FESA - HPE Support Center

FESA - HPE Support Center
Fast Ethernet Adapter
Installation and
Support Guide
Abstract
This guide provides step-by-step procedures for installing, replacing and relocating
Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapters on HP NonStop™ S-series servers. This guide is
intended for anyone who installs or maintains FESAs on NonStop S-series servers.
Product Version
N.A.
Supported Release Version Updates (RVUs)
This guide supports G06.20 and all subsequent G-series RVUs until otherwise
indicated in a new edition.
Part Number
Published
425685-003
August 2010
Document History
Part Number
Product Version
Published
140977
N.A.
August 1998
425685-001
N.A.
May 2000
425685-002
N.A.
May 2003
425685-003
N.A.
August 2010
Fast Ethernet Adapter
Installation and Support Guide
Glossary
Index
Examples
What’s New in This Guide vii
Manual Information vii
HP Encourages Your Comments
Figures
Tables
ix
About This Guide xi
Who Should Use This Guide xi
What’s in This Guide xi
Where to Get More Information xii
Notation Conventions xiii
1. Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA)
Overview of the FESA 1-2
FESA Features 1-2
External Connectors and Indicators 1-2
FESA System Connections 1-4
Data Transfer Interface (ServerNet) 1-5
Diagnostic Subsystem Interface (Serial Maintenance Bus)
Power Interface 1-6
Relationship to the SLSA Subsystem 1-6
Accessing an FESA through the SLSA Subsystem 1-6
Manufacturing Naming Conventions 1-9
2. Installing a New FESA
Prepare to Install a New FESA 2-2
Plan the Local Area Network (LAN) 2-2
Complete the Configuration Form 2-3
Gather the Proper Tools 2-7
Review Standard Operating Practices 2-7
Install the New FESA 2-8
Unpack and Install the New FESA 2-8
Check the Installation of the New FESA 2-14
Add and Start the FESA Using SCF 2-16
Hewlett-Packard Company—425685-003
i
1-5
3. Replacing an FESA
Contents
3. Replacing an FESA
Prepare to Replace an FESA 3-2
Gather the Proper Tools 3-2
Print the FESA Planning Worksheet 3-4
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet Wide Area Network (SWAN)
Using the FESA 3-5
Redirect or Stop Any Customer Applications Using the FESA 3-11
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN Concentrator Line Using the
FESA 3-11
Determine the Physical Location of the FESA 3-16
Abort the FESA 3-17
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the FESA 3-18
Replace the FESA 3-20
Review Standard Operating Practices 3-20
Remove the Adapter 3-22
Inspect the New FESA and Backplane 3-24
Unpack and Install the New FESA 3-24
Check the Installation of the New FESA 3-28
Resume Operations 3-30
Start the New FESA 3-30
Restart the Communications Lines 3-33
Verify that the Communications Lines are Restarted 3-34
Resume Customer Applications 3-39
4. Relocating an FESA
Prepare to Relocate an FESA 4-2
Gather the Proper Tools 4-2
Print the FESA Planning Worksheet 4-4
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet Wide Area Network (SWAN)
Using the FESA 4-5
Redirect or Stop Any Customer Applications Using the FESA 4-11
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN Concentrator Line Using the
FESA 4-11
Determine the Physical Location of the FESA 4-16
Stop the FESA 4-17
Locate the New Slot 4-19
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the FESA 4-19
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
ii
4. Relocating an FESA (continued)
Contents
4. Relocating an FESA (continued)
Remove and Install the FESA 4-21
Review Standard Operating Practices 4-21
Remove and Install the Adapter 4-23
Check the Installation of the FESA 4-28
Resume Operations 4-30
Complete the Configuration Form 4-30
Add the FESA Using SCF 4-33
A. FESA Configuration Form
B. Preparing an FESA for PMF or IOMF CRU Replacement
Safety and Compliance
Glossary
Index
Examples
Example 2-1.
Example 3-1.
Example 3-2.
Example 3-3.
Example 3-4.
Example 3-5.
Example 3-6.
Example 3-7.
Example 3-8.
Example 3-9.
Example 3-10.
Example 3-11.
Example 3-12.
Example 3-13.
Example 3-14.
Example 3-15.
Example 3-16.
Example 3-17.
Example 3-18.
Example 3-19.
SCF STATUS Commands 2-17
SCF INFO LIF Command 3-5
SCF INFO SUBNET Command, NonStop TCP/IPv6
SCF NAMES Command 3-7
SCF INFO LINE Command 3-7
SCF NAMES SUBSYS Command 3-8
SCF INFO PROCESS Command 3-8
SCF LISTDEV Command 3-9
SCF INFO LINE Command 3-9
SCF NAMES ADAPTER command 3-10
SCF INFO ADAPTER command 3-10
SCF INFO DEVICE command 3-11
SCF STATUS LINE Command 3-12
SCF STATUS PATH Command 3-12
SCF STATUS DEVICE Command 3-13
SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command 3-13
SCF STATUS LINE Command 3-14
SCF STATUS PATH Command 3-14
SCF STATUS DEVICE Command 3-14
SCF STATUS PROCESS Command 3-15
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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3-6
Examples (continued)
Contents
Examples (continued)
Example 3-20.
Example 3-21.
Example 3-22.
Example 3-23.
Example 3-24.
Example 3-25.
Example 3-26.
Example 3-27.
Example 3-28.
Example 3-29.
Example 3-30.
Example 3-31.
Example 3-32.
Example 3-33.
Example 3-34.
Example 3-35.
Example 3-36.
Example 3-37.
Example 4-1.
Example 4-2.
Example 4-3.
Example 4-4.
Example 4-5.
Example 4-6.
Example 4-7.
Example 4-8.
Example 4-9.
Example 4-10.
Example 4-11.
Example 4-12.
Example 4-13.
Example 4-14.
Example 4-15.
Example 4-16.
Example 4-17.
Example 4-18.
Example 4-19.
Example 4-20.
SCF STATUS LINE Command 3-16
SCF STOP SUBNET Command 3-16
SCF INFO ADAPTER Command 3-17
SCF STATUS LIF Command 3-17
SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command 3-18
SCF STATUS ADAPTER command 3-31
SCF STATUS SAC command 3-31
SCF STATUS PIF command 3-31
SCF STATUS LIF command 3-32
SCF STATUS SUBNET Command 3-34
SCF STATUS PROCESS Command 3-35
SCF STATUS LINE Command 3-35
SCF STATUS LINE Command 3-36
SCF STATUS PATH Command 3-36
SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command 3-37
SCF STATUS DEVICE Command 3-37
SCF STATUS LINE Command 3-38
SCF STATUS PATH Command 3-38
SCF INFO LIF Command 4-5
SCF INFO SUBNET Command 4-6
SCF NAMES Command 4-7
SCF INFO LINE Command 4-7
SCF NAMES SUBSYS Command 4-8
SCF INFO PROCESS Command 4-8
SCF LISTDEV Command 4-9
SCF INFO LINE Command 4-9
SCF NAMES ADAPTER command 4-10
SCF INFO ADAPTER command 4-10
SCF INFO DEVICE command 4-11
SCF STATUS LINE Command 4-12
SCF STATUS PATH Command 4-12
SCF STATUS DEVICE Command 4-13
SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command 4-13
SCF STATUS LINE Command 4-14
SCF STATUS PATH Command 4-14
SCF STATUS DEVICE Command 4-14
SCF STATUS PROCESS Command 4-15
SCF STATUS LINE Command 4-16
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
iv
Examples (continued)
Contents
Examples (continued)
Example 4-21.
Example 4-22.
Example 4-23.
Example 4-24.
Example 4-25.
Example 4-26.
SCF STOP SUBNET Command 4-16
SCF INFO ADAPTER Command 4-17
SCF INFO LIF Command 4-17
SCF STATUS LIF Command 4-18
SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command 4-19
SCF STATUS Commands 4-34
Figures
Figure 1-1.
Figure 1-2.
Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-2.
Figure 2-3.
Figure 2-4.
Figure 2-5.
Figure 2-6.
Figure 2-7.
Figure 2-8.
Figure 2-9.
Figure 3-1.
Figure 3-2.
Figure 3-3.
Figure 3-4.
Figure 3-5.
Figure 3-6.
Figure 3-7.
Figure 3-8.
Figure 3-9.
Figure 4-1.
Figure 4-2.
Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-4.
Figure 4-5.
Figure 4-6.
Figure 4-7.
Figure 4-8.
Figure 4-9.
Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA) 1-4
How HP Subsystems and Utilities Use the SLSA Subsystem to Access
an FESA 1-8
Completed FESA Configuration Form 2-4
FESA Slot Locations 2-5
FESA Installed 2-6
ESD Protected Environment 2-9
Grounding Clip 2-10
Ejector in Full-Open Position 2-11
Installing an FESA 2-12
FESA Hardware Cable Connection 2-13
FESA External Indicators 2-15
FESA Planning Worksheet 3-4
FESA Slot Locations 3-19
ESD Protected Environment 3-21
Grounding Clip 3-22
Removing an FESA 3-23
Ejector Shown in Full-Open Position 3-25
Installing an FESA 3-26
FESA Hardware Connection 3-27
FESA External Indicators 3-29
FESA Planning Worksheet 4-4
FESA Slot Locations 4-20
ESD Protected Environment 4-22
Grounding Clip 4-23
Removing an FESA 4-24
Ejector Shown in Full-Open Position 4-25
Installing an FESA 4-26
FESA Hardware Connection 4-27
FESA External Indicators 4-29
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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Figures (continued)
Contents
Figures (continued)
Figure 4-10.
Completed FESA Configuration Form
4-32
Tables
Table i.
Table 1-1.
Table 2-1.
Table 3-1.
Table 3-2.
Table 3-3.
Table 4-1.
Table 4-2.
Table 4-3.
Guide Organization xi
Naming Convention for LAN Subsystem and Related Processes
Preparation Checklist 2-2
Preparation Checklist 3-2
Replacement Checklist 3-20
Resuming Operations Checklist 3-30
Preparation Checklist 4-2
Replacement Checklist 4-21
Resuming Operations Checklist 4-30
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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1-9
What’s New in This Guide
Manual Information
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide
Abstract
This guide provides step-by-step procedures for installing, replacing and relocating
Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapters on HP NonStop™ S-series servers. This guide is
intended for anyone who installs or maintains FESAs on NonStop S-series servers.
Product Version
N.A.
Supported Release Version Updates (RVUs)
This guide supports G06.20 and all subsequent G-series RVUs until otherwise
indicated in a new edition.
Part Number
Published
425685-003
August 2010
Document History
Part Number
Product Version
Published
140977
N.A.
August 1998
425685-001
N.A.
May 2000
425685-002
N.A.
May 2003
425685-003
N.A.
August 2010
New and Changed Information
Changes to the 425685-003 Version
•
Chapters 1-4 have this new note:
Note. FESAs (including FESA connections via S-series I/O enclosures) are not supported
on NonStop BladeSystems.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
vii
What’s New in This Guide
•
Manual Information
Who Should Use This Guide has this new note:
Note. This guide describes using TSM to perform FESA procedures. As of G06.22 and
later RVUs, the HP NonStop Open System Management (OSM) Interface replaces TSM
as the system management tool of choice for NonStop S-series servers and is required to
support new functionality in G06.22 and later RVUs. OSM provides the same functionality
as TSM while overcoming limitations of TSM. For instructions on using OSM or migrating
to OSM, refer to the OSM documentation for your RVU.
•
Chapters 2, 3, and 4 and Appendix B have this new note:
Note. As of G06.22 and later RVUs, the HP NonStop Open System Management (OSM)
Interface replaces TSM as the system management tool of choice for NonStop systems.
For instructions on using OSM or migrating to OSM, refer to the OSM documentation for
your RVU.
•
•
•
Replaced all references to Total Information Manager (TIM) with the NonStop
Technical Library (NTL).
Updated the HP Publications email address for customer feedback.
Updated the part number for the HP ESD kit.
Changes to the 425685-002 Version
•
This publication has been updated to reflect new product names:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Since product names are changing over time, this publication might contain
both HP and Compaq product names.
Product names in graphic representations are consistent with the current
product interface.
Where applicable, added mention of the manual TCP/IPv6 Configuration and
Management Manual.
In Section 1, Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA), added
mention of NonStop TCP/IPv6.
In Section 2, Installing a New FESA, added mention of NonStop TCP/IPv6 and
Ethernet failover.
In Section 3, Replacing an FESA: added mention of NonStop TCP/IPv6 and
Ethernet failover; altered Example 3-2 to reflect NonStop TCP/IPv6.
In Section 4, Relocating an FESA, added mention of NonStop TCP/IPv6 and
Ethernet failover.
In Appendix B, Preparing an FESA for PMF or IOMF CRU Replacement, added
mention of guided replacement procedures.
Made various updates to Safety and Compliance and the glossary.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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What’s New in This Guide
HP Encourages Your Comments
HP Encourages Your Comments
HP encourages your comments concerning this document. We are committed to
providing documentation that meets your needs. Send any errors found, suggestions
for improvement, or compliments to docsfeedback@hp.com. Include the document
title, part number, and any comment, error found, or suggestion for improvement
concerning this document.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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What’s New in This Guide
HP Encourages Your Comments
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
x
About This Guide
This guide provides step-by-step procedures for adding, removing, replacing, and
moving Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapters (FESAs). This guide is intended for anyone
who installs or maintains FESAs on HP NonStop S-series servers.
Who Should Use This Guide
This guide is intended for anyone who installs or maintains FESAs on NonStop
S-series servers. This guide assumes you have experience in the following:
•
•
Tandem Service Management (TSM) Service Application
ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA)
Note. This guide describes using TSM to perform FESA procedures. As of G06.22 and
later RVUs, the HP NonStop Open System Management (OSM) Interface replaces TSM
as the system management tool of choice for NonStop S-series servers and is required to
support new functionality in G06.22 and later RVUs. OSM provides the same functionality
as TSM while overcoming limitations of TSM. For instructions on using OSM or migrating
to OSM, refer to the OSM documentation for your RVU.
What’s in This Guide
Table i shows how this guide is organized.
Table i. Guide Organization
Name of Section
Description
Section 1, Introduction to the Fast
Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA)
Describes the FESA and its relationship to
the SLSA subsystem.
Section 2, Installing a New FESA
Describes how to initially add an FESA.
Section 3, Replacing an FESA
Describes how to remove and replace an
FESA.
Section 4, Relocating an FESA
Describes how to relocate an FESA.
Appendix A, FESA Configuration Form
Provides a blank form for recording the
FESA configuration data.
Appendix B, Preparing an FESA for PMF
or IOMF CRU Replacement
Describes checking the fault tolerance of an
FESA
Glossary
Defines the terms used in this guide.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
xi
Where to Get More Information
About This Guide
Where to Get More Information
Manuals describing the NonStop S-series servers are organized into several sets of
manuals, which are fully described in the HP NonStop S-Series Planning and
Configuration Guide.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
xii
Other Manuals
About This Guide
Other Manuals
Depending on the tasks you are performing, you might also need the following
manuals:
•
•
•
•
•
•
LAN Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IP Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IPv6 Configuration and Management Manual
IPX/SPX Configuration and Management Manual
PAM Configuration and Management Manual
Notation Conventions
The following are notation conventions.
Hypertext Links
Blue underline is used to indicate a hypertext link within text. By clicking a passage of
text with a blue underline, you are taken to the location described. For example:
This requirement is described under Backup DAM Volumes and Physical Disk
Drives on page 3-2.
General Syntax Notation
The following list summarizes the notation conventions for syntax presentation in this
guide.
UPPERCASE LETTERS. Uppercase letters indicate keywords and reserved words; enter
these items exactly as shown. Items not enclosed in brackets are required. For
example:
MAXATTACH
lowercase italic letters. Lowercase italic letters indicate variable items that you supply.
Items not enclosed in brackets are required. For example:
file-name
[ ] Brackets. Brackets enclose optional syntax items. For example:
TERM [\system-name.]$terminal-name
INT[ERRUPTS]
A group of items enclosed in brackets is a list from which you can choose one item or
none. The items in the list may be arranged either vertically, with aligned brackets on
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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General Syntax Notation
About This Guide
each side of the list, or horizontally, enclosed in a pair of brackets and separated by
vertical lines. For example:
FC [ num ]
[ -num]
[ text]
K [ X | D ] address-1
{ } Braces. A group of items enclosed in braces is a list from which you are required to
choose one item. The items in the list may be arranged either vertically, with aligned
braces on each side of the list, or horizontally, enclosed in a pair of braces and
separated by vertical lines. For example:
LISTOPENS PROCESS { $appl-mgr-name }
{ $process-name }
ALLOWSU { ON | OFF }
| Vertical Line. A vertical line separates alternatives in a horizontal list that is enclosed in
brackets or braces. For example:
INSPECT { OFF | ON | SAVEABEND }
… Ellipsis. An ellipsis immediately following a pair of brackets or braces indicates that you
can repeat the enclosed sequence of syntax items any number of times. For example:
M address [ , new-value ]…
[ - ] {0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9}…
An ellipsis immediately following a single syntax item indicates that you can repeat that
syntax item any number of times. For example:
"s-char…"
Punctuation. Parentheses, commas, semicolons, and other symbols not previously
described must be entered as shown. For example:
error := NEXTFILENAME ( file-name ) ;
LISTOPENS SU $process-name.#su-name
Quotation marks around a symbol such as a bracket or brace indicate the symbol is a
required character that you must enter as shown. For example:
"[" repetition-constant-list "]"
Item Spacing. Spaces shown between items are required unless one of the items is a
punctuation symbol such as a parenthesis or a comma. For example:
CALL STEPMOM ( process-id ) ;
If there is no space between two items, spaces are not permitted. In the following
example, there are no spaces permitted between the period and any other items:
$process-name.#su-name
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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Notation for Messages
About This Guide
Line Spacing. If the syntax of a command is too long to fit on a single line, each
continuation line is indented three spaces and is separated from the preceding line by
a blank line. This spacing distinguishes items in a continuation line from items in a
vertical list of selections. For example:
ALTER [ / OUT file-spec / ] CONTROLLER
[ , attribute-spec ]...
!i and !o. In procedure calls, the !i notation follows an input parameter (one that passes data
to the called procedure); the !o notation follows an output parameter (one that returns
data to the calling program). For example:
CALL CHECKRESIZESEGMENT (
segment-id
, error
) ;
!i
!o
Notation for Messages
The following list summarizes the notation conventions for the presentation of
displayed messages in this guide.
Bold Text. Bold text in an example indicates user input entered at the terminal. For
example:
ENTER RUN CODE
?123
CODE RECEIVED:
123.00
The user must press the Return key after typing the input.
Nonitalic text. Nonitalic letters, numbers, and punctuation indicate text that is displayed or
returned exactly as shown. For example:
Backup Up.
lowercase italic letters. Lowercase italic letters indicate variable items whose values are
displayed or returned. For example:
p-register
process-name
[ ] Brackets. Brackets enclose items that are sometimes, but not always, displayed. For
example:
Event number = number [ Subject = first-subject-value ]
A group of items enclosed in brackets is a list of all possible items that can be
displayed, of which one or none might actually be displayed. The items in the list might
be arranged either vertically, with aligned brackets on each side of the list, or
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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Notation for Management Programming Interfaces
About This Guide
horizontally, enclosed in a pair of brackets and separated by vertical lines. For
example:
proc-name trapped [ in SQL | in SQL file system ]
{ } Braces. A group of items enclosed in braces is a list of all possible items that can be
displayed, of which one is actually displayed. The items in the list might be arranged
either vertically, with aligned braces on each side of the list, or horizontally, enclosed in
a pair of braces and separated by vertical lines. For example:
obj-type obj-name state changed to state, caused by
{ Object | Operator | Service }
process-name State changed from old-objstate to objstate
{ Operator Request. }
{ Unknown.
}
| Vertical Line. A vertical line separates alternatives in a horizontal list that is enclosed in
brackets or braces. For example:
Transfer status: { OK | Failed }
% Percent Sign. A percent sign precedes a number that is not in decimal notation. The
% notation precedes an octal number. The %B notation precedes a binary number.
The %H notation precedes a hexadecimal number. For example:
%005400
%B101111
%H2F
P=%p-register E=%e-register
Notation for Management Programming Interfaces
The following list summarizes the notation conventions used in the boxed descriptions
of programmatic commands, event messages, and error lists in this guide.
UPPERCASE LETTERS. Uppercase letters indicate names from definition files; enter these
names exactly as shown. For example:
ZCOM-TKN-SUBJ-SERV
lowercase letters. Words in lowercase letters are words that are part of the notation,
including Data Definition Language (DDL) keywords. For example:
token-type
Change Bar Notation
Change bars are used to indicate substantive differences between this edition of the
guide and the preceding edition. Change bars are vertical rules placed in the right
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
xvi
Change Bar Notation
About This Guide
margin of changed portions of text, figures, tables, examples, and so on. Change bars
highlight new or revised information. For example:
The message types specified in the REPORT clause are different in the COBOL85
environment and the Common Run-Time Environment (CRE).
The CRE has many new message types and some new message type codes for
old message types. In the CRE, the message type SYSTEM includes all messages
except LOGICAL-CLOSE and LOGICAL-OPEN.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
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Change Bar Notation
About This Guide
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
xviii
1
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet
ServerNet Adapter (FESA)
This section provides an introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA)
for HP NonStop S-series systems.
This section includes the following topics:
Overview of the FESA
Page 1-2
FESA System Connections
Page 1-4
Relationship to the SLSA Subsystem
Page 1-6
Manufacturing Naming Conventions
Page 1-9
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
1 -1
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
Overview of the FESA
Overview of the FESA
Note. FESAs (including FESA connections via S-series I/O enclosures) are not supported on
NonStop BladeSystems.
The Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) is a single-port ServerNet adapter that
provides connectivity between NonStop S-series systems and Fast Ethernet 802.3u
LANs. It supports 100 Mbps and 10 Mbps Ethernet data transfer rates on NonStop
S-series systems. The FESA installs directly into a system enclosure that supports
multiple FESAs per system enclosure.
FESA Features
The features of the FESA are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Automatically adjusts (auto-sensing feature) to 100 Mbps or 10 Mbps operation
and can be easily added to an existing network on a NonStop S-series server.
Supports multiple communications protocols including TCP/IP, Expand/IP,
IPX/SPX, PAM, and SWAN (data transfer rate is reduced to 10 Mbps with SWAN).
Operates with your existing NonStop S-series network infrastructure, including
cabling (customer-supplied), protocol stacks, and user-written application code.
Retains the knowledge base of HP network administrators and users.
Is fully fault-tolerant with two-channel (ServerNet X and Y fabric) connections for
each adapter.
Ensures a virtually risk-free upgrade path to support higher performance on a
NonStop S-series server.
Supported by Tandem Service Management (TSM) client software to facilitate
diagnostics and maintenance.
A twisted-pair electrical interface is provided from the base product.
Offers 10 times the speed of 10 Mbps Ethernet at less than twice the price.
Supports new and existing bandwidth-intensive applications.
External Connectors and Indicators
The external connectors on an FESA are one 10/100Base-T RJ-45 type connector,
one debugging port, and one power interface. The debugging port is for manufacturing
only.
The external indicators consist of two status LEDs for the FESA, and six status LEDs
for the Fast Ethernet port. Figure 1-1 on page 1-4 shows the position of the external
connectors and indicators on the front of the adapter.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
1 -2
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
External Connectors and Indicators
The two FESA status LEDs, which are controlled by the Service Processor (SP),
indicate the state of the FESA as follows:
LED
FESA State
Green
Power-on
Amber
Fault condition
The six status LEDs on the Fast Ethernet port indicate the activity on and condition of
the Fast Ethernet port as follows:
LED
Indication when ON
TX
Fast Ethernet is transmitting to the Ethernet
RX
Fast Ethernet is receiving from the Ethernet
FD
Data is being sent and received simultaneously
LNK
Twisted-pair link integrity
COL
Collision has been detected on the Ethernet
100
Data transfer rate is 100 Mbps (10 Mbps is off)
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
1 -3
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
FESA System Connections
Figure 1-1. Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA)
Power-On LED (green)
Ejector
Fault LED (amber)
Ethernet Port
Transmit Data (green)
Receive Data (green)
Full-Duplex
TX
RX
LNK
FD
100
COL
Link Integrity (green)
Collision Detect (green)
100 Mbps
CDT 001.CDD
FESA System Connections
A FESA has three primary, dual-ported system connections, as follows:
•
•
•
Data transfer interface (ServerNet)
Diagnostics subsystem interface (Serial Maintenance Bus)
Power interface
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
1 -4
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
Data Transfer Interface (ServerNet)
Data Transfer Interface (ServerNet)
The data transfer interface consists of ports for the X-fabric and Y-fabric. The ports
attach to an internal router that connects to the two SACs on the adapter. The router
provides dual-ported ServerNet access to each SAC. The SACs provide an interface
between the ServerNet fabrics and the 100baseT RJ-45 port on the front of the FESA.
The FESA supports Ethernet 802.3u and provides the following features:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Performance of MAC layer functions of Ethernet and IEEE 802.3
Performance of framing functions
Full collision support
Bit rates up to 10 megabits per second (Mbps)
Reception of back-to-back frames
Detection of received frames that are too long
Multibuffer data structure
Support of 48-bit addresses in physical, logical, and unchecked modes
Heartbeat indication
Transmitter network management and diagnostics
Receiver network management and diagnostics
Error counters (discarded frames, CRC errors, and alignment errors)
Internal and external loopback mode
Diagnostic Subsystem Interface (Serial Maintenance Bus)
The diagnostics subsystem interface is supported by the serial maintenance bus
(SMB). The maintenance subsystem contains the circuitry required to meet the
maintenance system requirements of an active-logic CRU, which includes
•
•
•
•
Dual-multiplexed SMB ports
An MROUTER, which provides redundant access to the maintenance-system
features of the CRU. The maintenance and diagnostic system provide the following
capabilities:
• Powering the adapter on or off
• Identifying the type, configuration, and revision of the adapter
• Running scan diagnostics IEEE 1149.1 (JTAG) on JTAG components
• Initializing the adapter for access to or from the ServerNet
• Controlling the adapter’s standard LEDs
A serial EEPROM (SEEROM) that provides the following:
•
•
•
Hardware identification (part number and revision)
Manufacturing tracking (serial) number
MAC addresses
CRU visual indicators
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
1 -5
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
•
Power Interface
Power control to the FESA
Power Interface
The FESA receives power through a shielded, high-density, metric connector module.
The connector module consists of two 72-pin blocks and a blade power block. The
connector module also provides attachments to the two SMBs and the two ServerNet
fabrics.
Relationship to the SLSA Subsystem
FESAs are configured and managed through the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF)
interface to the ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem. The SLSA
subsystem is preinstalled and preconfigured on NonStop S-series servers and is
started during the system-load sequence. During the system-load sequence, the
persistence manager ($ZPM) starts the primary and backup LAN Manager (LANMAN)
processes ($ZZLAN) in processors 0 and 1. The LANMAN process then starts the LAN
Monitor (LANMON) processes in each processor of the system and attempts to assign
the ServerNet addressable controller (SAC) on an FESA to a LANMON process. Each
LANMON process then initializes the SAC, physical interface (PIF), and the logical
interface (LIF) associated with the PIF. The LANMON process reports any state
transitions to other LANMON processes.
Note. SCF commands issued to the LANMONs or the LANMAN will not be accepted while
processes are starting or if the backup LANMAN is taking over from the primary LANMAN. The
SLSA subsystem will return the following error message: SLSA process is busy....
Refer to the LAN Configuration and Management Manual for information about the
SLSA subsystem.
Accessing an FESA through the SLSA Subsystem
The SLSA subsystem provides access to the FESA. The following subsystems and
utilities may be configured to access an FESA through the SLSA subsystem.
•
The conventional TCP/IP, Parallel Library TCP/IP, and NonStop TCP/IPv6
subsystems, which can interface to the SLSA subsystem to provide connectivity to
TCP/IP networks. The following subsystems and utilities can be configured to
access conventional TCP/IP, Parallel Library TCP/IP, or NonStop TCP/IPv6
subsystems:
•
•
•
The Expand subsystem, which interfaces to the TCP/IP subsystem to provide
Expand-over-IP connections.
Telserv and the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), which use the socket library to
establish remote connections through the TCP/IP subsystem.
Other HP subsystems, such as Remote Server Call (RSC), that can be
configured to establish connections through the TCP/IP subsystem.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
1 -6
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
•
•
Accessing an FESA through the SLSA Subsystem
The Port Access Method (PAM) subsystem, which can interface to the SLSA
subsystem to provide an independent interface to Ethernet networks and user
written applications that use the PAM subsystem port interface.
The IPX/SPX subsystem, which can interface to the SLSA subsystem to provide
access to Novell NetWare networks. The following HP utilities and subsystems can
interface to the IPX/SPX subsystem:
•
•
Telserv and FTP, which use the socket library to establish remote connections
and communicate through the IPX/SPX subsystem.
HP subsystems, such as Remote Server Call (RSC), that can be configured to
establish connections through the IPX/SPX subsystem.
Figure 1-2 on page 1-8 illustrates how HP subsystems and utilities use the SLSA
subsystem to access an FESA.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
1 -7
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
Accessing an FESA through the SLSA Subsystem
Figure 1-2. How HP Subsystems and Utilities Use the SLSA Subsystem to
Access an FESA
Processor
User Applications
File System
Interface
Socket Lib
WAN
IOP
QIO Shared Memory
Segment
Expand
WAN
TCP/IP
IPX/SPX
PAM
SLSA
Processes
LIF
LAN Drivers and Interrupt Handlers
Y Fabric
X Fabric
FESA
Legend
SLSA Subsystem
CDT 005.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide —425685-003
1 -8
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
Manufacturing Naming Conventions
Manufacturing Naming Conventions
HP manufacturing uses a naming convention for processes and devices that relates
logical names to the physical location of devices. Table 1-1 describes the naming
conventions used for SLSA subsystem processes and other processes and devices
required by the SLSA subsystem.
Table 1-1. Naming Convention for LAN Subsystem and Related Processes
Process or Device Type
Convention
Example
LAN Manager (LANMAN) process
Must be $ZZLAN
$ZZLAN
Logical interface (LIF)
$ZZLAN.Lcabid-portid
$ZZLAN.L018
Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter
(FESA)
$ZZLAN.Ecabid-slot
$ZZLAN.E0153
cabid
is the two-digit number that identifies the enclosure; cabid is also the group
number.
cabid
Description
Range of Values
0n
The object is in processor enclosure n.
01-08
n1
The object is in I/O enclosure 1
attached to processor enclosure n.
11, 21, 31, 41, 51, 61, 71, or
81
n2
The object is in I/O enclosure 2
attached to processor enclosure n.
12, 22, 32, 42, 52, 62, 72, or
82
n3
The object is in I/O enclosure 3
attached to processor enclosure n.
13, 23, 33, 43, 53, 63, 73, or
83
Note. FESAs (including FESA connections via S-series I/O enclosures) are not supported
on NonStop BladeSystems.
slot
is the physical slot number in the enclosure:
Number
Description
51 to 54
For the FESA.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
1-9
Manufacturing Naming Conventions
Introduction to the Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter
(FESA)
portid
is the combination of the slot number and port number mapped in the following
way:
Slot
Number
Port
Number
portid
Slot
Number
Port
Number
portid
51
0
0
53
0
8
51
1
1
53
1
9
51
2
2
53
2
A
51
3
3
53
3
B
52
0
4
54
0
C
52
1
5
54
1
D
52
2
6
54
2
E
52
3
7
54
3
F
For more information on suggested naming conventions, refer to the LAN
Configuration and Management Manual.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
1-10
2
Installing a New FESA
This section describes how to configure and install a new Fast Ethernet ServerNet
adapter (FESA) in an HP NonStop S-series system enclosure. The FESA can be
installed without shutting down the system. When a new system is shipped, HP
manufacturing has already installed and configured two FESAs. Additional FESAs can
be installed and configured by following the procedures outlined in this section.
Note. As of G06.22 and later RVUs, the HP NonStop Open System Management (OSM)
Interface replaces TSM as the system management tool of choice for NonStop systems. For
instructions on using OSM or migrating to OSM, refer to the OSM documentation for your RVU.
This section includes the following topics:
Prepare to Install a New FESA
Page 2-2
Install the New FESA
Page 2-8
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-1
Installing a New FESA
Prepare to Install a New FESA
Prepare to Install a New FESA
This section describes those tasks you should perform before installing or configuring a
new FESA. Table 2-1 summarizes the steps.
Table 2-1. Preparation Checklist
Step
Description
1.
Plan the Local Area Network (LAN).
2.
Complete the Configuration Form.
3.
Gather the Proper Tools.
4.
Review Standard Operating Practices.
Comments
A sample form is provided. See
Figure 2-1 on page 2-4. See also
Appendix A, FESA Configuration
Form
Plan the Local Area Network (LAN)
For information about planning your LAN and about network addresses, review the
LAN Configuration and Management Manual, and refer, if necessary, to the following
manuals:
•
•
•
•
•
TCP/IP Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IPv6 Configuration and Management Manual
PAM Configuration and Management Manual
IPX/SPX Configuration and Management Manual.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-2
Installing a New FESA
Complete the Configuration Form
Complete the Configuration Form
Complete an FESA Configuration Form for each FESA you are adding to your system.
Figure 2-1 on page 2-4 shows an example of a completed Fast Ethernet ServerNet
Adapter (FESA) Configuration Form.
When you add an adapter to a NonStop S-series system enclosure, you specify:
•
•
•
The name you want to use to identify the adapter; for example, E0153 for an Fast
Ethernet ServerNet adapter in slot 53 of the first system enclosure.
The location of the adapter within the system cabinet (group, module, and slot).
The processors that have access to the SAC on the adapter.
Before you begin the hardware installation, complete an FESA configuration form.
Obtain the form from Appendix A, FESA Configuration Form, and complete the
form as follows:
•
•
•
Enter the name of the system in the System Name field.
Enter the group number for this enclosure in the Group Number field.
Enter the slot number of this FESA in the Slot Number field. FESAs can be
installed in slots 51, 52, 53 and 54 of and I/O enclosure (expansion) but only
53 and 54 of a processor enclosure. Figure 2-2 on page 2-5 shows the
possible slot locations for the FESA.
Note. FESAs (including FESA connections via S-series I/O enclosures) are not
supported on NonStop BladeSystems.
•
•
Because there is exactly one module in a system enclosure, the module
number, 1, is already indicated on the form.
Complete the Ethernet Port information block.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Enter the IP or network address to be assigned to the port in the IP
Address field.
Enter the adapter name. (See the Manufacturing Naming Conventions on
page 1-9.)
Enter the SAC name.
Enter the numbers of the processors that will have access to the SAC in
the SAC Access List field. The first processor listed is the preferred
processor.
Enter the PIF name associated with the SAC in the PIF Name field.
Enter the LIF name associated with the PIF in the LIF Name field.
When you have completed this form, enter today’s date in the Date field.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-3
Installing a New FESA
Complete the Configuration Form
Figure 2-1. Completed FESA Configuration Form
Date
Group
IP Address:
FNET:
Adapter Name:
Tx
LNK
RX
COL
FD
100
SAC Name:
PIF Name:
\Case1
System Name
Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA)
Configuration Form
01
Module
01
01
/
Slot
21
/
00
53
192.231.036.100
E0153
E0153.0
E0153.0.A
(0,1)
SAC Access List:
LIF Name:
L018
CDT 003.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-4
Installing a New FESA
Complete the Configuration Form
Figure 2-2. FESA Slot Locations
NonStop S-Series I/O
Enclosure
NonStop S-Series Processor
Enclosure
(Service Side)
(Service Side)
I/O enclosures can use slots 51
through 54 for FESA CRUs
Processor enclosures can only use
slots 53 and 54 for FESA CRUs
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-5
Installing a New FESA
Complete the Configuration Form
Figure 2-3 shows the FESA installed in a system enclosure.
Figure 2-3. FESA Installed
FAST ETHERNET SERVERNET ADAPTER
Power-On LED (green)
Ejector
Fault LED (amber)
RJ 45 Connector
Transmit Data (green)
Receive Data (green)
Full-Duplex
TX
RX
FD
LNK
COL
100
Link Integrity (green)
Collision Detect (green)
100 Mbps
CDT 004.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-6
Installing a New FESA
Gather the Proper Tools
Gather the Proper Tools
You will need the following tools to install the adapter:
Tool
Used to. . .
Electrostatic discharge
(ESD) wriststrap with
grounding clip
Protect the adapter from damage caused by
electrostatic discharge.
Antistatic mat
(recommended)
Provide a static-free environment for removal and
installation of an adapter.
Flashlight
Check the connectors for bent or broken pins.
Note. An ESD protection kit can be purchased from HP using the following order number and
part number:
Order Number: ESD-Kit
Part Number: T99247
Review Standard Operating Practices
Standard operating practices include the following:
•
•
•
•
Work in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) protected environment.
Remove all metal accessories before working with electrical equipment.
Restrain any dangling items that can get caught in equipment.
Obtain an ESD protection kit and follow the directions that come with the kit.
Figure 2-4 on page 2-9 illustrates an ESD protected environment.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-7
Installing a New FESA
Install the New FESA
Install the New FESA
You should perform the hardware installation first and then add the adapter using the
Subsystem Control Facility (SCF). You can use SCF to add the adapter first and then
insert the hardware. Whichever installation method you choose, the state of a logical
interface (LIF) is not affected by the physical presence, or absence, of an adapter. If
you decide to configure the adapter and its LIF before the FESA is inserted into the
enclosure, the ServerNet addressable controller (SAC) and physical interface (PIF) of
the adapter will remain in the starting state; the LIF will be in the started state, but its
access state will be down until its associated PIF is started. The following subtopics
describe the tasks associated with physically inserting the FESA into a NonStop
S-series system enclosure and using the SLSA subsystem to logically add and start
the FESA:
•
•
•
Unpack and Install the New FESA
Check the Installation of the New FESA
Add and Start the FESA Using SCF
Unpack and Install the New FESA
The following paragraphs describe how to unpack and install the new FESA.
Note. Whenever you handle an Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA), you should follow
standard operating practices to avoid damage to the equipment. See Review Standard
Operating Practices on page 2-7.
Unpack the FESA
The following explains how to unpack the FESA:
1. Put on the electrostatic discharge (ESD) wriststrap and attach the grounding clip to
the antistatic mat.
2. Place the package containing the FESA on the antistatic mat.
3. Open the packing container and remove the FESA.
Caution. When opening the packing container, be careful not to cut into the ESD protective
bag.
4. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the antistatic mat and
connect it to an exposed, unpainted metal surface on the FESA.
5. Grasp the FESA by its ejector in one hand, support the bottom edge of the FESA
with the other hand, and carry the FESA to the service side of the system
enclosure and set it down.
Note. The FESA weights 6.75 pounds (3 kilograms)
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-8
Installing a New FESA
Unpack and Install the New FESA
6. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the FESA and connect it
to an exposed, unpainted, metal surface on the service side of the system
enclosure, such as the ventilation holes on the processor multifunction (PMF) or
I/O multifunction (IOMF) CRU. See Figure 2-5, Grounding Clip, on page 2-10 or
Figure 2-4, ESD Protected Environment.
Figure 2-4. ESD Protected Environment
System Enclosure (Appearance
Side)
ESD wriststrap clipped to
door latch stud (or to any
exposed, unpainted, metal
surface on the enclosure
frame.)
ESD wriststrap
with clip
ESD floor mats
ESD antistatic table mat.
Mat should be connected to a soft
ground
(1 megohm min. to 10 megohm max.)
Clip 15 inch straight
ground cord to•screw
screw
on grounded outlet
cover.
CDT 693.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-9
Installing a New FESA
Unpack and Install the New FESA
Figure 2-5 shows how to connect the grounding clip to the ventilation holes on the
PMF or IOMF CRU.
Figure 2-5. Grounding Clip
Processor Multifunction (PMF) CRU or
I/O Multifunction (IOMF) CRU
Grounding
Clip
To Grounding
Wriststrap
CDT 081.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-10
Installing a New FESA
Unpack and Install the New FESA
Install the FESA
The following explains how to insert the FESA into the system enclosure.
1. With the ejector on the FESA in the full-open position (Figure 2-6 on page 2-11),
grasp the FESA by the ejector with one hand and support the bottom edge of the
FESA with the other hand (Figure 2-7 on page 2-12). Hold the adapter so that its
ejector is at the top, as shown in Figure 2-6, and insert the adapter into the upper
part of the carrier as shown in Figure 2-7.
2. Push the FESA to the rear of the slot, but don't force it.
Caution. Apply equal pressure to both the top and bottom of the FESA when pushing it into
the slot to avoid damaging the connector pins. If pins are damaged, both the FESA and the
backplane (or enclosure) must be replaced.
3. Press the blue-green tab on the FESA ejector and latch the ejector to seat the
FESA against the backplane.
Figure 2-6. Ejector in Full-Open Position
CDT 500.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-11
Installing a New FESA
Unpack and Install the New FESA
Figure 2-7. Installing an FESA
CDT 058.CDD
4. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the enclosure.
5. Connect the RJ-45 connector to the Ethernet port on the FESA. Connect the other
end of the cable to your Ethernet hub. Use the label on the cable to make sure you
connect the cable to the proper port and Ethernet hub.
Figure 2-8 on page 2-13 shows the connection of the communication cable
between the FESA and vendor Ethernet hub.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-12
Installing a New FESA
Unpack and Install the New FESA
Figure 2-8. FESA Hardware Cable Connection
FAST ETHERNET SERVERNET ADAPTER
RJ 45 Connector
RX
TX
LNK
COL
FD
100
To LAN
Ethernet
Hub
CDT 002.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-13
Installing a New FESA
Check the Installation of the New FESA
Check the Installation of the New FESA
To check the installation of an FESA:
1. Make sure that the power-on LED (green light) is on.
Note. When the adapter is inserted, the fault LED (amber) remains on until the service
processor has completed its start-up configuration. The fault LED also comes on when
SLSA detects a POST failure.
Figure 2-9 on page 2-15 shows the location of the power-on LED and fault LED.
2. If the power-on LED does not come on, do one or both of the following:
•
•
Reseat the FESA.
Check the FESA and backplane connector for damaged pins.
Note the Following Error Conditions
•
•
If the power-on LED does not come on after you reseat the FESA, you must
replace the FESA.
If the FESA or backplane connector has damaged pins, both the FESA and
backplane (or enclosure) must be replaced. For backplane replacement
instructions, refer to the HP NonStop S-Series Service Provider Supplement.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-14
Installing a New FESA
Check the Installation of the New FESA
Figure 2-9. FESA External Indicators
Power-On LED (green)
Ejector
Fault LED (amber)
Ethernet Port
Transmit Data (green)
Receive Data (green)
Full-Duplex
TX
RX
LNK
FD
100
COL
Link Integrity (green)
Collision Detect (green)
100 Mbps
CDT 001.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-15
Installing a New FESA
Add and Start the FESA Using SCF
Add and Start the FESA Using SCF
Using the completed FESA configuration form as a guide, use the SCF interface to the
SLSA subsystem to add and start the newly installed FESA.
Note. Refer to the LAN Configuration and Management Manual for detailed information on the
SLSA subsystem SCF commands.
Adding and Starting the FESA
The following steps outline adding and starting the FESA.
1. Add the FESA by using the SLSA subsystem SCF ADD ADAPTER command as
follows:.
->ASSUME PROCESS $ZZLAN
->ADD ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E1053, TYPE FESA, LOCATION (1,1,53),
ACCESSLIST (0,1,2,3)
SCF adds an FESA to slot 53, group 1, module 1, and gives processor 0 primary
access to the ServerNet addressable controller (SAC). Processors 1 through 3 are
assigned secondary access.
2. Use the SLSA subsystem SCF NAMES command to display the names assigned
to the SAC and PIF of the adapter you added in Step 1.
->NAMES PIF $ZZLAN.E0153*
SLSA Names PIF \SYS.$ZZLAN.E0153
PIF
$ZZLAN.E0153.0.A
3. Assign logical interface (LIF) to the PIF on the FESA added in Step 1 by using the
SLSA subsystem SCF ADD LIF command. Use the name of the PIF returned from
the NAMES command in Step 2.
->ADD LIF $ZZLAN.L018, PIF E0153.0.A
4. Start the LIF by using the SLSA subsystem START LIF command.
->START LIF $ZZLAN.L018
5. Start the FESA and its subordinate SAC and PIF objects by using the SLSA
subsystem SCF START ADAPTER command with the SUB ALL option as shown
in the following example. The SUB ALL option starts the ADAPTER object and its
subordinate objects:
->START ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E1053, SUB ALL
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-16
Installing a New FESA
Add and Start the FESA Using SCF
Note. You can also use the TSM Service Application to start an adapter. Refer to Using the
TSM Service Application to Start the FESA on page 3-30.
6. Use the SLSA subsystem SCF STATUS commands to check that the adapter,
SAC, PIF, and LIF have started as shown in Example 2-1.
Example 2-1. SCF STATUS Commands
->STATUS ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E0153
SLSA Status ADAPTER
Name
State
$ZZLAN.E1053
STARTED
-> STATUS SAC $ZZLAN.E1053.*
SLSA Status SAC
Name
Owner
State
$ZZLAN.E1053.
0 0
STARTED
-> STATUS PIF $ZZLAN.E1053.*
SLSA Status PIF
Name
$ZZLAN.E1053.0.A
State
STARTED
-> STATUS LIF $ZZLAN.L01*
SLSA Status LIF
Name
$ZZLAN.L018
State
STARTED
Access State
UP
Troubleshooting: If the FESA SAC Object Is Still in the
STARTING State
If the SCF STATUS SAC command shows that the FESA SAC object is still in the
STARTING state after a few minutes or if the TSM Service Application indicates that
the resource needs attention, do the following:
1. Check for event messages in the Event Message Service (EMS) log. Use the TSM
EMS Event Viewer Application to view the EMS log:
1. From the File menu, select Log on.
2. Select the system.
3. Type the NonStop Kernel user name and password.
4. Click OK.
5. From the Setup menu, set up Timeframe, Source, or Subsystem criteria.
Refer to the Operator Messages Manual for cause, effect, and recovery
information for event messages.
2. Check the firmware version of the new FESA. (When the AUTOFIRMUP attribute
is set to ON, which is the default, the firmware file is automatically downloaded to
the SAC when the SAC is started. Although the firmware version is automatically
updated by the system, you should verify the firmware version.)
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-17
Installing a New FESA
Add and Start the FESA Using SCF
Use the TSM Service Application to check the firmware version:
1. Log on to the TSM Service Application.
2. From the Display menu, choose Firmware Update.
3. From the Resource type pull-down menu, select resource type.
4. From the Display pull-down menu, select Down-rev only.
A list of resources whose firmware is older than the version of the SYSnn is
displayed in the Available list box. Do the following:
5. Double-click on the resource. The resource is displayed in the Selected list
box.
6. Click Perform action to initiate the firmware update.
For information on configuring the conventional TCP/IP, Parallel Library TCP/IP,
NonStop TCP/IPv6, IPX/SPX, or Port Access Method (PAM) subsystems to access the
FESA through the SLSA subsystem, refer to the following manuals:
Note. You can configure the Parallel Library TCP/IP and NonStop TCP/IPv6 subsystems with
the Ethernet failover feature, which provides fault-tolerance at the adapter level.
•
•
•
•
•
•
LAN Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IP Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IPv6 Configuration and Management Manual
IPX/SPX Configuration and Management Manual
PAM Configuration and Management Manual
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
2-18
3
Replacing an FESA
This section describes how to perform online replacement of a Fast Ethernet
ServerNet adapter (FESA) in an HP NonStop S-series server. You might need to
replace an FESA if it has failed or partially failed. If POST fails and if there is an alarm
generated by the TSM package on the SAC FESA, the FESA must be replaced.
Note. As of G06.22 and later RVUs, the HP NonStop Open System Management (OSM)
Interface replaces TSM as the system management tool of choice for NonStop systems. For
instructions on using OSM or migrating to OSM, refer to the OSM documentation for your RVU.
Caution. If a previously installed FESA and backplane connector have damaged pins, remove
the FESA and install a filler panel in the vacant slot. Attach red tags to the filler panel to identify
the slot. Do not move the damaged FESA to a different, undamaged slot. Both the FESA and
backplane (or enclosure) must be replaced. For backplane replacement, refer to the backplane
replacement section of the HP NonStop S-Series Service Provider Supplement available in the
G-series NonStop Technical Library (NTL) collections.
This section includes the following topics:
Prepare to Replace an FESA
Page 3-2
Replace the FESA
Page 3-20
Resume Operations
Page 3-30
Note. Whenever you handle an FESA, you should follow standard operating practices to avoid
damage to the equipment. See Review Standard Operating Practices on page 3-20.
You can run Parallel Library TCP/IP and NonStop TCP/IPv6 with the Ethernet failover
feature and replace the FESA without taking down the TCP/IP communications.
With Ethernet failover:
•
•
TCP sessions continue to operate if there are cabling or adapter failures
Network traffic automatically migrates from the faulty LIF to the working LIF
For more information about Ethernet failover, refer to the following manuals:
•
•
•
TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Migration Guide
TCP/IPv6 Configuration and Management Manual
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-1
Replacing an FESA
Prepare to Replace an FESA
Prepare to Replace an FESA
FESAs can be installed in slots 53 and 54 of a processor enclosure and in slots 51, 52,
53, and 54 of an I/O enclosure. See Figure 3-2 on page 3-19. When no FESA is
installed in a slot, a ServerNet adapter filler panel occupies the empty slot. (Therefore,
a ServerNet adapter filler panel can possibly occupy slots 53 and 54 of a processor
enclosure or slots 51 through 54 of an I/O enclosure.) The filler panel maintains proper
air flow and reduces electromagnetic interference (EMI).
Note. FESAs (including FESA connections via S-series I/O enclosures) are not supported on
NonStop BladeSystems.
Table 3-1 summarizes the steps for preparing to replace an FESA.
Table 3-1. Preparation Checklist
Step
Description
Comments
1.
Gather the Proper Tools.
2.
Print the FESA Planning Worksheet.
3.
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA.
4.
Redirect or Stop Any Customer Applications Using
the FESA.
5.
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA.
6.
Determine the Physical Location of the FESA.
7.
Abort the FESA.
8.
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the
FESA.
Figure 3-1
Gather the Proper Tools
You will need the following tools to replace an adapter:
Tool
Used to. . .
Electrostatic discharge
(ESD) wriststrap with
grounding clip
Protect the adapter from damage caused by
electrostatic discharge.
Antistatic mat
(recommended)
Provide a static-free environment for removal and
installation of an adapter.
Flashlight
Check the connectors for bent or broken pins.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-2
Replacing an FESA
Gather the Proper Tools
Note. An ESD protection kit can be purchased from HP using the following order number and
part number:
Order Number: ESD-Kit
Part Number: T99247
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-3
Replacing an FESA
Print the FESA Planning Worksheet
Print the FESA Planning Worksheet
Print Figure 3-1, the FESA Planning Worksheet, and use it to record information about
an Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA).
Figure 3-1. FESA Planning Worksheet
FESA CRU Planning Worksheet
Print this worksheet and use it to record information about a Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) CRU.
Logical interface (LIF) and Physical Interface (LIF):
LIF:
PIF:
TCP/IP Process, Subnet, and Internet Protocol (IP) Address
LIF:
TCP/IP Process:
Subnet:
IP Address:
Port Access Method (PAM) Line:
LIF:
PAM Line:
IPXPROTO Process :
LIF:
IPXPROTO Process:
Expand-Over-IP Line:
Expand Line:
ServerNet Wide Area Network (SWAN) Concentrator:
SWAN:
WAN Subsystem Input/Output Process (IOP):
SWAN:
WAN IOP:
CDT040.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-4
Replacing an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet Wide Area
Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
The subsystems and utilities that use the SLSA subsystem to access an FESA are
illustrated in Figure 1-2 on page 1-8.
The following procedure should help you identify the subsystems and utilities that are
configured to use an FESA. Specific instructions are provided for identifying the
following:
•
•
•
Expand-over-IP lines
SWAN concentrator
WAN subsystem IOP
Note. You will need to make a note of the information you obtain during this procedure. You
can record this information on the planning worksheet provided or you can use the SCF LOG
command to capture both the command and the display that is produced to a file. To start
logging, type LOG logfilename at the SCF prompt. To stop logging, type LOG at the SCF
prompt.
Perform the following steps:
1. Determine the names of the logical interface (LIF) and the physical interface (PIF)
associated with the FESA to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO LIF command:
INFO LIF $ZZLAN.*
b. Scan the output of the command for the name of the FESA to be replaced.
Make a note of the LIF name and PIF name.
Example 3-1 shows the output of this command. The LIF name is shown in the
Name column and the PIF name is shown in the PIF column. The name of the
Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) CRU is the first part of the PIF name
(for example, E0153).
The PIF name indicates the physical port on the FESA CRU. For example, the
PIF named E0153.0.A. identifies port ENET 0A on the FESA named E0153. In
this example, the LIF associated with the FESA CRU named E0153 is named
L018.
Example 3-1. SCF INFO LIF Command
->INFO LIF $ZZLAN.*
SLSA Info LIF
Name
$ZZLAN.L018
PIF
E0153.0.A
MAC Address
08:00:8E:00:5C:85
Type
Ethernet
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-5
Replacing an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
2. Determine the TCP/IP process, subnet, and Internet Protocol (IP) address
associated with the LIF on the FESA to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO SUBNET command:
b. Scan the output of the command for the LIF you identified in Step 1 and then
find the associated TCP/IP process, subnet, and IP address. Make a note of
this information on the FESA Planning Worksheet on page 3-4.
Example 3-2 shows the output of this command for NonStop TCP/IPv6. The
following information should help you interpret the display:
The TCP/IPv6 process name is displayed in the first line of output
The subnet name is displayed in the Name column
The logical interface (LIF) name is shown in the Devicename column
The Internet Protocol (IP) address is shown in the LinkLevelAddress
column
Note. You can easily scan for Fast Ethernet ServerNet (FESA) CRU subnets by looking at
the TYPE column. FESA CRU subnets are displayed as type ETHERNET.
In Example 3-2, which is a partial output, the FESA CRU LIF named FE10A is
associated with the subnet named SN1 on the TCP/IPv6 process named
$ZZTCP.
Example 3-2. SCF INFO SUBNET Command, NonStop TCP/IPv6
->ASSUME PROCESS $ZZTCP
->INFO SUBNET *
TCPIPV6 Info SUBNET \MYSYS.$ZZTCP.#ZPTM0.*
AF_INET6:
Name
Devicename
SN1
\MYSYS.FE10A
LOOP0
TUN
LinkLevelAddress
fe80::a00:8eff:fe03:ee6f
::1
::170.15.200.50
TYPE
ETHERNET
LOOP
A-TUNNEL
3. Identify the PAM lines configured on the system.
Use the SCF NAMES command:
NAMES $ZZPAM
Example 3-3 on page 3-7 shows the output of this command. Port Access Method
(PAM) line names are shown under the LINE heading. In this example, which is a
partial output, one PAM line is configured named $TOK1.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-6
Replacing an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
Example 3-3. SCF NAMES Command
->NAMES $ZZPAM
PAM Names \SAMCAT.$ZZPAM
PROCESS
$TOK1 $ZZPAM
LINE
$TOK1
PORT
$TOK1.#L1P0002
$TOK1.#L1P0004
MSAP
$TOK1.#SNATR
4. Determine the PAM line associated with the LIF on the FESA to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO LINE command for the PAM line you identified in Step 3:
INFO LINE $line-name
b. Scan the output for a LIF on the FESA to be replaced. On the FESA Planning
Worksheet, record the PAM line associated with the LIF on the FESA.
Example 3-4 shows the output of this command. The LIF name is shown in the
LIF NAME column. The type of CRU is shown in the LIF TYPE column. Fast
Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) CRUs have the LIF type ENET. In this
example, the FESA CRU LIF named L018 is associated with the PAM line
named $TOK1.
Example 3-4. SCF INFO LINE Command
->SCF INFO LINE $TOK1
PAM Info LINE
Name
$TOK1
MAXREQUESTSIZE
3200
LIF NAME
L018
LIF TYPE
ENET
LIF MAC ADDRESS
08:00:8E:00:D1:96
5. Identify the IPXPROTO processes configured on the system.
Use the SCF NAMES SUBSYS command:
NAMES SUBSYS $ZMGR
Example 3-5 on page 3-8 shows the output of this command. IPXPROTO
process names are shown under the PROCESS heading. The two configured
IPXPROTO processes are named $ZNV0 and $ZNV1.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-7
Replacing an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
Example 3-5. SCF NAMES SUBSYS Command
->NAMES SUBSYS $ZMGR
IPXSPX Names SUBSYS \HIMA.$ZMGR
SUBSYS
$ZMGR
PROCESS
$ZNV0
SERVER
$ZNV0.#SAP
PROCESS
$ZNV1
SERVER
$ZNV1.#SAP
6. Determine the IPXPROTO process associated with the LIF on the FESA to be
replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO PROCESS command for the IPXPROTO process you
identified in Step 5:
INFO PROCESS $process-name
b. Scan the output of the command for the LIF you identified in Step 1 and then
find the associated IPX PROTO process. Make a note of the IPX PROTO
process name associated with the LIF on the FESA.
Example 3-6 shows the output of this command. The LIF name is shown in the
I/O Port Name column. In this example, which is partial output, the LIF
named L018 is associated with the IPXPROTO process named $ZNV0.
Example 3-6. SCF INFO PROCESS Command
->SCF INFO PROCESS $ZNV0
IPXSPX Info PROCESS
Process Name
$ZNV0
Primary CPU
2
Backup CPU
3
*I/O Port Name
L018 IPXETH
I/O Port Type
802.3
7. Identify the names of Expand-over-IP lines configured on the system.
Use the following SCF LISTDEV command to display the single-line Expandover-IP lines:
LISTDEV TYPE 63,2
Example 3-7 on page 3-9 shows the output of this command. Two Expandover-IP lines (named $IPC03 and $IPC02) are configured as part of a multiline
path.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-8
Replacing an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
Example 3-7. SCF LISTDEV Command
->LISTDEV TYPE 63,0
LDev Name
PPID
109 $IPYEA 3,9
159 $IPCORE 0,16
BPID
2,7
1,15
Type Rsize
(63,0)
3
(63,0)
3
Pri
199
199
Program
\COWBOY.$DATA00.T9057ADJ.LHOBJ
\COWBOY.$DATA00.T9057ADJ.LHOBJ
In this example, two Expand-over-IP lines (named $IPYEA and $IPCORE) are
configured on the system.
This is an example of the SCF LISTDEV command display for Expand-over-IP lines
that are part of a multiline path:
->LISTDEV TYPE 63,2
LDev Name
56
$IPC03
84
$IPC02
PPID
2,16
2,16
BPID
3,16
3,16
Type Rsize Pri
(63,2)
3 199
(63,2)
3 199
Program
\COWBOY.$DATA00.T9057ADJ.LHOBJ
\COWBOY.$DATA00.T9057ADJ.LHOBJ
8. Determine if any of the Expand-over-IP lines configured on the system use the port
on the FESA to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO LINE command with the DETAIL option for each Expandover-IP line you identified in Step 7:
INFO LINE $line-name, DETAIL
b. Scan the output of the command for the TCP/IP process and IP address used
by the Expand-over-IP line and compare this information to the TCP/IP process
and IP address that you found in Step 2. On the FESA Planning Worksheet on
page 3-4,record the Expand-over-IP line that uses the TCP/IP process and IP
address.
Example 3-8 shows the output of this command. The TCP/IP process used by
the Expand-over-IP line is shown in the Associatedev field and the local IP
address is shown in the SrcIpAddr field. In this example, the Expand-over-IP
line named $IPYEA uses the TCP/IP process named $ZTC23 and the IP
address 172.17.203.37.
Example 3-8. SCF INFO LINE Command
->INFO LINE $IPYEA,DETAIL
EXPAND
Detailed Info
LINE
*Associatedev...
$ZTC23
Framesize......
132
*Timerinactivity 0:00:00.00
*AfterMaxRetries
PASSIVE
*Timerreconnect. 0:00:30.00
*DestIpAddr 172.17.203.37
*SrcIpAddr 172.17.208.20
$IPYEA
*Maxconnects.
0 Delay.... 0:00:00.10
*Speed.......
74666 *Retryprobe
3
*Timerprobe.. 0:00:30.00 Txwindow..
7
StartUp......
OFF Rsize.....
3
L2Protocol...
Net^IP
*DestIpPort 2003
*SrcIpAddr
2003
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-9
Replacing an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
9. Identify the names of the SWAN concentrators configured on the system.
Use the SCF NAMES ADAPTER command:
NAMES ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#*
Example 3-9 shows the output of this command.
Example 3-9. SCF NAMES ADAPTER command
->NAMES ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#*
WanMgr Names ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#*
ADAPTER
$ZZWAN.#S01
$ZZWAN.#S02
10. Determine if any of the SWAN concentrators configured on the system are
connected to the FESA CRU to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO ADAPTER command for each SWAN concentrator you
identified in Step 9:
INFO ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#adapter-name
b. Scan the output of the command for the TCP/IP process and IP address used
by the SWAN concentrator and compare this information to the TCP/IP process
and IP address that you found in Step 2. Make a note of the names of the
SWAN concentrator that is connected to the FESA CRU.
Example 3-10 shows the output of this command. A SWAN concentrator uses
two TCP/IP processes and two Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. The preferred
TCP/IP process used by the SWAN concentrator is shown in the TCPIP Name
field and its associated IP address is shown in the HOSTIP Address field.
The alternate TCP/IP process used by the SWAN concentrator is shown in the
ALTTCPIP Name field and its associated IP address is shown in the
ALTHOSTIP Address field.
In this example, the SWAN concentrator named S01 uses the preferred
TCP/IP process $ZB019, the preferred IP address 172.16.35.16, the alternate
TCP/IP process $ZB01D, and the alternate IP address 172.16.45.16.
Example 3-10. SCF INFO ADAPTER command
->INFO ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#S01
WAN MANAGER Detailed Info Adapter \TAHITI.$ZZWAN.#S01
*TrackId..........
*ALTTCPIP Name....
KERNELCODE........
*SNMPCODE.........
*HOSTIP Address...
*ALTHOSTIP Address
SUBNETMASK........
ALTSUBNETMASK.....
ZWXFF
*TCPIP Name...... $ZB019
$ZB01D
Concentrator Type. SYNC
$SYSTEM.CSS00.C7953P00
$SYSTEM.CSS00.C7849P00
172.16.35.16
172.16.45.16
%HFFFFFF00
%HFFFFFF00
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-10
Replacing an FESA
Redirect or Stop Any Customer Applications Using
the FESA
11. If you determined that a SWAN concentrator is connected to the FESA CRU to be
replaced, determine the names of the WAN subsystem IOPs configured to use that
SWAN concentrator.
a. Use the SCF INFO DEVICE command:
INFO DEVICE $ZZWAN.#*
b. Scan the output of the command for the SWAN concentrator you identified in
Step 10. Make a note of the WAN subsystem IOPs that use the SWAN
concentrator connected to the FESA CRU.
Example 3-11 shows the output of this command. The SWAN concentrator
used by the WAN subsystem input/output process (IOP) is shown in the
Adapter Name field. The IOP named $A10 uses the SWAN concentrator
named S01.
Example 3-11. SCF INFO DEVICE command
->INFO DEVICE $ZZWAN.#*
WAN MANAGER Detailed Info Device \TAHITI.$ZZWAN.#A10
*Adapter Name.....
*Line.............
Profile...........
Preferred Cpu.....
*Type.............
*MULTINAME........
*IOPOBJECT........
S01
*Clip........... 1
0
*Path........... A
MLHSWAN
*Recsize........ 12
2
Alternate Cpu... 3
(63,06)
$PMAU1
\TAHITI.$SYSTEM.SYS00.LHOBJ
Redirect or Stop Any Customer Applications Using the FESA
To redirect or stop customer applications:
1. Notify end users that applications will be temporarily unavailable.
2. Perform any actions necessary to redirect or stop customer applications.
Note. The actions required to perform this step depend on the customer’s application.
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN Concentrator Line
Using the FESA
To stop the a ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator and its associated
WAN subsystem IOPs and communications lines:
Note. A SWAN concentrator has dual Ethernet ports, which can be configured to connect to
ports on two different FESAs; only one Ethernet connection is needed for full function. If the
SWAN concentrator’s second Ethernet port is connected to another FESA (other than the
FESA that you are replacing), you do not need to perform the following steps. However, the
SWAN concentrator will not be fault-tolerant while the FESA is being replaced.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-11
Replacing an FESA
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA
1. Abort the communications lines.
a. Use the SCF ABORT LINE command to stop a single line:
ABORT LINE $line-name
b. Use the SCF ABORT PATH command to stop the lines in an Expand multiline
path:
ABORT PATH $path-name
2. Verify that the lines are in the STOPPED state.
a. Use the SCF STATUS LINE command for a single line:
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 3-12 shows the output of this command. Note that the path is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 3-12. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $LINE1
EXPAND
Status LINE
Name
$LINE1
State
STOPPED
PPID
2, 10
BPID
3, 7
CIU-Path
A
ConMgr-LDEV
91
b. Use the SCF STATUS PATH command for an Expand multiline path:
STATUS PATH $path-name
Example 3-13 shows the output of this command. Note that the path is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 3-13. SCF STATUS PATH Command
->STATUS PATH $PATH
EXPAND
Name
$PATH
Status PATH
State
STOPPED
PPID
2, 15
BPID
3, 15
Lines #
2
3. Stop the WAN subsystem input/output processes (IOPs).
Use the SCF STOP DEVICE command:
STOP DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
4. Verify that the WAN subsystem IOPs are in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS DEVICE command:
STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
Example 3-14 on page 3-13 shows the output of this command. Note that the
WAN subsystem input/output process (IOP) is in the STOPPED state.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-12
Replacing an FESA
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA
Example 3-14. SCF STATUS DEVICE Command
->STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#LINE1
WAN Manager STATUS DEVICE for DEVICE \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#LINE1
State :........ STOPPED
LDEV number.... 110
PPIN........... 2 ,13
BPIN......... 3
,14
5. Stop the SWAN concentrator.
Use the SCF STOP ADAPTER command with the SUB ALL option. The SUB
ALL option stops the ADAPTER object and its subordinate objects.
STOP ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#adapter-name, SUB ALL
6. Verify that the SWAN concentrator is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS ADAPTER command:
STATUS ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#adapter-name
Example 3-15 shows the output of this command. Note that the ServerNet wide
area network (SWAN) concentrator is in the STOPPED state.
Example 3-15. SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command
->STATUS ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#S01
WAN Manager STATUS ADAPTER for ADAPTER \COWB0Y.$ZZWAN.#S01
State....... STOPPED
Number of clips. 3
Clip 1 status : CONFIGURED
Clip 2 status : CONFIGURED
Clip 3 status : CONFIGURED
To Stop an Expand-over-IP Line:
The following describes how to stop an Expand-over-IP line:
1. Abort the Expand-over-IP line.
a. Use the SCF ABORT LINE command to stop a single line:
ABORT LINE $line-name
b. Use the SCF ABORT PATH command to stop all the lines in an Expand
multiline path:
ABORT PATH $path-name
2. Verify that the Expand-over-IP line is in the STOPPED state.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-13
Replacing an FESA
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA
a. Use the SCF STATUS LINE command for a single line:
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 3-16 shows the output of this command. Note that the line is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 3-16. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $LINE1
EXPAND
Status LINE
Name
$LINE1
State
STOPPED
PPID
2, 10
BPID
3, 7
CIU-Path
A
ConMgr-LDEV
91
b. Use the SCF STATUS PATH command for an Expand multiline path:
STATUS PATH $path-name
Example 3-17 shows the output of this command.Note that the path is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 3-17. SCF STATUS PATH Command
->STATUS PATH $PATH
EXPAND
Name
$PATH
Status PATH
State
STOPPED
PPID
2, 15
BPID
3, 15
Lines #
2
3. Stop the WAN subsystem input/output processes (IOPs).
Use the SCF STOP DEVICE command:
STOP DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
4. Verify that the WAN subsystem IOPs are in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS DEVICE command:
STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
Example 3-18 shows the output of this command. Note that the WAN
subsystem input/output process (IOP) is in the STOPPED state.
Example 3-18. SCF STATUS DEVICE Command
->STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#LINE1
WAN Manager STATUS DEVICE for DEVICE \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#LINE1
State :........ STOPPED
LDEV number.... 110
PPIN........... 2 ,13
BPIN......... 3
,14
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-14
Replacing an FESA
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA
To Stop an IPXPROTO Process
The following describes stopping an IPXPROTO process.
1. Stop the IPXPROTO process.
a. If the IPXPROTO process is configured as a generic process, use the Kernel
subsystem SCF ABORT PROCESS command:
ABORT PROCESS $ZZKRN.#gpname
b. If the IPXPROTO process is not configured as a generic process, use the
SLSA subsystem SCF STOP PROCESS command:
STOP PROCESS $process-name
2. Verify that the IPXPROTO process is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS PROCESS command:
STATUS PROCESS $process-name
Example 3-19 shows the output of this command. Note that the IPXPROTO
process is in the STOPPED state.
Example 3-19. SCF STATUS PROCESS Command
->STATUS PROCESS $ZNV2
IPXSPX Status PROCESS
Process Name
$ZNV2
State
STOPPED
Diagnostic State
NORMAL
Trace
OFF
To Stop a Port Access Method (PAM) Line
The following describes stopping a PAM line.
1. Stop the PAM line.
Use the SCF STOP command with the SUB ALL option. The SUB ALL option
aborts the LINE object and all subordinate objects.
STOP LINE $line-name, SUB ALL
2. Verify that the PAM line is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS LINE command.
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 3-20 on page 3-16 shows the output of this command. Note that the
PAM line ($TOK1) is in the STOPPED state.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-15
Replacing an FESA
Determine the Physical Location of the FESA
Example 3-20. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $TOK1
PAM Status LINE
Name
$TOK1
State
STOPPED
Primary
CPU
PIN
1
278
Backup
CPU
-1
PIN
-1
Trace
OFF
To Stop a TCP/IP Subnet
Caution. Make sure that the TACL session from which you are issuing SCF commands is not
running on the subnet that you are about to stop.
Note. To stop and verify a TCP/IP subnet that is configured using Parallel Library TCP/IP, refer
to the TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual.
1. Stop the TCP/IP subnet.
Use the SCF STOP SUBNET command:
STOP SUBNET $tcpip-process-name.#subnet-name
2. Verify that the TCP/IP subnet is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS SUBNET command:
STATUS SUBNET $tcpip-process-name.#subnet-name
Example 3-21 shows the output of this command. Note that the subnet is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 3-21. SCF STOP SUBNET Command
->STATUS SUBNET $ZTC01.#SN2
TCPIP Status SUBNET \COWBOY.$ZTC01.#SN2
Name
#SN2
Status
STOPPED
Determine the Physical Location of the FESA
To determine the physical location of an FESA:
1. Use the SCF INFO ADAPTER command:
INFO ADAPTER $ZZLAN.adapter-name
Example 3-22 on page 3-17 shows the output of this command. Note that, for
this example, the Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) CRU named E0153
is located in group 1, module 1, slot 53.
2. Scan the output of the command for the group, module, and slot location.
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Replacing an FESA
Abort the FESA
Example 3-22. SCF INFO ADAPTER Command
-> INFO ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E0153
SLSA Info ADAPTER
Name
$ZZLAN.E0153
Group
1
Module
1
Slot
53
Type
FESA
Note. If Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapters (FESA) are named using the HP Manufacturing
naming convention, you can easily identify the physical location of the FESA by its name as
follows:
$ZZLAN.Ecabid-slot
where cabid is the two-digit number that identifies the enclosure and slot is the actual
physical slot number in the enclosure. For example, the FESA named E0153 is located in
enclosure 01, slot 53. (See Manufacturing Naming Conventions on page 1-9.)
Abort the FESA
To abort an FESA, perform the following:
1. Stop access to the logical interface (LIF) associated with the Fast Ethernet
ServerNet adapter (FESA) to be replaced.
Use the SCF ABORT LIF command for each LIF:
ABORT LIF $ZZLAN.lif-name
2. Verify that the LIF associated with the FESA to be replaced is in the STOPPED
state.
Use the SCF STATUS LIF command:
STATUS LIF $ZZLAN.*
Example 3-23 shows the output of this command. Note that the logical
interface (LIF) is in the STOPPED state.
Example 3-23. SCF STATUS LIF Command
->STATUS LIF $ZZLAN.*
SLSA Status LIF
Name
$ZZLAN.L018
State
STOPPED
Access State
UP
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Replacing an FESA
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the
FESA
3. Abort the FESA object and its subordinate objects. You can use either SCF or the
TSM Service Application to perform this step.
a. Using SCF to Abort the Adapter:
Use the SCF ABORT ADAPTER command with the SUB ALL option The SUB
ALL option aborts the ADAPTER object and all its subordinate objects.
ABORT ADAPTER $adapter-name, SUB ALL
b. Using the TSM Service Application to Abort the Adapter:
1. Log on to the TSM Service Application.
2. In the Tree view, select the FESA.
3. From the Display menu, choose Actions.
4. Select Abort.
5. Click Perform action.
4. Verify that the FESA ADAPTER object is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS ADAPTER command:
STATUS ADAPTER $adapter-name
Example 3-24 shows the output of this command. Note that the ADAPTER
(E0153) is in the STOPPED state.
Example 3-24. SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command
->STATUS ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E0153
SLSA Status ADAPTER
Name
$ZZLAN.E0153
State
STOPPED
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the FESA
To label the communication cable for an FESA:
1. Find the group, module, and slot in which the Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter
(FESA) is installed.
Figure 3-2 on page 3-19 shows the FESA slot locations.
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Replacing an FESA
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the
FESA
Figure 3-2. FESA Slot Locations
NonStop S-Series I/O
Enclosure
NonStop S-Series Processor
Enclosure
(Service Side)
(Service Side)
I/O enclosures can use slots 51
through 54 for FESA CRUs
Processor enclosures can only use
slots 53 and 54 for FESA CRUs
2. Tag the communication cable connected to the FESA with a physical label,
preferably at both ends. The label should include the following information:
•
•
•
The physical interface (PIF) name assigned to the line. For example,
E0154.0.A.
A description of the equipment and connector to which the cable is to be
connected.
The slot location of the FESA to which the cable is connected.
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Replacing an FESA
Replace the FESA
Replace the FESA
The following explains how to replace the FESA. You must remove the adapter and
then replace it.
Table 3-2. Replacement Checklist
Step
Description
1.
Review Standard Operating Practices
2.
Remove the Adapter
3.
Inspect the New FESA and Backplane
4.
Unpack and Install the New FESA
5.
Check the Installation of the New FESA
Note. Whenever you handle an Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA), you should follow
standard operating practices to avoid damage to the equipment.
Review Standard Operating Practices
Standard operating practices include the following:
•
•
•
•
Work in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) protected environment.
Remove all metal accessories before working with electrical equipment.
Restrain any dangling items that can get caught in equipment.
Obtain an ESD protection kit and follow the directions that come with the kit.
Figure 3-3 on page 3-21 illustrates an ESD protected environment.
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Replacing an FESA
Review Standard Operating Practices
Figure 3-3. ESD Protected Environment
System Enclosure (Appearance
Side)
ESD wriststrap clipped to
door latch stud (or to any
exposed, unpainted, metal
surface on the enclosure
frame.)
ESD wriststrap
with clip
ESD floor mats
ESD antistatic table mat.
Mat should be connected to a soft
ground
(1 megohm min. to 10 megohm max.)
Clip 15 inch straight
ground cord to•screw
screw
on grounded outlet
cover.
CDT 693.CDD
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Replacing an FESA
Remove the Adapter
Remove the Adapter
The following describes how to remove the adapter.
1. Disconnect the communications cables from the FESA.
2. Put on your electrostatic discharge (ESD) wriststrap and connect the grounding clip
securely to an exposed, unpainted, metal surface on the service side of the system
enclosure, such as the processor multifunction (PMF) CRU or I/O multifunction
(IOMF) CRU ventilation holes
The figure shows how to connect the grounding clip to the ventilation holes on the
PMF or IOMF CRU.
Figure 3-4. Grounding Clip
Processor Multifunction (PMF) CRU or
I/O Multifunction (IOMF) CRU
Grounding
Clip
To Grounding
Wriststrap
CDT 081.CDD
3. Unlatch the ejector on the FESA by pressing the blue-green tab on the ejector and
pulling the ejector outward to unseat the FESA from the backplane.
4. Grasp the FESA by its ejector in one hand and slowly pull the FESA out of the slot
while supporting the bottom edge of the FESA with the other hand.
Note. The FESA weighs 6.75 pounds (3 kilograms).
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Replacing an FESA
Remove the Adapter
Figure 3-5 shows how to pull the FESA out of the slot.
Figure 3-5. Removing an FESA
CDT 059.CDD
5. Place the FESA in an ESD protective bag and return it to its original packing
container.
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Replacing an FESA
Inspect the New FESA and Backplane
Inspect the New FESA and Backplane
To inspect an FESA:
Visually inspect the FESA and the backplane connector for damage. Use a flashlight, if
necessary, to check for bent or broken pins. You can damage pins by bumping or
jamming the FESA's shell against a surface, which can partially close the hole in the
connector-pin socket. If the FESA has a damaged connector-pin socket, do not install
it.
Caution. If you plug an FESA that has a damaged socket into a slot, that FESA's backplane
pins and the connectors on other adapter boards that are plugged into that slot can be
damaged. Moving a damaged board from slot to slot can damage other slots and other adapter
boards.
Unpack and Install the New FESA
The following paragraphs describe how to unpack and install the new FESA.
Note. Whenever you handle an Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA), you should follow
standard operating practices to avoid damage to the equipment. See Review Standard
Operating Practices on page 2-7.
Unpack the FESA
The following explains how to unpack the FESA:
1. Put on the electrostatic discharge (ESD) wriststrap and attach the grounding clip to
the antistatic mat.
2. Place the package containing the FESA on the antistatic mat.
3. Open the packing container and remove the FESA.
Caution. When opening the packing container, be careful not to cut into the ESD protective
bag.
4. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the antistatic mat and
connect it to an exposed, unpainted metal surface on the FESA.
5. Grasp the FESA by its ejector in one hand, support the bottom edge of the FESA
with the other hand, and carry the FESA to the service side of the system
enclosure and set it down.
Note. The FESA weights 6.75 pounds (3 kilograms)
6. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the FESA and connect it
to an exposed, unpainted, metal surface on the service side of the system
enclosure, such as the ventilation holes on the processor multifunction (PMF) or
I/O multifunction (IOMF) CRU.
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Replacing an FESA
Unpack and Install the New FESA
Figure 3-4 on page 3-22 shows how to connect the grounding clip to the ventilation
holes on the PMF or IOMF CRU.
Install the FESA
The following explains how to insert the FESA into the system enclosure.
1. With the ejector on the FESA in the full-open position (Figure 3-6), grasp the FESA
by the ejector with one hand and support the bottom edge of the FESA with the
other hand as shown in Figure 3-7. Hold the FESA so that its ejector is at the top
and insert the FESA into the upper part of the carrier.
Figure 3-6. Ejector Shown in Full-Open Position
CDT 500.CDD
2. Push the FESA to the rear of the slot, but don't force it.
Caution. Apply equal pressure to both the top and bottom of the FESA when pushing it into
the slot to avoid damaging the connector pins. If pins are damaged, both the FESA and the
backplane (or enclosure) must be replaced.
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Replacing an FESA
Unpack and Install the New FESA
Figure 3-7. Installing an FESA
CDT 058.CDD
3. Press the blue-green tab on the FESA ejector and latch the ejector to seat the
FESA against the backplane.
4. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the enclosure.
5. Connect the RJ-45 connector to the Ethernet port on the FESA. Connect the other
end of the cable to your Ethernet hub. Use the label on the cable to make sure you
connect the cable to the proper port and Ethernet hub.
Figure 3-8 on page 3-27 shows the connection of the communication cable
between the FESA and vendor Ethernet hub.
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Replacing an FESA
Unpack and Install the New FESA
Figure 3-8. FESA Hardware Connection
FAST ETHERNET SERVERNET ADAPTER
RJ 45 Connector
RX
TX
LNK
COL
FD
100
To LAN
Ethernet
Hub
CDT 002.CDD
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Replacing an FESA
Check the Installation of the New FESA
Check the Installation of the New FESA
To check the installation of an FESA:
1. Make sure that the power-on LED (green light) is on.
Note. When the adapter is inserted, the fault LED (amber) remains on until the service
processor has completed its start-up configuration. The fault LED also comes on when
SLSA detects a POST failure.
Figure 3-9 on page 3-29 shows the location of the power-on LED and fault LED.
2. If the power-on LED does not come on, do one or both of the following:
•
•
Reseat the FESA.
Check the FESA and backplane connector for damaged pins.
Note the Following Error Conditions
•
•
If the power-on LED does not come on after you reseat the FESA, you must
replace the FESA
If the FESA or backplane connector have damaged pins, both the FESA and
backplane (or enclosure) must be replaced. For backplane replacement
instructions, refer to the HP NonStop S-Series Service Provider Supplement.
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Replacing an FESA
Check the Installation of the New FESA
Figure 3-9. FESA External Indicators
Power-On LED (green)
Ejector
Fault LED (amber)
Ethernet Port
Transmit Data (green)
Receive Data (green)
Full-Duplex
TX
RX
LNK
FD
100
COL
Link Integrity (green)
Collision Detect (green)
100 Mbps
CDT 001.CDD
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Replacing an FESA
Resume Operations
Resume Operations
The following describes starting the new FESA.
Table 3-3. Resuming Operations Checklist
Step
Description
1.
Start the New FESA
2.
Restart the Communications Lines
3.
Verify that the Communications Lines are Restarted
4.
Resume Customer Applications
Comments
See Note below.
Note. You need to perform this step if you stopped communications lines or if an IPXPROTO
process was using the FESA CRU that was replaced. IPXPROTO processes must be manually
restarted after an FESA CRU is replaced.
Start the New FESA
Start the Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) ADAPTER object and its
subordinate SAC and PIF objects.
You can use either SCF or the TSM Service Application to start the FESA.
Using SCF to Start the FESA
Use the SCF START ADAPTER command with the SUB ALL option. The SUB ALL
option starts the ADAPTER object and its subordinate objects.
START ADAPTER $adapter-name, SUB ALL
Using the TSM Service Application to Start the FESA
1. Log on to the TSM Service Application.
2. In the Tree view, select the FESA.
3. From the Display menu, choose Actions.
4. Select Start.
5. Click Perform action.
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Replacing an FESA
Start the New FESA
Verify that Objects Are in the STARTED State
Use the following SCF STATUS commands:
1. Verify that the FESA ADAPTER object is in the STARTED state.
Use the SCF STATUS ADAPTER command:
STATUS ADAPTER $ZZLAN.adapter-name.*
Example 3-25 shows the output of the SCF STATUS ADAPTER command.
Note that the ADAPTER is in the STARTED state.
Example 3-25. SCF STATUS ADAPTER command
->STATUS ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E0153
SLSA Status ADAPTER
Name
$ZZLAN.E0153.0
State
STARTED
2. Verify that the ServerNet addressable controller (SAC) is in the STARTED state.
Use the SCF STATUS SAC command:
STATUS SAC $ZZLAN.adapter-name.*
Example 3-26 shows the output of the SCF STATUS SAC command. Note that
the ServerNet addressable controller (SAC) is in the STARTED state.
Example 3-26. SCF STATUS SAC command
->STATUS SAC $ZZLAN.E0153.*
SLSA Status SAC
Name
$ZZLAN.E0153.0
Owner
0
State
STARTED
3. Verify that the physical interface (PIF) is in the STARTED state.
Use the SCF STATUS PIF command:
STATUS PIF $ZZLAN.adapter-name.*
Example 3-27 shows the output of the SCF STATUS PIF command. Note that
the physical interface (PIF) is in the STARTED state.
Example 3-27. SCF STATUS PIF command
->STATUS PIF $ZZLAN.E0153.*
SLSA Status PIF
Name
$ZZLAN.E0153.0.A
State
STARTED
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Replacing an FESA
Start the New FESA
4. Start the logical interface (LIF).
Use the SCF START LIF command for the LIF:
START LIF $ZZLAN.lif-name
5. Verify that the LIF is in the STARTED state.
Use the SCF STATUS LIF command:
STATUS LIF $ZZLAN.*
Example 3-28 shows the output of the SCF STATUS LIF command. Note that
the logical interface (LIF) is in the STARTED state.
Example 3-28. SCF STATUS LIF command
->STATUS LIF $ZZLAN.*
SLSA Status LIF
Name
$ZZLAN.L018
State
STARTED
Access State
UP
Troubleshooting: If the FESA SAC Object Is Still in the
STARTING State
If the SCF SAC STATUS command shows that the FESA SAC object is still in the
STARTING state after a few minutes or if the TSM Service Application indicates that
the resource needs attention, do the following:
1. Check for event messages in the Event Message Service (EMS) log. Use the TSM
EMS Event Viewer Application to view the EMS log:
1. From the File menu, select Log on.
2. Select the system.
3. Type the NonStop Kernel user name and password.
4. Click OK.
5. From the Setup menu, set up Timeframe, Source, or Subsystem criteria.
Refer to the Operator Messages Manual for cause, effect, and recovery
information for event messages.
2. Check the firmware version of the new FESA. (When the AUTOFIRMUP attribute
is set to ON, which is the default, the firmware file is automatically downloaded to
the SAC when the SAC is started. Although the firmware version is automatically
updated by the system, you should verify the firmware version.)
Use the TSM Service Application to check the firmware version:
1. Log on to the TSM Service Application.
2. From the Display menu, choose Firmware Update.
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Replacing an FESA
Restart the Communications Lines
3. From the Resource type pull-down menu, select resource type.
4. From the Display pull-down menu, select Down-rev only.
A list of resources whose firmware is older than the version of the SYSnn is
displayed in the Available list box. Do the following:
5. Double-click on the resource. The resource is displayed in the Selected list
box.
6. Click Perform action to initiate the firmware update.
Restart the Communications Lines
Start the communications lines and SWAN concentrator using the FESA:
1. Start the TCP/IP subnet.
Note. To start a TCP/IP subnet that is configured using Parallel Library TCP/IP, refer to the
TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual. To start a TCP/IP subnet
that is configured using NonStop TCP/IPv6, refer to the TCP/IPv6 Configuration and
Management Manual.
Use the SCF START SUBNET command:
START SUBNET $tcpip-process-name.#subnet-name
2. Start an IPXPROTO process.
Use the SCF START PROCESS command:
START PROCESS $process-name
3. Start a Port Access Method (PAM) line.
Use the SCF START LINE command with the SUB ALL option. The SUB ALL
option starts the LINE object and its subordinate objects.
START LINE $line-name, SUB ALL
4. Start an Expand-over-IP line.
a. Start the WAN subsystem input/output process (IOP).
Use the SCF START DEVICE command:
START DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
b. Start the line(s).
1. Use the SCF START LINE command to start a single line:
START LINE $line-name
2. Use the SCF START PATH command to start all the lines in an Expand
multiline path:
START PATH $line-name
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Replacing an FESA
Verify that the Communications Lines are Restarted
5. Start the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator and its associated
WAN subsystem IOPs and communications lines:
a. Start the SWAN concentrator.
Use the SCF START ADAPTER command with the SUB ALL option:
START ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#adapter-name, SUB ALL
b. Start the WAN subsystem IOPs.
Use the SCF START DEVICE command:
START DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
c. Start the line(s).
1. Use the SCF START LINE command to start a single line:
START LINE $line-name
2. Use the SCF START PATH command to start all the lines in an Expand
multiline path:
START PATH $path-name
Verify that the Communications Lines are Restarted
Verify that communications lines using an FESA are started:
1. Verify that the TCP/IP subnet is started.
Note. To verify a TCP/IP subnet that is configured using Parallel Library TCP/IP, refer to the
TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual. To verify a TCP/IP subnet
that is configured using NonStop TCP/IPv6, refer to the TCP/IPv6 Configuration and
Management Manual.
Use the SCF STATUS SUBNET command:
STATUS SUBNET $tcpip-process-name.#subnet-name
Example 3-29 shows the output of this command. Note that the subnet (#SN2)
is in the STARTED state.
Example 3-29. SCF STATUS SUBNET Command
->STATUS SUBNET $ZTC01.#SN2
TCPIP Status SUBNET \COWBOY.$ZTC01.#SN2
Name
#SN2
Status
STARTED
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Replacing an FESA
Verify that the Communications Lines are Restarted
2. Verify that the IPXPROTO process is started.
Use the SCF STATUS PROCESS command.
STATUS PROCESS $line-name
Example 3-30 shows the output of this command. Note that the IPXPROTO
process ($ZNV2) is in the STARTED state.
Example 3-30. SCF STATUS PROCESS Command
->STATUS PROCESS $ZNV2
IPXSPX Status PROCESS
Process Name
$ZNV2
State
STARTED
Diagnostic State
NORMAL
Trace
OFF
3. Verify that a Port Access Method (PAM) line is started.
Use the SCF STATUS LINE command:
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 3-31 shows the output of this command. Note that the Port Access
Method (PAM) line ($TOK1) is in the STARTED state.
Example 3-31. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $TOK1
Name
$TOK1
State
STARTED
Primary
CPU
PIN
1
278
Backup
CPU
PIN
-1
-1
Trace
OFF
4. Verify that an Expand-over-IP line is started:
a. Verify that the WAN subsystem IOP is in the STARTED state.
Use the SCF STATUS DEVICE command:
STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
b. Verify that the line is in the STARTED state.
1. Use the SCF STATUS LINE command for a single line:
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 3-32 on page 3-36 shows the output of this command. Note that
the line is in the STARTED state.
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Replacing an FESA
Verify that the Communications Lines are Restarted
Example 3-32. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $LINE1
EXPAND
Name
$SATHO0
Status LINE1
State
STARTED
PPID
2, 10
BPID
3, 7
CIU-Path
A
ConMgr-LDEV
91
2. Use the SCF STATUS PATH command for an Expand multiline path:
STATUS PATH $path-name
Example 3-33 shows the output of this command. Note that the path is in
the STARTED state.
Example 3-33. SCF STATUS PATH Command
->STATUS PATH $PATH
EXPAND
Name
$PSHOT
Status PATH
State
STARTED
PPID
2, 15
BPID
3, 15
Lines #
2
5. Verify that the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator and its
associated WAN subsystem IOPs communications lines are started:
a. Verify that the SWAN concentrator is in the STARTED state.
Use the SCF STATUS ADAPTER with the SUB ALL option. The SUB ALL
option displays status information for the ADAPTER object and its
subordinate objects.
STATUS ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#adapter-name, SUB ALL
Example 3-34 on page 3-37 shows the output of this command. Note that
the ADAPTER, SERVER, PATH, and TASK objects are in the STARTED
state.
Note. Detailed information for only one communications line interface processor
(CLIP) is included in the display.
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Replacing an FESA
Verify that the Communications Lines are Restarted
Example 3-34. SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command
->STATUS ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#S01, SUB ALL
WAN Manager STATUS ADAPTER for ADAPTER \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#S01
State....... STARTED
Number of clips. 3
Clip 1 status : CONFIGURED
Clip 2 status : CONFIGURED
Clip 3 status : CONFIGURED
WAN Manager STATUS SERVER for CLIP \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#S01.1
State :...... STARTED
Path A.......: CONFIGURED
Path B.......: CONFIGURED
Number of lines. 2
Line............ 0
: FREE
Line............ 1
: FREE
WAN Manager STATUS PATH for PATH \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#S01.1.A
State :...... STARTED
MEDIA TYPE..... ETHERNET
MEDIA ADDRESS.. %H08008E004814
WAN Manager STATUS PATH for PATH \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#S01.1.B
State :...... STARTED
MEDIA TYPE..... ETHERNET
MEDIA ADDRESS.. %H08008E004815
WAN Manager STATUS TASK for TASK \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#S01.1.DIAG
State :...... STARTED
WAN Manager STATUS TASK for TASK \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#S01.1.DLC0
State :...... STARTED
CLIP Path Name.... A
TCPIP Port used.... 5000
CLIP Protocol Id.. 1
Interface Type..... 0
Clip Program...... $SYSTEM.CSS01.C1096P00
Program timestamp. 17 Jan 1997, 11:35:04.890
WAN Manager STATUS TASK for TASK \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#S01.1.DLC1
State :........ STARTED
CLIP Path Name.... A
TCPIP Port used.... 5001
CLIP Protocol Id.. 1
Interface Type..... 0
Clip Program...... $SYSTEM.CSS01.C1096P00
Program timestamp. 26 Mar 1997, 13:36:04.981
b. Verify that the WAN subsystem IOPs are in the STARTED state.
Use the SCF STATUS DEVICE command:
STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
Example 3-35 shows the output of this command. Note that the WAN
subsystem input/output process (IOP) is in the STARTED state.
Example 3-35. SCF STATUS DEVICE Command
->STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#LINE1
WAN Manager STATUS DEVICE for DEVICE \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#LINE1
State :........ STARTED
LDEV number.... 110
PPIN........... 2 ,13
BPIN......... 3
,14
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-37
Replacing an FESA
Verify that the Communications Lines are Restarted
c. Verify that the lines are in the STARTED state.
1. Use the SCF STATUS LINE command for a single line:
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 3-36 shows the output of these commands. Note that the line is in
the STARTED state.
Example 3-36. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $LINE1
EXPAND
Name
$SATHO0
Status LINE1
State
STARTED
PPID
2, 10
BPID
3, 7
CIU-Path
A
ConMgr-LDEV
91
2. Use the SCF STATUS PATH command for an Expand multiline path:
STATUS PATH $path-name
Example 3-37 shows the output of these commands. Note that the path is
in the STARTED state.
Example 3-37. SCF STATUS PATH Command
->STATUS PATH $PATH
EXPAND
Status PATH
Name
$PSHOT
State
STARTED
PPID
2, 15
BPID
3, 15
Lines #
2
Troubleshooting: If an Object is Not in the STARTED State
If an object is not in the STARTED state, check for event messages in the Event
Message System (EMS) log. Use the TSM EMS Event Viewer Application to view the
EMS log:
1. From the File menu, select Log on.
2. Select the system.
3. Type the NonStop Kernel user name and password.
4. Click OK.
5. From the Setup menu, select either Timeframe, Source, or Subsystem criteria, or
all three.
Refer to the Operator Messages Manual for cause, effect, and recovery information for
event messages.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-38
Replacing an FESA
Resume Customer Applications
Resume Customer Applications
To resume customer applications:
1. Perform any actions necessary to resume customer applications.
Note. The actions required to perform this step depend on the customer's application.
2. Notify end users that applications are now available.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-39
Replacing an FESA
Resume Customer Applications
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
3-40
4
Relocating an FESA
This section describes how to relocate a Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) that
has been previously installed in an HP NonStop S-series system enclosure. The FESA
can be relocated without shuttind down the system.
Note. As of G06.22 and later RVUs, the HP NonStop Open System Management (OSM)
Interface replaces TSM as the system management tool of choice for NonStop systems. For
instructions on using OSM or migrating to OSM, refer to the OSM documentation for your RVU.
Caution. If a previously installed FESA and backplane connector have damaged pins, remove
the FESA and install a filler panel in the vacant slot. Attach red tags to the filler panel to identify
the slot. Do not move the damaged FESA to a different, undamaged slot. Both the FESA and
backplane (or enclosure) must be replaced. For backplane replacement, refer to the backplane
replacement section of the HP NonStop S-Series Service Provider Supplement available in the
G-series NonStop Technical Library (NTL) collection.
This section includes the following topics:
Prepare to Relocate an FESA
Page 4-2
Remove and Install the FESA
Page 4-21
Resume Operations
Page 4-30
Note. Whenever you handle an FESA, you should follow standard operating practices to avoid
damage to the equipment. See Review Standard Operating Practices on page 4-21.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-1
Relocating an FESA
Prepare to Relocate an FESA
Prepare to Relocate an FESA
FESAs can be installed in slots 53 and 54 of a processor enclosure and in slots 51, 52,
53, and 54 of an I/O enclosure. See Figure 4-2 on page 4-20. When no FESA is
installed in a slot, a ServerNet adapter filler panel occupies the empty slot. (Therefore,
a ServerNet adapter filler panel can possibly occupy slots 53 and 54 of a processor
enclosure or slots 51 through 54 of an I/O enclosure.) The filler panel maintains proper
air flow and reduces electromagnetic interference (EMI).
Note. You can configure the Parallel Library TCP/IP and NonStop TCP/IPv6 subsystems with
the Ethernet failover feature, which provides fault-tolerance at the adapter level.
Table 4-1 summarizes the steps for preparing to relocate an FESA.
Note. FESAs (including FESA connections via S-series I/O enclosures) are not supported on
NonStop BladeSystems.
Table 4-1. Preparation Checklist
Step
Description
Comments
1.
Gather the Proper Tools.
2.
Print the FESA Planning Worksheet.
3.
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA.
4.
Redirect or Stop Any Customer Applications Using
the FESA.
5.
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA.
6.
Determine the Physical Location of the FESA.
7.
Stop the FESA.
8.
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the
FESA.
Figure 4-1
Gather the Proper Tools
You will need the following tools to replace an adapter:
Tool
Used to. . .
Electrostatic discharge
(ESD) wriststrap with
grounding clip
Protect the adapter from damage caused by
electrostatic discharge.
Antistatic mat
(recommended)
Provide a static-free environment for removal and
installation of an adapter.
Flashlight
Check the connectors for bent or broken pins.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-2
Relocating an FESA
Gather the Proper Tools
Note. An ESD protection kit can be purchased from HP using the following order number and
part number:
Order Number: ESD-Kit
Part Number: T99247
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-3
Relocating an FESA
Print the FESA Planning Worksheet
Print the FESA Planning Worksheet
Print Figure 4-1, the FESA Planning Worksheet, and use it to record information about
an Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA).
Figure 4-1. FESA Planning Worksheet
FESA CRU Planning Worksheet
Print this worksheet and use it to record information about a Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) CRU.
Logical interface (LIF) and Physical Interface (LIF):
LIF:
PIF:
TCP/IP Process, Subnet, and Internet Protocol (IP) Address
LIF:
TCP/IP Process:
Subnet:
IP Address:
Port Access Method (PAM) Line:
LIF:
PAM Line:
IPXPROTO Process :
LIF:
IPXPROTO Process:
Expand-Over-IP Line:
Expand Line:
ServerNet Wide Area Network (SWAN) Concentrator:
SWAN:
WAN Subsystem Input/Output Process (IOP):
SWAN:
WAN IOP:
CDT040.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-4
Relocating an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet Wide Area
Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
The subsystems and utilities that use the SLSA subsystem to access an FESA are
illustrated in Figure 1-2 on page 1-8.
The following procedure should help you identify the subsystems and utilities that are
configured to use an FESA. Specific instructions are provided for identifying the
following:
•
•
•
Expand-over-IP lines
SWAN concentrator
WAN subsystem IOP.
Note. You will need to make a note of the information you obtain during this procedure. You
can record this information on the planning worksheet provided or you can use the SCF LOG
command to capture both the command and the display that is produced to a file. To start
logging, type LOG logfilename at the SCF prompt. To stop logging, type LOG at the SCF
prompt.
Perform the following steps:
1. Determine the names of the logical interface (LIF) and the physical interface (PIF)
associated with the FESA to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO LIF command:
INFO LIF $ZZLAN.*
b. Scan the output of the command for the name of the FESA to be replaced.
Make a note of the LIF name and PIF name.
Example 4-1 shows the output of this command. The Logical interface (LIF)
name is shown in the Name column and the physical interface (PIF) name is
shown in the PIF column. The name of the Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter
(FESA) CRU is the first part of the PIF name (for example, E0153).
The PIF name indicates the physical port on the FESA CRU. For example, the
PIF named E0153.0.A. identifies port ENET 0A on the FESA named E0153. In
this example, the LIF associated with the FESA CRU named E0153 is named
L018.
Example 4-1. SCF INFO LIF Command
->INFO LIF $ZZLAN.*
SLSA Info LIF
Name
$ZZLAN.L018
PIF
E0153.0.A
MAC Address
08:00:8E:00:5C:85
Type
Ethernet
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-5
Relocating an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
2. Determine the TCP/IP process, subnet, and Internet Protocol (IP) address
associated with the LIF on the FESA to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO SUBNET command:
INFO SUBNET $*.*
b. Scan the output of the command for the LIF you identified in Step 1 and then
find the associated TCP/IP process, subnet, and IP address. Make a note of
this information on the FESA Planning Worksheet on page 4-4.
Example 4-2 shows the output of this command. The following information
should help you interpret the display:
The TCP/IP process name is displayed in the first line of output
The subnet name is displayed in the Name column
The logical interface (LIF) name is shown in the Devicename column
The Internet Protocol (IP) address is shown in the *IPADDRESS column
Note. You can easily scan for Fast Ethernet ServerNet (FESA) CRU subnets by looking at
the TYPE column. FESA CRU subnets are displayed as type ETHERNET.
In Example 4-2, which is a partial output, the FESA CRU LIF named L018 is
associated with the subnet named #SN1 on the TCP/IP process named
$ZB018 and has the IP address 172.16.40.64.
Example 4-2. SCF INFO SUBNET Command
->INFO SUBNET $*.*
TCPIP Info SUBNET \DRAGON.$ZB018.*
Name
Devicename
*IPADDRESS
TYPE
*SUBNETMASK SuName
#LOOP0
#SN1
#SN2
\NOSYS.$NOIOP
\DRAGON.L018
\DRAGON.L01C
127.0.0.1
172.16.40.64
172.16.35.15
LOOP-BACK %HFF000000
ETHERNET %HFFFFFF00
SNAP
%HFFFFFF00
QIO
*R
OFF
ON
ON
N
N
N
3. Identify the PAM lines configured on the system.
Use the SCF NAMES command:
NAMES $ZZPAM
Example 4-3 on page 4-7 shows the output of this command. Port Access Method
(PAM) line names are shown under the LINE heading. In this example, which is a
partial output, one PAM line is configured named $TOK1.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-6
Relocating an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
Example 4-3. SCF NAMES Command
->NAMES $ZZPAM
PAM Names \SAMCAT.$ZZPAM
PROCESS
$TOK1 $ZZPAM
LINE
$TOK1
PORT
$TOK1.#L1P0002
$TOK1.#L1P0004
MSAP
$TOK1.#SNATR
4. Determine the PAM line associated with the LIF on the FESA to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO LINE command for the PAM line you identified in Step 3:
INFO LINE $line-name
b. Scan the output for a LIF on the FESA to be replaced. On the FESA Planning
Worksheet, record the PAM line associated with the LIF on the FESA.
Example 4-4 shows the output of this command. The LIF name is shown in the
LIF NAME column. The type of CRU is shown in the LIF TYPE column. Fast
Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) CRUs have the LIF type ENET. In this
example, the FESA CRU LIF named L018 is associated with the PAM line
named $TOK1.
Example 4-4. SCF INFO LINE Command
->SCF INFO LINE $TOK1
PAM Info LINE
Name
$TOK1
MAXREQUESTSIZE
3200
LIF NAME
L018
LIF TYPE
ENET
LIF MAC ADDRESS
08:00:8E:00:D1:96
5. Identify the IPXPROTO processes configured on the system.
Use the SCF NAMES SUBSYS command:
NAMES SUBSYS $ZMGR
Example 4-5 on page 4-8 shows the output of this command. IPXPROTO
process names are shown under the PROCESS heading. The two configured
IPXPROTO processes are named $ZNV0 and $ZNV1.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-7
Relocating an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
Example 4-5. SCF NAMES SUBSYS Command
->NAMES SUBSYS $ZMGR
IPXSPX Names SUBSYS \HIMA.$ZMGR
SUBSYS
$ZMGR
PROCESS
$ZNV0
SERVER
$ZNV0.#SAP
PROCESS
$ZNV1
SERVER
$ZNV1.#SAP
6. Determine the IPXPROTO process associated with the LIF on the FESA to be
replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO PROCESS command for the IPXPROTO process you
identified in Step 5:
INFO PROCESS $process-name
b. Scan the output of the command for the LIF you identified in Step 1 and then
find the associated IPX PROTO process. Make a note of the IPX PROTO
process name associated with the LIF on the FESA.
Example 4-6 shows the output of this command. The LIF name is shown in the
I/O Port Name column. In this example, which is partial output, the LIF
named L018 is associated with the IPXPROTO process named $ZNV0.
Example 4-6. SCF INFO PROCESS Command
->SCF INFO PROCESS $ZNV0
IPXSPX Info PROCESS
Process Name
$ZNV0
Primary CPU
2
Backup CPU
3
*I/O Port Name
L018 IPXETH
I/O Port Type
802.3
7. Identify the names of Expand-over-IP lines configured on the system.
Use the following SCF LISTDEV command to display the single-line Expandover-IP lines:
LISTDEV TYPE 63,2
Example 4-7 on page 4-9 shows the output of this command. Two Expandover-IP lines (named $IPC03 and $IPC02) are configured as part of a multiline
path.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-8
Relocating an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
Example 4-7. SCF LISTDEV Command
->LISTDEV TYPE 63,0
LDev Name
PPID
109 $IPYEA 3,9
159 $IPCORE 0,16
BPID
2,7
1,15
Type Rsize
(63,0)
3
(63,0)
3
Pri
199
199
Program
\COWBOY.$DATA00.T9057ADJ.LHOBJ
\COWBOY.$DATA00.T9057ADJ.LHOBJ
In this example, two Expand-over-IP lines (named $IPYEA and $IPCORE) are
configured on the system.
This is an example of the SCF LISTDEV command display for Expand-over-IP lines
that are part of a multiline path:
->LISTDEV TYPE 63,2
LDev Name
56
$IPC03
84
$IPC02
PPID
2,16
2,16
BPID
3,16
3,16
Type Rsize Pri
(63,2)
3 199
(63,2)
3 199
Program
\COWBOY.$DATA00.T9057ADJ.LHOBJ
\COWBOY.$DATA00.T9057ADJ.LHOBJ
8. Determine if any of the Expand-over-IP lines configured on the system use the port
on the FESA to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO LINE command with the DETAIL option for each Expandover-IP line you identified in Step 7:
INFO LINE $line-name, DETAIL
b. Scan the output of the command for the TCP/IP process and IP address used
by the Expand-over-IP line and compare this information to the TCP/IP process
and IP address that you found in Step 2. On the FESA Planning Worksheet on
page 4-4,record the Expand-over-IP line that uses the TCP/IP process and IP
address.
Example 4-8 shows the output of this command. The TCP/IP process used by
the Expand-over-IP line is shown in the Associatedev field and the local IP
address is shown in the SrcIpAddr field. In this example, the Expand-over-IP
line named $IPYEA uses the TCP/IP process named $ZTC23 and the IP
address 172.17.203.37.
Example 4-8. SCF INFO LINE Command
->INFO LINE $IPYEA,DETAIL
EXPAND
Detailed Info
LINE
*Associatedev...
$ZTC23
Framesize......
132
*Timerinactivity 0:00:00.00
*AfterMaxRetries
PASSIVE
*Timerreconnect. 0:00:30.00
*DestIpAddr 172.17.203.37
*SrcIpAddr 172.17.208.20
$IPYEA
*Maxconnects.
0 Delay.... 0:00:00.10
*Speed.......
74666 *Retryprobe
3
*Timerprobe.. 0:00:30.00 Txwindow..
7
StartUp......
OFF Rsize.....
3
L2Protocol...
Net^IP
*DestIpPort 2003
*SrcIpAddr
2003
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-9
Relocating an FESA
Identify Any Communications Lines and ServerNet
Wide Area Network (SWAN) Using the FESA
9. Identify the names of the SWAN concentrators configured on the system.
Use the SCF NAMES ADAPTER command:
NAMES ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#*
Example 4-9 shows the output of this command.
Example 4-9. SCF NAMES ADAPTER command
->NAMES ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#*
WanMgr Names ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#*
ADAPTER
$ZZWAN.#S01
$ZZWAN.#S02
10. Determine if any of the SWAN concentrators configured on the system are
connected to the FESA CRU to be replaced.
a. Use the SCF INFO ADAPTER command for each SWAN concentrator you
identified in Step 9:
INFO ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#adapter-name
b. Scan the output of the command for the TCP/IP process and IP address used
by the SWAN concentrator and compare this information to the TCP/IP process
and IP address that you found in Step 2. Make a note of the names of the
SWAN concentrator that is connected to the FESA CRU.
Example 4-10 shows the output of this command. A SWAN concentrator uses
two TCP/IP processes and two Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. The preferred
TCP/IP process used by the SWAN concentrator is shown in the TCPIP Name
field and its associated IP address is shown in the HOSTIP Address field.
The alternate TCP/IP process used by the SWAN concentrator is shown in the
ALTTCPIP Name field and its associated IP address is shown in the
ALTHOSTIP Address field.
In this example, the SWAN concentrator named S01 uses the preferred
TCP/IP process $ZB019, the preferred IP address 172.16.35.16, the alternate
TCP/IP process $ZB01D, and the alternate IP address 172.16.45.16.
Example 4-10. SCF INFO ADAPTER command
->INFO ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#S01
WAN MANAGER Detailed Info Adapter \TAHITI.$ZZWAN.#S01
*TrackId..........
*ALTTCPIP Name....
KERNELCODE........
*SNMPCODE.........
*HOSTIP Address...
*ALTHOSTIP Address
SUBNETMASK........
ALTSUBNETMASK.....
ZWXFF
*TCPIP Name...... $ZB019
$ZB01D
Concentrator Type. SYNC
$SYSTEM.CSS00.C7953P00
$SYSTEM.CSS00.C7849P00
172.16.35.16
172.16.45.16
%HFFFFFF00
%HFFFFFF00
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-10
Relocating an FESA
Redirect or Stop Any Customer Applications Using
the FESA
11. If you determined that a SWAN concentrator is connected to the FESA CRU to be
replaced, determine the names of the WAN subsystem IOPs configured to use that
SWAN concentrator.
a. Use the SCF INFO DEVICE command:
INFO DEVICE $ZZWAN.#*
b. Scan the output of the command for the SWAN concentrator you identified in
Step 10. Make a note of the WAN subsystem IOPs that use the SWAN
concentrator connected to the FESA CRU.
Example 4-11 shows the output of this command. The SWAN concentrator
used by the WAN subsystem input/output process (IOP) is shown in the
Adapter Name field. The IOP named $A10 uses the SWAN concentrator
named S01.
Example 4-11. SCF INFO DEVICE command
->INFO DEVICE $ZZWAN.#*
WAN MANAGER Detailed Info Device \TAHITI.$ZZWAN.#A10
*Adapter Name.....
*Line.............
Profile...........
Preferred Cpu.....
*Type.............
*MULTINAME........
*IOPOBJECT........
S01
*Clip........... 1
0
*Path........... A
MLHSWAN
*Recsize........ 12
2
Alternate Cpu... 3
(63,06)
$PMAU1
\TAHITI.$SYSTEM.SYS00.LHOBJ
Redirect or Stop Any Customer Applications Using the FESA
To redirect or stop customer applications:
1. Notify end users that applications will be temporarily unavailable.
2. Perform any actions necessary to redirect or stop customer applications.
Note. The actions required to perform this step depend on the customer’s application.
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN Concentrator Line
Using the FESA
To stop the a ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator and its associated
WAN subsystem IOPs and communications lines:
Note. A SWAN concentrator has dual Ethernet ports, which can be configured to connect to
ports on two different FESAs; only one Ethernet connection is needed for full function. If the
SWAN concentrator’s second Ethernet port is connected to another FESA (other than the
FESA that you are replacing), you do not need to perform the following steps. However, the
SWAN concentrator will not be fault-tolerant while the FESA is being replaced.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-11
Relocating an FESA
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA
1. Abort the communications lines.
a. Use the SCF ABORT LINE command to stop a single line:
ABORT LINE $line-name
b. Use the SCF ABORT PATH command to stop the lines in an Expand multiline
path:
ABORT PATH $path-name
2. Verify that the lines are in the STOPPED state.
a. Use the SCF STATUS LINE command for a single line:
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 4-12 shows the output of this command. Note that the path is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 4-12. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $LINE1
EXPAND
Status LINE
Name
$LINE1
State
STOPPED
PPID
2, 10
BPID
3, 7
CIU-Path
A
ConMgr-LDEV
91
b. Use the SCF STATUS PATH command for an Expand multiline path:
STATUS PATH $path-name
Example 4-13 shows the output of this command. Note that the path is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 4-13. SCF STATUS PATH Command
->STATUS PATH $PATH
EXPAND
Name
$PATH
Status PATH
State
STOPPED
PPID
2, 15
BPID
3, 15
Lines #
2
3. Stop the WAN subsystem input/output processes (IOPs).
Use the SCF STOP DEVICE command:
STOP DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
4. Verify that the WAN subsystem IOPs are in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS DEVICE command:
STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
Example 4-14 on page 4-13 shows the output of this command. Note that the
WAN subsystem input/output process (IOP) is in the STOPPED state.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-12
Relocating an FESA
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA
Example 4-14. SCF STATUS DEVICE Command
->STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#LINE1
WAN Manager STATUS DEVICE for DEVICE \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#LINE1
State :........ STOPPED
LDEV number.... 110
PPIN........... 2 ,13
BPIN......... 3
,14
5. Stop the SWAN concentrator.
Use the SCF STOP ADAPTER command with the SUB ALL option. The SUB
ALL option stops the ADAPTER object and its subordinate objects.
STOP ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#adapter-name, SUB ALL
6. Verify that the SWAN concentrator is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS ADAPTER command:
STATUS ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#adapter-name
Example 4-15 shows the output of this command. Note that the ServerNet wide
area network (SWAN) concentrator is in the STOPPED state.
Example 4-15. SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command
->STATUS ADAPTER $ZZWAN.#S01
WAN Manager STATUS ADAPTER for ADAPTER \COWB0Y.$ZZWAN.#S01
State....... STOPPED
Number of clips. 3
Clip 1 status : CONFIGURED
Clip 2 status : CONFIGURED
Clip 3 status : CONFIGURED
To Stop an Expand-over-IP Line:
The following describes how to stop an Expand-over-IP line:
1. Abort the Expand-over-IP line.
a. Use the SCF ABORT LINE command to stop a single line:
ABORT LINE $line-name
b. Use the SCF ABORT PATH command to stop all the lines in an Expand
multiline path:
ABORT PATH $path-name
2. Verify that the Expand-over-IP line is in the STOPPED state.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-13
Relocating an FESA
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA
a. Use the SCF STATUS LINE command for a single line:
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 4-16 shows the output of this command. Note that the line is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 4-16. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $LINE1
EXPAND
Status LINE
Name
$LINE1
State
STOPPED
PPID
2, 10
BPID
3, 7
CIU-Path
A
ConMgr-LDEV
91
b. Use the SCF STATUS PATH command for an Expand multiline path:
STATUS PATH $path-name
Example 4-17 shows the output of this command.Note that the path is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 4-17. SCF STATUS PATH Command
->STATUS PATH $PATH
EXPAND
Name
$PATH
Status PATH
State
STOPPED
PPID
2, 15
BPID
3, 15
Lines #
2
3. Stop the WAN subsystem input/output processes (IOPs).
Use the SCF STOP DEVICE command:
STOP DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
4. Verify that the WAN subsystem IOPs are in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS DEVICE command:
STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#device-name
Example 4-18 shows the output of this command. Note that the WAN
subsystem input/output process (IOP) is in the STOPPED state.
Example 4-18. SCF STATUS DEVICE Command
->STATUS DEVICE $ZZWAN.#LINE1
WAN Manager STATUS DEVICE for DEVICE \COWBOY.$ZZWAN.#LINE1
State :........ STOPPED
LDEV number.... 110
PPIN........... 2 ,13
BPIN......... 3
,14
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-14
Relocating an FESA
Stop the Communications Lines and SWAN
Concentrator Line Using the FESA
To Stop an IPXPROTO Process
The following describes stopping an IPXPROTO process.
1. Stop the IPXPROTO process.
a. If the IPXPROTO process is configured as a generic process, use the Kernel
subsystem SCF ABORT PROCESS command:
ABORT PROCESS $ZZKRN.#gpname
b. If the IPXPROTO process is not configured as a generic process, use the
SLSA subsystem SCF STOP PROCESS command:
STOP PROCESS $process-name
2. Verify that the IPXPROTO process is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS PROCESS command:
STATUS PROCESS $process-name
Example 4-19 shows the output of this command. Note that the IPXPROTO
process is in the STOPPED state.
Example 4-19. SCF STATUS PROCESS Command
->STATUS PROCESS $ZNV2
IPXSPX Status PROCESS
Process Name
$ZNV2
State
STOPPED
Diagnostic State
NORMAL
Trace
OFF
To Stop a Port Access Method (PAM) Line
The following describes stopping a PAM line.
1. Stop the PAM line.
Use the SCF STOP command with the SUB ALL option. The SUB ALL option
aborts the LINE object and all subordinate objects.
STOP LINE $line-name, SUB ALL
2. Verify that the PAM line is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS LINE command.
STATUS LINE $line-name
Example 4-20 on page 4-16 shows the output of this command. Note that the
PAM line ($TOK1) is in the STOPPED state.
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Relocating an FESA
Determine the Physical Location of the FESA
Example 4-20. SCF STATUS LINE Command
->STATUS LINE $TOK1
PAM Status LINE
Name
$TOK1
State
STOPPED
Primary
CPU
PIN
1
278
Backup
CPU
-1
PIN
-1
Trace
OFF
To Stop a TCP/IP Subnet
Caution. Make sure that the TACL session from which you are issuing SCF commands is not
running on the subnet that you are about to stop.
Note. To stop and verify a TCP/IP subnet that is configured using Parallel Library TCP/IP, refer
to the TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual. To stop and verify a
TCP/IP subnet that is configured using NonStop TCP/IPv6, refer to the TCP/IPv6 Configuration
and Management Manual.
1. Stop the TCP/IP subnet.
Use the SCF STOP SUBNET command:
STOP SUBNET $tcpip-process-name.#subnet-name
2. Verify that the TCP/IP subnet is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS SUBNET command:
STATUS SUBNET $tcpip-process-name.#subnet-name
Example 4-21 shows the output of this command. Note that the subnet is in the
STOPPED state.
Example 4-21. SCF STOP SUBNET Command
->STATUS SUBNET $ZTC01.#SN2
TCPIP Status SUBNET \COWBOY.$ZTC01.#SN2
Name
#SN2
Status
STOPPED
Determine the Physical Location of the FESA
To determine the physical location of an FESA:
1. Use the SCF INFO ADAPTER command:
INFO ADAPTER $ZZLAN.adapter-name
Example 4-22 on page 4-17 shows the output of this command. Note that, for
this example, the Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA) CRU named E0153
is located in group 1, module 1, slot 53.
2. Scan the output of the command for the group, module, and slot location.
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Relocating an FESA
Stop the FESA
Example 4-22. SCF INFO ADAPTER Command
-> INFO ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E0153
SLSA Info ADAPTER
Name
$ZZLAN.E0153
Group
1
Module
1
Slot
53
Type
FESA
Note. If Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapters (FESA) are named using the HP Manufacturing
naming convention, you can easily identify the physical location of the FESA by its name as
follows:
$ZZLAN.Ecabid-slot
where cabid is the two-digit number that identifies the enclosure and slot is the actual
physical slot number in the enclosure. For example, the FESA named E0153 is located in
enclosure 01, slot 53. (See Manufacturing Naming Conventions on page 1-9.)
Stop the FESA
To stop an FESA, perform the following:
1. Determine the name of the logical interface (LIF) associated with the FESA to be
relocated.
Use the SCF INFO LIF command:
INFO LIF $ZZLAN.*
Example 4-23 shows the output of this command. The logical interface (LIF)
name is shown in the Name column and the physical interface (PIF) name is
shown in the PIF column. The name of the Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter
(FESA) CRU is the first part of the PIF name (for example, E0153).
The PIF name indicates the physical port on the FESA CRU. For example, the
PIF named E0153.0.A. identifies port ENET 0A on the FESA named E0153. In
this example, the LIF associated with the FESA CRU named E0153 is named
L018.
Example 4-23. SCF INFO LIF Command
->INFO LIF $ZZLAN.*
SLSA Info LIF
Name
$ZZLAN.L018
PIF
E0153.0.A
MAC Address
08:00:8E:00:5C:85
Type
Ethernet
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4-17
Relocating an FESA
Stop the FESA
2. Stop access to the logical interface (LIF) associated with the Fast Ethernet
ServerNet adapter (FESA) to be relocated.
Use the SCF STOP LIF command for each LIF:
STOP LIF $ZZLAN.lif-name
If you receive a message that the LIF client is still active, use the SCF ABORT
LIF command to remove the LIF.
3. Verify that the LIF associated with the FESA to be relocated is in the STOPPED
state.
Use the SCF STATUS LIF command:
STATUS LIF $ZZLAN.*
Example 4-24 shows the output of this command. Note that the logical
interface (LIF) is in the STOPPED state.
Example 4-24. SCF STATUS LIF Command
->STATUS LIF $ZZLAN.*
SLSA Status LIF
Name
$ZZLAN.L018
State
STOPPED
Access State
UP
4. Stop the FESA object and its subordinate objects.
You can use either SCF or the TSM Service Application to perform this step.
a. Using SCF to Stop the Adapter:
Use the SCF STOP ADAPTER command with the SUB ALL option The SUB
ALL option stops the ADAPTER object and all its subordinate objects.
STOP ADAPTER $adapter-name, SUB ALL
b. Using the TSM Service Application to Stop the Adapter:
1. Log on to the TSM Service Application.
2. In the Tree view, select the FESA.
3. From the Display menu, choose Actions.
4. Select Stop.
5. Click Perform action.
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Relocating an FESA
Locate the New Slot
5. Verify that the FESA ADAPTER object is in the STOPPED state.
Use the SCF STATUS ADAPTER command:
STATUS ADAPTER $adapter-name
Example 4-25 shows the output of this command. Note that the ADAPTER
(E0153) is in the STOPPED state.
Example 4-25. SCF STATUS ADAPTER Command
->STATUS ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E0153
SLSA Status ADAPTER
Name
$ZZLAN.E0153
State
STOPPED
Locate the New Slot
Find the group, module, and slot containing the FESA you want to move and the empty
slot to which you want it moved. The empty slot contains a double-high filler panel.
(Figure 4-2 on page 4-20 shows the FESA slot locations.)
Remove the double-high filler panel from the slot to which you want to move the FESA.
Set the filler panel aside. You will reinstall the filler panel in the slot left vacant by the
FESA you move.
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the FESA
To label the communication cable for an FESA:
1. Find the group, module, and slot in which the Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter
(FESA) is installed.
Figure 4-2 on page 4-20 shows the FESA slot locations.
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Relocating an FESA
Label the Communications Cables Connected to the
FESA
Figure 4-2. FESA Slot Locations
NonStop S-Series I/O
Enclosure
NonStop S-Series Processor
Enclosure
(Service Side)
(Service Side)
I/O enclosures can use slots 51
through 54 for FESA CRUs
Processor enclosures can only use
slots 53 and 54 for FESA CRUs
2. Tag the communication cable connected to the FESA with a physical label,
preferably at both ends. The label should include the following information:
•
•
•
The physical interface (PIF) name assigned to the line. For example,
E0154.0.A.
A description of the equipment and connector to which the cable is to be
connected.
The slot location of the FESA to which the cable is connected.
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Relocating an FESA
Remove and Install the FESA
Remove and Install the FESA
The following explains how to remove the FESA that will be relocated to a new slot.
Table 4-2. Replacement Checklist
Step
Description
1.
Review Standard Operating Practices
2.
Remove and Install the Adapter
3.
Check the Installation of the FESA
Note. Whenever you handle a Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA), you should follow
standard operating practices to avoid damage to the equipment.
Review Standard Operating Practices
Standard operating practices include the following:
•
•
•
•
Work in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) protected environment.
Remove all metal accessories before working with electrical equipment.
Restrain any dangling items that can get caught in equipment.
Obtain an ESD protection kit and follow the directions that come with the kit.
Figure 4-3 on page 4-22 illustrates an ESD protected environment.
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Relocating an FESA
Review Standard Operating Practices
Figure 4-3. ESD Protected Environment
System Enclosure (Appearance
Side)
ESD wriststrap clipped to
door latch stud (or to any
exposed, unpainted, metal
surface on the enclosure
frame.)
ESD wriststrap
with clip
ESD floor mats
ESD antistatic table mat.
Mat should be connected to a soft
ground
(1 megohm min. to 10 megohm max.)
Clip 15 inch straight
ground cord to•screw
screw
on grounded outlet
cover.
CDT 693.CDD
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4-22
Relocating an FESA
Remove and Install the Adapter
Remove and Install the Adapter
The following steps describe how to remove an FESA and then install it in a new
location.
1. Disconnect the communications cables from the FESA.
2. Put on your electrostatic discharge (ESD) wriststrap and connect the grounding clip
securely to an exposed, unpainted, metal surface on the service side of the system
enclosure, such as the processor multifunction (PMF) CRU or I/O multifunction
(IOMF) CRU ventilation holes
The figure shows how to connect the grounding clip to the ventilation holes on the
PMF or IOMF CRU.
Figure 4-4. Grounding Clip
Processor Multifunction (PMF) CRU or
I/O Multifunction (IOMF) CRU
Grounding
Clip
To Grounding
Wriststrap
CDT 081.CDD
3. Unlatch the ejector on the FESA by pressing the blue-green tab on the ejector and
pulling the ejector outward to unseat the FESA from the backplane.
4. Grasp the FESA by its ejector in one hand and slowly pull the FESA out of the slot
while supporting the bottom edge of the FESA with the other hand.
Note. The FESA weighs 6.75 pounds (3 kilograms).
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Relocating an FESA
Remove and Install the Adapter
Figure 4-5 shows how to pull the FESA out of the slot.
Figure 4-5. Removing an FESA
CDT 059.CDD
5. Move the FESA to the new slot.
a. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the system
enclosure, and connect it to an exposed, unpainted metal surface on the
FESA.
b. Grasp the FESA by its ejector with one hand, and support the bottom edge of
the FESA with the other hand. Carry the FESA to the slot where it is to be
installed.
Note. The FESA weights 6.75 pounds (3 kilograms)
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-24
Relocating an FESA
Remove and Install the Adapter
6. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the FESA and connect it
to an exposed, unpainted, metal surface on the service side of the system
enclosure, such as the ventilation holes on the processor multifunction (PMF) or
I/O multifunction (IOMF) CRU.
Figure 4-4 on page 4-23 shows how to connect the grounding clip to the ventilation
holes on the PMF or IOMF CRU.
7. With the ejector on the FESA in the full-open position (Figure 4-6), grasp the FESA
by the ejector with one hand and support the bottom edge of the FESA with the
other hand as shown in Figure 4-7. Hold the FESA so that its ejector is at the top
and insert the FESA into the upper part of the carrier.
Figure 4-6. Ejector Shown in Full-Open Position
CDT 500.CDD
8. Push the FESA to the rear of the slot, but don't force it.
Caution. Apply equal pressure to both the top and bottom of the FESA when pushing it into
the slot to avoid damaging the connector pins. If pins are damaged, both the FESA and the
backplane (or enclosure) must be replaced.
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Relocating an FESA
Remove and Install the Adapter
Figure 4-7. Installing an FESA
CDT 058.CDD
9. Press the blue-green tab on the FESA ejector and latch the ejector to seat the
FESA against the backplane.
10. Disconnect the grounding clip of your ESD wriststrap from the enclosure.
11. Install the double-high filler panel in the slot left vacant by the FESA you moved.
12. Connect the RJ-45 connector to the Ethernet port on the FESA. Connect the other
end of the cable to your Ethernet hub. Use the label on the cable to make sure you
connect the cable to the proper port and Ethernet hub.
Figure 4-8 on page 4-27 shows the connection of the communication cable
between the FESA and vendor Ethernet hub.
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Relocating an FESA
Remove and Install the Adapter
Figure 4-8. FESA Hardware Connection
Link Light
RX
COL
TX
LNK
ENET 1B
SAC 1
Link Light
RX
COL
TX
LNK
ENET 1A
Link Light
RX
COL
TX
LNK
ENET 0B
To LAN
SAC 0
RJ 45 Connector
Link Light
RX
TX
COL
LNK
Ethernet
Hub
ENET 0A
CDT 816.CDD
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Relocating an FESA
Check the Installation of the FESA
Check the Installation of the FESA
To check the installation of an FESA:
1. Make sure that the power-on LED (green light) is on.
Note. When the adapter is inserted, the fault LED (amber) remains on until the service
processor has completed its start-up configuration. The fault LED also comes on when
SLSA detects a POST failure.
Figure 4-9 on page 4-29 shows the location of the power-on LED and fault LED.
2. If the power-on LED does not come on, do one or both of the following:
•
•
Reseat the FESA.
Check the FESA and backplane connector for damaged pins.
Note the Following Error Conditions
•
•
If the power-on LED does not come on after you reseat the FESA, you must
replace the FESA
If the FESA or backplane connector have damaged pins, both the FESA and
backplane (or enclosure) must be replaced. For backplane replacement
instructions, refer to the HP NonStop S-Series Service Provider Supplement.
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Relocating an FESA
Check the Installation of the FESA
Figure 4-9. FESA External Indicators
Power-On LED (green)
Ejector
Fault LED (amber)
RJ-45 Connector
Receive Data (green)
Transmit Data (green)
RX
COL
TX
LNK
ENET 1B
Collision Detect (green)
Link Integrity (green)
SAC 1
RX
COL
TX
LNK
ENET 1A
RX
TX
COL
LNK
ENET 0B
SAC 0
RX
COL
TX
LNK
ENET 0A
CDT 116.CDD
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Relocating an FESA
Resume Operations
Resume Operations
The following describes starting the relocated FESA.
Table 4-3. Resuming Operations Checklist
Step
Description
1.
Complete the Configuration Form
2.
Add the FESA Using SCF
Complete the Configuration Form
Complete a new configuration form for the relocated FESA. Figure 4-10 on page 4-32
shows an example of a completed Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA)
Configuration Form.
Identify the following information for the relocated FESA:
•
•
•
The name you want to use to identify the adapter; for example, E0153 for an Fast
Ethernet ServerNet adapter in slot 53 of the first system enclosure.
The location of the adapter within the system cabinet (group, module, and slot).
The processors that have access to the SAC on the adapter.
Before you begin the hardware installation, complete an FESA configuration form.
Obtain the form from Appendix A, FESA Configuration Form, and complete the
form as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Enter the name of the system in the System Name field.
Enter the group number for this enclosure in the Group Number field.
Enter the slot number of this FESA in the Slot Number field. FESAs can be
installed in slots 51, 52, 53 and 54 of and I/O enclosure (expansion) but only
53 and 54 of a processor enclosure. Figure 4-2 on page 4-20 shows the
possible slot locations for the FESA.
Because there is exactly one module in a system enclosure, the module
number, 1, is already indicated on the form.
Complete the Ethernet Port information block.
•
•
•
Enter the IP or network address to be assigned to the port in the IP
Address field.
Enter the adapter name. (See the Manufacturing Naming Conventions on
page 1-9.)
Enter the SAC name.
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4-30
Relocating an FESA
•
•
•
•
Complete the Configuration Form
Enter the numbers of the processors that will have access to the SAC in
the SAC Access List field. The first processor listed is the preferred
processor.
Enter the PIF name associated with the SAC in the PIF Name field.
Enter the LIF name associated with each PIF in the LIF Name field.
When you have completed this form, enter today’s date in the Date field.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
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Relocating an FESA
Complete the Configuration Form
Figure 4-10. Completed FESA Configuration Form
Date
Group
IP Address:
FNET:
Adapter Name:
Tx
LNK
RX
COL
FD
100
SAC Name:
PIF Name:
\Case1
System Name
Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA)
Configuration Form
01
Module
01
01
/
Slot
21
/
00
53
192.231.036.100
E0153
E0153.0
E0153.0.A
(0,1)
SAC Access List:
LIF Name:
L018
CDT 003.CDD
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Relocating an FESA
Add the FESA Using SCF
Add the FESA Using SCF
Using the completed FESA configuration form as a guide, use the SCF interface to the
SLSA subsystem to add the newly installed FESA.
Note. Refer to the LAN Configuration and Management Manual for detailed information on the
SLSA subsystem SCF commands.
The following steps outline adding and starting the relocated FESA
1. Add the FESA by using the SLSA subsystem SCF ADD ADAPTER command as
follows:.
->ASSUME PROCESS $ZZLAN
->ADD ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E1053, TYPE FESA, LOCATION (1,1,53),
ACCESSLIST (0,1,2,3)
SCF adds an FESA to slot 53, group 1, module 1, and gives processor 0 primary
access to the ServerNet addressable controller (SAC). Processors 1 through 3 are
assigned secondary access.
2. Use the SLSA subsystem SCF NAMES command to display the names assigned
to the SAC and PIF of the adapter you added in step 1.
->NAMES PIF $ZZLAN.E0153*
SLSA Names PIF \SYS.$ZZLAN.E0153
PIF
$ZZLAN.E0153.0.A
3. Assign a logical interface (LIF) to the PIF on the FESA added in step 1 by using
the SLSA subsystem SCF ADD LIF command. Use the name of the PIF returned
from the NAMES command in step 2.
->ADD LIF $ZZLAN.L018, PIF E0153.0.A
4. Start the LIF by using the SLSA subsystem START LIF command.
->START LIF $ZZLAN.L018
5. Start the FESA and its subordinate SAC and PIF objects by using the SLSA
subsystem SCF START ADAPTER command with the SUB ALL option as shown
in the following example. The SUB ALL option starts the ADAPTER object and its
subordinate objects:
->START ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E1053, SUB ALL
Note. You can also use the TSM Service Application to start an adapter. Refer to Using the
TSM Service Application to Start the FESA on page 3-30.
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Relocating an FESA
Add the FESA Using SCF
6. Use the SLSA subsystem SCF STATUS commands to check that the adapter,
SAC, PIF, and LIF have started as shown in Example 4-26.
Example 4-26. SCF STATUS Commands
->STATUS ADAPTER $ZZLAN.E0153
SLSA Status ADAPTER
Name
State
$ZZLAN.E1053
STARTED
-> STATUS SAC $ZZLAN.E1053.*
SLSA Status SAC
Name
Owner
State
$ZZLAN.E1053.
0 0
STARTED
-> STATUS PIF $ZZLAN.E1053.*
SLSA Status PIF
Name
$ZZLAN.E1053.0.A
State
STARTED
-> STATUS LIF $ZZLAN.L01*
SLSA Status LIF
Name
$ZZLAN.L018
State
STARTED
Access State
UP
Troubleshooting: If the FESA SAC Object Is Still in the
STARTING State
If the SCF STATUS SAC command shows that the FESA SAC object is still in the
STARTING state after a few minutes or if the TSM Service Application indicates that
the resource needs attention, do the following:
1. Check for event messages in the Event Message Service (EMS) log. Use the TSM
EMS Event Viewer Application to view the EMS log:
1. From the File menu, select Log on.
2. Select the system.
3. Type the NonStop Kernel user name and password.
4. Click OK.
5. From the Setup menu, set up Timeframe, Source, or Subsystem criteria.
Refer to the Operator Messages Manual for cause, effect, and recovery
information for event messages.
2. Check the firmware version of the new FESA. (When the AUTOFIRMUP attribute
is set to ON, which is the default, the firmware file is automatically downloaded to
the SAC when the SAC is started. Although the firmware version is automatically
updated by the system, you should verify the firmware version.)
Use the TSM Service Application to check the firmware version:
1. Log on to the TSM Service Application.
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Relocating an FESA
Add the FESA Using SCF
2. From the Display menu, choose Firmware Update.
3. From the Resource type pull-down menu, select resource type.
4. From the Display pull-down menu, select Down-rev only.
A list of resources whose firmware is older than the version of the SYSnn is
displayed in the Available list box. Do the following:
5. Double-click on the resource. The resource is displayed in the Selected list
box.
6. Click Perform action to initiate the firmware update.
For information on configuring the conventional TCP/IP, Parallel Library TCP/IP,
NonStop TCP/IPv6, IPX/SPX, or Port Access Method (PAM) subsystems to access the
FESA through the SLSA subsystem, refer to the following manuals:
•
•
•
•
•
•
LAN Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IP Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IP (Parallel Library) Configuration and Management Manual
TCP/IPv6 Configuration and Management Manual
IPX/SPX Configuration and Management Manual
PAM Configuration and Management Manual
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Relocating an FESA
Add the FESA Using SCF
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
4-36
A
FESA Configuration Form
This appendix contains a blank Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA) configuration
form. It is recommended that you make copies of this form because you will need
several copies of this form when planning for a new system or for additions to a
system. You are authorized to photocopy this form only for the purpose of installing
and configuring your HP system.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
A-1
FESA Configuration Form
Fast Ethernet ServerNet Adapter (FESA)
Configuration Form
System Name
Date
Group
FNET:
Module
/
01
/
Slot
IP Address:
Adapter Name:
Tx
LNK
RX
COL
FD
100
SAC Name:
SAC Access List:
PIF Name:
LIF Name:
CDT 010.CDD
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
A-2
B
Preparing an FESA for PMF or IOMF
CRU Replacement
Note. As of G06.22 and later RVUs, the HP NonStop Open System Management (OSM)
Interface replaces TSM as the system management tool of choice for NonStop systems. For
instructions on using OSM or migrating to OSM, refer to the OSM documentation for your RVU.
The FESA depends on X-fabric or Y-fabric communication from the PMF or IOMF
CRUs in the group of enclosures where the FESA is installed. The fault tolerance of an
FESA must be verified prior to replacing a PMF or IOMF CRU
Note. For HP NonStop S-series servers, replacing a PMF or IOMF CRU can result in loss of
access to the FESA unless fault tolerance is ensured.
Note. You use the Replace PMF or Replace IOMF guided replacement procedure to replace a
PMF or IOMF CRU. From your system console, access the procedures as follows:
Start > Programs > Compaq TSM > Guided Replacements Tools > [Replace PMF |
Replace IOMF]
If you are replacing a PMF or IOMF CRU in a system running TSM server version T7945AAW
(shipped with G06.12) or earlier, use the Guided Replacement Toolkit (GRT) to replace a PMF
or IOMF CRU. From your system console, access the GRT as follows:
Start > Programs > Compaq TSM > Guided Replacement Tools > Guided Replacement
Toolkit
To verify the fault tolerance of an FESA, use the SLSA SCF STATUS SAC command
with the DETAIL option to
•
•
Verify that the Current Access list indicates access to more than one processor.
Verify that both the X and Y fabrics are UP.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
B-1
Preparing an FESA for PMF or IOMF CRU
Replacement
The following is an example of the display returned by the STATUS SAC command
with the DETAIL option.
-> STATUS SAC $ZZLAN.F0153.0 , DETAIL
SLSA Detailed Status SAC \ABBY.$ZZLAN.F0153.0
Current Access...........
Last Download Time.......
Last Error...............
Owner CPU................
State....................
Trace Filename...........
Trace Status.............
( 1, 2, 3 )
27 JAN 2000, 7:11:49:662
(0, 0, 0)
1
STARTED
OFF
Fabric Status
CPU Accesslist
-------------1
2
3
Fabric-X
-------UP-PRIMARY
UP-PRIMARY
UP-PRIMARY
Fabric-Y
-------UP
UP
UP
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
B-2
Safety and Compliance
Regulatory Compliance Statements
The following warning and regulatory compliance statements apply to the products
documented by this manual.
FCC Compliance
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause interference to radio communications. Operation of this
equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference in which case the
user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Any changes or modifications not expressly approved by Hewlett Packard Computer
Corporation could void the user’s authority to operate this equipment.
CISPR Compliance
This equipment complies with the requirements of CISPR 22 (EN 55 022) for Class A
Information Technology Equipment (ITE). In a domestic environment this product may
cause radio interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate
measures.
Canadian Compliance
This class A digital apparatus meets all the requirements of the Canadian InterferenceCausing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du Règelment sur
le matériel brouilleur du Canada.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Statements-1
Safety and Compliance
Regulatory Compliance Statements
Taiwan (BSMI) Compliance
Japan (VCCI) Compliance
This is a Class A product based on the standard or the Voluntary Control Council for
Interference by Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this equipment is used in
a domestic environment, radio disturbance may occur, in which case the user may be
required to take corrective actions.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Statements-2
Safety and Compliance
Regulatory Compliance Statements
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
Supplier Name:
HP COMPUTER CORPORATION
Supplier Address:
HP Computer Corporation,
NonStop Enterprise Division
10300 North Tantau Ave
Cupertino, CA 95014
USA
Represented in the EU By:
Hewlett Packard Company
P.O. Box 81 02 44
81902 Munich
Germany
Declares under our sole responsibility that the following product
Product Name:
Product Model No:
Fast Ethernet Adapter (FESA)
3863
Conforms to the following normative European and International Standards.
Product Safety:
EN60950:1995
IEC 950 2nd Edition
Electromagnetic
Compatibility:
EN 55022:1998
EN 61000-3-2:1995
EN 61000-3-3:1995
EN 55024:1998
Radiated and Conducted Emission
Harmonic Current Emission
Voltage Fluctuation and Flicker
EMC Immunity
Following the provisions of the normative European Council Directives:
EMC Directive 89/336/EEC (including amendments)
Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEC (amended by 93/68/EEC)
Supplementary Information:
Safety:
Protection Class I, Pollution Degree II
Emissions:
EMC Class A
Year Assessed/First Production: 1999
Product conformance to cited product specifications is based on sample (type) testing, evaluation, or
assessment at Hewlett Packard’s compliance laboratories in Cupertino, California or at accredited
laboratories accepted by European Union Notified and Competent Bodies.
Derek Smith
Manager, Hardware Product Assurance
NonStop Enterprise Division
Cupertino, California
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Statements-3
Safety and Compliance
Regulatory Compliance Statements
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Statements-4
Index
A
F
Aborting an Expand-over-IP line 3-13, 4-13
Assigning LIFs 2-16, 4-33
Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA)
auto-sensing feature 1-2
features 1-2
FESA planning worksheets 3-4, 4-4
FESA slot locations 2-5
introduction 1-1
new installation 2-1
preparing for PMF or IOMF CRU
replacement B-1
relationship to SLSA subsystem 1-6
relocating 4-1
replacing 3-1
FESA configuration form 2-3, 4-30
FESA slot locations 3-19, 4-20
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) 1-6
C
Checking
firmware version 2-17, 3-32, 4-34
for damaged pins 2-14, 3-28, 4-28
installation of the adapter 2-14, 3-28,
4-28
D
Damaged pins 3-1, 3-24, 4-1
Determining
IP addresses 3-6, 4-6
IPXPROTO processes associated with
LIFs 3-8, 4-8
names of LIFs 3-5, 4-5
physical location of the FESA 3-16,
4-16
G
Guided replacement procedures B-1
I
E
ESD protected environment
antistatic mat 2-7, 2-8, 3-24
ESD protection wriststrap 2-8, 3-24
grounding clip, use of 2-10, 3-22, 4-23
illustration of 2-7
ESD protection kit 2-7, 3-3, 4-3
Ethernet failover 2-18, 3-1, 4-2
Event Message Service (EMS) log 2-17,
3-32, 4-34
Identifying
IXPROTO processes 3-7, 4-7
names of Expand-over-IP lines 3-8, 4-8
PAM lines 3-7, 4-7
physical location of adapter 3-17, 4-17
IEEE 802.3 standard 1-5
Installation
assign logical LIFs 2-16, 4-33
checking for damaged pins 2-14, 3-28,
4-28
Compaq manufacturing 2-1, 3-1, 4-1
FESA configuration form
completed form 2-3, 4-30
overview of 2-8
RJ-45 connectors 2-12
unpacking the adapter 2-8
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Index-1
Index
L
Installation (continued)
using SCF to add the FESA 2-16, 4-33
Introduction to FESA 1-2
IOMF CRU Replacement
preparing an FESA B-1
IPXPROTO process names 3-7, 4-7
L
Label communications cables 3-18, 4-19
LANMAN
backup 1-6
primary 1-6
LANMON
adapter ownership 1-6
M
Manufacturing naming conventions 1-9,
3-17, 4-17
P
PMF CRU Replacement
preparing an FESA B-1
POST failure 2-14, 3-28, 4-28
Preparing to install a new FESA 2-1, 2-2
Processor enclosure
filler panel 3-2, 4-2
slots 3-2, 4-2
R
Redirect or stop customer
applications 3-11, 4-11
Relocating an FESA 4-1
Remote Server Call (RSC) 1-7
Removing an FESA 3-23, 4-24
Replacing
an FESA 3-1
connecting RJ-45 connectors 3-26,
4-26
Printing the FESA worksheet 3-2, 4-2
S
SCF commands
ABORT LIF 3-17, 4-18
ABORT LINE 3-12, 3-13, 4-12, 4-13
ADD ADAPTER 2-16, 4-33
ADD LIF 2-16, 4-33
INFO ADAPTER 3-10, 3-16, 4-10, 4-16
INFO DEVICE 3-11, 4-11
INFO LIF 3-5, 4-5
INFO LINE 3-7, 3-9, 4-7, 4-9
INFO PROCESS 3-8, 4-8
INFO SUBNET 3-6, 4-6
LISTDEV 3-8, 4-8
NAMES 2-16, 3-6, 3-7, 4-6, 4-7, 4-33
NAMES ADAPTER 3-10, 4-10
NAMES SUBSYS 3-7, 4-7
START ADAPTER 2-16, 4-33
START LIF 3-32
STATUS ADAPTER 3-31, 3-32, 3-37
STATUS DEVICE 3-37
STATUS LIF 3-17, 4-18
STATUS PATH 3-12, 3-38, 4-12
STATUS PIF 3-31
STATUS SAC 3-31
STOP DEVICE 3-14, 4-14
SCF LOG, creating 3-5, 4-5
Slot numbers for FESA 2-3, 3-2, 4-2, 4-30
Standard operating procedures for
hardware installation 2-7
Starting
All lines in an Expand multiline
path 3-34
IPXPROTO process 3-33
LIFs 3-32
single line 3-34
TCP/IP subnets 3-33
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Index-2
Index
T
Stopping
Expand-over-IP line 3-13, 4-13
FESA 3-17, 4-17
IPXPROTO process 3-15, 4-15
PAM line 3-15, 4-15
TCP/IP subnet 3-16, 4-16
T
TCP/IPv6 1-6, 2-18, 3-1
Telserv 1-7
This 3-1
Tools needed for installation 2-7
TSM EMS Event Viewer Application 2-17,
4-34
TSM Service Application 2-17, 4-34
checking firmware version 2-17, 4-34
used to abort the adapter 3-18, 4-18
V
Verifying
SAC objects 3-31
Special Characters
$ZZLAN 1-6
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Index-3
Index
Special Characters
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Index-4
Glossary
3-phase. Describes a single power source with three output phases (A, B, and C). The
phase difference between any two of the three phases or currents is 120 degrees.
3860 ATM 3 ServerNet adapter (ATM3SA). See ATM 3 ServerNet adapter (ATM3SA).
3861 Ethernet 4 ServerNet adapter (E4SA). See Ethernet 4 ServerNet adapter (E4SA).
3862 Token-Ring ServerNet adapter (TRSA). See Token-Ring ServerNet adapter (TRSA).
3863 Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA). See Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter
(FESA).
3865 Gigabit Ethernet ServerNet adapter (GESA). See Gigabit Ethernet ServerNet
adapter (GESA).
4619 disk drive. An 18-gigabyte, 15,000-rpm, small computer system interface (SCSI) disk
drive for HP NonStop™ S-series servers running G06.06 and later software release
version updates (RVUs). The 4619 disk drive can coexist and operate with
lower-capacity or lower-speed drives in the same storage subsystem module.
4637 disk drive. A 36-gigabyte, 10,000-rpm, small computer system interface (SCSI) disk
drive for HP NonStop™ S-series servers running G06.06 and later software release
version updates (RVUs).
6740 ServerNet/FX adapter. See ServerNet/FX adapter.
6742 ServerNet/FX 2 adapter. See ServerNet/FX 2 adapter.
6760 ServerNet device adapter (ServerNet/DA). See ServerNet device adapter
(ServerNet/DA).
6761 F-PIC. See fiber-optic plug-in card (F-PIC).
6762 S-PIC. See SCSI plug-in card (S-PIC).
6763 Common Communication ServerNet adapter (CCSA). See Common
Communication ServerNet adapter (CCSA).
A.
See ampere (A).
A0CINFO file. A distribution subvolume (DSV) file that contains information about a product
and each of its files, including product and file dependencies, how the files are used
and where they are placed, and which type of processor the product runs on. Every
product and software product revision (SPR) to be managed by the Distributed
Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) is distributed in a
subvolume and that subvolume must contain the product’s A0CINFO file.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Glossary-1
Glossary
absolute pathname
absolute pathname. An Open System Services (OSS) pathname that begins with a
slash (/) character and is resolved beginning with the root directory. Contrast with
relative pathname.
AC. See alternating current (AC).
accelerated mode. The operational environment in which Accelerator-generated RISC
instructions execute. See also TNS mode and TNS/R native mode.
accelerated object code. The RISC instructions that result from processing a TNS object
file with the Accelerator program.
accelerated object file. The object file that results from processing a TNS object file with
the Accelerator program. An accelerated object file contains the original TNS object
code, the accelerated object code and related address map tables, and any binder and
symbol information from the original TNS object file.
Accelerator program. A program that processes a TNS object file and produces an
accelerated object file. Most TNS object code that has been accelerated runs faster on
TNS/R processors than TNS object code that has not been accelerated. The
Accelerator program (AXCEL) is run prior to running the accelerated linker, XLLINK.
access mode. The form of file access permitted for a user or process.
ACL. See automatic cartridge loader (ACL).
ACS. See automated cartridge subsystem (ACS).
action. An operation that can be performed on a selected resource.
activation. The operator action of putting software into use after the software has been
applied from the activation package to the target system.
activation package. A set of files containing product files, operator instructions, and
instructions for applying the software on the target system. It consists of a header file
containing the activation instructions and file attributes, multiple data files, Distributed
Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) control
information, and Event Management Service (EMS) events.
AC transfer switch. A component of a HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch that provides access
to dual AC power sources and the ability to switch between the two sources if one fails.
The AC transfer switch draws power from its primary power source as long as it is
available. If the primary source fails, the AC transfer switch is switched to draw power
from the secondary power source.
adapter. See ServerNet adapter.
adapter cable. (1) A cable that connects components that have incompatible electrical
interfaces. (2) For the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator, one of four
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Glossary-2
Glossary
ADAPTER object type
types of cable that can connect any of the six 50-pin WAN ports to one of the
supported electrical interfaces (RS-232, RS-449, X.21, or V.35).
ADAPTER object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for all adapters
attached to your system.
address space. The memory locations to which a process has access.
ADE. See application development environment (ADE).
adjacent SP. A service processor (SP) that is directly connected through the ServerNet
fabrics to the enclosure of a specified SP.
administrator. (1) For an HP NonStop™ system, the person responsible for the installation
and configuration of a software subsystem on a NonStop node. Contrast with operator.
(2) For an IBM system, the person responsible for the day-to-day monitoring and
maintenance tasks associated with a software subsystem on an IBM node. (3) For a
UNIX system, the owner of /dev/console. The administrator is responsible for the
installation and configuration of all hardware and software within a node.
ADP. See Automated Data Processing (ADP).
ALLPROCESSORS paragraph. A required paragraph in the CONFTEXT configuration file
that contains attributes defining the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system image for
all system processors. The ALLPROCESSORS paragraph follows the optional
DEFINES paragraph.
alternate path. A path not enabled as the preferred path. An alternate path can become a
primary path when a primary path is disabled.
alternating current (AC). An electric current having a waveform that regularly reverses in
positive and negative directions. North American electrical power alternates 60
times/second (60 hertz). Contrast with direct current (DC).
amperage. Current-carrying capacity, expressed in amperes.
ampere (A). The unit of electrical current or rate of flow of electrons. One volt across one
ohm of resistance causes a current flow of one ampere. A flow of one coulomb/second
equals one ampere.
ANSI. The American National Standards Institute.
API. See application program interface (API).
appearance side. The side of a system enclosure that contains, behind a door, disk
customer-replaceable units (CRUs) and power monitor and control unit (PMCU) CRUs.
The appearance side is the side opposite the service side. System enclosures are
typically arranged so that the appearance side is the most visible side. See also
service side.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Glossary-3
Glossary
application development environment (ADE)
application development environment (ADE). A set of methods and tools that are used
throughout the lifecycle of an application project to design, code, and manage that
project.
application program interface (API). A set of services (such as programming language
functions or procedures) that are called by an application program to communicate with
other software components. For example, an application program in the form of a
client might use an API to communicate with a server program.
application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). A custom-built integrated circuit (IC) used
to perform highly specialized functions.
Apply. The Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM)
action of executing the instructions contained in an activation package, such as placing
new software on the target system and taking a snapshot of the new target system.
appropriate privileges. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, an
implementation-defined means of associating privileges with a process for function
calls or function call options that need special privileges.
Archive. A set of unstructured files used to collect the software received onto the host
system. Files received as input are placed in the Archive, and attributes of the files are
stored in the host database. The planner specifies the Archive location in the
Configuration Manager profile, using the Archive and Database Maintenance Interface.
Archive and Database Maintenance Interface. A block-mode interface run by a database
or system administrator at both the host system and target systems to perform
Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM)
maintenance functions.
ASCII. American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A single-byte code set that
uses only 7 of the 8 bits in a byte to represent each character. The ASCII code set
contains the uppercase and lowercase characters of the U.S. English alphabet, some
punctuation symbols, the digits 0 through 9, and some symbols and control characters.
Because of its limited characters, and because the 8th bit is sometimes used in ASCII
programs as a utility bit, the ASCII code set is not appropriate for use in international
software.
ASIC. See application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC).
ASSIGN. An HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL) command you can use to
associate a file name with a logical file of a program, or to assign a physical device to
logical entities that an application uses.
assign message. Within Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), a message created by SCF for
each ASSIGN command. A new process must request its assign message following
receipt of the startup message. All assign messages set by the SCF ASSIGN
command, plus the ones read from the HP Tandem Advanced Command Language
(TACL) command interpreter, are passed to the new process.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Glossary-4
Glossary
assumed object
assumed object. The object type or object name specified by a Subsystem Control Facility
(SCF) ASSUME command. If an ASSUME command has been used to establish a
default object type and fully qualified default object name, and if that object type and
object name together refer to a valid object, then object-spec can be omitted
entirely from an SCF command, and the command is applied to the object known as
the assumed object.
asynchronous wide area network (AWAN) servers. A local area network (LAN)-based
communications device that provides (1) asynchronous connections to terminals,
printers, and terminal emulators for HP NonStop S-series and K-series servers; (2)
remote-access disk operating system (DOS), Windows, and Macintosh platforms; (3)
VT-to-6530 protocol conversion; and (4) dial-out connections for LAN-attached DOS,
Windows, and Macintosh platforms.
ATM3SA. See ATM 3 ServerNet adapter (ATM3SA).
ATM 3 ServerNet adapter (ATM3SA). A ServerNet adapter that provides access to
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) networks from an HP NonStop™ S-series server.
The 3860 ATM3SA supports the ATM User-Network Interface (UNI) specification over
a 155-megabit/second (Mbps) OC-3 Sonet (Synchronous Optical Network) connection.
atomic. Behaving as a single, indivisible operation. For example, an atomic write operation
on a file cannot write data that is interleaved with data from another, concurrent write
operation on that file.
attachment. A file that contains information that augments the information in an incident
report.
attribute. (1) For the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), a characteristic of an entity. For
example, two attributes of a process might be its program file and its user ID. An
attribute is sometimes called a modifier. (2) For the Compaq TSM package, a data item
associated with a resource. All attributes can be viewed and some can be modified.
audit. A Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM)
activity initiated by the operator at a target system that updates the target database
with the fingerprints of all the files in a selected set of target subvolumes (TSVs).
authentication attributes. Security attributes of a process that do not change unless a
successful reauthentication occurs or the super ID changes them. For Open System
Services (OSS) processes, the authentication attributes include the login name, real
user ID, real group ID, authentication system (node name), and group list.
authorization attributes. Security attributes of a process that can change through use of
functions such as setuid() (or of Guardian procedures such as
PROCESS_CREATE_) without reauthentication. For Open System Services (OSS)
processes, the authorization attributes include the effective user ID, saved-set user ID,
saved-set group ID, user audit flags, and effective user name.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Glossary-5
Glossary
authorization key
authorization key. A password required for logging on to a modem. If you plan to allow
dial-outs to a service provider, you must specify the authorization key of the service
provider’s modem during Compaq TSM configuration.
automated cartridge subsystem (ACS). A type of tape library. Also known as automated
cartridge system.
Automated Data Processing (ADP). The term used in the FIPS PUB 94 document to refer
to computerized data processing equipment that is installed inside a computer room.
automatic cartridge loader (ACL). A device that stores multiple cartridge tapes and loads
them automatically, one at a time, into a tape drive.
automatic configuration. The automatic assignment of magnetic disk attributes to an
internal disk drive when it is inserted into a slot. Also known as “plug and play.”
averaging. A measurement method for determining the average value of alternating voltage
and current waveforms. The averaging method involves sampling a waveform and
averaging the samples over the period of one cycle.
AWAN. See asynchronous wide area network (AWAN) servers.
back-end board (BEB). A circuit board that translates fiber-optic signals from a 3216
controller or 6760 ServerNet device adapter into small computer system interface
(SCSI) commands and information for a tape drive. The BEB is housed in a cage-like
sheet-metal enclosure and plugs into one of the 50-pin SCSI ports on the back of a
tape drive customer-replaceable unit (CRU).
background process. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a process that
belongs to a background process group.
background process group. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a process
group that is both:
•
•
Not a foreground process group
A member of a session that has a connection with a controlling terminal
backout. The Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager
(DSM/SCM) action of making the last configuration applied to the target system
inaccessible and replacing it with the previous configuration.
backplane. A board that has connectors, on one or both sides of the board, into which
circuit board assemblies plug. Backplanes are located behind card cages.
BACKUP. A utility for the HP NonStop™ servers that creates a backup copy of one or more
disk files on magnetic tape. See also RESTORE.
backup processor. A processor running the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system that
communicates with the primary processor, allowing the processors to remain
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Glossary-6
Glossary
base computing platform
independent. A component failure in one processor has no effect on any other
processor.
base computing platform. The minimum software implementation that is the foundation for
the X/Open common applications environment (CAE).
base enclosure. An enclosure that is placed on the floor and can have other enclosures
stacked on top of it. A base enclosure is installed on a frame base. Contrast with
stackable enclosure.
base profile. In an X/Open compliant system, a minimum set of software components
required to create a common applications environment.
battery load. The electrical current drain imposed on a battery.
BEB. See back-end board (BEB).
BIC. Backplane interconnect card. Not applicable to HP NonStop™ S-series servers. See
ServerNet adapter.
BIND. A program invoked during system generation that creates TNS object (file code 100)
system code files and system library files.
Binder. A program development tool that enables you to read, link, and modify TNS and
accelerated object files.
bit-synchronous. A type of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Layer-2 protocol that uses
synchronous transmission but does not require a character code to define terminal and
line control sequences.
block. A grouping of one or more system enclosures that an HP NonStop™ S-series
system recognizes and supports as one unit. A block can consist of either one
processor enclosure, one I/O enclosure, or one processor enclosure with one or more
I/O enclosures attached.
blocked signal. A programmatic signal that is currently in the pending signal mask of a
process and, when generated, is not delivered to the process because of the signal
mask setting. Some signals cannot be blocked.
block special file. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a device that is
treated as a file for which all input or output must occur in blocks of data. Traditionally,
such files are disk or tape devices. Block special files provide access to a device in a
manner that hides the hardware characteristics of the device. Contrast with character
special file.
bond. A reliable connection that ensures the required electrical conductivity between
conductive parts that must be electrically connected.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Glossary-7
Glossary
bonded
bonded. The mechanical interconnection of conductive parts to maintain a common
electrical potential.
bonding. The permanent joining of conductive parts to form a path that ensures electrical
continuity and the capacity to safely conduct any current likely to be imposed.
bonding jumper. See main bonding jumper.
boot. A synonym for load. Load is the preferred term used in this and other HP NonStop™
S-series system publications.
BOOTP. A protocol for providing initialization information to diskless nodes in an open
network.
BOOTPC. See BOOTP client (BOOTPC).
BOOTP client (BOOTPC). A client provided as a Portable Silicon Operating System
(pSOS) system product task in the essential firmware on each communications line
interface processor (CLIP) in the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator.
BOOTPC tasks are also provided on the host system as the WANBoot process in the
WAN subsystem.
BOOTPD. See BOOTP daemon (BOOTPD).
BOOTP daemon (BOOTPD). The BOOTP server. One BOOTPD runs as a Portable Silicon
Operating System (pSOS) system product task in the essential firmware on each
communications line interface processor (CLIP) in the ServerNet wide area network
(SWAN) concentrator. BOOTPD tasks are also provided on the host system as the
WANBoot process in the WAN subsystem.
branch circuit. The circuit conductors located between the equipment receptacles and the
final overcurrent device in a power distribution panel (PDP) that protect the circuits.
branded product. A software product that is licensed by X/Open to carry the X/Open or
UNIX trademark.
branding process. The activities that lead to the acceptance of a product by X/Open in
accordance with its Trade Mark Licence Agreement.
break condition. An event indicator or sequence of data from a terminal or terminal
emulator that requests interruption of an application program.
bridge rectifier. A full-wave rectifier with four elements, as in a bridge circuit. Alternating
voltage is applied to one pair of opposite junctions, and direct voltage is obtained from
the other pair of junctions.
BSD. Berkeley Software Distribution.
Fast Ethernet Adapter Installation and Support Guide—425685-003
Glossary-8
Glossary
built configuration
built configuration. A configuration revision for which a system image and activation
package have been created.
built-in command. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a command that is
implemented within the /bin/sh file. Some built-in commands are also available as
separately executable files.
bypass mechanism. Equipment that permits switching from one power source to another.
For example, a bypass mechanism on an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) would
switch to an alternative power source (such as a standby power generator or
commercial utility source) when maintenance must be performed on the UPS.
byte-synchronous. A type of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Layer-2 protocol that
uses synchronous transmission techniques and requires a character code to define
terminal and line control sequences. Data is always transmitted in a block.
cable channel. A cable management conduit that protects the cables that run between two
system enclosures in a double-high stack. Each system enclosure has two cable
channels running vertically on its service side: one on the left-hand side of the
enclosure, and one on the right-hand side of the enclosure.
cable guidepost. A cable management rod that routes cables exiting the upper enclosure
in a double-high stack to prevent the cables from hanging down in front of the
customer-replaceable units (CRUs) in the base enclosure. A cable guidepost extends
from the base of each cable channel.
cable support. A piece of cable management hardware that secures system cables. The
cable support attaches to the service side of a system enclosure near the bottom of the
enclosure. Cable ties for securing system cables are threaded through the cable
support. The cable support also contains the group and module ID labels and the rear
group service light-emitting diode (LED).
cache (cache memory). A small, fast memory holding recently accessed data designed to
speed up subsequent access to the same data. Cache memory is built from faster
memory chips than main memory, and it is most often used with process or main
memory but also used in network data transfer to maintain a local copy of data.
cached bindings. A copy in virtual memory of the data pages containing symbolic
references that were rebound when a loadfile was loaded. The cached bindings are
associated with a library import characterization that characterizes the set of loadfiles
to which the symbols were bound. If the same file is subsequently loaded in an
equivalent environment in the same processor, the cached bindings can be reused.
See fastLoad.
CAE. See common applications environment (CAE).
canonical input mode. For an Open System Services (OSS) process, a terminal input
mode in which data is not made available to the process until an entire logical line
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Glossary-9
Glossary
CAP
(delimited by a newline, EOF, or EOL character) is entered. This mode is sometimes
called line mode or nontransparent mode. Contrast with noncanonical input mode.
CAP. See cartridge access port (CAP).
Carbon Copy. A remote operations software application that enables a workstation in one
location to access, through a modem, a workstation in another location. Carbon Copy
is included with all Compaq TSM workstations, and service providers use it to dial in to
TSM workstations at customer sites. See also remote access.
card cage. A structure made up of slots that hold components such as customerreplaceable units (CRUs) and ServerNet adapters.
carrier. (1) A sheet-metal structure that allows a single-high ServerNet adapter to be
installed in a ServerNet adapter slot designed for a double-high ServerNet adapter.
(2) An electrical signal that carries data.
cartridge. See optical disk cartridge.
cartridge access port (CAP). The component on the optical storage library (OSL) and the
tape libraries supported on HP NonStop™ S-series systems where you insert
cartridges into and remove cartridges from the library.
caught signal. A programmatic signal that is delivered to a process that has a signalhandling function for it. When the signal is caught, the process is interrupted and the
signal-handling function executes.
CBB. See common base board (CBB).
CCITT. International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee.
CCSA. See Common Communication ServerNet adapter (CCSA).
CE. Customer engineer. See service provider.
cell. See storage cell.
central processing unit (CPU). Historically, the main data processing unit of a computer.
The HP NonStop™ servers have multiple cooperating processors rather than a single
CPU. See also processor.
Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP). An Internet-standard protocol for
verifying encrypted passwords. CHAP is a security protocol that is implemented using
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP). The Compaq TSM Notification Director Application uses
CHAP to maintain security during dial-outs.
channel. An information route for data transmission. See also ServerNet link.
CHAP. See Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP).
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Glossary-10
Glossary
character
character. A sequence of one or more bytes representing a single character; used for the
organization, representation, or control of data. A single-byte character consists of
eight bits that represent a character. A multibyte character uses one or more bytes to
represent a character. A wide character is a fixed-width character wide enough to hold
any coded character supported by an implementation.
The ISO C standard defines the term multibyte character; a single-byte character is a
special case of multibyte character.
character set. A finite set of characters (letters, digits, symbols, ideographs, or control
functions) used for the organization, representation, or control of data. See also code
set.
character special file. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a device that is
treated as a file for which all input or output must occur in character bytes.
Traditionally, such files are interactive terminals, and the ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990
standard defines only the access to such terminal files. See also terminal. Contrast
with block special file.
chassis. A single sheet-metal structure that houses one set of system components. In an
HP NonStop S-series server, a chassis is part of a system enclosure but can also be
mounted in any standard 19-inch rack.
checksum. A generic term, meaning to “add” together (although the definition of “add” need
not be a “normal” arithmetic add) all of the data to produce a check “word.” See also
cyclic redundancy check (CRC).
child process. A process created by another process. The creating process becomes the
parent process of the new process. See also parent process.
CIIN. A command file in the SYSnn subvolume that is read and executed by the startup HP
Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL) process after system load if the CIIN
file is specified in the CONFTEXT file and enabled in the Compaq TSM client software.
circuit breaker. A device designed to open and close a circuit by nonautomatic means and
to open the circuit automatically on a predetermined overcurrent without damage to
itself.
CISC. See complex instruction-set computing (CISC).
CISC processor. An instruction processing unit (IPU) that is based on complex
instruction-set computing (CISC) architecture.
Class-1 CRU. A customer-replaceable unit (CRU) that probably will not cause a partial or
total system outage if the documented replacement procedure is not followed correctly.
Customers replacing Class-1 CRUs do not require previous experience with replacing
HP NonStop™ S-series CRUs. However, for some CRUs, customers must be able to
use the tools needed for the replacement procedure (which are common tools) and
must protect components from electrostatic discharge (ESD).
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Glossary-11
Glossary
Class-2 CRU
Class-2 CRU. A customer-replaceable unit (CRU) that might cause a partial or total system
outage if the documented replacement procedure is not followed correctly. Customers
replacing Class-2 CRUs should have either three or more months of experience with
replacing HP NonStop™ S-series CRUs or equivalent training. Customers must be
able to use the tools needed for the replacement procedure and must protect
components from electrostatic discharge (ESD).
Class-3 CRU. A customer-replaceable unit (CRU) that probably will cause a partial or total
system outage if the documented replacement procedure is not followed correctly.
Customers replacing Class-3 CRUs should have either six or more months of
experience with replacing HP NonStop™ S-series CRUs or equivalent training.
Customers must be able to use the tools needed for the replacement procedure, must
protect components from electrostatic discharge (ESD), and must understand the
dependencies involved in NonStop S-series CRU-replacement procedures, such as
disk-path switching. Replacement by a service provider trained by HP is
recommended.
client. A software process, hardware device, or combination of the two that requests
services from a server. Often, the client is a process residing on a programmable
workstation and is the part of an application that provides the user interface. The
workstation client might also perform other portions of the application logic.
client application. An application that requests a service from a server application.
Execution of remote procedure calls is an example of a client application.
client (of a loadable library). A loadfile that uses functions or data from a library.
CLIP. See communications line interface processor (CLIP).
cluster. (1) A collection of servers, or nodes, that can function either independently or
collectively as a processing unit. See also ServerNet cluster. (2) A term used to
describe a system in a Fiber Optic Extension (FOX) ring. More specifically, a FOX
cluster is a collection of processors and I/O devices functioning as a logical group. In
FOX nomenclature, the term is synonymous with system or node.
cluster number. A number that uniquely identifies a node in a Fiber Optic Extension (FOX)
ring. This number is in the range 1 through 14. See also node number.
cluster switch. See HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch.
cluster switch enclosure. An enclosure provided by HP for housing the subcomponents of
an HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch, which include the ServerNet II Switch, the AC
transfer switch, and the uninterruptible power supply (UPS). A cluster switch enclosure
resembles, but is half the height of, a standard HP NonStop S-series system
enclosure.
CME. See correctable memory error (CME).
CMI. See Communications Management Interface (CMI).
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Glossary-12
Glossary
code segment
code segment. A segment that contains program instructions to be executed plus related
information. Code segments cannot be altered by an application program; they are
read from disk but never written back to disk.
code set. Codes that map a unique numeric value to each character in a character set,
using a designated number of bits to represent each character. Single-byte code sets
use 7 or 8 bits to represent each character. The ASCII and ISO 646 code sets use 7
bits to represent each character in Roman-based alphabets; these code sets are very
limited and are not appropriate for international use. The single-byte ISO 8859 code
sets use 8 bits to represent each character and can therefore support Roman-based
alphabets and many others including Greek, Arabic, Hebrew, and Turkish. Multibyte
code sets represent characters that require more than one byte, such as East Asian
ideographic characters.
cold load. A synonym for system load or load (in the case of single processor load). System
load or load is the preferred term in HP NonStop™ S-series system publications.
command. A demand for action by or information from a subsystem or the operation
demanded by an operator or application. A command is typically conveyed as an
interprocess message from an application to a subsystem.
command file. An EDIT file that contains a series of commands and serves as a source of
command input.
common applications environment (CAE). A computer environment in which applications
can be ported across all X/Open branded products because of the use of international
and industry standards. A CAE is an open system application development
environment, an open system execution environment, or a combination of the two.
common base board (CBB). In modular customer-replaceable units (CRUs), the printed
wiring assembly (PWA) that plug-in cards (PICs) are installed in.
Common Communication ServerNet adapter (CCSA). A ServerNet adapter that provides
an HP NonStop™ S-series integration platform for Signaling System Number 7 (SS7)
protocol communications.
common mode. Electrical interference that can be measured as a ground-referenced
signal. In true common mode, a signal is common to all of the current-carrying
conductors.
common-mode transients. Transients that appear between both inputs of a circuit and a
common reference (such as ground).
communications line. A two-way link consisting of processing equipment, I/O devices,
protocol conventions, and cables that connect a computer to other computers.
communications line interface processor (CLIP). The major programmable device within
the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator, providing link-level protocol
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Glossary-13
Glossary
Communications Management Interface (CMI)
and a software interface to the host. The CLIP stores and implements specific
communications protocols.
Communications Management Interface (CMI). A utility used in D-series and earlier
release version updates (RVUs) to make online changes to the configuration of
ATP6100, CP6100, and EnvoyACP/XF communications subdevices. In G-series
RVUs, CMI functions are performed by the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF).
communications subsystem. The combination of data communications hardware and
software processes that function together as an integrated unit to provide services and
access to wide and local area networks.
Compaq TSM. Identifies a client or server software component used to manage or service
HP NonStop™ S-series servers. See also Compaq TSM client software and Compaq
TSM server software.
Compaq TSM client software. The component of the Compaq TSM package that runs on a
TSM workstation. The TSM client software consists of the TSM Low-Level Link
Application, the TSM Service Application, the TSM Notification Director Application,
and the TSM EMS Event Viewer Application. See also Compaq TSM server software.
Compaq TSM EMS Event Viewer Application. A component of the Compaq TSM client
software. The TSM EMS Event Viewer Application lets you set up criteria to view Event
Management Service (EMS) log files in several ways, enabling you to rapidly assess
service problems.
Compaq TSM Low-Level Link Application. A component of the Compaq TSM client
software. The TSM Low-Level Link Application enables you to communicate with an
HP NonStop™ S-series server even when the HP NonStop Kernel operating system is
not running. When the operating system is running, you usually communicate with the
server using the TSM Service Application. See also Compaq TSM Service Application.
Compaq TSM notification. A type of notification. Compaq TSM notifications are generated
by the TSM server software on an HP NonStop™ S-series server when an event
occurs that requires information to be updated in the TSM client software. The TSM
Notification Director Application passes TSM notifications to the TSM client software
where they are used to update resource information.
Compaq TSM Notification Director Application. A component of the Compaq TSM client
software. The TSM Notification Director Application receives notifications and incident
reports from an HP NonStop™ S-series server, displays them, and allows you to take
action or forward the incident reports to your service provider for resolution. The TSM
Notification Director Application can be configured to run on a TSM workstation at all
times, even when other TSM applications are not being used.
Compaq TSM package. A software product for HP NonStop™ S-series servers that
provides the information needed to perform functions such as querying resources and
testing, provides notification of problems on the system, and allows local or remote
access to the system for service and maintenance. The TSM package performs the
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Glossary-14
Glossary
Compaq TSM server software
same role as that of HP Tandem Maintenance and Diagnostic System (TMDS),
Syshealth, and Remote Maintenance Interface (RMI) on earlier systems.
Compaq TSM server software. The component of the Compaq TSM package that runs on
an HP NonStop™ S-series server. When the HP NonStop Kernel operating system is
running, the TSM client software on a TSM workstation communicates with a server
through the TSM server software. See also Compaq TSM client software.
Compaq TSM Service Application. A component of the Compaq TSM client software. The
TSM Service Application enables you to communicate with an HP NonStop™ S-series
server when the HP NonStop Kernel operating system is running. When the operating
system is not running, communication must take place using the TSM Low-Level Link
Application. See also Compaq TSM Low-Level Link Application.
Compaq TSM workstation. A PC-compatible workstation on which the Compaq TSM client
software is running. The TSM workstations configured as the primary and backup
dial-out points are referred to as the primary and backup system consoles.
complex instruction-set computing (CISC). A processor architecture based on a large
instruction set, characterized by numerous addressing modes, multicycle machine
instructions, and many special-purpose instructions. Contrast with reduced
instruction-set computing (RISC).
compliance. The testing and verification process that precedes X/Open licensing.
computer-room power center (CRPC). The equipment that conditions and distributes
facility power to computer-room equipment. The CRPC typically houses an
electrostatically shielded isolation transformer, power distribution panels (PDPs), a
main shunt-trip circuit breaker, and voltage indicators. Also referred to as a power
distribution unit (PDU) or power distribution center.
concentrator manager process (ConMgr). A process provided as part of the wide area
network (WAN) subsystem. The ConMgr process runs in each processor that supports
WAN products and provides management functions to the WAN subsystem and WAN
products, such as downloading data link control (DLC) tasks to the communications
line interface processors (CLIPs) on the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN)
concentrator and selecting the preferred path for the DLC tasks.
conduit. A tubular raceway, usually constructed of rigid or flexible metal, through which
insulated power and ground conductors or data cables are run. Nonmetallic conduits,
although available, are not recommended.
CONFAUX file. The auxiliary configuration file created by the Distributed Systems
Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) tools. The CONFAUX file
contains a list of the code files and system files that are needed to build the new HP
NonStop™ Kernel operating system. HP recommends that you avoid making any
changes to your CONFAUX file.
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Glossary-15
Glossary
CONFBASE file
CONFBASE file. In G-series release version updates (RVUs), the basic system
configuration database file, which is stored on the $SYSTEM.SYSnn subvolume. See
also configuration file.
CONFIG file. In G-series release version updates (RVUs), the current system configuration
database file, which is stored on the $SYSTEM. ZSYSCONF subvolume. See also
configuration file.
configuration. (1) The arrangement of enclosures, system components, and peripheral
devices into a working unit. (2) The definition or alteration of characteristics of an
object.
configuration file. In G-series release version updates (RVUs), one of the following files:
CONFBASE, CONFIG, one or more saved configuration files named CONFxxyy, and
CONFSAVE. See also system configuration database. In pre-G-series RVUs, the
configuration file is either the OSCONFIG file used by the Configuration Utility Program
(COUP) or the CONFTEXT file used during system generation.
configuration planner. The person who manages system configuration changes and
software configuration changes. This person modifies the system configuration
database for system configuration changes and creates a new operating system image
for software configuration changes. See also planner.
configuration revision. A planner-defined set of software products and related
configuration information that the Distributed Systems Management/Software
Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) can activate on a target system. Multiple
configuration revisions might exist on a target system. A configuration revision is made
up of the product versions named in its software revision list, its HP NonStop™ Kernel
operating system image, and the relevant profile items, such as the location of the
target subvolumes on the target system. It is created by a Build request and is included
in the activation package sent to the target system.
configuration tag. A parameter used by Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) and the guided
procedures that allows the SANMAN process to select an appropriate switch
configuration block (SCB) from the M6770CL switch configuration library. The selected
SCB is subsequently loaded on the specified HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch. The
configuration tag determines the position of the cluster switch in the topology and the
ServerNet node numbers supported by the cluster switch.
configuration utility process. The $ZCNF process that is the access process for the
CONFIG file and starts and maintains the $ZPM persistence manager process.
Configuration Utility Program (COUP). A utility used in D-series and earlier release
version updates (RVUs) to make online changes to the configuration of devices and
controllers. COUP is part of the Dynamic System Configuration (DSC) facility. In
G-series RVUs, similar functions are performed by the Subsystem Control Facility
(SCF).
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Glossary
configured object
configured object. A Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object that exists at the time a
subsystem completes its initialization process, or an SCF object that is brought into
existence by a command issued through a subsystem management interface.
CONFLIST file. The output file produced during system generation, including error and
warning messages.
conformance. Meeting the requirements of a specific standard.
conformance document. An implementor’s document that must accompany software
claiming conformance with a POSIX standard. The document specifies the behavior or
other aspect of the software when the standard describes a behavior or aspect as
implementation-defined.
conformance statement questionnaire (CSQ). A document that identifies how a product
implements X/Open Specifications as defined in XPG Component/Profile Definitions. A
CSQ exists for each branded product.
conforming POSIX.1 application. An application that is either an ISO/IEC-conforming
POSIX.1 application or a national-standards-body conforming POSIX.1 application.
conforming POSIX.1 application using extensions. An application that:
•
•
•
Is a conforming POSIX.1 application.
Also uses features or facilities that are not described in ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990
(POSIX.1) but are consistent with the standard.
Meets the documentation requirements of a conforming POSIX.1 application and
documents its use of nonstandard features or facilities.
For example, an application using the tdm_fork() function could be a conforming
POSIX.1 application using extensions.
CONFSAVE file. In G-series release version updates (RVUs), the automatically saved
configuration database file, which is stored on the $SYSTEM.ZSYSCONF subvolume.
See also configuration file.
CONFTEXT file. The configuration file used as input during system generation that contains
a series of entries defining your HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system attributes. A
G-series CONFTEXT file consists of one or two paragraphs: DEFINES (optional) and
ALLPROCESSORS.
CONFxxyy file. In G-series release version updates (RVUs), a saved configuration
database file created by the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) and stored in the
$SYSTEM.ZSYSCONF subvolume. xxyy is the number you entered as xx.yy in the
SCF SAVE CONFIGURATION command (xx indicates the base version and yy
indicates the subversion). See also configuration file.
ConMgr. See concentrator manager process (ConMgr).
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Glossary-17
Glossary
connection
connection. (1) The path between two protocol modules that provides reliable stream
delivery service. (2) For the Compaq TSM package, the logical link established
between the TSM client software on a workstation and the TSM server software on an
HP NonStop™ S-series system after a logon sequence has been performed. There are
two types of logical connections: service connections and low-level links.
Connection view. One of several views of a server available in the view pane of the
Management window of the Compaq TSM package. The Connection view is a visual
representation of the connectivity among components within an enclosure. See also
Physical view.
connectivity. The ability of a system to transfer information between itself and a system
from another vendor. Other vendors use the term “connectivity” to mean hardware
compatibility. See also interoperability.
connector. See port.
console message. See operator message.
contiguous ground. An insulated grounding conductor that extends from an equipment
enclosure power receptacle to the final point of electrical service for the computer-room
equipment, whether that final point is the main service entrance or the separately
derived power source. In most instances, the final point of electrical service is an
isolating transformer installed in the computer room.
control and inquiry. Those aspects of Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object
management related to the state or configuration of an object. Such aspects include
actions that affect the state or configuration of an object, inquiries about the object, and
commands pertaining to the session environment (for example, commands that set
default values for the session).
controller. See I/O controller or ServerNet addressable controller (SAC).
controlling process. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the session leader
that established the connection to the controlling terminal. The session leader stops
being the controlling process when the corresponding terminal stops being the
controlling terminal.
controlling terminal. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a terminal that
might be associated with a session. A session can have only one controlling terminal,
and a controlling terminal can control only one session at a time. When a session has
a controlling terminal, all the following are true:
•
•
•
Certain character sequences entered from that terminal cause signals to be sent to
all processes in the process groups of that session.
Certain characters entered from that terminal might receive special treatment.
Members of background process groups of the session are restricted from certain
kinds of access to the controlling terminal.
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Glossary-18
Glossary
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The standard measure of time from the beginning of
the current Epoch. UTC is sometimes called Universal Coordinated Time, CUT, or
UCT; the standard appellation is abbreviated as UTC, an arbitrary ordering of the
letters. UTC was formerly called Greenwich mean time (GMT).
core dump file. See saveabend file.
core file. See saveabend file.
correctable memory error (CME). An error caused by incorrect data at a particular
memory location. The cause of the error is such that the error is automatically
corrected by the system. Contrast with uncorrectable memory error (UCME).
COUP. See Configuration Utility Program (COUP).
CPU. See central processing unit (CPU).
cpu, pin. In the Guardian environment, a number pair that uniquely identifies a process
during the lifetime of the process, consisting of the processor (CPU) number and the
process identification number (PIN). See also PID.
CRC. See cyclic redundancy check (CRC).
creation version serial number (CRVSN). In the Open System Services (OSS)
environment, a number assigned by a disk process when a file is created. The
CRVSN is used by the disk process and the OSS name server process to verify that
the correct file is accessed. The CRVSN is stored in the catalog entry for an OSS
regular file and is passed to the disk process when a Data Definition Language (DDL)
request that involves the file is made.
critical load. Equipment that must have an uninterruptible power input to prevent damage
to the equipment or the facility, or injury to personnel.
CRPC. See computer-room power center (CRPC).
CRU. See customer-replaceable unit (CRU).
CRVSN. See creation version serial number (CRVSN).
CSQ. See conformance statement questionnaire (CSQ).
current. The movement of electrons caused by potential difference between two
electromotive charge forces.
current configuration file. See configuration file.
current working directory. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the directory
used in pathname resolution of relative pathnames. A process always has a current
working directory. See also working directory.
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Glossary
CUSTFILE
CUSTFILE. An EDIT file included on every site update tape (SUT) as
$SYSTEM.Annnnnn.CUSTFILE, where nnnnnn is the system serial number of the
target system. The CUSTFILE contains information on the software products on the
SUT, their related files, and the destination and use of each file. HP customizes
information in the CUSTFILE for each customer’s system.
customer engineer (CE). See service provider.
customer-installable system. A system that does not require specially trained service
providers to install.
customer-replaceable unit (CRU). A unit that can be replaced in the field either by
customers or by qualified personnel trained by HP. CRUs are divided into the
categories of Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 according to the risk of causing a system
outage if the documented replacement procedure is not followed correctly and how
much CRU-replacement training or experience is advisable. See also Class-1 CRU,
Class-2 CRU, Class-3 CRU, and field-replaceable unit (FRU).
cyclic redundancy check (CRC). The most widely used error detection code for ensuring
the integrity of transmitted data. The digits of the CRC are calculated by the sender for
each block of data sent and recalculated by the receiver (it is a family of mathematical
functions involving computing the quotient and remainder of a polynomial division). A
CRC is a form of checksum.
daemon. See demon.
dark site. See unattended site.
data communications equipment (DCE). Equipment that provides all the functions
required to establish, maintain, and terminate a connection and provides the signal
conversion and coding between the data terminal equipment (DTE) and telephone
company lines or data circuits. A DCE is usually a modem.
data link control (DLC). A set of functions associated with Layer 2 of the Open Systems
Interconnection (OSI) reference model. These functions are responsible for reliable
communication between two physically connected nodes.
data link control (DLC) task. Tasks that support the equivalent to Layer 2 of the Open
Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference model. Wide area network (WAN) DLC tasks
execute in the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator communications line
interface processor (CLIP), and each WAN DLC task controls one line interface.
data terminal equipment (DTE). Equipment that constitutes the data source or data sink
and provides for the communication control function protocol; it includes any piece of
equipment at which a communication path begins or ends.
data transparent. Describes software that examines all eight bits of every data byte and
that uses no bit in a data byte for its own purposes. Internationalized applications must
be data transparent.
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Glossary-20
Glossary
dB
dB. See decibel (dB).
dBm. Decibels as referenced to a milliwatt. A unit of measure that establishes 0 dBm equal
to 1 milliwatt. A negative value represents a decrease in power, and a positive value
represents an increase in power. See also decibel (dB).
DC. See direct current (DC).
DCE. See data communications equipment (DCE).
DCF. See dynamic configuration file (DCF).
DC power cable. In system enclosures with power shelves, a cable that delivers DC power
from the power shelf to a processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable unit
(CRU) or I/O multifunction (IOMF) CRU in that enclosure.
decibel (dB). A unit of measure used to express a relative difference in power. A negative
value represents a decrease in power, and a positive value represents an increase in
power.
dedicated Compaq TSM LAN. An Ethernet local area network (LAN) for use by only
Compaq TSM applications. This LAN connects TSM workstations with the Ethernet
ports on the processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable units (CRUs) in
group 01 of an HP NonStop™ S-series server. A dedicated Compaq TSM LAN
supports NonStop S-series servers and TSM workstations but does not support any
other types of servers or workstations. See also public LAN.
DEFINE. An HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL) command you can use to
specify a named set of attributes and values to pass to a process.
DEFINES paragraph. An optional paragraph in the CONFTEXT configuration file that
contains one or more identifiers, each with its associated text string. The DEFINES
paragraph, if used, precedes the ALLPROCESSORS paragraph.
delta. A method for connecting a 3-phase power source (or load) in a closed series loop
with input (or output) connections made to each of the three junctions. The delta’s
physical arrangement resembles the delta character from the Greek alphabet.
demon. On a UNIX system, a process that runs continuously to provide a specific service
for other processes. A demon does not have a controlling terminal and is not explicitly
invoked. On an HP NonStop™ system, a demon runs in the Open System Services
(OSS) environment and has an OSS process ID. See also static server.
destination ServerNet ID (DID). A field in the ServerNet packet header indicating the
intended destination for the packet.
detailed report. A complete listing of status or configuration information provided by the
Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) STATUS or INFO command when you use the
DETAIL option. Contrast with summary report.
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Glossary
device
device. A computer peripheral or an object that appears to an application as such. See
also terminal.
dial-out point. A Compaq TSM workstation from which incident reports are sent to a
service provider. Incident reports are sent only from the TSM workstations defined as
the primary and backup dial-out points (the primary and backup system consoles).
DID. See destination ServerNet ID (DID).
DIMM. See dual inline memory module (DIMM).
direct current (DC). Electric current that flows in only one direction. Contrast with
alternating current (AC).
direct jump area. One of sixteen 256-megabyte portions of the 4-gigabyte virtual address
space. A RISC jump instruction has the ability to jump directly to any location within its
own direct jump area without having to use a far jump table.
directory. A type of Open System Services (OSS) special file that contains directory entries,
which associate names with files. No two directory entries in the same directory have
the same name.
directory entry. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, an object that associates
a filename with a file. Several directory entries can associate names with the same
file. See also link.
directory loop. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, an error condition in which
a directory is identified as its own parent directory.
directory special file. See directory.
directory stream. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, an object with an
opaque data type. A process can sequentially read directory entries from a directory
stream.
directory tree. A hierarchy of directories. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment,
directories are connected to each other in a branching hierarchical fashion such that
only one path exists between any two directories (if no backtracking occurs).
disconnecting means. A device, group of devices, or other means by which the conductors
of a circuit can be disconnected from their source of supply.
discovery. For the Compaq TSM package, the process of identifying the resources that
exist on an HP NonStop™ S-series server. See also incremental discovery and initial
discovery.
disk bootstrap. A software entity residing on disk that is used to load the HP NonStop™
Kernel operating system image (OSIMAGE) into memory during a system load. A disk
that contains the disk bootstrap is referred to as a bootable disk. The disk bootstrap is
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Glossary-22
Glossary
disk cache
placed on the disk either as part of a tape load or as a result of the SCF CONTROL
DISK, REPLACEBOOT command.
disk cache. A temporary storage buffer into which data is read, retained, and perhaps
updated before being written to disk, for more efficient processing.
disk drive. A device that stores and accesses data on a disk. There are two types of disk
drives: magnetic and optical. Random access to addressable locations on a magnetic
disk is provided by magnetic read/write heads. Random access to addressable
locations on an optical disk is provided by a low-intensity laser. See also volume.
DISKGEN. A system generation option that invokes the DISKGEN program to copy directly
to disk those files necessary to generate a HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system.
DISKGEN can be used instead of a system image tape (SIT).
DISK object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for all disk devices
attached to your system.
disk volume. See volume.
distributed system. A system that consists of a group of connected, cooperating
computers.
Distributed Systems Management (DSM). A set of tools used to manage HP NonStop™
S-series systems and Expand networks.
Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM). A
graphical user interface (GUI)-based program that installs new software and creates a
new HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system. DSM/SCM creates a new software
revision and activates the new software on the target system.
distribution subvolume (DSV). A subvolume containing program files for a particular
software product along with the software release version update (RVU) document
(softdoc) file for that product. The format for a DSV name is Ynnnnrrr or Rnnnnrrr,
where nnnn is the software product number and rrr is the base version identifier
(such as D20) or software product revision (SPR) identifier (such as AAB).
DLC. See data link control (DLC).
DNS. See Domain Name System (DNS).
DNS server. A server that resolves hostnames to Internet protocol (IP) address mapping
queries. These queries originate from either client computers, which are known as
resolvers, or other Domain Name System (DNS) servers, which accounts for the
distributed nature of DNS. See also Network Information Service (NIS).
domain. (1) A set of objects over which control or ownership is maintained. Types of
domains include power domains and service processor (SP) domains. (2) In the
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Glossary-23
Glossary
Domain Name System (DNS)
Internet, a part of the naming hierarchy. Syntactically, a domain name consists of a
sequence of names (labels) separated by periods (dots).
Domain Name System (DNS). A system that defines a hierarchical, yet distributed,
database of information about hosts on a network. The network administrator
configures the DNS with a list of hostnames and Internet protocol (IP) addresses,
allowing users of workstations that are configured to query the DNS to specify remote
systems by hostnames rather than by IP addresses. DNS domains should not be
confused with Windows NT networking domains. See also DNS server, Network
Information Service (NIS), and ping.
donor system. The computer system you make smaller by removing enclosures, either to
reduce the system or to add the removed enclosures to another target system, using a
process known as system reduction.
double-high ServerNet adapter. A ServerNet adapter that occupies an entire ServerNet
adapter slot in an HP NonStop™ S-series server. Contrast with single-high ServerNet
adapter.
double-high stack. A stack that includes a base, a frame, and two system enclosures.
Contrast with single-high stack.
double-wide plug-in card (PIC). A large-form-factor plug-in card (PIC) that occupies two
adjacent PIC slots within a customer-replaceable unit (CRU). See also single-wide
plug-in card (PIC).
download. The process of transferring software from one location to another, where the
transferring entity initiates the transfer.
download line task. Any task running under the Portable Silicon Operating System (pSOS)
system product, such as a data protocol.
downtime. Time during which a computer system is not capable of doing useful work
because of a planned or unplanned outage. From the end user’s perspective,
downtime is any time a needed application is not available.
downward compatibility. The ability of a requester to operate with a server of an earlier
revision level. In this case, the requester is downward-compatible with the server and
the server is upward-compatible with the requester. Contrast with upward compatibility.
drive. See disk drive, optical disk drive, or tape drive.
dropout. A voltage loss of very short duration (that is, milliseconds).
DSC. See Dynamic System Configuration (DSC).
DSM. See Distributed Systems Management (DSM).
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Glossary
DSM/SCM
DSM/SCM. See Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager
(DSM/SCM).
DSV. See distribution subvolume (DSV).
DTE. See data terminal equipment (DTE).
dual inline memory module (DIMM). Small circuit boards carrying memory integrated
circuits, with signal and power pins on both sides of the board. A DIMM is different
from a single inline memory module (SIMM) in that the connections on each side of the
module connect to different chips, whereas the connections on both sides of a SIMM
connect to the same memory chip. This difference gives the DIMM a wider data path,
as more modules can be accessed at once.
dual-ported. The capability of a ServerNet adapter or peripheral device to receive data and
commands from two sources although only one source might have access at any
particular moment.
duplicate file descriptor. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, a file descriptor
that refers to the same open file description as another file descriptor.
dynamic configuration file (DCF). An attachment file that is produced by the Compaq
TSM client software and accompanied by an incident report. The DCF contains a
snapshot of the system configuration, the state of the HP NonStop™ S-series server,
and outstanding alarms at the time that the incident report was issued. The DCF is
used by the service provider to avoid having to perform online discovery of the server
over dial-up telephone lines.
dynamic information. Information that represents the set of resources that actually exist in
the current configuration of an HP NonStop™ S-series server. Dynamic information is
gathered from a server through the process of discovery. Contrast with static
information.
dynamic-link library (DLL). A collection of procedures whose code and data can be loaded
and executed at any virtual memory address, with run-time resolution of links to and
from the main program and other independent libraries. The same DLL can be used by
more than one process. Each process gets its own copy of DLL static data. Contrast
with shared run-time library (SRL). See also TNS/R library.
dynamic loading. Loading and opening dynamic-link libraries under programmatic control
after the program is loaded and execution has begun.
dynamic process configuration. Using Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) to configure a
generic process to always start in a designated primary processor (that is, to be
fault-tolerant).
dynamic shared object (DSO). See dynamic-link library (DLL).
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Glossary-25
Glossary
Dynamic System Configuration (DSC)
Dynamic System Configuration (DSC). A utility used in D-series and earlier release
version updates (RVUs) to make online changes to the configuration of devices and
controllers. Its interactive utility is called the Configuration Utility Program (COUP). In
G-series RVUs, similar functions are performed by Subsystem Control Facility (SCF).
E4SA. See Ethernet 4 ServerNet adapter (E4SA).
earth ground. The connection of the electrical-grounding conductors to a dependable, lowresistance contact with the soil.
earth-grounding electrode. An electrically conductive rod that is driven into soil, thus
providing an earth-ground connection point for the electrical ground wiring in a building.
A vertical steel column of a building, with its base sunk into soil, can also serve as an
earth-grounding electrode.
earth-grounding electrode system. A grounding network created by bonding together the
grounding means in a building (for example, underground metal water pipes, structural
steel, and ground rods into the earth) and bonding them to the switchgear at the
facility’s main electrical service entrance.
ECL. See emitter-coupled logic (ECL).
ECL plug-in card (PIC). See emitter-coupled logic (ECL) plug-in card (PIC).
ECL ServerNet cable. See emitter-coupled logic (ECL) ServerNet cable.
EDIT file. In the Guardian file system, an unstructured file with file code 101. An EDIT file
can be processed by either the EDIT or PS Text Edit (TEDIT) editor. An EDIT file
typically contains source program or script code, documentation, or program output.
Open System Services (OSS) functions can open an EDIT file only for reading.
effective group ID. An attribute of an Open System Services (OSS) process that is used to
determine permissions such as the file access allowed for the process. The effective
group ID of a process is a group ID that contributes to the group access privileges of
that process. The effective group ID of a process might be used to set the group ID of
files created by that process. The effective group ID can be changed while the process
runs.
effective user ID. An attribute of an Open System Services (OSS) process that is used to
determine such permissions as the file access allowed for the process. The effective
user ID of a process is the user ID that determines the owner access privileges of that
process. The effective user ID of a process might be used to set the user ID of files
created by that process. The effective user ID can be changed while the process runs.
EIA. Electronic Industries Association.
electric utility. The local utility service that, for a fee, supplies alternating-current (AC)
power to businesses and residences.
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Glossary-26
Glossary
electromagnetic interference (EMI)
electromagnetic interference (EMI). Forms of conducted or radiated interference that
might appear in a facility as either normal or common-mode signals. The frequency of
the interference can range from the kilohertz to gigahertz range. However, the most
troublesome interference signals are usually found in the kilohertz to low megahertz
range. At present, the terms electromagnetic interference and radio frequency
interference (RFI) are usually used interchangeably.
electrostatically shielded transformer. A transformer that has a metallic shield placed
between the primary and secondary windings. This shield diverts high-frequency
signals to ground.
electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection kit. A kit containing an antistatic mat and a
wriststrap with a cable and grounding clip. A service provider or customer wears the
wriststrap while performing maintenance procedures inside an enclosure. The
wriststrap and cable contain grounding wires so that when the grounding clip is
attached to a metal object, such as the enclosure, the person wearing the wriststrap is
grounded and any static electricity incurred during the procedure is discharged safely
to the enclosure instead of to electrical components within the enclosure.
ELF. See extended link format (ELF).
emergency power off (EPO). Describes equipment used to automatically disconnect all
electrical power to connected equipment if there is an emergency. A computer room’s
main EPO system shuts off all room equipment (except for lighting and fire-sensor
equipment) if there is a fire. An equipment zone EPO shuts off power to all connected
computer equipment if a power anomaly occurs.
emergency power-off (EPO) connector. A two-pin connector on the service side of an
enclosure that allows an external signal to disable the batteries in the enclosure during
emergency conditions. A cable is attached from the connector to a relay band or push
button typically located near the door of a computer room. Pushing the EPO button
removes power from all computer equipment in the room. The EPO connectors prevent
the batteries from powering the server after power is removed. EPO capabilities are
required in the United States when a server is installed in a computer room designed to
comply with the special construction and fire protection provisions of the United States’
national electrical code (or at other sites as required by local regulations.)
EMI. See electromagnetic interference (EMI).
emitter-coupled logic (ECL). A logic that expresses digital signals in differential negative
voltage levels, from -8 volts to -1.8 volts. HP NonStop™ S-series servers containing
ServerNet expansion boards (SEBs) use ECL ServerNet cables. An ECL plug-in card
(PIC) allows the modular SEB (MSEB) and I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2
customer-replaceable unit (CRU) to use ECL ServerNet cables.
emitter-coupled logic (ECL) plug-in card (PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) for the modular
ServerNet expansion board (MSEB) and I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2 customer-
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Glossary-27
Glossary
emitter-coupled logic (ECL) ServerNet cable
replaceable unit (CRU) that supports the emitter-coupled logic (ECL) interface. See
also emitter-coupled logic (ECL) and plug-in card (PIC).
emitter-coupled logic (ECL) ServerNet cable. A ServerNet cable that uses emittercoupled logic (ECL). Before the modular ServerNet expansion board (MSEB) was
introduced, ECL was the only ServerNet cable technology used by HP NonStop™
S-series servers. You can connect an ECL ServerNet cable directly to a ServerNet
expansion board (SEB) or to an MSEB using an ECL plug-in card (PIC).
empty directory. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, a directory that contains
only an entry for itself and an entry for its parent directory.
empty string. In C and C++ programs, a character string that begins with a null character.
This term is synonymous with “null string.”
EMS. See Event Management Service (EMS).
EMS collector. An Event Management Service (EMS) process to which subsystems report
events.
enclosure. Similar to a cabinet in HP NonStop™ K-series systems. An enclosure can
contain components of a system or a peripheral. Base enclosures are placed on the
floor and can have other enclosures stacked on top of them. Stackable enclosures can
be placed on top of other enclosures. See also system enclosure and peripheral
enclosure.
enclosure interleaving. On HP NonStop™ S-series systems, configuring a mirrored disk
volume to use two separate system enclosures. For internal disk drives, the two disk
drives of the mirrored volume can be in separate enclosures. For external disk drives,
the adapters connected to the two disk drives of the mirrored volume can be in
separate enclosures.
environmental parameters. Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) session parameters set by
default or by using various SCF commands. The values associated with the
environmental parameters can be examined using the ENV command.
environment strings. For an Open System Services (OSS) process, a vector of strings of
the form name = value that contains information about the environment that the
process runs in. Environment strings are accessible to the process and are inherited
by its child processes.
EPO. See emergency power off (EPO).
Epoch. The period beginning January 1, 1970, at 0 hours, 0 minutes, and 0 seconds
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).
EPO connector. See emergency power-off (EPO) connector.
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Glossary-28
Glossary
equipment grounding conductor
equipment grounding conductor. The conductor used to connect the non-current-carrying
metal parts of equipment, raceways, and other enclosures to the grounding electrode
conductor at the facility’s main service entrance or at the source of a separately
derived power source.
errno. An external variable that contains the most recent error condition set by a C function.
error number. For the Subsystem Programmatic Interface (SPI), a value that can be
assigned to a return token, or to the last field of an error token, to identify an error that
occurred. SPI defines a small set of error numbers, but most error numbers are defined
by subsystems.
ESD kit. See electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection kit.
ESP. See expansion service processor (ESP).
essential firmware. Code in memory that is necessary for power-up initialization and
communication with a host or device. Contrast with nonessential firmware.
Ethernet. A local area network (LAN) that uses the carrier sense multiple access with
collision detection (CSMA/CD) access method on a bus topology and is the basis for
the IEEE 802.3 standard.
Ethernet 4 ServerNet adapter (E4SA). A ServerNet adapter for Ethernet local area
networks (LANs) that contains four Ethernet ports.
Ethernet hub. A multiport repeater typically supporting 10Base-T cabling. Most hubs are
connectors for 8 or 12 cables. Also referred to as a concentrator.
Event Management Service (EMS). A Distributed Systems Management (DSM) product
that provides event collection, event logging, and event distribution facilities. EMS
provides different event descriptions for interactive and programmatic interfaces, lets
an operator or an application select specific event-message data, and allows for
flexible distribution of event messages within a system or network.
event message. Text intended for a system operator that describes a change in some
condition in the system or network, whether minor or serious. The change of condition
is called an event. Events can be operational errors, notifications of limits exceeded,
requests for actions needed, and so on. See also operator message.
Event Viewer Server Manager. A persistent process that routes messages and data
between the Compaq TSM EMS Event Viewer Application on the TSM workstation and
event server and summary server processes on the HP NonStop™ S-series server. An
event server process retrieves events. A summary server is a persistent process that
maintains a summary of all the events in a specified log file.
exception handler. A section of program code to which control is transferred when an
exception occurs. The exception handler then determines what action should be taken.
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Glossary
Expand line-handler process
Expand line-handler process. A process pair that handles incoming and outgoing Expand
messages and packets. An Expand line-handler process handles direct links and also
binds to other processes using the Network Access Method (NAM) interface to support
Expand-over-X.25, Expand-over-FOX, Expand-over-ServerNet, Expand-over-TCP/IP,
and Expand-over-SNA links. See also Expand-over-ServerNet line-handler process.
Expand network. The HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system network that extends the
concept of fault-tolerant operation to networks of geographically distributed HP
NonStop S-series systems. If the network is properly designed, communication paths
are constantly available even if there is a single line failure or component failure.
Expand node. A system in an Expand network. See also node.
Expand node number. A number in the range 0 through 254, sometimes referred to as the
system number, that identifies a node in an Expand network. Each Expand node
number must be unique within the network. See also ServerNet node number.
Expand-over-ServerNet line. The single line associated with an Expand-over-ServerNet
line-handler process. Note that an Expand-over-ServerNet line has the same name
and logical device number as its Expand-over-ServerNet line-handler process.
However, the line does not have the same states as the line-handler process.
Expand-over-ServerNet line-handler process. An Expand line-handler process that uses
the NETNAM protocol to access the Network Access Method (NAM) interface provided
by the ServerNet cluster monitor process, $ZZSCL. The Expand-over-ServerNet linehandler process handles incoming and outgoing Expand messages. It also handles
packets leaving the server and security-related messages going between systems
within a ServerNet cluster. Each node in a ServerNet cluster must be configured with
an Expand-over-ServerNet line-handler process for each other node in the ServerNet
cluster.
expansion service processor (ESP). A service processor (SP) that is not a master service
processor (MSP). ESPs occur in pairs in groups 02 through nn (not in group 01). See
also master service processor (MSP).
explicit DLL. See explicit dynamic-link library (explicit DLL).
explicit dynamic-link library (explicit DLL). A dynamic-link library (DLL) that is named in
the libList of a client or is a native-compiled loadfile associated with a client.
export. To offer a symbol definition for use by other loadfiles. A loadfile exports a symbol
definition for use by other loadfiles that need a data item or function having that
symbolic name.
export digest. A mathematical hash of the exported symbol names and locations in a
library. Two libraries with the same export digest are interchangeable in that they both
export the same symbols at the same locations; they are not necessarily semantically
equivalent.
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Glossary
extended data segment.
extended data segment. See selectable segment.
extended link format (ELF). A standard binary file format common on UNIX systems. The
ELF format is used for position-independent code (PIC) files.
extensible input/output (XIO). A redesign of the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system’s
I/O subsystem to enable it to extend itself in general ways to meet future requirements.
extent. A contiguous area on disk for allocating one file.
extent size. The size in bytes of a contiguous area on disk for allocating one file.
external fabric connection. The low-level ServerNet connection between a node and one
of the external ServerNet fabrics. Each node has an X and a Y connection to the
external fabrics.
external routing. The routing of packets over the external ServerNet fabrics—that is,
between systems (or nodes) in a ServerNet cluster. See also internal routing.
external ServerNet fabrics. The fabrics that link systems in a ServerNet cluster. See also
internal ServerNet fabrics.
external ServerNet X or Y fabric. The X or Y fabric that links systems in a ServerNet
cluster. See also internal ServerNet X or Y fabric.
external system area network manager process (SANMAN). (1) A Guardian process
with the name $ZZSMN that provides management access to the external ServerNet X
and Y fabrics. (2) A Windows NT process that configures and maintains ServerNet
switches within a Windows NT cluster.
fabric. A complex set of interconnections through which there can be multiple and (to the
user) unknown paths from point to point. The term “fabric” is used to refer to the X or Y
portion of the ServerNet communications network; for example, the X fabric.
factory-installed operating system. The version of the operating system image that HP
creates having a CONFTEXT configuration file, OSIMAGE file, and configuration
database that matches your order. Your system is shipped with this version installed in
the system subvolume $SYSTEM.SYS00.
fan. A component within an HP NonStop™ S-series system enclosure that circulates air
into the enclosure to help maintain optimal temperature. Each NonStop S-series
system enclosure contains two fans.
far gateway. A short code sequence that accomplishes the transition to privileged mode for
legitimate calls to callable procedures that are located in a different direct jump area.
Typically, SCr (system code, RISC) is the target area. See also direct jump area, far
jump, and gateway.
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Glossary
far jump
far jump. A sequence of RISC instructions that permits crossing the boundaries of the
256-megabyte direct jump areas in virtual memory. Such sequences are necessary, for
example, when calling into system code from user code, because the two are located
in different direct jump areas. The sequence ends with a JR (Jump via Register) RISC
instruction.
fastLoad. An optimization that allows the loader to avoid reading symbols and binding
symbolic references when loading a program or dynamic-link library in an environment
equivalent to that of a previous load. See also preset, cached bindings, and library
import characterization (LIC).
Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA). A single-ported ServerNet adapter that supports
100-megabit/second (Mbps) or 10-Mbps Ethernet data transfer rates on an HP
NonStop™ S-series server. The 3863 FESA installs directly into an available I/O port.
fault tolerance. The ability of a computer system to continue processing despite the failure
of any single software or hardware component within the system.
feature-test macro. In C and C++ programs, a symbol that, if defined in a program’s source
code, includes specific other symbols from a header within that program’s source code
and makes those symbols visible.
feeder circuit. The circuit conductors installed between the facility’s main service entrance
and the power distribution panels (PDPs) that supply the branch circuits.
ferrule. A cylindrical end terminal sometimes used on resistors, cartridge fuses, and other
parts to permit quick insertion and removal from holders that have corresponding
spring contacts.
FESA. See Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA).
Fiber Optic Extension (FOX). Refers to two products, FOX II and ServerNet/FX, which
allow you to create high-speed (up to 4 megabytes/second) networks of as many as 14
systems connected by dual fiber-optic cables.
fiber-optic plug-in card (F-PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) for the 6760 ServerNet device
adapter (ServerNet/DA) that uses a fiber-optic interface to connect an HP NonStop™
S-series system to external disk drives and to some tape drives that contain a
back-end board (BEB) that translates fiber-optic signals from the F-PIC into SCSI
commands and information for the tape drive. See also plug-in card (PIC) and SCSI
plug-in card (S-PIC).
fiber optics. A medium for data transmission that conveys light or images through very fine,
flexible, glass or plastic fibers. Fiber-optic cables (light guides) are a direct replacement
for conventional coaxial and wire pairs.
fiber-optic ServerNet addressable controller (F-SAC). A ServerNet addressable
controller (SAC) that is contained within a fiber-optic plug-in card (F-PIC).
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Glossary
fiber-optic ServerNet cable
fiber-optic ServerNet cable. A ServerNet cable that uses fiber optics to transmit data. HP
NonStop™ S-series servers support two types of fiber-optic ServerNet cables:
multimode fiber-optic (MMF) ServerNet cable and single-mode fiber-optic (SMF)
ServerNet cable.
field. In a structured programming language, an addressable entry within a data structure.
The term “field” is sometimes used to mean “member.”
field-programmable gate array (FPGA). A programmable integrated circuit that can be
customized to perform specific functions.
field-replaceable unit (FRU). A unit that can be replaced in the field only by qualified
personnel trained by HP and cannot be replaced by customers. A unit is classified as a
FRU because of safety hazards such as weight, size, sharp edges, or electrical
potential; contractual agreements with suppliers; or national or international standards.
See also customer-replaceable unit (CRU).
FIFO. A type of Open System Services (OSS) special file that is always read and written in
a first-in, first-out manner.
FIFO special file. See FIFO.
file. An object to which data can be written or from which data can be read. A file has
attributes such as access permissions and a file type. In the Open System Services
(OSS) environment, file types include regular file, character special file, block special
file, FIFO, and directory. In the Guardian environment, file types include disk files,
processes, and subdevices.
file class. The property of an Open System Services (OSS) file indicating access
permissions for a process related to the owner, group, or other identification of the
process. See also file group class, file other class, and file owner class.
file description. See open file description.
file descriptor. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, the nonnegative integer
that uniquely identifies a single open of a file to a running process. Each file descriptor
is associated with an open file description that contains data about the file.
file group class. The property of an Open System Services (OSS) file indicating access
permissions for a process related to the group ID of the process. A process is in the
file group class of a file if both:
•
•
The process is not a member of the file owner class for the file.
The process has an effective group ID or supplementary group ID that is the same
as the group ID associated with the file.
file identifier. In the Guardian environment, the portion of a filename following the
subvolume name. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a file identifier is
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Glossary-33
Glossary
file link count
a portion of the internal information used to identify a file in the OSS file system (an
inode number). The two identifiers are not comparable.
file link count. The total number of directory entries for an Open System Services (OSS)
file within an HP NonStop™ node.
file mode. For an Open System Services (OSS) process, a field in the stat structure for a
specific file that describes the type and characteristics of the file and contains the
access permission bits for the file.
file mode creation mask. A mask associated with an Open System Services (OSS)
process and used when the process creates a file. Bits set in this mask are cleared in
the access permission bits for the file.
filename. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a component of a pathname
containing any valid characters other than slash (/) or null. See also file name.
file name. A string of characters that uniquely identifies a file.
In the PC environment, file names for disk files normally have at least two parts (the
disk name and the file name); for example, B:MYFILE.
In the Guardian environment, disk file names include a node name, volume name,
subvolume name, and file identifier; for example, \NODE.$DISK.SUBVOL.MYFILE.
In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a file is identified by a pathname; for
example, /usr/john/workfile. See also filename.
file other class. The property of an Open System Services (OSS) file indicating access
permissions for a process related to the user ID and group ID of the process. A
process is in the file other class of a file if both:
•
•
The process is not a member of the file owner class for the file.
The process is not a member of the file group class for the file.
file owner class. The property of an Open System Services (OSS) file indicating access
permissions for a process related to the user ID of the process. A process is in the file
owner class of a file if the process has an effective user ID that is the same as the user
ID (owner) associated with the file.
file permission bits. Information about an Open System Services (OSS) file that is used,
along with other information, to determine whether a process or user has read, write, or
execute/search permission to that file. The bits are divided into three parts: owner,
group, and other. Each part is used with the corresponding file class of processes.
file serial number. A number that uniquely identifies a file within its file system.
fileset. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a set of files with a common
mount point within the file hierarchy. A fileset can be part or all of a single virtual file
system.
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Glossary
file system
On an HP NonStop™ system, the Guardian file system for a node has a mount point
and is a subset of the OSS virtual file system. The entire Guardian file system
therefore could be viewed as a single fileset. However, each volume, and each
process of subtype 30, within the Guardian file system is actually a separate fileset.
The term “file system” is often used interchangeably with “fileset” in UNIX publications.
file system. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a collection of files and file
attributes. A file system provides the namespace for the file serial numbers that
uniquely identify its files. Open System Services provides a file system (see also
ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 [ANSI/IEEE Std. 1003.1-1990], Clause 2.2.2.38); the
Guardian application program interface (API) provides a file system; and OSS Network
File System (NFS) provides a file system. (OSS NFS filenames and pathnames are
governed by slightly different rules than OSS filenames and pathnames.) Within the
OSS and OSS NFS file systems, filesets exist as manageable objects.
On an HP NonStop™ system, the Guardian file system for a node is a subset of the
OSS virtual file system. Traditionally, the API for file access in the Guardian
environment is referred to as the “Guardian file system.”
In some UNIX and NFS implementations, the term “file system” means the same thing
as “fileset.” That is, a file system is a logical grouping of files that, except for the root of
the file system, can be contained only by directories within the file system. See also
fileset.
File Transfer, Access, and Management (FTAM). The Open Systems Interconnection
(OSI) standard developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)
for network file exchange and management services.
file transfer protocol (FTP). (1) The Internet-standard, high-level protocol for transferring
files from one machine to another. The server side requires the client to supply a logon
identifier and password before it honors requests. FTP makes no assumptions about
the file-naming structure of the source and destination systems, and it allows the file
names of each system to be represented in the vernacular. (2) The application used to
send complete files over Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
services.
filler panel. A blank faceplate that is installed in place of a ServerNet adapter or plug-in
card (PIC) to ensure proper ventilation.
fingerprint. A unique identifier calculated for a file and displayed in hexadecimal format.
FIPS. A Federal Information Processing Standard of the United States government.
FIPS 151-1. The Federal Information Processing Standard that specifies the requirements
for conformance to an older draft of POSIX.1 (IEEE Std. 1003.1-1988) than the version
adopted as ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 and imposes some additional requirements.
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Glossary-35
Glossary
FIPS 151-2
FIPS 151-2. The Federal Information Processing Standard that specifies the requirements
for conformance to POSIX.1 as ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 and imposes some additional
requirements.
FIR. See FRU information record (FIR).
FIRINIT. A diagnostic task used to update the communications line interface processor
(CLIP) FRU information record (FIR) that is kept in the ServerNet wide area network
(SWAN) concentrator CLIP flash memory.
FIRMUP. A diagnostic task used to update the copy of the Portable Silicon Operating
System (pSOS) system product embedded kernel that is kept in the ServerNet wide
area network (SWAN) concentrator communications line interface processor (CLIP)
flash memory.
firmware. Code in memory that is necessary for the power-up initialization and
communication with a host or device. The software for components of the ServerNet
architecture (for example, an adapter) is called firmware. Some firmware for ServerNet
components is downloaded when the system or component is loaded.
fixed process configuration. Using Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) to configure a
generic process to always start in the first available processor (that is, to be fault
tolerant).
flag. In a UNIX or Open System Services (OSS) command, a character sequence that
begins with a hyphen and is processed as a unit.
flash memory. A type of memory that contains essential firmware and nonessential
firmware.
flash PROM. A type of programmable read-only memory (PROM) that is electrically
reprogrammable.
flat segment. A type of logical segment. Each flat segment has its own distinct address
range within the process address space that never overlaps the range of any other
allocated segments. Thus all allocated flat segments for a process are always available
for use concurrently. See also logical segment and selectable segment.
foreground process. An Open System Services (OSS) process that belongs to a
foreground process group.
foreground process group. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a process
group whose members have privileges for access to their controlling terminal that are
denied to processes in background process groups of that terminal. Each session with
a controlling terminal has only one foreground process group for that terminal.
Contrast with background process group.
foreground process group ID. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the
process group ID of a foreground process group.
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Glossary
four-lane link
four-lane link. The four single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) ServerNet cables that connect the
two HP NonStop™ Cluster Switches on the same external fabric (for example, X1 and
X2) in a split-star topology.
FOX. See Fiber Optic Extension (FOX).
FOXMON. See FOX monitor process.
FOX monitor process. The Fiber Optic Extension (FOX) monitor process for the
ServerNet/FX adapter subsystem. The process name is $ZZFOX.
FOX ring. The fiber-optic cabling that connects the nodes in a Fiber Optic Extension (FOX)
cluster. This term is also used to refer to the topology of a FOX network.
FPGA. See field-programmable gate array (FPGA).
F-PIC. See fiber-optic plug-in card (F-PIC).
frame. (1) An assembly of sheet-metal parts that is an integral part of an enclosure and
might contain peripherals or a chassis, depending on the type of enclosure. The frame
enables the enclosures to be stacked and has provisions for routing and securing
cables. The frame of an enclosure has dimensions that conform to an industrystandard 19-inch rack. (2) A unit of transmission in some data communications
protocols, usually containing header, data, and checksum fields. (3) In NonStop Sseries processors, a 4096-byte unit of physical memory; also called a physical page.
frame base. An assembly consisting of casters, leveling pads, and frame sheet metal that is
an integral part of a base enclosure.
free list. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, the list of available inodes that
can be allocated to files.
frequency. The number of complete cycles/second of sinusoidal variation. For alternatingcurrent (AC) power lines, the most common frequencies are 60 hertz and 50 hertz.
FRU. See field-replaceable unit (FRU).
FRU information record (FIR). A collection of information that every field-replaceable unit
(FRU) carries with it, such as part number, revision, track ID, and media access control
(MAC) address.
F-SAC. See fiber-optic ServerNet addressable controller (F-SAC).
FTAM. See File Transfer, Access, and Management (FTAM).
FTP. See file transfer protocol (FTP).
gateway. (1)A device used to convert the message protocol of one network to that of
another. (2) A short code sequence that accomplishes the transition to privileged mode
for legitimate calls to callable procedures. See also far gateway.
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Glossary
GB
GB. See gigabyte (GB).
GCSC. See Global Customer Support Center (GCSC).
general-purpose register (GPR). One of a small number of undedicated high-speed
memory locations in a processor.
generic process. A process created and managed by the Kernel subsystem; also known as
a system-managed process. A common characteristic of a generic process is
persistence.
GESA. See Gigabit Ethernet ServerNet adapter (GESA).
Gigabit Ethernet ServerNet adapter (GESA). A single-port ServerNet adapter that
provides 1000 megabits/second (Mbps) data transfer rates between HP NonStop™
S-series systems and Ethernet LANs. A GESA can be directly installed in slots 51
through 54 of an I/O enclosure and slots 53 and 54 of a processor enclosure.
Two versions of the GESA are available:
•
•
3865 GESA-C (T523572): a single-port copper version compliant with the 1000
Base-T standard (802.3ab)
3865 GESA-F (T523572): a single-port fiber version compliant with the 1000
Base-SX standard (802..z)
gigabyte (GB). A unit of measurement equal to 1,073,741,824 bytes (1024 megabytes).
See also kilobyte (KB), megabyte (MB), and terabyte (TB).
Global Customer Support Center (GCSC). A support organization that provides telephone
and remote diagnostic support for HP customers. GCSCs are located all over the
world. See also Online Support Center (OSC).
global offset table (GOT). A table of indirect addresses of data, including function
descriptors, that might reside in a different loadfile.The GOT is an artifact of the native
compiler.
globalized. The import-control characteristic of a loadfile that allows it to import symbols
from any loadfile in the loadList of the program with which it is loaded. When those
loadfiles offer multiple definitions of the same symbol, those loadfiles are searched in
loadList sequence and the first definition found takes precedence. See also searchList.
globally unique ID (GUID). A unique, read-only number stored in nonvolatile memory
(SEEPROM) on a ServerNet II Switch at the time of manufacture. The GUID also
appears on the bar code label. This number can be used programmatically to identify
the switch.
GOT. See global offset table (GOT).
GPR. See general-purpose register (GPR).
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Glossary-38
Glossary
graphical user interface (GUI)
graphical user interface (GUI). A user interface that offers point-and-click access to
program functions.
ground. A conducting connection, whether intentional or accidental, between an electrical
circuit and either the earth or some conducting body that serves in place of the earth,
such as an underground metal water pipe, structural steel, or a ground rod driven into
the earth. See also earth ground.
grounded. Connected to earth or to some conducting body that serves in place of the earth.
grounded conductor. A system or circuit conductor that is intentionally grounded.
ground fault. Any undesired current path from a point of differing potential to ground.
ground fault interrupter. A device that interrupts the electric current to the load when a
fault current to ground exceeds a predetermined value that is less than that required to
operate the overcurrent protection device of the supply circuit.
grounding conductor. A conductor used to connect equipment of the grounded circuit of a
wiring system to one or more earth-grounding electrodes. See also earth-grounding
electrode.
group. (1) The set of all objects accessible by a pair of service processors (SPs) located in
the processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable unit (CRU). In an HP
NonStop™ S-series server, a system enclosure has exactly one group. (2) In the
Open System Services (OSS) environment, a set of user IDs with the same group ID.
group database. A database on a node that contains the group name, group ID, and user
names for each group using that node.
group ID. The nonnegative integer used to identify a group of users of an HP NonStop™
network node. Each user of a node is a member of at least one group. When the
identity of a group is associated with an Open System Services (OSS) process, a
group ID value is referred to as one of the following:
•
•
•
•
Real group ID
Effective group ID
Supplementary group ID
Saved-set group ID
group list. An Open System Services (OSS) process attribute that is used with the effective
group ID of the process to determine the file access permissions for the process.
GRT. See Guided Replacement Toolkit (GRT).
Guardian. An environment available for interactive or programmatic use with the HP
NonStop™ Kernel operating system. Processes that run in the Guardian environment
usually use the Guardian system procedure calls as their application program
interface; interactive users of the Guardian environment usually use the HP Tandem
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Glossary-39
Glossary
Guardian environment
Advanced Command Language (TACL) or another HP product’s command interpreter.
Contrast with Open System Services (OSS).
Guardian environment. The Guardian application program interface (API), tools, and
utilities.
Guardian services. An application program interface (API) to the HP NonStop™ Kernel
operating system, plus the tools and utilities associated with that API. This term is
synonymous with “Guardian environment.” See also Guardian.
Guardian user ID. See HP NonStop™ Kernel user ID.
GUI. See graphical user interface (GUI).
GUID. See globally unique ID (GUID).
guided procedure. A software tool that assists you in performing complex configuration or
replacement tasks on an HP NonStop™ S-series server. Guided procedures are
accessible from the Start menu on your system console. Examples include Replace
SEB or MSEB, Configure ServerNet Node, and Replace IOMF.
Guided Replacement Toolkit (GRT). A software product that guides you through online
replacement of the following customer-replaceable units (CRUs) on HP NonStop™
S-series systems: I/O multifunction (IOMF) CRUs, power supplies, processor
multifunction (PMF) CRUs, and 6760 ServerNet device adapters. GRT is used only
with older versions of TSM server software; if you are replacing a CRU in a system
running TSM server version T7945AAX (shipped with G06.13) or later, use the
appropriate guided procedure.
hard link. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, the relationship between two
directory entries for the same file. A hard link acts as an additional pointer to a file. A
hard link cannot be used to point to a file in another fileset. Contrast with symbolic link.
hard reset. An action performed on an HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch that reinitializes the
router-2 ASIC within the switch, disrupting the routing of ServerNet messages through
the switch for several minutes. When the hard reset is finished, the paths are restored
automatically.
harmonic. The sinusoidal component of an alternating-current (AC) voltage that is a
multiple of the waveform frequency.
harmonic distortion. Harmonics that change an alternating-current (AC) waveform from
sinusoidal to complex.
header. An object that, when specified for inclusion in a program’s source code, causes the
program to behave as if the statement including the header were actually a specific set
of other programming statements. A header contains coded information that provides
details (such as data item length) about the data that the header precedes.
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Glossary
hertz (Hz)
In an Open System Services (OSS) program, a header is the name of a file known to
the run-time library used by a process. In a Guardian environment C language
program, a header is the file identifier for a file known to the run-time library used by a
process.
hertz (Hz). A unit of frequency. One hertz equals one cycle/second.
high frequency. A Federal Communications Commission (FCC) designation for a
frequency in the range 30 through 300 megahertz, corresponding to a decametric
wave in the range 10 through 100 meters.
high PIN. A process identification number (PIN) that is greater than 255. Contrast with low
PIN.
hop count. The number of routers that form a route between a ServerNet source and
ServerNet destination. Hop count is used to determine the best route. If two alternate
routes have the same time factor, the path with the lower hop count is the better route.
host database. An SQL database maintained for the host system and containing
information about requests, software inputs, snapshots, targets, and profiles.
host system. (1) A computer system that supports very large databases and does batch
processing, usually for an entire network of smaller systems. (2) The central site on
which the Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager
(DSM/SCM) is managed, the Archive is maintained, and configuration revisions are
built. The host system is also a target system.
HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch. An assembly that routes ServerNet messages across an
external fabric of a ServerNet cluster. The cluster switch consists of a ServerNet II
Switch, an uninterruptible power supply (UPS), and an AC transfer switch, and it can
be packaged in a switch enclosure or in a 19-inch rack.
HP NonStop™ Kernel Open System Services (OSS). The product name for the OSS
environment. See also Open System Services (OSS).
HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system. The operating system for HP NonStop systems.
HP NonStop™ Kernel user ID. A user ID within an HP NonStop system. The Guardian
environment normally uses the structured view of this user ID, which consists of either
the group-number, user-number pair of values or the group-name.user-name
pair of values. For example, the structured view of the super ID is (255, 255). The
Open System Services (OSS) environment normally uses the scalar view of this user
ID, also known as the UID, which is the value (group-number * 256)
+ user-number. For example, the scalar view of the super ID is (255 * 256) + 255
= 65535.
HP NonStop™ K-series servers. The set of servers in the HP NonStop servers having
product numbers beginning with the letter K. These servers run the HP NonStop
Kernel operating system, but they do not implement the ServerNet architecture.
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Glossary
HP NonStop™ S700 Server
HP NonStop™ S700 Server. A special configuration of HP NonStop S-series server that is
limited to one processor enclosure and a maximum of two I/O enclosures. A matched
pair of any model of PMF CRU can be used in a NonStop S700 server.
HP NonStop™ S7000 Server. The first server in a product line of servers (HP NonStop
S-series servers) that implement the ServerNet architecture and run the HP NonStop
Kernel operating system.
HP NonStop™ S7400 Server. A model of HP NonStop S-series server that provides a
midrange upgrade option for migrating from an HP NonStop K-series server or a
NonStop S7000 server.
HP NonStop™ S7600 Server. A model of HP NonStop S-series server that implements the
ServerNet architecture and runs the HP NonStop Kernel operating system. The
NonStop S7600 PMF CRU is based on the NonStop S74000 PMF CRU, and the
NonStop S7600 server supports all S-series hardware products that are compatible
with the NonStop S74000 server.
HP NonStop™ S70000 Server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
HP NonStop™ S72000 Server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
HP NonStop™ S74000 Server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
HP NonStop™ S76000 Server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
HP NonStop™ S86000 Server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server. Any server in a family of high-performance servers (HP
NonStop S-series servers) that implement the ServerNet architecture and run the HP
NonStop Kernel operating system. This family includes the NonStop S70000, S72000,
S74000, S76000, and S86000 servers.
HP NonStop™ ServerNet Cluster (ServerNet Cluster). The product name for the
collection of hardware and software components that constitute a ServerNet cluster.
HP NonStop™ S-series servers. The set of servers in the HP NonStop servers having
product numbers beginning with the letter S. These servers implement the ServerNet
architecture and run the HP NonStop Kernel operating system.
HP NonStop™ servers. The entire line of HP NonStop servers, including NonStop K-series
and NonStop S-series servers.
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model D processor (NSR-D processor). The model
designation for the TNS/R processor used in the HP NonStop S7400 Server.
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model E processor (NSR-E processor). The model
designation for the TNS/R processor used in the HP NonStop S7600 Server.
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Glossary
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model G processor
(NSR-G processor)
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model G processor (NSR-G processor). The model
designation for the TNS/R processor used in the HP NonStop S70000 Server.
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model T processor (NSR-T processor). The model
designation for the TNS/R processor used in the HP NonStop S72000 Server.
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model V processor (NSR-V processor). The model
designation for the TNS/R processor used in the HP NonStop S74000 Server.
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model W processor (NSR-W processor). The model
designation for the TNS/R processor used in the HP NonStop S7000 Server.
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model X processor (NSR-X processor). The model
designation for the TNS/R processor used in the HP NonStop S76000 Server.
HP NonStop™ System RISC Model Y processor (NSR-Y processor). The model
designation for the TNS/R processor used in the HP NonStop S86000 Server.
HP NonStop™ TCP/IP. The HP implementation of Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol (TCP/IP) for the HP NonStop servers. See also Parallel Library TCP/IP.
HP NonStop™ TCP/IP process. An HP product that supports the Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) layers. TCP/IP processes are used together with
the communications line interface processor (CLIP) pNA+ to provide the transport layer
between wide area network (WAN) I/O processes and data link control (DLC) tasks,
between ConMgr and the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) task,
between the WANBoot process and BOOTP tasks, and between a Compaq TSM
process and a DIAG task.
HP NonStop™ TCP/IP subsystem. A subsystem that allows the use of HP NonStop
TCP/IP to access an HP NonStop S-series host from Macintosh computers, personal
computers, and UNIX workstations. Applications running on a NonStop S-series
system or in an Expand network can transparently exchange data with NonStop
TCP/IP devices.
HP NonStop™ Transaction Manager. HP software that provides transaction protection
and database consistency in demanding online transaction processing (OLTP) and
decision-support environments. It gives full protection to transactions that access
distributed SQL and Enscribe databases, as well as recovery capabilities for
transactions, online disk volumes, and entire databases. See also Transaction
Management Facility (TMF) subsystem.
HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL). The user interface to the HP
NonStop™ Kernel operating system. The TACL product is both a command interpreter
and a command language. Users can write TACL programs that perform complex
tasks or provide a consistent user interface across independently programmed
applications.
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Glossary
HP Tandem Failure Data System (TFDS)
HP Tandem Failure Data System (TFDS). A diagnostic tool that is a component of the HP
NonStop™ Kernel operating system. The TFDS tool isolates software problems and
provides automatic processor-failure data collection, diagnosis, and recovery services.
hybrid shared run-time library (hybrid SRL). A shared run-time library (SRL) that has
been augmented by the addition of a dynamic section that exports the SRL’s symbols
in a form that can be used by position independent code (PIC) clients. A hybrid SRL
looks like a dynamic-link library (DLL) to PIC clients (except it cannot be loaded at
other addresses and cannot itself link to DLLs). The code and data in the SRL are no
different in a hybrid SRL, and its semantics for non-PIC clients are unchanged.
Hz.
See hertz (Hz).
I18N. See internationalization.
IBC. See in-band control (IBC).
ICMP. See Internet control message protocol (ICMP)
identifier. A unique name, for example, TANDEM^FILES^TO^COPY, in the CONFTEXT file
that refers to a text string (one or more file names as given in the CONFAUX file).
When Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM)
encounters an identifier, it substitutes the text string for the identifier.
ideogram. See ideograph.
ideograph. A character or symbol representing a word or idea. Some writing systems, such
as Japanese and Chinese, use thousands of ideographs. An ideograph is sometimes
called an “ideogram.”
IEC. International Electrotechnical Committee. IEC is a professional organization that
creates or adopts standards for computer hardware, environments, and physical
interconnections.
IEEE. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. IEEE is a professional organization
whose committees develop and propose computer standards that define the physical
and data link protocols of entities such as communication networks.
IEEE 802.3 protocol. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standard
defining the hardware layer and transport layer of (a variant of) Ethernet. The
maximum segment length is 500 meters and the maximum total length is 2.5
kilometers. The maximum number of hosts is 1024. The maximum packet size is 1518
bytes.
impedance. The total opposition (that is, resistance and reactance) a circuit provides to the
flow of alternating current at a given frequency.
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Glossary
implementation-defined
implementation-defined. Not specified by a standard. A correct value or behavior that is
implementation-defined can vary from system to system and therefore might represent
a feature or facility that cannot be ported.
implicit library. A library supplied by HP that is available in the read-only and execute-only
globally mapped address space shared by all processes without being specified to the
linker or loader. See also TNS system library and public library.
implicit library import library (imp-imp). See import library.
implied user library. A method of binding TNS object files that have more than 16 code
segments. Segments 16 through 31 are located in the user code (UC) space but are
executed as if they were segments 0 through 15 of the user library (UL) code space.
This method precludes the use of a user library. Binder now supports 32 segments of
UC space concurrently with 32 segments of UL code space, so the implied user library
method is not needed in new or changed TNS applications.
import. To refer to a symbol definition from another loadfile. A loadfile imports a symbol
definition when it needs a data item or function having that symbolic name.
import control. The characteristic of a loadfile that determines from which other loadfiles it
can import symbol definitions. The programmer sets a loadfile’s import control at link
time. That import control can be localized, globalized, or semiglobalized. A loadfile’s
import control governs the way the linker and loader construct that loadfile’s searchList
and affects the search only for symbols required by that loadfile.
import library. A file that represents a dynamic-link library (DLL) and can substitute for it as
input to the linker. Import libraries facilitate linking on auxiliary platforms (that is, PCs)
where it is inconvenient to store the actual DLLs.
in-band control (IBC). A symbol-based communications protocol for communicating
management information across a ServerNet link without interfering with any
application traffic in the network. In ServerNet II architecture, IBC traffic uses standard
ServerNet packets. ServerNet I architecture uses the Illegal Symbol variation of IBC,
which uses a subset of the available symbols to convey control information from one
node to another. The symbol subset chosen is from the group of symbols that are not
used for passing data; these symbols are usually considered illegal or unused.
incident report. A report sent by the Compaq TSM server software to the TSM Notification
Director Application. If remote notification (dial-out) is configured, the TSM Notification
Director Application forwards incident reports to a service provider. There are three
types of incident reports: problem incident reports, periodic incident reports, and
software configuration incident reports.
incremental discovery. Discovery of an HP NonStop™ S-series server when the Compaq
TSM client software has locally saved information but where there have been
configuration changes on the server since that information was saved.
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Glossary
indicator lights
indicator lights. Two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on a customer-replaceable unit (CRU)
that indicate the status of the unit. The red or amber indicator light is lit when the unit is
not working properly; during startup, this light can indicate that the unit is not yet
functioning. The green indicator light is lit when the unit has proper power applied. See
also light-emitting diode (LED).
inductive reactance. Resistance at a frequency that is caused by the inductance of a coil
or circuit.
initial discovery. Discovery of an HP NonStop™ S-series server with which the Compaq
TSM client software has had no prior contact and for which the TSM client software
has no locally saved information.
initialization. The process of defining a new Distributed Systems Management/Software
Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) target system, including giving it a name, setting
up default values used when processing requests, and creating the first software
revision (list of products) for the system.
initial software revision. The software revision on a target system when it is first brought
into the Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager
(DSM/SCM) environment. The DSM/SCM host database must be initialized with
information about the initial software revision. The initial software revision is then used
as a baseline upon which new software revisions are based.
inode. A data structure that stores the location of an Open System Services (OSS) file.
inode number. A unique identifier within the Open System Services (OSS) file system of an
instance of an OSS file. The inode number identifies the instance within the file system
catalogs.
input/output process (IOP). A running program (part of the HP NonStop™ Kernel
operating system) that manages the I/O functions for one or more ServerNet
addressable controllers (SACs) of the same type.
input source. The resource from which Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) accepts
command input. SCF can accept input from a terminal or a disk file. The initial input
source is determined by the form of the RUN command used to initiate SCF. At any
time during an SCF session, the input source can be temporarily changed to execute a
series of commands from a command file.
inrush current. The initial surge current demand of a load.
Inspect region. The region of a TNS object file that contains symbol tables for all blocks
compiled with the SYMBOLS directive. The Inspect region is sometimes called the
symbols region.
installation subvolume (ISV). A subvolume containing files that perform a specific function
during the installation process, such as organizing documentation in a specific location,
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Glossary-46
Glossary
installer
providing the components of the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system image
(OSIMAGE), and containing files that are used after the installation process.
installer. The person who installs the system equipment for a new system. This person also
installs new equipment when additions are made to the system. This person can install
software and perform system verification procedures as directed by the system
planner, configuration planner, or support planner.
instruction processing unit (IPU). A processing unit that executes programs by fetching
instructions from memory and executing them.
insulated ground. A grounding conductor with a dielectric (low-conductance) insulator
around it to prevent inadvertent contact with metal conduits.
intelligent SCSI processor (ISP). The ServerNet addressable controller (SAC) that
controls the small computer system interface (SCSI) bus.
interactive mode. A mode of operation that is characterized by having the same input and
output device (a terminal or a process) for the session. If a terminal is used, a person
enters a command and presses Return. If a process is used, the system interface waits
for the process to send a request and treats the process in the same manner as a
terminal. Contrast with noninteractive mode.
internal routing. The routing of packets within an HP NonStop™ S-series server. See also
external routing.
internal ServerNet fabrics. The fabrics that link ServerNet devices within an HP
NonStop™ S-series server. See also external ServerNet fabrics.
internal ServerNet X or Y fabric. The X or Y fabric that links ServerNet devices within an
HP NonStop™ S-series server. See also fabric.
internationalization. The process of designing and coding software so that it can be
adapted to meet the needs of different languages, cultures, and character sets, with
the ability to handle various linguistic and cultural conventions. Internationalization
methods enable the processing of character-based data independently of the
underlying character encoding, allowing choice among character sets. Sometimes
referred to as “I18N,” derived from the 18 letters between the initial “I” and the final “N”
of the word “internationalization.” See also character set.
Internet address. The 32-bit address assigned to hosts that want to participate in the
Internet using Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). Internet
addresses are an abstraction of physical hardware addresses, just as the Internet is an
abstraction of physical networks. As assigned to the interconnection of a host to a
physical network, an Internet address consists of a network portion and a host portion.
See also IP address.
Internet control message protocol (ICMP). A maintenance protocol in the Transmission
Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite that is required in every TCP/IP
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Glossary
Internet protocol (IP)
implementation. The ICMP allows two nodes on an IP network to share IP status and
error information. The ICMP is used by the ping utility to determine the readability of a
remote system. See also IP address and ping.
Internet protocol (IP). A data communications protocol that handles the routing of data
through a network, which typically consists of many different subnetworks. IP is
connectionless; it routes data from a source address to a destination address. See also
IP address.
interoperability. (1) Within an HP NonStop™ node, the ability to use the features or
facilities of one environment from another. For example, the gtacl command in the
Open System Services (OSS) environment allows an interactive user to start and use a
Guardian tool in the Guardian environment. (2) Among systems from multiple vendors
or with multiple versions of operating systems from the same vendor, the ability to
exchange status, files, and other information. Product externals and end-user
publications for the NonStop range of servers often use the term “connectivity” in this
context. See also connectivity.
interprocessor communications (IPC). The exchange of messages between processors.
intrinsic library. See Shared Millicode Library.
instance. A particular case of a class of items or objects. For example, a process is defined
as one instance of the execution of a program; multiple processes might be executing
the same program simultaneously. Also, instance data refers to global data of a
program or library; each process has a its own instance of these data.
instance data. For each process using a dynamic-link library, a data segment area
containing the global variables used by the library.
I/O cabinet. See I/O enclosure.
I/O controller. The hardware logic that controls computer I/O operations for a particular set
of devices, such as disks, tapes, terminals, or communications lines. See also
ServerNet addressable controller (SAC).
I/O enclosure. An HP NonStop™ S-series system enclosure containing exactly one
module, which includes ServerNet adapters, disk drives, components related to the
ServerNet fabrics, and components related to electrical power and cooling for the
enclosure. An I/O enclosure is identical to a processor enclosure, except that it
contains I/O multifunction (IOMF) customer-replaceable units (CRUs) instead of
processor multifunction (PMF) CRUs.
IOMF CRU. See I/O multifunction (IOMF) CRU.
IOMF 2 CRU. See I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2 CRU.
I/O multifunction (IOMF) CRU. (1) An HP NonStop™ S-series customer-replaceable unit
(CRU) that connects an I/O enclosure to a processor enclosure through a ServerNet
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Glossary
I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2 CRU
cable and supplies power to the components within the IOMF CRU as well as
redundantly to the disk drives, SCSI terminators, and ServerNet adapters in that
enclosure. The IOMF CRU contains a power supply, a service processor (SP), a
ServerNet router, an Ethernet controller, an external ServerNet port, and three SCSI
ServerNet addressable controllers (S-SACs) in a single unit. (2) A collective term for
both IOMF CRUs and IOMF 2 CRUs when a distinction between the two types of
CRUs is not required.
I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2 CRU. An HP NonStop™ S-series customer-replaceable unit
(CRU) that connects an I/O enclosure to a processor enclosure through a ServerNet
cable and supplies power to the components within the IOMF 2 CRU as well as
redundantly to the disk drives, SCSI terminators, and ServerNet adapters in that
enclosure. The IOMF 2 CRU contains a power supply, a service processor (SP), a
ServerNet router 2, an Ethernet controller, three configurable ServerNet ports, and
three SCSI ServerNet addressable controllers (S-SACs) in a single unit. IOMF 2
CRUs are supported on G06.10 and later software release version updates (RVUs).
IOP. See input/output process (IOP).
IP.
See Internet protocol (IP).
IP address. An address that uniquely identifies a specific host system within a network to
the Internet protocol (IP). An IP address consists of two parts: a network address,
which identifies the network, and a local address, which identifies the host within the
network. IP routes data between source and destination IP addresses.
iPAQ Desktop. An Internet-based computing model and business PC used for Internet
access, mainstream computing, and running the Windows 2000 Professional operating
system. The iPAQ Desktop is designed to reduce hardware and software conflicts; it
eliminates Industry Standard Architecture (ISA)/Peripheral Component Interconnect
(PCI) slots and uses Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports with the Windows 2000 or
Windows ME operating system.
IPC. See interprocessor communications (IPC).
IPU. See instruction processing unit (IPU).
ISO. International Organization for Standardization. ISO is an international body that drafts,
discusses, proposes, and specifies standards for network protocols. ISO is best known
for its seven-layer reference model that describes the conceptual organization of
protocols.
ISO is sometimes called the “International Standards Organization”; although ISO is
the official abbreviation, it does not correspond to the organization’s name in any
language.
ISO 646. An ISO standard for representing characters in languages based on the Roman
alphabet. Like ASCII, ISO 646 uses only 7 bits of each 8-bit byte to represent data.
Contrast with ISO 8859.
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Glossary
ISO 8859
ISO 8859. A series of ISO standard 8-bit code sets used to represent languages based on
many alphabets, including Roman, Greek, Cyrillic, Hebrew, Turkish, and Arabic. The
ISO 8859 code sets are used in international applications that must be data
transparent. ASCII is a subset of each of the ISO 8859 code sets.
ISO 10646. A universal coded character set that represents all characters and symbols from
all commonly used scripts and languages.
ISO/IEC-conforming POSIX.1 application. An application that both:
•
•
Uses only the facilities described in ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 and approved
conforming language bindings for any ISO or IEC standard.
Is documented as using only those facilities and approved conforming language
bindings.
isolated ground. A grounding conductor that directly connects the equipment ground
through an isolated ground-type receptacle with the power system grounding point
without any intermediate grounding points.
isolation transformer. A transformer containing electrostatic shields between the primary
and secondary windings, with no direct electrical path between the primary and
secondary windings.
ISP. See intelligent SCSI processor (ISP).
ISV. See installation subvolume (ISV).
JDS box. See ServerNet extender module (SEM).
job control. The Open System Services (OSS) features that allow processes to be stopped,
continued, and moved from or to the background.
KB. See kilobyte (KB).
Kernel subsystem. In G-series release version updates (RVUs), the subsystem for
configuration and management of the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) subsystem
managers that are generic processes, some system attributes, and the ServerNet X
and Y fabrics.
Kernel subsystem manager process. The generic process that starts and manages other
generic processes, some system attributes, and the ServerNet X and Y fabrics in
G-series release version updates (RVUs). The $ZZKRN Kernel subsystem manager
process is started and managed by the $ZPM persistence manager process.
kilobyte (KB). A unit of measurement equal to 1024 bytes. See also gigabyte (GB),
megabyte (MB), and terabyte (TB).
K-series servers. See HP NonStop™ K-series servers.
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Glossary
L10N
L10N. See localization.
labeled dump. A token-by-token display-text representation of the Subsystem
Programmatic Interface (SPI) command buffer or response buffer, as produced by the
Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) commands DETAIL CMDBUFFER and DETAIL
RSPBUFFER. The display text includes a labeled value for each token.
LAN. See local area network (LAN).
LANMAN. See LAN manager (LANMAN) process.
LAN manager (LANMAN) process. The process provided as part of the ServerNet local
area network (LAN) Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem that starts and manages the
SLSA subsystem objects and the LAN monitor (LANMON) process and assigns
ownership of Ethernet adapters to the LANMON processes in the system. Subsystem
Control Facility (SCF) commands are directed to the LANMON processes for
configuring and managing the SLSA subsystem and the Ethernet adapters.
LANMON. See LAN monitor (LANMON) process.
LAN monitor (LANMON) process. The process provided as part of the ServerNet local
area network (LAN) Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem that has ownership of the
Ethernet adapters controlled by the SLSA subsystem.
late binding. At load time, binding a symbolic reference in a dynamic-link library (DLL) to a
definition in a loadfile that appears on the program’s loadList rather than the one found
on the DLL’s linker searchList. Late binding occurs in either of the following cases:
•
•
The loader resolves a symbol that is unresolved by any loadfile on the linker
searchList.
The loader binds a symbol in a DLL to the first definition it finds on the program’s
loadList, and this is not the first definition that was encountered on the linker
searchList.
For localized loadfiles, the linker and loader searchLists are the same, so late binding
does not occur.
LB. See logic board (LB).
LED. See light-emitting diode (LED).
legacy system. An operating system that is not open but from which applications must be
ported or users transferred.
libList. The list of libraries to be loaded along with a loadfile. When linking the loadfile, the
linker constructs the libList from the names of libraries specified in the linker’s
command stream; it stores the libList within the loadfile.
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Glossary
library
library. A generic term for a collection of routines useful in many programs. An object code
library can take the form of a linkfile to be physically included into client programs, it
can be an OSS archive file containing several linkable modules, it can be a loadfile, or
it can be a system-managed collection of preloaded routines. Source-code libraries fall
outside the scope of this glossary. See also dynamic-link library (DLL) and shared runtime library (SRL).
library client. A program or another library that uses routines or variables from that library.
library file. See library.
library import characterization (LIC). A list of the export digests and relocation offsets of
all the libraries used to resolve symbols in a loadfile. It allows the loader and operating
system to determine when a file is being loaded in an environment equivalent to that
found by the linker or to a previous load (see fastLoad). A LIC is generated and stored
in the loadfile by the linker when a file is preset; it can be used in a subsequent load
step to determine whether the loadfile’s existing bindings can be reused. The operating
system can also retain the bindings as modified when a loadfile is loaded (see cached
bindings) and associate a LIC with those cached bindings, so that they can be reused
when the same file is again loaded in an equivalent environment.
LIC. See library import characterization (LIC).
LIF. See logical interface (LIF).
light-emitting diode (LED). A semiconductor device that emits light from its surface.
Indicator lights are composed of LEDs. See also indicator lights.
line. The specific hardware path over which data is transmitted or received. A line can also
have a process name associated with it that identifies an input/output process (IOP) or
logical device associated with that specific hardware path.
linear load. Electrical loads for which the impedance is constant regardless of the voltage,
so that if the voltage is sinusoidal, the current drawn is also sinusoidal.
line-handler process. See Expand line-handler process or Expand-over-ServerNet
line-handler process.
line interface unit (LIU). A dual-ported unit consisting of two parts: a communications line
interface processor (CLIP) and a line interface module (LIM). An LIU can communicate
with either the primary or the backup processor, providing fault tolerance. When it is a
component of the communications subsystem, an LIU communicates with either
processor through either of a pair of communications interface units (CIUs).
link. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, a directory entry for a file.
link count. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, the number of directory entries
that refer to a particular file.
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Glossary
linker
linker. (1) The process or server that invokes the message system to deliver a message to
some other process or server. (2) A programming utility, which combines one or more
compilation units’ linkfiles to create an executable loadfile for a native program or
library.
linkfile. (1) For native C/C++ compilers in the Guardian environment, a command file for
input to the nld or ld utility. (2) A file containing object code that is not yet ready to
load and execute. Linkfiles are combined by means of a linker or binder to make an
executable loadfile for a program or library. Compiling creates one linkfile per
independent source module. Contrast with loadfile.
linking. The operation of collecting, connecting, and relocating code and data blocks from
one or more separately compiled object files to produce a target object file.
link name. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the filename associated with
a specific file within a directory. The length of a filename, and therefore the length of a
link name, depends on the file system.
listener. The process or server that is notified by the message system that a message from
some other process or server is being delivered.
LIU. See line interface unit (LIU).
LMU. See logical memory unit (LMU).
load. (1) To transfer the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system image or a program from
disk into a computer’s memory so that the operating system or program can run. (2) To
insert a tape into a tape drive, which prepares it for a tape operation (read or write).
loadable library. A loadfile that offers functions and data to other loadfiles. In this manual,
dynamic-link libraries and hybrid shared run-time libraries are libraries. A library cannot
normally be invoked externally; for example, by a RUN command. Instead, it is
invoked by calls or data references from client loadfiles.
loader. A programming utility that transfers a program into memory so it can run. The
mechanism that brings loadfiles into memory for execution, maps them into virtual
address space, and resolves symbol references among them. Synonyms include
run-time loader and run-time linker. The loader for TNS and for TNS/R native programs
and libraries that are not position-independent code (PIC) is part of the operating
system. For PIC loadfiles, a loader called RLD works with the operating system to load
programs and libraries.
loadfile. An executable object code file that is ready for loading into memory and executing
on the computer. Loadfiles are further classified as executable programs (containing a
main routine at which to begin execution of that program) or executable libraries
(supplying routines or variables to multiple programs or separately loaded libraries). A
TNS code file might be both a loadfile and a linkfile; native code files are never both.
Contrast with linkfile.
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Glossary
loadList
loadList. A list of all the libraries that must be loaded for a given loadfile to execute. A
loadfile’s loadList includes all the libraries in the given loadfile’s libList plus all the
libraries in those loadfiles’ libLists, and so forth. It does not include the implicit
libraries. The loadList order is the sequence in which these loadfiles are to be loaded
when they are not already loaded by a previous operation. The loadList of the program
includes all the loadfiles present in the process, in the order they were loaded.
local area network (LAN). A network that is located in a small geographical area and
whose communications technology provides a high-bandwidth, low-cost medium to
which low-cost nodes can be connected. One or more LANs can be connected to the
system such that the LAN users can access the system as if their workstations were
connected directly to it. Contrast with wide area network (WAN).
locale. In localization, the definition of the subset of a user’s environment that depends on
language and cultural conventions.
localization. The process of adapting computer interfaces, data, and documentation to the
culturally accepted way of presenting information in the culture. Sometimes referred to
as “L10N,” derived from the 10 letters between the initial “L” and the final “N” of the
word “localization.”
local mount. In the Network File System (NFS), a mount that attaches the fileset
associated with a server to the specified mount point within the local directory
hierarchy. The local mount is visible within the NFS subsystem and makes the files
associated with the server available through the path associated with the local mount
point.
local node. See local system.
local operator. The person who performs routine system operations, such as starting and
stopping the system, loading and unloading tapes, and changing the air filter. The
local operator is normally the operator of the asynchronous system console for the
node. See also operator.
local processor. A processor in the same node as the ServerNet cluster monitor process
(SNETMON) that is reporting status about the processor.
local system. (1) An on-site system or a system that is geographically near to the user or
operator. (2) From the perspective of a particular SNETMON, the system or node on
which that SNETMON is running. (3) From the perspective of a Compaq TSM operator,
the system to which the operator is logged on. Contrast with remote system.
logical device name. The name assigned to an I/O process during its configuration. Other
processes use the logical device name when issuing Guardian procedure calls to the
I/O process.
logical device number. A number that identifies a particular I/O device in the system.
Logical device numbers are assigned to physical I/O devices.
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Glossary
logical disk volume
logical disk volume. A hardware device or device pair that provides persistent, highly
accessible storage for data on a medium that is either magnetic or optical.
logical interface (LIF). A process that allows an application or another process to
communicate with data communications hardware.
logical memory unit (LMU). A group of four memory units. Memory on a processor and
memory board (PMB) is divided into two LMUs. One LMU contains memory units in
slots MS1 through MS4; the other LMU contains memory units in slots MS5 through
MS8. An LMU must have memory units installed either in all of its slots or in none of its
slots. See also memory unit.
logical segment. A single data area consisting of one or more consecutive 128-kilobyte
unitary segments that is dynamically allocated by a process. There are two types of
logical segments: selectable segments and flat segments. See also selectable
segment and flat segment.
logic board (LB). A printed wiring assembly (PWA) on which computer circuits (chips and
wiring) are mounted. One type of logic board is a processor and memory board (PMB);
another type is a multifunction I/O board (MFIOB).
login. The activity by which a user establishes a locally authenticated identity on a server.
Each login has one login name.
login name. A user name associated with a session.
logon sequence. The process through which the HP NonStop™ S-series server to be
managed is determined, the security constraints to interact with that server are met,
and a connection with that server is established.
low-level link. A connection between the Compaq TSM client software running on a TSM
workstation and the master service processors (MSPs) on an HP NonStop™ S-series
server. When the HP NonStop Kernel operating system is not running, communication
must take place over a low-level link. You can also communicate with a NonStop
S-series server over a low-level link when the operating system is running. See also
service connection.
low PIN. A process identification number (PIN) that is in the range 0 through 254. Contrast
with high PIN.
MAC address. See media access control (MAC) address.
main bonding jumper. The connection between the grounded circuit conductor and the
equipment grounding conductor at the service.
main memory. Data storage, specifically the chips that store the programs and data
currently in use by a processor. On HP NonStop™ S-series servers, main memory is
stored on the processor and memory board (PMB) in the processor multifunction
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Glossary
main service entrance
(PMF) customer-replaceable unit (CRU) and is cleared when the system is powered
off.
main service entrance. The enclosure containing connection panels and switchgear,
located at the point where the utility power lines enter the building.
Maintenance Interface. See Archive and Database Maintenance Interface.
management process. A process through which an application issues commands to a
subsystem. A management process can be part of a subsystem or it can be associated
with more than one subsystem; in the latter case, the management process is logically
part of each subsystem. Subsystem Control Point (SCP) is the management process
for all subsystems controlled by Subsystem Control Facility (SCF).
manager. (1) For an HP NonStop™ system, the person responsible for day-to-day
monitoring and maintenance tasks associated with a software subsystem on a
NonStop node. (2) For a UNIX system, any person in Management and Information
Services management for the site.
man page. A term sometimes used in UNIX documentation for the online or hard-copy
version of a file that provides reference information. See reference page.
master service processor (MSP). A service processor (SP) that provides the basic service
processor functions as well as centralized system functions such as a console port, a
modem port for remote support functions, and system-load control. The enclosure
containing processors 0 and 1 (group 01) also contains a pair of MSPs. See also
expansion service processor (ESP).
MB. See megabyte (MB).
Measure. A tool used for monitoring the performance of the HP NonStop™ servers.
Measure can be used to check the performance of a ServerNet cluster.
media access control (MAC) address. A value in the Medium Access Control sublayer of
the IEEE/ISO/ANSI local area network (LAN) architecture that uniquely identifies an
individual station implementing a single point of physical attachment to a LAN.
Media Interface Connector (MIC). A type of head on a fiber-optic cable that has locking
wings on the sides.
megabyte (MB). A unit of measurement equal to 1,048,576 bytes (1024 kilobytes). See also
gigabyte (GB), kilobyte (KB), and terabyte (TB).
member. In a structured programming language, an addressable entry within a data
structure. A member can be a simple field or a data structure.
memory-exact point. A location in an accelerated program at which the values in memory
(but not necessarily in the register stack) are the same as they would be if the program
were running on a TNS processor. Most source statement boundaries are
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Glossary
memory manager
memory-exact points. Complex statements might contain several such points: at each
function call, privileged instruction, and embedded assignment. Contrast with
register-exact point.
memory manager. A HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system process that implements the
paging scheme for virtual memory. This process services requests generated by
different interrupt handlers as well as by other system processes.
memory page. A unit of virtual storage. In TNS systems, a memory page contains 2048
bytes. In TNS/R systems, the page size is determined by the memory manager and
can vary, depending on the processor type.
memory slot. One of eight slots for memory units on the processor and memory board
(PMB). The slots are labeled MS1 through MS8.
memory unit. A unit consisting of a dual inline memory module (DIMM) or a single inline
memory module (SIMM) that is installed in groups of four on the processor and
memory board (PMB) of the processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable unit
(CRU). Memory units constitute the processor memory. The memory units in certain
models of PMF CRU are not replaceable by customers or in the field.
message monitor process (MSGMON). A helper process for the ServerNet cluster monitor
process (SNETMON) that runs in each processor on every node of a ServerNet
cluster. MSGMON is started by the persistence manager process, $ZPM. It performs
duties for SNETMON in those instances where SNETMON needs an agent in each
system processor. In addition, MSGMON monitors the connections within the
processor and reports changes back to SNETMON when required.
MFIOB. See multifunction I/O board (MFIOB).
MIC. See Media Interface Connector (MIC).
microcode. Any machine code or data that can run in a microprocessor. HP produces two
types of microcode for HP NonStop™ S-series systems: volatile and nonvolatile.
Volatile microcode is loaded into the volatile random-access memory (RAM) of some
types of printed wiring assemblies (PWAs) and is not retained in a host PWA when
power to the PWA is interrupted. For nonvolatile microcode, see firmware. See also
millicode.
millicode. RISC instructions that implement various TNS low-level functions such as
exception handling, real-time translation routines, and library routines that implement
the TNS instruction set. Millicode is functionally equivalent to TNS microcode.
mirrored disk or volume. A pair of identical disk drives that are used together as a single
logical volume. One drive is considered primary and the other is called the mirror. Each
byte of data written to the primary drive is also written to the mirror drive; if the primary
drive fails, the mirror drive can continue operations. See also volume.
MMF PIC. See multimode fiber-optic (MMF) plug-in card (PIC).
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Glossary
MMF ServerNet cable
MMF ServerNet cable. See multimode fiber-optic (MMF) ServerNet cable.
mode. The set of attributes that specify the type and access permissions for a file. See also
file mode.
modular ServerNet expansion board (MSEB). A ServerNet expansion board (SEB) that
uses plug-in cards (PICs) to provide a choice of connection media for routing
ServerNet packets.
module. (1) A set of components sharing a common interconnection, such as a backplane.
A module is a subset of a group, and it is usually contained in an enclosure. In an HP
NonStop™ S-series server, there is exactly one module in a group. (2) A set of I/O
devices or services that share a common protocol and can be controlled by a single
module driver in the extensible I/O (XIO) subsystem.
MON object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for the Storage
Management Foundation (SMF) master process.
mount. In the Network File System (NFS), to make a fileset accessible to the users of a
node.
mount point. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, a directory that contains a
mounted fileset. The mounted fileset can be in a different file system.
MRouter. A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) or application-specific integrated circuit
(ASIC) that is part of the serial maintenance bus (SMB) architecture. The MRouter
distributes the SMB throughout a group.
MSEB. See modular ServerNet expansion board (MSEB).
MSEB CBB. See MSEB common base board (CBB).
MSEB common base board (CBB). In modular ServerNet expansion boards (MSEBs), the
printed wiring assembly (PWA) that plug-in cards (PICs) are installed on.
MSEB port. A connector on modular ServerNet expansion boards (MSEBs) used for
ServerNet links. An MSEB has four fixed serial-copper ports and six plug-in card (PIC)
slots that accept a variety of connection media. See also SEB port.
MSGMON. See message monitor process (MSGMON).
MSP. See master service processor (MSP).
multifunction I/O board (MFIOB). A ServerNet adapter that contains ServerNet
addressable controllers (SACs) for SCSI and Ethernet; a service processor; ServerNet
links to the processor, to the two ServerNet adapter slots, and to one of the ServerNet
expansion board (SEB) slots; and connections to the serial maintenance bus (SMB),
which connects components within an enclosure to the service processor.
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Glossary
multilane link
multilane link. A communication link between HP NonStop™ Cluster Switches that can
consist of multiple ServerNet cables. Two-lane links and four-lane links are examples
of multilane links.
multimode fiber-optic (MMF) plug-in card (PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) for the modular
ServerNet expansion board (MSEB) and I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2 customerreplaceable unit (CRU) that supports the multimode fiber-optic (MMF) interface.
multimode fiber-optic (MMF) ServerNet cable. A fiber-optic cable that either allows more
than one mode to propagate or supports propagation of more than one mode of a
given wavelength. MMF ServerNet cable typically supports shorter transmission
distances than single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) ServerNet cable.
multiplexed. The action of separating data traffic from one line onto several distinct lines or
of combining data traffic from several distinct lines onto one line.
NAM. See Network Access Method (NAM).
national-standards-body conforming POSIX.1 application. An application that both:
•
•
Uses only the facilities described in ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 and approved
standards of a specific member of the ISO or IEC (the national standards body).
Documents use of only those facilities and approved standards and documents all
options and dependencies on limits.
native link editor. See nld utility.
native mode. See TNS/R native mode.
native system library. Synonym for implicit library.
$NCP. The process name of the network control process.
NEC. National Electrical Code.
network. Two or more computer systems (nodes) connected so that they can exchange
information and share resources. See also Expand network, wide area network (WAN),
and local area network (LAN).
Network Access Method (NAM). The interface through which an Expand-over-ServerNet
line-handler process communicates with the ServerNet cluster monitor process
(SNETMON).
network control process. A process pair, named $NCP, that runs in each system of an
Expand network. $NCP establishes and terminates system-to-system connections,
maintains network-related system tables (including the network routing table, NRT),
calculates the most efficient way to transmit data to other systems in the network,
monitors and logs changes in the status of the network and its systems, informs
$NCPs at neighbor systems of changes in line or Expand line-handler process status,
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Glossary
Network Information Service (NIS)
and aborts pending requests when all paths go down. See also network routing table
(NRT).
Network Information Service (NIS). A distributed name service (formerly known as Yellow
Pages) developed by Sun Microsystems. See also Domain Name System (DNS).
network routing table (NRT). A table that resides in each processor in each system in a
network. The NRT associates each destination system with the logical device (LDEV)
number of the best-path route Expand line-handler process to use to send messages
to that system. See also network control process.
network topology. The physical layout of components that define a system, a local area
network (LAN), or a wide area network (WAN).
neutral. (1) The conductor used as the primary return for current during normal operation of
electrical equipment. (2) The junction of the legs in a wye circuit. See also wye.
NIS. See Network Information Service (NIS).
nld utility. (1) The utility that collects, links, and modifies code and data blocks from one or
more object files to produce a target TNS/R native object file. The nld utility is similar
to the Binder program used in the TNS development environment. (2) The native link
editor invoked during system generation to build the TSYSCLR and TSYSDP2 files.
NNA. See node-numbering agent (NNA).
NNA PIC. See node-numbering agent (NNA) plug-in card (PIC).
node. (1) A uniquely identified computer system connected to one or more other computer
systems in a network. See also Expand node and ServerNet node. (2) An endpoint in
a ServerNet fabric, such as a processor or ServerNet addressable controller (SAC).
node number. A number used to identify a member system in a network. The node number
is usually unique for each system in the network. See also node and ServerNet node
number.
node-numbering agent (NNA). A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) in a single-mode
fiber-optic (SMF) plug-in card (PIC) that translates the node number of each ServerNet
packet entering or exiting the external ServerNet fabrics.
node-numbering agent (NNA) plug-in card (PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) for the modular
ServerNet expansion board (MSEB) that supports the node-numbering agent (NNA)
interface.
node routing ID. See ServerNet node routing ID.
noncanonical input mode. For an Open System Services (OSS) process, a terminal input
mode in which data is made available to the process when a timer expires or when a
certain number of characters have been entered. Noncanonical data is not grouped
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Glossary
nonclustered
into logical lines of input. This mode is sometimes called block mode or transparent
mode. Contrast with canonical input mode.
nonclustered. Lacking the quality of belonging to a cluster.
nonconfigured object. An object that comes into existence after Subsystem Control
Facility (SCF) is running and that was created in response to activity outside the SCF
environment. An SCF STATUS command can display the name of a nonconfigured
object, but its state is UNKNOWN.
nonessential firmware. Code that is used for support routines such as self-test diagnostics
and that can be overwritten during flash programming without affecting the next
power-up operation. Contrast with essential firmware.
noninteractive mode. A mode of operation that usually involves a command file (an EDIT
file that contains a series of commands). Contrast with interactive mode.
nonlinear load. Electrical load for which the instantaneous current is not proportional to the
instantaneous voltage. Consequently, the local impedance varies with the voltage.
nonsensitive command. A command that can be issued by any user or program that is
allowed access to a subsystem—that is, a command on which the subsystem imposes
no further security restrictions. For Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), nonsensitive
commands are those that cannot change the state or configuration of objects; most of
them are information commands. Contrast with sensitive command.
NonStop™ zone. A branch of the power-distribution system that provides power directly to
HP NonStop computer equipment.
NonStop™ Kernel operating system. See HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system.
NonStop™ ServerNet Cluster. See HP NonStop™ ServerNet Cluster (ServerNet Cluster).
NonStop™ TCP/IP. See HP NonStop™ TCP/IP.
NonStop™ TCP/IP process. See HP NonStop™ TCP/IP process.
NonStop™ TCP/IP subsystem. See HP NonStop™ TCP/IP subsystem.
NonStop™ TCP/IPv6. An HP product that adds IP version 6 (IPv6) functionality to the
parallel library TCP/IP product. IPv6 is a TCP/IP protocol that extends the IP version 4
(IPv4) of 32 bits to 128 bits. NonStop TCP/IPv6 can be run in three modes: INET (only
IPv4 and is a direct replacement for parallel library TCP/IP), INET 6 (only IPv6), and
Dual (both IPv4 and IPv6 communications).
NonStop™ TMF. See HP NonStop™ Transaction Manager.
normal mode. Electromagnetic interference that occurs between current-carrying
conductors (for example, line to neutral).
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Glossary
notification
notification. A message that is generated by a resource managed by the Compaq TSM
package when something occurs that might affect that resource’s performance. There
are two types of notifications: TSM notifications and service processor (SP) event
messages.
NRT. See network routing table (NRT).
NSR-D processor. See HP NonStop™ System RISC Model D processor (NSR-D
processor).
NSR-E processor. See HP NonStop™ System RISC Model E processor (NSR-E
processor).
NSR-G processor. See HP NonStop™ System RISC Model G processor (NSR-G
processor).
NSR-T processor. See HP NonStop™ System RISC Model T processor (NSR-T
processor).
NSR-V processor. See HP NonStop™ System RISC Model V processor (NSR-V
processor).
NSR-W processor. See HP NonStop™ System RISC Model W processor (NSR-W
processor).
NSR-X processor. See HP NonStop™ System RISC Model X processor (NSR-X
processor).
NSR-Y processor. See HP NonStop™ System RISC Model Y processor (NSR-Y
processor).
null object type. A placeholder object type for the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF)
NAMES and VERSION commands, which do not require explicit specification of a
particular object type.
null string. In C and C++ programs, a character string that begins with a null character.
This term is synonymous with “empty string.”
OBEY file. See command file.
object. One or more of the devices, lines, processes, and files in a subsystem; any entity
subject to independent reference or control by one or more subsystems. In the
Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), each object has an object type and an object name.
object-code library. Synonym for library.
object file. A file generated by a compiler, binder, or linker that contains machine
instructions and other information needed to construct the executable code spaces and
initial data for a process. The file can be a complete program that is ready for
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Glossary
object name
immediate execution, or it can be incomplete and require binding or linking with other
object files before execution.
object name. A unique name for a Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object within a
subsystem.
object-name template. A name that stands for more than one Subsystem Control Facility
(SCF) object. Such a name includes one or more wild-card characters, such as *
(asterisk) and ? (question mark). See also wild-card character.
object type. The category of Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) objects to which a specific
SCF object belongs; for example, a specific disk has the object type DISK and a
specific terminal may have the object type SU. Each subsystem has a set of object
types for the objects it manages.
obsolescent. An indication that a feature or facility exists for compatibility with older
versions or drafts of a standard. Obsolescent features or facilities should not be used,
because they might be removed from future versions of a standard and therefore might
not be portable.
ODP. See Optical Disk Process (ODP).
offline. (1) Used to describe tasks that are performed outside of the control of an application
or computer system. (2) Used to describe tasks that require system resources to be
shut down. Contrast with online.
offline change. Any change that requires system resources to be shut down. Offline
changes are usually performed during a planned outage. Contrast with online change.
offline configuration. Configuration performed offline by SYSGENR. If necessary, you edit
the CONFTEXT configuration file to create a new configuration and then run the
Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) (which
in turn runs SYSGENR) to generate a system image for the new configuration.
ohm. The standard unit for measuring resistance.
online. Used to describe tasks that can be performed while the HP NonStop™ Kernel
operating system and system utilities are operational. Contrast with offline.
online change. Any change that can be performed while an application or its system
resources are operational. In some situations, online changes might temporarily affect
subsystem and application availability. For example, altering the characteristics of a
communications line might temporarily affect applications that use the communications
line. Contrast with offline change.
Online Support Center (OSC). The group of support specialists within the HP Global
Customer Support Center (GCSC) who respond to telephone calls regarding system
problems and diagnose malfunctioning systems using remote diagnostic links.
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Glossary
open file
open file. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, a file with a file descriptor.
open file description. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, a data structure
within an HP NonStop™ node that contains information about the access of a process
or of a group of processes to a file. An open file description records such attributes as
the file offset, file status, and file access modes. An open file description is associated
with only one open file but can be associated with one or more file descriptors.
open migration. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, the set of events and
outcomes that occur when an open file description is inherited by a child process in a
different processor than its parent process. Contrast with open propagation.
open propagation. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, the set of events and
outcomes that occur when an open file description is inherited by a child process in the
same processor as its parent process. Contrast with open migration.
Open SCSI. A subsystem that provides the hardware and software for a SCSI-2 open
interface that runs on HP NonStop™ S-series servers and to which developers can
attach small computer system interface (SCSI) devices.
open system. A system with interfaces that conform to international computing standards
and therefore appear the same regardless of the system’s manufacturer. For example,
the Open System Services (OSS) environment on HP NonStop™ systems conforms to
international standards such as ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 (ANSI/IEEE Std. 1003.11990, also known as POSIX.1), national standards such as FIPS 151-2, and portions
of industry specifications such as the X/Open Portability Guide Version 4 (XPG4).
Open System Services (OSS). An open system environment available for interactive or
programmatic use with the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system. Processes that
run in the OSS environment usually use the OSS application program interface;
interactive users of the OSS environment usually use the OSS shell for their command
interpreter. Synonymous with “Open System Services (OSS) environment.” Contrast
with Guardian.
Open System Services (OSS) environment. The HP NonStop™ Kernel Open System
Services (OSS) application program interface (API), tools, and utilities.
Open System Services (OSS) Monitor. A Guardian utility that accepts commands affecting
OSS objects through an interactive Guardian interface named the Subsystem Control
Facility (SCF).
Open System Services (OSS) signal. A signal model defined in the POSIX.1 specification
and available to TNS processes and TNS/R native processes in the OSS environment.
OSS signals can be sent between processes.
Open Systems Interconnection (OSI). A seven-layer network architecture model defined
by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). The two lowest layers deal
with the physical connections and their protocols. The five upper layers deal with
network services, such as network file transfers and accessing remote databases.
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Glossary
Open Systems Interconnection Layer 2
Open Systems Interconnection Layer 2. The data-link control level of the Open Systems
Interconnection (OSI) model, composed of asynchronous or minimal line control
protocols, byte-oriented or character-oriented protocols, and bit-synchronous or
bit-oriented protocols. Data link protocols can be defined in terms of method of access
of data, link relationship of stations, error detection scheme, error recovery, message
formatting, logical half-duplex or full-duplex operation, code, and machine
transparency.
operating system image. See OSIMAGE.
operational environment. The conditions under which your system performs. These
include the devices and communications lines that are made active and the system
and application processes that are started at system startup.
operator. (1) A symbol—such as an arithmetic or conditional operator—that performs a
specific operation on operands. (2) In Network Control Language (NCL), a lexical
element used for working on terms in expressions. There are five types of operators:
parenthetical, arithmetic, Boolean, relational, and string. (3) For an HP NonStop™
system, the person or program responsible for day-to-day monitoring and maintenance
tasks associated with the HP NonStop Kernel operating system and the hardware of a
NonStop node. The operator issues commands to subsystems; retrieves, examines,
and responds to event messages; or does any combination of those things. See also
local operator. Contrast with administrator. (4) For a UNIX system, any interactive user
of that system.
operator message. A message, intended for an operator, that describes a significant event
on an HP NonStop™ S-series system. An operator message is the displayed-text form
of an Event Management Service (EMS) event message.
optical disk cartridge. A container that protects an optical disk platter from damage and
allows easy handling. Each cartridge contains two optical disk volumes.
optical disk drive. An optical storage library component that holds optical disk cartridges
during read and write operations.
Optical Disk Process (ODP). The software I/O process that controls an optical storage
library (OSL) and its optical disk volumes.
optical disk volume. One side of an optical disk cartridge.
optical storage library (OSL). A storage device consisting of an optical disk cabinet,
optical disk drives, multiple storage cells for optical disk cartridges, a robot that
automatically loads the cartridges into and unloads them from the drives, and a
cartridge access port (CAP) where an operator can load cartridges into or remove
cartridges from the OSL.
option. In a UNIX or Open System Services (OSS) command, a flag and its parameters or
a flag without parameters.
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Glossary
ordinary library
ordinary library. A dynamic-link library (DLL) or shared run-time library (SRL) that is not
public. See ordinary dynamic-link library (ordinary DLL).
ordinary dynamic-link library (ordinary DLL). A dynamic-link library (DLL) or shared
run-time library (SRL) that is not public; the code file is found at run time and can be
provided by the user. Contrast with public dynamic-link library (public DLL).
orphaned process group. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a process
group in which the parent of every member either is also a member of the process
group or is a member of a different session.
orphan file. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a file with no corresponding
inode in the PXINODE file.
orphan inode. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, an inode that appears in
the PXINODE file but has no links in the PXLINK file.
OSC. See Online Support Center (OSC).
OSCONFIG file. In G-series release version updates (RVUs), a configuration file built during
system generation that contains only Software Problem Isolation and Fix Facility
(SPIFF) and Software Identification (SWID) tool records. In D-series and earlier RVUs,
the Configuration Utility Program (COUP) uses the $SYSTEM.SYSnn.OSCONFIG file
to store its configuration information.
OSI. See Open Systems Interconnection (OSI).
OSIMAGE. A file built during system generation that contains the complete image of the HP
NonStop™ Kernel operating system that runs in each processor in the system.
OSL. See optical storage library (OSL).
OSL object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for an optical storage
library (OSL).
OSS. See Open System Services (OSS).
OSS environment. See Open System Services (OSS) environment.
OSS Monitor. See Open System Services (OSS) Monitor.
OSS process ID. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the unique identifier
that identifies a process during the lifetime of the process and during the lifetime of the
process group of that process. See also PID.
OSS signal. See Open System Services (OSS) signal.
OSS user ID. See HP NonStop™ Kernel user ID.
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Glossary
outage
outage. Time during which a computer system is not capable of doing useful work. Outages
can be planned or unplanned. From the end user’s perspective, an outage is any time
an application being used is not available. See also planned outage and unplanned
outage.
outage minutes. A metric for measuring outages that translates percentages into
minutes/year of downtime.
output destination. The resource to which Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) sends its
responses to commands. SCF can direct output to a disk file, an application process, a
terminal, or a printer. The initial output destination is determined by the form of the
RUN command used to initiate SCF. The output destination can be changed
dynamically during an SCF session.
owner. (1) In the case of a disk file, the user or program that created the file, or a user or
program to whom the creator has given the file with the File Utility Program (FUP)
GIVE command. (2) In the case of a process, the user or program that created the
process or, if the PROGID option was specified in the FUP SECURE command for the
code file, the user or program that owns the code file. (3) In the case of a token or
other definition, the subsystem that provided the definition. (4) In the case of a
subsystem, the company or organization that provides the subsystem, or the
eight-character string identifying that company.
packet. A block of information that contains fields for addressing, sequencing information,
possible priority indicators, and a portion of a message or an entire message. See
also ServerNet packet.
page. See memory page.
Parallel Library TCP/IP. An HP product that provides increased performance and scalability
over conventional Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). Parallel
Library TCP/IP coexists with conventional TCP/IP on HP NonStop™ S-series systems
and supports Ethernet 4 ServerNet adapters (E4SAs), Fast Ethernet ServerNet
adapters (FESAs), Gigabit Ethernet ServerNet adapters (GESAs), and ServerNet wide
area network (SWAN) concentrators. See also HP NonStop™ TCP/IP.
PARAM. An HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL) command and a
Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) command you can use to create a parameter and
give it a value. The TACL process stores the values of parameters assigned by the
PARAM command and sends the values to applications that request parameter values.
parent directory. A particular directory in the hierarchy of directories within a file system.
The parent directory for a directory contains an entry for that specific directory and is
identified in that directory as the directory immediately above it in the hierarchy. The
parent directory for a file contains an entry for that file.
parent process. The process that created a given process, or (if the creating process has
stopped) a process that has inherited a given process. See also child process.
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Glossary
parent process ID
parent process ID. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, an attribute of a child
process determined by the parent process. The parent process ID is the OSS process
ID of the current parent process.
passthrough terminator. See SCSI passthrough terminator.
path. The route between a processor and a subsystem. If a subsystem is configured for
fault tolerance, it has a primary path (from the primary processor) and a backup path
(from the backup processor).
pathname. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system and Network File System
(NFS), the string of characters that uniquely identifies a file within its file system. A
pathname can be either relative or absolute. See also ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990
(ANSI/IEEE Std. 1003.1-1990 or POSIX.1), Clause 2.2.2.57.
pathname component. See filename.
pathname resolution. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the process of
associating a single file with a specified pathname.
pathname-variable limits. Limits that can vary within the Open System Services (OSS) file
hierarchy; that is, the limits on a pathname variable that can vary according to the
directory in which pathname resolution begins.
path prefix. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a pathname, with an optional
final slash (/) character, that refers to a directory.
PDC. See phase-loss detector/contactor (PDC).
PDP. See power distribution panel (PDP).
PDU. See computer-room power center (CRPC).
peak load current. The maximum instantaneous load over a designated interval of time.
PEEK. A utility program that reports statistics on resource use in a processor. PEEK is used
to ensure proper allocation of memory and processes in a system after system load.
peer fabric. The fabric on which an operation is not taking place. The X and Y fabrics are
peers. If an action is being performed on one fabric, the other fabric is the peer fabric.
peer service processors. A pair of service processors (X and Y) in a service processor
(SP) domain. Peer service processors function similarly to a fault-tolerant process pair
in an HP NonStop™ K-series system. See also service processor (SP).
pending incident report. An incident report that has never been delivered to your service
provider, either because delivery to both the primary and backup dial-out points was
unsuccessful or because the incident report was generated at an unattended site.
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Glossary
pending signal
pending signal. A signal that has been generated for a process but has not been delivered.
Pending signals are usually blocked signals.
periodic incident report. A type of incident report that is generated periodically to test the
connection to the service provider and report the current system configuration. The
default frequency is 20 days.
peripheral enclosure. An enclosure that contains components related to one or more
peripherals. The 519x tape subsystem is an example of a peripheral enclosure.
Peripheral enclosures are not part of the set of system enclosures. Contrast with
system enclosure.
Peripheral Utility Program (PUP). A utility used in D-series and earlier release version
updates (RVUs) to manage disks and other peripheral devices. In G-series RVUs,
similar functions are performed by the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF).
persistence. For the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), the capability of a generic process
to restart automatically if it was stopped abnormally. You configure this capability by
specifying a nonzero AUTORESTART value in an ADD command.
persistence count. The number of times the $ZPM persistence manager process will
restart a generic process that has been terminated abnormally. A generic process with
an AUTORESTART value of 10 (the maximum) is said to have a persistence count of
10. See also persistence.
persistence manager process. The $ZPM process that is started and managed by the
$ZCNF configuration utility process and that starts generic processes in G-series
release version updates (RVUs) and manages their persistence.
persistent configuration. A configuration that remains the same from one system load to
another.
persistent process. A process that must always be either waiting, ready, or executing.
Persistent processes are usually controlled by a monitor process that checks on the
status of persistent processes and restarts them, if necessary.
phase-loss detector/contactor (PDC). Equipment used to detect the interruption (for 50
milliseconds or longer) or the complete loss of one or more phases of power to
computer equipment. Upon detection of a phase dropout, the contactor shuts down all
input phases to the system equipment, thereby allowing smooth system shutdown and
recovery.
physical interface (PIF). The hardware components that connect a system node to a
network.
physical link interfaces. Communications standards defined by standards organizations.
The following physical link interfaces are supported for the ServerNet wide area
network (SWAN) concentrator: RS-232, RS-442, RS-449, V.35, and X.21.
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Glossary
Physical view
Physical view. One of several views of a server available in the view pane of the
Management window of the Compaq TSM package. A Physical view of a server is a
view of all the enclosures and is intended to represent the actual floor plan at the site.
A Physical view of an enclosure is a visual representation of the physical placement of
supported resources inside the enclosure. See also Connection view.
PIB. See power interface board (PIB).
PIC. See plug-in card (PIC).
PID. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a synonym for process ID. OSS
process ID is the preferred term in HP NonStop™ S-series system publications.
In the Guardian environment, PID is sometimes used to mean either:
•
•
A Guardian process identifier such as the process ID
The cpu, pin value that is unique to a process within a node (see HP NonStop™
Kernel user ID)
PIF. See physical interface (PIF).
PIN. See process identification number (PIN).
ping. A utility used to verify connections to one or more remote hosts. The ping utility uses
the Internet control message protocol (ICMP) echo request and echo reply packets to
determine whether a particular IP system on a network is functional. The ping utility is
useful for diagnosing IP network or router failures.
pipe. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, an unnamed FIFO, created
programmatically by invoking the pipe() function or interactively with the shell pipe
syntax character (|). A shell pipe redirects the standard output of one process to
become the standard input of another process. A programmatic pipe is an
interprocess communication mechanism.
planned outage. Time during which a computer system is not capable of doing useful work
because of a planned interruption. A planned outage can be time when the system or
user application is shut down to allow for servicing, upgrades, backup, or general
maintenance.
planner. The Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration Manager
(DSM/SCM) user who is responsible for planning and managing new software
revisions. The planner uses the DSM/SCM Planner Interface to carry out these
functions.
Planner Interface. A graphical user interface (GUI) to the Distributed Systems
Management/Software Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) that runs on the host
system. It provides an interface to all the host DSM/SCM planner functions.
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plug-in card (PIC)
plug-in card (PIC). A replaceable component that provides a unique function when
installed in a customer-replaceable unit (CRU) or field-replaceable unit (FRU). PICs
for modular ServerNet expansion boards (MSEBs) and I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2
CRUs provide a choice of connection media for attaching ServerNet cables.
PM. See product module (PM).
PMB. See processor and memory board (PMB).
PMCU. See power monitor and control unit (PMCU).
PMF CRU. See processor multifunction (PMF) CRU.
PMF 2 CRU. See processor multifunction (PMF) 2 CRU.
pNA+. The support for the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) layers
and the Ethernet interface provided by Integrated Systems Inc. as part of the Portable
Silicon Operating System (pSOS) system product. pNA+ is provided as part of the
wide area network (WAN) architecture in each ServerNet wide area network (SWAN)
concentrator communications line interface processor (CLIP).
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP). A data communications protocol that provides a standard
method of encapsulating Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
information over point-to-point links. The Compaq TSM package uses PPP to provide
TCP/IP communication over a dial-up connection.
POOL object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for Storage
Management Foundation (SMF) storage pools.
port. (1) A data channel that connects to other devices or computers. (2) A connector to
which a cable can be attached. The system transmits and receives data or requests
through ports on ServerNet adapters and processor multifunction (PMF) customerreplaceable units (CRUs). A port is also called a connector. (3) The entrance or
physical access point (such as a connector) to a computer, multiplexer, device, or
network where signals are supplied, extracted, or observed.
portable application. An application that can execute on a wide range of hardware
systems from multiple manufacturers. A portable application is a program that can be
moved with little or no change in its source code from another manufacturer’s system
to an HP NonStop™ system.
portable filename character set. The set of characters that includes the Roman uppercase
and lowercase letters, the Arabic numerals, the period, the underscore, and the
hyphen. The hyphen cannot be the first character of a portable filename.
portable pathname character set. The set of characters that includes the Roman
uppercase and lowercase letters, the Arabic numerals, the period, the underscore, the
slash (/), and the hyphen. The hyphen cannot be the first character of a portable
pathname.
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Portable Silicon Operating System (pSOS) system
product
Portable Silicon Operating System (pSOS) system product. A product of Integrated
Systems Inc. that provides support for industry-standard communications protocols
based on the UNIX operating system. It is used as a compact multitasking kernel
operating system for PowerPCs and similar systems.
position ID. A character that indicates the position an HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch
occupies in a network topology. The position ID is a component of the two-character
cluster switch name. The cluster switch name includes an external fabric ID (X or Y) as
the first character and a position ID as the second character. For example, the cluster
switch name X3 indicates that the cluster switch serves the external ServerNet X fabric
and occupies position 3 in the topology. Supported values for position IDs are 1
through 9 or A through Z. Currently supported topologies (star, split-star, and tri-star)
use position IDs 1, 2, and 3.
position-independent code (PIC). Executable program or library code that is designed to
be loaded and executed at any virtual memory address, without any modification.
Addresses that can be modified by the loader do not appear in PIC code, only in data
that can be modified by the loader. See also dynamic-link library (DLL).
POSIX. The Portable Operating System Interface, as defined by the Institute of Electrical
and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the American National Standards Institute
(ANSI). Each POSIX interface is separately defined in a numbered ANSI/IEEE
standard or draft standard. The application program interface (API), known as
POSIX.1, has become ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990.
power distribution panel (PDP). A group of panel assemblies that composes a single
panel that includes buses and overcurrent protection devices (with or without
switches). A PDP is used for the control of power circuits.
power distribution unit (PDU). See computer-room power center (CRPC).
power domain. A set of customer-replaceable units (CRUs) and field-replaceable units
(FRUs) that share a set of power rails. For Telco Central Office (CO) systems, the
power domain is the entire system.
power factor. The ratio of real power to apparent power (that is, kilowatts/kilovoltamperes).
The power factor for a sinusoidal load is determined by the position of the applied
voltage waveform with respect to the current drawn by the load. When voltage and
current are in phase with each other, the power factor is unity and the power for the
load is equal to the product of the applied voltage and load current (P=EI). When the
current waveform lags after the voltage waveform, the load is inductive. Conversely,
when the current waveform leads the voltage waveform, the load is capacitive. In either
case, the power for the load is equal to the product of the applied voltage, load current,
and the angular displacement between the voltage and current waveforms (P=EIcosf).
Nonlinear (nonsinusoidal) loads also have a power factor; however, the power factor
for a nonsinusoidal load reflects harmonic content and not angular displacement.
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power factor correction
power factor correction. The addition of a reactive component to offset the angular
displacement of a sinusoidal load. Traditionally, the normal power factor for a facility is
inductive, so the normal correction involves the addition of capacitors to offset the
lagging power factor. The capacitors offset part or all of the inductive reactance,
making the total circuit more nearly in phase with the applied voltage. The power factor
for nonlinear (nonsinusoidal) loads cannot be corrected through the addition of simple
reactive components. Harmonic filters are required to correct the power factor of
nonlinear loads.
power interface board (PIB). In system enclosures with power shelves, a board mounted
on the bulkhead located behind the power supplies in the power shelf. The PIB
provides electrical connection between the power supplies and DC power cables.
power monitor and control unit (PMCU). A field-replaceable unit (FRU) that connects the
batteries to the DC power distribution bus in an HP NonStop™ S-series enclosure and
provides a means of disconnecting the batteries for powering off the system. The
PMCU also provides a means for the service processor (SP) to diagnose the condition
of the batteries, fans, and power supplies; to regulate the voltage supplied to the fans;
and to provide the interface to the group ID switches and service light-emitting diodes
(LEDs). A group contains two PMCUs, one for each of the two DC power distribution
buses.
power shelf. In HP NonStop™ S7400, S7600, and Sxx000 processor enclosures and I/O
enclosures containing I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2 customer-replaceable units (CRUs),
an assembly residing below the chassis consisting of power supplies and supporting
circuitry that provides DC power to the enclosure.
power supply. (1) In system enclosures without power shelves, the component on the
processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable unit (CRU) or the I/O
multifunction (IOMF) CRU that converts standard AC line voltage into the DC voltages
needed by the group components in the enclosure. (2) In system enclosures with
power shelves, the component located in the power shelf that converts standard AC
line voltage into DC voltage and delivers it to the PMF CRUs or IOMF CRUs in that
enclosure, which in turn supply the DC voltages needed by the group components in
the enclosure.
PPP. See Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP).
preferences file. A file that contains configuration information for the graphical user
interface (GUI) portion of the Compaq TSM client software. The preferences file is
used by the TSM client software at system startup.
preferred path. See primary path.
preprocessing commands. Commands specifying unique run-time parameters that can
override your default system parameters. These commands can assign process file
names, select backup media formats, and define utility options during system
configuration.
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preset
preset. A linker operation that sets the correct values (addresses) of imported symbols
according to the environment seen by the linker. If the loader encounters the same
environment at load time, it avoids adjusting these values, which reduces loading
overhead (see fastLoad). If not, the loader resets these values to match the load-time
environment.
primary path. A path enabled as the preferred path. When a primary path is disabled, an
alternate path becomes the primary path.
primary processor. The processor that is designated as “owning” the ServerNet
addressable controller (SAC) connected to separate processors running the HP
NonStop™ Kernel operating system. The primary processor is the processor that has
direct control over the SAC. Contrast with backup processor.
private dynamic-link library (private DLL). See ordinary dynamic-link library (ordinary
DLL).
problem incident report. A type of incident report that reports a problem in the server. A
problem incident report is generated when changes occur on the server that could
directly affect the availability of system resources.
process. (1) A program that has been submitted to the operating system for execution, or a
program that is currently running in the computer. (2) An address space, a single
thread of control that executes within that address space, and the system resources
required by that thread of control.
process group. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a set of processes that
can signal associated processes. Each process in a node is a member of a process
group; the process group has a process group ID. A new process becomes a member
of the process group of its creator.
process group ID. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the unique identifier
representing a process group during its lifetime.
process group leader. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the process that
has the process group ID of its process group as its OSS process ID.
process group lifetime. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the period that
begins when a process group is created and ends when the lifetime of the last
remaining process of the group ends.
process ID. In the Guardian environment, the content of a four-integer array that uniquely
identifies a process during the lifetime of the process. See also PID.
process identification number (PIN). A number that uniquely identifies a process running
in a processor. The same number can exist in other processors in the same system.
See also process ID.
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process image file
process image file. On a UNIX system, an executable object file. In some Guardian
product externals and end-user publications, an executable object file is referred to as
a “program file.” See also object file.
process lifetime. The period that begins when an Open System Services (OSS) process is
created and ends when its OSS process ID is returned to the system for reuse.
PROCESS object type. In a subsystem, the object type for the subsystem manager
process itself or any generic process.
processor. (1) A functional unit of a computer that reads program instructions, moves data
between processor memory and the input/output controllers, and performs arithmetic
operations. A processor is sometimes referred to as a central processing unit (CPU),
but the HP NonStop™ servers have multiple cooperating processors rather than a
single CPU. (2) One or more computer chips, typically mounted on a logic board, that
are designed to perform data processing or to manage a particular aspect of computer
operations.
processor and memory board (PMB). A logic board that has lockstepped
microprocessors, the main memory system, and the ServerNet memory interface (SMI)
application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) to act as an interface between the
microprocessors and memory and the ServerNet fabrics. This board is part of the
processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable unit (CRU).
processor cache. A small, fast memory holding recently accessed data in order to speed
up subsequent access to the same data. Cache memory is built from faster memory
chips than main memory, and it is most often used with process or main memory but
also used in network data transfer (to maintain a local copy of data), and so forth.
processor dump. A copy of the memory of a processor. A dump can be to disk or to tape.
See also ServerNet dump and tape dump.
processor enclosure. An HP NonStop™ S-series system enclosure containing exactly one
group, which includes processors, ServerNet adapters, disk drives, components
related to the ServerNet fabrics, and components related to electrical power and
cooling for the enclosure.
processor multifunction (PMF) CRU. (1) An HP NonStop™ S-series
customer-replaceable unit (CRU) that contains a power supply, service processor (SP),
ServerNet router 1, Ethernet controller, three ServerNet addressable controllers
(SACs), and a processor and memory system in a single unit. The PMF CRU consists
of three subassemblies: the processor and memory board (PMB), the multifunction I/O
board (MFIOB), and the power supply subassembly. (2) A collective term for both PMF
CRUs and PMF 2 CRUs when a distinction between the two types of CRUs is not
required.
processor multifunction (PMF) 2 CRU. An HP NonStop™ S-series customer-replaceable
unit (CRU) that contains a power supply, service processor (SP), ServerNet router 2,
Ethernet controller, three ServerNet addressable controllers (SACs), and a processor
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product module (PM)
and memory system in a single unit. The PMF 2 CRU consists of three subassemblies:
the processor and memory board (PMB), the multifunction I/O board (MFIOB), and the
power supply subassembly.
product module (PM). The part of the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) subsystem that is
responsible for subsystem-specific command processing.
profile. Default values used by the Distributed Systems Management/Software
Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) when processing requests. There are three types
of profiles: the Configuration Manager profile, the system profile, and the target profile.
PROFILE object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for the storage
subsystem configuration profile.
program. See program file.
program file. An executable object code file containing a program’s main routine plus
related routines statically linked together and combined into the same object file. Other
routines shared with other programs might be located in separately loaded libraries. A
program file can be named on a RUN command; other code files cannot. See also
object file.
pSOS system product. See Portable Silicon Operating System (pSOS) system product.
public dynamic-link library (public DLL). Optional native-mode executable code modules
available to all native user processes. A public library that is specified in the public
library registry, supplied by HP or, optionally, a user. Contrast with ordinary
dynamic-link library (ordinary DLL).
public LAN. A local area network (LAN) connected to the Ethernet ports on an Ethernet 4
ServerNet adapter (E4SA), Fast Ethernet ServerNet adapter (FESA), or Gigabit
Ethernet ServerNet adapter (GESA). Unlike a dedicated Compaq TSM LAN, a public
LAN supports the connection of many types of servers and workstations. TSM
workstations can be connected to a public LAN, but such TSM workstations cannot use
all the TSM client applications. See also dedicated Compaq TSM LAN.
public library. A dynamic-link library (DLL) or shared run-time library (SRL) that is known to
the operating system, available for execution by any process or user, and is not an
implicit library.
public shared run-time library (public SRL). A TNS/R library supplied by HP.
PUP. See Peripheral Utility Program (PUP).
quad-integrated communications controller (QUICC). The Motorola MC68360 chip. For
HP NonStop™ S-series servers, the QUICC is used as the service processor (SP) and
is the main part of the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator
communications line interface processor (CLIP).
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quality power
quality power. The attributes and configuration of the power-distribution systems installed
within a facility that best serve the power needs of that facility’s electrical equipment
(for example, computer systems, air conditioning, and so on), providing the minimum
possible disruption to equipment operation.
QUICC. See quad-integrated communications controller (QUICC).
R1. See ServerNet router 1.
R2. See ServerNet router 2.
raceway. An enclosed channel used to hold wires, cables, or busbars. Most raceways have
removable tops to facilitate the installation or removal of their contents.
rack. A structure that houses a chassis, power shelf, and other system components. The
HP NonStop™ S-series server is designed to be mounted in an industry-standard
19-inch rack or a NonStop S-series frame. See also frame.
radio frequency interference (RFI). Forms of conducted or radiated interference that might
appear in a facility as either normal or common-mode signals. The frequency of the
interference can range from the kilohertz to gigahertz range. However, the most
troublesome interference signals are usually found in the kilohertz to low megahertz
range. At present, the terms radio frequency interference and electromagnetic
interference (EMI) are usually used interchangeably.
range of servers. See HP NonStop™ servers.
read-only file system. A file system with implementation-defined characteristics that restrict
changes to the files within that file system.
read/write head. An electromagnet that can pick up (read) electronic pulses and record
(write) electronic pulses on a magnetic disk or tape. The electronic pulses are
interpreted by the processor as binary data. See also disk drive and tape drive.
real group ID. An attribute of an Open System Services (OSS) process. When an OSS
process is created, the real group ID identifies the group of the user or parent process
that created the process. The real group ID can be changed after process creation.
real user ID. An attribute of an Open System Services (OSS) process. When an OSS
process is created, the real user ID identifies the user or parent process that created
the process. The real user ID can be changed after process creation.
$RECEIVE. The name of a file through which a process receives and optionally replies to
messages from other processes.
reconfiguration. The act of changing the hardware or software configuration of a running
system. Examples include installing a new software release version update (RVU),
adding hardware peripherals, and restructuring a database. Reconfiguring a system
might or might not require a planned outage.
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reduced instruction-set computing (RISC)
reduced instruction-set computing (RISC). A processor architecture based on a relatively
small and simple instruction set, a large number of general-purpose registers, and an
optimized instruction pipeline that supports high-performance instruction execution.
Contrast with complex instruction-set computing (CISC).
re-exported library. A library whose symbols are made available by another dynamic-link
library (DLL) to any localized client of that DLL. Re-export is an attribute of the DLL’s
libList entry for that library. This attribute is specified by the DLL’s programmer and
recorded by the linker as a DLL is built. It affects only localized clients of the DLL. This
feature allows a symbol to be moved from one DLL to another without relinking clients
of the original DLL.
Re-exporting is transitive; that is, if A re-exports B and B re-exports C, then A reexports C. Re-exported libraries can re-export other libraries to form a succession of
re-exported-libraries of arbitrary length.
reference page. In Open System Services (OSS) and Distributed Computing Environment
(DCE), the online or hard-copy version of a file that provides reference information for
a software facility. Some UNIX product externals and end-user publications use the
term “man page” instead, referring either to the online delivery mechanism used to
display the file (usually the shell man command) or to the nature of the file as part of a
publication.
register-exact point. A location in an accelerated program at which the values in both
memory and the register stack are the same as they would be if the program were
running on a TNS processor. A register-exact point is also a memory-exact point.
regular file. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system, a file that is a randomly
accessible sequence of bytes. A regular file contains binary or text data and has no
structure imposed by the system. Contrast with special file.
relative pathname. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system and Network File
System (NFS), a pathname that does not begin with a slash (/) character. A relative
pathname is resolved beginning with the current working directory. Contrast with
absolute pathname.
release version update (RVU). A collection of compatible revisions of HP NonStop Kernel
operating system software products, identified by an RVU ID, and shipped and
supported as a unit. An RVU consists of the object modules, supporting files, and
documentation for the product revisions. An RVU also includes a set of documentation
for the overall RVU.
RELOAD. An HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL) command to load the HP
NonStop™ Kernel operating system image from disk over the ServerNet fabrics into
the memory of the processor.
remote access. For the Compaq TSM package, a form of remote support. Remote access,
or dial-in, allows a service provider to dial in to your HP NonStop™ S-series server to
diagnose hardware and software problems. See also remote notification.
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remote interprocessor communication (RIPC)
remote interprocessor communication (RIPC). The exchange of messages between
processors in different systems or nodes.
remote mount. A mount used by a Network File System (NFS) client to attach part of the
local NFS file hierarchy to a point within the client’s remote file hierarchy. The remote
mount is visible only to the NFS client performing the mount. In effect, the local
hierarchy from the mount point down is exported to the client performing the remote
mount.
remote node. See remote system.
remote notification. A form of remote support. Remote notification, or dial-out, allows the
Compaq TSM package to notify a service provider, such as the Global Customer
Support Center (GCSC), of pending hardware and software problems. See also remote
access.
remote operator. The person who performs routine system operations from a geographical
distance, usually when no local operator is present.
remote procedure. A procedure or function packaged to be called within a server process
indirectly by a client process.
remote procedure call. A remote procedure or the action of calling a remote procedure.
Remote Procedure Call (RPC). A protocol that extends a procedure-call form of processto-process communication to a network environment. RPC is a way for programs
running on client computers to invoke the services of a program running on a server
computer. RPC allows a program to call a procedure that does not exist on the client
computer.
remote procedure call system. A set of facilities that includes a programming library,
network resource mapping, and binding services to provide a mechanism for a client
process to execute a procedure on a remote server. A remote procedure call system is
a subset of the Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) and of other products.
remote processor. A processor in a node other than the node running the ServerNet
cluster monitor process (SNETMON) that is reporting status about the processor.
remote switch. An HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch in a split-star topology that is not directly
connected to the server that you are logged onto. The Compaq TSM Service
Application cannot perform any actions on a remote switch. To perform actions or get
additional information on a remote switch, use the TSM Service Application to log on to
a server that is directly connected to the switch.
remote system. An active ServerNet node to which the local system has active external
ServerNet paths. Contrast with local system.
request packet. A ServerNet packet sent from one ServerNet device to another, requesting
either a read action or a write action on the part of the receiving device. In the case of
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reserved symbol
a write request, the packet contains the data to be written. The receiving device is
expected to take the appropriate action and return a response packet to the device that
sent the request packet. See also response packet, ServerNet packet,and ServerNet
transaction.
reserved symbol. An identifier that is reserved for use by system or compiler language
implementors.
resistance. The measure of opposition to current that limits the amount of current that can
be produced by an applied voltage. Conductors have very little resistance; insulators
have a large amount of resistance. Resistance is measured in ohms.
resource. A component of a computer system that works together with other components to
process transactions. Terminals, workstations, processors, memory, disk drives,
processes, files, and applications are examples of resources.
response. The information or confirmation supplied by a subsystem in reaction to a
command. A response is typically conveyed as one or more interprocess messages
from a subsystem to an application.
response packet. A ServerNet packet returned from one ServerNet device to another,
responding to an earlier received read request or write request. In the case of
responding to a read request, the response packet contains the data that the
requesting device wanted to have read. See also request packet, ServerNet packet,
and ServerNet transaction.
RESTORE. A utility for the HP NonStop™ servers that copies files from a backup tape to
disk. See also BACKUP.
RFC. Request for Comments. Documents compiled by number by the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF) that define standards for intercommunication.
RFI. See radio frequency interference (RFI).
RIPC. See remote interprocessor communication (RIPC).
RISC. See reduced instruction-set computing (RISC).
RISC processor. An instruction processing unit (IPU) that is based on reduced
instruction-set computing (RISC) architecture. TNS/R processors contain RISC
processors.
rld library. A library that loads position-independent code (PIC) programs and their
associated dynamic-link libraries (DLLs). The rld library also provides the dlopen(),
dlclose(), dlresultcode(), dlsys(), and dlerror() functions.
rms. See root mean square (rms).
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robot
robot. A media-changer device that transfers an optical disk cartridge from a storage cell to
an optical disk drive for use, then returns the cartridge to the storage cell.
root. See root fileset and root directory. See also super ID.
root directory. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system and Network File System
(NFS), a directory associated with a process that the system uses for pathname
resolution when a pathname begins with a slash (/) character.
root fileset. For the Open System Services (OSS) file system, the fileset with the device
identifier of 0, normally containing the root directory. HP recommends that this fileset
be named “root”.
root mean square (rms). A measurement method used to determine the direct current
(DC) equivalent value for alternating voltage and current waveforms. The rms method
refers to the process of sampling a waveform, squaring the samples, averaging the
samples (mean value) over the period from one cycle, then calculating the square root
of the samples. In general, rms-sensing devices are more accurate than averaging
meters. Measurements from averaging meters can be as low as 30 percent of the
actual current for loads with high crest factors.
root user. See super ID.
router. See ServerNet router.
router 1. See ServerNet router 1.
router 2. See ServerNet router 2.
RPC. See Remote Procedure Call (RPC).
RS-232. An industry standard for serial data transmission. It describes pin assignments,
signal functions, and electrical characteristics. The current standard specifies a 25-pin
connector.
RS-449. An industry standard for serial data transmission. It specifies pin assignments,
signal functions, electrical characteristics, and a 37-pin connector with an optional
9-pin connector for a secondary channel.
run-time linker. See linker.
run-time loader. See loader.
RVU. See release version update (RVU).
S700 server. See HP NonStop™ S700 Server.
S7000 server. See HP NonStop™ S7000 Server.
S7400 server. See HP NonStop™ S7400 Server.
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S7600 server
S7600 server. See HP NonStop™ S7600 Server.
S70000 server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
S72000 server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
S74000 server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
S76000 server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
S86000 server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
Sxx000 server. See HP NonStop™ Sxx000 Server.
S-series servers. See HP NonStop™ S-series servers.
SAC. See ServerNet addressable controller (SAC).
sag. A reduction in voltage, usually lasting from one cycle to a few seconds. Sags are
typically caused by fault clearing or by heavy load startups.
SAN. System area network. The preferred term is fabrics (see fabric).
SANMAN. See external system area network manager process (SANMAN).
saveabend file. A file containing dump information needed by the system debugging tool on
a TNS or TNS/R system. In UNIX systems, such files are usually called core files or
core dump files. A saveabend file is a special case of a save file. See also save file.
saved-set group ID. An Open System Services (OSS) process attribute that stores a group
ID so that the group ID can later be used as the effective group ID of the process.
saved-set user ID. An Open System Services (OSS) process attribute that stores a user ID
so that the user ID can later be used as the effective user ID of the process.
save file. A file created through the Inspect or Debug product. A save file contains enough
information about a running process at a given time to restart the process at the same
point in its execution. A save file contains an image of the process, data for the
process, and the status of the process at the time the save file was created.
A save file can be created through an Inspect SAVE command at any time. A save file
called a saveabend file can be created by the DMON debug monitor when a process’s
SAVEABEND attribute is set and the process terminates abnormally.
SBB. See ServerNet buffer board (SBB).
SBI. See ServerNet bus interface (SBI).
SC. See Subscriber Channel (SC).
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scalar view of the user ID
scalar view of the user ID. A view of the HP NonStop™ Kernel user ID, normally used in
the Open System Services (OSS) environment, that is the value
(group-number * 256) + user-number. Also called the UID.
SCC. See serial communications controller (SCC).
SCF. See Subsystem Control Facility (SCF).
SCL. The mnemonic subsystem name for the ServerNet cluster subsystem.
SCP. See Subsystem Control Point (SCP).
SCSI. See small computer system interface (SCSI).
SCSI object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for an Open SCSI
device.
SCSI passthrough terminator. A bus-terminating plug connected between a cable and the
external connector of a customer-replaceable unit (CRU). The SCSI passthrough
terminator contains the necessary termination resistors required by the SCSI bus. See
also terminator.
SCSI plug-in card (S-PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) for the 6760 ServerNet device adapter
(ServerNet/DA) that uses a small computer system interface (SCSI) interface to
connect devices to an HP NonStop™ S-series system. See also plug-in card (PIC)
and fiber-optic plug-in card (F-PIC).
SCSI ServerNet addressable controller (S-SAC). A ServerNet addressable controller
(SAC) that is contained within a small computer system interface (SCSI) plug-in card
(S-PIC).
SCSI terminator. See terminator.
SE. System engineer. See service provider.
searchList. For each loadfile, a list that is constructed and used by the linker and loader to
tell them which libraries to examine, and in which order, to locate symbol definitions
needed by that loadfile. The linker and loader construct the loadfile’s searchList in
accordance with that loadfile’s import control, which is set at link time by the loadfile’s
programmer. A loadfile’s searchList is unaffected by the import control of any other
loadfile.
SEB. See ServerNet expansion board (SEB).
SEB port. A connector on ServerNet expansion boards (SEBs) used for ServerNet links.
An SEB has six emitter-coupled logic (ECL)-based ServerNet ports. See also MSEB
port.
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Security Manager Process (SMP)
Security Manager Process (SMP). A component of the Safeguard subsystem that
manages all changes to the subject and object databases and authenticates user
logon attempts.
selectable segment. A type of logical segment formerly known as an extended data
segment. The data area for a selectable segment always begins with relative segment
4, and this area can be dynamically switched among several selectable segments by
calls to the Guardian SEGMENT_USE_ procedure; the effect is similar to a rapid
overlaying of one large data area. See also logical segment and flat segment.
SEM. See ServerNet extender module (SEM).
semaphore. A mechanism used to provide multiple processes with access to a shared data
object.
semi-globalized. An import control characteristic of a loadfile that allows the loadfile first to
obtain symbols from its own definitions and then to obtain others as for a globalized
loadfile. See also searchList.
sensitive command. A Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) command that can be issued only
by a user with super-group access, by the owner of the subsystem, or by a member of
the group of the owner of the subsystem. The owner of a subsystem is the user who
started that subsystem (or any user whose application ID is the same as the server
ID—the result of a PROGID option that requires super-group access). Contrast with
nonsensitive command.
separately derived power source. A facility wiring system where power is derived from a
generator, transformer, or converter windings and there is no direct electrical
connection, including a solidly connected grounded circuit conductor (neutral), to
supply conductors originating in other facility wiring systems. Types of separately
derived power sources include standby power generator, uninterruptible power supply
(UPS), isolation transformer, and computer-room power center (CRPC).
serial communications controller (SCC). A type of communications controller. Each
quad-integrated communications controller (QUICC) has four SCCs to handle the two
Ethernet ports and the two wide area network (WAN) ports.
serial copper. A standard for physical connectivity in ServerNet I and ServerNet II networks
that is available both in HP NonStop™ S-series servers and in Windows NT clusters.
Serial copper uses serial encoding and supports 50 and 125 megabyte/second (MB/s)
speeds. The maximum link distance at 125 MB/s is 25 meters.
serial copper PIC. See serial copper plug-in card (PIC).
serial copper plug-in card (PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) for the modular ServerNet expansion
board (MSEB) and I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2 customer-replaceable unit (CRU) that
supports the serial copper interface. See also serial copper and plug-in card (PIC).
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serial maintenance bus (SMB)
serial maintenance bus (SMB). A bus that connects service processors (SPs) within an
enclosure to each other and to the customer-replaceable units (CRUs) in the group.
serial maintenance bus (SMB) domain. The set of enclosures, modules, field-replaceable
units (FRUs), and customer-replaceable units (CRUs) connected by a common serial
maintenance bus (SMB).
server. (1) An implementation of a system used as a stand-alone system or as a node in an
Expand network. (2) A combination of hardware and software designed to provide
services in response to requests received from clients across a network. For example,
the HP NonStop™ servers provides transaction processing, database access, and
other services. (3) A process or program that provides services to a client or a
requester. Servers are designed to receive request messages from clients or
requesters; perform the desired operations, such as database inquiries or updates,
security verifications, numerical calculations, or data routing to other computer
systems; and return reply messages to the clients or requesters. A server process is a
running instance of a server program.
server application. An application that provides a service to a client application. An
application that provides local execution of remote procedure calls is an example of a
server application.
ServerNet. A communications protocol developed by HP that is used in HP NonStop™
S-series servers. See also ServerNet I and ServerNet II.
ServerNet I. The first-generation ServerNet network. ServerNet I architecture is used in
current HP NonStop™ S-series servers and other products, and it features 50
megabytes/second speed, six-port ServerNet routers, 8b/9b encoding, and a 64-byte
maximum packet size. See also ServerNet II.
ServerNet II. The second-generation ServerNet network. ServerNet II architecture is
backward-compatible with ServerNet I architecture, and it features 125 (or 50)
megabytes/second speed, 12-port ServerNet routers, 8b/9b and 8b/10b (serializer
ready) encoding, and a 512-byte maximum packet size. See also ServerNet I.
ServerNet adapter. A component that connects peripheral devices to the rest of the system
through a ServerNet bus interface (SBI). A ServerNet adapter is similar in function to
an I/O controller logic board (LB) and backplane interconnect card (BIC) in HP
NonStop™ K-series servers.
ServerNet address. A virtual memory address that, when translated to a physical address,
indicates where the memory access needed by a ServerNet transaction begins. In
some cases, the translation can point to some entity other than memory, such as a
register. The ServerNet address is included in all ServerNet read request and write
request packets.
ServerNet addressable controller (SAC). An I/O controller that is uniquely addressable by
a ServerNet ID in the ServerNet fabrics. A SAC is typically implemented on some
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ServerNet buffer board (SBB)
portion of a processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable unit (CRU), an I/O
multifunction (IOMF) CRU, or a ServerNet adapter.
ServerNet buffer board (SBB). The board that provides the ServerNet connection to and
from the I/O multifunction (IOMF) customer-replaceable unit (CRU). This board
replaces the processor and memory board (PMB) in the IOMF CRU.
ServerNet bus interface (SBI). The I/O control and expansion packetizer applicationspecific integrated circuit (ASIC).
ServerNet cable. A cable that provides ServerNet links between system enclosures.
ServerNet cluster. A network of servers (nodes) connected together using the ServerNet
protocol for interprocessor communication across a cluster and within its nodes. A
ServerNet cluster offers linear system expansion beyond the 8-processor or
16-processor limits of a single server, achieving comparable speeds for internal and
external ServerNet communication. See also cluster and HP NonStop™ ServerNet
Cluster (ServerNet Cluster).
ServerNet Cluster. See HP NonStop™ ServerNet Cluster (ServerNet Cluster).
ServerNet cluster monitor process (SNETMON). A process pair with the process name
$ZZSCL that manages the state of the ServerNet cluster subsystem. Each node
(system) in a ServerNet cluster must have one SNETMON process pair running.
ServerNet cluster services. The functions necessary to allow a node to join, participate in,
or leave an HP NonStop™ ServerNet Cluster. These functions include monitoring and
control of the physical connections to the cluster, discovery of other nodes in the
cluster, and automatic recovery of failed connections.
ServerNet cluster subsystem. The subsystem managed by the ServerNet cluster monitor
process (SNETMON). The subsystem name is SCL. The subsystem number is 218.
The subsystem identifier is ZSCL.
ServerNet/DA. See ServerNet device adapter (ServerNet/DA).
ServerNet device. Interface logic that is associated with a specific hardware unit, such as a
processor or I/O adapter, and that provides the interface to the ServerNet
communications network. The responsibilities of the ServerNet device are to transform
message data into ServerNet packets, to transmit those packets, to receive ServerNet
packets, and to unpack the data on behalf of the associated hardware unit. See also
ServerNet subdevice.
ServerNet device adapter (ServerNet/DA). A ServerNet adapter that controls external
devices. The 6760 ServerNet/DA contains up to four ServerNet addressable
controllers (SACs), each of which can control either disk drives or tape drives.
ServerNet device ID. See ServerNet ID.
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ServerNet diagram
ServerNet diagram. A graphical layout of the logical connections between objects in the
system. These objects can include processors, ServerNet routers, ServerNet adapters,
disks on the SCSI bus, and so on.
ServerNet dump. To copy the memory of a processor to disk by using the ServerNet
fabrics.
ServerNet end device. See ServerNet device.
ServerNet expansion board (SEB). (1) A connector board that plugs in to the backplane to
allow one or more ServerNet cables to exit the rear of the enclosure. The SEBs and
ServerNet cables allow processors in one group to communicate with processors in
another group. Each SEB provides either the ServerNet X fabric or the ServerNet Y
fabric for a group. (2) A collective term for both SEBs and modular SEBs (MSEBs)
when a distinction between the two types of SEBs is not required.
ServerNet extender module (SEM). Equipment that increases the distance that ServerNet
signals can be transmitted over fiber-optic cables to 40 kilometers. If multimode
fiber-optic (MMF) and single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) ServerNet cables are used in the
same system, the SEM converts MMF signals so that they can be transmitted by SMF
ServerNet cables and converts SMF signals so that they can be transmitted by MMF
ServerNet cables.
ServerNet/FX adapter. A ServerNet adapter that logically extends the ServerNet X and Y
fabrics to other clusters in a Fiber Optic Extension (FOX) ring by using fiber-optic lines.
Two 6740 ServerNet/FX adapters are used, one for the X ring and one for the Y ring.
ServerNet/FX 2 adapter. A ServerNet adapter that logically extends the ServerNet X and Y
fabrics to other clusters in a Fiber Optic Extension (FOX) ring by using fiber-optic lines.
Two 6742 ServerNet/FX 2 adapters are used, one for the X ring and one for the Y ring.
ServerNet ID. A unique identifier for an addressable unit on a ServerNet communications
network. A unit can have multiple ServerNet node IDs. This ID is used for routing: each
packet has a source ServerNet node ID and a destination ServerNet node ID. Note
that a pair of processors operating in duplex mode share one ServerNet node ID.
ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem. A subsystem of the HP NonStop™
Kernel operating system for configuration and management of ServerNet local area
network (LAN) objects in G-series release version updates (RVUs).
ServerNet link. Two unidirectional point-to-point communication paths, one in each
direction, connecting a router to a ServerNet node or another router. Each ServerNet
link contains a transmit channel and a receive channel.
ServerNet memory interface (SMI). An application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that
provides the interface between the microprocessor and the two ServerNet fabrics and
main memory.
ServerNet node. A system in a ServerNet cluster. See also node.
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ServerNet node number
ServerNet node number. A number that identifies a member system in a ServerNet cluster.
The ServerNet node number is a simplified expression of the six-bit node-routing ID
that determines the node to which a ServerNet packet is routed. The ServerNet node
number is assigned based on the port to which the node is connected on the
ServerNet II Switch. The ServerNet node number, which can be viewed using
Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) or the Compaq TSM Service Application, is unique
for each node in a ServerNet cluster.
ServerNet node routing ID. A bit field used to route ServerNet packets across the external
ServerNet X and Y fabrics. The ServerNet node routing ID occupies the upper six bits
of the 20-bit ServerNet ID, and it is unique for each member, or node, in a ServerNet
cluster. This term is the fully qualified form of “node routing ID.”
SERVERNET object type. In the Kernel subsystem, the object type for either the $ZSNET
ServerNet subsystem manager process or the ServerNet X fabric or Y fabric.
ServerNet packet. The unit of transmission in a ServerNet communications network. A
ServerNet packet consists of a header, a variable-size data field, and a 32-bit cyclic
redundancy check (CRC) checksum covering the entire packet. The header contains
fields for control, virtual memory address, and destination and source fields to identify
the processor or I/O controller transmitting and receiving the packet. See also request
packet and response packet.
ServerNet port. A connector used for ServerNet links. Six ServerNet ports are located on a
ServerNet expansion board (SEB). Ten ServerNet ports are located on a modular
ServerNet expansion board (MSEB).
ServerNet router. An application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) responsible for routing
ServerNet packets along ServerNet links in the ServerNet fabrics, using routing
information that is present within the packets. A ServerNet router acts as a fully duplex
crossbar switch, able to switch any of its input ports to any of its output ports. A
ServerNet router in an HP NonStop™ S-series server has either six router ports (see
ServerNet router 1) or twelve router ports (see ServerNet router 2).
ServerNet router 1. A model of ServerNet router that, in an HP NonStop™ S-series server,
has a total of six input and six output ports. See also ServerNet router 2.
ServerNet router 2. A model of ServerNet router that, in an HP NonStop™ S-series server,
has a total of twelve input and twelve output ports. See also ServerNet router 1.
ServerNet subdevice. An I/O device that sends and receives its information through a
controlling device that acts as the ServerNet device for routing purposes.
ServerNet subdevice ID. The low-order (least significant) bits of a ServerNet ID, used by a
ServerNet device to distribute incoming and outgoing information between itself and its
associated subdevices.
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ServerNet switch
ServerNet switch. A point-to-point networking device that connects ServerNet nodes to a
single fabric (X or Y) of the ServerNet communications network. The ServerNet switch
routes ServerNet packets among these nodes.
ServerNet II Switch. A 12-port network switch that provides the physical junction point to
enable an HP NonStop™ S-series server to connect to a ServerNet cluster. The
ServerNet II Switch is a component of the HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch.
ServerNet transaction. The bidirectional, successful transmission of a pair of ServerNet
packets between two ServerNet devices. The device that originates the transaction
sends a request packet, and the device that receives the request returns a response
packet. See also request packet and response packet.
ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator. (1) An HP data communications
peripheral that provides connectivity to an HP NonStop™ S-series server. The SWAN
concentrator supports both synchronous and asynchronous data over RS-232,
RS-449, X.21, and V.35 electrical and physical interfaces. (2) A collective term for both
SWAN concentrators and SWAN 2 concentrators when a distinction between the two is
not required.
ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) 2 concentrator. An HP data communications
peripheral that provides connectivity to an HP NonStop™ S-series server. The SWAN
2 concentrator supports both synchronous and asynchronous data over RS-232,
RS-449, X.21, and V.35 electrical and physical interfaces. The SWAN 2 concentrator
is the next-generation SWAN concentrator and has 12 WAN ports.
service connection. A connection between the Compaq TSM client software running on a
TSM workstation and the TSM server software running on an HP NonStop™ S-series
server. A service connection can be used only to communicate with the server when
the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system is running. A service connection provides
a comprehensive service and maintenance picture of the server and is used to perform
most service management tasks. See also low-level link.
service equipment. The necessary equipment, usually consisting of circuit breakers and
their accessories, that is located near the entrance point of supply conductors. This
equipment constitutes the main control and cutoff means of the supply.
service processor (SP). A physical component of the processor multifunction (PMF)
customer-replaceable unit (CRU) or I/O multifunction (IOMF) CRU that controls
environmental and maintenance functions (including system load functions) in the
enclosure. SPs operate in pairs to provide fault tolerance. The two SPs in group 01
are designated the master service processors (MSPs). Other pairs of SPs within a
system are called expansion service processors (ESPs). See also expansion service
processor (ESP) and master service processor (MSP).
service processor (SP) event message. A type of notification. SP event messages are
generated by the master service processors (MSPs) on the HP NonStop™ S-series
server. The Compaq TSM Notification Director Application can gather SP event
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Glossary
service provider
messages directly from the MSPs, allowing SP event messages to be received when
the HP NonStop Kernel operating system is not running. The System Down Message
is a special type of SP event message.
service provider. (1) A person trained and qualified to service field-replaceable units
(FRUs). (2) An organization, such as the Global Customer Support Center (GCSC),
that helps you resolve problems with your HP NonStop™ S-series server. The Compaq
TSM package allows you to use the help of a service provider by configuring TSM to
support remote notification and remote access.
service side. The side of a system enclosure that contains, behind an optional door,
processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable units (CRUs) or I/O multifunction
(IOMF) CRUs, ServerNet expansion boards (SEBs), modular SEBs (MSEBs), and
ServerNet adapters; it is opposite the appearance side. Cables are accessed from the
service side. System enclosures are typically arranged so that the service side is the
least visible side.
session. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a set of process groups
associated for job control purposes. A session can have a controlling terminal.
session leader. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the process that created
a session.
session lifetime. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the period that begins
when a session is created and ends when the lifetime of the last remaining process
group of the session ends.
setup configuration. A simple stand-alone network used to configure the Compaq TSM
environment. The setup configuration consists of the server, the primary system
console, an Ethernet hub, and two local area network (LAN) cables. One cable
connects the primary system console to the hub, and another cable connects the hub
to a processor multifunction (PMF) customer-replaceable unit (CRU) in group 01 of the
server. When TSM configuration is complete, the setup configuration can serve as the
working network configuration. Variations of the setup configuration can be constructed
using additional cables and hubs to increase fault tolerance.
set-user-ID program. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a program file that
has the S_ISUID bit set in its file mode.
shared memory. An interprocess communication mechanism that allows two or more
processes to share a given region of memory.
Shared Millicode Library. An intrinsic library containing privileged or TNS-derived millicode
routines used by many native-compiled programs and by emulated TNS programs.
This library includes efficient string-move operations, TNS floating point emulation, and
various privileged-only operations. These routines are mode-independent; they comply
with native calling conventions but can be directly invoked from any mode without
changing execution modes.
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shared run-time library (SRL)
shared run-time library (SRL). A collection of procedures whose code and data can be
loaded and executed only at a specific assigned virtual memory address (the same
address in all processes). SRLs use direct addressing and do not have run-time
resolution of links to and from the main program and other independent libraries.
Contrast with dynamic-link library (DLL). See also TNS shared run-time library (TNS
SRL) and TNS/R native shared run-time library (TNS/R native SRL).
shell. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a program that interprets
sequences of text input as commands. A shell can operate on an input stream, or it
can interactively prompt and read commands from a terminal.
shielded twisted pair (STP). A transmission medium consisting of two twisted conductors
with a foil or braid shield. Contrast with unshielded twisted pair (UTP).
shutdown file. A file invoked by the local operator or by another shutdown file that contains
commands to shut down system devices, communications lines, and system and
application software. Contrast with startup file.
SID. See system image disk (SID) or source ServerNet ID (SID).
signal. The method by which an environment notifies a process of an event. Signals are
used to notify a process when an error that is not related to input or output has
occurred. See also Open System Services (OSS) signal.
signal delivery. The time when Open System Services (OSS) takes the action appropriate
for a specific process and a specific signal.
signal generation. The time when an event occurs that causes a signal for a process.
signal handler. A function or procedure that is executed when a specific signal is delivered
to a specific process.
Signaling System Number 7 (SS7). The protocol used in public networks to establish
connections between switches.
signal mask. The set of signals that are currently blocked from delivery to a specific
process.
signal reference grid. A series of conductors, constructed of pure or composite metals (for
example, copper) with good surface conductivity. A superior signal reference grid is
installed on the subfloor of a computer room and connected to the raised-floor
structure to establish constant and equal potential for all equipment in the computer
room that is connected to it.
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). An asynchronous request-response
protocol used for network management. SNMP originated as a means for managing
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and Ethernet networks. The
Compaq TSM package can include an SNMP-compliant interface for communication
between the TSM workstation and HP NonStop™ S-series server.
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single-high ServerNet adapter
single-high ServerNet adapter. A ServerNet adapter that occupies only the upper half of a
ServerNet adapter slot in an HP NonStop™ S-series server. Contrast with double-high
ServerNet adapter.
single-high stack. A stack that includes a base, a frame, and one system enclosure.
Contrast with double-high stack.
single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) plug-in card (PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) for the modular
ServerNet expansion board (MSEB) and I/O multifunction (IOMF) 2 customerreplaceable unit (CRU) that supports the single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) interface.
single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) ServerNet cable. A fiber-optic cable that allows only one
mode to propagate. SMF ServerNet cable has a small-diameter core for optimized
long-distance transmission. See also multimode fiber-optic (MMF) ServerNet cable.
single-wide plug-in card (PIC). A small-form-factor plug-in card (PIC) that occupies one
PIC slot within a customer-replaceable unit (CRU). See also double-wide plug-in card
(PIC).
sinusoidal. A waveform that can be mathematically expressed by the sine function.
SIT. See system image tape (SIT).
site update tape (SUT). One or more tapes that contain each target system’s site-specific
subvolume and various products. Each product contains a softdoc and a complete set
of files. A SUT is delivered with every new HP NonStop™ S-series system and can be
ordered whenever a new release version update (RVU) of the system software is
available. A full SUT contains the current RVU of the HP NonStop Kernel operating
system and all product software that has been ordered with it. A partial SUT contains
a subset of products for the current software RVU.
SIV. See system interrupt vector (SIV).
skin effect. The tendency of higher frequency signals to flow on the outside surface, or
skin, of a conductor instead of through the entire cross-section of the conductor. The
result is less total conductor area available for carrying current and an increase in the
resistance of the conductor at that high signal frequency.
slot. A physical, labeled space for a customer-replaceable unit (CRU) or field-replaceable
unit (FRU) that is part of a module. A module contains one or more slots.
slot location. A three-number identifier for a particular slot on a system that consists of the
group number, module number, and slot number; for example, 02,01,08 (group 02,
module 01, slot 08).
SLSA subsystem. See ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem.
small computer system interface (SCSI). An ANSI-standard protocol used by a controller
to access a device.
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SMB
SMB. See serial maintenance bus (SMB).
SMB domain. See serial maintenance bus (SMB) domain.
SMF. See Storage Management Foundation (SMF).
SMF PIC. See single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) plug-in card (PIC).
SMF ServerNet cable. See single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) ServerNet cable.
SMI. See ServerNet memory interface (SMI).
SMN. The mnemonic name for the external system area network manager process
(SANMAN).
SMP. See Security Manager Process (SMP).
SMT. See SWAN manager task (SMT).
snapshot. (1) For the Compaq TSM client software, a file that is created or updated and
saved on your TSM workstation each time the workstation connects to an HP
NonStop™ S-series server. The snapshot file contains information about the status of
the server and the attributes of all customer-replaceable units (CRUs) at the time the
file was saved. (2) For Distributed Systems Management/Software Configuration
Manager (DSM/SCM), a list of the target system tape and disk locations, file
fingerprints for files managed by DSM/SCM, and DSM/SCM target information. The
snapshot is compiled on the target system from the target database and sent to the
host system to store in the host database. An instruction to create a snapshot is part of
every activation package sent from the host and can also be requested independently
through the Target Interface.
SNDA. See ServerNet device adapter (ServerNet/DA).
SNETMON. See ServerNet cluster monitor process (SNETMON).
SNMP. See Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).
SNMP task. A task that runs in each ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator
communications line interface processor (CLIP) as part of the WAN architecture. This
task accepts and replies to Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) request
messages.
socket. An end-point for stream-oriented communication. A socket has a file descriptor.
soft reset. An action performed on an HP NonStop™ Cluster Switch that restarts the
firmware on the cluster switch but does not interfere with ServerNet passthrough data
traffic.
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software configuration incident report
software configuration incident report. A type of incident report that reports changes in
the software configuration of the server. A software configuration incident report
includes the server’s software configuration file.
software product revision (SPR). The method of releasing incremental software updates
on HP NonStop™ S-series systems. An SPR can include one or more corrections to
code or it can contain code that adds new function to a software product.
source ServerNet ID (SID). A field in the ServerNet packet header indicating the source of
the packet.
SP.
See service processor (SP).
special character. A character entered from a terminal that has an effect other than being
part of the input stream from that terminal.
special file. A file in the Open System Services (OSS) file system that is not a regular file.
Special files include directories, FIFOs, and character special files such as terminal
device files. Contrast with regular file.
SP event message. See service processor (SP) event message.
SPI. See Subsystem Programmatic Interface (SPI).
S-PIC. See SCSI plug-in card (S-PIC).
split-star topology. A network topology that uses up to two HP NonStop™ Cluster
Switches for each external fabric. External routing is implemented between the two
starred halves of a ServerNet cluster. (A starred half consists of up to eight nodes
attached to one set of cluster switches.) The starred segments are joined by four-lane
links. Introduced with the G06.12 release version update (RVU) of the HP NonStop
ServerNet Cluster product, the split-star topology supports up to 16 nodes. See also tristar topology.
spooler. The collection of files and processes that manages the printers and print jobs on
the system.
SPR. See software product revision (SPR).
SP Tool Application. A PC-based software application that you can use to request
information from the master service processors (MSPs) in an HP NonStop™ S-series
server. This application is intended for use only by trained service providers.
SRL. See shared run-time library (SRL).
SRM. See system resource model (SRM).
SS7. See Signaling System Number 7 (SS7).
SS7TE PIC. See SS7TE plug-in card (PIC).
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SS7TE2 PIC
SS7TE2 PIC. See SS7TE2 plug-in card (PIC).
SS7TE plug-in card (PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) used in the 6763 Common Communication
ServerNet adapter (CCSA) that supports the EIA-232, EIA-449, V.35, and X.21
interfaces.
SS7TE2 plug-in card (PIC). A plug-in card (PIC) used in the 6763 Common
Communication ServerNet adapter (CCSA) that supports the E1, J1, and T1 interfaces.
S-SAC. See SCSI ServerNet addressable controller (S-SAC).
SSI log. See System Service Information (SSI) log.
stackable enclosure. An enclosure that can rest on top of another enclosure. A stackable
enclosure is not installed on a frame base. Contrast with base enclosure.
standby power generator. A turbine-driven or engine-driven generator that provides a
backup source of power to designated loads. Often used to supplement an
uninterruptible power supply (UPS) in the event of extended utility outages.
star group. One set of X and Y HP NonStop™ Cluster Switches and the ServerNet nodes
(up to eight) that are connected to them. A star group can be thought of as a segment
of a split-star or tri-star topology. A split-star topology can contain up to two star
groups; a tri-star topology can contain up to three star groups.
start mode. An attribute of Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) PROCESS objects that
controls when and if an application process starts in G-series release version updates
(RVUs).
star topology. A network topology in which all nodes are connected to a central hub (HP
NonStop™ Cluster Switch). Each node has its own connection to the network, so a
break in the connection does not affect other nodes in the network. In a ServerNet
cluster, a star topology requires one cluster switch for each external fabric and can
support up to eight nodes. See also split-star topology and tri-star topology.
startup file. A file invoked by the local operator or by another startup file that contains
commands to start up system devices, communications lines, and system and
application software. Contrast with shutdown file.
state. In Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), one of the generally defined possible conditions
of an object with respect to the management of that object. Examples of states are
DEFINED, STARTED, and STOPPED.
static information. Information that represents the set of customer-replaceable units
(CRUs) on an HP NonStop™ S-series system. Contrast with dynamic information.
static server. In the Guardian environment, a process that runs continuously and provides a
specific service to other processes. A static server differs from a traditional UNIX
demon in that a demon actively looks for tasks to perform, while a static server
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STFs
performs only tasks brought to its attention by a client (requestor) process. See also
demon.
STFs. See super time factors (STFs).
storage cell. A compartment in an optical storage library (OSL) that stores an optical disk
cartridge.
Storage Management Foundation (SMF). A subsystem used by the storage subsystem
that facilitates automation of storage management tasks by providing locationindependent naming, storage pools, and virtual disks on HP NonStop™ S-series
systems.
storage pool. A set of physical disk volumes administered as a set of logical disk volumes.
A logical disk volume can span multiple physical disk volumes. When a logical disk
volume becomes full, more physical disk volumes can be added.
storage-pool file. A file containing a list of disk volumes to be used by an Open System
Services (OSS) fileset. As these volumes are filled, more volumes can be added to the
storage-pool file.
storage subsystem. A subsystem of the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system that
handles configuration and management of disk and tape devices in G-series release
version updates (RVUs).
storage subsystem manager process. The generic process that starts and manages disk
and tape drives. The $ZZSTO storage subsystem manager process is started and
managed by the $ZZKRN Kernel subsystem manager process through the $ZPM
persistence manager process.
store and forward routing. A form of message routing whereby a router must receive an
entire packet or message before it can start to forward the packet or message to the
next router. Contrast with wormhole routing.
STP. See shielded twisted pair (STP).
strictly conforming POSIX.1 application. An application that requires only the facilities
described in ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 and the applicable computer language
standards. Such an application must accept any behavior or value described in
ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 as unspecified or implementation-defined and, for symbolic
constants, accept any value permitted by ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990.
structured view of the user ID. A view of the HP NonStop™ Kernel user ID, normally used
in the Guardian environment, that consists of either the group-number,
user-number pair of values or the group-name.user-name pair of values.
subnet. See subnetwork.
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subnetwork
subnetwork. A physical network within an Internet protocol (IP) network. Each IP network
can be divided into a number of subnetworks. Within a given network, each
subnetwork is treated as a separate network. Outside the network, the subnetworks
appear as part of a single network. The terms subnetwork and subnet are used
interchangeably.
subnetwork address. An extension of the Internet protocol (IP) addressing scheme that
allows a site to use a single IP address for multiple physical networks. A subnetwork
address is created by dividing the local part of an IP address into a subnetwork number
(identifying a particular subnetwork) and a host number (uniquely identifying the host
system within the subnetwork). The terms subnetwork address and subnet address are
used interchangeably.
SUB option. In some Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) subsystems, the designation that
the object name given in a command stands not just for itself, but for the names of all
objects at the next-lower level in the hierarchy. The given object name can stand both
for itself and for the subordinate objects, or it can stand only for the subordinate
objects, depending on the value of the SUB option.
subordinate objects. In Subsystem Control Facility (SCF), objects that are logically
subordinate to other objects. Some subsystems are structured hierarchically, with
objects of one type logically subordinate to (that is, controlled by) an object of another
type. For example, a number of subdevices can be configured on a single line. Some
SCF commands include a SUB option that refers to subordinate objects.
Subscriber Channel (SC). A type of head on a fiber-optic cable in which the pins connect
through a push-pull mating interface.
substate. Further information about the state of a device. The state and substate together
provide information about the current condition of a device or path to a device.
SUBSYS object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for most
subsystems that use SCF as the user interface.
subsystem. (1) A secondary or subordinate system, usually capable of operating
independently of or asynchronously with a controlling system. (2) A program or set of
processes that manages a cohesive set of Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) objects.
Each subsystem has a manager through which applications can request services by
issuing commands defined by that subsystem. See also subsystem manager.
Subsystem Control Facility (SCF). An interactive interface for configuring, controlling, and
collecting information from a subsystem and its objects. SCF enables you to configure
and reconfigure devices, processes, and some system variables while your HP
NonStop™ S-series server is online.
Subsystem Control Point (SCP). The message router for Subsystem Control Facility
(SCF). There can be several instances of this process. Using the Subsystem
Programmatic Interface (SPI), applications send each command for a subsystem to an
instance of the SCP process, which in turn sends the command to the manager
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subsystem manager
process of the target subsystem. SCP also processes a few commands itself. It
provides security features, version compatibility, support for tracing, and support for
applications implemented as process pairs.
subsystem manager. A process that performs configuration and management functions for
a subsystem.
Subsystem Programmatic Interface (SPI). A set of procedures and associated definition
files and a standard message protocol used to define common message-based
interfaces for communication between management applications and subsystems. It
includes procedures to build and decode specially formatted messages; definition files
in Transaction Application Language (TAL), COBOL85, and HP Tandem Advanced
Command Language (TACL) for inclusion in programs, macros, and routines using the
interface procedures; and definition files in Data Definition Language (DDL) for
programmers writing their own subsystems.
subvolume. A group of related files stored on a disk; all the files have the same volume and
subvolume name, but each file has a unique file identifier.
summary report. A brief informational listing of status or configuration information provided
by the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) STATUS or INFO command. Contrast with
detailed report.
superblock. The part of the Open System Services (OSS) environment that contains all the
information about the current state of the OSS file system. The superblock contains
such items as the free list and the size of inodes.
super group. The group of user IDs that have 255 as the group number. This group has
special privileges; many HP utilities have commands or functions that can be executed
only by a member of the super group.
super-group user. A user who can read, write, execute, and purge most files on the
system. Super-group users have user IDs that have 255 as the group number.
super ID. On HP NonStop™ systems, a privileged user who can read, write, execute, and
purge all files on the system. The super ID is usually a member of a system-supervisor
group.
The super ID has the set of special permissions called appropriate privileges. In the
Guardian environment, the structured view of the super ID, which is (255, 255), is most
commonly used; in the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the scalar view of
the super ID, which is 65535, is most commonly used.
super time factors (STFs). An enhancement to the Expand product that allows the
extension of automatically calculated time factors to line speeds greater than 224
kilobits/second. These time factors are logarithmic-based and allow specification of a
much broader range of line performance.
superuser. See super ID.
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supplementary group ID
supplementary group ID. An Open System Services (OSS) process attribute that is used
to determine the file access permissions for the process.
support planner. The person who creates the operational environment for the system and
is responsible for the support of the system. This person creates the startup and
shutdown files, performs replacement operations, and prepares the system for
upgrades and additions.
surge. An increase in the amplitude of source voltage of short duration.
SUT. See site update tape (SUT).
SVID. The System V Interface Definition for UNIX, published by AT&T.
SVR4. System V Release 4, a specific implementation of UNIX. See also System V.
SWAN concentrator. See ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator.
SWAN 2 concentrator. See ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) 2 concentrator.
SWAN manager task (SMT). A manager task that is provided as part of the wide area
network (WAN) subsystem. The SMT runs in each communications line interface
processor (CLIP) and provides a variety of management functions such as
coordinating data link control (DLC) and diagnostic task downloads.
SWID. The software identification tool invoked by the SYSGENR program that audits file
identification information about your software.
switch mode power supply. A computer power supply that uses a pulse-width modulation
switching inverter and nonlinear current draw characteristics. Switch-mode power
supplies are widely used because of their small size and efficiency.
symbol. (1) The symbolic name of a value, typically a function entry point or a data location.
In the context of loadable libraries, symbols are defined in loadfiles and referenced in
the same or other loadfiles. (2) Within the ServerNet architecture, the nine or more bits
that encode 8-bit data and protocol commands.
symbolic link. In the Open System Services (OSS) file system and Network File System
(NFS), a type of special file that acts as a name pointer to another file. A symbolic link
contains a pathname and can be used to point to a file in another fileset. Symbolic
links are not included in ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990. Contrast with hard link.
symbolic reference. An occurrence in code or data of the value of a symbol. The symbolic
reference is bound (resolved and made usable) by assigning to it the value of a
definition of that symbol. The symbol value is normally the address of a function or
variable named by the symbol. In position-independent code (PIC) loadfiles, symbolic
references occur only in data.
symbols region. See Inspect region.
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SYSGENR
SYSGENR. The system generation program that generates a customized version of the HP
NonStop™ Kernel operating system.
SYSnn subvolume. A subvolume on the $SYSTEM volume where the new version of the
HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system image is located. Also located on the SYSnn
subvolume is system-dependent and release version update (RVU)-dependent
software. nn is an octal number in the range %00 through %77.
SYSPOOL. The system data space that remains in memory after all system data structures
are built by the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system at the time of a processor load.
system. All the processors, controllers, firmware, peripheral devices, software, and related
components that are directly connected together to form an entity that is managed by
one HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system image and operated as one computer.
See also node.
system area network management process. See external system area network manager
process (SANMAN).
system code. A logically distinct part of the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system that
consists of operating-system procedures shared by all processors.
system configuration database. The database file on the $SYSTEM.ZSYSCONF
subvolume that contains configuration information for all system objects that can be
configured by the Subsystem Control Facility (SCF). Configuration information for all
system objects that can be configured during system generation is contained on the
$SYSTEM.SYSnn subvolume. See also configuration file and SYSnn subvolume.
system console. (1) A Compaq TSM workstation configured as the primary or backup
dial-out point. The TSM workstation configured as the primary dial-out point is called
the primary system console. The TSM workstation configured as the backup dial-out
point is called the backup system console. (2) In UNIX, an optional file such as
/dev/console that receives messages sent through certain application program
interfaces.
system enclosure. An enclosure for system components. Processor enclosures and I/O
enclosures are both system enclosures. Contrast with peripheral enclosure.
system engineer (SE). See service provider.
system expansion. The process of making a target system larger by adding enclosures to
it. The enclosures being added can be either new enclosures or enclosures from a
donor system. Contrast with system reduction.
system generation. The process of creating an operating system to support a particular
system configuration and software release version update (RVU).
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system image disk (SID)
system image disk (SID). A disk copy of the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system
produced during system configuration. The DISKGEN utility copies operating system
files to the SID.
system image tape (SIT). A tape that can be used to perform a system load on a system if
the system subvolume has become corrupted on both $SYSTEM disks. The tape
contains a minimum set of software necessary to bring up and run the system. Use
the SIT only for disaster recovery; it is not needed for normal system load. Contact the
Global Customer Support Center (GCSC) before loading the system from a SIT; many
additional steps are required to restore your system to working order. See also tape
load.
system interrupt vector (SIV). A HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system data structure
that contains the addresses of interrupt handlers, parameters passed to interrupt
handlers by special interrupt microcode, and other interrupt processing information.
system library. A logically distinct part of the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system that
consists of user-callable library procedures and kernel procedures.
system load. (1) To start the system; to load the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system
image into the memory of a processor. See RELOAD. (2) The process of loading the
operating system. A system load changes a system from an inactive to an active (or
operational) state by loading software that establishes communication between the
operating system and configured system peripherals.
system-managed process. Another name for a generic process.
system manager. See manager.
system number. See Expand node number.
system operator. See local operator and remote operator.
system planner. The person who plans for the hardware and software installation of a new
system or for changes to a system already installed. This person arranges for site
preparation, schedules the installation, and completes the Installation Document
Packet.
system process. (1) A privileged process that comes into existence at system-load time
and exists continuously for a given configuration for as long as the processor remains
operable. (2) A HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system process, such as the memory
manager, the monitor, and the input/output (I/O) control processes. The files containing
system processes are invoked by ALLPROCESSORS paragraph entries. (3) A part of
a single copy of the HP NonStop Kernel operating system with Open System Services
(OSS) interfaces. A system process does not have an OSS process ID.
system reduction. The process of making a donor system smaller by removing enclosures
from it. The enclosures removed from a donor system might be added to a target
system. Contrast with system expansion.
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system resizing
system resizing. See system expansion or system reduction.
system resource model (SRM). A collection of C++ objects that model the diagnostic and
serviceability state behavior of the system resources discovered and managed by the
Compaq TSM package. The SRM has the following attributes:
Generic process name
$ZZKRN.#TSM-SRM
Process name
$ZTSM
Program file name
$SYSTEM.SYSnn.SRM
system serial number. A unique identifier, typically five or six alphanumeric characters,
assigned to an HP NonStop™ S-series server when it is built.
System Service Information (SSI) log. An Event Management Service (EMS) log that
includes information about customer-replaceable unit (CRU) removal, CRU insertion,
firmware loading, security authentication, incident report dial-out authorization, incident
report dial-out failure, and incident report confirmation. The SSI log can be viewed
using the Compaq TSM EMS Event Viewer Application.
system terminal. See system console.
System V. A version of UNIX developed and marketed originally by AT&T.
TACL. See HP Tandem Advanced Command Language (TACL).
tape bootstrap. The program on a system image tape (SIT) that reads the rest of the SIT
during tape load and writes it to the system disk.
tape drive. A device that moves magnetic tape past magnetic read/write heads, which read
data from or write data to the tape.
tape dump. To copy the memory of a processor to tape.
tape library. A storage device consisting of magnetic tape drives, multiple storage locations
for magnetic tape cartridges, an automatic mechanism for loading the cartridges into
and unloading them from the drives, and a means for an operator to load cartridges
into or remove cartridges from the tape library.
tape load. A system load. A tape load is the process of reading a system image tape (SIT)
and writing it to the system disk. Performing a tape load from a SIT to restore the
system image files to the $SYSTEM disk is generally not recommended. Perform a
tape load only with the advice of the Global Customer Support Center (GCSC) or your
service provider. Loading from a tape reinitializes the disk directory.
TAPE object type. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) object type for all tape drives
attached to your system.
target system. The computer system you make larger by adding enclosures, using a
process known as system expansion. See also donor system.
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TB
TB. See terabyte (TB).
TCP. See Transmission Control Protocol (TCP).
TCP/IP. See Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).
TEMPLI. The Event Management Service (EMS) template installation program that merges
template object files from specified subsystems and produces resident and nonresident
template files.
terabyte (TB). A unit of measurement equal to 1,099,511,627,776 bytes (1024 gigabytes).
See also gigabyte (GB), kilobyte (KB), and megabyte (MB).
terminal. A type of Open System Services (OSS) character special file that conforms to the
interface description in Clause 7 of ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990.
terminator. A resistor connected to a signal wire in a bus or network for the purpose of
impedance matching to prevent reflections. SCSI chains, Ethernet cables, and some
LocalTalk wiring configurations require terminators.
Tetra 8 topology. A tetrahedral topology of HP NonStop™ S-series servers that allows a
maximum of four processor enclosures (eight processors) and eight I/O enclosures.
Contrast with Tetra 16 topology.
Tetra 16 topology. A tetrahedral topology of HP NonStop™ S-series servers that allows a
maximum of eight processor enclosures (16 processors). The maximum number of I/O
enclosures allowed by the Tetra 16 topology varies depending on the software release
version update (RVU) and the server model. Contrast with Tetra 8 topology.
tetrahedral topology. A topology of HP NonStop™ S-series servers in which the ServerNet
connections between the processor enclosures form a tetrahedron. See also
tetrahedron and topology.
tetrahedron. A solid bounded by four triangular faces. In ServerNet context, a tetrahedron
is four processors interconnected by ServerNet links so as to form a conceptual
tetrahedron. Each processor therefore has a direct connection to the other three
processors. See tetrahedral topology.
text string. A variable-length sequence of ASCII characters, defined in the CONFTEXT file,
that an identifier represents. When Distributed Systems Management/Software
Configuration Manager (DSM/SCM) encounters an identifier, it substitutes the
associated text string for the identifier.
TF.
See time factor (TF).
TFDS. See HP Tandem Failure Data System (TFDS).
TFTP. See Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP).
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THD
THD. See total harmonic distortion (THD).
three point fall of potential measurement method. The measurement of a grounding
electrode (such as a ground rod) where ground resistance is measured with respect to
two other points. The ratio of the measurements determines the resistance of the
grounding electrode.
time factor (TF). A number assigned to a line, path, or route to indicate its efficiency in
transporting data. The lower the time factor, the more efficient the line, path, or route.
See also surge.
TLB. See translation lookaside buffer (TLB).
TMF subsystem. See Transaction Management Facility (TMF) subsystem.
TNS. HP computers that support the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system and that are
based on complex instruction-set computing (CISC) technology. TNS processors
implement the TNS instruction set. Contrast with TNS/R.
TNS instructions. Stack-oriented, 16-bit machine instructions defined as part of the TNS
environment. On TNS systems, TNS instructions are implemented by microcode; on
TNS/R systems, TNS instructions are implemented by millicode routines or by
translation to an equivalent sequence of RISC instructions.
TNS library. A single, optional, TNS-compiled loadfile associated with one or more
application loadfiles. If a user library has its own global or static variables, it is called a
TNS shared run-time library (TNS SRL). Otherwise it is called a User Library (UL).
TNS loading. A task performed at process startup time when executing a TNS object file.
This task involves mapping the TNS instructions, procedure entry point (PEP) table,
and external entry point (XEP) table from a TNS object file into memory.
TNS mode. The operational environment in which TNS instructions execute by inline
interpretation. See also accelerated mode and TNS/R native mode.
TNS object code. The TNS instructions that result from processing program source code
with a TNS language compiler. TNS object code executes on both TNS and TNS/R
systems.
TNS object file. The object file created by a TNS compiler. The file contains TNS
instructions and other information needed to construct the code spaces and the initial
data for a TNS process.
TNS process. A process initiated by executing a TNS or accelerated object file. A TNS
process, whether accelerated or not, uses TNS register and stack conventions.
Contrast with TNS/R native process.
TNS shared run-time library (TNS SRL). A shared run-time library (SRL) available to TNS
processes in the Open System Services (OSS) environment. A TNS process can have
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TNS system library
only one TNS SRL. A TNS SRL is implemented as a special user library that allows
shared global data.
TNS system library. A collection of HP-supplied TNS-compiled routines available to all
TNS processes. There is no per-program or per-process customization of this library.
All routines are immediately available to a new process; no dynamic loading of code or
creation of instance data segments is involved. See also native system library.
TNS/R. HP computers that support the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system and that are
based on reduced instruction-set computing (RISC) technology. TNS/R processors
implement the RISC instruction set and are upwardly compatible with the TNS
system-level architecture. Systems with these processors include most of the HP
NonStop™ servers. Contrast with TNS.
TNS/R library. A TNS/R native-mode library. For a PIC-compiled application, TNS/R
libraries can be dynamic-link libraries (DLLs) or hybridized native shared runtime
libraries (SRLs). For a non PIC-compiled application, TNS/R libraries can only be
native SRLs.
TNS/R native mode. The operational environment in which native-compiled RISC
instructions execute. See also accelerated mode and TNS mode.
TNS/R native process. A process initiated by executing code that has been compiled
directly to RISC instructions, rather than to TNS instructions. Such a process uses
RISC register and stack conventions and executes in TNS/R native mode.
TNS/R native shared run-time library (TNS/R native SRL). A shared run-time library
(SRL) available to TNS/R native processes in both the Guardian and Open System
Services (OSS) environments. TNS/R native SRLs can be either public or private. A
TNS/R native process can have multiple public SRLs but only one private SRL.
Token-Ring ServerNet adapter (TRSA). A ServerNet adapter that provides a single line
from an HP NonStop™ S-series server to a token-ring network, allowing the server to
act as a station on the ring. The 3862 TRSA can be configured to support network
speeds of 4 megabits/second (Mbps) or 16 Mbps, and the media can be either
shielded twisted pair (STP) or unshielded twisted pair (UTP).
topology. The physical layout of components that define a local area network (LAN), wide
area network (WAN), or ServerNet fabric. See also star topology and tetrahedral
topology.
topology branch. A processor enclosure and the I/O enclosures attached to it.
total harmonic distortion (THD). The ratio, expressed in percent, of the root mean square
(rms) value for all harmonics present in the output of a power source to the total rms
voltage at the output, for a pure sine-wave output. The lower the THD, the better the
power source.
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Transaction Management Facility (TMF) subsystem
Transaction Management Facility (TMF) subsystem. The major component of the HP
NonStop™ Transaction Manager product, which protects databases in online
transaction processing (OLTP) environments. To furnish this service, the TMF
subsystem manages database transactions, keeps track of database activity through
audit trails, and provides database recovery methods. Formerly called Transaction
Monitoring Facility (TMF). See also HP NonStop™ Transaction Manager.
transformer. Equipment used to step up or step down alternating-current (AC) voltage to
meet the specific requirements of the load. A transformer also provides isolation and
noise-attenuation properties.
transient. A short-duration, high-amplitude impulse that is imposed upon the normal voltage
or current.
translation lookaside buffer (TLB). A special-purpose cache, part of the RISC processor
chip, that is used in quickly translating virtual addresses to physical addresses. This
rapid translation is accomplished by remembering and reusing the translations of
recently referenced pages.
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). A connection-oriented protocol that provides for the
reliable exchange of data between a sending and a receiving system. TCP implements
functions corresponding to the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference model
Layer 4, the transport layer.
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). A set of layered
communication protocols for connecting workstations and larger systems in both local
area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs). See also HP NonStop™
TCP/IP and Parallel Library TCP/IP.
tri-star topology. A network topology that uses up to three HP NonStop™ Cluster Switches
for each external fabric. External routing is implemented between the three star groups
of a ServerNet cluster. (A star group consists of the eight nodes attached to one set of
cluster switches.) The star groups are joined by two-lane links. Introduced with the
G06.14 release version update (RVU) of the HP NonStop ServerNet Cluster product,
the tri-star topology supports up to 24 nodes. See also split-star topology.
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP). A protocol defined by Request for Comments (RFC)
1350. TFTP is used as a data link control (DLC) and diagnostic task.
TRSA. See Token-Ring ServerNet adapter (TRSA).
TSM. See Compaq TSM.
TSM client software. See Compaq TSM client software.
TSM EMS Event Viewer Application. See Compaq TSM EMS Event Viewer Application.
TSM Low-Level Link Application. See Compaq TSM Low-Level Link Application.
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TSM notification
TSM notification. See Compaq TSM notification.
TSM Notification Director Application. See Compaq TSM Notification Director
Application.
TSM package. See Compaq TSM package.
TSM server software. See Compaq TSM server software.
TSM Service Application. See Compaq TSM Service Application.
TSM workstation. See Compaq TSM workstation.
two-lane link. The two single-mode fiber-optic (SMF) ServerNet cables that connect the HP
NonStop™ Cluster Switches on the same external fabric (for example, X1, X2, and X3)
in a tri-star topology.
UCME. See uncorrectable memory error (UCME).
UID. A nonnegative integer that uniquely identifies a user within a node.
In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, the UID is the scalar view of the HP
NonStop™ Kernel user ID. The UID is used in the OSS environment for functions
normally associated with a UNIX user ID.
unattended site. A computer environment where there is no operator residing on site and
the only access is from a central monitoring station.
uncorrectable memory error (UCME). An error caused by incorrect data at a particular
memory location. The cause of the error is such that the error is not automatically
corrected by the system, and memory replacement is required. Contrast with
correctable memory error (CME).
undefined. Pertaining to the use of an incorrect value for data or the incorrect behavior of a
program for which the ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 standard imposes no portability
requirements.
undervoltage. A negative change in the amplitude of the voltage.
uninterruptible power supply (UPS). The equipment used to provide an uninterruptible
source of power to connected equipment if a main power outage occurs. The basic
components of any UPS system are a rectifier/charger that converts alternating-current
(AC) power to direct-current (DC) power, batteries that store the DC power, and an
inverter that converts the DC power back into AC power for distribution to the load.
unmount. In the Network File System (NFS), to make a fileset inaccessible to the users of a
node.
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Glossary
unplanned outage
unplanned outage. Time during which a computer system is not capable of doing useful
work because of an unplanned interruption. Unplanned interruptions can include
failures caused by faulty hardware, operator error, or disaster.
unshielded twisted pair (UTP). A transmission medium consisting of two twisted
conductors with no cable shielding. Contrast with shielded twisted pair (STP).
unspecified. Pertaining to the use of a correct value for data or the correct behavior of a
program for which the ISO/IEC IS 9945-1:1990 standard imposes no portability
requirements.
UPS. See uninterruptible power supply (UPS).
upward compatibility. The ability of a requester to operate with a server of a later revision
level. In this case, the requester is upward-compatible with the server and the server is
downward-compatible with the requester. Contrast with downward compatibility.
user code. A logically distinct part of the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system that
consists of the code for user processes.
user database. A database within an HP NonStop™ node that contains the user name,
user ID, group ID, initial working directory, and initial user program for each user of the
node.
user ID. The unique identification of a user within a node.
In the Guardian environment, the term “user ID” usually means the structured view of
the HP NonStop™ Kernel user ID. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment,
the term “user ID” usually means the scalar view of the HP NonStop™ Kernel user
ID—a number called the UID.
user library. A logically distinct part of the HP NonStop™ Kernel operating system that
consists of procedures that the operating system can link to a program file at run time.
user name. A string that uniquely identifies a user within the user database for a node.
UTC. See Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).
UTP. See unshielded twisted pair (UTP).
V.
See volt (V).
V.35. The International Telecommunications Union, Telecommunication Standardization
Sector (ITU-T) standard for data transmission at 48 kilobits/second over 60 - 108
kilohertz group band circuits. It contains the 34-pin V.34 connector specifications
normally implemented on a modular RJ-45 connector. V.35 is the equivalent of
Electronics Industry Association (EIA) RS-422/RS-449.
V AC. Volts of alternating current.
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Glossary
virtual file system
virtual file system. In UNIX and Open System Services (OSS), a file system that allows
files of a fileset to be distributed across several physical devices.
volt (V). The standard unit of measure of the potential difference that is required to move an
electric charge.
volume. A logical disk, which can be one or two magnetic disk drives or one side of an
optical disk cartridge. In HP NonStop™ S-series systems, volumes have names that
begin with a dollar sign ($), such as $DATA. See also mirrored disk or volume and
optical disk volume.
WAN. See wide area network (WAN).
WANBoot process. A process provided as part of the wide area network (WAN) subsystem
that implements the BOOTP protocol and provides management functions to the WAN
subsystem and the WAN products.
WAN concentrator. See ServerNet wide area network (SWAN) concentrator and ServerNet
wide area network (SWAN) 2 concentrator.
WAN shared driver. A driver, provided as part of the wide area network (WAN) subsystem,
that provides a simplified interface to HP NonStop™ TCP/IP for use by I/O processes.
The shared driver interface is similar to that provided by DOIOPLEASE on earlier
systems.
WAN subsystem. See wide area network (WAN) subsystem.
WAN subsystem manager process. A process named $ZZWAN provided as part of the
wide area network (WAN) subsystem that starts and manages the WAN subsystem
objects, the WAN product process, and device objects. Subsystem Control Facility
(SCF) commands are directed to the WAN subsystem manager process for configuring
and managing the WAN subsystem and the ServerNet wide area network (SWAN)
concentrator.
WAN Wizard Pro. A graphical user interface (GUI) that guides you step-by-step through the
configuration of wide area network (WAN) and local area network (LAN) software and
hardware.
wide area network (WAN). A network that operates over a larger geographical area than a
local area network (LAN)—typically, an area with a radius greater than one kilometer.
The elements of a WAN may be separated by distances great enough to require
telephone communications.
wide area network (WAN) subsystem. The Subsystem Control Facility (SCF) subsystem
for configuration and management of WAN objects in G-series release version updates
(RVUs).
wild-card character. A character that stands for any possible character or characters in a
search string or in a name applying to multiple objects. In Subsystem Control Facility
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Glossary
Windows Internet Name Service (WINS)
(SCF) object-name templates, two wild-card characters can appear: ? (question mark)
for a single character and * (asterisk) for zero or more consecutive characters. See
also object-name template.
Windows Internet Name Service (WINS). A name resolution service that resolves
Windows NT networking computer names to Internet protocol (IP) addresses in a
routed environment. A WINS server handles name registration, queries, and release
version updates (RVUs). See also IP address.
WINS. See Windows Internet Name Service (WINS).
work files. Temporary files created during system generation that serve as storage areas.
Work files are useful for debugging purposes after system generation. You can choose
to make specified work files permanent.
working directory. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a directory,
associated with a process, that is used in pathname resolution for relative pathnames.
WORM. See write once, read many (WORM).
wormhole routing. A technique for reducing network latency in a router. Packet bytes are
immediately switched to the appropriate output port as soon as they arrive, rather than
accumulated in a buffer until an entire packet has been received. Contrast with store
and forward routing.
write once, read many (WORM). A media storage class in which data, once written, cannot
be erased or overwritten.
wye. A polyphase electrical supply where the conductors of the source transformer are
connected to the terminals in a physical arrangement that resembles the letter Y. Each
point of the Y represents the connection for a conductor at high potential. The angle of
phase displacement between each point on the Y is 120 degrees. The center point of
the Y is the common return point for the neutral conductor.
wye-delta. The interconnections between a wye source and a delta load.
X.21. A digital signaling interface recommended by the International Telecommunications
Union, Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) that includes specifications
for data terminal equipment/data communications equipment (DTE/DCE) physical
interface elements, alignment of call control characters and error checking, elements of
the call control phase for circuit switched services, data transfer at or below 9600
bits/second, and test loops.
X fabric. The X side of the internal or external ServerNet fabrics. See also fabric, external
ServerNet X or Y fabric, and internal ServerNet X or Y fabric.
XIO. See extensible input/output (XIO).
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Glossary
XLLINK
XLLINK. The linker program invoked during system generation to link accelerated (file code
100) TNS object files to create system code and system library files.
XO bond. The bond connection on an isolation transformer, installed between the
transformer’s neutral XO terminal and ground. This bond is required at North American
and British sites to provide an effective return path for any equipment conductor fault
current back to the neutral of the isolation transformer.
Y fabric. The Y side of the internal or external ServerNet fabrics. See also fabric, external
ServerNet X or Y fabric, and internal ServerNet X or Y fabric.
$YMIOP. The name of the maintenance I/O process that is built during system generation
and is available at system startup.
$ZCNF. The name of the configuration utility process.
zero-signal reference. A connecting point, bus, or conductor used as one side of a signal
circuit. Such a reference object might or might not necessarily be designated as a
ground. Sometimes referred to as a common circuit.
$ZEXP. The name of the Expand manager process.
$ZMnn. The name of the QIO monitor process in processor nn.
$ZNET. The name of the Subsystem Control Point (SCP) management process.
zombie process. In the Open System Services (OSS) environment, a process that has
terminated but is still recorded in system tables.
$ZPM. The name of the persistence manager process.
ZSCL. The subsystem identifier for the ServerNet cluster subsystem.
ZSERVER. The object file name of the $ZSVR server process for the labeled-tape
subsystem.
ZSMN. The subsystem identifier for the external system area network manager process
(SANMAN).
$ZSVR. The name of the server process for the labeled-tape subsystem. See also
ZSERVER.
ZSYSCONF subvolume. The subvolume on the $SYSTEM disk that contains the system
configuration database.
$ZTC0. The default transport-provider process that provides Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) services to Open System Services (OSS) AF_INET
sockets programs.
$ZZATM. The name of the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) monitor process.
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Glossary
$ZZFOX
$ZZFOX. The name of the Fiber Optic Extension (FOX) monitor process in the
ServerNet/FX adapter subsystem.
$ZZKRN. The name of the Kernel subsystem manager process.
$ZZLAN. The name of the ServerNet LAN Systems Access (SLSA) subsystem manager
process that is started by the $ZZKRN Kernel subsystem manager process and
maintained by the $ZPM persistence manager process. See also LAN manager
(LANMAN) process.
$ZZPAM. The name of the Port Access Method (PAM) manager process.
$ZZSCL. The name of the ServerNet cluster monitor process (SNETMON).
$ZZSMN. The name of the external system area network manager process (SANMAN).
$ZZSTO. The name of the storage subsystem manager process.
$ZZWAN. The name of the wide area network (WAN) subsystem manager process.
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