
st be
etely,
In a digital wireless system, the minimum distance for reusing a common frequency is one sixth of an analog
setup. Compared to an analog system or a mixed analog/digital system, the digital wireless system can
be configured for a three times bigger operation area which facilitates efficient use of space in convention
centers for trade fairs and similar applications.
Common frequency reuse area distances
In digital wireless systems, the minimum distance is one sixth of an analog wireless or mixed analog/digital
setup. (With 10 mW output)
Analog wireless system, or mixed analog/
digital system
Digital wireless system
Minimum area distance: only 30 meters
Minimum area distance: 180 meters
180m
30m
300m
Digital wireless system operation
area (radius 60 meters)
Analog wireless system operation
area (radius 60 meters)
180m
audio
lly,
atio
more,
ng
Key Features of WiDIF-HP
13
Technology
Encrypted Transmission
Meta
In an analog system, the frequency-modulated (FM) audio signal can be received by anyone with the right
equipment and some technical knowledge. By contrast, a digital system allows the use of encryption to make
the wireless transmission secure. The signals cannot be decoded by a conventional wideband receiver.
This makes it easy to maintain confidentiality for conference rooms, live performance venues and other
applications where strong measures against interception are required.
The Sony digital system offers the choice between a secure mode using encryption keys, and a password
mode where a secure group comprising multiple transmitters and receivers can be created.
Metad
Secure key mode
This is a one-on-one arrangement where the encryption key generated by the transmitter is used for a single
transmitter/receiver pair only. The mode provides highly secure strong encryption.
Password mode
A password that can be freely specified is set for a number of transmitters and receivers, and only
equipment using that password can communicate with each other. Connection to equipment without the
password set is blocked, resulting in secure operation.
Application example: broadcast station
All pieces of equipment used by the station are assigned the same password, allowing secure operation by
staff without having to worry about complicated setup procedures or information leaks. It is also possible to
broadcast audio from one transmitter to multiple receivers. Besides applications in the broadcasting sector,
this kind of system is also suitable for example for government and other public offices where information must
be transmitted securely.
Analog wireless system
FM-modulated
audio signal
Digital wireless system
(WiDIF-HP)
Digitally modulated
coded audio
The risk of being intercepted by a
receiver of an outside system.
For confidential communication,
WiDIF-HP provides two
communication modes:
1) Secure key mode
2) Password mode
Notes
Encrypted transmission does not guarantee 100% confidentiality.
 Changing the password on a regular basis is recommended.

Using
14
Key Features of WiDIF-HP
Metadata Transmission
rd
Technology
Along with the audio signal, comprehensive information about the transmitter is sent as metadata, including
audio input level, battery status, attenuator setting, etc. This enhances operation convenience, since the
transmitter status can be monitored in any of the following ways:
 On the display of the receiver
 In the viewfinder of the camcorder (when using a slot-mounted camcorder; receiver information can also
be monitored)
 In Wireless Studio (a dedicated software application supplied with the Digital Wireless Receiver DWR-R01D)
ight
make
Metadata transmission principle
Receiver uses data to display
detailed status information
Send comprehensive information
about transmitter
a single
Receiver
Transmitter
RF signals
ut the
Metadata
n by
e to
ctor,
n must
Normal information display
Audio level meter
Transmitter status display example
Transmission
power indication
QL meter
Audio input level meter
Wireless remote control
condition indication
Display
switching
Transmission battery
indication
RF level meter
Model name
Input level
Attenuator level
Transmission battery
indication
Example for transmitted information (with DWT-B01)






Transmitter name
Battery status
RF power setting
Attenuator level setting
Low-cut filter setting
Continuous operation time
Using metadata
Metadata can be used for setup of other connected equipment.
 Combined delay time of transmitter and receiver can be sent to camcorder for video synchronization, etc.
Key Features of WiDIF-HP
15
Technology
WiDIF-HP Precautions
This section provides information about various points to keep in mind when operating a digital wireless system.
Soun
For details, see “UHF System Configuration” (page 38).
RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) Noise
WiDIF-HP performs cyclic packet transmissions similarly to mobile phones, computers, and other digital
transmission equipment.
The nonlinear devices (FETs, etc.) in the condenser microphone pick up these other RF signals, and RFI noise
may occur according to the packet format as a result. Countermeasures are therefore required. This applies in
particular to DWX transmitters set to high output (50 mW).

The RF signals emitted by
WiDIF-HP may affect the lavalier
microphone.
RFI noise may also occur due to RF signals emitted by mobile
phones, computers, and other digital equipment.
Lavalier microphone
Mobile phone signals
At
pro
sam
cu
Detection
2.4G Wifi
Noise countermeasures



Use cables with effective shielding.
Take measures to implement RF immunity of microphone unit.
Use lavalier microphones designed to be used together with digital wireless equipment that include RFI noise
countermeasures.
Notes
Dynamic microphones are typically not subject to exhibiting this type of RFI noise.
 Sony professional lavalier and shotgun microphones with a suffix /9X in the model name, such as the
ECM-77BC/9X, are certified by Sony to be suitable for use with the DWX digital wireless system. Other Sony
professional microphones without a /9X in the model name may not be suitable for use with the DWX
system.
 Microphones from Sanken, DPA, or Countryman include models that do not produce RFI noise and can
therefore be used with the DWX system. For details on compatible models, contact the manufacturer of
each microphone.

16
WiDIF-HP Precautions
Sound Quality Degradation under Weak Field Conditions — Analog and Digital Propagation
At the same power, the
propagation reach is the
same, but behavior in the
cut-off region is different.
Sound quality
bile
When compared at an equal transmitter power level, the following differences will occur as correlated to the
reception level.
 There will be an area where 1) digital wireless retains high sound quality, 2) analog wireless suffers from
deteriorated audio S/N ratio.
 There will be an area where 1) digital wireless starts to exhibit intermittent muting, 2) analog wireless has
lower S/N ratio but sound remains audible.
Digital
Analog
Noise
noise
plies in
This graph shows a conceptual rendering.
It does not represent actual measurement
values.
Audio
dropout
Field strength
Distance
The differences in sound quality degradation under weak field conditions may be experienced as a subjective
difference in service area size.
With WiDIF-HP, error processing has been optimized for a digital wireless system where intermittent muting
increases as the signal gets weaker. Operation patterns should be decided based on application
requirements and an evaluation of characteristics at the service area limit.
FI noise
Because WiDIF-HP is tuned to maintain voice clarity as much as possible even when errors occur, evaluation
of error rates within the service area should be done using the Quality Level (QL) meter on the display of the
receiver or of the Wireless Studio application. The QL meter allows observation of transmission quality changes
over time.
ony
an
of
WiDIF-HP Precautions
17
Technology
Provided that the transmitter power is the same, the signal level at the receiver at a given distance will be the
same for a digital wireless and analog wireless system. This means that both systems can be said to have a
service area of the same size.
However, as explained in the preceding sections, the audio quality degradation behavior when field strength
becomes low is significantly different for digital wireless and analog wireless.
Technology
Mixed Digital/Analog Systems
Syste
When digital wireless and analog wireless systems are used together, take the following points into
consideration.
Channel plan limitations

In a mixed digital/analog wireless system, channel plans designed for analog systems must be used.
Equal channel spacing applies only to fully digital wireless systems. Equal channel spacing is not available
for analog wireless systems.
Notes
Refer to Sony digital wireless system frequency lists for further details on pre-programmed groups of
frequencies built into every DWX transmitter and receiver.
 Sony’s built-in pre-programmed frequency groups provide 500 kHz channel spacing for digital channel
plans D1-D9 along with analog channel plans 01-09 (containing irregular channel spacing) to ensure
compatibility with Sony analog wireless system channel plans.

Analo
Digita
Analo
Common frequency interference precaution
When operating adjacent to an analog wireless system, the minimum distance for analog wireless systems
must be observed.
180m
30m
Digital wireless system operation
area (radius 60 meters)
Digita
300m
Analog wireless system operation
area (radius 60 meters)
180m
180m
Digital wireless system only
18
WiDIF-HP Precautions
Analog wireless system, or mixed analog/
digital system
System Behavior in Case of Interference
To understand how analog and digital systems can have a mutual effect on each other in actual operation,
it is important to consider the way in which the demodulated audio signal deteriorates when interference
occurs.
Technology
Analog  Analog
lable
The stronger the interference, the higher the level of unwanted signals mixed to the audio.
This is heard as so-called beat noise, a chirping or squealing sound.
Digital  Analog
As interference gets stronger, a “digital type” hiss noise will gradually be mixed to the audio of the desired
signal.
There is no beat noise typical of analog to analog interference. If the receiver has a function for detecting
noise and muting the output, the audio will eventually be cut off as the interference noise increases.
nel
re
Analog  Digital
Behavior is the same as for digital to digital interference.
As interference gets stronger, errors will cause intermittent audio degradation.
When interference increases further, intermittent muting will occur more frequently.
Finally, the output will be completely muted.
ms
Digital  Digital
eration
Behavior is the same as for analog to digital interference.
As interference gets stronger, errors will cause intermittent audio degradation.
When interference increases further, intermittent muting will occur more frequently.
Finally, the output will be completely muted.
With WiDIF-HP, sound quality will not be impaired as long as the D/U signal ratio is 20 dB or more. Unlike with
analog systems, there will also be no loud beat noise in case of interference.
The rapid transition characteristics from high sound quality to muting when interference increases are the
same as for weak field reception. If the same channel must be used in adjacent areas, suitable measures
should be taken to ensure a D/U signal ratio of at least 20 dB. Such measures include maintaining minimum
distances, making appropriate settings for transmission power, and appropriate antenna installation design
and settings. The RF indicator and QL meter functions of the receiver should be used to determine the final
channel plan and equipment settings.
WiDIF-HP Precautions
19
Technology
Cross Remote Technology
Cross Remote is a system that allows transmitters to be monitored and controlled from a receiver and the Wireless
Why
Studio control software installed on a computer connected to the receiver.
Cross Remote Outline
Compared to analog wireless systems, the DWX series allows more channels to be operated simultaneously.
The Cross Remote system for remote control of transmitters from a receiver was developed to facilitate setup
and operation of large wireless microphone configurations.
Cross Remote uses an independent 2.4 GHz RF carrier (compliant with the IEEE 802.15.4 standard) to
implement remote control that is separate from the UHF main link. This allows simultaneous audio transmission
and remote control operation without affecting the battery life, audio quality and other features of the wireless
microphone system. Attenuator and low-cut filter settings as well as power, frequency and almost all other
transmitter settings can be controlled remotely. Even when the transmitter is worn concealed on the body,
Cross Remote makes it easy to change settings remotely.
How Cross Remote works
Cross Remote transmits the data described below, allowing remote monitoring and operation of the transmitter
from the receiver side.
DWM-01
Metadata transmitted via WiDIF-HP
 Status information for each transmitter is sent on
Monitoring and control possible at receiver
 Covers transmitters currently being received
 ST mode uses the internal 2.4 GHz antenna
respective UHF frequency
 If metadata monitor function only is used, service
2.4 G
area is equal to UHF (sound) range
AN-01
UHF
DWR-R01D
BNC Cable
2.4 GHz
Control data sent via 2.4 GHz
NT mode
RMU-01
IEEE80
* Used in NT mode only.
 RMU-01 transmits control information for all
transmitters on network (max. 82 units)
 Up to nine RMU-01 units can be used, to enlarge
service area
*Internal 2.4 GHz antenna of receiver cannot be used
ST mode
 Control information is sent to currently received
transmitters (max. 2) via internal 2.4 GHz antenna
Cross Remote protocol is expanded over
Ethernet network
 Protocol is TCP/IP based
 100Base-TX/10Base-T network equipment can
be used
 RMU-01 used for 2.4 GHz antenna expansion
Both modes
DWT-B01
 Transmitter identifies received control data by ID
Network HUB
 Control results are returned as WiDIF-HP metadata
LAN Cable
 Area where UHF and 2.4 GHz communication
overlaps is service area for control functions
Monitoring and control with
Wireless Studio
 2.4 GHz communication range has a radius of about
10 meters in a space with good line of sight
 In sleep mode, WiDIF-HP is not received. Two-way
2.4 GHz communication is used for monitoring
 Allows integrated system
management
PC
* When using the DWR-S01D as receiver, the RMU-01 or a computer cannot be used.
20
Cross Remote Technology
 Up to 6 Windows PCs are supported
s
Why does Cross Remote use both UHF and 2.4 GHz frequencies?
Technology
Cross Remote is a two-way communication system for transmitters and receivers that uses both UHF and 2.4
GHz frequencies to complement each technology’s strengths and advantages.
Advantages of 2.4 GHz (over using two-way UHF)
usly.
etup


mission
wireless
her
dy,
Two-way UHF would require a built-in receiver on the transmitter and would result in higher power
consumption, larger equipment size, and higher cost, making the implementation of this approach
impractical.
Because two-way UHF uses UHF channels for control, the number of channels that can be used
simultaneously is reduced. 2.4 GHz control on the other hand does not effect the number of channels
that can be used simultaneously.
Advantages of UHF (over using two-way 2.4 GHz)



nsmitter

iver
UHF communication is always on. If an audio link is established, it will always reach the other party.
2.4 GHz on the other hand is not always on, in order to save power.
2.4 GHz uses common frequencies on a time sharing basis and connects only when needed.
The control signal (upstream) sends the same information to 82 units simultaneously, and status
information (downstream) can be divided into separate UHF streams.
In NT mode, up to 82 transmitters can be monitored and controlled together using RMU-01 units and
Wireless Studio. With 2.4 GHz, communicating with all 82 transmitters would take time. When using
UHF and 2.4 GHz, the combination of 2.4 GHz for upstream and UHF for downstream links results in a
communication system that realizes a smooth workflow.
2.4 GHz IEEE 802.15.4 Technology
Cross Remote uses 2.4 GHz band IEEE 802.15.4 communication technology that does not affect the band used
for digital wireless audio communication.
IEEE802.15.4 standard
er
n
IEEE 802.15.4 is a worldwide standard for close-range communication applications using the 2.4 GHz band.
Bands within the 2.4 GHz range are called ISM* bands and are widely used for microwave ovens, WiFi and
Bluetooth applications, as well as for data transmission in medical institutions and similar.
* Abbreviation of “Industrial, Scientific and Medical”. Frequency range allocated to wireless communication in these fields, requiring no
license to operate.
N Cable
Notes
IEEE 802 is a set of network standards developed by the 802 committee of the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and
Electronics Engineers). It comprises the following standards:
 802.11
Wireless LANs
 802.15
Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPANs)
 802.15.1 Bluetooth
 802.15.3 UWB
 802.15.4 Wireless Sensor Network (PAN standard with low power consumption and low transfer rate)
 Reference: About ZigBee
This is a short-range wireless communication standard for domestic appliances. It uses the physical layer
interface defined by the IEEE 802.15.4 and newly defines the network layer, security service provider, and
application layer. ZigBee is not identical with IEEE 802.15.4.

th
ported
Cross Remote Technology
21
Technology
System configuration
Used
Application Layer:
APL Layer
Defines the protocols for user interaction
on the network
(pairing and address allocation).
Cross Remote defines APL layer.
Determines the network configuration and pairing
method, roaming principles, and protocols.
ST mode/NT mode switching is also performed here.
(Note: ZigBee also defines these specifications.)
Media Access Layer:
MAC Layer
Defines the specifications for device
interaction on the network
(error correction, ACK, resend request etc.).
Physical Layer:
PHY Layer
Cross
The MAC layer and PHY layer are defined
by IEEE 802.15.4.
Defines the wireless principles for the network
(frequency, modulation principle etc.)
Follows RF standards for various countries.
Why was IEEE802.15.4 adopted?
Among alternatives such as 2.4 GHz wireless LAN, Bluetooth, and UWB, Cross Remote has chosen IEEE 802.15.4
for the following reasons.
 Very low power consumption avoids degradation of battery life for the main communication link.
 Very fast wakeup from sleep state. Intermittent operation further contributes to power savings, while posing
no inconvenience for users.
 Communication speed and range are suitable for control requirements.
 In addition to point-to-point communications, network can be expanded, allowing control of multiple
transmitters from multiple computers.
Cross Remote uses the physical layer and MAC layer specified by IEEE 802.15.4, and defines the application
layer according to the requirements of convenient on-site use.
Notes
Why RF wireless rather than infrared?
Whereas infrared wireless becomes unusable when there are screens or other obstacles, RF wireless allows
remote control of a transmitter even when worn under clothing.
Why 2.4 GHz band?
Among the frequencies covered by IEEE 802.15.4, namely 868 MHz, 915 MHz, and 2.4 GHz, the 2.4 GHz band
was chosen because it allows worldwide use. It is suitable as a common platform for devices to be used
globally.
22
Cross Remote Technology
Used frequencies
pairing
Cross Remote frequency bands
IEEE 802.15.4 comprises the following specifications, but because of RF regulations, only the 2.4 GHz band can
be used worldwide.
 868 MHz (BPSK, 20 kbps)
 915 MHz (BPSK, 40 kbps)
 2.4 GHz (O-QPSK, 250 kbps)
02.15.4
Cross Remote uses the 2.4 GHz band to allow identical specifications for all global regions.
The 2.4 GHz band comprises 16 channels spaced at 5 MHz, from 2.405 GHz (channel 11) to 2.480 GHz
(channel 26).
Out of these, Cross Remote uses the following frequencies.
 ST mode: 2.405 GHz (11ch), 2.425 GHz (15ch), 2.450 GHz (20ch), 2.475 GHz (25ch)
 NT mode: 2.420 GHz (14ch), 2.445 GHz (19ch), 2.470 GHz (24ch)
osing
Wireless LAN and channel allocation
Channels 1, 6, and 11 are commonly used for wireless LANs.
2.400 GHz – 2.4835 GHz
tion
Ch.5
Ch.10
Ch.4
Ch.9
Ch.3
ws
Ch.8
Ch.2
Ch.7
Ch.1
and
2 MHz
11
Ch.12
Ch.6
Ch.11
22 MHz
5 MHz
12
Ch.13
13
Wireless LAN
25 MHz
14
NT
15
ST
16
17
18
19
NT
20
ST
21
22
23
24
NT
25
ST
26
IEEE802.15.4
Conditions for frequency switching
Channels are switched when the following conditions occur:



A wireless LAN starts to operate on the currently selected channel and remote control communication is
no longer possible.
Interference is detected at the receiver. The network is reconfigured.
 A reset is performed, and the system starts scanning for an empty channel.
 When a channel is found, the system waits for transmitter reconnection.
When the connection is interrupted, the transmitter scans all channels and looks for a reconnection
target.
 When the paired equipment is found on another channel, the reconnection process is initiated.
Note
Channel switching does not necessarily occur for all types of interference.
 Short, sporadic interference cannot be avoided by this technique .
 Channel switching is effective for prolonged interference caused by streaming or similar operations on
the wireless LAN.
 The receiver controls whether channel switching is performed. Even if subject to interference, the
transmitter does not initiate channel switching.
Cross Remote Technology
23
Technology
med here.
ons.)
Cross Remote selects the optimal frequency for communication based on the system and the environment.
If interference is detected on a currently used frequency, the system automatically switches to another
frequency and continues communication. This assures stable operation even under congested 2.4 GHz
conditions.
Technology
Pairing
Roam
Prior to being able to use the Cross Remote control functions, the transmitter and receiver must be assigned to
each other in a process called pairing. The relationship between transmitter and receiver is that of Coordinator
to Device. When NT mode is used, the Remote Control Unit RMU-01 is the Coordinator.
Pairing requirement
Because Cross Remote uses only three frequencies to control multiple transmitters (up to 82 in NT mode),
it is not possible to identify devices by frequency assignment, as for the main communication link. As the
control signal reaches all transmitters within the service area, pairing is necessary to establish which receiver is
operating which transmitter.
Roam
Control of transmitter A is intended, but
signals also reach unrelated transmitter B.
Only commands from paired
receiver A are processed.
Receiver A
Transmitter A
Signals are received from receiver A but are
addressed only to transmitter A, and are
therefore not processed on transmitter B.
Receiver B
Signals are also received from
unrelated receiver B.
Transmitter B
Transmission content for pairing
Establish Coordinator/Device allocation



Exchange ID information
The MAC address is used as ID.
In NT mode, the Ethernet IP address is also registered in the transmitter.
Exchanging abbreviated ID information for communication
Sending basic transmitter information (transmitter  receiver)
The following information is sent.
dB range available for attenuation
 Phantom power supply present/absent, etc.

Setting the frequency (transmitter  receiver)
Notes
If pairing was established in ST mode, renewed pairing is necessary when NT mode is to be used
subsequently (because the Ethernet IP address information is not registered in ST mode).
 The receiver can display up to 8 candidates for pairing. As the ninth and subsequent transmitters will not
be displayed, do not set too many transmitters to pairing mode at the same time.

24
Cross Remote Technology
Roam
Roaming
),
e
eiver is
Technology
In NT mode, when the connection between transmitter and remote control unit is interrupted, the transmitter
automatically searches for another remote control unit to connect to.
If found, the transmitter connects to that remote control unit, and the connection to the paired receiver is
established again. This process is called roaming. The Cross Remote service area can be enlarged by using
multiple remote control units and maintaining communication through roaming.
ned to
dinator
Roaming in NT mode

RMU-01
NG
Receiver
Transmitter

RMU-01
t are
e
B.
Transmitter
 When communication with connected RMU-01 is
interrupted...
 ...the transmitter scans all channels looking for a
RMU-01.
(The RMU-01 connected immediately prior is
assigned a lower priority. When other RMU-01 units
are found, the transmitter connects to them in the
order they are found.)
 When a RMU-01 is found, a connection request is
sent.
 Same sequence as during startup is performed.
Notes
Roaming is only carried out if current
communication is interrupted.
 The number of antenna bars displayed in the “Cross
Remote” control condition indication, indicates the
communication quality, and not the field strength.
 Interruption can be caused by insufficient number
of antennas, even if RMU-01 is in close proximity.
 During roaming, connection requests are issued
in the order that RMU-01 units are found. The
connection is not necessarily established with the
closest RMU-01 unit. The RMU-01 unit with which
communication was interrupted immediately before
will have a lower priority for reconnecting.
 The scan is carried out for not only for NT mode but
also for ST mode. When there is a mix of ST mode
and NT mode systems or when there are multiple NT
mode systems, the roaming process will take longer.

Roaming times
will not
When one transmitter performs roaming in a normal communication environment
The number of operation channels does not significantly change the roaming time.
1-channel system: approx. 1 second
 82-channel system: approx. 1.5 seconds

When multiple transmitters are performing roaming


Time per unit x number of units (approximate calculation)
For example, when 50 transmitters are roaming concurrently, all connections will be established after
about 50 seconds. (In-house data)
Note
When there is a mix of ST mode and NT mode systems or when there are multiple NT mode systems, the
roaming time may change, depending on the installation environment.
Cross Remote Technology
25
Technology
Cross Remote Features
Cross Remote can be operated in two modes, ST mode and NT mode, to fit different system requirements.
NT M
This section explains the features of ST mode and NT mode, and of the Wireless Studio application designed for
monitoring and controlling transmitters.
ST Mode Features
In ST mode, the transmitter and receiver communicate directly in a one-on-one configuration.
When the receiver is placed within a main link service area, Cross Remote can be used within a range of
about 10 meters from the receiver.
Featu
Note
Because the number of channels will increase when more equipment is introduced in ST mode, the NT mode
should be selected when more than six transmitters are to be controlled.
General communication flow
Conne
In ST mode, the receiver and transmitter communicate as shown below.
Transmitter A
 ATT 0 dB
 Receive command and
change ATT to 3 dB
 Metadata
Receiver
 Transmit control command
in 2.4 GHz band
 Show transmitter A information
ATT 0 dB
 Change transmitter A attenuation to 3 dB
 Update transmitter A information
ATT 3 dB
Gener
Transmitter B
ST mode startup
In ST mode, the connection between receiver and transmitter is established as follows.
Receiver
 Turn receiver on.
 Turn transmitter on.
 Scan channels and look for available
channel.
 Low field strength
 No other communication system
present
 Search for Coordinator in ST mode and NT
mode.
 Decide on channel and wait for
connection request.
 Receive connection request.
 Check connection target. If paired
equipment, send connection
permission.
 Connection established.
26
Transmitter
Cross Remote Features
 When Coordinator is found, send connection
request.
 Connection established.
NT Mode Features
Features of Remote Control Unit RMU-01
mode
Connection to receiver is established via Ethernet (wired LAN).
By installing the Wireless Studio application (supplied with DWR-R01D) on a computer and connecting this
computer to the network, multiple transmitters can be monitored and controlled from the computer.
Connection diagram (simplified)
Computer used for monitoring
RMU-01
Up to 9 units can be
connected
Hub
Receiver
Up to 41 units can be connected
General communication flow
In NT mode, the receiver and transmitter communicate via the RMU-01, as shown below.
Communication flow from DWR-R01D
RMU-01
 Transmit control command
via 2.4 GHz band
Computer used for monitoring
Transmitter
Hub
 Send command
via Ethernet
 ATT 0 dB
 Send information  Receive command and
as metadata via
change ATT to 3 dB
UFH band
NT
Receiver
ection
 Show transmitter information
ATT 0 dB
 Change transmitter attenuation to 3 dB
 Update transmitter information
ATT 3 dB
Cross Remote Features
27
Technology
of
In NT mode, transmitters and receivers communicate via the Remote Control Unit RMU-01 connected to a
network. This enhances convenience during simultaneous multi-channel operation.
In ST mode, a paired receiver and transmitter operate in a one-on-one configuration. This will lead to channel
congestion when the equipment count increases. In NT mode on the other hand, the transmitter and receiver
communicate via the RMU-01. Because the RMU-01 controls the overall communication volume on the remote
control channels, congestion can be avoided also when equipment count increases.
Technology
Feat
Communication flow from Wireless Studio
RMU-01
Computer used
for monitoring
All commands must
pass through receiver
 Transmit control command
via 2.4 GHz band
Transmitter
 Send command
via Ethernet
Hub
 Send command
via Ethernet
 Show transmitter
 Send status
information
information via
ATT 0 dB
Ethernet
 Change
transmitter
attenuation to
3 dB
 ATT 0 dB
 Send information  Receive command
as metadata via
and change ATT
UFH band
to 3 dB
 Show transmitter information
ATT 0 dB
Receiver
 Update transmitter information
ATT 3 dB
Communication flow when no RF signal is present (sleep mode etc.)
RMU-01
Computer used for monitoring
 Send command
via Ethernet
 Transmit control command via
2.4 GHz band
Two-way 2.4 GHz communication
because no metadata are sent from
WiDIF-HP
Transmitter
Hub
 Return status
information via
2.4 GHz band
 Send status information
via Ethernet
Receiver
 In sleep mode
 Show transmitter
information Sleep mode
 Receive command
and cancel sleep
mode
Inform
 Cancel sleep mode
NT mode startup
In NT mode, the connection between receiver and transmitter is established as follows.
2.4 GHz
Ethernet
Setup
Receiver
 Turn receiver on.
IIf IP address changes,
communicationis no longer
possible
 Repeat pairing process
 Identify pairing target and
establish match
RMU-01
 Turn RMU-01 on.
 Turn transmitter on.
 Scan channels and start
network.
 Search for Coordinator in ST
mode and NT mode.
 When connection request is
received, enable connection.
 When RMU-01 is found, send
connection request.
 Request transmitter pairing
information (IP address of
connection target).
 Establish connection
provisionally. (Antenna is still
disabled)
 Check with receiver whether IP
address and pairing target are
correct.
 Send pairing information.
 When correct target is found,
send communication enabled
information.
 Start communication.
28
Cross Remote Features
Transmitter
 Start communication.
Log fil
Features of Wireless Studio
Using the Wireless Studio software application supplied with the Digital Wireless Receiver DWR-R01D, up to 82
transmitters can be simultaneously monitored and controlled. By recording the operation log, operational
errors can be examined later.
Technology
Device List
Status Viewer
Shows the status of various equipment.
ommand
ge ATT
on
t from
Warning and error messages are shown here.
and
ep
Information displayed in Status Viewer









Reception channel information (group/channel/frequency)
Reception data quality
Audio signal level
Transmitter RF power setting
Synchronization status of output signal at DIGITAL OUT connector of DWR-R01D
Transmitter communication status
Transmitter battery status
Transmitter name
RF input level
Setup file
Settings required for monitoring with the Wireless Studio application can be saved in a setup file and recalled
later.
Note
Wireless Studio identifies the DWR-R01D and RMU-01 by IP address. The DWM-01/DWT-B01 are mutually identified
by the DWR-R01D and MAC address. In order to allow later reloading and 100% restoring of setting information
saved in Wireless Studio, all equipment must be the same, and IP address settings also must match. If a
piece of equipment is replaced for repairs, for example, be sure to configure the same IP address for the
replacement equipment.
n ST
send
s still
n.
Log file
The log begins recording as soon as Wireless Studio enters online mode and is saved automatically in CSV
format.
You can view the contents of a saved log by using a text editor to open the log file stored in the Start > My
Documents > Wireless Studio folder.
Cross Remote Features
29
Technology
Cross Remote Precautions
Co
D
This section provides information about various points to keep in mind when setting up and operating a Cross Remote
This se
system.
suppo
Ensuring a Stable Service Area
Syste









In the Cross Remote service area, the two wireless signals for the main (UHF) link and remote control
(2.4 Ghz) link must be available together.
Equipment must be installed in such a way as to ensure that the main (UHF) link and remote control
(2.4 GHz) link wireless signals will not be interrupted in the Cross Remote service area.
When installing main link equipment including antenna, receiver, and remote control unit, the possibility of
interference from other equipment should be taken into consideration.
Design the installation so as to minimize the risk of interference from TV broadcast transmission, other wireless
systems, and common frequency channels within the same wireless microphone system. If interference is
occurring, increase the distance between the interference source and the wireless microphone system, turn
power to the interference source off, or take other suitable measures.
Regarding the remote control link, the interference risk from other equipment using the 2.4 GHz band
should be taken into consideration. Increase the distance of the wireless microphone system to possible
interference sources and select equipment to avoid the possibility of simultaneous operation of other 2.4
GHz equipment.
ST mode: Uses 2.405 GHz (11ch), 2.425 GHz (15ch), 2.450 GHz (20ch), and 2.475 GHz (25ch). When there is
other equipment that uses the 2.4 GHz band, these channels should be avoided.
NT mode: Uses 2.420 GHz (14ch), 2.445 GHz (19ch), and 2.470 GHz (24ch). When there is other equipment
that is using the 2.4 GHz band, these channels should be avoided.
2.4 GHz band radio wave propagation is highly linear and not easily deflected. When people or objects
are present in the path between the remote control unit and transmitter, reception field strength may
decrease drastically. Always try to ensure a direct line of sight between remote control unit and the wireless
microphone and transmitter.
To ensure stable transmission of 2.4 GHz band signals and prevent adverse influences from blocking by
obstacles, it is recommended to use a minimum of two RMU-01 remote control units. When multiple units are
used, the distance between installation locations should be about 10 to 20 meters. Up to nine remote control
units can be used within one system.
When multiple remote control units are used simultaneously, they should be spaced at least 10 meters apart.
The equipment should be kept as far as possible from wireless LAN access points or other equipment using
the 2.4 GHz band.
In NT mode, the whip antennas supplied with the Digital Wireless Receiver DWR-R01D cannot be used. (When
the receiver detects a remote control unit, it automatically switches to NT mode.) When there is an adjacent
system using NT mode, add a remote control unit to the current system and also operate it in NT mode.
Preventing Interference
Main (UHF) link precautions



Design the installation so as to minimize the risk of interference from TV, other wireless systems, and common
frequency channels within the same system.
Select channels so as to prevent interference
If interference is occurring, increase the distance between the interference source and the wireless
microphone system, turn power to the interference source off, or take other suitable measures.
Remote control (2.4 GHz) link precautions



30
Design the installation so as to minimize the risk of interference from other devices that use the 2.4 GHz band,
and be wary of close proximity between devices and simultaneous use of multiple devices.
WiFi and Bluetooth and other applications also use the 2.4 GHz band. Special care must be taken in
locations where large numbers of people congregate, such as at trade shows etc.
Also take care to avoid interference from wireless remote controls for lighting appliances.
Cross Remote Precautions
System
System
Configuring a DWX System
DWX System Configuration
mote
This section describes the process of configuring a system and provides information about limitations, frequency
support and other aspects.
System Sections and Configuration Flow
System configuration
wireless
ce is
m, turn
BNC cable
LAN cable
2. UHF Section
DWX Microphone Series
1. Audio section (RX)
DWM-01/F31
Digital Wireless
Microphone
ble
2.4
AN-01
UHF Antenna
DWM-01/C31
Digital Wireless
Microphone
ere is
ment
Wireless
transmission
WD-850
UHF Antenna
Divider
DWT-B01
Digital Wireless
Transmitter
cts
reless
DWR-S01D
Digital Wireless Receiver
AN-820
UHF Antenna
DWT-P01
Digital Wireless
Transmitter
by
nits are
control
(When
jacent
e.
DWR-R01D
Digital Wireless Receiver
WiDIF-HP
DWX Transmitter Series
s apart.
using
Wired
transmission
DWA-01D
Digital Wireless Adapter
Wireless
communication
3. Network section
Computer
Computer
Wired communication
Hub
Hub
RMU-01
Remote Control Unit
System configuration flow
Use the following information as a guideline to the steps that are generally required when configuring a DWX
system.
Step 1
mmon
Selecting audio equipment
Step 2
Selecting UHF equipment
z band,
Step 3
Checking RF settings (UHF)
Select transmitter (TX) side and receiver (RX) side audio equipment.
Select UHF transmission equipment according to the application type and scale of the
system.
Select suitable channel plan, RF power, antenna gain, and attenuator settings for usage
environment.
Step 4
Select network equipment according to Cross Remote function requirements and the scale of
Selecting network equipment the system.
Step 5
Check network settings
Make settings for network and check Cross Remote function.
DWX System Configuration
31
Configuring a DWX System
lity of
In general, configuring a DWX system will involve the three devices listed below.
1. Audio equipment such as transmitters and receivers (audio section)
2. UHF transmission equipment such as antennas and dividers (UHF section)
3. Network communication equipment such as Remote Control Unit RMU-01 and
network hubs (network section)
Configuring a DWX System
A
When
System Limitations
model
The following limitations apply regarding equipment used in a DWX series system.
Section
Audio/frequency
planning section
Item
Max. number of transmitters
UHF section
Max. number of DWR-R01D Digital Wireless Receivers (RF cascade)
Network section
US/Canada
EU
Japan
Number of antenna inputs for UHF Antenna Divider WD-850 Antenna
input
Number of antenna division outputs for UHF Antenna Divider WD-850
Antenna divider output
Number of cascaded outputs for UHF Antenna Divider WD-850
Cascaded output
Max. number of transmitters controlled by Remote Control Unit
RMU-01
Max. number of Digital Wireless Receiver DWR-R01D units controlled/
monitored from computer with Wireless Studio
Max. number of RMU-01 Remote Control Units (in one network
system)
Max. number of computers with Wireless Studio installed (in one
network system)
Maximum Limit
12 channels
16 channels
18 channels
10 channels
82 channels
8 units
(16 channels)
4 inputs
(2 channels × 2 inputs)
8 outputs
(2 channels × 4 outputs)
1 output
(2 channels × 1 output)
82 units
(82 channels)
41 units
(82 channels)
9 units
Remarks
Within 1 TV channel (6 MHz)
Within 1 TV channel (8 MHz)
Within 1 FPU channel (9 MHz)
Within B band (4 MHz)
Within A–B band (40 MHz)
2 diversity inputs
Using DWR-R01D cascade connection, one WD-850
supports up to 64 channels
Combination of 2 cascaded WD-850 units and DWRR01D cascade connection supports up to 128 channels
Maximum is 82 regardless of number of RMU-01 units
Maximum is 42 regardless of number of computers
6 units
Supported Frequencies
Before selecting equipment, verify the frequency blocks used by the DWX system.
32
DWX System Configuration
Equi
DWX M
Audio Equipment Selection
When selecting equipment for a DWX series system, please take the features and specifications of the respective
models into consideration.
Equipment Features
DWX Microphone Series
D-850
DWRchannels
01 units
DWM-01/F31 Digital Wireless Microphone (Dynamic type)
DWM-01/C31 Digital Wireless Microphone (Condenser type)
These handheld microphones are suitable for live stage performances and other events, broadcast studios,
halls, and theater applications.
uters
DWM-01/F31




DWM-01/C31
Handheld digital wireless microphone suitable for vocals, available in two variants, as a dynamic model
and a condenser model.
Three-stage switchable RF output power: 1 mW / 10 mW / 50 mW
Five continuous hours of operation with two AA-size alkaline batteries at the 10 mW power setting
Dedicated microphone holder included.
Directional Charts
DWM-01/F31 (Dynamic Capsule)
400 Hz
1000 Hz
4000 Hz
0
30
0
400 Hz
1000 Hz
4000 Hz
30
-10
60
DWM-01/C31 (Condenser Capsule)
60
0
30
90
120
120
180
60
-20
-30
150
30
-10
60
-20
90
0
150
-30
90
90
120
120
150
180
150
Audio Equipment Selection
33
Configuring a DWX System
DWX series equipment is divided into the following categories.
 DWX Microphone Series
 DWX Transmitter Series
 DWX Receiver Series
 DWX Adapter
Configuring a DWX System
DWX Transmitter Series
DWT-P01 Digital Wireless Transmitter
DWT-B01/E Digital Wireless Transmitter
Compact and lightweight transmitter suitable for a wide range of
input levels, from microphone level to line audio level.
Rear P
The DWT-P01 is a plug-on transmitter that supports a wide range
of audio input levels, from microphone level to line level.
 ANA
For con
The ana
 DIGIT
type
Supply
digital i





Use with a small, high-performance lavalier microphone
equivalent to the ECM-77BC/9X widely used in broadcasting
applications or K-1161 GTR adapter.
Supplied accessories for various applications include soft case
with belt clip, XLR input converter cable, etc. (48 V phantom
power supply not supported)
Two-stage switchable RF output power: 1 mW / 10 mW /50 mW
Five continuous hours of operation with two AA-size alkaline
batteries at the 10 mW power setting


Allows direct connection of dynamic microphones and
condenser microphones requiring 48 V phantom powering.
Three-stage switchable RF output power: 1 mW / 10 mW /
50 mW
Five continuous hours of operation with two AA-size alkaline
batteries at the 10 mW power setting
DWX Receiver Series
DWR-R01D Digital Wireless Receiver
The DWR-R01D is a 1U-size two-channel rack-mountable receiver
with wide bandwidth coverage.



 Audio input connector (SMC9-4S)
Connects the output plug from the optional lavalier microphone.
This connector also accepts the input from another wired
microphone connected through the supplied XLR cable, or the
audio output from a mixer, etc.
Audio Equipment Selection



(output)
 USB connector (Micro USB)
Use this connector to connect an optional USB keyboard to carry
out menu functions using key operations. By connecting the
DWR-S01D to this connector with the supplied USB cable, you
can exchange the encryption key for encrypted transmission
function.
34
 ANTE
For con
or the s
Antenn
a menu
connec
 AC I
For con
 ANTE
(BNC
DWR-R0
cascad

 Battery compartment
Accommodates two LR6 (size AA)
alkaline batteries.
 LAN
For con
Connec
using th


Large OLED display and JOG dial on the unit make it easy to
perform various operations quickly and precisely.
3 digital outputs in addition to 2-channel analog output.32 kHz
– 96 kHz word sync input/output connector supports system
connection for digital synchronization.
Support for diversity reception enables dual antenna input/
cascaded output.
9 or 12 V DC power supply output for powering Sony UHF AN
series active antennas.
Built-in LAN (10/100) port allows configuration of a network
system using the Remote Control Unit RMU-01 and Wireless
Studio.
Supplied Wireless Studio application supports monitoring and
control of up to 82 transmitters.
 REM
For con
 WOR
conn
An exte
WORD S
externa
96 kHz)
The sign
is to the
Set only
cascad
Rear Panel
range



DWR-S01D Digital Wireless Receiver




Camcorder slot interface 2-channel receiver

 DIGITAL OUT (Digital output) 1/2/3 connectors (1/2: XLR
type, 3: BNC-R)
Supply an AES3 format digital audio signal. For connection to the
digital input of a mixer, amplifier, etc.
ing.
/
line
ceiver
 LAN (Ethernet) (10/100) connector (RJ-45)
For connection to a 100Base-TX network.
Connect to a Windows computer or hub, for communication
using the supplied Wireless Studio software application.
 ANTENNA a/b IN (Antenna a/b input) connectors (BNC-R)
For connection of the separately available UHF antenna AN-820
or the supplied whip antennas.
Antenna power supply can be set to 9 V or 12 V DC from
a menu. The power supply can be switched off when the
connected antennas do not require powering.

Can be mounted also on camcorders without mounting slots,
by using the Wireless Adapter DWA-01D.



 AC IN connector
For connection of the supplied AC power cable.
sy to
.32 kHz
tem
put/
F AN
ork
ess

 ANTENNA a/b OUT (Antenna a/b output) connectors
(BNC-R)
DWR-R01D can be connected to a and b, with support for
cascading of up to 8 units.
 Antenna and antenna connector (BNC type)
Connect the supplied antenna here.
 REM ANT (ST mode system antenna)
For connection of an external antenna for the ST mode system.
 Mounting screw
Use to attach the receiver to a camcorder or DWA-01D digital
wireless adapter.
 WORD SYNC IN/OUT (Synchronization signal input/output)
connectors (BNC-R) and 75-ohm termination switch
An external word clock sync signal can be connected to the
WORD SYNC IN connector to synchronize the digital output to
external equipment. (Word clock sample rate range: 32 kHz –
96 kHz)
The signal supplied to the WORD SYNC IN connector is passed as
is to the OUT connector.
Set only the 75-ohm termination switch on the last DWR-R01D in a
cascaded configuration to ON.
 Accessory connector
Use to connect the receiver to a camcorder or DWA-01D digital
wireless adapter. Power, audio, and control signals are sent
through this connector.
 USB connector
Connecting a USB keyboard to this connector allows menu
operation to be performed on the keyboard. Connecting the
transmitter to this connector through the supplied USB cable
allows an encryption key to be exchanged with the transmitter.
g and
Audio Equipment Selection
35
Configuring a DWX System
 ANALOG OUT (Analog output) 1/2 connectors (XLR type)
For connection to the analog input of a mixer, amplifier, etc.
The analog audio output level can be set from a menu.
Configuring a DWX System
U
Adapter
In orde
Bottom
DWA-01D Wireless Adapter
The DWA-01D can be used as a portable wireless receiver in
conjunction with the Digital Wireless Receiver DWR-S01D. It can
also be mounted on a camcorder, and two units can be linked
for 4-channel operation.



 
describ
Syste
System
 DC IN (external power input)
connector (4-pin) Connect to the external power output
connector of the camcorder using the supplied DC power cable.
This connector accepts the power voltage between 10 V DC and
17 V DC.

Audio output can be switched to analog or AES/EBU digital
output. AES/EBU digital output carries two channels over a
single cable. Channel 1 can be analog, even if channel 2
is used as digital output. (Analog UHF Synthesizer Tuner Unit
WRR-855S is also supported, but the AES/EBU digital output and
analog output in channel 2 cannot be used.)
Front
 WORD SYNC (word sync input) connector (BNC type)
Accepts external sync signal. When the DWR-S01D is attached
and the sync signal is input, the DWR-S01D can be operated in
synchronization with the whole audio system.
Note that this connector does not work when the WRR-855S is
attached.
Note
Even when the 75-ohm termination has been added on the
DWR-S01D, this connector still works as the high-impedance input
connector while the DWR-S01D is turned off.



 Monitor output selector
Selects the audio output from the PHONES connector.
1: Outputs the audio from the OUTPUT1 connector to the L/R
channels.
1+2: The audio from the OUTPUT1 connector is mixed with the
audio from the OUTPUT2 connector (only when the OUTPUT2
connector is set to output analog signal) and output to the L/R
channels.
2: Outputs the audio from the OUTPUT2 connector (only when
the OUTPUT2 connector is set to output analog signal) to the L/R
channels. When the WRR-855 is attached, no audio is output
from the PHONES connector.
Note
Monitor output is split from the analog signal output to the
OUTPUT1/2 connectors. When audio that is output to the
OUTPUT1 connector is changed on the DWR-S01D using
the ANALOG OUTPUT1 function, monitor output changes
accordingly.
 PHONES (monitor output)
connector (3.5 mm, TRS jack, tip: L, ring: R, sleeve: ground)
Connect the headphones here. Select the output signal using
the monitor output selector.
 Monitor level control
Adjusts the monitor output level.
36
Audio Equipment Selection
 OUTPUT1 (analog audio output) connector (4-pin)
Outputs balanced analog audio signal. When the DWR-S01D is
attached, audio from the tuner 1 or 2 can be selected by
using the UTILITY menu of the DWR-S01D. The output from this
connector is factory-set to the audio from the tuner 1. When the
WRR-855S is attached, audio is output from this connector only.
 OUTPUT2 (analog/digital audio output) connector (4-pin)
When the DWR-S01D is attached, this connector outputs
balanced analog audio signal or AES3-format digital audio
signal. Output signal can be selected using the ANALOG AES/
EBU selector. When this selector is set to ANALOG, audio from the
tuner 2 is output.
Note that this connector does not work when the WRR-855S is
attached.
 ANALOG AES/EBU selector
When the DWR-S01D is attached, this selector determines the
signal output from the OUTPUT2 connector.
ANALOG: Balanced analog audio signal is output.
AES/EBU: AES3-format digital audio signal is output.
Note that this selector does not work when the WRR-855S is
attached.
Note
DWA-01D supplied accessories include two xx inch length XLR
adapter cables for the purpose of audio output connection with
output 1 and output 2.
BNC c
UHF System Configuration
In order to maximize performance of the Digital Wireless Receiver DWR-R01D, select the UHF antenna configuration as
described below.
System Configuration


r cable.
DC and

Because the DWX system uses RF transmission in the UHF band, similar to analog wireless systems, antenna
cables of an existing analog wireless system can be used, provided that the frequency matches. When
operating the DWX system along with an analog wireless system, antenna cables can be shared.
The DWR-R01D is supplied with two whip antennas. If the service area is small, you can also use the supplied
whip antennas, but for better reception performance, using the optional UHF AN-820 or AN-01 UHF antennas
is recommended. Select the antenna system according to the scale and purpose of your application.
The supplied whip antennas can be mounted either on the front panel or the rear panel.
hed
ed in
S is
Whip antenna (supplied)
Notes
In applications such as on-stage use where the required RF directivity is known, or when used in conjunction
with in-ear monitoring where unneeded directions are known, use the directional AN-01 antennas and install
them with a suitable orientation.
 When the direction to the area where the transmitter will be used is not pre-determined, use omnidirectional
antennas to ensure reception from all directions.
e
e input

1D is
his
en the
only.
pin)
o
AES/
om the
S is
BNC cable splitting
Without a divider, cascaded connection*1 of up to 8 DWR-R01D units (16 channels) is possible.
If 9 or more DWR-R01D units are to be used, use the Antenna Divider WD-850 to split the BNC connection.
One WD-850 unit allows splitting into 4 outputs, and cascaded connection of two WD-850 units allows splitting
into 8 outputs.

Number of DWR-R01D units
2 to 8: Cascaded connection of DWR-R01D units without using WD-850*2
9 to 32: One WD-850 in conjunction with cascaded DWR-R01D units
33 to 41*3: Configured with two cascaded WD-850 units combined with cascaded DWR-R01D units
*1 Cascaded DWR-R01D output reflects attenuator settings.
Set ANT DC OUT to [OFF] and ANT ATT a/b to [0dB] on second and subsequent DWR-R01D units to which antennas are not
connected directly.
*2 When configuring two diversity reception systems, the WD-850 is used to join the systems.
*3 Due to network limits such as RMU-01 control and Wireless Studio combined monitoring capability, the DWX system supports a
maximum of 82 channels in a networked configuration. If not configured as a network system, more than 82 channels are possible
as far as frequency allocation allows. (In this case, the status of transmitters received by the DWR-R01D can be monitored at the unit
itself.)
When two WD-850 units are used, a UHF system with a maximum of 128 channels, using 64 DWR-R01D units, can be configured.
the
s
XLR
on with
UHF System Configuration
37
Configuring a DWX System
System Requirements
Configuring a DWX System
Equipment Features
Wall i
UHF Accessories
UHF Antenna AN-01
This is a unidirectional log periodic dipole antenna.
Example of horizontal
directivity characteristics



1
Wall installation using built-in outlet box
Built-in low noise and low distortion booster amplifier with three
gain settings: 18 dB/10 dB/0 dB.
Booster amplifier can be powered from connected receiver or
divider, using either 9 or 12 V DC.
Grip with screw allows mounting on a microphone stand.
Plate covering the outlet box
Connect to the
Hangers
ANTENNA A/B
NO.6-32UNC
IN (DC9V OUT)
screws (supplied)
connector
on either of
BNC
the following
connecter
devices:
 MB-8N/MBX6 Tuner
Base Unit
Coaxial cable
 SRP-X500P/
Attachment A
X700P
(supplied)
Powered
Antenna seat
Mixer
M3 screw
(supplied)
M3 screw
UHF Antenna AN-820A
This is a horizontal omnidirectional dipole antenna.
2
M3 s
to
co
No.6-32UNC
screw
Fit these slots over the
hangers of attachment A.
UHF
This is a
BNC connector
Place this groove over the
antenna seat of attachment A.
Place this groove over the
antenna seat of attachment A.





Built-in booster amplifier provides 18 dB gain (if powered with
12 V DC) or 10 dB gain (if powered with 9 V DC).
Booster amplifier can be powered from connected receiver or
divider, using either 9 or 12 V DC.
Various supplied accessories enable mounting to a utility box
or to a wall, as well as mounting on a microphone stand.
Splashproof construction allows outdoor installation in a roofed
location.
Installation on a microphone stand

1

Microphone stand screw (supplied)
Microphone stand screw adaptor
(PF1⁄2 to NS 5⁄8) (supplied)
M3 screw (supplied)
2
Coaxlal cable
Connect to the ANTENNA A/B IN
(DC9V OUT) connector on either of
the devices.
Microphone
stand
38
UHF System Configuration
Incor
to a m
a dive
opera
Provid
to be
9 or 1
Front panel
Wall installation
1
Wood screw
(supplied)
Screw to the
wall.
Coaxlal cable
2
Attachment B (supplied)
Attachment
B screwed to
the wall
Hangers
M3 screws (supplied)
/MBer
nit
00P/
Coaxlal
cable
to the BNC
connecter
Attachment
A (supplied)

 ANTENNA A DC OUT (power supply to antenna A) switch
Supplies 9V DC to the Sony UHF antenna connected to the
ANTENA A DC OUT 1 and 2 connectors. If interference or
distortion occurs, set to OFF.
 ANTENNA B DC OUT (power supply to antenna B) switch
Supplies 9V DC to the Sony UHF antenna connected to the
ANTENA B DC OUT 1 and 2 connectors. If interference or distortion
occurs, set to OFF.
 
Rear panel

d
M3 screw
Connect to the ANTENNA A/B IN
(DC9V OUT) connector on either
of the devices.
Antenna seat
UHF Antenna Divider WD-850
This is a 1U size rack mount antenna divider.
 

 ANTENNA A IN / DC OUT 1 and 2 (antenna A input/DC power
output 1 and 2) connectors
When connected by coaxial cable, the signal is input from the
Sony UHF antenna while power is supplied to the antenna’s
booster amplifier. The power supply can be set to 9V or OFF using
the ANTENNA A DC OUT switch on the front panel. Depending
on the required range of the wireless microphone, up to two
antennas can be connected.
 ANTENNA A CASCADE connector
During use of two dividers at the same time, connect this
connector to the ANTENNA A IN/DC OUT connector 1
or 2 on the second divider.



Incorporates two circuits for supplying the antenna output
to a maximum of four outputs, making it easy to configure
a diversity reception system for simultaneous multi-channel
operation.
Provides antenna signal cascading outputs, allowing two units
to be cascaded for connection of up to eight outputs.
9 or 12 V DC power supply output for booster amplifier.
 ANTENNA A OUT 1 to 4 (antenna A output 1 to 4) connectors
Connect from ANTENNA A OUT connector on the unit to the
ANTENNA A IN connector on the tuner.
 ANTENNA B IN / DC OUT 1 and 2 (antenna B input/DC power
output 1 and 2) connectors
When connected by coaxial cable, the signal is input from the
Sony UHF antenna while power is supplied to the antenna’s
booster amplifier. The power supply can be set to 9V or OFF using
the ANTENNA B DC OUT switch on the front panel. Depending
on the required range of the wireless microphone, up to two
antennas can be connected.
 ANTENNA B CASCADE connector
During use of two dividers at the same time, connect this
connector to the ANTENNA B IN/DC OUT connector 1 or 2 on the
second divider.
N
er of
 ANTENNA B OUT 1 to 4 (antenna B output 1 to 4) connectors
Connect from ANTENNA B OUT connector on the unit to the
ANTENNA B IN connector on the tuner.
UHF System Configuration
39
Configuring a DWX System
to the
A A/B
OUT)
or
of
wing

Configuring a DWX System
Numb
Booster power supply
The booster power supply voltage, drive voltage, and supported gain will differ, depending on the
equipment. Refer to the table below for details.
Category
Receiver/Divider
Antenna/Booster
Model
name
DWR-R01D
DWR-S01D
WD-850
AN-01
AN-820A
WB-850
Supply voltage
for AN series UHF
antennas
0 V/9 V/12 V
0V
0 V/9 V/12 V
Voltage selection
method
Menu*1
—
Front-panel switch*2*6
—
Gain/attenuator
Support gain/attenuator Voltage selection
method
0 dB/–5 dB/–10 dB*5
Menu
—
0 dB/–5 dB/–10 dB
Menu
0 dB
—
Switch
0 dB/10 dB/18 dB/Auto*6
Trim switch
6
None (Auto) Auto*
Auto only
—
–10 dB/0 dB/+10 dB
Selector switch
Drive voltage
9 V/12 V*3
9 V/12 V*3*4
9 V – 12 V
Voltage
selection
method
*1 Separate power supply voltage setting for antenna A/antenna B not supported.
*2 Separate power supply voltage setting for antenna A/antenna B supported.
*3 0 V is not supported. Use as a passive antenna is not possible. Power supply must be provided.
*4 Supplying 12 V to legacy models may result in fatal damage. When selecting 12 V, be sure to obtain a new AN-820A. When
supplying 12 V to an owned AN-820A, make sure that a label that includes frequency information is affixed next to the LED
indicators at the bottom of the unit.
*5 The antenna output level reflects the attenuator setting. In a cascaded connection, set the attenuator on the second unit to 0
dB, to prevent attenuation values from being added up.
*6 In the Auto mode, gain is 10 dB with 9 V DC and 18 dB with 12 V DC.
Antenna Installation Requirements
The antenna installation conditions for the DWX system are basically the same as for analog wireless systems.
Consider the following points when planning an installation.
The transmission distance of a wireless system will differ greatly, depending on factors such as how the
equipment is worn on the body, the presence of obstacles, etc. Before finalizing an installation, be sure to
check the reception condition, as described in “Checking the RF Level (UHF)” (page 45).
BNC cables
The connection between antenna and receiver is made with BNC cables, as in an analog wireless system.
If there are existing cable installations from an analog wireless system, these can be used.
BNC cable types



Wireless microphone systems commonly use BNC cables for antenna connections. There are a number
of standards for BNC cables, with different specifications for impedance and cable gauge (attenuation
characteristics).
For example, in a standard classification such as “5C-2V” and “8D-2V”, the first numeral indicates the
cable gauge (thickness), and the subsequent letter indicates the impedance: “C” stands for 75 ohms
and “D” for 50 ohms.
Both for analog wireless systems and digital wireless systems, Sony recommends “5D-2V” -- “8D-2V” cables
with 50-ohm impedance because these have lower transmission losses.
75-ohm BNC cables can also be used.



When configuring a system in venues with existing cables, 75-ohm cables can also be used. When a DWX
receiver is connected to a 75-ohm cable, in principle there will be a transmission loss due to impedance
mismatching, but this loss amounts only to a few decibels. Because this is smaller than the loss introduced
by the cable length, it often can be disregarded.
Not only BNC cables but also BNC connectors come in two types, rated either for 50 ohms or 75 ohms
impedance. When a 75-ohm cable is connected to a 50-ohm connector, an impedance mismatch
occurs, but in practice this is often disregarded because the influence is small.
More important than the difference between 50 ohms and 75 impedance are differences in signal losses
introduced by two cables of different length. (With a 5D-2V cable, a 10-meter difference amounts to a
difference of about 3 dB.)
For information on available distances under different conditions, see “Distance between transmitter and
antenna” (page 43).
Note
When configuring a new system, the use of 5D-2V -- 8D-2V BNC cables is recommended.
40
UHF System Configuration
Number of antennas and diversity reception
Use two identical antennas
enuator
election
The DWX system, like the conventional analog wireless system, uses the space diversity reception principle.
Two antennas are employed to receive the signal, with the system automatically switching to the antenna
with the stronger signal.
To ensure stable reception, the two antennas must be identical.
—
tch
en
it to 0
One may think that the further the two antennas are apart, the better the reception performance, but
this is not necessarily true. It is usually not necessary to maintain a large distance between the antennas.
Of course, if the antennas are too close to each other (less than 1 meter (3.2 ft.)), the advantages of
the diversity system will be lost, but since the wavelength of a radio wave in the 600 MHz band is about
50 centimeters (1.6 ft.), ensuring a distance of about 3 to 5 times the wavelength (1.2 to 2 meters (3.9 to
6.6 ft.)) will usually result in good diversity reception. The distance should generally be kept well below the
maximum of 20 meters (65.6 ft.), because performance will decrease above this point.
Use shorter, thicker BNC cables of identical length
To minimize transmission losses, the BNC cables should be as short and large-gauge as possible. If there is
a difference in cable length, differences in cable loss can degrade the diversity effect. Make sure that both
BNC cables are of the same length.
tems.
to
m.
mber
ation
Use two antenna sets (4 antennas) in large venues
In large venues where two antennas do not provide sufficient coverage, and in cases where there are spots
without direct line of sight between transmitter and antenna, the UHF Antenna Divider WD-850 should be
used to allow for two sets of antennas (total 4 antennas).
If venues such as banquet halls are partitioned into separate sections, a separate antenna installation
should be provided for each section. In some cases, partition panels may incorporate metal plates for
sound proofing, which may also block radio transmission. Special care is required in such instances.
However, simply increasing the number of antennas is not always the answer, and an excessive number
of antennas (such as 3 or 4 sets) may lead to mutual interference and thereby degrade reception
performance.
Multiple dividers make it possible to use antennas for other systems, but the number of antennas receiving
the same RF signal should be kept to no more than two sets. (In a small venue, even two antenna sets may
result in decreased reception performance. Always check actual performance before starting operation.)
he
ms
cables
a DWX
ance
oduced
ms
h
losses
oa
d
UHF System Configuration
41
Configuring a DWX System
Spacing between antennas: 1 to 20 meters (3.2 to 65.6 ft.)
Configuring a DWX System
Antenna installation position
Booste
Distance between transmitter and antenna
Line-of-sight service area ranges for different RF power levels are listed below.
RF power
10 mW
1 mW
Transmission distance
60 m (196.9 ft.)
20 m (65.6 ft.)
If the transmitter is located too close to the antenna, input overload may occur, leading to intermodulation
distortion and noise. A distance of at least 2 to 3 meters between transmitter and antennas should always
be maintained.
If the transmitter and antenna are too far apart, the service area will become doughnut-shaped.
Installation should allow direct line of sight from transmitter to antenna
There should be no obstacles between the transmitter and antennas.
Normally, the antennas should be mounted at a height above average human height, looking up from the
transmitter at an inclined angle.
Keep away from windows
If wireless systems are operated on several floors of a building, antennas near windows may cause
interference between floors.
For installation in high-rise buildings, antennas should be positioned at least 3 meters away from windows.
On higher floors, radio signals from other microphones may interfere with reception even over considerable
distances.
Keep a clearance of several tens of centimeters from the ceiling
Close proximity to the ceiling can cause reflections that negatively affect reception sensitivity. When
installing antennas in corners, also keep a clearance of several tens of centimeters from adjacent walls.
Locations to avoid
Do not install antennas in the following types of locations. Otherwise signal reception may suffer or noise
may occur.
 Behind ceiling or wall finishing layers
 Near windows, metal frames/plates, or electric appliances (lighting fixtures, motors, elevators, power
distribution panels, etc.)
 Near electronic equipment (computers, dimmers, TV sets, video cameras, etc.)
Install antennas with correct orientation
The sensitivity pattern of an antenna extends in the horizontal direction from the correct mounting
orientation. For example, if the AN-820A is mounted to the ceiling pointing down, reception sensitivity may
decrease.
42
UHF System Configuration
Booster gain setting conditions
Configuring a DWX System
ulation
ways
BNC cables used with UHF antennas should have low losses. To obtain the proper diversity effect, the cables
should in principle be kept as short and large-gauge as possible, and should have the same length. If BNC
cables need to be run over long distances, you should use an antenna booster to compensate for cable
transmission losses.
The table below shows the relationship between BNC cable length and gain settings.
However, depending on usage conditions, RF level may be insufficient even if these recommendations are
followed. Always check actual operation before finalizing a setting.
* When transmitter output is 10 mW and the distance between the transmitter and antennas is approx. 30 m (98.4 ft.)
At 5D-2V (50 ohms)
BNC cable length
0 m – 10 m (0 ft. – 32.8 ft.)
10 m – 75 m (32.8 ft. – 246.1 ft.)
75 m – 150 m (246.1 ft. – 492.1 ft.)
At 5C-2V (75 ohms)
Gain
0 dB
10 dB
18 dB
BNC cable length
0 m – 8 m (0 ft. – 26.2 ft.)
8 m – 60 m (26.2 ft. – 196.9 ft.)
60 m – 120 m (196.9 ft. – 393.7 ft.)
Gain
0 dB
10 dB
18 dB
om the
At 8D-2V (50 ohms)
BNC cable length
0 m – 12 m (0 ft. – 39.4 ft.)
12 m – 90 m (39.4 ft. – 295.3 ft.)
90 m – 180 m (295.3 ft. – 590.6 ft.)
dows.
erable
At 7C-2V (50 ohms)
Gain
0 dB
10 dB
18 dB
BNC cable length
0 m – 10 m (0 ft. – 32.8 ft.)
10 m – 70 m (32.8 ft. – 229.7 ft.)
70 m – 140 m (229.7 ft. – 459.3 ft.)
Gain
0 dB
10 dB
18 dB
* When transmitter output is 10 mW and the distance between the transmitter and antennas is approx. 60 m (196.9 ft.)
At 5D-2V (50 ohms)
BNC cable length
0 m – 5 m (0 ft. – 16.4 ft.)
5 m – 50 m (16.4 ft. – 164 ft.)
50 m – 100 m (164 ft. – 328.1 ft.)
At 5C-2V (75 ohms)
Gain
0 dB
10 dB
18 dB
BNC cable length
0 m – 4 m (0 ft. – 13.1 ft.)
4 m – 35 m (13.1 ft. – 114.8 ft.)
35 m – 70 m (114.8 ft. – 229.7 ft.)
Gain
0 dB
10 dB
18 dB
alls.
At 8D-2V (50 ohms)
oise
er
may
BNC cable length
0 m – 6 m (0 ft. – 19.7 ft.)
6 m – 60 m (19.7 ft. – 196.9 ft.)
60 m – 120 m (196.9 ft. – 393.7 ft.)
At 7C-2V (50 ohms)
Gain
0 dB
10 dB
18 dB
BNC cable length
0 m – 5 m (0 ft. – 16.4 ft.)
5 m – 45 m (16.4 ft. – 147.6 ft.)
45 m – 90 m (147.6 ft. – 295.3 ft.)
Gain
0 dB
10 dB
18 dB
Note
Antenna boosters are basically intended only to cover cable losses. High gain settings exceeding the cable
loss compensation requirements may actually result in a smaller service area during simultaneous multichannel operation, due to increased intermodulation. For example, when antenna input level is raised, the
range from the antenna to the transmitter increases, but the distance by which the transmitter has to be kept
from the antenna also increases. If taking measures to optimize performance when the transmitter is at a
maximum distance from the antenna, care must be taken so that the performance of the transmitter when
it is closest to the antenna is not impaired. If the antenna booster gain is raised, and a transmitter operating
simultaneously is brought in close proximity to the antenna, the reception performance of the distant
transmitter may deteriorate.The DWX series provides an array of functions including transmitter RF power
switching, antenna booster gain switching, and switching of the RF attenuator integrated in the Digital Wireless
Receiver DWR-R01D. This allows flexible optimization of the service area. Use these functions to establish the
settings required for the respective application.
UHF System Configuration
43
Configuring a DWX System
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
Follow the procedure shown in the flowchart below to establish parameters and check operation.
Chec
Parameters to check
1. Band usage: White space TV channel
2. Group usage: See “List of Supported Frequencies” (page 78)
3. Antenna installation location/orientation: distance to TX, height, orientation etc.
4. Antenna gain: 0 dB, 10 dB, or 18 dB
5. Number of antennas: 2, 4
6. TX RF power: 1 mW, 10 mW, or 50 mW
7. RX attenuator: 10 dB, 5 dB, or 0 dB
CH: Channel
TX: Transmitter
RX: Receiver
Flow for making and checking RF settings
Step 1
Channel plan selection
Step 2
Antenna installation and
setup
Step 3
Checking the service area
with one channel
Step 4
Checking third-order
intermodulation distortion
Step 5
Checking simultaneous
multi-channel operation
44
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
Check possible sources of external interference, and determine a band and group to use that
is free from external noise.
Determine the channel most susceptible to third-order intermodulation distortion (this
channel is subsequently called desired channel) and perform an operation test with the
desired channel (single channel). Determine antenna installation positions and orientation
that will be difficult to change later, and decide on number of antennas and gain settings.
Using the desired channel only, assign a range of parameters for TX RF power and RX
attenuator settings, and check coverage of the intended service area with each setting.
Power up all transmitters for channels other than the desired channel, and generate thirdorder intermodulation distortion (subsequently called interference) in the receiver for the
desired channel. Assign a range of parameters for TX RF power and RX attenuator settings
and check the interference noise level with each setting.
Using settings established as acceptable in steps 1 – 4, power up all transmitters and
check the service area for the desired channel. If the service area for the desired channel is
achieved, the service area for other channels should also be equal or better.
Checking the RF Level (UHF)
The RF level at which the receiver receives signals can be checked using the display of the Digital Wireless
Receiver DWR-R01D or the RF level meter of Wireless Studio. See the next section for details.
Checking with the DWR-R01D display
Configuring a DWX System
You can check whether the transmitter is in the service area by using the display of the Digital Wireless
Receiver DWR-R01D.
 RF level meters
 QL meter
Channel
nsmitter
eceiver
at
 RF indicator
 RF (radio reception) level meters
Indicates the level of the signal input from the ANTENNA a/b IN connector. The number of segments that
light up depends on the input level.
 RF (radio reception) indicator
Lights up to indicate the level of the signal input from the ANTENNA a/b IN connector as follows.
Set the RF level so that the indicator lights green.
On in orange: 80 dBμ or more
On in green: 25 dBμ to 80 dBμ
On in red: 15 dBμ to 25 dBμ
Off: Less than 15 dBμ
RF level meter and RF indicator display levels
s
RF level meters
8. 80 dBμ or more
7. Equal to or more than 70 dBμ, less than 80 dBμ
6. Equal to or more than 60 dBμ, less than 70 dBμ
5. Equal to or more than 50 dBμ, less than 60 dBμ
4. Equal to or more than 40 dBμ, less than 50 dBμ
3. Equal to or more than 30 dBμ, less than 40 dBμ
2. Equal to or more than 20 dBμ, less than 30 dBμ
1. Equal to or more than 10 dBμ, less than 20 dBμ
0. Off: Less than 10 dBμ
Orange: 80 dBμ or
more
Green: 25 dBμ to
80 dBμ
Red: 15 dBμ to 25 dBμ
Off: Less than 15 dBμ
RF indicator
 QL (signal quality level) meter
Indicates the quality of received data along the time axis, using five steps.
This meter allows you to monitor RF signal quality deterioration that may occur when there is interference or
when the transmitter is too far from the receiver.
When checking RF levels, the QL meter should always show more than four segments.
5
4
3
2
1
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
45
Configuring a DWX System
Checking with Wireless Studio
The RF level meter of the Wireless Studio application can be used to verify the RF level.
RF level meter
Flowc
Step 1 Channel Plan Selection
Check possible sources of interference including TV broadcast signals and external interference noise and
determine the band and group to use.
Procedure
1 Power down all transmitters.
2 Determine the channel plan for the receiver.
Select the band

Select the band based on your intended purpose and your wireless environment (e.g., whether TV
broadcast transmissions exist).
* The band is fixed for the DWR-S01D.

Take factors such as effective use of frequencies and the risk of mutual interference with other wireless
equipment and/or analog wireless systems into consideration.
Select the group


There are groups that are designed for simultaneous multi-channel operation and others that are not.
Select an appropriate group according to the intended purpose and the number of channels to be
operated simultaneously.
Groups not specifically designed for simultaneous multi-channel operation are 00 for US models, 00 for
EU models, and groups that include TV channel names (e.g., TV62). In order to accommodate flexible
channel planning even when using these groups, continuous channel setting is possible in 125-kHz steps
(25-K steps for groups that include TV channel names on EU models). When using these, design your own
channel plans according to specific requirements.
3 Check for external interference.
Sample settings for checking
 Band to use: To be established in this step.
 Group to use: To be established in this step.
 Antenna installation location/orientation: Install according to requirements described in “Antenna
installation position” (page 43).
 Antenna gain: Set according to instructions in “Booster gain setting conditions” (page 44), ensuring that
cable losses can be fully covered.
 Number of antennas: Determine according to requirements described in “Antenna installation position”
(page 43).
 TX RF power: TX to be OFF in this step.
 RX attenuator: Provisionally set to 0 dB.
Checking procedure
Check the RF level meter indication. Verify that interference is less than 10 dBμ (RF level meter is always out.).
46
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
4 If there is interference noise that could become a problem, change the channel plan perform
the checking procedure again.
If there is no interference noise, the channel plan can be used.
Flowchart for Step 1
Channel plan selection
 Power down all transmitters
 Select the RX channel plan
 Check for external interference
 Change the RX channel plan
nd
RF level meter is out?
No
Yes
To Step 2
ess
Notes
When using only a digital wireless microphone system
Taking advantage of the fact that digital wireless systems are highly resistant to interference, using groups
with a high number of channels that can be operated simultaneously is recommended.
* In this case, when neighboring channels from two bands are used, ensure that channel spacing is at least 375 kHz.
not.
e
0 for
ible
steps
ur own
When using analog wireless and digital wireless systems together
Select a group designed for simultaneous multi-channel operation in an environment where analog wireless
and digital wireless systems are used.
Groups for environments where analog wireless and digital wireless systems are used together include those
intended for single TV band use and those intended for multiple TV band use. Take factors such as the
number of bands used and whether TV broadcast transmissions exist into consideration when selecting the
group.
For details on the groups that can be selected, see “Sony Digital Wireless Microphone System Frequency
Lists” (PDF).
* When simultaneous multi-channel operation is realized with a mix of analog wireless and digital wireless systems, the frequency
spacing between the analog and digital systems must be at least 375 kHz. Therefore certain channels will not be available for
selection in the digital wireless system.
a
ng that
sition”
s out.).
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
47
Configuring a DWX System
Note
If the computer on which Wireless Studio is installed, a Bluetooth mouse, or similar device is set up on top of
the DWR-R01D and operated, the RF meters on the DWR-R01D may light up due to noise from the computer
or other device. In such cases, distance the computer or other device from the DWR-R01D until the RF level
meters turn off.
Configuring a DWX System
Step 2 Antenna Installation and Setup
Select the channel with the most difficult conditions as the desired channel, and perform an operation
test with the desired channel (single channel). Determine and optimize antenna installation positions and
orientation that will be difficult to change later, and decide on number of antennas and gain settings.
Procedure
Selecting the desired channel
5 Power up all TX except one, and position the TX within the envisioned service area at the
location closes to the antenna.
Example: In a 12-channel system, turn one TX off and turn the eleven other TX on.
* Equipment other than TX (RX, boosters, etc.) should be constantly on.
6 Use the RF level meter on the RX that is being set up to check the level of third-order
intermodulation noise in the channel of the TX that is off.
Sample settings for checking (RF raised to make noise easier to detect)







Band to use: Band established in step 1.
Group to use: Group established in step 1.
Antenna installation location/orientation: Refer to “Antenna installation position” (page 43).
Antenna gain: Refer to “Booster gain setting conditions” (page 44).
Number of antennas: Refer to “Antenna installation position” (page 43).
TX RF power: 10 mW
RX attenuator: 0 dB
Checking procedure
Check the RF level meter indication.
7 Power down a different TX and repeat steps 5 to 6.
Check all channels.
Example: In a 12-channel system, perform the procedure 12 times.
8 Designate the channel with the highest noise level as the desired channel.
Note
When using multiple RX units in a cascaded configuration, the third-order intermodulation noise of each
RX will be added up, so that noise may be highest at the last channel.
* However, this depends on the channel plan and the number of channels, and may not always apply.
Noise in last channel may be highest
48
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
Antenna installation and setup
nd
9 Power up only the desired channel TX and establish a setup simulating the expected
conditions during actual operation.
Example: If the TX is the DWM-01, it should be held in the hand, close to the mouth.
If the TX is the DWT-B01, it should be worn on the hip.
* Equipment other than TX (RX, boosters, etc.) should be constantly on.
the
Configuring a DWX System
10 Move the desired channel TX throughout the service area, and check for the presence of
obstructions, dropout points, and body effect.
Sample settings for checking







Band to use: Band established in Step 1.
Group to use: Group established in Step 1.
Antenna installation location/orientation: To be determined in this step.
Antenna gain: To be determined in this step.
Number of antennas: To be determined in this step.
TX RF power: 1 mW
RX attenuator: 10 dB
Checking procedure
Check that the RF indicator is lit green.
* In this step, we recommend adjusting the setup, direction, and number of antennas to obtain the highest possible RF level.
11 Even at points with weak RF levels, optimize the antenna setup conditions so that the RF
level is at its highest, and check the service area again.
 Determining the antenna installation location/orientation:
 As close as possible to service area *1
 As far as possible, ensure direct line of sight to TX (directional antennas should be pointed to the
farthest point of the desired area)
 As far as possible, antennas should overlook service area
Adjust antenna location/orientation to maximize the service area.
 Determine antenna gain*2*3: 0 dB, 10 dB, or 18 dB (should cover cable loss but not be excessively
high)
 Determine number of antennas: 2, or 4
f each
*1 Too short distance between TX and antenna can also result in reception degradation, due to RF input overload and thirdorder intermodulation distortion. Recommended TX to antenna distance for 3-channel operation is about 3 meters, and for
10-channel operation 5 meters or more.
*2 Antenna gain must be set to the same value on both antennas, to obtain the diversity effect.
*3 When using the AN-01 antenna, you can set gain on the antenna to “Auto” and control gain by switching the DWR-R01D
booster power supply voltage. This makes it easier to change settings also after installation. (AN-820 supports Auto only.)
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
49
Configuring a DWX System
Flowchart for Step 2
Step
Selecting the desired channel
From Step 1
Proce
 Power up all TX except for one.
 Power down a different TX
 Check third-order intermodulation
distortion noise level
 Designate channel with highest noise
level as desired channel
Antenna installation and setup
 Power up only desired channel TX
 Check service area for desired
channel (single channel)
 Optimize antenna installation
conditions
1. Determine Antenna installation
location/orientation
2. Determine antenna gain
3. Determine number of antennas
Sufficient service area
achieved?
Yes
To Step 3
50
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
No
Step 3 Checking the Service Area With One Channel
Using the desired channel subject to severe conditions, assign a range of parameters for TX power output and
RX attenuator settings, and check whether the settings result in coverage of the intended service area.
Procedure
Example: If the TX is the DWM-01, it should be held in the hand, close to the mouth.
If the TX is the DWT-B01, it should be worn on the hip.
* Equipment other than TX (RX, boosters, etc.) should be constantly on.
13 Make the parameter settings, and move the desired channel TX throughout the service area,
checking at various locations.
Sample settings for checking







Band to use: Band established in step 1.
Group to use: Group established in step 1.
Antenna installation location/orientation: As determined in step 2.
Antenna gain: As determined in step 2.
Number of antennas: As determined in step 2.
TX RF power: To be determined in this step *1 (settings 1 to 6 in table below)
RX attenuator: To be determined in this step *1 (settings 1 to 6 in table below)
RX ATT
10 dB
5 dB
0 dB
1 mW
Setting 1
Setting 2
Setting 3
TX RF power
10 mW
Setting 4
Setting 5
Setting 6
As 50 mW output of the TX produces high third-order intermodulation distortion, it is not suited for
simultaneous multi-channel operation. Therefore, 50 mW output is excluded from the items for checking.
Checking procedure
Check the following:
 No dropouts in audio signal
 RF indicator lit in green
 QL meter shows more than 4 segments
*1 When multiple TX are used in step 4 and following, changing the TX RF power for a high number of channels is time-consuming.
On the other hand, changing the RX attenuator setting can be done at the first DWR-R01D of the cascaded configuration and is
therefore relatively easy. To simplify the procedure, you can first perform steps 3 to 5 by changing the RX attenuator setting only,
and then change the TX RF power and repeat steps 3 to 5.
Sample results
RX ATT
10 dB
5 dB
0 dB
TX RF power
1 mW
10 mW
Setting 1: Poor Setting 4: Good
Setting 2: Fair
Setting 5: Good
Setting 3: Good Setting 6: Good
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
51
Configuring a DWX System
12 Power up only the desired channel TX and establish a setup simulating the expected
conditions during actual operation.
Configuring a DWX System
Step 4 Checking Third-order Intermodulation Distortion
Step
Power up all transmitters for channels other than the desired channel, and generate third-order
intermodulation distortion (subsequently called interference) in the receiver for the desired channel. Assign
a range of parameters for TX output power and RX attenuator settings and check the interference noise level
with each setting.
Procedure
Proce
14 Power up all transmitters for channels other than the desired channel. Establish a setup
simulating the expected conditions during actual operation, and have a person with the TX
stand in a position closest to the antenna.
Example: If the TX is the DWM-01, it should be held in the hand, close to the mouth.
If the TX is the DWT-B01, it should be worn on the hip, and the person should stand at the rim of the
stage, approaching the antenna.
* Equipment other than TX (RX, boosters, etc.) should be constantly on.
15 Using the RF level meter of the RX set to the channel whose TX is switched off, check the thirdorder intermodulation distortion noise level in the channel.
Setting example for checking







Band to use: Band established in step 1.
Group to use: Group established in step 1.
Antenna installation location/orientation: As determined in step 2.
Antenna gain: As determined in step 2.
Number of antennas: As determined in step 2.
TX RF power: Setting that cleared the requirements of step 3.
RX attenuator: Setting that cleared the requirements of step 3.
Check procedure
Check the RF level meter indication.
 In principle, the noise level should be less than
10 dBμ (RF level meter should be consistently out).
Sample results
10 dB
RX ATT
5 dB
0 dB
TX RF power
1 mW
10 mW
Step 3
Step 4
Step 3
Step 4
Setting 1
Setting 4
Poor
(Good)
Good
Good
Setting 2
Setting 5
Fair
(Good)
Good
Good
Setting 3
Setting 6
Good
Good
Good
Fair
Note
For stable reception, sufficient RF power levels should be obtained in the desired channel, and at the
same time, the D/U ratio between desired channel and interference should be at least 20 dB. Decreasing
the system-wide RF level will decrease interference in the desired channel by a factor of 3. Consequently,
if the D/U ratio is insufficient, reducing the RF lower will provide an improvement. For example, when a 5
dB attenuation is introduced, the level in the desired channel will decrease by 5 dB, but the interference
level will decrease by 15 dB, thereby yielding an improvement in D/U ratio by 10 dB. The same applies to
the attenuation of RF power due to distance. If the RF level is too low, the available distance will decrease,
resulting in an insufficient service area. But if the RF level is very high, this also can cause problems because
the required D/U ratio cannot be obtained in the antenna vicinity. The resulting service area will be shaped
like a doughnut, with a large hole in the middle, which also is undesirable. Therefore, 50 mW output of the
TX is not suited for simultaneous multi-channel operation.
TX RF power
Low
High
Low
High
RX ATT
A
Third-order intermodulation
distortion noise level
B
C
Low
High
Small
Zone A
Interference is low,
but RF level in
desired channel is
also low, resulting in
insufficient service
area.
52
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
Service area for single channel
Zone B
Good balance between
desired channel and
interference RF level. Desired
service area is achieved,
also during simultaneous
multi-channel operation.
Large
Zone C
RF level in desired channel is
high, but interference level is
also high. During simultaneous
multi-channel operation,
desired service area will not be
achieved in antenna vicinity.
Service area
Step 5 Checking Simultaneous Multi-channel Operation
Using settings established as acceptable in steps 1 – 4, power up all transmitters and check the service area
for the desired channel. If the service area for the desired channel is achieved, the service area for other
channels should also be equal or better. By checking the service area with multiple sets of parameters, the
degree of leeway can be established. You should then select the optimal parameters for operation.
sign
level
e TX
m of the
16 Power up all transmitters. Establish a setup simulating the expected conditions during actual
operation, and have a person with the TX stand in a position closest to the antennas.
Example: If the TX is the DWM-01, it should be held in the hand, close to the mouth.
If the TX is the DWT-B01, it should be worn on the hip, and the person should stand at the rim of the
stage, approaching the antenna.
17 Move the desired channel TX throughout the service area and check at various locations.
e third-
Setting example for checking







Band to use: Band established in step 1.
Group to use: Group established in step 1.
Antenna installation location/orientation: As determined in step 2
Antenna gain: As determined in step 2.
Number of antennas: As determined in step 2.
TX RF power: Setting that cleared the requirements of steps 3 and 4.
RX attenuator: Setting that cleared the requirements of steps 3 and 4.
Operation Check
Check the following:
 No dropouts in audio signal
 At least 2 segments of RF indicator shown throughout
 RF indicator lit in green
 QL meter shows more than 4 segments
18 Check the service area with multiple combinations of TX RF power and RX attenuator
settings.
Then select the combination that best matches the anticipated operation conditions.
Sample results
asing
ntly,
a5
nce
s to
ease,
ecause
haped
of the
10 dB
RX ATT
5 dB
0 dB
TX RF power
1 mW
10 mW
Step 3
Step 4
Step 5
Step 3
Step 4
Step 5
Setting 1: Zone A
Setting 4: Zone B
Poor
(Good)
(Poor)
Good
Good
Good
Setting 2: Zone A
Setting 5: Zone C
Fair
(Good)
(Fair)
Good
Good
Good
Setting 3: Zone B
Setting 6: Zone C
Good
Good
Good
Good
Fair
(Fair)
For example, with a result such as shown above, settings 3, 4, and 5 will produce a Zone B type service area
which meets the requirements. Either of these settings can be chosen. However, with setting 4 the RF level
margin is smaller than with setting 5. Taking the possible influence of the body effect into consideration,
settings 3 or 5 therefore are a better choice for stable operation.
 With setting 3, the transmitter output is 1 mW. Compared to the 10 mW of setting 5, battery life will be
extended by about 10 to 20 percent.
 With setting 5, the transmitter output is 10 mW. Compared to the 1 mW of setting 3, the higher RF level is
more suitable for situations with a lot of movement.
It is also possible to use setting 3 as a general system setting, and increase the RF level to 10 mW only in one
or more specific channels with lots of movement, to enlarge the service area for these channels. However,
because third-order intermodulation distortion will increase in this case, and channels that may be affected
should be checked beforehand. For safety, operation in all channels should be checked before going into
operation.
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
53
Configuring a DWX System
Procedure
Configuring a DWX System
Flowchart for Step 3
Troub
Checking the service area with one channel
From Step 2
 Make parameter settings and power
up only TX for desired channel
 Check whether service area is
achieved for desired channel
(single channel)
Change TX RF power and RX ATT
level parameters
All combinations tried?
No
Yes
Flowchart for Step 4
Checking third-order intermodulation distortion
 Power down only desired channel TX
 Check third-order intermodulation
distortion noise level
Change TX RF power and RX ATT
level parameters
Combination clearing
requirements of step 3 was
determined?
No
Yes
Flowchart for Step 5
Checking simultaneous multi-channel operation
 Power up all transmitters
 Check service area for desired
channel
Change TX RF power and RX ATT
level parameters
Combination clearing
requirements of step 4 was
determined?
No
Yes
Is there a combination
that fulfills the service area
requirements?
Yes
 Among the combinations that fulfills
the service area requirements, select
the one that best matches the
operation conditions.
Setup procedure is complete.
54
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
No
Return to  of step 2
Troubleshooting
If noise, audio output dropout, or a decrease in the QL occurs, check the following.
No
Yes
To Case 1
No
Is the RF level
too high?
To Case 3
Configuring a DWX System
Is the RF level
too low?
Yes
To Case 2
Case 1: RF level is too low (15 dBu or less, RF indicator frequently turns red)


If only the RF level of a specific receiver is low, increase the RF power of the corresponding transmitter.
If the RF levels of all receivers are low, perform one of the following.
 Increase the RF power of all the transmitters.
 Decrease the RF attenuator settings of the DWR-R01D and other peripheral devices.
 Increase the RF level settings of the AN-01, AN-820A, and other peripheral devices.
Case 2: RF level is too high (RF indicator frequently turns orange)*


If only the RF level of a specific receiver is high, decrease the RF power of the corresponding transmitter.
If the RF levels of all receivers are high, perform one of the following.
 Decrease the RF power of all the transmitters.
 Increase the RF attenuator settings of the DWR-R01D and other peripheral devices.
 Decrease the RF level settings of the AN-01, AN-820A, and other peripheral devices.
* The indicator turns orange when the RF level is too high (80 dBu or more) only on the DWR-R01D.
Case 3: Interference may be picked up
To check this, perform the following steps.
 Turn power to all transmitters off.
 In this condition, monitor the RF level on the display of the DWR-R01D or in Wireless Studio.
 If the RF level meter registers by one segment or more, take measures to eliminate interference, or
change to another available channel within the same group.
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
55
Configuring a DWX System
N
Use of
Quick Check
Cross R
When there is not enough time for a step-by-step configuration of the system, such as during an event or
concert, check the following three items to verify that the system has been configured properly.
Syste
Conditions for checking
Perform the check after confirming that all antennas and cables are installed, settings for the antenna gain, TX
RF power, RX attenuator, and used frequencies are configured, and the RX equipment is turned on.
System
 Turn off all TX equipment, and check that RF level meters for all RX equipment are off (i.e., not lit).
 Turn on all TX equipment except one, check that the RF level meters are off (i.e., not lit) for the RX with the
same frequency as the TX that is turned off, and repeat this check for each TX.
 Turn on all TX equipment, and check that the RF indicators for all RX equipment are always lit green under
all envisioned conditions.
ST mo
Items for checking
If all the above conditions are met, you can reliably operate the system without concerns.
If there is not enough time to check all envisioned operating conditions
’ Turn on all TX equipment, and check that the RF level meters for all RX equipment show 4 to 6 segments
under the normal state (i.e., normal installation at a fixed position).
If the conditions for , , and ’ are met, you can operate the system with reasonable reliability.
Note
The body effect has an influence of 10 dB to 20 dB. If the body effect is not present under the normal state,
the addition of the body effect will result in a drop of 10 dB to 20 dB. If the body effect is present under the
normal state, the loss of the body effect will result in an increase of 10 dB to 20 dB. If the RF level meters
show 5 segments under the normal state, the addition or loss of the body effect will result in a showing of 3
or 7 segments respectively, leaving you with an RF level that provides reasonable reliability (RF indicator is lit
green).
If conditions are not met
If condition  is not met, interference exists. Remove computers, Bluetooth mice, mobile phones, game
devices, and other signal transmitting devices away from the area. If the problem persists after removing
the above, interference from another system may be present. Perform a clear channel scan, and reselect
a frequency without interference.
 If condition  is not met, third-order intermodulation distortion exists, but as long as condition ③ is met,
you can reliably operate the system.
 In addition to checking condition  in such cases, check that the QL meter always shows more than 4
segments.
 If time allows, check that conditions  and  are met after adjusting the antenna setup positions,
antenna gain, attenuator, and TX output levels to ensure even more reliable operation.

56
Making and Checking RF Settings (UHF)
Opera
Network System Configuration
Use of the Remote Control Unit RMU-01 and a computer on which Wireless Studio is installed allows configuration of a
Cross Remote network with expanded functions.
r
System Configuration
System Requirements



Configure a dedicated LAN for the DWX system using 100Base-TX/10Base-T Ethernet equipment. Do not use
an existing LAN.
Make sure that IP addresses of equipment do not conflict.
Operation is not guaranteed for connections utilizing wireless LAN access points.
h the
ST mode and NT mode
under
The Sony digital wireless system supports two types of remote control: ST mode where a transmitter and
receiver communicate directly in a one-on-one configuration, and NT mode where the transmitter and receiver
communicate via the RMU-01 connected to the network.
System configuration for ST mode
ments
Transmitter and receiver communicate directly in a one-on-one configuration. When the receiver is placed
within a main UHF service area, Cross Remote can be used within a range of about 10 meters from the
receiver.
Notes
Within a single Cross Remote service area, control should be limited to six transmitters (three receivers). To
control more than six transmitters, the NT mode system should be used.
 As the DWR-S01D is not equipped with a network terminal, it can only operate in ST mode.
 The DWR-R01D allows connection of a computer and use of Wireless Studio for transmitter monitoring and
control also in ST mode.

state,
r the
rs
g of 3
tor is lit
game
oving
eselect
met,
an 4
System configuration for NT mode
Transmitters and receivers communicate via the Remote Control Unit RMU-01 connected to a network. One
RMU-01 unit can control up to 82 transmitters. The service area range is about 10 meters from the Remote
Control Unit RMU-01. Up to nine RMU-01 units can be used within a system, which allows expanding the
service area.
Notes
If at least one RMU-01 unit is connected to the system, remote control always operates in NT mode.
 Keep in mind that the internal 2.4 GHz antenna of the DWR-R01D ceases to operate in NT mode.
 The DWR-S01D does not support NT mode.

Operation from receiver and operation from computer
Transmitter monitoring can be controlled from a receiver or from a computer on which Wireless Studio is
installed.
Operation from receiver
Transmitter monitoring can be controlled while checking the transmitter settings on the receiver display.
When the DWR-S01D is mounted on a camcorder, operation from the camcorder menu screen is also
possible.
Note
Although the built-in 2.4 GHz antenna of the DWR-R01D will stop functioning in NT mode, remote control from
the DWR-R01D is still possible, without the use of a computer. (Operation in conjunction with a computer is
also possible.)
Operation from a computer
Transmitter monitoring can also be controlled from a Windows computer that has the Wireless Studio
application installed.
Up to 6 computers can be used in a single system.
Note
Transmitter monitoring control is also possible via a connected computer in ST mode (DWR-R01D only).
(Refer to Figures 3 and 4 in the “System configuration examples” section.)
Network System Configuration
57
Configuring a DWX System
gain, TX
Configuring a DWX System
System configuration examples
Configure the system while referring to the following examples.
Confi
Configuring an ST mode system
When operating from the receiver only

When operating from the receiver and a computer
One DWR-R01D or DWR-S01D unit

Notes
When
take t
 When
One DWR-R01D unit

Transmitters
Transmitters
Whe

One
DWR-R01D
DWR-R01D
or
Crossover cable
: WiDIF-HP
DWR-S01D
: Cross Remote
Figure 3
Figure 1
Note
When using the DWR-S01D, a configuration for operation from the
receiver is the only option.

Note
Use a crossover cable to connect the DWR-R01D to the
computer.
Note
Use a c

Multiple DWR-R01D or DWR-S01D units (2 to 3)
PC
Multiple DWR-R01D units (2 to 3)
Transmitters
Transmitters
DWR-S01D
DWR-R01D
DWR-R01D

Multip
or
Straight cable
or
or
Figure 2
Note
When using the DWR-S01D, a configuration for operation from the
receiver is the only option.
Hub
PC
Straight cable
(1 to 6)
Figure 4
Note
Use straight cables for all connections.
RM
Note
Use stra
58
Network System Configuration
Configuring an NT mode system
Notes
When determining the number of RMU-01 units to use, refer to the “Installation of Remote Control Unit RMU-01” (page 62) section and
take the coverage area of the RMU-01 into consideration.
 When supplying power to the RMU-01 via PoE, refer to the diagrams in the “Power supply (PoE) for RMU-01” section.

When operating from the receiver and a computer
One DWR-R01D unit

One DWR-R01D unit
Transmitters
Transmitters
RMU-01 (1 to 9)
RMU-01
DWR-R01D
DWR-R01D
Straight cable
Crossover cable
Hub
Figure 5
Straight cable
Note
Use a crossover cable to connect the DWR-R01D to the RMU-01.
PC
(1 to 6)
Straight cable
Figure 7
Note
Use straight cables for all connections.

Multiple DWR-R01D units (2 to 41)

Transmitters
Multiple DWR-R01D units (2 to 41)
DWR-R01D
DWR-R01D
Hub
Straight
cable
Straight cable
DWR-R01D
Straight cable
Straight cable
Transmitters
DWR-R01D
Straight cable Hub
Straight
cable
Straight cable
Straight cable
RMU-01 (1 to 9)
Figure 6
RMU-01 (1 to 9)
Note
Use straight cables for all connections.
PC
(1 to 6)
Figure 8
Note
Use straight cables for all connections.
Network System Configuration
59
Configuring a DWX System
When operating from the receiver only

Configuring a DWX System
Equipment Features
Insta
DWX Network Accessories
Computer requirements
Remote Control Unit RMU-01
This is a 2.4 GHz antenna designed specifically for Cross Remote
NT mode operation.
The computer on which to install Wireless Studio for use with the
DWX system must meet the following requirements.
Item
Operating system (OS)
CPU
RAM
Graphics card
Available hard disk space
Monitor resolution
Other
Condition
Windows XP (SP3 or later)
Windows Vista (SP1 or later)
Windows 7 (32 bit/64 bit)
1 GHz or better recommended
1 GB or more recommended
Video memory of 128 MB or greater recommended
1 GB or more
1024 × 768 pixels or better recommended
English-language display capability
100Base-TX LAN card
CD-ROM drive
Ethernet hub information




By connecting the unit and the DWR-R01D to a LAN, the
transmitter remote control range can be extended, and up to
82 transmitters can be controlled remotely.
Using multiple RMU-01 units to enlarge the service area is also
possible. Up to nine units can be used in one network system.
Power can be supplied either from the included AC adapter or
from a PoE hub supporting PoE (Power Over Ethernet) or a PoE
power supply.
Mounting to a microphone stand is possible.
Bottom side



 Hole for attaching the microphone stand
Can be attached to the microphone stand (PF 1/2-inch thread)
with this hole.
To attach an NS 5/8-inch or a W 3/8-inch microphone stand, use
the supplied screw adapter.
 AC adapter connector and POWER indicator
Connect the supplied AC adapter to the AC adapter connector
to supply power to this unit.
The POWER indicator lights up green while the power is supplied
from the AC power connector or the LAN connector.
For details on power supply to this unit, see “Power supply (PoE)
for RMU-01”.
 LAN connector (RJ-45)
This is a 100Base-TX/10Base-T connector for network connection.
Communication speed automatically changes according to the
connected device.
Connect to a receiver such as DWR-R01D, Windows PC, or hub.
When a PoE device including PoE hub is connected, the power is
supplied through this connector.
60
Network System Configuration
The RMU-01 supports PoE (Power over Ethernet).
When the RMU-01 is connected to the LAN using an IEEE802.3af
compliant PoE hub, the RMU-01 can be powered via the LAN
cable.
This sec
Cover
The inte
propag
and tra
establis
Note
The ma
the num
system.
The rad
meters,
01 units
should
What is PoE (Power over Ethernet)?
PoE allows powering a device over the Ethernet cables used in
a LAN. Because data and power are routed through a single
cable, installation of equipment is facilitated even in locations
where providing a conventional power supply would be difficult.
The RMU-01 can be powered from an IEEE802.3af compliant hub
with PoE support, or by connecting a PoE power supply between
a regular hub and the RMU-01.
LAN cable information
Use Category 5 or better LAN cable for connecting the RMU-01 or
DWR-R01D to the computer. The maximum allowable cable run is
100 meters. If longer cable runs are required, use a hub between
the computer and the RMU-01 or DWR-R01D.
Depending on the connection configuration, use the following
type of cable.
Direct connection to computer: Crossover cable
Connection via hub: Straight cable
When in
signal a
Installa
When tw
pack tra
is recom
body-pa
transmi
Installation of Remote Control Unit RMU-01
This section provides information about the coverage area, roaming times etc. when using the RMU-01 for wireless communication.
th the
Coverage area of Remote Control Unit RMU-01
Configuring a DWX System
The internal antenna of the RMU-01 emits a strong circular-pattern RF signal centered on the antenna axis. 2.4 GHz band radio wave
propagation is highly linear and not easily deflected. When people or objects are present in the path between the remote control unit
and transmitter, reception field strength may decrease drastically. Always try to install the RMU-01 so that a direct line of sight can be
established from the wireless microphone or transmitter.
Note
The maximum number of RMU-01 units in a single network system is nine, but increasing the number of RMU-01 units will not increase
the number of transmitters that can be used. Regardless of the number of RMU-01 units, the maximum number of transmitters is 82 per
system.
2.3af
AN
The radius of the area where RF signals are strong is about 10
meters, centered on the antenna. When using multiple RMU01 units to enlarge the coverage area, these concentric areas
should overlap.
Installation example 2 (plane view)
To increase the total operation area by putting the areas
that multiple RMU-01 units cover together, place them so that
the area that one RMU-01 covers touches those on others,
completely adjacent and with no gaps.
Antenna
(inside the casing)
ed in
gle
ions
ifficult.
nt hub
etween
U-01 or
e run is
etween
1) RMU-01
2) Transmitter
wing
1) Radius: approx. 10 m (33 feet)
2) Front side (the side with SONY logo)
When installing multiple RMU-01 units, place them so that strong
signal area touches that of adjacent RMU-01 unit.
Installation example 1 (plane view)
Installation example 3 (section view)
When two RMU-01 units are installed to control the bodypack transmitter that is worn around the waist of a person, it
is recommended that the RMU-01 units be placed across the
body-pack transmitter so that there is no obstacle between the
transmitter and at least one of the RMU-01 units.
This is an example when this unit is installed to the microphone
stand.
Indoors: Because the signal is reflected from the walls, floor, and
ceiling, there are no conditions for the installation height of
this unit.
Outdoors: Install this unit at the same height as the transmitters.
1) RMU-01
2) Transmitter worn around the waist of a person
1) RMU-01
2) Transmitter
3) Floor
Network System Configuration
61
Configuring a DWX System
Installation example 4 (section view)
Installation example 6 (plane view)
This is an example when this unit is installed on the wall.
Indoors: Because the signal is reflected from the walls, floor, and
ceiling, there are no conditions for the installation height of
this unit.
Outdoors: Install this unit at the same height as the transmitters.
If transmitters in locations such as the stage wings or mixing
booth are to be controlled in addition to the stage at a concert
venue, install RMU-01 units in the vicinity of these locations.
LAN c
Stage
1) RMU-01
2) Transmitter
3) Wall
4) Floor
Mixer booth
1) RMU-01
2) Transmitter
Installation example 5 (section view)
Roaming Times
This is an example when this unit is installed indoors, near the
ceiling.
When two or more RMU-01 units are installed to enlarge the
coverage area by overlap, and a transmitter moves out of
the service area of one RMU-01 unit, roaming occurs and the
connection switches to the other RMU-01 unit. The connection
interruption due to the roaming action will occur also if there are
no blanks, that is when the coverage area overlaps properly.
Also when the number of coverage area points has been
increased, a transmitter leaving the coverage area of one RMU01 and entering that of another, or re-entering the same RMU-01
coverage area will go through a roaming phase, and some time
will be required for reconnection.
The time required for roaming depends on the wireless
environment and the number of transmitters. It can range from
several seconds to several tens of seconds.
1) RMU-01
2) Transmitter
3) To make the most of the signal emission
characteristics, install facing the front side
(the side with SONY logo) downward.
4) Ceiling
5) Wall
6) Floor
When one transmitter performs roaming in a normal
communication environment
The number of operation channels does not significantly
change the roaming time.
 1-channel system: approx. 1 second
 82-channel system: approx. 1.5 seconds
When multiple transmitters are performing roaming

Number of coverage area points
The coverage area can be enlarged by installing multiple RMU01 units with overlapping coverage areas, but if the number of
locations to control is limited, it is not necessary that all areas
overlap each other.
Install RMU-01 units in the areas to be controlled, and increase
the number of coverage area points.
62
Network System Configuration
Netw

Time per unit x number of units (approximate calculation)
For example, when 50 transmitters are roaming
concurrently, all connections will be established after about
50 seconds. (In-house data)
Note
When there is a mix of ST mode and NT mode systems or when
there are multiple NT mode systems, the roaming time may
change, depending on the installation environment.
Power
g
oncert
.
Network Device Connections
This section describes which LAN cables to use and how to supply power (PoE) when connecting each device
in a network.
LAN cable information
Power supply (PoE) for Remote Control Unit RMU-01
The RMU-01 supports PoE (Power over Ethernet).
PoE allows powering a device over the Ethernet cables used in a LAN. Because data and power are
routed through a single cable, installation of equipment is facilitated even in locations where providing
a conventional power supply would be difficult. When an IEEE802.3af compliant hub with PoE support is
connected to the network, or when a PoE power supply is connected between the RMU-01 and a regular hub,
the RMU-01 can be powered without requiring another power source.
To supply power from the PoE hub
RMU-01
PC
PoE hub
e
f
the
tion
ere are
erly.
DWR-R01D
1) Straight cable
e RMUMU-01
me time
from
To supply power from the PoE power supply unit

When only one receiver (such as the DWR-R01D)
or the PC is connected to this unit and the
power is supplied to this unit from the PoE power
supply unit
RMU-01
PoE power
supply unit

When multiple devices including this unit
and the receivers are connected and the
power is supplied to this unit from the PoE
power supply unit
RMU-01
PoE power
supply unit
PC
Hub
ly
PoE power
supply unit
DWR-R01D
1) Cross cable
2) Straight cable
DWR-R01D
ation)
r about
or when
may
1) Straight cable
RMU-01
Notes
 The RMU-01 can also be powered from the supplied AC adapter.
 Be sure to use Category 5 or better LAN cable.
 The length of the LAN cable run between the RMU-01 and other equipment (PoE hub, receiver, etc.) should
not exceed 100 meters.
 If a PoE power supply without repeater capability is inserted between the RMU-01 and the target equipment
(DWR-R01D, hub etc.), the combined LAN cable run to the RMU-01 should not exceed 100 meters.
Network System Configuration
63
Configuring a DWX System
Use Category 5 or better LAN cable, and keep cable length under 100 meters. If cable runs of more than 100
meters are required, use a hub or other suitable equipment.
You can also use crossover cables for direct connections between the DWR-R01D, computer, or RMU-01,
without the use of a hub. For details, refer to Figures 3 and 5 in the “System configuration examples” section,
and to “To supply power from the PoE power supply unit” in the “Power supply (PoE) for RMU-01” section.
Configuring a DWX System
Making and Checking Network Settings
Follow the steps described below to make network settings and check the Cross Remote functions.
Step 1
Network setup
Step 2
Checking equipment
connections
Step 3
Checking for 2.4 GHz
interference
Step 4
Checking the monitor
function
Step 5
Checking the control
function
64
Making and Checking Network Settings
Specify the IP addresses and subnet masks of the devices connected to the network.
Verify that there are no IP address conflicts and that all devices connected to the network are
correctly installed and set up.
Use spectrum analyzer or WiFi analyzer application software to verify that there is no
interference in the frequency bands used for Cross Remote.
In a Cross Remote configuration, UHF reception forms parts of the network system. Use
Wireless Studio to check transmitter information received via WiDIF-HP and passed onto the
network.
While checking whether the obtained service area fulfills the requirements, determine the
installation location and number of RMU-01 units.
2.4 GH
2.4 GHz area operation check
Checking with the DWR-R01D display
Use the “Cross Remote” control condition indication to check whether the transmitter is in the 2.4 GHz area.
“Cross Remote” control
condition indication
Configuring a DWX System
re
“Cross Remote” control condition indication
e
Indicates the signal transmission condition of the “Cross Remote” control function (four levels).
: Good transmission
: Somewhat good transmission
: Somewhat poor transmission
: Poor transmission
: Unable to communicate with paired transmitter
When the “Cross Remote” control function is off, this indication does not appear.
Checking with Wireless Studio
Use the “Cross Remote” control condition display to check whether the transmitter is in the 2.4 GHz area.
“Cross Remote” control condition display
“Cross Remote” control condition display
Indicates the communication status of the paired transmitter according to four levels.
: Good transmission
: Somewhat good transmission
: Somewhat poor transmission
: Poor transmission
(red indication): Unable to communicate with paired transmitter
This icon does not appear when the “Cross Remote” function on the DWR-R01D is turned off.
Making and Checking Network Settings
65
Configuring a DWX System
Step 1 Network Setup
 Co
Specify the IP addresses and subnet masks of the devices connected to the network.
Network configuration
Configure a dedicated network for the DWX system, using 100Base-TX/10Base-T Ethernet equipment.
Do not use an existing network.
System precautions and limitations


Make sure that IP addresses of equipment do not conflict.
Operation is not guaranteed for connections utilizing wireless LAN access points.
IP address setup
IP addresses must be configured for the computer, DWR-R01D, and RMU-01.
The IP addresses should be unique within the same subnet.
The values for the first three sets of numbers are identical for IP addresses (XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX) within the
same subnet.
Example:
 For IP addresses in the same subnet
192.168.0.100 and 192.168.0.20
Values for first three sets of numbers are identical.

For IP addresses in different subnets
192.168.0.100 and 192.168.2.200
Values for first three sets of numbers are different.
If IP addresses within different subnets are configured for the devices, the devices will not communicate
properly even when connected to the same hub.
Configure identical values for the first three sets of numbers as follows, and configure a unique value
between 1 and 255 in the fourth set for each device.
Configuration example:
Computer: 192.168.0.10
DWR-R01D: 192.168.0.100
RMU-01:
192.168.0.200
Set the subnet mask to 255.255.255.0.
Note
The DWR-R01D and RMU-01 do not include a DHCP client function. Each device must have a fixed IP
address. If there is an IP address conflict due to identical addresses, the system will not operate properly.
Make sure that each device has a unique IP address.
66
Making and Checking Network Settings
 DW
 Computer network settings
Use the regular procedure for the respective operating system to set the IP address and subnet mask of the
computer.
PC network settings
The following procedure explains the setting operations using the Windows XP operating system.
* For details on how to make network settings with other operating systems, refer to the help of the operating system that you use.
Configuring a DWX System
1 Select “Start>Control Panel>Network and Internet Connections”.
2 Click “Network Connections”.
3 Right-click the local area connection icon and then click “Properties”.
4 Double-click “Internet Protocol 4 (TCP/IP)”.
The properties window of the local area connection opens up.
5 Double-click “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)”.
The internet protocol (TCP/IP) properties window opens up.
he
ate
6 Click “Use the following IP address”, and then enter the IP address in the IP address field.
Note
Make sure not to use an IP address that is already assigned to another device on the network.
7 Enter “255 255 255 0” into the Subnet Mask field.
8 Click “OK” to close the internet protocol (TCP/IP) properties window.
9 Click “Close” to close the local area connection properties window.
erly.
 DWR-R01D network settings
Configure the IP address and subnet mask for the DWR-R01D in the NETWORK submenu of the UTILITY menu.
Note
When IP address settings are changed, NT mode pairing settings are disabled. Perform the pairing process
again.
Making and Checking Network Settings
67
Configuring a DWX System
 RMU-01 network settings
Step
Install the setup tool supplied with the RMU-01 on the computer and make the RMU-01 network settings from
the computer.
Procedure
 Ch
Start the RMU-01 setup tool on the computer.
Click the [Search Devices] button.
Note
On some computers equipped with multiple LAN ports (either wired or wireless), the RMU-01 units connected
to the LAN will not be detected even after you click the [Search Devices] button. In such cases, temporarily
disable all ports including those for LAN and IEEE1394 connections via [Network Connections] on the operating
system, and enable only the port to which the RMU-01 is connected. Then, restart the RMU-01 setup tool and
perform auto detection again.
RMU-01 devices present on the network are detected, and information about them is displayed.
Select the device for which to make the setting, and click the [Setting] button.
Specify the device name, IP address, and subnet mask.
Set the first three fields to the same values for each device.
Use a unique value for the fourth field only.
Specify a different segment from
other wireless networks in the vicinity.
Set to 255.255.255.0
Select the model number of the transmitter to be controlled
from the RMU-01 in [Target TX].
The optimal remote control channel will be selected based
on the specified transmitter and appear in [Remote CH].
You can select [Custom] to freely select the remote control
channel. If radio interference exists between the RMU-01
remote control and other systems such as wireless LAN,
you may be able to avoid the interference by selecting the
remote control channel with [Custom] enabled.
Notes
When [Custom] is selected, the automatic selection of the optimal remote control channel for the
transmitter will be ignored. In such cases, signals from the transmitter may affect remote control. Be sure to
verify operation before beginning actual use.
 Depending on the operating environment of your computer, certain operations may be blocked by the
firewall or security filter after startup of the RMU-01 setup tool. If LAN communication that is necessary for
operation in NT mode is blocked, the system will not operate properly. Therefore, configure the firewall or
security filter to allow RMU-01 setup tool operations.

68
Making and Checking Network Settings
Step 2 Checking Equipment Connections
rom
Verify that all devices connected to the network are correctly installed and set up.
 Checking the remote mode
The display of the DWR-R01D can be used to check whether the receiver currently operates in ST mode or NT
mode.
Configuring a DWX System
To show the remote mode on the display, press the RF REMOTE button on the front panel.
cted
arily
perating
and
RF REMOTE menu button
Remote mode indication
Remote mode indication
Display whether the receiver is operating in the ST mode or NT mode. (The mode can only be displayed.)
NT: The receiver has recognized the RMU-01 unit and is operating in NT mode.
ST: The receiver is operating in ST mode.
SEARCH: The receiver is searching for the remote mode state.
ed
d
ol
e
ure to
he
or
or
Making and Checking Network Settings
69
Configuring a DWX System
 Checking the equipment count
Step
Use Wireless Studio to check the type and number of devices connected to the network.
If there are IP address conflicts such as address duplication, the actual number of devices and the number
shown in Wireless Studio will not match.
Procedure
Power up all devices and set Wireless Studio to the online condition. A list of all devices on the network will
be shown.
In cases such as the following, the actual number of devices and the devices shown in the device list
will not match: IP address conflicts, IP address settings with overlapping subnet masks, Ethernet cable
disconnection, device not powered up, etc.
Check the number of DWR-R01D and RMU-01 units in the device list.
Step
Device List window
IP address conflict between DWR-R01D units
The receiver section of the device list will only shown one DWR-R01D unit, so that the count does not match
the actual number of units.
IP address conflict between RMU-01 units
The RMU section of the device list will only shown one RMU-01 unit, so that the count does not match the
actual number of units.
IP address conflict between DWR-R01D and DWR-R01D units
The device list will only shown one device, either in the receiver section or the RMU, so that the count does
not match the actual number of units.
IP address conflict between computer and DWR-R01D, or computer and RMU-01
Wireless Studio cannot be set to the online condition, or the device list does not show the DWR-R01D or RMU01, so that the count does not match the actual number of units.
IP address conflict between computers
When the operating system detects an IP address conflict, an alert message will appear on one or both of
the computers.
 IP address re-assignment
Check the settings including those for other LANs and network connections as well as the settings within the
same subnet, and verify that there are no IP address conflicts, IP address settings with overlapping subnet
masks, or other problems. If necessary, re-assign IP addresses to the computer, DWR-R01D, and RMU-01 units,
as described in “IP address setup” (page 67).
Note
Wireless Studio identifies the DWR-R01D and RMU-01 by IP address. The DWM-01/DWT-B01 are mutually identified
by the DWR-R01D and MAC address. In order to allow later reloading and complete restoring of setting
information saved in Wireless Studio, all equipment must be the same, and IP address settings also must
match.
70
Making and Checking Network Settings
Step
Step 3 Checking for 2.4 GHz Interference
ber
k will
Procedure
 Power down all DWX equipment so that no RF signals in the 2.4 GHz band are emitted by the DWX
system.
 Use a spectrum analyzer or WiFi spectrum analysis application for PC, smart phone, or tablet PC to verify
that there is no interference in the 802.11.4 band on channel 14 (2.420 GHz), channel 19 (2.445 GHz),
and channel 24 (2.470 GHz).
 If there is interference, increase the distance between the system and interference sources, stop
operation of the interference sources or move these to another frequency, to eliminate the interference.
Caution
The W-DMX wireless remote control system for lighting equipment and similar systems also may use the
2.4 GHz band. Pay special attention to such devices.
Note
If radio interference between wireless LAN or other systems cannot be avoided otherwise, you may be
able to avoid interference by selecting the remote control channel with [Custom] enabled in [Setting] of
the RMU-01 setup tool. When [Custom] is selected, the automatic selection of the optimal remote control
channel for the transmitter will be ignored. In such cases, signals from the transmitter may affect remote
control. Be sure to verify operation before beginning actual use.
Step 4 Checking the Monitor Function
In a Cross Remote configuration, UHF reception forms parts of the network system. Use Wireless Studio to check
transmitter information received via WiDIF-HP and passed onto the network.
Procedure
 Make suitable settings for frequency, security mode etc. so that the transmitter WiDIF-HP information can
be received by the receiver.
match
 Check the status of received transmitters using the display on the receiver.
 Check the status of received transmitters using the Wireless Studio screen.
the
If the transmitter status cannot be checked even if reception has been set up properly, there may be a
problem with the UHF service area.
Return to the channel plan selection and RF level setting stage, and establish other suitable settings.
does
Step 5 Checking the Control Function
or RMU-
oth of
the
et
units,
entified
While checking whether the obtained service area fulfills the requirements, determine the installation location
and number of RMU-01 units.
Procedure
 Perform transmitter and receiver pairing and set the control function to ON.
 Have a person wear the transmitter as for actual operation and move throughout the service area, to
check conditions at various locations.
Points to check
 “Cross Remote” control condition is not interrupted
 Control function is operative
 If the obtained service area does not fulfill the requirements, change the installation location and
number of RMU-01 units to increase the RF reception level, and check the service area again.
Increasing the RF reception level
Change the antenna installation position, aiming for
 close proximity to service area
 line of sight to transmitters
 position overlooking service area
Increasing RMU-01 unit count: Up to 9 units are supported
Making and Checking Network Settings
71
Configuring a DWX System
t
e
Verify that there is no interference in the frequency bands used for Cross Remote.
Configuring a DWX System
Step 4
Flowchart
Step 1 Network setup
 to  Establish network settings for
each device
Step 2 Checking equipment connections
 Check mode
 Check equipment count
Step 5
 Check and re-assign IP addresses
Does number of
devices shown in Wireless
Studio match actual
number of
devices?
No
Yes
Step 3 Checking for 2.4 GHz interference
 Power down all equipment
 Check for interference in 2.4 GHz
band
 Take measures against interference
1. Increase distance between
interference source and RMU-01
2. Eliminate interference source
No interference
in channels 14, 19, and 24?
Yes
72
Making and Checking Network Settings
No
Step 4 Checking the monitor function
 Power up all equipment and make
WiDIF-HP reception settings
 Check monitor function at receiver
and computer
No
Configuring a DWX System
Does status monitoring
work in all channels?
Repeat RF level setting (see page 45)
Yes
Step 5 Checking the control function
 Perform pairing
 Check control function service area
 Re-assess 2.4 GHz service area
1. Change RMU-01 unit location
2. Increase RMU-01 unit count
Desired service area achieved?
No
Yes
Setup procedure is complete.
Making and Checking Network Settings
73
Sample System Configaration
Sample Minimum System Configuration (2 channels)
Samp
The Digital Wireless Transmitter DWT-B01 and the Digital Wireless Receiver DWR-S01D are used in a one-on-one
configuration.
Cross Remote via
internal 2.4 GHz
DWR-R01D
Transmitters
Sample Small-Scale System Configuration Using Remote Control Unit RMU-01 (7 – 16 channels)
Transmitters1)
UHF antennas
RMU-012)
DWR-R01D3)
PoE
Mixer of I/O box
PoE
To a wall outlet
Hub
PC
1) When 41 DWR-R01D units are used, up to 82 transmitters can be used.
2) Up to nine RMU-01 units can be installed to expand the NT mode operation area.
3) Up to 41 DWR-R01D units can be used by incorporating optional WD-850.
74
Making and Checking Network Settings
Sample Medium-Scale System Configuration Using Antenna Divider WD-850 (17 channels or more)
n-one
Transmitters
RMU-01
Sample System Configaration
RMU-01
UHF antenna
nels)
50-ohm terminator
50-ohm terminator
50-ohm
terminator
To AC power
source
To AC power
source
DWR-R01D
(Total eight units)
To AC power
source
DWR-R01D
(Total eight units)
RMU-01
PoE
PoE
PoE
Hub
PC
Making and Checking Network Settings
75
Sample System Configaration
Re
Sample Maximum System Configuration (82 channels)
List o
Transmitters
UHF antenna
WD-850
Network connections are not illustrated here.
76
Making and Checking Network Settings
WD-850
References
* December, 2010
List of Supported Frequencies
Because there are no dedicated frequency bands for wireless use in North America and Europe, empty TV
channels in the UHF band are used for wireless microphone operation. The bandwidth of one TV channel is
6 MHz in the US and 8 MHz in the EU.
TX
RX
UHF
ACC
DWM-01/F31
DWM-01/C31
DWT-B01/E
DWT-P01/E
DWR-R01D
DWR-S01D
AN-01
AN-820A
WD-850
EU
EU
EU
EU
EU
EU
SYM
L
M
H
F1
799.875
793.875
787.875
781.875
775.875
769.875
763.875
757.875
751.875
745.875
739.875
733.875
727.875
721.875
715.875
709.875
703.875
697.875
691.875
685.875
679.875
673.875
667.875
661.875
655.875
649.875
643.875
637.875
631.875
625.875
619.875
613.875
607.875
601.875
595.875
589.875
583.875
577.875
571.875
565.875
559.875
553.875
547.875
541.875
535.875
529.875
523.875
517.875
511.875
505.875
499.875
493.875
487.875
481.875
805.875
800.125
794.125
788.125
782.125
776.125
770.125
764.125
758.125
752.125
746.125
740.125
734.125
728.125
722.125
716.125
710.125
704.125
698.125
692.125
686.125
680.125
674.125
668.125
662.125
656.125
650.125
644.125
638.125
632.125
626.125
620.125
614.125
608.125
602.125
596.125
590.125
584.125
578.125
572.125
566.125
560.125
554.125
548.125
542.125
536.125
530.125
524.125
518.125
512.125
506.125
500.125
494.125
488.125
482.125
476.125
470.125
475.875
50-51
470-542MHz
566-662MHz
638-758MHz
470-862MHz
- 846.000
- 854.000
- 862.000
854.025
- 838.000
846.025
- 830.000
830.025
838.025
- 822.000
790.025
822.025
- 790.000
782.025
814.025
- 782.000
774.025
- 814.000
- 774.000
766.025
806.025
- 766.000
758.025
- 806.000
- 758.000
750.025
798.025
- 750.000
742.025
798.000
- 742.000
- 662.000
654.025
42-50ch
42-50ch
42-50ch
42-50ch
734.025
- 654.000
646.025
- 734.000
- 646.000
638.025
726.025
- 638.000
630.025
- 726.000
- 630.000
622.025
718.025
- 622.000
614.025
- 718.000
- 614.000
606.025
710.025
- 606.000
598.025
- 710.000
- 598.000
590.025
702.025
- 590.000
582.025
- 702.000
- 582.000
574.025
694.025
- 574.000
566.025
- 694.000
- 566.000
558.025
686.025
- 558.000
550.025
- 686.000
- 550.000
542.025
678.025
- 542.000
534.025
- 678.000
- 534.000
526.025
670.025
- 526.000
518.025
33-40ch
33-35ch
38-40ch
- 670.000
- 518.000
510.025
33-40ch
33-40ch
33-40ch
33-40ch
662.025
502.025
510.000
- 502.000
494.025
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69
- 494.000
Frequency
EU Countries
38-41ch 42-45ch 46-49ch
470-862MHz
SYM
LL
L
M
F1
CH
42-51c h
30-33ch 34-36
486.025
WD-850
30-41ch
14-25c h
US 14-17ch 18-21ch 22-25ch
US
- 486.000
AN-820A
US
42-51c h
42-51ch
42-51ch
42-51c h
30-41ch
30-41ch
30-41ch
30-41ch
478.025
UHF
ACC
14-25c h
14-25ch
14-25ch
14-25c h
US
US
US
References
RX
DWM-01/F31
DWM-01/C31
DWT-B01/E
DWT-P01/E
DWR-R01D
DWR-S01D
AN-01
- 478.000
TX
470.025
US/Canada
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69
Frequency
As of December 2010 (including planned use)
CH
62-69ch
62-69ch
62-69ch
62-69ch
51-59ch
51-59ch
51-59ch
51-59ch
62-69ch
62-64ch
42-50ch
51-59ch
42-44ch 45-47ch 48-50ch 51-53ch 54-56ch 57-59ch
67-69ch
470-862MHz
566-662MHz
638-758MHz
758-862MHz
470-862MHz
Standard model
Made-to-order model
Modifiable model
In Japan, since the revision of the Radio Law in May 2009, the entire FPU band has become available for digital
wireless use. The FPU Channel 1 Band and FPU Channel 3 Band which cannot be used for analog wireless
systems are now being used for digital systems. By using the entire A band and B band, up to 82 channels can
be operated simultaneously in a digital wireless system.
The DWX series covers the entire range from the A band (FPU channels 1-4) to the B band with a single device,
available as an AB model that allows simultaneous operation of up to 82 channels and a B model that allows
unlicensed operation.
TX
DWM-01/F31
J
DWM-01/C31
J
DWT-B01/E
J
DWR-R01D
J
DWR-S01D
J
UHF
ACC
SYM
J
J
J
J
B
806.13
-
797.125
809.88
FPU -
FPU -
779.125
788.125
-
AB
B
AB
B
AB
B
AB
B
RX
AN-01
AN-820
AN-57M
WB-850
WD-850
770.125
Frequency
Japan
FPU -
FPU -
As of December 2010 (including planned use)
CH
AB
B
470-862MHz
770-810MHz
770-822MHz
770-810MHz
770-810MHz
Standard model
Made-to-order model
Modifiable model
Making and Checking Network Settings
77
References
Equipment Specifications
Digit
Design and specifications are subject to change without notice.
Digital Wireless Microphone/Digital Wireless Transmitter
DWM-01/F31
Transmitter section
Wireless interface
Oscillator type
Carrier frequencies
Channel step
RF power output
Antenna type
Occupied RF bandwidth
Frequency tolerance
Type of emission
Modulation principle
Audio section
Microphone type
Maximum input level
WiDIF-HP
Quartz PLL synthesizer
See frequency information below.
See frequency information below.
50 mW/10 mW/1 mW, switchable
Helical antenna
192 kHz or less
±6.5 ppm
G1E or G1D
π/4 Shift QPSK
SPL
Mic level
Line level
Voice attenuator
Microphone input connector
Input impedance
Frequency response
S/N ratio
Dynamic range
THD
Audio latency
Network section
Wireless remote control
General
Operating voltage
Battery life
Operating temperature
Storage temperature
Dimensions
Mass
Supplied accessories
DWT-B01/E
DWT-P01/E
/4 flexible wire
Helical antenna
WORD SYN
Electret condenser Unidirectional (cardioid)
—
—
—
—
–22 dBu (with 0 dB attenuation)
+24 dB
0 to 21 dB (3-dB steps)
0 to 48 dB (3-dB steps, for microphone level input only)
—
SMC9-4S (female)
XLR-3-11C (female)
—
4.7 kilohms or more
60 Hz to 18,000 Hz
60 Hz to 20,000 Hz
20 Hz to 22,000 Hz
70 dB or more (A-weighted, 94 dBSPL, 1 kHz) 66 dB or more (A-weighted, 94 dBSPL, 1 kHz)
—
—
106 dB or more (A-weighted)
—
0.03% or less
1.5 msec
Cross Remote (2.4 G Hz band, IEEE802.15.4 compliant)
3.0 V DC, with two LR6 (AA) batteries
Continuous operating time 5 hours (Ambient temperature 25 °C, using Sony LR6 AA-size alkaline batteries, 10 mW output, wireless remote control off, DIMMER MODE set to AUTO OFF)
0 °C to 50 °C
–20 °C to +60 °C
Approx. 63 × 73 × 17 mm
Approx. 44 × 78 × 44 mm
(excl. antenna and other protruding parts)
dia. 47.6 × 257 mm (Diameter × Length)
dia. 47.6 × 249 mm (Diameter × Length)
(excl. protruding parts) (W × H × D)
Approx. 63 × 188 × 17 mm
(excl. protruding parts) (W × H × D)
Approx. 323 g (incl. batteries)
Approx. 298 g (incl. batteries)
Approx. 125 g (incl. batteries)
Approx. 245 g (incl. batteries)
Lavalier microphone (with wind screen and
horizontal clip) (1), Spare battery case (1),
Spare battery case (1), Soft case (1), USB
Soft case (1), Microphone cable (4-pin to
Identification ring (1 set), Microphone holder (1), USB adapter cable (1), USB cable (1),
adapter cable (1), USB cable (1), Warranty
XLR type) (1), USB adapter cable (1), USB
Carrying case (1), Warranty Card (1), Operating Instructions (1), CD-ROM (1)
Card (1)
cable (1), Warranty Card (1), Operating
Instructions (1)
Making and Checking Network Settings
ANALOG OU
DIGITAL OU
Dynamic unidirectional (super cardioid)
151 dBSPL (with 21 dB attenuation)
DWM-01/F31, DWM-01/C31, DWT-B01/E, DWT-P01/E
Carrier frequencies and channel steps
Model No. Frequency band Frequency
TV14-17
470.125 – 493.875 MHz
U1424
TV18-21
494.125 – 517.875 MHz
TV22-25
518.125 – 541.875 MHz
TV30-33
566.125 – 589.875 MHz
US models
TV34-36
590.125 – 607.875 MHz
Channel step: U3040
TV37
Not available
125 kHz
TV38-41
614.125 – 637.875 MHz
TV42-45
638.125 – 661.875 MHz
U4250
TV46-49
662.125 – 685.875 MHz
TV50-51
686.125 – 697.875 MHz
Model No. Frequency band Frequency
TV33-35
566.025 – 590.000 MHz
CE3338
TV36-37
590.025 – 606.000 MHz
TV38-40
606.025 – 630.000 MHz
TV42-44
638.025 – 662.000 MHz
CE4248
TV45-47
662.025 – 686.000 MHz
European
TV48-50
686.025 – 710.000 MHz
models
Channel step:
TV51-53
710.025 – 734.000 MHz
25 kHz
CE5157
TV54-56
734.025 – 758.000 MHz
TV57-59
758.025 – 782.000 MHz
TV62-64
798.025 – 822.000 MHz
CE6267
TV65-66
Not available
TV67-69
838.025 – 862.000 MHz
78
DWM-01/C31
Tuner sectio
Wireless int
Type of rece
Circuit syste
Carrier freq
Channel ste
Oscillator ty
ANTENNA a
ANTENNA a
Sensitivity
Audio secti
External WO
Reference
output leve
(0 dBu =
0.775 Vrms
Dynamic ra
THD
Audio laten
Network se
Wireless re
LAN (10/10
General
Operating v
Power cons
consumptio
Operating t
Storage tem
Dimensions
Mass
Supplied ac
DWR-R01
Carrier fr
Group/channel (factory setting)
00 1801 494.125 MHz
US models
Channel ste
125 kHz
00 3001 566.125 MHz
00 4201 638.125 MHz
Group/channel (factory setting)
00 3301 566.125 MHz
00 4201 638.125 MHz
00 5101 710.125 MHz
00 6201 798.125 MHz
European
models
Channel ste
25 kHz
Digital Wireless Receiver
DWR-R01D
Tuner section
Wireless interface
Type of reception
Circuit system
Carrier frequencies
Channel step
Oscillator type
ANTENNA a/b IN connector
ANTENNA a/b OUT connector
Sensitivity
Audio section
Digital Wireless Adapter
DWA-01D
DWR-S01D
WiDIF-HP
Space diversity
Double superheterodyne
See frequency information below.
See frequency information below.
Quartz PLL synthesizer
BNC-R, 50 ohms (2)
BNC-R, 50 ohms (2)
—
20 dBμ or lower (bit error rate 1 × 10-5, no S/N degradation)
Dynamic range
THD
Audio latency
OFF)
Analog output
Digital output
Network section
Wireless remote control
LAN (10/100) port
General
Operating voltage
Power consumption/Current
consumption
Operating temperature
Storage temperature
Dimensions (W × H × D)
D)
1), USB
Warranty
Mass
Supplied accessories
106 dB or more (A-weighted)
0.03% or less
1.9 msec
1.9 msec
WORD SYNC input
Monitor output
Monitor output level
General
Power requirements
12 V DC
Remote Control Unit
D-sub 15-pin connector (female)
×1
–40 dBu
—
–36 dBFs/–20 dBFs, switchable
2.1 msec
RMU-01
Network section
Radio system
Frequency range of transmission/reception
Antenna gain
RF power output
Remote control distance
LAN transmission speed
LAN connector
Connectors
AC adapter connector
Supply voltage
Current consumption
100 V/120 V AC, switchable
7 V DC
22 W
500 mA or less (at 7 V DC)
0 °C to 50 °C
–20 °C to +60 °C
Approx. 88 × 119 × 31 mm (excl.
antenna and other protruding
parts)
Approx. 88 × 204 × 31 mm (excl.
protruding parts)
Approx. 4.1 kg
Approx. 280 g
(incl. supplied antenna)
(incl. supplied antenna)
Helical antenna (2), Whip
Whip antenna (2), Antenna
antenna (2), USB adapter cable
mount with BNC connector (2),
(1), USB cable (1), Warranty Card
AC power cord (1), Foot (4),
Operating Instructions booklet (1), (1), Operating Instructions (1),
PC control software (CD-ROM) (1) CD-ROM (1)
Approx. 482 × 44 × 335 mm
Group/channel (factory setting)
00 1801 494.125 MHz
00 3001 566.125 MHz
00 4201 638.125 MHz
Conforms to IEEE802.15.4
2.405 GHz to 2.480 GHz
2 dBi
1 mW
10 m (33 feet) at maximum (per unit)
10M/100Mbps (automatic detection)
RJ45-type, 8-pin (accepts PoE power)
EIAJ-type4
General
PoE power reception
Cross Remote (2.4 G Hz band, IEEE802.15.4 compliant)
RJ-45 modular jack (1)
—
DWR-R01D
Carrier frequencies and channel steps
Model No. Frequency band Frequency
TV14-17
470.125 – 493.875 MHz
U1424
TV18-21
494.125 – 517.875 MHz
TV22-25
518.125 – 541.875 MHz
TV30-33
566.125 – 589.875 MHz
US models
TV34-36
590.125 – 607.875 MHz
Channel step: U3040
TV37
Not available
125 kHz
TV38-41
614.125 – 637.875 MHz
TV42-45
638.125 – 661.875 MHz
U4250
TV46-49
662.125 – 685.875 MHz
TV50-51
686.125 – 697.875 MHz
Model No. Frequency band Frequency
TV33-35
566.025 – 590.000 MHz
CE3338
TV36-37
590.025 – 606.000 MHz
TV38-40
606.025 – 630.000 MHz
TV42-44
638.025 – 662.000 MHz
CE4248
TV45-47
662.025 – 686.000 MHz
European
TV48-50
686.025 – 710.000 MHz
models
Channel step:
TV51-53
710.025 – 734.000 MHz
25 kHz
CE5157
TV54-56
734.025 – 758.000 MHz
TV57-59
758.025 – 782.000 MHz
TV62-64
798.025 – 822.000 MHz
CE6267
TV65-66
Not available
TV67-69
838.025 – 862.000 MHz
SMC9-4S (female) (OUTPUT1/OUTPUT2)
150 ohms or less
110 ohms
BNC-R, 75 ohms (when the DWRS01D is attached to the adapter
and 75-ohm termination is added)
3.5 mm TRS jack
50 mW (16-ohm load, at T.H.D = 1%)
References
XLR-3-32 type, 47 ohms or
lower (2)
XLR-3-32 type, 110 ohms (2)
DIGITAL OUT connectors
BNC-R, 75 ohms (1)
BNC-R (1 each for input/output)
WORD SYNC IN/OUT connector
With 75-ohm terminator switch
External WORD SYNC
32 Hz to 96 Hz
Mic level –58 dBu
Reference
Analog
output level
Line level –12 dBu
(0 dBu =
–36 dBFs
0.775 Vrms) Digital
ANALOG OUT connector
Audio section
Audio output connector
Analog output impedance
AES/EBU output impedance
Operation
temperature
Storage temperature
Dimensions (W × H × D)
Mass
Supplied accessories
When the PoE device is used
When the AC adapter is used
When the PoE device is used
When the AC adapter is used
When the PoE device is used
When the AC adapter is used
Conforms to IEEE802.3af (supports mode A and B)
48 V DC
12 V DC
50 mA or less
100 mA or less
0 °C to 50 °C (32 °F to 122 °F)
0 °C to 45 °C (32 °F to 113 °F)
–20 °C to 60 °C (–4 °F to 140 °F)
107 × 151 × 30 mm (4 1/4 × 6 × 1 3/16 inch)
300 g (10.5 oz)
AC adapter (1), Bracket (2), Stand adapter (2),
Screws (1 set), Safety wire (1), Operating
Instructions (1), CD-ROM (1), Warranty booklet (1)
DWR-S01D
Carrier frequencies and channel steps
Model No. Frequency band Frequency
U1820
TV18-21
494.125 – 517.875 MHz
US models
TV30-33
566.125 – 589.875 MHz
Channel step: U3032
125 kHz
U4244
TV42-45
638.125 – 661.875 MHz
Model No. Frequency band Frequency
CE38
TV38-40
606.025 – 630.000 MHz
European
CE42
TV42-44
638.025 – 662.000 MHz
models
CE51
TV51-53
710.025 – 734.000 MHz
Channel step:
CE62
TV62-64
798.025 – 822.000 MHz
25 kHz
CE67
TV67-69
838.025 – 862.000 MHz
Group/channel (factory setting)
00 1801 494.125 MHz
00 3001 566.125 MHz
00 4201 638.125 MHz
Group/channel (factory setting)
00 3801 606.125 MHz
00 4201 638.125 MHz
00 5101 710.125 MHz
00 6201 798.125 MHz
00 6701 838.125 MHz
Group/channel (factory setting)
00 3301 566.125 MHz
00 4201 638.125 MHz
00 5101 710.125 MHz
00 6201 798.125 MHz
Making and Checking Network Settings
79
References
UHF Accessories
AN-01
Antenna section
Booster section
Inputs/Outputs
General
M
Directivity
Antenna type
Frequency bands
Antenna gain:
VSWR
Half-power angle
FB ratio
Frequency bands
Unidirectional
log periodic dipole array
470 – 862 MHz
5 dBi or more
2.5 or less
Within 150 degrees
12 dB or more
470 – 862 MHz
Booster gain
18 ±2 dB, 10 ±2 dB, 0 +0/–2 dB (switchable)
VSWR
Noise factor
Third-order intermodulation
3.0 or less
6 dB or less
60 dB or more (95 dBμVEMF input)
—
—
—
470 – 542 MHz 556 – 662 MHz 638 – 758 MHz
18 +12 dB (with 12 V DC)
10 ±12 dB (with 9 V DC)
3.0 or less
4 dB or less
60 dB or more (85 dBμVEMF input)
Operating voltage
9 V/12 V DC
9 V/12 V DC
Current consumption
Antenna input
Antenna output
Cascaded output
Operating temperature
Storage temperature
100 mA or less
50 mA or less
Dimensions (W × H × D)
Mass
Supplied
accessories
AN-820A
LL
L
Horizontal omnidirectional
Dipole
470 – 542 MHz 556 – 662 MHz
(0 dB)
—
0 to 50 °C
–20 to +60 °C
Approx. 343 × 341 × 36 mm
(excl. microphone stand mounting pole/grip)
Approx. 530 g
Microphone stand mounting pole/grip (1 set)
Stand adapter
PF1/2-W5/8 type (1)
PF1/2-W3/8 type (1)
Operating Instructions (1)
Warranty Card (1)
WD-850
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
758 – 862 MHz
758 – 862 MHz
770 – 810 MHz
—
—
—
—
Approx. 270 g
100 V AC, 50/60 Hz
12 V/9 V DC/OFF, switchable
Approx. 14 W (Rated output current 100 mA)
BNC-R × 4 (2 connectors × 2 inputs), 50 ohms
BNC-R × 8 (2 connectors × 4 outputs), 50 ohms
BNC-R × 2 (2 connectors × 1 output), 50 ohms
0 to 50 °C
–20 to +60 °C
Approx. 482 × 44 × 300 mm (excl. protruding
parts)
Approx. 4.6 kg
Power utility box mounting attachment (1), Wall mounting attachment
(1), Microphone stand mounting adapter (PF 1/2 screw) (1), Mounting
screws (1 set), Operating Instructions (1), Warranty Card (1)
AC power cord (1), 50-ohm terminator (6),
3P-2P adapter (1), Operating Instructions (1),
Warranty Card (1)
—
BNC-R, 50 ohms
638 – 758 MHz
H
—
BNC-R, 50 ohms
—
0 to 50 °C
–20 to +60 °C
Approx. 70 × 117 × 132 mm
Note
Old AN-820A’s are not suitable for to use with DWR-R01D 12V DC power setting. Damage will occur to old AN-820A’s if the DWR-R01D is set
to 12V.
80
Making and Checking Network Settings
References
00 mA)
50 ohms
, 50 ohms
50 ohms
otruding
r (6),
ons (1),
D is set
Making and Checking Network Settings
81
Distributed by
DWX_SI guide_v1
Making and Checking Network Settings
©2011 Sony Corporation. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Features, design and specifications are subject to change without notice.
The values for mass and dimension are approximate.
“Sony”, “make.believe”, “DWX”, “WiDIF” and “Cross Remote” are trademarks
of Sony Corporation.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Sony group has acquired a globally
integrated ISO 14001 certification. For
details on scope of certification, please
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