Part # 20504 180 Amp Gas/No Gas Welder

Part # 20504 180 Amp Gas/No Gas Welder
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owner's Manual
CRAFTSMAN]
WIRE FEED MIG WELDER
ModelNo. A
196.205040
Part # 20504
180 Amp Gas/No Gas Welder
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CAUTION: Before usingthis | _
product, readthis manuatand Español p.33
follow all its Safety Rules and | | 1
Operating Instructions. |
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[RAYE OF CONTENTS
Craftsman Limited Warranty.......... 2 Align and Set the Drive = Roller ен 13
Introduction 2 Install the Welding Wire ................ 13
Safety Summa 3 Set the Wire Drive Tension ose 15
Safety Information 3 Installing Aluminum Wire... 15
Shock Hazards 4 Change Polarity 16
Flash Hazards 4 Operation... 17
Fire Hazards 5 Controls and Indicators ...........—.. 17
Fume Hazards 6 Power Switch 16
Compressed Gasses Voltage Selectors 16
and Equipment Hazards ............——.... 6 Wire Speed Control... 16
Additional Safety Information ......... 7 Learning to Weld 18
Welder Specifications.............—.—.—.—.. 8 Holding the Gun 18
Description 8 Weiding Techniques .................—.—.——. 19
Welder Operating Characteristics... $ Moving the Gun 19
Duty Cycle 8 Types of Weld Bead 19
Internal Thermal Protection .......... 8 Welding Positions 20
Know Your Welder ...............—.—...... 9 Multiple Pass Welding 21
Weider Installation J 10 Special Welding Methods .............. 22
Power Source Connection wu... 10 - Spot Welding 22
Power Requirements eer. 10 Maintenance 23
Connect to Power Source ........wm. 10 General 23
Extension Cords ------ 10 Consumable Maintenance prrsoscennenvnes 23
Assembling the Welder a. 10 Maintaining the Contact Tip........... 23
Uhpacking the Welder ...........e.em... 10 Maintaining the Nozzle .................——.. 23
Packing List 10 . Testing for a Shorted Nozzle.............. 24
Assemble the Face Shield ................. 11 Replace a GUN Liner cere 24
Installing the Handle ................. 11 Preventive Maintenance ............... 26
Installing the Feet 11 Troubleshooting 26
Selecting Shielding Gas -............... 11 — Wiring Diagram 27
Install the Shielding Gas -..........—......- 12 Parts List 28
Check the Gas Flow .............——.—em.—. 12 - Suggested Settings... 32
a. EG a
Three-Year Limited Warranty on 1 Craftsman Weide r i |
For three years from the date of purchase, if any. part of this welder, except for the gun or
cables, fails due to a defect in material or workmanship, return’it-to your nearest Sears Parts &
Repair Center, and it will be repaired free of charge. Sears will repair the gun or cables free of
charge for only one year from the date of purchase. This warranty does not cover expendable
parts such as contact tips or nozzles, which are consumed during normal welder operation.
This warranty applies only while this product is used in the United States. This warranty gives
you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
Sears Brands Management Corporation
Noia
This owner's manual provides all of the specific information you need to safely and effectively use
your Weider. It contains instructions on safety, set-up, installation and actual Welder operation.
SAFETY SUMMARY
Every craftsman respects the tools with
which they work. They know that the tools
represent years of constantly improved
designs and developments. The true
craftsman also knows that tools are
dangerous if misused or abused.
Reading this operator's manual before using
the welder will enable you to do a better,
safer job. Learn the welder's applications
and limitations as well as the specific
potential hazards peculiar to welding.
IMPORTANT SAFETY
INFORMATION
The followhg safety information is provided
as guidelines to help you operate your new
welder under the safest possible conditions.
Any equipment that uses electrical power
can be potentially dangerous to use when
safety or safe handling) instructions are not
known or not followed. The following safety
information is provided to give the user the
information necessary for safe use and
operation.
A procedure step preceded by a
WARNING is an indication that the next step
contains a procedure that might be injurious
to a person if. proper safety precautions are
not heeded.
A procedure step preceded by a CAUTION
is an indication that the next step contains a
procedure that might damage the equiprnent
being used.
A NOTE may be used before or after a
procedure step to highlight or explain
something in that step.
READ ALL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
CAREFULLY before attempting to install,
operate, or service this welder. Failure fo
comply with these instructions could result in
personal injury and/or property damage.
RETAIN THESE INSTRUCTIONS FOR
FUTURE REFERENCE.
Note:
* The following safety alert symbols identify
important safety messages in this manual.
When you see one of the symbols shown
here, be alert to the possibility of personal
injury and carefully read the message that
follows.
This symbol indicates that the
possibility of electric shock hazard
‘exists during the operation of the
step(s) that follow.
This symbol indicates that the
possibility of fire hazard exists
during the operation of the step(s)
that follow.
This symbol indicates that the
helmet must be worn during the
step(s) that follow to protect
against eye damage and burns
due to flash hazard.
This symbol indicates that the
possibility of toxic gas hazard
exists during operation of the
step(s) that follow.
This symbol indicates that the
possibility of being burned by hot
slag exists during operation of the
step(s) that follow.
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This symbol indicates that the eye
protection shouid be worn to
protect against flying debris in
the following step(s).
-
This symbol indicates that the
possibility of injury or death exists
due to improper handling and
maintenance of compressed gas
cylinders or regulators.
« Published standards on safety are
available. They are listed in ADDITIONAL
SAFETY INFORMATION at the end of
this SAFETY SUMMARY.
The National Electrical Code, Occupation
Safety and Health Act regulations, local
industrial codes and local inspection
requirements also provide a basis for
equipment installation, use, and service.
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SHOCK HAZARD
WARNING
NE
ELECTRIC SHOCK CAN KILL! To reduce
the risk of death or serious injury from shock,
read, understand, and follow the following
safety instructions. in addition, make certain
that anyone else who uses this welding
equipment, or who is a bystander in the
welding area understands and follows these
safety instructions as well.
* IMPORTANT! TO REDUCE THE RISK
OF DEATH, INJURY, OR PROPERTY
DAMAGE, DO NOT ATTEMPT
OPERATION of this welding equipment
until you have read and understand the
following safety summary.
* Do not, in any manner, come into
physical contact with any part of the
welding current circuit. The welding
current circuit includes;
a. the work piece or any conductive
material in contact with it,
b. the ground clamp,
¢. the electrode or welding wire,
d. any metal parts on the electrode
holder, or wire feed gun.
* Do not weld in a damp area or come in
contact with 2 moist or wet surface. —
* Do not attempt to weld if any part of
clothing or body is wet.
» Do not allow the welding equipment to
come in contact with water or moisture.
Do not drag welding cables, wire feed
gun, or welder power cord through or
allow them to come into contact with
water or moisture.
* Do not touch welder, attempt to tum
welder on or off if any part of the body or
clothing is moist or if you are in physical
contact with water or moisture.
» Do not attempt to plug the welder into the
power source if any part of body or cloth-
ing is moist, or if you are in physical
contact with water or moisture.
- Do not connect welder work piece clamp
to or weld on electrical conduit.
* Do not alter power cord or power cord
plug in any way.
* Do not attempt to plug the welder
into the power source if the ground prong
on power cord plug is bent over, broken
off, or missing.
* Do not allow the welder to be connected
to the power source or attempt to weld if
the welder, welding cables, welding site,
or welder power cord are exposed to any
form of atmospheric precipitation, or salt
water spray.
* Do not carry coiled welding cables around
shoulders, or any other part of the body,
when they are plugged into the welder.
* Do not modify any wiring, ground
connections, switches, or fuses in this
welding equipment.
* Wear welding gloves to help insulate
hands from welding circuit.
* Keep all liquid containers far enough
away from the welder and work area so
that if spilled, the liquid can not possibly
come in contact with any part of the
welder or electrical welding circuit.
* Replace any cracked or damaged parts
that are insulated or act as
insulators such as welding cables, power
cord, or electrode holder IMMEDIATELY,
FLASH HAZARDS
m
y WARNING
ARC RAYS CAN INJURE EYES AND
BURN SKIN! To reduce the risk of injury
from arc rays, read, understand, and follow
the following safety instructions. in addition,
make certain that anyone else that uses this
welding equipment, or is a bystander in the
welding area understands and follows these
safety instructions as well. Headshields and
filter shouid conform to ANSI Z87.1 stan-
dards.
* Do not look at an electric arc without proper
. protection. A welding arc is extremely bright
and intense and, with inadequate or no eye
protection, the retina can be bummed, ieav-
ing a permanent dark spot in the field of
vision. A shield or helmet with a number 10
shade filter lens (minimum) must be used.
* Do not strike a welding arc until all
bystanders and you {the welder) have
welding shields and/or helmets in place.
* Do not wear a cracked or broken
helmet and replace any cracked or .
broken filter lenses IMMEDIATELY.
* To prevent an arc flash from being
created on contact do not allow the unin- .
sulated portion of the wire feed
gun to touch the ground clamp or .
grounded work.
* Provide bystanders with shields or .
helmets fitted with a #10 shade filter lens.
» Wear protective clothing. The intense
light of the welding arc can burn the skin
in much the same way as the sun, even
through light-weight clothing. Wear dark
clothing of heavy material. The shirt worn
should be long sleeved and the collar
kept buttoned to protect chest and neck.
+ Protect against REFLECTED ARC RAYS.
Arc rays can be reflected off shiny surfaces +
such [email protected] glossy painted surface,
aluminum, stainless steel, and glass. lt is
possible for your eyes to be injured by .
reflected arc rays even when wearing a
protective helmet or shield. If welding with a
reflective surface behind you, arc rays can
~ bounce off the surface, then off the filter
lens on the inside of your helmet or shield,
then into your eyes. If a reflective
background exists in your welding area,
either remove it or cover it with something
non-flammable and non-reflective. °
Reflective arc rays can also cause skin
burn in addition to eye injury.
FIRE HAZARDS
(№ WARNING
FIRE OR EXPLOSION CAN CAUSE :
DEATH, INJURY, AND PROPERTY DAM-
AGE! To reduce the risk of death, injury, or .
property damage from fire or explosion, read,
understand, and follow the following safety
instructions. In addition, make certain that
anyone else that uses this welding equip-
ment, or is a bystander in the welding area,
understands and follows these safety
instructions as well. REMEMBER!
Arc welding by nature produces sparks, hot
spatter, molten metal drops, hot slag, and hot
metal parts that can start fires, burn skin, and .
damage eyes.
Do not wear gloves or other clothing that
contains oil, grease, or other
flammable substances.
Do not wear flammabie hair
preparations.
Do not touch the hot weld bead or weld
puddie until fuliy cooled.
Do not weld in an area until it is checked
and cleared of combustible and/or
flammable materials. BE AWARE that
sparks and slag can fly 35 feet and can
pass through small cracks and openings.
If work and combustibles cannot be
separated by a minimum of 35 feet,
protect against ignition with suitable,
snug-fitting, fire resistant, covers or
shields.
Do not weld on walls until checking for
and removing combustibles touching the
other side of the walls.
Do not weld, cut, or perform other such
work on used barrels, drums, tanks, or
other containers that had contained a
flammable or toxic substance. The
techniques for removing flammabie sub-
stance and vapors, to make a used
container safe for welding or cutting, are
quite complex and require special
education and training.
Do not strike an arc on a compressed
gas or air cylinder or other pressure
vessel. Doing so will create a brittle area
that can result in a violent rupture
immediately or at a later time as a result
of rough handling.
"Do not weld or cut in an area where the
air may contain flammable dust {such as
grain dust), gas, or liquid vapors (such as
gasoline).
Do not handle hot metal, such as the work
piece or electrode stubs, with bare hands.
Wear leather gloves, heavy long sleeve
shirt, cuffless trousers, high-topped
shoes, helmet, and cap. As necessary,
use additional protective clothing such as
leather jacket or sleeves, fire resistant
leggings, or apron. Hot sparks or metal
can lodge in rolled up sleeves, trouser
cuffs, or pockets. Sleeves and collars
should be kept buttoned and pockets
eliminated from the shirt front.
Have fire extinguisher equipment handy
for immediate use! A portable chemical
fire extinguisher, type ABC, is
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recommended.
* Wear ear plugs when welding overhead
to prevent spatter or slag from falling
into ear.
- Make sure welding area has a good,
solid, safe floor, preferably concrete or
masonry, not tiled, carpeted, or made of
any other flammable material.
* Protect flammable walls, ceilings,
and floors with heat resistant covers
or shields.
* Check welding area to make sure
it is free of sparks, glowing metal or
slag, and flames before leaving the
welding area.
FUME HAZARDS
WARNING
_
FUMES, GASSES, AND VAPORS CAN
CAUSE DISCOMFORT, ILLNESS, AND
DEATH! To reduce the risk of discomfort,
illness, or death, read, understand, and
follow the following safety instructions. In
addition, make certain that anyone else that
uses this welding equipment or is a
bystander in the welding area, understands
and follows these safety instructions as well.
«Do not weld in an area until it is checked
for adequate ventilation as described in
ANSI standard #Z49.1. If ventilation is
not adequate to exchange all fumes and
gasses generated during the welding
process with fresh air, do not weld unless
you (the welder) and all bystanders are
wearing air-supplied respirators.
* Do not heat metais coated with, or that
contain, materials that produce toxic
fumes (such as galvanized steel), unless
the coating is removed. Make certain the
area ts well ventilated, and the operator
and all bystanders are wearing air-sup-
plied respirators.
* Do not weld, cut, or heat lead, zinc,
cadmium, mercury, beryllium, or similar
metals without seeking professional
advice and inspection of the ventilation of
the welding area. These metals produce
EXTREMELY TOXIC fumes which can
cause discomfort; illness, and death.
* Do not weld or cut in areas that are near
chlorinated solvents. Vapors from
chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as
trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene,
can be decomposed by the heat of an
electric arc or its ultraviolet radiation.
These actions can cause PHOSGENE, a
HIGHLY TOXIC gas to form, along with
other lung and eye-irritating gasses. Do
not weld or cut where these solvent
vapors can be drawn into the work area
or where the ultraviolet radiation can
penetrate to areas containing even very
small amounts of these vapors.
* Do not weld in a confined area unless it
is being ventilated or the operator (and
anyone else in the area) is wearing an
air-supplied respirator.
* Stop welding if you develop momentary
eye, nose, or throat irritation as this
indicates inadequate ventilation. Stop
work and take necessary steps to
improve ventilation in the welding area.
Do not resume welding if physical
discomfort persists.
COMPRESSED GASSES AND
EQUIPMENT HAZARDS
fl WARNING
TE _
IMPROPER HANDLING AND |
MAINTENANCE OF COMPRESSED GAS
CYLINDERS AND REGULATORS CAN
RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH!
To reduce the risk of injury or death from
compressed gasses and equipment hazards,
read, understand, and follow the following
safety instructions. In addition, make certain
that anyone else who uses this welding
equipment or a bystander in the welding
area understands and follows these safety
instructions as well.
* Do not use flammable gasses with MIG
welders. Only inert or nonflammabie
gasses are suitable for MIG welding.
Examples are Carbon Dioxide, Argon,
Helium, etc. or mixtures of more than one
of these gasses. |
* Do not attempt to mix gasses or refill a
cylinder yourself. Do not expose
F
cylinders to excessive heat, sparks, slag
and flame, etc, Cylinders exposed to
temperatures above 130°F will require
water spray cooling.
Do not expose cylinders to electricity of
any kind.
Do not use a cylinder or its contents for
anything other than its intended use. Do
not use as a support or roller.
Do not locate cylinders in passageways
or work area where they may be struck.
Do not use a wrench or hammer to open
a cylinder valve that cannot be opened
by hand. Notify your supplier.
Do not modify or exchange gas
cylinder fittings.
Do not deface or aiter name, number or
other markings on a cylinder. Do not rely
on cylinder color to identify the contents.
Do not connect a regulator to a cylinder
containing gas other than that for which
the regulator was designed.
Do not attempt to make regulator repairs.
Send faulty regulators to manufacturer's
- designated repair center for repair.
Do not attempt to lubricate a regulator.
Always change cylinders carefully to
prevent leaks and damage to their walls,
valves, or safety devices.
Always secure cylinders with a steel chain
so that they cannot be knocked over.
Always.protect a eylinder, especially the
valve, from bumps, falls, failing objects
and weather. Remember that gasses in
the cylinders are under pressure and
damage to a regulator can cause the
regulator or portion of the regulator to be
explosively ejected from the cylinder.
Always make certain the cylinder cap is
securely in place on the cylinder,
whenever the cylinder is moved.
Always close the cylinder valve and
immediately remove a faulty regulator
from service, for repair, if any of the
following conditions exist:
«Gas leaks externally.
«Delivery pressure continues to rise with
down stream valve closed.
*The gauge pointer does not move off the
stop pin when pressurized or fails to
return to the stop pin after pressure is
released.
ADDITIONAL SAFETY
INFORMATION
For additional information concerning
welding safety, refer to the following
standards and comply with them as
applicable.
ANSI Standard 749.1 — SAFETY IN
WELDING AND CUTTING — obtainable
from the American Welding Society, 550
NW Le Jeune Road, Miami, FE 33126
Telephone (800) 443-9353,
Fax (305) 443-7559 — www.amweld.org
Or WWW.aws.org
ANSI Standard Z87.1 — SAFE PRAC-
TICE FOR OCCUPATION AND
EDUCATIONAL EYE AND FACE
PROTECTION — obtainable from the
American National Standards institute,
11 West 42nd St., New York, NY 10036
Telephone (212) 642-4900,
Fax (212) 398-0023 — www.ansi.org
NFPA Standard 51B — CUTTING AND
WELDING PROCESS -- obtainable from
the National Fire Protection Association,
1 Batterymarch Park, P.O. Box 9101,
Quincy, MA 02269-3101
Telephone (617) 770-3000
Fax (617) 770-0700 — www.nfpa.org
OSHA Standard 29 CFR, Part 1910,
Subpart Q., WELDING, CUTTING AND
BRAZING — obtainable from your state
OSHA office or U.S. Dept. of Labor
OSHA, Office of Public Affairs, Room
N3647, 200 Constitution Ave.
Washington, DC 20210 — www.osha.gov
CSA Standard W117.2 — Code for
SAFETY IN WELDING AND CUTTING. —
obtainable from Canadian Standards
Association, 178 Rexdale Blvd.
Etobicoke, Ontario MSW 1R3 —
WWW.Csa.ca
American Welding Society Standard
AB.0. WELDING AND CUTTING
CONTAINERS WHICH HAVE HELD
COMBUSTIBLES. — obtainable from the
American Welding Society, 550 NW Le
Jeune Road, Miami, FL 33126
Telephone (800) 443-9353,
Fax (305) 443-7559 — www.amweld.org
or www.aws.org
DESCRIPTION
Your new MIG (Metal Inert Gas) wire feed
welder is designed for maintenance and
sheet metal fabrication. The welder consists
of a single-phase power transformer, stabiliz-
er, rectifier, and a unique built-in control/feed-
er.
Now you can weld sheet metal from 18
gauge up to 1/4 inch thick with a single pass.
You can weld thicker steel with beveling and
multiple pass techniques. Table 1 lists your
MIG welder specifications.
Table 1. Welder Specifications
Primary (input) volts 220 Vac
Primary (input) Amps 22.5
Phase Single
Frequency 60HZ
Secondary (output) volts 20
Secondary (UL output} amps 150
Open Circuit Volts (Max.) 30 Vdc
Duty Cycle Rating |
MIG welders equipped with gas are capable
of welding with 0.024 (0.6mm) and 0.030
(0.8mm) solid steel, bronze or aluminum wire
on dc reverse polarity and with 0.030
(0.8mm) and 0.035 inch (0.9mm) self-shield-
ing flux-core wire on dc straight polarity. The
use of larger diameter wire makes welding
difficult and the results cannot be guaran-
teed. Use of larger than .035 diameter wire is
not recommended.
WELDER OPERATING
CHARACTERISTICS
DUTY CYCLE
The duty cycle rating of a welder defines
how long the operator can weld and how
long the welder must be rested and cooled.
Duty cycie is expressed as a percentage of
10 minutes and represents the maximum
welding time allowed. The balance of the 10-
minute cycle is required for cooling.
This welder has a duty cycle rating of 25% at
the rated output. This means that you can
weld for 2.5 minutes out
WELDER SPECIFICATIONS
of 10 with the remaining 7.5 minutes
required for cooling. {See Table 2).
Table 2. Duty Cycle Ratings
25%@120A
Duty Maximum Required
Cycle Welding Resting
Rating Time Time
10% 1 minutes 9 minutes
Ses: - me
5 minutes —
75% 7.5 minutes 2.5 minutes
100% 10 minutes O minutes
INTERNAL THERMAL
PROTECTION
CAUTION
Do not constantly exceed the duty cycle or
damage to the welder can result. If you
exceed the duty cycle of the welder, an inter-
nal thermal protector will open, shutting off
all welder functions except the cooling fan. If
this happens, DO NOT SHUT OFF THE
WELDER. Leave the welder turned on with
the fan running. After cooling, the thermal
protector will automatically reset and the
welder will function normally again. However
you should wait at least ten minutes.after the
thermal protector opens before resuming
welding. You must do this even if the thermal
protector resets itself before the ten minutes
is up or you may experience less than speci-
fied duty cycle performance.
- ht
if you find that the welder will not weld for
two minutes without stopping, reduce the
wire speed slightly and tune in the welder at
the lowest wire speed setting that still pro-
duces a smooth arc. Welding with the wire
speed set too high causes excessive current
draw and shortens the duty cycle.
KNOW YOUR WELDER
Handle. 38 Wire Speed
Voltage путей
Selector
Switch Voltage
Selector
Dial
Gun
Cable
Power
Switch
| Power
Clamp Cord
> of er
Welding -
Gun Cable
Figure 1. Model 20504 Welder
Handle — Rugged,-top mounted handie
allows for easy transport of your welder.
_ Wire Speed Control — Use this dial to adjust
the speed at which the welder feeds wire to
the gun. 1is the slowest wire feed speed, 10
is the highest. You will need to adjust or
“tune-in” your wire speed for different welding
conditions (thickness of metals, gas -vs-
gasiess welding, metal type, wire size, etc.).
When the wire speed is properly “tuned-in”
the welding wire will melt into the material you
are welding as quickly as it is fed through the
welding gun. |
Voltage Selectors — The VOLTAGE selectors
control the weld heat. There are six voltage
(heat) selections available on this welder.
Lower voltage (less heat) is achieved by set-
ting the Voltage Selector Switch to the MIN
position and/or the Voltage Selector Dial to
A. Higher voltage (more heat) is achieved by
setting the Voltage Selector Switch to the
MAX position and/or the Voltage Selector
Dial to C. Different materials and material
thickness will require different voltage set-
tings. You will need to adjust your voltage
accordingly for different welding conditions.
By properly adjusting your voltage settings
and wire feed speed, you will enable clean,
precision welds. (Refer to the Suggested
Settings Chart on p.32 of this manual OR on
the inside of the door of the welder.)
Power Switch -— This switch turns the welder
ON and OFF. (Make sure the power switch is
in the OFF position before performing any
maintenance on the welder.) |
Power Cord -- This is a standard, NEMA 6-
50P 50 amp 220 volt power cord. (Make sure
you are using a properly grounded 220 Vac,
60HZ, single phase, 50 amp power source.)
Ground Clamp -- Attaching the ground
clamp to your work piece “completes” the
welding current circuit. You must attach the
ground clamp to the metal you are welding. If
the ground clamp is not connected to the
metal work piece you intend to weld, the
welder will not have a completed circuit and
you will be unable to weld. A poor connection
at the ground clamp will waste power and
heat. Scrape away dirt, rust, scale, oil or
paint before attaching the ground clamp.
Ground Cable — The ground cable connects
the ground clamp fo the internal workings of
the welder.
Welding Gun and Cable — The welding gun
controls the delivery of the welding wire to
the material to be welded. The welding wire
is fed through the welding cable and welding
gun when the welding gun trigger is pulled.
You will need to install a contact tip and
welding nozzle to the end of the welding gun,
as described later in this manual, prior to
welding.
“Welding Terms
Now that you are familiar with the main parts
of the welder, make note of the following
terms. You will see them used throughout
this manual.
weld puddle: The localized volume
of molten metal in a weld prior to its
solidification.
weld angle: The angle of the welding wire,
as it extends from the welding gun, in
relation to the item being welded.
slag: The protective coating that forms on
the surface of molten metal.
arc: A sustained luminous discharge of
electricity across a gap in a circuit.
welding bead: The extended build up of a
weld, made by pushing or pulling the weld
puddle.
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WELDER INSTALLATION
SITE SELECTION
Select a clean, dry location with adequate
working space around all components.
The power supply is fan cooled by air flow
through the front and rear panels. This air
flow must not be obstructed. Provide at least
two feet of space in front of and behind the
unit to allow for free flow of air.
POWER SOURCE CONNECTION
POWER REQUIREMENTS
This welder is designed to operate on a
properly grounded 220 volt, 60Hz, single-
phase alternating current (ac) power source
fused with a 50 amp time delayed fuse or cir-
cuit breaker. Ht is recommended that a quali-
fied electrician verify the ACTUAL VOLT-
AGE at the receptacle into which the welder
will be plugged and confirm that the recepta-
cle is properly fused and grounded. The use
of the proper circuit size can eliminate nui-
sance circuit breaker tripping when welding.
DO NOT OPERATE THIS WELDER if the
ACTUAL power source voltage is less than
198 volts ac or greater than 240 volts ac.
Contact a qualified electrician if this problem
exists. Improper performance and/or damage
to the welder will resuit if operated on inade-
quate or excessive power.
CONNECT TO POWER SOURCE
[WARNING
NE
High voltage danger from power source!
Consult a gualified electrician for proper
installation of receptacle at the power source.
This welder must be grounded while in use to
protect the operator from electrical shock. If
you are not sure if your outlet is properly
grounded, have it checked by a qualified elec-
trician. Do not cut off the grounding prong or
alter the plug in any way and do not use any
adapters between the welder's power cord
and the power source receptacle. Make sure
the POWER switch is OFF then connect your
welder's power cord to a properly grounded
220 Vac, 60 Hz, single phase, 50 amp power
Source.
10
EXTENSION CORDS
For optimum welder performance, an exten-
sion cord should not be used unless
absolutely necessary. If necessary, care
must be taken in selecting an extension cord
appropriate for use with your specific welder.
Select a properly grounded extension cord
that will mate directly with the power source
receptacle and the welder power cord with-
out the use of adapters. Make certain that
the extension is properly wired and in good
electrical condition. Extension cords must be
a #12 gauge cord at the smallest. Do not use
an extension cord over 25 ft. in length.
ASSEMBLING THE WELDER
The following procedures describe the
process required to assemble, install, main-
tain, and prepare to weld with your new wire
. feed welder.
UNPACKING THE WELDER
1. Remove any cartons or bags containing
parts/accessories, (Most parts are
shipped INSIDE the welder door.)
2. Open the cartons or bags packed with your
welder and inspect their contents for damage.
3. Layout the parts and compare them fo —
the packing list in Table 3 to familiarize
yourself with the parts and what they are
called. This will help you when reading
the manual.
PACKING LIST
Table 3 contains a list of the items you will
find packed in the carton. ”
Table 3. Packing List >.
O
2
ITEM
Welder
Face Shield
Face Shield Handle
Shaded Lens
Welder Handle
Handle Screws
Front and Back Foot 1
Foot Screws
Wire Brush/Hammer
Parts Bag
Contact Tip 0.024
Contact Tip 0.030
Contact Tip 0.040
Nozzle
Wire .030 Fluxcore 1/2 1b.
Manual, Instruction 1
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ASSEMBLE THE FACE SHIELD
1. Remove the lens retaining pegs and
shield handle nut from the arm of the
shield handle. (DO NOT DISCARD!)
2. Place the shaded lens into the space
provided on the inside of the face shield.
3. Screw the lens retaining nuts into the
holes to either side of the lens until they
are tight against lens.
4. - Insert threaded peg on shield handle into
hole on face shield. Press firmly until
threaded peg and smaller peg below i
are locked into place.
5. From inside of shield, screw the shield
handie nut tightly onto peg threads.
See Figure 2 for face shield assembly.
A вы
[on 2. Face Shield Assembly
INSTALLING THE HANDLE
1. insert the fabs of the welder handle into the
slots provided on the top of the welder.
2. inserta large flat head screw (included in
the accessories bag) info each hole on
the top of the welder handle.
3. With a flat tip screwdriver, securely
tighten both screws. (see Figure 3)
| |
Figure 3. Handie Installation
INSTALLING THE FEET
Locate the two black plastic feet for the
welder. (The front foot is slightly larger than
the back foot.)
1. Lay the welder on its side.
2. Align the holes of the front foot with the
front screw holes on the bottom of the
welder. The curved face of the front foot
should face the front of the welder.
3. Insert the two Phillips head screws (includ-
ed in the accessories bag) info the holes.
4. With a Phillips head screwdriver, securely
fighten both screws.
5. Align the holes of the back foot with the
rear screw holes on the bottom of the
welder. The curved face of the back foot
should face the rear of the welder.
6. Insert the two Phillips head screws
(included in the accessories bag) into the
holes.
7. With a Phillips head screwdriver, securely
tighten both screws. (see Figure 4)
| |
Y
| |
Figure 4. Feet Installation
SELECTING SHIELDING GAS
The shielding gas plays an exiremely
important role in the MIG welding process. It
is critical that the molten weld puddie be
shielded from the atmosphere. The shielding
gas creates a protective pocket around the
weld puddle which keeps impurities in the air
from infecting the weld. Inadequate shielding
- will result in porous, brittle welds.
Although there are many gasses and gas
mixtures available for MIG welding, the
following recommendations are based on the
electrical output characteristics and metal
thickness capabilities of this specific
MIG welder.
Gas Selection For Steel Welding With
Steel Wire
For either mild or low carbon (High Strength
Structural) steel, use a gas mixture of 75%
Argon and 25% Carbon Dioxide. DO NOT
USE Argon gas concentrations higher than
75% on steel. The result will be extremely
poor penetration, porosity, and brittleness
of weld.
This gas mixture helps to prevent burn
through and distortion on very thin steel! yet
provides good penefration on thicker steel.
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Its ability to minimize spatter results in clean,
smooth weld appearances. In addition, it
provides good puddle control when welding
vertically or overhead.
Gas Selection For Stainless Steel Welding
The best shielding gas for stainless steel
welding is a mixture of 90% Helium, 7.5%
Argon, and 2.5% Carbon Dioxide. However,
100% Argon can also be used, but an
increase in the area being heated by the arc
will be experienced causing slightly greater
distortion of the base metal.
Gas Selection For Steel Welding With
Silicon Bronze Wire
Use only pure Argon when welding steel with
Silicon-Bronze wire.
Gas Selection For Aluminum Welding
with Aluminum Wire
Use only pure Argon when welding aluminum.
INSTALL THE SHIELDING GAS
af, WARN ING
IMPROPER HANDLING AND MAINTE-
NANCE OF COMPRESSED GAS CYLIN-
DERS AND REGULATORS CAN RESULT
IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH! Always
secure gas cylinders to the welding cart, a
wall, or other fixed support to prevent the
cylinder irom falling over and rupturing. Read,
understand, and follow all the COMPRESSED
GASSES AND EQUIPMENT HAZARDS in the
SAFETY SUMMARY at the front of this manu-
al. Secure your gas cylinder to the welding
cart, or other fixed support.
1. Remove the protective cap from the cylin-
der and inspect the regulator connecting
threads for dust, dirt, oil, and grease.
Remove any dust or dirt with a clean
cloth. DO NOT ATTACH YOUR REGULA-
TOR IF OIL, GREASE, OR DAMAGE
ARE PRESENT.
2. Open the cylinder valve FOR JUST AN
INSTANT to blow out any foreign matter
inside the valve port. Never aim the open
valve cylinder port at yourself or
bystanders.
3. Screw the regulator into the cylinder
valve and tighten with a wrench.
4. Firmly push the gas hose over barbed fit-
tings on back of welder and regulator.
5. Secure both ends of hose onto barbed fit-
tings with hose clamps.
CHECK THE GAS FLOW
wll [WARNING
Dr
IMPROPER HANDLING AND MAINTENANCE
OF COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS AND
REGULATORS CAN RESULT IN SERIOUS
INJURY OR DEATH. To reduce the risk of
“injury or death, always stand to the side of the
cylinder opposite the regulator when opening
the cylinder valve, keéping the cylinder valve
between you and the regulator. Never aim the
open cylinder valve port at yourself or
bystanders. Failure to comply with ihis waming
could result in serious personal injury.
‘Note: If the cylinder you have is equipped
with male regulator connecting threads
instead of female, you will need to obtain a
special compressed gas cylinderadapter
from your gas supplier to install between
your gas cylinder and regulator.
-The gas control function does not require
the welder to be turned on or plugged in.
-To avoid damage to your regulator, make ~
sure you have the regulator valve closed
before opening the cylinder valve.
1. Slowly crack open the cylinder valve,
then turn open ALL THE WAY.
2. Pull the trigger on the gun to allow the gas
to flow. KEEP THE TRIGGER PULLED.
Listen and feel for gas flowing from the end
of the welding gun. if your regulator has no
adjustment, it has been preset at the factory
for a flow of 20 cubic feet per hour. if your
gas regulator has an adjustment to control .
the gas flow rate, tum the adjustment key
clockwise to increase gas flow; counter-
clockwise to reduce flow. For most welding,
the gas flow should be set at 15-20 cubic
feet per hour. If no gas is heard or felt, verify
all steps involved in connecting the gas.
3. Release the trigger. |
Note: If welding outside or in a draft, it may
become necessary to set up a wind break to
keep the shielding gas from being blown from
the weld area. .
-MAKE SURE TO TURN OFF THE GAS
CYLINDER VALVE WHEN DONE
WELDING.
ALIGN AND SET THE DRIVE ROLLER
Before installing any welding wire into the
unit, the proper sized groove must be placed
into position on the wire drive mechanism.
Change the drive roller according to the fol-
lowing steps:
1. Remove the drive tension by unscrewing
the tension adjusting screw (ALL THE
WAY in a counterclockwise direction).
The drive tension screw will come loose,
, allováng you to pull the drive tension arm
up away from the drive roller, Make sure
to keep the screw and the spring in place
with the drive tension arm.
2. [lf there is wire already installed in the
welder, roll it back onto the wire spool by
hand-turning the spool counter-clockwise.
Be careful not to allow the wire to come
out of the rear end of the gun without
holding onto it or it will unspool itself. Put
the end of the wire into the hole on the
outside edge of the wire spool and bend
it over to hold the wire in place. Remove
the spool of wire from the welder.
3. Loosen the drive roller set screw with the
provided hex wrench and pull the drive
roller off the drive shaft.
Note: The drive roller has two wire size
grooves built into it. When installing the drive
roiter the number stamped on the drive roller
for the wire size you are using should be fac-
ing away from you. If you can read the wire
size you are using on the drive roller, it is
installed backwards. Use only the proper
size drive roller when using your welder.
4. Find the side of the drive roller that is
stamped with the same wire diameter as
that of the wire being installed (see
Figure 5). Push the drive roller onto the
motor shaft, aligning the set screw with
the flat side of the drive shaft. Make sure
the side stamped with the desired wire diam-
eter is away from you.
Drive
Roller
Set Screw
Motor Shaft
Figure 5. Drive Roller
5. Slide the roller onto the shaft so that the
groove in the roller lines up with the inlet
tube and the welding gun liner.
6. Tighten the set screw, while holding the
drive roller in place.
INSTALL THE WELDING WIRE
WARNING
AL
Electric shock can kill! Always turn the
POWER switch OFF and unplug the power
cord from the ac power source before
installing wire.
Be very careful when removing the welding
nozzle. The contact tip on this welder is
electrically hot as long as POWER is turned
ON. Make certain POWER is turned OFF.
1. Remove the nozzle and contact tip from
the end of the gun assembly.
2. Make sure the proper groove on the drive
roller is in place for the wire being installed.
If the proper groove is not in place, change
the drive roller as described above.
3. Unwrap the spool of wire and then find
the leading end of the wire (it goes
through a hole in the outer edge of the
spool and is bent over the spool edge to
prevent the wire from unspooling), BUT
DO NOT UNHOOK IT YET.
4. Place the spool on the spindle in such a
manner that when the wire comes off the
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spool, it will look like the top illustration in
Figure 6. The welding wire should always
come off the top of the spool into the
drive mechanism.
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Figure 6. Wire Installation
If you are installing a four-inch spool of
wire, install the drive brake hardware on
the top of the spool of wire according to
figure 7A. If you are installing an eight-
inch spool, install the spindle adapter and
drive brake hardware as shown in Figure
7B. The purpose of the drive brake is to
cause the spool of wire to stop turning at
nearly the same moment that wire
feeding stops.
Figure 7A. Drive
Brake Hardware
6.
14
Figure 7B. Spindle
Adapter and Drive
Installation Brake Installation
Once the drive brake hardware is installed,
set the spool tension,
a) With one hand, tum the wire spool and
continue tuming it while adjusting the
tension on the spool.
b) With your free hand, tighten {turn clock-
Wise) ihe drive tension adjustment knob.
c) Stop tightening when drag is felt on the
wire spool that you are turning, then stop
hand-turmning the wire spool.
Note: If TOO MUCH tension is applied to the
wire spool, the wire will slip on the drive
roller or will not be able to feed at all. If TOO
LITTLE tension is applied, the spool of wire
will want to unspool itself. Readjust the drive
brake tension as necessary to correct for
either problem.
7. After checking to make sure that your
welder is disconnected from the ac power
. source, free the leading end of the wire
from the spool, but do not let go of it until
told to do so; or the wire will unspool itself.
8. Using a wire cutter, cut the bent end off
the leading end of the wire so that only a
straight leading end remains.
8. loosen the tension adjusting knob
holding the drive tension arm in place and
lift the tension arm up off the drive roller.
10. insert the leading end of the wire into the
inlet guide tube. Then push it across the
drive roller and into the gun. assembly
about six inches.
CAUTION
Make certain that the welding wire is actually
going into the gun liner. Be very sure it hag
not somehow been accidentally routed
alongside the liner or even in some other
direction. If this should happen, the wire
could feed inside the cable casing or take a
right angle and follow the wires and gas
hose inside the welder. H could also feed
back on itself jamming up the mechanism.
11. Line the wire up in the inside groove of
the drive roller, then allow the drive ten-
sion arm to drop onto the drive rolier.
12. Flip the quick release drive tensioner
back up into position on the drive ten-
sioner arm.
13. Tighten (tum clockwise) the drive tension
adjusting knob until the tension roller is apply-
ing enough force on the wire to prevent it
from slipping out of the drive assembly.
14. Let go of the wire.
15. Connect the welder power cord to the ac
power source. Turn the welder ON. Set
the VOLTAGE switch and dial to the volt-
age (heat) settings recommended for the
gauge metal that is to be welded. Refer
to the label mounted on the cover, inside
the drive compartment, for recommended
voltage (heat) settings for your welding
job. The VOLTAGE selectors control the
weld heat. There are six voltage (heat)
selections available on this welder.
Placing the voltage switch in MIN posi-
tion, and the voltage dial in position A
provides the lowest voltage (heat).
Placing the voltage switch in MAX posi-
tion, and the voltage dial in position C
provides the highest voltage (heat).
16. Set the WIRE SPEED control to the
middle of the wire speed range.
17. Straighten the gun cable and pull the
trigger on the welding gun to feed the
— wire through the gun assembly.
18. When at least an inch of wire sticks out
past the end of the gun, release the
trigger.
19. Select a contact tip stamped with the
same diameter as the wire being used.
=
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Note: Due to inherent variances in flux-cored
welding wire, it may be necessary to use a
contact tip one size larger than your flux core
wire if wire jams occur.
20. Slide thé contact tip over the wire
(protruding from the end of the gun).
Thread the contact tip info the end of the
gun and hand-tighten securely.
21. Install the nozzle on the gun assembly.
For best results, coat the inside of the
nozzle with anti-stick spray or gel.
22. Cut off the excess wire that extends past
the end of the nozzle.
SET THE WIRE DRIVE TENSION
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К BY WARNING
Arc flash can injure eyes! To reduce the
risk of arc flash, make certain that the wire
coming out of the end of the gun does not
come in contact with work piece, ground
clamp or any grounded material during the
drive tension setting process or arcing will
occur.
1. Pull the trigger an the gun.
2. Turn the drive tension adjustment knob
clockwise, increasing the drive tension
until the wire seems to feed smoothly
without slipping.
When set correctly, there should be no slip-
page between the wire and the drive roller
under normal conditions. If an obstruction
occurs along the wire feed path, the wire
should then slip on the drive roller.
After the tension is properly adjusted, the
quick release drive tensioner may unlocked
and relocked and no readjustment of the
drive tension adjustment knob will be neces-
sary (unless the diameter or type of wire is
changed).
INSTALLING ALUMINUM WIRE
Install aluminum wire the same as steel wire,
but with the following exceptions:
1. Install a teflon liner in the welding gun.
. 2. Adjust the drive tension VERY carefully.
Aluminum wire is very sensitive to slight
changes in drive tension.
Note: For welding aluminum with this unit,
5356 alloy wire is recommended because of
its superior feedability. A teflon liner is needed.
When welding with softer aluminum alloys,
you may experience feed problems. For best
results with aluminum it may be necessary to
use a spool gun.
15
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CHANGE POLARITY
This welder allows you the capability to
change the welding current polarity. You may
select either dc Straight (dc - Flux Cored) or
dc Reverse Polarity {dc + MIG). For welding
steel with solid wire, stainless steel, flux cored
hardfacing of steel, and silicon bronze welding
of steel, select dc Reverse Polarity (dc +
MIG). When using self-shielding, flux-core
steel wire, use dc Straight Polarity (dc - Flux
Cored). |
Change the polarity of your welder according
to the following procedure steps. Figure 8
shows what the polarity block should look like
for each polarity setting.
WARNING
NE
Electric shock can kill! Always turn the
power OFF and unplug the power cord from
the ac power source before changing polarity.
- CAUTION
Do not use a raichet, crescent or other lever
type wrench to tighten knobs on the polarity
block, The nuts must be hand tightened only.
Too much torque applied to one of the knobs
could cause the knob to break off.
1. Remove the retaining knobs from the +
‘and - mounting posts on the Gas/No Gas
Board, located just below the drive motor
on the inside of your welder. |
A. For Gasless welding, mount the
Ground Clamp ring terminal to the “+”
mounting post and the Torch ring ter-
minal to the “-" mounting post.
B. For Gas (MIG) welding, mount the
Ground Clamp ring terminal to the
mounting post and the Torch ring
terminal to the “+” mounting post.
See configuration shown in Figure 8.
été 5
§
Figure 8. Changing Polarity
16
2. Attach the ground clamp to the work
piece, making sure that it is cleaned of dirt,
oil, rust, scale, oxidation, and paint at the
point of connection.
Note: it is best to connect the ground clamp
directly to the work piece and as close to the
weld as possible. If it is impractical to con-
nect the ground clamp directly to the work
piece, connect it to metal that is securely
attached to the work piece, but not electrical-
ly insulated from it. Make certain this other
metal is of equal or greater thickness than
that of the workpiece.
|CAUTION
Risk of electric component damage! If the
ground clamp is being connected to an auto-
mobile or other equipment with on-board
computer systems, solid state electronic con-
trols, solid state sound systems, etc., do not
weld until disconnecting the battery that is
attached to the chassis ground. Failure to do
so may result in electronic component dam-
age.
OPERATION
Operation of this welder consists of selecting
and adjusting operating controls for optimum
voltage {welding heat) and wire speed settings.
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Æ WARNING
AL
Electric shock can kill! Whenever the
POWER switch is in the ON position, the
welding circuit is activated. Under this
condition, an arc will occur if the welding wire
or any pag of the welding circuit comes in
contact with welding ground.
POWER SWITCH - The power swifch
supplies electrical current to the welder.
Whenever the powerswitch is in the ON
position, the welding circuit is activated.
ALWAYS turn the power switch to the OFF
position and unplug the welder before
performing any maintenance.
VOLTAGE SELECTORS - The voltage
selector switch and dial controf the welding
heat. The voltage selector switch is label
MIN/MAX, referring to minimum and maxi-
mum voltage output. The voltage selector
dial is lettered A-C. Letter A is the lowest .
heat and letter C is the highest. Refer to the
label under the welder hood (or on page 32
of this manual) for recommended voltage
selectors settings for your welding job.
Switch position "MAX" and dial position “C"
produce the rated output of 150 amps.
WIRE SPEED CONTROL. - The wire speed
control adjusts the speed at which the wire is
fed out of the welding gun. The wire speed
needs to be closely matched (tuned-in) fo
the rate at which it is being melted off. Some
things that affect wire speed selection are
the type and diameter of the wire being
used, the heat setting selected, and the
welding position to be used.
Note: The wire will feed faster without an
arc. When an arc is being drawn, the wire
speed will slow down.
TUNING IN THE WIRE SPEED
This is one of the most important parts of
MIG welder operation and must be done
before starting each welding job or whenever
any of the following variables are changed:
heat setting, wire diameter, or wire type.
1. Set up and ground a scrap piece of the
same type of material which you will be
welding. It should be equal to or greater
than the thickness of the actual work
piece, and free of oil, paint, rust, etc.
Select a heat setting.
Hold the gun in one hand, ailowing the
nozzle to rest on the edge of the work-
piece farthest away from you, and at an
angle similar to that which will be used
when welding. (See HOLDING THE GUN
on page 18 if you are uncertain of the
angle at which you will be welding)
4. With your free hand, turn the Wire Speed
Dial to maximum and continue to hold
onto the knob.
о
EXPOSURE TO A WELDING ARC IS
EXTREMELY HARMFUL TO THE EYES
AND SKIN! Prolonged exposure to the
welding arc can cause blindness and burns.
Never strike an arc or begin welding until you
are adequately protected. Wear flameproof
welding gloves, a heavy long sleeved shirt,
cuffless trousers, high topped shoes and a
welding helmet.
5. Lower your welding helmet and pull the
trigger on the gun to start an arc, then
begin to drag the gun toward you while
simultaneously turning the Wire Speed
Dial counter-clockwise.
6. LISTEN! As you decrease the wire
speed, the sound that the arc makes will
change from a sputtering to a high-
pitched buzzing sound and then wili
begin sputtering again if you decrease
the wire speed too much. The point on
the wire speed adjustment where the
high-pitched buzzing sound is achieved is
the correct setting.
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You can use the wire speed control to slight-
ly increase or decrease the heat and pene-
tration for a given heat setting by selecting
higher or lower wire speed settings. Repeat
this tune-in procedure if you select a new
heat setting, a different diameter wire, or a
different type of welding wire.
LEARNING TO WELD
MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding is the process
of uniting metallic parts by heating and
allowing the metals to flow together through
the use of an electrical arc. The electrical arc
is created between a continuous consumable
wire electrode (the welding wire) and the
work piece. An inert shielding gas is used to
protect the weld puddle from contamination
and enhance the welding capabilities of the
electrical arc.
Whether you have welded before or not, it is
important that you become familiar with your
new welder, its controls, and the results
achieved at different settings. We strongly
recommend that you practice with your new
welder on scrap metal trying different heat
settings, base metal thicknesses, and welding
positions for each type and size of wire you
will be using. By doing this you will gain a feel
for how changes in these welding variables
affect the weld.
Of course, if you have not welded before,
you will-need to develop welding skills and
techniques as well.
The self-taught welder learns through a
process of trial and error. The best way to
teach yourself how to weld is with short peri-
ods of practice at regular intervals. All prac-
tice welds should be done on scrap metal
that can be discarded. Do not attempt to
make any repairs -on valuable equipment
until you have satisfied yourself that your
practice welds are of good appearance and
free of slag or gas inclusions. What you fail
to learn through practice will be learned
through mistakes and re-welds later on.
HOLDING THE GUN
The best way to hold the weiding gun is the
way that feels most comfortable to you.
While practicing to use your new welder,
experiment holding the gun in different posi-
18 |
tions until you find the one that seems to
work best for you. Refer to WELDING POSI-
: TIONS - p.20)
Position the Gun to the Work Piece
There are two angles of the gun nozzle in
relation to the work piece that must be con-
sidered when weldina.
1. Angle À (Figure 9) can be varied, but in
most cases the optimum angle will be 60
degrees, the point at which the gun han-
dle is parallel to the work piece. If angle
A is increased, penetration will increase.
If angle A is decreased, penetration will
decrease also.
Angle A
Figure 9. Gun Position, Angle A
2. Angle B (Figure 10) can be varied for two
reasons: to improve the ability to see the
arc in relation tó the weld puddle and to
direct the force of the arc. |
> 2
NN BE
|
Figure 10. Gun Position, Angle B
LS
The force of the welding arc follows a
straight line out of the end of the nozzle.
If angle B is changed, so will the direction of
arc force and the point at which penetration
will be concentrated. |
On a butt weld joint, the only reason to vary
angle B from perpendicular {straight up) to
the work piece would be to improve visibility
of the weld puddle. In this case, angle B can
be varied anywhere from zero to 45 degrees
with 30 degrees working about the best.
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On a fillet weld joint, the nozzle is generally
positioned in stich a manner so as to split
the angle between the horizontal and vertical
members of the weld joint. In most cases, a
fillet weld will be 45 degrees.
Distance from the Work Piece -
The end of the welding gun is designed with
the contact tip recessed from the end of the
nozzle and the nozzle electrically insulated
from the rest of the gun. This permits the
operator fo actually rest the nozzle on the
work piece and drag it along while welding.
This can be very helpful to beginning
welders to steady the gun, allowing the
welder to concentrate on welding technique.
If the nozzle is held off the work piece, the
distance between the nozzle and the work
piece should be kept constant and should
not exceed 1/4 inch or the arc may begin
sputtering, signaling a loss in welding
performance
WELDING TECHNIQUES
EXPOSURE TO A WELDING ARC IS
EXTREMELY HARMFUL TO THE EYES
AND SKIN! Prolonged exposure to the
welding arc can cause blindness and burns.
Never strike an arc or begin welding until you
are adequately protected. Wear flameproof
welding gloves, a heavy long sleeved shirt,
cuffless trousers, high topped shoes and a
welding helmet.
WARNING
Ze
ELECTRIC SHOCK CAN KILL! To prevent
ELECTRIC SHOCK, do not perform any
welding while standing, kneeling, or lying
directly on the grounded work.
MOVING THE GUN
Gun travel refers to the movement of the gun
along the weld joint and is broken into two
elements: Direction and Speed. A solid weld
bead requires that the welding gun be
moved steadily and at the right speed along
the weld joint. Moving the gun too fast, too
slow, or erratically will prevent proper fusion
or create a lumpy, uneven bead.
1. TRAVEL DIRECTION is the direction the
gun is moved along the weld joint in
relation to the weld puddle. The gun is either
PUSHED (see Figure 11} into the weld pud-
dle or PULLED away from the weld puddle.
Figure 11. Travel Direction
For most welding jobs you will pull the
gun along the weld joint to take advan-
tage of the greater weld puddle visibility.
2. TRAVEL SPEED is the rate at which the
gun is heing pushed or pulled along the
weld joint. For a fixed heat setting, the
faster the travel speed, the lower the
penetration and the lower and narrower
the finished weld bead. Likewise, the
slower the travel speed, the deeper the
penetration and the higher and wider the
finished weld bead.
TYPES OF WELD BEADS
The following paragraphs discuss the most
commonly used welding beads.
Once you have the gun in position with the
wire lined up on the weld joint, lower your
helmet, pull the trigger and the arc will start.
In a second or two you will notice a weld
puddle form and the base of the bead begin-
ning to build. It is now time to begin to move
with the gun. If you are just learning to weld,
simply move the gun in a straight line and at
a steady speed along the weld joint. Try to
achieve a weld with the desired penetration
and a bead that is fairly flat and consistent in
width.
As you become more familiar with your new
welder and better at laying some simple weld
beads, you can begin to try some different
weld bead types.
19
There are two basic types of weld beads, the
stringer bead and the weave bead.
1. The STRINGER BEAD (Figure 12) is
formed by traveling with the gun in a straight
line while keeping the wire and nozzle
centered over the weld joint. This i is the easi-
est type of bead to make.
Figure 12, Stringer Bead
2. The WEAVE BEAD (Figure 13) is used
when you want to deposit metal over a wider
space than would be possible with a stringer —
bead. it is made by weaving from side to
side while moving with the gun. It is best to
hesitate momentarily at each side before
weaving back the other way.
Figure 13. Weave Bead
WELDING POSITIONS
There are four basic welding positions: flat,
horizontal, vertical, and overhead.
1. The FLAT POSITION (Figure 14) is the
easiest of the welding positions and is most
commonly used. lt is best if you can weld in
the flat position if at all possible as good
results are easier to achieve.
20 Figure 14. Flat Position
2. The HORIZONTAL POSITION (Figure 15)
is next in difficulty level. It is performed very
much the same as the flat weld except that
angle B (see HOLDING THE GUN - p.18) is
such that the wire, and therefore the arc force,
is directed more toward the metal above the
weld joint. This is to help prevent the weld
puddle from running downward while still
allowing slow enough travel speed to achieve
good penetration. À good starting point for
angie B is about 30 degrees DOWN from
being perpendicular to the work piece.
3. The VERTICAL POSITION Figura 16) is
the next most difficult position. Pulling the
gun from top to bottom may be easier for
many people, but in some instances it can
be difficult to prevent the puddle from -
running downward. Pushing the gun from
bottom to top may provide better puddle
control and allow slower rates of travel
speed to achieve deeper penetration. When
vertical welding, angle B (see HOLDING
THE GUN - p.18) is usually alwaySkept at
zero, but angle A wilt generally range from 45
to 60 degrees to provide better puddle ‘
control.
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, WARNING
Hot slag can cause fires and serious injury
from burns! Be sure to wear protective cloth-
ing and eye gear when using the Cverhead
Position.
4. The OVERHEAD POSITION (Figure 17) is
the most difficult welding position because
gravity is pulling at the weld puddle trying to
make it drip off the work piece. Angle A (see
HOLDING THE GUN - p.18) should be main-
tained at 60 degrees, the same as in the fiat
position. Maintaining this angle will reduce the
chances of molten metal falling into the nozzle
should it drip from the weld puddle. Angle B
should be held at zero degrees so that the
wire is aiming directly into the weld joint. If
you experience excessive dripping of the weld
puddle, select a lower heat setting. Also, the
weave bead tends to work better than the
stringer bead when welding overhead.
Figure 17. Overhead Position
MULTIPLE PASS WELDING
Butt Weld Joints. When butt welding thicker
materials, you will need to prepare the edges
of the material to be joined by grinding a
bevel on the edge of one or both pieces of
the metal being joined. When this is done, a
V is created between the two pieces of
metal, that will have to be welded closed. In
most cases more than one pass or bead will
need to be laid into the joint to close the V.
Laying more than one bead into the same
weld joint is known as a multiple-pass weld.
The illustrations in Figure 18 show the
sequence for laying multiple pass beads into
a single V butt joint.
NOTE: WHEN USING SELF-SHIELDING
FLUX-CORE WIRE it is very important to
thoroughly chip and brush the slag off each
completed weld bead before making another
pass or the next pass will be of poor quality.
Figure 18. Butt Joints
Fillet Weld Joints. Most fillet weld joints, on
metals of moderate to heavy thickness, will
require multiple pass welds to produce a
strong joint. The illustrations in Figure 19
show the sequence of laying multiple pass
beads into a T fillet joint and a lap fillet joint.
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Figure 19. Fillet Weld Joints
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SPECIAL WELDING METHODS
SPOT WELDING
The purpose of a spot weld is to join pieces
of metal together with a spot of weld instead
of a continuous weld bead. There are three
methods of spot welding: Burn-Through,
Punch and Fill, and Lap (see Figure 20).
Each has advantages and disadvantages
depending on the specific application as well
as personal preference.
FUNCH AND FILL
SUAN THROUGH
Figure 20. Spot Welding
1. The BURN-THROQUGH METHOD welds
two overlapped pieces of metal together
by burning through the top piece and into
- the bottom piece.
With the burn-through method, larger wire
diameters tend to work better than smaller -
diameters because they have greater cur-
rent carrying capabilities allowing the arc
to burn through very quickly while leaving
a minimal amount of filler metal build up.
Wire diameters that tend fo work best,
with the burn-through method, are 0.030
inch diameter solid wire or 0.035 inch
self-shielding flux-core wire.
Do not use 0.024 inch diameter solid or
0.030 inch self-shielding flux-core wires
when using the burn-through method
unless the metal is VERY thin or
excessive filler metal build-up and minimal
penetration is acceptable.
Always select the HIGH heat setting with
the burn-through method and tune in the
wire speed prior to making a spot weld.
2. The PUNCH AND FILL METHOD
produces a weld with the most finished
appearance of the three spot weld
methods. In this method, the arc is direct-
ed through a hole punched or drilled into
22
the top piece of metal so that it penetrates
into the bottom piece. The puddle is
allowed to fill up the hole leaving a spot
weld that is smooth and flush with the sur-
face of the top piece.
Select the wire diameter, heat setting, and
tune in the wire speed as If you were
welding the same thickness material with
a continuous bead.
3. The LAP SPOT METHOD directs the
welding arc to penetrate the bottom and
fop pieces, at the same time, right along
each side of the lap joint seam,
Select the wire diameter, heat setting, and
tune in the wire speed as if you were
welding the same thickness material with
a continuous bead.
SPOT WELDING INSTRUCTIONS
1. Select the wire diameter and heat setting
recommended above for the method of
spot welding you intend to use.
2. Tune in the wire speed as if you were
going to make a continuous weld.
3. Hold the nozzle piece completely
perpendicular to and about 1/4 inch off
the work piece.
4. Pull the trigger on the.gun and release it
when it appears that the desired penetra-
tion has been achieved.
5. Make practice spot welds on scrap metal,
varying the length of time you hold the
trigger, until a desired spot weldis made.
6. Make spot welds on the actual work piece
at desired locations.
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MAINTENANCE |
GENERAL
This welder has been engineered to give
many years of trouble-free service providing
that a few very simple steps are taken to
properly maintain it. .
1. Keep the wire drive compartment lid
closed at all times unless the wire needs
to be changed or the drive tension needs
adjusting.
2. Keep all consumables (contact tips, noz-
zles, and gun liner) clean and replace
when necessary. See CONSUMABLE
MAINTENANCE and TROUBLESHOOT-
ING later in this section for detailed
information.
3. Replace power cord, ground cable,
ground clamp, or gun assembly when
damaged or worn.
4. Periodically clean dust, dirt, grease, etc.
from your welder with a damp rag. Every
six months, or as necessary, remove the
side panels from the welder and air-blow
any dust and dirt that may have accumu-
lated inside the welder.
WARNING
>
Electric shock can kill! To reduce the risk
of electric shock, always unplug the welder
from its ac power source before removing
side panels.
CONSUMABLE MAINTENANCE
IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO MAINTAIN THE
CONSUMABLES TO AVOID THE NEED
FOR PREMATURE REPLACEMENT OF
THE GUN ASSEMBLY.
The GUN LINER is intended to provide an
unrestricted path for the welding wire to flow
through the gun assembly. Over time the
liner will accumulate dust, dirt, and other
debris. Replacement is necessary when
these accumulations begin to restrict the free
flow of wire through the gun assembly.
MAINTAINING THE CONTACT TIP
The purpose of the CONTACT TIP is to
transfer welding current to the welding wire
while allowing the wire to pass through it
smoothly.
Always use a contact tip stamped with the
same diameter as the wire it will be used
with.
Note: Due to inherent variances in flux-cored
welding wire, it may be necessary to use a
contact tip one size larger than your flux core
wire if wire jams occur.
1. If the wire burns back into the tip, remove
the tip from the gun and clean the hole
running through it with an oxygen-acety-
lene torch tip cleaner or tip drill.
2. Over time, the hole in the contact tip will
become worn by the wire passing
through it. The more worn this hole
becomes, the less efficient is the transfer
of welding current to the wire and eventu-
ally arc breakage and difficult arc starting
will result. Replace contact tips when
signs of wear become apparent.
MAINTAINING THE NOZZLE
The nozzle directs the shielding gas to the
weld puddle, determines the size of the
shielding area, and prevents the electrically
hot contact tip from contacting the work
piece.
CAUTION
KEEP THE NOZZLE CLEAN! During the
welding process, spatter and slag will build
up inside the nozzle and must be cleaned
out periodically. Clean the nozzle by scraping
away the build up with a nozzle cleaning tool
or a narrow metal surface similar fo the tip of
a screwdriver. Failure to clean and/or replace
the nozzle in a timely fashion WILL CAUSE
DAMAGE TO THE FRONT-END OF THE
GUN ASSEMBLY.
For best results, coat the inside of a new, or
freshly cleaned nozzle with anti stick spray
or gel.
1. Stop welding and clean any accumulated
slag or spatter from the nozzle every 5 to
10 minutes of welding time.
2. When welding overhead, if any molien
metal drips from the weld puddle and
falls into the nozzle, STOP WELDING
IMMEDIATELY and clean/scrape any
build up from the nozzle.
3. If the slag cannot be thoroughly cleaned
from the nozzle, REPLACE THE
NOZZLE!
23
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Failure to keep the nozzle adequately
cleaned can result in the following
problems:
A SHORTED nozzle results when spatter
buildup bridges the insulation in the nozzle,
allowing welding current to flow through it as
well as the contact tip. When shorted, a
nozzle will steal welding current from the
wire whenever it contacts the grounded work
piece. This causes erratic welds and reduced
penetration. in addition, a shorted nozzle
overheats the end of the gun, which can
DAMAGE the front-end of the gun.
A RESTRICTED nozzle is created when
enough slag builds up in the nozzle to affect
the direction, concentration, and/or rate of
the shielding gas flow. This problem can
cause porous, brittle welds and reduce
penetration.
TESTING FOR A SHORTED NOZZLE
Arcing between the nozzle and the work _
piece ALWAYS means the nozzle is shorted,
but this can be hard to detect through the
- lens of a welding helmet. The following
testing method is another way to tell if a
nozzle is shorted.
With the welder unplugged from the ac
power source, touch the probes of an
ohmmeter or continuity tester to the end of
the contact tip and the outside of the nozzle.
If there is any continuity at ali, the nozzle 15
shorted. Clean or replace as needed.
REPLACE A GUN LINER
When installing a new gun liner, care must be
taken not to kink or otherwise damage the gun
liner. See Figure 21 for the drive assembly and
Figure 22 for the gun assembly.
1. Turn OFF welder POWER SWITCH and
unplug welder from power supply.
2. Open the welder side panel.
3. Lower Drive Tension Adjustment knob
and lift the Drive Tension Arm up off the
drive roller. a.
4. Turn the wire spool counter-clockwise (be
sure to hold onto the wire itself while
turning the spool or the wire will unspool
itself when it becomes free of the gun
liner), and remove wire from gun
assembly.
5. Lay gun cable and gun handle straight
out in front of unit.
24
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
Unscrew large flat head screws which
hold handle to welder cabinet and
remove handie.
Remove self tapping screws which con-
nect welder cabinet to frame and lift cabi-
net away from welder.
Remove Cable Holding Clamp according
to the following steps: |
a) Remove the two self tapping screws at
the end of Cable Holding Clamp clos-
est to the Drive Roller.
b) Remove the two bolts at the end of
Cable Holding Clamp closest to Gun
Cable. Note: There are two nuts on
opposite side of dividing panel which
hold the bolts in place.
Take gun handle halves apart by remov-
ing the five phillips head screws.
Remove gas hose from fast coupler fit-
ting on Gas Valve. Depress lip on fast
coupler fitting back towards fitting and
pull gas hose out.
Remove Fast Coupler Fitting from Gas
Valve using a 9 millimeter wrench.
Firmly hold the brass fitting on the end of
the gun liner with a wrench and rotate
Gas Valve counterclockwise to unscrew
fitting.
Note: Rotate Gas Valve - Do not rotate
brass fitting or gun liner will twist inside
gun cable and may cause damage to gun
cable. >
The Live Wire Terminal is held in place
on the Gas Valve by the brass fitting on
the end of the gun liner. When the brass
fitting is removed, slide the Live Wire
Terminal off of the brass fitting.
Firmly grip the gun cable and pull the gun
liner all the way out.
Install the new gun liner into gun cable,
starting from the end where the welding
gun will be mounted, and feeding the
liner all the way through the gun cable to
the wire feed roller.
Note: It may be helpful to apply a small
amount of liquid soap to the end of the
gun liner to decrease resistance during
installation process.
Slide the eyelet of the Live Wire Terminal
onto the threaded end of the gun liner
brass fitting.
EZ
17. Firmiy hold the brass fitting on the end
of the gun liner with a wrench and rotate
Gas Valve clockwise to screw it
onto fitting. -
Note: Rotate Gas Valve - Do not rotate
brass fitting or gun liner will twist inside
gun cable and may cause damage to gun
cable.
18. Return all components to the handie
casing and realign them as they were
originally.
19. With both halves of the handle case in
place, tighten the five phillips head
SCrews.
20. Using wire cutters, trim the new gun liner
to approximately 3/16 inch beyond the
edge of the Cable Holding Clamp. (The
goal is to make sure that the end of the
gun liner will be visible after the Cable
Holding Clamp is assembled. This will
make installing the welding wire much
easier.)
21. Reassemble the Cable Holding Clamp
according to the following steps:
a) Install the two self tapping screws at
the end of the Cable Holding Clamp
closest to the Drive Roller - Do not
fully tighten yet!
b) install the two bolts at the end of the
Cable Holding Clamp closest to the
Gun Cable. Securing tightly with the
nuts on the opposite side of the divid-
ing panel.
c) Fully tighten the 2 self tapping screws.
22. Replace welder cabinet (and Side panel)
and tighten all self tapping screws.
23 Reinstall handle to top of welder cabinet -
securely tighten the two fiat head screws.
24. Reinstall the welding wire according 10
specifications in INSTALL THE WELDING
WIRE section.
25, Close side panel.
26. Plug welder into power supply and turn
POWER SWITCH to ON position.
Drive Drive Cable Gun
Tension Tension Holding Cabie
Adiustment Arm Clamp (Tail End)
>
Inlet
Guide Drive Gun
Tube Roller Liner
Figure 21. Drive Assembly
Nozzle
Ne Contact Tip
Ng Gas Diffuser
CS Conductor Tube
Conductor Tube
Insulation
Trigger Gas Valve
Live Wire Fast
Terminal | i Coupler
. Ÿ Fitting
Switch ___— |
Contacts da à Gas Hose
Gun SR, |
Liner E “sl
Handle ; €
Casing а
Switch / Switch
Contact LE / {Contact
Wire MS | Wire
Gun
Cable
Figure 22. Gun Assembly
25
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PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
Except for intemal and external cleaning,
cleaning the nozzle, and occasionally
retightening screws, there is no periodic
maintenance recommended for your welder.
TROUBLESHOOTING
The following TROUBLESHOOTING
table is provided as a guide to help resolve
some of the more common problems that
could be encountered. This table doesnot
provide all possible solutions, only those
possibilities considered to likely be common
faults. The table consists of a TROUBLE or
symptom, a POSSIBLE CAUSE for the
symptom, and a POSSIBLE REMEDY for
| that symptom.
TABLE4 - TROUBLESHOOTING
3. Wrong type of gas
4. Dirty or rusty welding wire
ING gas section of manual.
4. Replace spool of wire.
TROUBLE POSSIBLE CAUSE POSSIBLE REMEDY
Ditty, porous, brittle 1. Plugged welding nozzle 1. Clean or replace nozzle,
weld: | 2. No shislding gas 2. Tank empty, flow restricted or regulator set too low.
3. See SELECTING SHIELD-
2. Too long or improper extension cord
3. Wrong type or size wire
4, Poor ground connection
5. Wrang size contact tip
8. Loose gun connection or
faulty gun assembly
7. Wrong welding polarity set
8, Dirty or rusty welding wire
Wira feed works but 1. Bad ground or loose connection 1. Check ground and connections.
noarc Tighten as necessary.
2, Bad connection to gun or faulty gun | 2. Check connection to gun or replace gun
Arc works but not 1. Faulty wire speed control assembly | 1. Replace wire speed control assembly.
feeding wire 2. No tension on drive roller 2. Adjust the drive tension.
3. Faulty drive motor (RARE!) 3. Replace drive motor.
Nothing works 1. Faully trigger on gun 1. Replace gun trigger.
except fan 2. Exceeded duty cycle; 2. Let welder cool at least 10 minutes |
thermal protector opened (observe and maintain proper duly cycle.)
3. Faulty transformer (RARE!) 3. Replace transformer. :
Low output or non- 4. Loose connection inside machine 1. Blow inside of machine out with compressed
penetrating weld air. Clean and tighten ali connections.
2 See EXTENSION CORDS section of manual.
. 3. Use correct size wiré.
4. Reposition clamp and check
cable to clamp connection.
5. Use correct size contact ip. “>.
6. Tighten gun or replace gun.
7. Change to proper palarity.
8. Replace spool of wire.
Wire is jamming or
1. Too much tension on drive roller
1. Adjust drive tension. {See INSTALL THE
"birdnesting” at the WELDING WIRE)
drive roller 2. Gun finer worm or damaged 2. Replace gun linet.
3. Contact tip is clogged or damaged 3. Replace contact tip.
4, Liner stretched or is too long 4. Trim liner to proper length.
Wire bums back to 1. Gun liner wom or damaged 1. Replace gun liner.
contact tip 2. Liner stretched or is too long 2. Trim liner to proper length.
3. Wrong size contact tip 3. Use correct size contact tip.
4. Contact ip is clogged or damaged 4. Replace contact tip.
Ground camp and/or Bad connection from cable to clamp Tighten connection or replace cable.
ground cable gals hot
Gun nozzle ares to Slag buildup inside nozzle Clean or replace nozzle
work surface or nozzle is shorted as needed.
TO GET ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT THIS PRODUCT CALL 1-800-521-6038 EXT 849
26
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Code
WE20504-21680177
. WE20504-21055015
- WE20504-05000076
WE20504-33810095
WE20504-21020038
WE20504-05000066
WE20504-21020039
WE20504-21005040
WE20504-2 1600021
WE20504-21690176
WE20504-23000081
WE20504-21005017
WE20504-21020003
VWE20504-21590244
WE20504-22400038
WE20504-33720063
WE20504-22210014
WE20504-22800039
WE20504-21690175
WE20504-05000075
WE20504-21020018 -
WE20504-21020037
WE20504-21610014
WE20504-44135018
WE20504-21610015
WE20504-33700138
WE20504-44120076
WE20504-22210016
WE20504-05000077
WE20504-21690312
WE20504-21690310
WE20504-22200036
WE20504-21690001
WE20504-33805001
WE20504-21010010
WE20504-21590002
WE20504-44400016
WE20504-04800145
WE20504-04600002
WEZ20504-21800036
WE20504-22910070
WE20504-30800030
WE20504-22710037
WE20504-04600114
WE20504-21800051
WE20504-21000005
WE20504-2 1035002
WE20504-21025011
WE20504-22110025
WE20504-43210148
WE20504-20220120
WE20504-21605010
WE20504-22200035
WE20504-22205116
WE20504-21025029
WE20504-21030010
WE20504-21025028
WE20504-21020006-
VWE20504-21030011
WE20504-21035004
WE20504-21000020
WE20504-21605036
WE20504-21025015
WE20504-21905002
WE20504-21905007
WE20504-21905011
WE20504-21910050
WE20504-22910062
WE20504-22905062
Description
Side Panel Clip
Lack Washer for Clip
Access Door
Iron Pin for Access Door
Self-Tapping Screw for Cabinet
Right Upper Panel
Self-Tapping Screw for Cabinet
Handle Screw
Plastic Handle
Back Plastic Frame
Gun 0/8 10mm?
TCI Screw for Pressure Cover
Self-Tapping Screw for Pressure Cover
Gun Pressure Cover
Rectifier PMS 8/4/1 F
Dividing Panel
Thermostat 100" 1GA
Complete Fan
Front Plastic Frame
Front Panel
Self-Tapping Screw for Frame
Self-Tapping Screw for Feet
Front Plastic Foot
Choke 40x40 AL
Back Plastic Foot
Lower Panel
Transformer 220V 40x85 AL
Thermostat 127° 16A
Back Panel
Voltage Settings Knob
Wire Speed Knob
Voltage Settings Switch 184 250V
- Gun Grommet on Front Panel
Wire Feed Roll @ 9X30 .023-.030 Knurled
ST-CE Screw for Feed Roil
Hex Key
Black Plastic Wire Feeder
Wire Feeding Motor
Complete Spool Holder
Spool Holder Handwheel
Gas Hose Barb
. Black Gas Hose
P.C. Board EQ795 220/240V +Fuse "CSA"
Kit Gas/No Gas Change Board
Handwheel
TE Screw for Change Board & Contactor
Gear Washer for Change Board & Contactor
Hex Nut for Rectifier
Ground Clamp 300A
Ground Cable 10MM?
Power Cord 3xAWG12 M2.5 220V 50A Plug
Cable Clamp
Amber Power Switch
Switch 17A
Hex Nut for Wire Feeder
Flat Washer for Choke and Transformer
Hex Nut for Rectifier
Self-Tapping Screw for Rectifier
Flat Washer far Rectifier
Gear Washer for Rectifier
TE Screw for Rectifier
Cable Clamp
Nut for Spool Holder
Plastic Welding Mask
Dark Glass for Welding Mask
Hammer-Brush
Flux-Cored Wire Spool
9/16” x 18 Female Connector
Gas Regulator
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~ WIRE FEED WELDER MODEL 196.205040 PARTS DIAGRAM
TERA ЛВ ЯчеСИЯ
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WIRE FEED WELDER MODEL 196.205040 PARTS DIAGRAM
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WIRE FEED WELDER MODEL 196.205040 GUN PARTS LIST
No. Qty.
Code
Description
WE20504-21690300
WE20504-21690301
WE20504-23005009
WE20504-23005145
WE20504-23005091
WE20504-23005090
WE20504-23005146
08a WE20504-23005018
08b WE20504-23005019
08c WE20504-23005020
9
WE20504-23005147
WE20504-33810090
WE20504-21200010
WE20504-33800009
WE20504-21020012
WE20504-22910001
WE20504-23005131
WE20504-30900022
WE20504-30900007
WE20504-23005148
WE20504-23005144
Black Gun Handle
Red Trigger for Gun
Gun Gas Valve
Gun Neck for TW Gun
Thread Guide Wire Liner x T Neck 1.4
Conductor Tube Insulation
Gas Diffuser for Gun TW1 ME-99
.024 (0.6mm) Contact Tip
030 (0.8mm) Contact Tip
-040 (1.0mm) Contact Tip
Nozzle for Gun TW1 MC-31
Pin for Gun Trigger D.Ax16ZN
Fast-On Contact 6.3x0.8
No-Gas Gun Contact Spring
Self Tapping Screw TCC 3.9x16
Fast Coupling Connector D.4 M6x0.75
Stainless Wire Liner 1.4x4 Blue L=2500
Rubber Quter Sleeve D.17.5 + Hose L=2200
Rilsan Gas Hose D.2x4 L=3200
Gas Neck w/Outside Liner and Difus.
Gas Neck w/Gas Valve
WIRE FEED WELDER MODEL 196.205040 GUN
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SUGGESTED SETTINGS
VoltageWire Speed
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- Your Home
= For troubleshooting, product manuals and home solutions advice: ‘
E.
= www.managemyhome.com
For repair — in your home — of all major brand appliances,
lawn and garden equipment, or heating and cooling systems,
no matter who made it, no matter who sold it!
For the replacement parts, accessories and
owner's manuals that you need to do-it-yourself.
For Sears professional installation of home appliances
and items like garage door openers and water heaters.
1 -800-4-MY -HOMEO Call anytime, day or night :
(1-800-469-4663) “ (U.S.A. and Canada) o
www.sears.com -— - www.sears.ca | :
ул.
Our Home |
For repair of carry-in items like vacuums, lawn equipment,
‘and electronics, call anytime for the location of the nearest
Sears Parts & Repair Service Center
Е 1-800-488-1222 (U.S.A.) 1-800-469-4663 (Canada)
EEES www.sears.com www.sears.ca | |
= To purchase a protection agreement on a product serviced by Sears:
== 1-800-827-6655 (USA) 1-800-361-6665 (Canada)
E Para pedir servicio de reparación Au Canada pour service en frangais:
= adomicillo, yparaordenar piezas: 1-800-LE-FOYERMC
== 1-888-SU-HOGAR® | (1-800-533-6937)
2 (1-888-784-6427) WWW.Sears.ca
www.sears.com -
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®& Registered Trademark / ™ Trademark of KCD IP, LLC in the United States, or Sears Brands, LLC in other countries
® Marca Registrada / ™ Marca de Fabrica de KCD IP, LLC en Estados Unidos, o Sears Brands, LLC in otros países
MC Marque de commerce / M0 Marque déposée de Sears Brands, LLC 77611279
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