[CD CHHNGERI

[CD CHHNGERI
US006272078B2
(12)
United States Patent
(10) Patent N0.:
US 6,272,078 B2
(45) Date of Patent:
*Aug. 7, 2001
Yankowski
(54)
METHOD FOR UPDATING A MEMORY IN A
5,244,705
9/1993 Tsurushima et al. ................ .. 428/64
RECORDED MEDIA PLAYER
5,335,218
5,260,922
11/1993
8/1994 Osada
Chigasaki
.................................
.............. ..
.. 369/178
(75) Inventor: Carl J. Yankowskl, Dover, MA (US)
(List Continued on next page‘)
(73) Assignees: Sony Corporation, Tokyo (JP); Sony
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
Electronics Inc., Park Ridge, NJ (US)
(*)
Notice:
This patent issued on a continued pros-
0460869A2
()580361A2
12/1991
1/1994 (EP) _
ecution application ?led under 37 CFR
0680040A2
11/1995 (EP).
1.53(d), and is subject to the tWenty year
_
patent term provisions of 35 U.S.C.
_
(Llst Con?rmed on next page‘)
154(a)(2)-
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
SubJeCt_t0 any disclaimer>_ the term of this
Compact Disc Technology, H. Nakajima/H. OgaWa, 1992,
Patent 15 extended or adtusted under 35
Pub. by Ohmsha, Ltd. 3_1 Kanda Nishiki—cho, Chiyoda—ku,
U50 154(b) by 0 days-
Tokyo
101,
Japan,
Chap.5,
pp.
85—124,
ISBN
4—274—03347—3.
(21) Appl' NO‘: 08/961’394
(22) Filed;
Oct, 30, 1997
The Song Servant Advertisement, undated.
Denon DN—1400F 200 CD Change Speci?cation Sheet,
undated.
Related U‘S‘ Apphcatlon Data
_ _ _
(62)
_
CDP—CX153 100—Disc Changer, Features/Speci?cations,
_
1995 Sony Electronics Inc., 1 Sony Drive, Park Ridge, NJ
DlVlSlOIl of application No. 08/507,544, ?led on Jul. 26,
07656 (2/95)
1995, now Pat. No. 5,751,672.
'
(List continued on neXt page.)
(51)
Int. Cl.7 ...................................................... .. G11B 7/22
(52)
US. Cl. .......................... .. 369/30; 369/34; 369/47.15
(58)
Field of Search ................................ .. 369/30, 34, 32,
Primary Examiner—Ali NeyZari
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm—Christopher M. Tobin;
Harold T. Fujii
369/47.15, 47.16, 59.1, 53.2, 36, 38, 47.1,
360/19'1’ 33'1
(56)
References Cited
(57)
ABSTRACT
A method and a PP aratus for uP datin g a memor y in a Com
pact Disc changer. Information identifying discs stored in a
CD changer is stored in a memory. The memory is updated
U'S' PATENT DOCUMENTS
4,358,780
11/1982 Sato ................................ .. 369/135.1
When a CD is loaded Which does not have identifying
features Which are recogniled by the CD changer- Updating
is carried out via a modem connection to a remote database.
4,397,011
8/1983 Ogawa
4,491,882
1/1985
4,587,643
5/1986 Monen et a1
47017900
10/1987
Fujiie
____ __ 369/50
............
. . . . .. 360/53
Ha_SegaWa ct a1~ - - - - - - -
,
a
amura
e
a.
database
can
be
stored
locally
in
a
local
- - - ~~ 369/36
queried to locate desired tracks and can be used to facilitate
control of the compact disc changer by providing a simpli
..... ..
-
4,893,199
1/1990
Okada
...............
. . . . .. 360/48
5,148,418
9/1992
Tsurushima
5,243,588
9/1993 Maeda et a1. ........................ .. 369/54
-
-
-
19 Claims, 8 Drawing Sheets
/2 4
20
[CD CHHNGERI ;
/32
COMPUTER
38
-
?ed Interface for bulldmg a play 11st and the hke'
.... .. 369/32
DHTH
BHSE
database
residing in a personal computer Where the database can be
ghlilkenbearf elt a1‘ "
,
The
369/32
STEREO
HMPLIFIER
%<
/40
/44
MODEM
PHONE LINE
REMOTE
DHTHBFISE
/28
U
US 6,272,078 B2
Page 2
US. PATENT DOCUMENTS
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
5,341,350
8/1994 Frank et a1. ......................... .. 369/30
5,446,714
8/1995 Yoshio et a1. .
5,475,835
3-76082
8
12/1995 Hickey ............................... .. 395/600
5,559,764
9/1996
5,615,345
3/1997 Wanger .............................. .. 395/309
WO91/2OO82
2/1991
(JP) -
151332 8;; 12/1991 (W0) _
Chen et a1. .......................... .. 369/30
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
2’642’337 * 6/1997 0.5131311“. a1’ """"""""""" " 369/30
523%: * 1i/
11:16 er em et a ' '
369 30
5, 5 ,
* 5/
etelison ............................. ..
/
Microsoft Windows Sound System, Version 2.0, Software
User’s Guide, Microsoft Corp. 1993, Dragon Systems, Inc.,
Newton, MA, USA, DOC‘ NO‘ HA53828_0993~
632353;? * “£333 zankowski """""""""""""" "
Compact Disc Player, Operating Instructions, CDP—CX100/
’
’
6,128,625
/
* 10/2000
an 0W5
'
"" "
/
CDP—CX100S, 1993 Sony Corporation, Tokyo, Japan.
Yankowski ......................... .. 707/104
6,147,940 * 11/2000 Yankowski ........................... .. 369/30
* cited by eXarniner
U.S. Patent
Aug. 7, 2001
Sheet 2 0f 8
US 6,272,078 B2
24
STEREO
HMF’LIFIER
PHONE LINE
REMOTE
DFITHBFISE
FIG.2
/?4
/?8
MULTI-DISC cn
CHHNGER MECHFINISM
—>
_, lc?rggggé
B4
I
PRSEESE‘ENG
W CONTROLLER
72
84
DISPLFIY/
IR RECEIVER
CONTROL PFINEL J
FIG.3
U.S. Patent
Aug. 7, 2001
Sheet 3 0f 8
STFIRT
US 6,272,078 B2
1'30
SELECT DISC r104
CID
/10s
CHFINGER
REHD DISC "FINGERPRINT" |
COMPFIRE T0 MEMORY |/110
CONVENTIONFIL
OPERFITION
FOUND?
1 14
N0 /12U
MHNUFIL
MRNUHL
ENTRY
ROUTINE
122
MESSFIGE: "DISC DHTH
NOT FOUND. PLFIY OR
RETRIEVE DFITH OR
MFINUFIL ENTRY?"
RETRIEVE
SEND "F‘INGERPRINT"
T0 COMPUTER
CHECK LOCHL
DHTFIBHSE
FOUND?
132
DIHL.
PLHY
124
128
/l38
noTwglLgn?n
CHHNGER
N0
MEMORY
MESSHGE: "DISC DFITFI
NOT FUOND. PLRY, DIFIL
REMOTE DFITF-IBFISE OR
MFINUFIL ENTRY?"
MFINUFIL
F I G . 4H
PLHY
U.S. Patent
Aug. 7, 2001
Sheet 4 0f 8
US 6,272,078 B2
?
DIHL REMOTE DHTHBHSEI/
QUERY REMOTE DFITHBFISE
FOR "FINGERPRINT"
N0
FOUND?
A
144
150
I
COMPUTER
YES
158
/1B2
MESSHGE: "DISC DFITH NOT FOUND.
PLF'IY OR MFINUFIL. ENTRY?"
PLFIY
MFINUFIL
| DONNLOHD T0 LOCHL DFITFIBFISE I/IBB
DONNLOFID T0 cn CHHNGER MEMORY
FIG. 4B
170
U.S. Patent
Aug. 7, 2001
Sheet 5 0f 8
US 6,272,078 B2
CONTROL
SEFIRCH EDIT
CHHNGER on MORE /174
TITLE TRI TR2 TR3 TR4 TRS TRG
1
LOCFIL
2
DHTFIBFISE
3
O O
4
5
s
7
SEHRCH PLHY PLFIY LIST 00. MORE /1?5
DISC TITLE TRI TR2 TR3 TR4 TRS
/
1
I
//
//A///
2
l?gggl?lqslz
REPRESENTFITION
OF cn CHHNGER
a
/ // //
4
5
/////.M_E.MORY
' //
‘L
/1?8
PLHY LIST
12345—
67-
NIGHTINGHLE
.IFIZZMHN
YOU GO YOUR NFIY, I'LL GO MINE
COME DONN EFISY
MY MY SHE CRIES
THE FIRST DHY IN HUGUST
BLUE INTERLUDE
FIG . 5
U.S. Patent
Aug. 7, 2001
Sheet 6 0f 8
US 6,272,078 B2
I
QUERY CD CHHNGER MEMORY FOR
DISCS INSTHLLED IN CHHNGER
FIND CORRESPONDING ENTRIES
IN LOCFIL DHTHBRSE
<
SERRcH
PLRY
LIST
INSTRUCT
0Q0
CD CHHNGER
T0 PLFIY
cURRENT
PLRY LIST
ENTER
DHTHBHSE
QUERY
ROUTINE
186/
l/182
/184
_>
USER COMMFIND?
PLHY
r180
188
V
/19O
HDD, DELETE, DISRLRY? >
HUD
—
/192
DELETE
HDD SELEcTIoN
DISPLHY
T0 CURRENT
PLF-IY LIST
19B
DELETE
SELEcTIoN
FROM
cURRENT
PLFIY LIST
/198
OPEN PLRY
LIST wINDow
v
FIG.5
U.S. Patent
Aug. 7, 2001
US 6,272,078 B2
vv
m
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I"
nUmHDIoIPJZ
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U.S. Patent
Aug. 7, 2001
Sheet 8 0f 8
US 6,272,078 B2
(SE/30°
SELECT DISC
‘
304
/3 U5
LREFID DISC FINGERPRINT
31C]
COMF'HRE TO MEMORY
YES
FOUND?
314
MHNUHL
N0
CONVENTIONHL
OPERHTIONS
/320
MESSHGE: "DISC DFITH NOT
FOUND. PLFIY 0R RETRIEVE
DFITH 0R MFINUFIL ENTRY"
PLHY
MHNUFIL /322
ENTRY
&
DIHL REMOTE DFITHBHSE I’ 344
QUERY REMOTE DFITFIBFISE
FOR "FINGERPRINT"
DONNLOFID TO
CD CHHNGER
MEMORY
358
/362
MFINUHL
MESSF'IGE: "DISC NOT FOUND.
F’LFIY OR MHNUFIL ENTRY?"
FIG. 8
PLHY
‘
US 6,272,078 B2
1
2
METHOD FOR UPDATING A MEMORY IN A
RECORDED MEDIA PLAYER
this technique is helpful in locating a desired selection, the
user still has only limited access to the available information
This application is a division of application Ser. No.
08/507,544 ?led Jul. 26, 1995, now US. Pat. No. 5,751,672
relating to the disc. For eXample, there is no information
available on the speci?ed tracks on the disc, artist, etc.
unless this information is used to identify the entire disc.
Which is copending and is hereby incorporated by reference.
Moreover, all such information must currently be entered by
BACKGROUND
the user using a remote control or jog dial to cycle through
available characters. The process of entering such data is
1. Field of the Invention
This invention relates generally to the ?eld of audio and
10
audio/video equipment including compact disc (CD) play
ers. More particularly, this invention relates to a CD changer
Which can access a database Which is user searchable and
updated upon recognition of an unknown CD. This invention
is particularly useful for multiple CD changers Which serve
to store substantial numbers of compact discs. In addition,
this invention provides a mechanism for computer control of
the operation of the CD changer.
2. Background of the Invention
Several large capacity compact disc players are currently
content of individual tracks on the disc.
15
07676. Each of these players includes an internal rotary table
itself in machine readable form, there eXists a large body of
Work Which has no such identi?cation information. Thus,
there is a need to provide the user With access to an
20
The present invention addresses these problems by pro
viding a database of the information for access by the user
to provide searchable access to the information Which and
25
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
30
It is an object of the present invention to provide a
compact disc player With access to an external database
and compact arrangement.
Which permits easy selection of discs stored in a multiple
In earlier compact disc players Which only hold one or a
disc player.
35
It is a further feature that the present invention identi?es
a CD by the table of contents area of the disc (or other
40
track or disc.
Unfortunately, this information may not be as readily
available to the user of a CD player Which is used as a
storage device such as the above-mentioned high capacity
CD players. Since users commonly use such players to store
It is a feature that the present invention provides the
ability to search a database for desired music selections With
minimal or no user entry of the database data.
ing each selection (e.g. artist, title, author, etc.). Such
information facilitates the listener’s selection of the desired
the ability to doWnload such information. This minimiZes
and in most cases eliminates the need for data input by the
user.
a convenient mechanism for storing such discs in a very neat
feW discs, the compact discs are commonly stored in their
protective jeWel case. Such jeWel cases generally include an
insert provides a Written directory for each disc Which
generally lists in order the selections available on the disc
and often includes play times and other information regard
equivalent body of information to use, particularly in con
nection With high capacity multiple disc players.
With 100 slots Which can store up to 100 compact discs.
Players With even higher storage capacity Will no doubt
appear in the future. Compact disc players of this nature are
commonly used to not only play compact discs, but also as
While variations of compact disc format might permit
various information about the disc to be included on the disc
available commercially. For eXample, Sony Corporation,
Tokyo Japan produces several such players such as the
model CDP-CX100 and the CDP-CX153, available through
Sony Electronics Inc., 1 Sony Drive, Park Ridge, N].
someWhat inconvenient (especially for large numbers of
discs) and thus often omitted by the user. Furthermore, the
user of such players are currently restricted to controlling the
discs using stored parameters (eg level and sound ?eld
selections) on a disc by disc basis Without regard for the
45
the compact discs, they also frequently store the jeWel case
unique identifying information) Which is used as a “?nger
print” for the disc.
It is a further feature that certain embodiments of the
present invention can facilitate control over playback param
eters of a compact disc on a track-by-track basis.
It is an advantage that the present invention can provide
a large body of searchable information for the user to access
and related informational inserts in a less convenient loca
tion. Moreover, the user must knoW not only the disc Which
he desires to play, but the location of the disc in the rotary
table and perhaps a track number in order to readily access
a particular chosen selection. In addition, it is dif?cult for the
Without entry of the data.
It is a further advantage of the present invention that
compact discs or other storage media can be easily stored
Within a multiple disc player While producing an enhanced
user to have a clear overvieW of the musical selections
ability to locate a music selection of choice.
available and to control the play of such selections.
It is another advantage of embodiments of the present
invention to provide for user control of the play selections of
the CD player via the computer’s user interface.
This problem has been partially addressed in the above
Sony disc players by providing the user With the ability to
program the disc player to store identifying information for
each disc in the player’s memory and to categoriZe discs into
a number of groups of the user’s selection (e.g. jaZZ,
classical, Rock, etc.). These multiple CD changers utiliZe a
portion of the table of contents (TOC) data for uniquely
identifying each compact disc stored therein. In particular,
the total music play time and the number of movements
55
Broadly speaking, the present invention provides a
modem link to a remote database Which a user can utiliZe in
order to provide information updates to a memory forming
60
a part of a CD player. The system uses a “?ngerprint” of a
CD in order to search the remote database for information
such as title, track names, artist, etc. Once the CD is
identi?ed, the information associated With the CD can be
(typically songs) as indicated in the TOC is used in some
loaded into a local database so that the user can search for
changers to uniquely identify the discs. Compact disc chang
desired music, artists, etc. In addition, the information is
ers also include a feature knoWn as “Custom File” Which is 65 loaded into the memory of a CD player so that discs stored
described in Japanese patent application publication number
03-76082 Which is incorporated herein by reference. While
in the CD player can be readily identi?ed. This is especially
useful for large capacity multiple CD players Which are also
US 6,272,078 B2
3
4
used to store CDs. The user can further use the computer as
remote database is accessed and searched via a modem,
Wherein in the event the comparison does not detect the
identifying information in the memory, the remote database
is searched via the modem to locate identifying information
a simpli?ed control interface to search for selections, build
play lists as Well as enhance control of the playback opera
tion.
The present invention contemplates many alternatives and
variations. For example, in one aspect of the present
invention, a system for playback of music compact discs
includes a disc changer for receiving a compact disc and
reading data from the disc to convert to signals representing
music. An identifying portion of the disc is read in order to
uniquely identify the disc. The identifying portion of the disc
relating to the medium, the medium being identi?ed in the
database by the identifying portion. The information relating
to the medium is doWnloaded from the remote database to
the memory.
A method of updating a memory in an audio compact disc
10
Which uniquely identi?es the compact disc; comparing the
identifying portion With identifying portions stored in a
With a memory to determine if data relating to the compact
disc is stored in the memory. A modem is provided along
With a searching mechanism for accessing a remote database
via the modem, Wherein in the event the comparison does
not detect the identifying information in the memory, the
changer according to an aspect of the invention includes the
steps of: reading an identifying portion of a compact disc
15
remote database is accessed via the modem to locate iden
memory; querying a database residing outside the compact
disc changer for the identifying portion of the disc if the
identifying portion is not found in the memory; and doWn
loading data from the database to the memory corresponding
to the identifying portion.
tifying information relating to the disc, the disc being
identi?ed in the database by the identifying portion. The
Amethod of updating a memory in recorded media player,
according to an aspect of the invention includes the steps of:
reading an identifying portion of a recorded medium Which
information is then doWnloaded from the remote database to
the memory.
uniquely identi?es the medium; comparing the identifying
In another aspect of the invention, a system for playback
of music compact discs includes a disc changer for receiving
identifying portion of the disc Which can be used to uniquely
portion With identifying portions stored in a memory; que
rying a database residing outside the recorded media player
for the identifying portion of the medium if the identifying
portion is not found in the memory; and doWnloading data
identify the disc. The identifying portion of the disc is
from the database to the memory corresponding to the
compared With the memory to determine if data relating to
the compact disc is stored in the memory. A ?rst searching
mechanism is provided for accessing a local database,
Wherein in the event the comparison does not detect the
controlling the operation of a compact disc player, Which in
a compact disc and reading data from the disc to convert to
signals representing music. Aportion of the changer reads an
25
identifying portion.
The present invention further contemplates a method for
one aspect includes the steps of: storing data relating to a
compact disc in a database, the database including informa
tion relating to each track of the compact disc; storing a
playback attribute in the database on a track-by-track basis;
identifying portion in the memory, the ?rst searching mecha
nism accesses the local database to locate the identifying
portion relating to the disc, the disc being identi?ed in the
local database by the identifying portion. Asecond searching
35
and instructing the compact disc changer to play a selected
track using the playback attribute.
mechanism is provided for accessing a remote database via
a modem, Wherein in the event the comparison does not
detect the identifying information in the memory and the
?rst searching mechanism does not locate the identifying
Furthermore, the present invention contemplates a
method of building a play list for a multiple disc compact
disc changer, Which in one embodiment includes the steps
portion in the local database, the second searching mecha
of: in a computer, storing information in a database about a
nism accesses the remote database via the modem to locate
plurality of compact discs residing in the multiple disc
compact disc changer; the database including playback
identifying information relating to the disc, the disc being
identi?ed in the database by the identifying portion. The
information is doWnloaded from either of the local database
or the remote database to the memory.
45
attributes for tracks of the compact discs; displaying a table
of tracks of the plurality of compact discs; selecting a
sequential set of tracks from the plurality of compact discs
to de?ne a play list; and sending a sequence of commands
In another aspect of the invention, a multiple disc compact
disc player includes a multiple disc CD changer mechanism
for playing and storing a plurality of compact discs. A
memory stores information associated With the plurality of
compact discs. A controller controls operations of the mul
tiple disc compact disc player. A modem is coupled to the
invention, as Well as others, Will become apparent to those
skilled in the art upon consideration of the folloWing
controller for accessing a remote database via a telephone
description of the invention.
from the computer to the multiple compact disc changer to
sequentially play the selected tracks from the play list.
The above objects, advantages and features of the
line connection. The controller includes capability for issu
The features of the invention believed to be novel are set
ing a ?rst query to the memory to determine if the memory
forth With particularity in the appended claims. The inven
includes information associated With a selected disc in the 55 tion itself hoWever, both as to organiZation and method of
CD changer mechanism, and for issuing a second query to
operation, together With further objects and advantages
a remote database via the modem in order to ?nd informa
thereof, may be best understood by reference to the folloW
tion associated With the selected, if the ?rst query fails to
locate a information in the memory associated With the
selected compact disc.
In another aspect of the invention, a system for playback
of recorded media includes a media changer for receiving a
recorded medium and reading data from the medium. An
identifying portion of the medium is read and used to
ing description taken in conjunction With the accompanying
uniquely identify the medium. The identifying portion of the
medium is compared With With a memory to determine if
data relating to the medium is stored in the memory. A
draWing.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
FIG. 1 illustrates the TOC data format for a conventional
compact disc.
FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a ?rst embodiment of the
65
present invention.
FIG. 3 is a block diagram of the CD changer 20 of FIG.
2.
US 6,272,078 B2
6
5
FIG. 4, Which is shown as FIG. 4A and FIG. 4B, is a How
TOC entry for the ?rst movement alone could theoretically
chart describing the operation of one embodiment of the
present invention.
account for up to 272 (Which is approximately 4.7E21)
unique discs. In practice, the actual number of unique values
FIG. 5 illustrates the use of computer 32 for control of the
Which are likely to occur in this one entry is substantially
loWer since a typical movement has a duration of approxi
CD changer 20.
mately three minutes, the movement number for the ?rst
movement is alWays 1, the POINT value is often the same,
FIG. 6 is a simpli?ed ?oW chart of one embodiment of a
routine for issuing commands to the CD changer 20.
etc. Even so, it is clear that each disc has an adequate amount
of unique information that one can readily understand that
FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a second embodiment of the
present invention.
FIG. 8 is a How chart describing the operation of the
10
second embodiment as shoWn in FIG. 7.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
INVENTION
While this invention is susceptible of embodiment in
many different forms, there is shoWn in the draWings and
Will herein be described in detail speci?c embodiments, With
each compact disc has its oWn unique “?ngerprint” Which
can be used to uniquely identify the disc from all other discs.
By Way of example, and not to be limiting, an extremely
large number of discs could be uniquely identi?ed by
examining the number of movements, the play time of each
15
movement (or, e. g. the play time of the ?rst ?ve movements)
and the total play time of the CD. Such a scheme Would
provide data of a manageable siZe Which Would uniquely
the understanding that the present disclosure is to be con
sidered as an example of the principles of the invention and
not intended to limit the invention to the speci?c embodi
ments shoWn and described. In the description beloW, like
identify a vast number of discs. Due to the variables men
tioned earlier, the exact number of discs Which can be
reference numerals are used to describe the same, similar or
Other combinations Will occur to those skilled in the art. The
exact scheme selected should be based upon an analysis of
a large sampling of compact discs to assure that enough TOC
data is used Without making the amount of data unneces
identi?ed by this scheme for practical purposes is dif?cult to
ascertain With any degree of exactness, but is clearly huge.
corresponding parts in the several vieWs of the draWing.
Before discussing the actual method and apparatus of the
present invention in detail, it is useful to understand several
basic concepts relating to the standard formatting of com
pact discs so that the options available for uniquely identi
25
sarily large.
In addition to the above example of using TOC data for
the identifying information, a sample of the actual disc data
fying each disc are understood. Conventional music com
pact discs are formatted according to a speci?cation Which
representing a musical selection or movement can also be
is knoWn in the industry as the “Red Book” speci?cation.
The format is also discussed in, for example, chapter 5 of
used to uniquely identify each disc. Due to the Wide dynamic
CompactDisc Technology, by Heitaro Nakaj ima and Hiroshi
OgaWa, 1992, Ohmsha, Ltd., 3-1 Kanda Nishiki-cho,
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan, Which is incorporated herein
samples taken at consistent locations on a disc can also be
by reference. While the Red Book speci?cation permits an
identifying code to be used With each disc, the industry
rarely utiliZes this option. Thus, there is no unique label
Which is currently assured of being available for each disc.
HoWever, the Red Book speci?cation de?nes a lead-in area
to include an area of subcoding having so called P-channel
data and Q-channel data. This data includes information
knoWn as the Table of Contents (TOC) Which is someWhat
analogous to the table of contents of a book. Since each CD
is unique in exact content, it is possible to use this the TOC
information as a sort of “?ngerprint” to uniquely identify
each CD.
FIG. 1 illustrates the format of a TOC entry for a typical
music compact disc. It is noted that a frame of TOC data is
range of music characteriZed on each disc, several data
statistically likely to uniquely identify the disc, either alone
or in combination With a portion of the TOC data. Thus, by
35
has been manufactured and Which is likely to be manufac
tured in the future. Accordingly, an exact de?nition of the
“?ngerprint” data is to be determined by a detailed analysis
of a large body of discs and is not critical to the understand
ing of the overall concept and operation of the present
invention. After selection of such a sampling of data to be
used as a CD “?ngerprint”, in the unlikely event that the
45
identifying “?ngerprint” of tWo or more discs are the same,
remedies such as user selection of the appropriate disc are
contemplated by the present invention.
Referring noW to FIG. 2, a ?rst embodiment of a system
according to the present invention is shoWn in block diagram
provided for each track (movement) of the music disc. Each
TOC entry includes the elapsed time of each movement and
form. In this embodiment, a CD changer 20 is coupled in a
conventional manner to a stereo ampli?er (or receiver) 24
Which provides poWer ampli?cation suitable to drive a pair
an absolute time for the POINT content. These times are
extremely precise in that they are measured in minutes,
seconds and frames. Each disc may include up to 99 such
tracks or movements With each TOC entry occupying 72
bits. The TOC entries are repeated in order to ?ll the entire
lead-in area. As stated above, a small portion of this TOC
selecting a large enough sampling of data to characteriZe
each disc, it is possible to uniquely identify each disc Which
(or more) of stereo speakers 26 and 28 or headphones (not
shoWn). According to the present embodiment, the CD
changer 20 includes an interconnection to an external com
55 puter 32 such as a personal computer or a dedicated com
information has been used to uniquely identify compact
puter designated to carry out the functions of the present
invention. Computer 32 includes input devices such as a
discs for purposes of the “Custom File” feature in Sony
keyboard, mouse or other input device and a display screen.
compact disc players. In the present invention, a larger
sampling of the data may be required to uniquely identify or
“?ngerprint” each compact disc, since the invention depends
suitable standard or proprietary interface including SCSI or
Computer 32 may be coupled to the CD changer 20 via any
RS-232, or via a local area netWork interconnection as
upon unique identi?cation of all discs in an extremely
extensive database. The solution to this problem is to simply
select a sampling of information Which is large enough to
uniquely identify each disc.
An enormous amount of data is available on each disc
Which can be used to uniquely characteriZe each disc. The
desired. Computer 32 includes a disc drive 36 including any
65
suitable database management softWare (for example, a SQL
compliant database such as those commercially available
from various manufacturers).
Computer 32 also includes a modem 40 (either internal or
external) Which is connected to a telephone netWork 44.
US 6,272,078 B2
7
8
While the present invention contemplates a conventional
display/control panel 82 to receive commands directly from
data modem connection using conventional telephone
the user and to provide visual displays in a more or less
service, those skilled in the art Will appreciate that a number
conventional manner. In addition, controller 68 may be
of alternatives are possible such as ISDN netWorks and
coupled to an infra-red (or RF) receiver 84 Which receives
associated terminal adapters.
control signals from a remote commander.
Controller 68 is used to control the normal functions of
the compact disc changer 20 in a conventional manner and
In operation, the present invention utiliZes the modem 40
to dial up a database 50 Which may be maintained by an
online service provider or made available on the Internet, for
in addition provides the function of (1) receiving memory
updates from the computer interface 64, (2) updating
eXample. Database 50 is preferably industry maintained to
assure the maXimum level of completeness, but could also 10 memory 72, and (3) Sending requests, Via interface 64 fOf
be maintained by the user community, the CD changer
iIlfOrIIlatiOn updates fOr memory 72.
manufacturer, commercial ventures or other sources. DataOne method of operation according to the present inven
base 50 includes identifying information as described above
tion is illustrated in the How chart of FIG. 4 (Which is broken
for a large body of compact discs Which is associated With
doWn into FIGS. 4A and 4B. The process starts at step 100.
tabulated data for each disc. An eXample of the type of data 15 When the user selects or loads a disc at step 104, the
in such a database is illustrated in TABLE 1 beloW. The
controller 68 directs the changer mechanism 74 to read the
preferred method for accessing and utiliZing this information
portion of the disc Which contains the identifying informa
Will described later.
tion or “?ngerprint” of the selected disc at step 106. The
TABLE 1
Movement # 1
Movement # 1
time
Movement Movement # 99
# 99
time
Total play
time
Total # of
Title
(Min, Sec, Frame)
Title
(Min, Sec, Frame)
(Min, Sec, Frame)
Movements
06:38:42
null
00:00:00
78:04:22
8
Fingerprint
CD-Title
Artist
~
The New
Yo-Yo Ma Concerto for Cello
York
Album
and Orchestra:
I. Audacemente
ma sostenuto
As illustrated in TABLE 1, the machine readable data
controller then compares this With the “?ngerprints” stored
in memory 72 at step 110. If the “?ngerprint” is found at step
available on the actual CD can be supplemented substan
tially by the addition of titles of each movement, CD title,
35
Artist, etc. Those skilled in the art Will also understand that
disc selection.
If the “?ngerprint” is not found at step 114, the user is
the database can also include even more detailed informa
tion such as composer, producer, record label, as Well as any
other information Which might be of value to the user. While
TABLE 1 illustrates the data in a form Which might be
interpreted as a ?at ?eld database, those skilled in the art Will
understand that the data may be more readily stored in the
form of a relational database. TABLE 1, is thus intended to
be an illustrative eXample of the database and should not be
considered limiting since those skilled in the art Will under
stand that the database may be designed in numerous Ways
and may contain any relevant data of the designer’s choos
informed via a display (or other message system) indicating
40
45
CD changer 20 of FIG. 2 is illustrated. The interconnection
With computer 32 is provided via a conventional computer
interface 64. Interface 64 is coupled to a microprocessor
based controller 68 to provide communication betWeen the
computer 32 and the controller 68. Controller 68 is coupled
50
to a memory 72 Which is preferably a non-volatile read-Write
memory such as an Electrically Erasable Programmable
55
122. Such manual entry can be accomplished in a manner
similar to that used in commercially available CD changers
to enter so-called “custom ?le” information. After step 122,
control returns to step 116. If the user decides to attempt to
retrieve data, the disc’s “?ngerprint” is sent to the computer
32 via the computer interface 64 at step 124. Under softWare
control, the computer 32 then initiates a query of the
database stored in disc drive 36 to attempt to match the
Read Only Memory (EEPROM) or a battery backed up
Random Access Memory
Memory 72 is used to
“?ngerprint” in question at step 128. If found at step 132, the
store an internal database of information relating to a
60
be more extensive. Controller 68 is coupled to a multiple
disc CD changer mechanism 74 such as that used in the
conventional manner. Controller 68 is also coupled to a
the display/control panel 82. If the user decides to simply
play the disc (for eXample, if the disc is borroWed or
infrequently played), control returns to step 116 Where
conventional operation proceeds. If the user decides to enter
the data manually, a manual entry routine is initiated at step
Referring noW to FIG. 3, a more detailed diagram of the
commercially available Sony CDP-CX153 and associated
signal processing circuitry 78 to provide control thereto in a
that the disc data Was not found in the CD changer’s
database. The user is then asked if the disc is to be played,
if the user Wishes to attempt to retrieve the data from a
database, or if the user desires to enter data manually at step
120. The user may respond via a remote commander or via
ing.
plurality of CDs. In particular, the memory 72 contains
information relating to at least all of the CDs presently
stored in the multiple disc changer mechanism, but may also
114, the CD changer 20 operates in a more or less conven
tional manner at step 116 and then returns to aWait the neXt
appropriate portions of the database are doWnloaded to the
CD changer’s memory at step 138 and control returns to step
116. Thus, the user is received of the burden of manual entry.
In the event the “?ngerprint” is not found at step 132, the
user may be informed at step 139. At this point, the user can
again make a decision as to Whether to simply play the disc,
65
make further attempts to doWnload information from a
database or opt for manual entry of the data. If the user elects
to play the disc, control returns to step 116. If the user elects
US 6,272,078 B2
9
10
to enter the data manually, control returns to step 122.
added to a play list. This is shoWn in FIG. 5 as shaded blocks
in database 176. Once the user selects an item for the play
list, the play list can be revieWed in a play list WindoW or
Manual entry routine 122 should preferably utilize the
connection to the computer 32 in order to permit a simpli?ed
manual entry of the data via the keyboard of computer 32.
screen shoWn as 178. Thus, the user can select as many
If the user elects to make further attempts to doWnload the
data, the computer 32 initiates a call to the remote database
selection for play in a speci?ed order as desired. The
selection is made based upon the ?ll knoWledge of the title
50 via modem 40 and telephone line 44 to attempt to retrieve
the data. Once the database is accessed, computer 32 ini
of the selection and/or the disc, rather than simply the disc
number and track number. In addition, the poWer of the
tiates a query of the remote database to locate the “?nger
database management softWare can be used to search for
print” for the disc in question at step 150.
particular selections to add to the play list. Thus, for
eXample, the user could initiate a search by entering speci?c
10
If the disc’s “?ngerprint”s not found, a message is pro
vided at step 162 indicating such and providing the user With
the option of entry of the data or playing the CD Without data
entry. If the user elects to play, control again returns to step
key Words. The search results can be presented as a list of
possible tracks or discs containing the key Word(s) and the
user can add the track or disc to the play list by selecting the
116. If the user elects to enter data manually, this can be 15 desired match.
carried out at the computer keyboard at step 122. If the
Once the play list is assembled in this manner, the user
can then initiate play of the list at 188. The control interface
“?ngerprint” is found in the remote database at step 158, the
computer 32 doWnloads the data to the local database stored
at 36 at step 166. Computer 32 then proceeds to doWnload
the appropriate data to the changer’s memory 72 at step 170.
can be implemented as a character or graphical user interface
as desired, In one embodiment, the interface can be designed
in a manner similar to that of the Music Box WindoW
Once the data is stored in the database at 36, the user can
available in the Microsoft WindoWsTM operating system and
utiliZe the search poWer of the database management soft
may include all conventional instructions Which could be
Ware to ?nd selections; categoriZe discs, by music type,
artist, etc.; and perform other knoWn database management
issued via a remote control (including stop, play, pause, skip
back, skip forWard, play modes such as shuffle and repeat,
volume, sound ?elds, etc.). In addition, the interface can
activities.
Once the above-referenced interconnection betWeen the
CD changer 20 and computer 32 is established, and once the
local database is created, this arrangement can be used
25
include character and graphic displays of such attributes as
CD and track play time, CD and track time remaining, track
number, track title, CD title, Artist and any other desired
information from the database. Of course, in the Music Box
interface, any desired database information must be entered
advantageously to control operation of the CD changer by
utiliZing the computer’s keyboard, mouse or other input
devices. The computer may be used to provide a friendlier
interface to the user than that provided by a conventional CD
changer to permit the user to start or stop play of a CD, select
a play list, identify a CD or track of a CD for play, search
for a passage in a CD, and in general effect control over all
by the user, and this interface does not have a communica
35
aspects of the CD changer. In order to illustrate this, consider
FIG. 5 Which illustrates ?rst the local database (shoWn as
174) arranged as an array of cells. The above control can be
effected by selecting any of the desired CD changer func
tions from a menu of available functions or by directly
typing commands from the computer keyboard. Those
tion mechanism Which permits the computer to knoW the
disc content of a multiple disc player. Those skilled in the art
Will understand that many variations of this procedure can
be implemented Within the scope of the present invention.
With reference to FIG. 6, one simpli?ed process for
implementing the control of CD changer 20 is illustrated.
Those skilled in the art Will appreciate that many variations
of this implementation are possible, and an implementation
similar to this could be built around the Microsoft Music
Box program as described above. At step 180, the CD
changer 20 is queried by the computer 32 for a listing of all
CD “?ngerprints” for CDs Which are currently installed in
the CD changer. This step can be carried out Whenever the
skilled in the art Will understand that there are many Ways to
represent these control functions in a user interface, for
eXample, a menu bar can be provided With drop doWn menus
or particular control icons can be provided. Such an interface 45 user requests it or Whenever the CD changer detects that a
Will desirably occupy the computer’s display simultaneously
CD has been loaded or unloaded. At step 182, these “?n
gerprints” are checked against the local database 174 and the
local database is restricted to those CDs currently installed
in the database at 182. This produces an image of the CDs
currently installed at step 176. At this point, the user can
With the database tables including data relating to the
compact discs.
In one embodiment of the enhanced control possible With
the present invention, the user may generate a play list by
?rst having the computer 32 query the CD changer 20 to
scan the matrix displayed as 176 and select CDs or tracks to
determine Which CDs are contained Within the changer as
identi?ed in the memory 72. Since the local database 174
can carry information regarding as many CDs as the user
desires Without regard for the content of the CD changer 20,
55
be added to the play list using mouse or keyboard com
mands. Alternatively, the user can implement a search at step
184 by selecting “SEARCH” from a menu (eg a menu bar,
menu button or icon). In this event, the database is searched
the user can then reduce the display of the local database 174
to a representation of only those discs Which are in fact
using conventional query methods at step 186. When the
query is completed, a display of the matching selections is
loaded into the CD changer 20. This reduced representation
176 is shoWn as having only 5 entries corresponding to 5
compact discs. In other embodiments, the loaded discs might
shoWn for the user to select from and control returns to step
be represented in a different color or might be accented in
the “PLAY LIST” command from the menu. At this point the
user can select any variety of play list related commands at
184.
Once one or more selections are made, the user can select
some other manner. Once the user has a display of the
step 190. Step 190 illustrates three such commands, but
available discs including the titles of all tracks on the discs,
the user can create a play list by simply revieWing the
available tracks and then making a selection by, for eXample,
clicking a mouse button When a display cursor points to a
desired selection and then con?rming that the item is to be
65
those skilled in the art Will understand that a full comple
ment of such commands can be programmed as desired. If
the user selects “ADD” at 190, control passes to a routine
192 that adds the selected tracks or CDs to the current play
US 6,272,078 B2
11
12
In operation, the CD changer 220 of FIG. 7 performs
list. If “DELETE” is selected at step 190, control passes to
a routine 196 Which deletes the selected tracks or CDs from
functions similar to those of CD changer 20 of FIGS. 2 and
the current play list. If “DISPLAY” is selected, a WindoW
such as 178 is opened to shoW a list representation of the
play list. Of course, once the play list is represented as list
3, except that the local database search is bypassed. Of
course, those skilled in the art Will appreciate that by
incorporating mass storage into the CD changer 220, the
178, the user can more readily see the listing of songs or CDs
function of computer 32 could be more or less completely
selected in their playing order and can preferably manipulate
the list directly to delete items, rearrange items, etc.
integrated into a single package.
FIG. 8, illustrates one method of operation of CD changer
220. This method starts at step 300, When the user selects or
loads a disc at step 304, the controller 268 directs the
Those skilled in the art Will appreciate that the process of
FIG. 6 is but one partial illustration of a command structure
changer mechanism 74 to read the portion of the disc Which
contains the identifying information or “?ngerprint” of the
selected disc at step 306. The controller then compares this
With the “?ngerprints” stored in memory 72 at step 310. If
the “?ngerprint” is found at step 314, the CD changer 220
Which could be utiliZed to control CD changer 20.
Obviously, many additional useful commands (as discussed
above) can be implemented throughout the process.
Accordingly, the present process is not intended to be
limiting, but rather, illustrative of the type of control that can
be implemented once the computer 32 is linked to the CD
changer 20 and once the poWer of the database is harnessed
for use in controlling the CD changer 20.
15 operates in a more or less conventional manner at step 316
and then returns to aWait the next disc selection at step 304.
If the “?ngerprint” is not found at step 314, the user is
Once the user has access to the entire content of a compact
informed via a display (or other message system) indicating
disc via the database 174, other opportunities for control are
possible. For example, the Sony CDP-CX100 includes a
function knoWn as “custom ?les” in Which, for example, the
volume level for playback can be stored along With each disc
(a so-called “level ?le”). Once the user has access to the
that the disc data Was not found in the CD changer’s internal
memory 72. The user is then asked if the disc is to be played
or if the user Wishes to attempt to retrieve the data from a
database, or if the user desires to enter data manually at step
320. The user may respond via a remote commander or via
database 174 including information regarding every track of
every disc, one can readily appreciate that the individual
attributes of each track can be individually controlled via
computer 36. For example, in an extension of the “custom
?le” function of the CDP-CX100, computer 36 can issue
commands to the CD changer 20 to alter the volume level on
a track by track basis on the playback list. Moreover, other
attributes such as sound ?elds can similarly be manipulated
on a track by track basis. Thus, the play list and/or the local
25
the display/control panel 282. If the user decides to simply
play the disc, control returns to step 316 Where conventional
operation proceeds. If the user decides to enter the data
manually, a manual entry routine is initiated at step 322 and
then control returns to step 316.
If the user Wishes to doWnload information from a data
base at step 320, control passes to step 344 Where the
database can also include entries for attributes associated
With each track as illustrated in TABLE 2 beloW. Such
controller 268 directly initiates a call to the remote database
50 via modem 240 and telephone line 44 to attempt to
retrieve the data. Once the database is accessed, controller
entries can be expanded in a separate WindoW shoWing
268 initiates a query of the remote database to locate the
selections of attributes for each database entry (track).
“?ngerprint” for the disc in question at step 350.
35
If the disc’s “?ngerprint” is not found, a message is
provided at step 362 indicating such and providing the user
With the option of manual entry of the data or playing the CD
Without data entry. If the user elects to play, control again
TABLE 2
Track Title: Come DoWn Easy
Track: 1
Disc: 3
returns to step 316. If the user elects to enter data manually,
Disc Title: Rhymes & Reasons
this can be carried out via the remote commander or the
Artist: Carole King
Play Time: 03:06
display/control panel at step 322. If the “?ngerprint” is
found in the remote database at step 358, the controller 268
doWnloads the data to the changer’s memory 72 at step 370.
Play Attributes:
Level: 65%
Sound Field: Live Room
Thus, by the above processes, the CD changer’s memory
45
Thus, for the example of TABLE 2, at play time the track
can be updated Without need for tedious manual entry
Whenever the disc in question can be found in the comput
er’s local database or When the information can be doWn
loaded from a remote database. For the sake of not obscuring
Will be played at a volume level of 65% With a signal
processing sound ?eld “live room”. Of course, other user
the present invention With unnecessary details, the above
controllable attributes can similarly be stored and assigned
process has been described Without the details of error
on a track by track basis.
Referring noW to FIG. 7, a second embodiment of the
trapping, database format, communications protocol for
contact With the remote database, full messaging and other
details Which are not required for the understanding of the
present invention. In addition, the above process, of course,
present invention is shoWn. In this embodiment, a compact
disc changer 220 incorporates an internal modem 240 Which
operates under the control of controller 268 to access remote 55 assumes that the computer is active at the time of the need
for contact by the CD changer. These details are Well Within
the abilities of those skilled in the art and need not be
explained here. In addition, as CD formats evolve to incor
porate speci?c identifying information stored on the disc for
database 50 via telephone line 44. In this embodiment, a
portion of the function of computer 32 is absorbed into the
compact disc changer 220. The function and operation of
controller 268 is similar to that of controller 68 except that
the additional functions required to control modem 240 and
this purpose (or to contain the actual database information),
the present invention contemplates utiliZing this information
the additional search and communications functions are
to the extent it is available.
incorporated therein. Infrared receiver 284 is similar in
function to that of infrared receiver 84, except that it may
require a broader vocabulary of commands in the absence of
Many alternative embodiments of the above processes
Will occur to those skilled in the art. For example, the
processes described can be carried out With the CD in
the computer 32. Similarly, display/control panel 282 is
similar to that of display/control panel 82 except that in the
absence of the computer display and keyboard, a more
extensive display and keyboard function is desirable.
65
question playing While the database updating process is
carried out. In another variation, the user may select default
ansWers to the doWnload queries of steps 120, 138, 162, 320,
US 6,272,078 B2
13
14
or 362. In addition, although the possibility of having tWo
discs Which have identical “?ngerprints” is remote, the
5. The method of claim 4, further comprising the step of
manually updating said EEPROM in the event said identi
fying portion is found in neither said ?rst nor said second
process can provide the user With the ability to select among
them if the situation Were to occur.
database.
6. A method of updating a memory in a recorded media
While the present invention has been described in terms
of a compact disc as the media containing the program
player, comprising the steps of:
material, the present invention also contemplates equivalent
reading a portion of a recorded medium Which uniquely
identi?es said recorded medium as storing particular
embodiments in other music or video or other recording
media Which might not contain machine readable informa
tion Which Would be useful to a user of the media. For
eXample, an equivalent embodiment can be devised for
media such as the MiniDiscTM, digital video discs or other as
10
yet undeveloped media. Accordingly, the present invention
should not be limited to the illustrated format.
Thus it is apparent that in accordance With the present
invention, an apparatus that fully satis?es the objectives,
15
aims and advantages is set forth above. While the invention
content;
determining Whether the memory in the recorded media
player includes supplementary information that is asso
ciated With the particular content but Which is not
stored on the recorded medium, the supplementary
information including at least one of a title and a name
of an artist;
has been described in conjunction With speci?c
embodiments, it is evident that many alternatives,
modi?cations, permutations and variations Will become
apparent to those skilled in the art in light of the foregoing
description. Accordingly, it is intended that the present
querying a database residing outside said recorded media
invention embrace all such alternatives, modi?cations and
variations as fall Within the scope of the appended claims.
What is claimed is:
1. A method of updating a memory in an audio compact
doWnloading said supplementary information from said
player for said supplementary information if said
supplementary information is not found in said
memory; and
database to said memory.
25
disc changer, comprising the steps of:
reading a portion of a compact disc Which uniquely
identi?es said compact disc as storing particular musi
cal content;
determining Whether the memory in the audio compact
disc changer includes supplementary information that
is associated With the particular musical content but
Which is not stored on the compact disc, the supple
7. The method of claim 6, Wherein said database resides
in a computer coupled to said compact disc changer.
8. The method of claim 6, Wherein said database resides
in a remote location and Wherein said querying step includes
the step of accessing said database via a modem connection.
9. The method of claim 6, further comprising the step of
storing playback attributes for entries in said local database.
10. The method of claim 9, further comprising the step of
controlling playback of said recorded medium in accordance
With said playback attributes stored in said local database.
11. The method of claim 9, Wherein said recorded medium
may include a plurality of tracks and Wherein playback
mentary information including at least one of a title for
a movement, a title for the compact disc, and a name of 35
an artist;
attributes are stored on a track-by-track basis for each track
querying a database residing outside said compact disc
of said recorded medium.
changer for said supplementary information if said
12. The method of claim 1, Wherein said portion includes
TOC data and Wherein said reading step includes reading
supplementary information is not found in said
memory; and
doWnloading said supplementary information from said
database to said memory.
2. The method of claim 1, Wherein said database resides
in a computer coupled to said compact disc changer.
3. The method of claim 1, Wherein said database resides
in a remote location and Wherein said querying step includes
the step accessing said database via a modem connection.
4. A method of updating a memory in an audio compact
45
said compact disc’s TOC data.
13. The method of claim 1, Wherein said database resides
in a remote location and Wherein said doWnloading step
includes accessing said database in said remote location.
14. The method of claim 1, Wherein playback attributes
are stored in said database and further including the step of
playing back said compact disc in accordance With said
playback attributes.
uniquely identi?es said compact disc, said identifying
15. The method of claim 2, Wherein playback attributes
are stored in said database and further including the step of
playing back said compact disc in accordance With said
portion including a portion of said compact disc’s TOC
playback attributes.
disc changer, comprising the steps of:
reading an identifying portion of a compact disc Which
data;
comparing said identifying portion With identifying por
tions stored in an EEPROM;
querying a ?rst database residing in a computer situated
55
16. The method of claim 14, Wherein playback attributes
are stored in said database and further including the step of
playing back said compact disc in accordance With said
playback attributes.
outside and connected to said compact disc changer for
17. The method of claim 6, Wherein said recorded media
said identifying portion of said disc if said identifying
portion is not found in said EEPROM;
player includes a compact disc player for playing compact
disc media.
18. The method of claim 6, Wherein said recorded media
player includes a MiniDiscTM.
19. The method of claim 6, Wherein said recorded media
querying a second database residing in remote location
via a modem connected to said computer for said
identifying portion of said disc if said identifying
player includes a digital video disc player for playing digital
portion is not found in said ?rst database; and
doWnloading data from said ?rst or second database to
said EEPROM corresponding to said identifying por
tion.
65
video discs.
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