DIRECTIONS - Ink Jet Patents web site

DIRECTIONS - Ink Jet Patents web site
DIRECTIONS
from Pivotal Resources
Ink jet technology
Patents
January/February 2011
Authors
Tom Ashley
Dr. Phil Bentley
Dr. Clare Conboy
Mike Willis
Highlights:
•
Fujifilm Dimatix’s new silicon piezo printhead
•
Updated MEMS printhead from Silverbrook
•
Inside Silverbrook’s wide format printer and web press
•
Canon’s photo printer with page-wide arrays
•
New pigmented inks from Canon
•
Samsung’s encapsulated colorant inks
•
UV-curable ink for glass substrates from Sun Chemical
•
Fluids for ink jet finishing of textiles from Ten Cate
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Industry news............................................................................................................................ 3
patent review and commentary.......................................................................................... 5
Printhead technologies...................................................................................................................................5
Thermal printheads........................................................................................................................................ 5
Piezo printheads............................................................................................................................................... 5
MEMS printheads............................................................................................................................................... 8
System design..................................................................................................................................................... 9
Product designs and applications......................................................................................................10
Ink jet inks................................................................................................................................................................ 19
Ink jet substrates................................................................................................................................................ 25
INDEX OF INK JET PATENTS & APPLICATIONS PUBLISHED January/February 2011...... 29
Disclaimer
While Pivotal Resources takes care in preparing this analysis of patents and applications it has
no control over any implementation resulting from this analysis or advice. Pivotal Resources
therefore cannot accept any liability for losses, whether consequential or otherwise, which may
arise from such implementation.
Pivotal Resources does not represent itself as a supplier of those services usually provided by
lawyers and patent agents; and Pivotal Resources recommends that clients seek advice from their
own advisers where appropriate before implementing any decisions based on the contents of this
report.
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Industry news
Tom Ashley, Pivotal Resources USA
Kornit Digital (Rosh-Ha’ayin, Israel), a developer and manufacturer of ink jet printers and ink for
the textile industry, announced the Kornit Avalanche 951 direct-to-garment printer, targeted
primarily at the tee-shirt market.
The Avalanche 951 is a dual-pallet printer for mass production of garments. The unit incorporates
twelve 256-nozzle printheads (8 CMYK + 4 White) and can print up to 300 garments an hour, in
sizes up to 23.5 x 35 inches. It uses formaldehyde-free, pigmented inks and prints at resolutions
up to 636 x 363 dpi.
Memjet (San Diego, CA) announced partnerships with three companies to bring colour office
printers to market this year. Computer manufacturer Lenovo (Research Triangle Park, NC, USA)
plans to offer an office printer in the China market later this year. WeP Peripherals (Mysore, India)
expects to bring an office printer to consumers in India, and Kpowerscience Co. (Taipai, Taiwan)
will launch a printer in Taiwan.
Memjet is targeting three other markets for its printhead technology. The first is labels and
packaging, and it already has partners who are shipping in this market. It is pursuing the
photo retail kiosk market, as well as the wide-format printer business. It expects to announce
partnerships in those markets later this year.
Xerox Corporation introduced what it called the world’s first high-speed waterless ink jet system.
Using its proprietary solid ink technology, Xerox has developed a granulated, resin-based ink
formulation. The key benefit is the elimination of water so that consistent colour can be printed
on low-cost offset paper that exhibits no cockle or strike-through. In addition, the formulation of
the ink enables document de-inking, which can be difficult to achieve with other inks.
Xerox’s Production Inkjet System can print at nearly 500 feet per minute and is targeted at
applications such as personalized direct marketing, transpromo and publishing applications. It is
expected to ship in quantity during the second half of 2011.
Hewlett Packard announced a drug research application for its ink jet technology that enables
pharmaceutical companies to more efficiently develop better drugs through precise dispensing of
dosages. The technology can also be used in evaluating drug safety and effectiveness, testing for
drug interactions and developing new drugs.
HP has worked with the medical instrument OEM Tecan (Männedorf, Switzerland), a provider of
solutions in biopharmaceuticals, forensics and clinical diagnostics. The two firms have developed
the HP Digital Dispenshead and the D300 Digital Dispenser instrument, which can accurately
dispense quantities from 15 pl to 5 µl.
HP is also working with several leading pharmaceutical companies to incorporate its dispensing
technology into their own workflows.
Canon introduced three new MFPs, and a new printer, in Europe. The Canon Pixma MX360 is
a print-scan-copy-fax device with a 30-sheet automatic document feed (ADF). It has ISO ESAT
speeds of approximately 8.4 ipm mono and 4.8 ipm colour. It prints a minimum drop size of 2
pl. and can achieve a print resolution of 4,800 x 1,200 dpi. It features PictBridge and can save
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documents as PDF or JPG files onto flash memory and memory cards without a PC. It has a 2.44
inch colour display and USB and Ethernet connectivity. Estimated street price is $79.99.
The Pixma MX410 has the same multi-functionality, ADF and USB/Ethernet connectivity. ISO
ESAT speeds are approximately 8.7 ipm in monochrome and 5.0 ipm in colour. It also has a 2.44
inch colour display, but adds WiFi connectivity, allowing it to print from iPhones and iPads. It has
an estimated street price of $99.99.
The Pixma MX885 is also a print-scan-copy-fax device and adds a 35-sheet duplexing ADF and
a new dual function panel user interface. It features an upgraded 2.95 inch colour display. WiFi
and Ethernet connectivity are standard. It uses 5 single ink tanks and uses dye-based inks with
a minimum 1 pl. drop size. Maximum print resolution is 9,600 dpi. ISO ESAT print speeds are
approximately 12.5 ipm in monochrome and 9.3 ipm colour and it has an estimated price of
$299.99.
The Pixma iX6540 is a compact A3+ single-function printer that uses five individually replaceable
ink tanks and uses dye inks. Minimum drop size is one pl., while maximum print resolution is 9,600
dpi. ISO ESAT speeds for document printing are 11.3 ipm in monochrome and 8.8 ipm in colour.
$319.99 is the estimated street price.
Kodak introduced the ESP C310, an entry-level MFP featuring a new print engine and a 3-D
printing feature. It is a print-scan-copy device featuring USB and WiFi connectivity.
The new print engine uses only CMYK inks, eliminating the photo black and the gloss-enhancer
used in earlier products. Kodak claims that print quality is equivalent to the older models, thanks
to improved inks but will continue to use six inks in higher end products. The C310 is rated at 20
ppm in black and in colour and has ISO ESAT speeds of 6 and 4 ppm respectively. Print resolution
is said to be 9,600 dpi; dual drop sizes are 2.7 (cyan and magenta) and 6.5 pl. (black and yellow). It
features a 1.5 inch LCD display.
The 3-D printing feature uses familiar anaglyph technology requiring special glasses; two paperframed ones are included. One camera is used to take two images, a few inches apart, and these
are processed by the included software.
It appears that the new 30-series cartridges will cause the cost-per-page for the C310 to be higher
than that of it predecessors. The cost-per-page of the older 10-series cartridges was also increased
by about 10%. The printer sells for $99.99.
To stay informed about product launches and industry news, Pivotal Resources recommends the
Hard Copy Observer newsletter published by Lyra Research, Newtonville, MA, USA - http://www.
lyra.com tel: +1 617 454 2600
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patent review and commentary
Printhead technologies
Mike Willis, Pivotal Resources Limited
Thermal printheads
US 2011/0018938 A1Printing device
Hewlett-Packard Company
Thermal ink jet printheads, and several new piezo printheads, have components such as the main
channel sections made from silicon. HP has found that when using pigmented inks with charged
dispersants or a high pH solvent, silicon can leach into the ink. If the presence of silicon particles
exceeds 10 parts per million (ppm) then there is a risk of the precipitation of silicon rings at the
nozzle, causing blockages.
In the figure a typical thermal ink jet head
is shown, with a nozzle plate 68 formed on
a silicon substrate. Heaters 38 are on the
underside of the substrate. At the end of
the manufacturing process a coating 50
is applied over the entire exposed surface
where ink could be present. The coating
can be anything suitable that will prevent
ink penetrating to the silicon substrate. One
suitable material is silicon dioxide, coated
using a PECVD process. This is deposited in
two stages, from the front and back of the
printhead, to a thickness of 20,000 Angstroms.
Tests where a substrate was immersed in 10 ml of ink for 2 days at 70C showed a silicon
concentration of 19.5 ppm but only 1.5 ppm when coated. In another test printheads were loaded
with ink and left at 60C for 7 days. Uncoated, silicon concentrations of 53 ppm were found in the
ink, but with coated substrates only 7.4 ppm.
Piezo printheads
US 2011/0007117 A1MEMS jetting structure for dense packing
WO 2011/005699 A2MEMS jetting structure for dense packing
Fujifilm Dimatix, Inc.
Dimatix has been developing piezo printheads with silicon components for many years now, most
recently the Samba fixed array. This is a high specification printhead, but is quite complex and
we suspect expensive to manufacture, which might limit its application to high-end products.
The new design here draws on some of the features of the Samba printhead, but simplifies the
construction to increase performance and reduce costs.
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The example given shows a long thin printhead comparable to the
Dimatix S-class and Sapphire printheads used for industrial printing.
This has a silicon die 103 mounted on an integrated circuit interposer
104, in turn mounted on a lower housing 322. These components are
located within mounting frame 110 which has locating features 142
and pins 152 to fix the frame to a print bar. Ink circulates through the
actuator chambers, through the ink connections 162 and 166.
Although the printhead is long and narrow, the nozzle layout appears
to be similar to the Samba design, that is with a two dimensional
array of actuators to achieve a high single pass print resolution.
Below, the cross section through the printhead shows the ink flow
in more detail. At the bottom is the printhead die 103, consisting of
main layer 122 with the piezo actuator 190 and channel plate. Fixed
to the bottom is a nozzle plate 184. At the top is the integrated circuit
interposer 104. On the lower surface of the interposer is a transistor
202 that drives the actuator. The electrical connection to the
actuator is via solder bumps 222a and 222b. The ink flows along line 124, through the interposer,
along channel 276 into the actuator chamber, then via channel 272 to the outlet 172. There is a
membrane 806, made from a material such as SU8, that seals the ink connection between the two
components and prevents leakage into the electronics and actuator.
Note that compared to the Samba
design, here there is no long descender
to the nozzle. The actuator chamber is
around 125-250 microns along its longest
dimension, with a height of roughly
half that. This allows drops of 2 pl to be
generated from a 15 microns nozzle at
frequencies in the range of 180-390 kHz at
a low drive voltage such as 17 volts. This
would give a print speed of 4-8 m/second at
1,200 dpi.
Here a three dimensional drawing shows
the top face of the printhead die. The
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piezo actuators 192 are arranged in an array, and the top ring electrodes 194 are also shown.
The actuators are made using a thin film technique. The apertures 802 are for the ink flow into
the actuators. Electrical contacts 810 allow a flexible PCB to be connected. Apertures 812 allow
ground connections to the bottom face of the actuators.
The patent application describes the manufacturing processes. The die width is 33 mm, so
presumably several dies will need to be butted to achieve a useful printhead width, but this is not
explained.
Overall the design is much more compact than the Samba design, where the drive chips are
mounted at the sides of the printhead dies, rather than above the die as in this design. The
performance is very high, enabled by the elimination of the descender to the nozzle. Dimatix also
claims that at least 88 dies can be formed on a six inch wafer, so the manufacturing costs should
also be reduced.
US 2011/0037813 A1 Inkjet printer head
Rohm Co., Ltd.
Rohm have a long history of making thermal printheads for direct thermal printing. They
published a few ink jet printhead patents a decade ago, but as far as we are aware nothing was
commercially launched. Perhaps they have plans to enter the market again, as here they show a
design for a piezo printhead. The piezo actuator deforms the nozzle plate, deflecting it into the
ink chamber, and thereby forcing ink through the nozzle.
Here a section through a printhead is shown, with the drive circuits on the left and the actuator on
the right. The main substrate 2 is silicon, on to which a silicon dioxide diaphragm layer 5 is formed.
The diaphragm has a thickness of 0.5-2 microns. The piezo material 8 is PZT, and is formed in an
annular ring. The upper electrode 9 is also an annular ring, and interconnect 16 connects this to
ground.
The bottom electrode 7 also has an interconnect 15 which joins it to the drive electronics 72. Over
the top of the actuator is a silicon dioxide interlevel insulating film 14 on top of a hydrogen barrier
film 13. Finally there is a silicon nitride surface protecting film 61 covering everything. The driver
72 is a MOSFET.
One of the final stages of the manufacturing process is etching of the silicon substrate to form
the actuator chamber and nozzle. First main cavity 62 is etched, followed by etch 63 which
undercuts the diaphragm layer 5. This allows the diaphragm to vibrate under the action of the
piezo material. Finally the nozzle 64 is etched. Multiple actuators and nozzles are formed on the
substrate in a 2D array.
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US 2011/0043564 A1 Inkjet head and method of manufacturing the same
Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd.
This patent application describes a silicon roof-mode piezo printhead similar to ones we have seen
before from Samsung. The intended use is listed as printing conductive tracks with molten gold
or silver, and for depositing materials during the manufacture of LCDs and OLEDs. When jetting,
piezo printheads generate heat, which affects the ink viscosity of the jetting fluid and hence the
jetting performance. In addition it might be necessary to heat the printhead to deliberately lower
the fluid viscosity in order for jetting to take place. One way to achieve temperature control of
the printhead is to heat the ink and circulate it through the ink manifold. However this has the
disadvantage of not controlling the temperature around the actuators and nozzles, the most
critical areas. In addition it requires a large
volume ink system, which may not be desirable
if the cost of the jetting fluid is high.
The proposed solution is to incorporate
channels within the silicon printhead through
which a coolant or heated fluid can be
circulated. The printhead comprises three layers
– 110, 120 and 130. These are separately etched
to form features such as the ink feed hole 116,
manifold 122, pressure chamber 112 and nozzle
132. The piezo actuator 140 is mounted on
top of a thinned diaphragm layer. In addition
channels 152a and 152b are etched, through
which the temperature control fluid can be
circulated.
MEMS printheads
US 2011/0018939 A1 Inkjet printhead assembly having backside electrical connection
WO 2011/011807 A1Inkjet printhead assembly having backside electrical connection
US 2011/0018940 A1Printhead integrated circuit configured for backside electrical
connection
US 2011/0018941 A1Printhead integrated comprising through-silicon connectors
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
One of the drawbacks of the Memjet
printheads that we have previously
described is that the electrical
connections from the silicon MEMS
printhead are via wire bonds on the
front face to a flexible PCB. This is
shown in the first figure, where 150
is a wire bond rising from close to
the nozzles 102. The wire bonds are
encapsulated to protect them from
damage.
The encapsulation and bonds means
that the nozzle plate is non-planar,
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making it difficult to run a wiper blade over the surface to keep it clean. In addition the printhead
cannot be coated with PDMS, a hydrophobic coating, which the inventors have found leads to a
significant improvement in both print quality and nozzle maintenance.
With the improved design described
here the connections are made from
the backside of the silicon. Vias 14 are
formed through the silicon layer 20
during the MEMS processing to the
contacts pads 24 seen in the previous
design. The contact pads themselves
connect through the MEMS layer 26
to the underlying CMOS circuitry layer
113. The vias 14 are insulated from
the silicon by coating 21, which may
comprise a Si or SiO2 layer and inner
tantalum layer. The tantalum minimises the diffusion of copper into the silicon substrate, and acts
as a seed layer for the electrodeposition of the copper.
The backside connection is to a TAB film 8 on the surface of which are conductive tracks 10. Both
the PCB and the silicon are bonded together on to the LCP channel moulding 124.
Not only is there the advantage of the front face now being planar, but less silicon can also be
used. The previous design had 60-70% of the silicon area dedicated to the nozzles, but the new
design allows 80%, reducing the cost of the MEMS chips.
System design
US 2011/0012973 A1Printed matter seasoning apparatus and method, and inkjet recording
apparatus
EP 2 275 271 A1Printed matter seasoning apparatus and method, and inkjet recording
apparatus Fujifilm Corporation
One of the key issues surrounding digital presses is drying. Ink jet printing using water-based
inks has to be dried sufficiently so that the image will not be disturbed by subsequent handling.
The drying process also uses a lot of energy to remove the water from printing. In the Fujifilm
sheet-fed press a halogen heater is first used as part of the drying process, followed by heated
rollers. However the sheet exiting the press may still have excess moisture content compared to
when it entered the press, and the moisture content will be distributed according to the image.
In an extreme example, a large solid area may contain a high water content, but the areas where
no printing has occurred may have been dried so that the moisture content is below the original
level.
The concern is that the variations in moisture content will
cause distortions in the substrate which will affect any
subsequent processing, particularly printing on the back
side. This patent application therefore proposes a method
to season sheets after printing and restore the correct and
uniform moisture content.
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Tests were carried out where sheets of a coated offset paper
were printed with a large solid area, and after printing the water
volume retained was 2.5 g/m2. The sheet 18 was placed in the test
rig within a defined gap h, and a controlled airflow was passed
through the gap using fan 30 until the retained water volume had
dropped to 0.5 g/m2. It was found that as long as the airflow was
greater than 0.02 m3/minute then the sheet would be seasoned in
15 minutes.
This then led to the design of a seasoning unit shown here.
Sheets 70 are stacked in the tray, which is closed at the sides 64
and 65 but open along one edge. On the opposite edge fans 54
blow air at the room temperature and humidity through gaps 62.
The sheets are levitated by the airflow, and to stop them blowing
away a cover 76 is used on top.
The idea is that sheets should be conditioned after printing, and
between single and double-sided printing. This method not only
removes excess moisture from printed areas but restores the
correct moisture content to unprinted areas.
Product designs and applications
US 2011/0025742 A1Print engine with ink supply conduits extending from a long side of
elongate printhead carriage
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
This is one of 40 patent applications published this issue concerning a print engine for a wide
format printer. We normally list the set of patents at the beginning of the review, but in this case
we refer you to the index where you will find them all highlighted in bold type. Each patent
application has different claims, but most of the patents cover the same wide range of topics so it
is only necessary to consider one for a broad understanding of the design. The 18 inventors are all
from San Diego, California, USA.
This being a Memjet engine, the printhead is a fixed page-wide array with the substrate moving
underneath. By wide format, Silverbrook means a print width of at least 36 inches. Compared
to scanning heads, the use of a fixed array printhead this wide requires some rethinking of the
engineering within the print engine to retain the required tolerances.
The Memjet technology is very efficient compared
to previous thermal ink jet technologies where the
heater is in contact with the silicon substrate. The
patent application points out that a conventional
600 dpi thermal ink jet printhead 54 inches
(1,372mm) wide requires 136,000 nozzles and
would generate 24 kilowatts of heat during
operation. This would pose not only a problem
of cooling the printhead, but would require the
cooling system to vent outside of the room.
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The first drawing shows the layout of the machine. Paper is fed from roll 4 and a series of rollers to
printheads 42, 44, 46, 48 and 50. There are five 8.5 inch wide printhead modules mounted in two
staggered rows 56. As the paper passes the printheads it is held flat by fixed vacuum platen 26,
then transported away by vacuum belts 20. Just before the printheads is a cutter 62 to separate
a sheet from the roll after printing. If a new printhead module is installed a test sheet is printed
and the image scanned by a scanning head 18. The interpretation of the dot pattern printed
allows the electronic adjustment and alignment of the printing. Finally ink tanks 60 feed inks to
accumulators 70 which are connected to all of the printhead modules.
Here is a top view of the print engine. The printheads 42-50 can be seen in the two staggered
rows. The rows are positioned as close together as possible to reduce any image defects if the
paper is fed slightly skew. The feed roller 16 is in fact a grit shaft, designed to prevent any slipping
of the substrate. Once the paper is past the printheads it is transported by the vacuum belts 20.
Between the two printheads 44 and 48 is an encoder wheel 38 that detects the substrate speed
allowing the image along the substrate to be printed without distortion. The five printhead
modules give a print width of 42 inches. The scanning sensor 18 is shown mounted above the
vacuum belts.
The printhead zone has a width of 2.72 inches (69 mm) in the feed direction. The inventors
consider it important to minimise this distance to minimise the force required on the feed roller
to drive the paper through the print zone, and to minimise the vacuum pressure required by the
platen.
Here a side view of the print engine shows the printheads 42-50. Encoder wheel 24 rotates in
conjunction with pinch roller 38. On the left, positioned above the exit path from the printheads,
is a channel 34. This is an ink mist collector, and small airflow ensuring that any fine mist
generated by the printheads during operation is removed away from the vacuum belt assembly.
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Here a printhead module is shown. There are two sets
of ink sockets 142, forming inlets and outlets. At the
bottom of the module is a liquid crystal polymer (LCP)
moulding 138 that distributes ink to the printhead ICs
mounted along its underside.
Below the printhead module is shown loosely fitted in
its holder. The fluid couplings 148 and 150 are shown
retracted. Ink is fed to the couplings via pipes 152. The
actuator lever 154 retracts both of the fluid couplings
from the ink sockets, and at the same time cams to
the side of the lever pinch the ink pipes. When a new
printhead has been fitted, the lever engages the fluid
couplings and un-pinch the ink pipes.
The pressure of the fluid couplings also presses the printhead module in its mount and against the
electrical connections which are on the far side of the printhead module.
Above, one of the service modules is shown – there is one per printhead module. The main body
172 is a rotating carousel with three maintenance stations – a capper (on the far face, not shown),
a spittoon/vacuum platen 200 and a microfiber wiping roller 196. Any of these can be brought
to the top opposite the printhead. The carousel is mounted between two sliding mounts 174,
allowing it to be raised and lowered as well as rotated.
To cap the printheads the carousel is rotated to bring the capping station to the top, then cams
move the cap upwards into contact with the printhead. To begin printing, the carousel is lowered
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and the spittoon/vacuum platen is brought to the top. The top face of the vacuum platen is level
with the paper path. The vacuum helps keep the paper flat and away from the printhead nozzles
during printing. The spittoon is used to collect any “keep wet” drops fired between sheets, to
collect mist between sheets, and also to allow over the edge printing – both leading and trailing
edges, and also at the sides. The centre of the carousel is porous, allowing it to collect waste ink,
which then exits at the end of the shaft and via pipes into a waste tank.
To clean the nozzles, a wiper roller is raised and rotated in contact with the printhead. The roller
is covered with a microfiber material which absorbs and removes ink and contaminants from the
nozzle plate. The microfibers are cleaned by scraping against a wiper blade. An alternate scheme
uses three soft polymer blades to wipe the nozzles.
As the five printheads each have
independently controlled service modules,
they can be used in various configurations.
If no printing is being carried out then all
heads are capped. If the substrate is the
full print width of the machine then all of
the service modules will be rotated so the
spittoon/vacuum platens are uppermost.
If the substrate is narrower than the full
print width, as shown in the figure, then
the outer modules are set to capped mode.
All three of the centre modules are orientated with the spittoon/vacuum platens uppermost, but
two of the modules 222 and 226 are used in spittoon mode while the centre module 224 is used
in platen mode. In both vacuum and spittoon modes air is drawn into the service module, the
spittoon helping to collect any stray drops at the edges of the print.
We will now describe the ink supply
system. Large ink reservoirs 266 are
gravity fed by ink bottles (not shown) to
accumulator reservoirs 70. The ink level
in the accumulators is set by float 286 and
valve 284. This sets the negative pressure
at the nozzles to -75 mm, as shown by
lines 280 and 292. The drawing shows
the fluid system and printheads being
primed. When the priming process begins
printhead valves 298 and 300 are closed
and bypass valve 278 is open. Peristaltic
pump 268 draws ink around the system,
with the ink from the accumulator tanks
passing through filter 288, filling all of the
feed pipes. The ink system shown is for
one colour, with only one printhead 42
shown. The other heads are fed by pipes
314. Once the pipes are filled printhead
valves 298 and 300 are opened and bypass
valve 278 closed.
During printing the bypass valve is
opened allowing ink to be drawn into
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the printheads from both sides. The peristaltic pump is stationary during printing, the ink being
drawn by capillary flow by the printheads. The negative pressure difference to the nozzles hinders
this flow. However the negative pressure not only prevents ink drawl from the nozzles, but also
cross contamination from one colour nozzle row to another. This is especially important with the
Memjet printheads as all 5 colour ink nozzles are within a 1 mm width.
As the printheads will require frequent
replacement, it is important to be able to
extract the ink from the old heads before
exchange. Here the depriming scheme is
shown. To begin with the bypass valve 278
is opened and the printhead valves 298
and 300 closed. The peristaltic pump 268
is then run in reverse, pushing ink back into
the accumulator through filter 288. Once
the pipes are empty the valve settings are
reversed and the printheads are emptied of
ink. After replacement the new printhead or
printheads are primed.
The patent applications contain around 40 figures, many of which show exploded views of the
print engine and components. Unfortunately the quality of reproduction is not very good in the
copies we have, so we have not included them, but we recommend readers to look at the patents
for a fuller understanding of this wide format print engine.
US 2011/0043554 A1 Continuous web printer for printing non-identical copies within a print
run
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
This is one of 8 patent applications concerning a high speed web press. The other patent
applications are in the series 2011/0043580-43586. The application refers several times to the HP
web press, pointing out its large footprint and high cost. Here 12 arrays of 5 Memjet printheads
are used to print on both sides of a web at up to 2 metres/second. The high print speed is
achieved by running each printhead with 10 rows with a single colour, so that there are 10 rows of
nozzles per colour instead of 2. This gives a fivefold increase in linear print speed. The six arrays
of printheads allow up to six colours to be printed. Suggested configurations are CCMMYK of
CMYKKIR where IR is an infra-red absorbing ink that is invisible to human visible wavelengths, and
is used to print machine readable codes across
graphics and text – the basis of Silverbrook’s
Hyperlabel technology.
The first figure shows the size of the web press.
Not shown are industry-standard web winders
and unwinders that are used for web handling.
The web 14 enters the machine at 16 and exits at
18. At the front of the machine removable panels
22 and 24 allow access to the printhead arrays.
Next the inside of the machine is shown, although
without some of the support structure. The web
14 enters at the top left and travels horizontally
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under the top array of printheads 28 that print the first side. The paper then passes downwards
and then back to the left under the second array of printheads 30 that print the backside. The
paper path then reverses and exits the machine at the right. As the paper web passes under the
printheads it is guided by a set of rollers arranged in an arc. These are mounted on frames 32
which are pivoted around shaft 70. To gain access to the printheads the web guide frames are
lowered by jacking mechanism 74. The upper and lower guide frames are connected together by
arms 76 so both move together. Once they are lowered either of the printhead mounting trays
can be pulled out to the front of the machine as they are mounted on roller bearing slides.
The design also incorporated automatic web threading. At each side of the paper path is a cable
46 that stretches around a series of pulleys. The pulleys are free to rotate on the shafts and are not
driven by the rollers. The web is attached to a clamp 44 which is parked close to the web entrance.
With the web guide roller frames in their lowered position, the web can then be drawn through
the machine by these guide cables.
Other system components are shown in the drawing. There are two infra-red heaters 56 and
58 positioned over the web after each print array. The printed drop sizes are very small – 1.1
picolitres – and therefore the small amount of ink printed is dried very quickly. This enables a
relatively short paper path through the print engine, with only a small distance required for the
driers. The total path from the beginning of the first engine to the end of printing the second side
is 3.5 metres.
Also visible are the ink header tanks 98. Two sets of these supply ink at the correct pressure to the
printhead modules.
Mounted across the paper path close to the exit is an image scanner, unfortunately not numbered
in this figure but around half way up the final vertical paper path. The sensors span both sides of
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the web and read test patterns printed at least at the beginning of each web. These test patterns
are used to register the images between printhead modules across the web and between colours
along the web.
Just before the first heater, but on the reverse
side of the web, is a particulate trap 62 – in effect
a web cleaner . Rotating blades 212 brush the
web surface to remove paper dust, ink aerosol or
other contaminants before the web passes the
second set of printheads. The blades are cleaned
as they pass the vacuum vent 216. It is interesting
that this device is fitted between print stations
and not before the first one, suggesting that its
main purpose is to reduce print defects caused by
contamination generated within the machine.
An alternative to the web guide rollers is an
array of air platens 220 shown here. Air is blown
through the fine holes on the upper surface of the
air platens to provide a cushion of air and hence
reduce the friction of the web during printing.
Each of the platens is mounted on a rotating
shaft, which are then driven by a gear train 224
and 228. After printing and web removal, the air
platen frames 88 are lowered from the printheads,
and the motor connected to gear 22 is operated
to rotate the air platens. This brings maintenance
stations 90 mounted on the backs of the air
platens into a position opposite the printheads.
By closing the frames the printheads can then be
wiped and capped.
US 2011/0012972 A1Recording apparatus and sheet processing method
Canon USA Inc.
This patent application describes an ink jet photofinishing
system with an A4 paper width and fixed array printheads.
Therefore this may describe some of the technology inside
the Canon DreamLabo 5000 production photo printer that
was recently announced.
Rolls of coated photo paper are stored in cassettes 11a and
11b. The paper passes along a path shown by the arrows b,
c and d where it passes under printheads 4. After printing
it passes down through a cutter unit 5. The cut sheets then
pass through a speed absorption unit 7, which outputs
the sheets into the dryer unit 6 at the base of the machine.
Finally the sheets exit at h where they will pass into a
stacking unit (not shown).
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Just above the dryer unit are ink tanks 9. At the top of the machine is the electrical control unit 8.
Here the printheads 4 are shown in their mounting frame. Very little information is given except
that photos up to A4 can be printed, suggesting the print width is at least 210 mm. The process
speed is given as 75 mm/second. The DreamLabo 5000 is designed for printing photobooks, not
just photos, hence the page size.
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Ink jet inks
Dr. Phil Bentley
US 2011/0023749 A1 Colored particles
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
One way of classifying a pigment is as a colorant that is insoluble in the liquid used to disperse
it. Although this is accurate, most pigments are actually totally intractable colorants, insoluble
in all normal liquids as a result of their high levels of molecular conjugation, which results in very
stiff backbones and limited degrees of freedom. Dyes, in comparison, are molecularly dispersed
molecules based upon very similar chemical structures, but with pendant solubilising groups.
This patent describes something between, as it attempts to produce low particle size, low
size variation pigment dispersions. Such ultra-fine pigments are suggested to be required for
transparency, storage stability and for improving penetration into porous media.
The first step in the proposed process is to take a solvent soluble, and water non-soluble dye, such
as dye 1 (above) and dissolve it in an organic, water immiscible solvent, such as chloroform. This
mixture is then added slowly to water containing the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate and
the mixture is emulsified at 4C for 20 minutes with ultrasound. The resultant emulsion is then put
under reduced pressure to remove the chloroform, leaving the dispersed dye particles behind.
Excess surfactant is then removed with dialysis to give a dispersion with an average particle size of
76 nm. The full procedure described here is shown schematically below.
The dispersions are
characterised with their
average particle size and their
coefficient of variation which
is a normalized measure of
the dispersion of a probability
distribution, in this case, the
standard deviation divided by
the mean.
The examples go on to describe
a range of colours using this
process to make these small
particle size pigments. These
dispersions were then made into
simple ink jet inks by reducing
the solid dye content to 5 wt%
with water and adding glycerine as a humectant. These test vehicles were then printed onto
Canon “office planner” paper using an Epson PX-V630 printer and tested for scratch resistance. The
results seem to show better scratch resistance as the particle size decreases, with the best results
at below 50 nm.
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WO 2011/013308 A1 Aqueous ink
Canon Kabushika Kaisha
Pigmented inks must penetrate into porous media such as plain paper in order to avoid the
pigment particles sitting on the surface and contributing to poor rub resistance. This can
be achieved by progressively lowering the surface tension of the ink with penetrants, but by
formulating an ink that allows the colorant to penetrate into the paper structure, pigment is
necessarily moved away from the surface, potentially resulting in poor optical density.
Additives can be used that slightly destabilise the ink, to cause rapid precipitation of the pigment
on contact with the paper. If such inks are combined with high levels of penetrants then the
pigment can be made to penetrate into the fibres enough to give the required abrasion properties
without penetrating too deeply and reducing the optical density. The problem with this approach
is the inherent reduction in the dispersion stability of the ink.
This patent attempts to overcome such issues by using a self-dispersed pigment that has acidic
groups with at least two different levels of acidity, and therefore two different acid dissociation
constants (pKa values) in a formulation with a set pH and an ammonium salt of a carboxylic acid
(ammonium benzoate at 0.7 wt%) as the pigment destabiliser. Specifically, the two pKa values of
the self-dispersed pigment and the formulation pH must conform to the following equations:
(1)
2.0 ≤ pKa2 – pKa1
(pKa2 – 1.5) ≤ pH ≤ (pKa2 +0.5)
(2)
The examples focus on two self-dispersed pigments, one in which the pigment surface is
stabilised by phosphoric acid groups (commercially available as Cab-O-Jet 400), and the second
stabilised by isophthalic acid and prepared internally. This latter material was synthesised by the
diazotization of 4-aminophthalic acid in the presence of carbon black, followed by neutralisation
and purification with dialysis. Both of these proposed self-dispersed carbon blacks have two pKa
values. The phosphonic acid groups are bi-protic and so have two pKa values at 2.9 and 5.9 and
the prepared dispersion stabilised by the isophthalic group (below) has two pKa values at 2.5 and
6.1.
What the opaque mathematical formula above actually means in practice is that the best
compromise between stability (in the presence of the ammonium salt) and rapid precipitation on
paper is achieved when only one acidic group is deprotonated, as in state 2 in the diagram below.
This is achieved when the pH of the formulation
sits in between the two pKa values of the specific
dispersion.
The examples present a range of formulations with
different pH values to back up the above claims, and
clearly demonstrate that a certain amount of rub
resistance can be achieved without the use of binders
if the pigment penetration can be controlled.
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US 2011/0046295 A1 Capsulated colorant, method of preparing the same, ink composition
including the capsulated colorant
Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd.
We have discussed encapsulated pigments in these pages before and ink jet products do exist
using such materials. To improve the robustness of aqueous ink jet inks a binder can be added,
preferably an emulsion polymer due to the viscosity restrictions in these inks. However, this
approach involves compromises with respect to the solids loading of both the colorant and the
binder, so it makes perfect sense to combine the two by making what is in effect a coloured
polymer binder.
Many different approaches have been taken to prepare these pigment/binder combinations,
usually by emulsion polymerising the selected monomers in the presence of the pigment
particles. This patent proposes a similar method, but with an interesting refinement in the
monomer choice that may result in a higher quality encapsulated pigment.
The first difference is that no traditional surfactants are used in the proposed polymerisation
route. The exemplified approach first takes a self-dispersed carbon black, preferably one that is
anionically stabilised, and disperses this in water to which is added polyethyleneglycol ethyl ether
mono methacrylate. This PEG-methacrylate is used as the surfactant replacement and used at
levels of around 5% by weight of the solid pigment loading.
A monomer mixture comprising styrene, butyl acrylate and 2-vinyl pyridine at a ratio of around
10:10:1 is then added to the pigment mixture and emulsified with ultrasound or high shear
mixing. The temperature of this emulsion is then increased to 80C under nitrogen, at which point
the initiator (potassium persulfate) is added and heated for 24 hours. The emulsion is then filtered
to give the encapsulated pigment. A schematic is shown below.
A range of examples are discussed, mainly varying the level of the 1-vinyl pyridine monomer or
exchanging it for other nitrogen containing monomers such as acrylamide. The success of this
“surfactant-free” encapsulation seems to be due to the basic monomer (2-vinyl pyridine) forming
a strong association with the negatively charged pigment surface. This association ensures
that most of the monomer is polymerised around the pigment particles rather than separately.
Additionally, the PEG-methacrylate stabiliser is co-polymerised into this monomer shell, thereby
permanently maintaining dispersion stability of the emulsion.
The encapsulated pigments were made into simple ink jet ink formulations with the addition of
glycerol and diethylene glycol as humectant, and then tested for stability, printhead reliability,
abrasion resistance, water-fastness, optical density and antifoaming properties. The best
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formulations showed excellent properties across the board, whereas the comparative surfactant
containing inks gave OK results, but always very poor results with the antifoaming trials.
US 2011/0043577 A1 Black ink-jet inks with reduced lightness and haze
Hewlett-Packard Company
A single ink jet colorant that has good chroma, gamut, hue angle and environmental robustness
may not always be optimal for use with other colorants and/or ingredients of that ink jet ink.
To function reliably as an ink jet ink, the four (or more) colorants must work together to give
acceptable colour qualities. This patent suggests that three ink dye-based ink jet printing
systems, comprising cyan, magenta and yellow, commonly suffer from high lightness (L*min) in the
composite black regions of the print. This issue seems to be compounded by the hazing of prints
on porous media, an effect known as “stacked haze”. This type of haze occurs in stacked images
due to the slower drying of the inks in all but the uppermost print, which does not show this
effect.
The patent suggests that the addition of a dye-based black ink to a three colorant system will help
improve the lightness of the black regions, however the choice of this black dye is critical to the
permanence of the image as well as the extent of the observed haze. It is this latter point that the
patent addresses in detail. The use of black dyes in conjunction with a CMY ink-set can reduce
the L*min value. In this case, L*min is the minimum lightness value recorded on the media and a
reduction in this leads to a blacker black and higher contrast. This patent proposes that the use
of the following black dye in combination with CMY inks can significantly reduce L*min as well as
preventing stacking haze.
The dye was included in a relatively standard formulation using trimethylol propane,
2-pyrolidinone and 1,5-pentanediol as the humectant combination. A comparative example using
the following quite similar dye showed severe hazing and poorer L*min values when printed under
the same conditions.
Although no attempt is made to explain this effect, the examples do show quite large effects
in the maximum achievable blackness and stacked haze reduction, which demonstrates how
relatively small changes in chemical structure can have a large impact on physical properties.
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US 2011/0008547 A1 Jet ink and ink jet printing process
Sun Chemical B.V.
Ink jet inks can be formulated to strongly adhere to a wide range of materials, including polymeric
films or paper products, and so enjoy considerable success in these areas. Certain surfaces, such
as glass or ceramics are significantly more problematic and most current non-porous ink jet inks
show poor adhesion performance on such difficult surfaces.
Strongly adhered printed images on glass can be prepared by printing a mixture of an inorganic
pigment and a low temperature melting glass powder (frit) and then firing this to melt the glass
powder and pigment into the glass surface. This gives an exceptionally well bonded “ink” but
the need for the frit, the limitations of inorganic pigments and the high temperature treatment
conspire to make this approach less than attractive in certain applications.
This patent presents a formulation approach that results in an ink jet ink that can be ink jet printed
and UV cured to a solid image which is then heated to above 100C to fully cure the ink. The core
of the patent is the use of siloxane monomers to impart the adhesion to the glass surface, an
approach that is well known, although this patent uses these materials at significantly higher
concentrations than is usual in these inks.
Fundamentally, the inks described consist of an acrylic or cationic monomer, combined with the
siloxane as the liquid phase, with a “typical” organic pigment as colorant, as well as the required
photoinitiators. The idea seems to be to gel the mixture on application of UV light by the
crosslinking of the acrylic or cationic components, followed by the hydrolysis and condensation of
the siloxane materials to give a highly cured interpenetrating network (see figure below). In this
way the organic monomers give some toughness to the hard siloxane component, which in turn
imparts glass adhesion.
The examples suggest that for an acrylate-based ink, the best results were obtained with a
siloxane material (glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane) at 30 wt% along with two different acylic
monomers, CTFA (cyclic trimethylolpropane formal acrylate) at 43% and an acidic acrylic
monomer (Sartomer 9051) at 10%. This latter monomer is suggested to be important to give the
required adhesive properties, potentially due to an increased rate of hydrolysis of the siloxane
material in the presence of the acid .
US 2011/0017291 A1 Diffusing agent composition for ink-jet and method for production of
electrode or solar battery using the composition Tokyo Ohka Kogyo Co. Ltd.
Photovoltaic (PV) power is becoming increasingly prevalent, the sight of rooftops covered in
modules now a common sight, even in the cloudy UK. Thus there is a huge amount of research
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being conducted into both new PV technologies and into squeezing out the very last efficiency
percentage point and cost from the more traditional silicon PV cells.
Currently the vast majority of multi-crystalline silicon PV cells are produced using screenprinting as the main patterning technique, and as this is a contact printing process, it can lead to
breakages. Ink jet, on the other hand, is non-contact and so potentially offers advantages. Other
than the ink jet printing of the conductive tracks of the PV cell, the ability to pattern the n-doped
layer on the front of the device could also significantly improve efficiencies as the areas under the
contact fingers could be specifically doped to a very high level to give good contact resistance,
whereas the rest of the cell area could be left at a very low doping level to ensure that nonradiative recombination is kept to a minimum.
This patent mentions that although ink jettable phosphorous dopant inks do exist, they tend to
be based upon low boiling point solvents and also tend to show poor ink jet reliability, as well as
bleeding into un-doped areas during the diffusion heat treatment. This patent goes on to present
an improved ink jet formulation by modifying a spin-on-glass (SOG) formulation for use in an ink
jet printhead.
Spin-on-glass methods of doping silicon rely on a solution containing a partly hydrolysed siloxane
oligomer as a carrier for the phosphorous (or other) dopant. The siloxane oligomer functions like a
binder allowing the SOG to be spin coated to give smooth films. When these films are then heated
to the diffusion temperature the siloxane oligomers condense to give a silica layer which then
holds the dopant in place while it diffuses into the silicon reliably. The glass layer is subsequently
removed with a hydrofluoric acid treatment.
The ink jet formulations contain around 9 wt% SiO2 equivalent siloxane oligomer, 1 wt%
diphosphorous pentoxide as dopant, 75 wt% ethanol, 5 wt% dipropylene glycol and 10 wt%
propylene glycol. The last two materials are included to improve the ink jet reliability and dwell
time. These formulations were loaded into a Roland flat bed ink jet printer and printed on to the
silicon wafers before drying and baking, to give the final doped wafers.
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Ink jet substrates
Dr. Clare Conboy
EP 2284232 A1
Composition for continuous inkjet finishing of a textile article
US 2011/0033691 A1 Composition, method and device for digitally coating textile
Ten Cate Advanced Textile B.V.
Manufacture of fabrics is generally followed by one or more “upgrading” processes in which
the textile is given its final appearance and finish. These steps can be quite complex, involving
bleaching and dying or printing processes which often necessitate additional washing and drying.
Further processing will give the fabric its finished qualities such as fire resistance or anti-static
functionalisation. It is desirable to create some form of modularity to the various processes
involved so that it is possible to pass a web of fabric through each stage in a way that is analogous
to a reel to reel process.
As described in these two patents, at the finishing stage, coatings may be applied either by
continuous or drop on demand ink jet printing using suitable ink formulations. Arrays of
printheads can be mounted in a module through which the fabric is passed. The main advantages
here are that the functional material is delivered at a relatively high concentration so drying
is minimised. Use of thickeners and other processing aids is generally not necessary, and so
the process is quite straightforward. In general, a minimal number of coatings can be applied.
Application can also be controlled so that the finish is delivered to the parts of the fabric where it
is required and not as an overall blanket. This has obvious economic benefits.
Drops must be of sufficient size so that they cover several threads and do not pass through the
mesh openings in the fabric which would give a less homogeneous finish. This is illustrated below.
For a typical woven textile with fibre spacing of around 40 µm, a pixel size of around 100 µm is
appropriate such that it covers at least four openings.
Aqueous formulations of materials giving anti-static, anti-microbial, non-crease, water-repellancy,
UV-protection, deodorant, wear or stain-resistance, adhesiveness, stiffness, softness, elasticity,
conductivity, or photo-sensitivity functionality can be prepared for application in this way.
Formulations are described in fairly general terms. Unsurprisingly, they differ according to
whether the mode of application is continuous or drop on demand ink jet. The particle size can
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be bigger for continuous ink jet: up to 5 µm rather than a maximum of 2 µm and a conductivity
salt, preferably potassium thiocyanate, is required with continuous ink jet to give a conductivity
of 500 µS/cm or more. Typically inks contain, in addition to the functional part, a co-solvent, a
humectant, viscosity control agents, surfactants, biocide, a pH modifier and perhaps a corrosion
inhibitor.
WO 2011/002457 A1 Ink-jet overcoats including latex polymers and inorganic nano
particles
Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
The durability of images printed by aqueous based inks commonly used in ink jet printers can be
inherently poor compared to other forms of printing such as laser printing. This is because the
colorant is deposited on the surface with minimal binder, and so may be removed or smeared by
typical handling conditions of abrasion, contact with fingers and by the use of highlighter pens.
In the last few years, HP has introduced latex based inks. As polymers in a latex are dispersed
rather than dissolved, some polymers can be used in an aqueous ink that otherwise could only be
used in a solvent ink. As these latex polymers are able to form a film after deposition they offer
advantages both in terms of print quality and of minimal environmental impact, while extending
the range of polymer systems available to the ink formulator. The durability of these latex inks
is improved relative to other aqueous ink systems, and other factors such as lightfastness and
ozonefastness are also improved. However, interactions between latex and pigment particles can
degrade print quality, and durability is still not adequate.
This patent describes a latex based overcoat formulation, which is clear or translucent, seals
the ink, makes the image hydrophobic and protects it from outside influences. Incorporation
of nanoparticles serves to give physical strength to the coating and consequently superior
performance in comparison with purely latex-containing overcoat formulations.
The overcoating fluid comprises around 15% of a composite latex particle, that is to say an
inorganic nanoparticle that is partially or totally encapsulated by a polymer. The nanoparticle
may be a metal or semimetal oxide such as silica, titania or alumina. The latex polymer is a
copolymer of a hydrophobic monomer with 0.1 to 20% of an acid containing monomer. The
copolymer has a preferred Tg of 25 to 75C and the whole composite particle is 100 to 400 nm in
diameter. Examples of suitable hydrophobic monomers are styrenic or acrylic monomers, while
suitable acidic monomers include acrylic acid and styrene sulphonic acid. The latex particles may
be stabilised by a reactive surfactant such as a functionalised ethylene glycol acrylate (Rhodia,
SIPOMER®) which is bound to the surface of the latex particles during polymerisation, the
hydrophilic end of the molecule can be cationic, anionic or zwitterionic.
In an example, hydrophobic silica nanoparticles and a surfactant (Rhodafac RS 710 30%), are
heated and agitated in order to form a dispersion. A separate emulsion of styrene (16.2 g), butyl
acrylate (1.6 g) and methyl acrylate (1.25 g) is prepared in 136 ml water, additionally containing
1.6 g isooctylthiglycolate and 33.28 g of the same surfactant. This is added to the dispersion
along with an initiator (0.07%) potassium persulphate, and maintained at 90C for 2 hours. After
cooling to ambient temperature it is neutralised with 50% KOH and an ink-jettable composition
containing 1-15% solids is prepared. In standard dry rub and window cleaner tests, the composite
particle formulation exhibited superior performance in comparison with other overcoating latex
compositions.
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US 2011/0008553 A1 Ink jet recording medium and production process thereof, and fine
particle dispersion
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Prevention of fading continues to be an issue, particularly in the case of dye-based inks
and even more particularly in the case of photographic standard images. Phosphite and
phosphate compounds are able to prevent fading, but at concentrations that are effective they
are deleterious to the stability of dispersions of the inorganic pigments that are intrinsic to
microporous coatings.
A better solution is provided by a pentavalent phosphorus compound, with general formula
where R1 and R2 can be any one of a hydrogen atom, a hydroxyl group, an alkyl group, or an aryl
group. R3 is an alkylene or an arylene group, and X is an acidic solubilising group. This molecule
is able to act as a deflocculant, and acts to improve the dispersibility of the pigment. In particular,
this compound is effective where R4 is a methylene, ethylene, isopropylene or phenylene group
and X is a carboxylic acid.
In addition to the fade retarding compound, recommended formulations comprise an inorganic
pigment; alumina hydrate having a beohmite structure being particularly suitable. A binder such
as polyvinyl alcohol is also present. Ideally, the fade retarding compound is incorporated in the
coating formulation at a concentration of 0.5 to 10 parts per mass, per 100 parts of the pigment.
Both paper and non-paper substrates such as polymer film, and glass or metal, are suitable.
The patent is illustrated by a number of examples and comparative examples. A dispersion of
23% of an alumina hydrate (DISPERAL HP14, Sasol Co.) is prepared and an aqueous solution of
Phosphorus Compound 1 is added to give
a concentration that is 0.5 to 10 parts by mass of the pigment. The coating formulation is
prepared by the addition of 8% polyvinyl alcohol to give a concentration of 1 part per mass of
pigment. A 3% solution of boric acid is also added to give a concentration that is 1.7 parts by mass
of the pigment. Coating is by die coater to give a dry coating amount of 35 g/m3.
Evaluation of a media that had been coated using this formulation showed fastness to ozone and
xenon light to be superior to that obtained when phosphate and phosphate compounds were
used as fade retarding agents. Ink absorbency and image characteristics were also improved.
WO 201/006641 A1Method for generating photonically treated printed structures on
surfaces, apparatus, and use thereof
Stichting Dutch Polymer institute
Use of lasers to cure previously deposited material is an established technique, and is a known
means for curing materials that have been deposited by ink jet printing. The term photonic
treatment in this patent refers to the use of electromagnetic radiation delivered as laser light to
induce a chemical or physical change in a material.
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This patent discusses, in general terms, the use of a laser beam that tracks synchronously with
printing a functionalisable material. The laser can be mounted on the printhead to deliver actinic
radiation with wavelengths ranging from 150 to 1100 nm. This can modify the printed material.
Most substrates are appropriate, although limitations must be imposed by the ability of specific
substrates to sustain damage from some types of radiation, for example by excessive heating. It is
also to be supposed that the time lag between print and cure must be considered to ensure that
flow of the ink after printing is optimal.
The material printed may take any form that can be modified by laser radiation. UV cure inks
are particularly suitable. Alternatively the morphology of the printed image may be altered,
for example by heating, to remove volatile compounds, or perhaps melt, sinter or anneal a
component, consequently avoiding the need for further treatment. Conversely, laser ablation
removes surplus material, and in so doing, may perhaps also increase resolution. Particular
attention is given to use of laser curing in the production of directly written circuits and electrical
devices, in which conductors such as metals or polymers, or semiconductors such as silicon or
cadmium sulphide, may be sintered to produce circuits or features.
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INDEX OF INK JET PATENTS & APPLICATIONS PUBLISHED
January/February 2011
Bold type indicates review in this issue
Reference key:
H Printheads/Hardware
I InkM Substrates/Media
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 002957 A2
Advanced Liquid Logic, Inc.
Droplet actuator devices and methods
Jan-11
I
EP 2 272 893 A1
Agfa Graphics N.V.
Polymeric dispersants and non-aqueous dispersions
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007106 A1
Agfa Graphics NV
Ink supply system without pump, for ink jet printer with ink recirculation system
Feb-11
M
WO 2011 019609 A1
Brady Worldwide, Inc.
Durable multilayer inkjet recording media topcoat
Jan-11
H
EP 2 269 830 A1
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Sheet package
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 869 A2
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink cartridge, set of ink cartridges, and ink cartridge determination system
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 870 A2
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink cartridge, set of ink cartridges, and ink cartridge determination system
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 871 A2
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink cartridge, set of ink cartridges, and ink cartridge determination system
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001769 A1
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Apparatus for communicating with rfid tag
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001772 A1
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Liquid ejecting apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001776 A1
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Image data processing apparatus and liquid ejection apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001781 A1
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Liquid supply systems
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012953 A1
Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha
Liquid supply devices
Jan-11
I
EP 2 268 747 A1
Cabot Corp
Modified pigments having reduced phosphate release, and dispersions and inkjet ink
compositions therefrom
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0008590 A1
Cambridge Display Technology
Limited
Solvent for a printing composition
Jan-11
H
EP 2 269 825 A2
Canon Finetech Inc.
Printing head, ink jet printing apparatus, and ink jet printing method
Jan-11
H
EP 2 269 827 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Liquid container
Jan-11
I
EP 2 270 109 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Clear ink, ink jet recording method, ink set, ink cartridge, recording unit and ink jet
recording apparatus
Jan-11
H
EP 2 272 673 A2
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink jet head and its manufacture method
Jan-11
H
EP 2 272 676 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Liquid container and liquid supplying system
Jan-11
H
EP 2 272 678 A2
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Complementary recording system using multi-scan
Jan-11
H
EP 2 272 679 A2
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Complementary recording system using multi-scan
Jan-11
I
EP 2 275 267 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink-contacting thermoplastic elastomer composition for ink jet printer
Jan-11
H
EP 2 277 708 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Inkjet recording apparatus and recording medium conveyance method for the inkjet
recording apparatus
Jan-11
M
EP 2 277 709 A2
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Recording medium
Feb-11
H
EP 2 282 514 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Recording apparatus and processing method executed by the recording apparatus
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 002 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Printing apparatus and printing method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001775 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Clear ink, ink jet recording method, ink set, ink cartridge, recording unit and ink jet
recording apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001778 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Recording apparatus and pattern recording method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007113 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Inkjet printing apparatus
Jan-11
M
US 2011 0008553 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink jet recording medium and production process thereof, and fine particle
dispersion
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012950 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Element board for printhead, and printhead having the same
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012960 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Liquid discharge head substrate and manufacturing method thereof, and liquid
discharge head using liquid discharge head substrate and manufacturing method
thereof
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012972 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Recording apparatus and sheet processing method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018924 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Recording apparatus and method for controlling the recording apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018925 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Printing apparatus and control method thereof
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018926 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Inkjet recording apparatus and recording medium conveyance method for the inkjet
recording apparatus
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
29
DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018933 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink jet recording head
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018934 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Recording element substrate, and inkjet head and its production method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018945 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Piezoelectric element, ink jet head and producing method for piezoelectric element
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0023749 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Colored particles
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025790 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink tank and printer with the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0027530 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Beam, ink jet recording head having beams, and method for manufacturing ink jet
recording head having beams
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0027970 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Method for dicing wafer and process for manufacturing liquid-discharging head using
the dicing method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032292 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Recording apparatus and processing method executed by the recording apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032295 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Element substrate, printhead, head cartridge, and printing apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032296 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Printing apparatus and printing method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032299 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Inkjet printing method and inkjet printing apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032317 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Signaling module, liquid container, recording apparatus, and control method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037794 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Inkjet printing apparatus and inkjet printing method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037799 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Printing apparatus and printing method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037801 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Image processing apparatus and image processing method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037806 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Printing apparatus and printing method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037815 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Liquid container and manufacturing method therefor
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043561 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Information processing apparatus and information processing method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043565 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Liquid discharge head and method for manufacturing the same
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 013308 A1
Canon Kabushiki Kaisha
Aqueous ink
Jan-11
H
EP 2 271 067 A1
Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd.
An additional information printing service for images
Feb-11
H
EP 2 285 086 A2
Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd.
A dynamic shot printing system
Feb-11
I
EP 2 284 226 A1
Dai Nippon Toryo Co., Ltd.
Nonaqueous inkjet ink composition
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 004675 A1
DIC Corporation
Binder for ink-jet printing ink, ink-jet printing ink containing same, and printed matter
Jan-11
I
EP 2 274 385 A1
Du Pont
Inkjet inks for textiles containing crosslinked polyurethanes and further containing
additional reactive components
Feb-11
I
EP 2 285 917 A1
Du Pont
Fixer inks for use with ink jet inks
Feb-11
I
EP 2 285 918 A1
Du Pont
Inkjet ink with self dispersed pigments and polyurethane ink additives
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 008810 A1
E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Crosslinking pigment dispersion based on diblock polymeric dispersants
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 008813 A1
E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
An aqueous ink jet ink comprising a crosslinking pigment dispersion based on diblock
polymeric dispersants
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 008820 A1
E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Method of printing using ink jet inks comprising a crosslinking pigment dispersion
based on diblock polymeric dispersants
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 011233 A1
E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Self-dispersing pigment dispersions and ink jet inks containing them
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 014615 A1
E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Method of preparing dispersions
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0018928 A1
E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Inkjet inks containing crosslinked polyurethanes
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0030580 A1
E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Magenta inkjet ink, and process of making and using same
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0032303 A1
E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Fixer inks for use with ink jet inks
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0037793 A1
E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Inkjet ink and ink set
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0039028 A1
E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And
Company
Inkjet ink with self dispersed pigments and polyurethane ink additives
Jan-11
H
EP 2 276 635 A1
Eastman Kodak Co
Carriage support member
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012949 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Printing method for reducing stitch error between overlapping jetting modules
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012967 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Catcher including drag reducing drop contact surface
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025741 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Continuous printing using temperature lowering pulses
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025779 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Printhead including dual nozzle structure
30
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DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025780 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Printhead having reinforced nozzle membrane structure
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025786 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Ink reservoir with a biasing valve
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037808 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Metalized printhead substrate overmolded with plastic
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043555 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Drop ejection method through multi-lobed nozzle
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043569 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Drop ejector having multi-lobed nozzle
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043570 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Paired drop ejector
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043572 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Paired drop ejector method of operation
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 019529 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Metalized printhead substrate overmolded with plastic
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 022283 A1
Eastman Kodak Company
Paired drop ejector
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 022299 A2
Eastman Kodak Company
Enhanced imaging with adjusted image swath widths
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 000491 A2
Eckart GmbH
Printing ink, in particular ink-jet ink, containing pearlescent pigments based on fine
and thin substrates
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 018239 A1
Eckart GmbH
Ink jet printer ink comprising effect pigments having high gloss
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037807 A1
Electronics For Imaging, Inc.
Ink jet printer
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018916 A1
Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.
Eccentricity amount estimation device, rotation velocity control device, image forming
apparatus, and computer readable storage medium
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025740 A1
Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.
Droplet ejecting apparatus and current control method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032294 A1
Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.
Droplet ejecting apparatus and current control method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032315 A1
Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.
Ink absorbing particle, material set for recording and recording apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043558 A1
Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.
Droplet ejection device
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0030583 A1
Fujifilm Coporation
Azo pigments, process for producing the azo pigments, and pigment dispersion,
coloring composition and ink for inkjet recording containing the pigment
Jan-11
I
EP 2 268 744 A1
Fujifilm Corp
Azo pigments, and pigment dispersion, coloring composition and ink for inkjet
recording containing the azo pigment
Jan-11
H
EP 2 275 271 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Printed matter seasoning apparatus and method, and inkjet recording apparatus
Feb-11
I
EP 2 284 229 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Pigment dispersion, ink composition, and inkjet recording method
Feb-11
I
EP 2 284 230 A2
Fujifilm Corporation
Inkjet ink composition, ink set, and image forming method
Feb-11
I
EP 2 284 231 A2
Fujifilm Corporation
Aqueous ink composition, method of manufacturing composite particles, ink set and
image forming method
Feb-11
I
EP 2 287 258 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Aqueous colorant dispersion, method of producing aqueous colorant dispersuion, and
aqueous ink for inkjet recording
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 934 A2
Fujifilm Corporation
Columnar structure film and method of forming same, piezoelectric element, liquid
ejection apparatus and piezoelectric ultrasonic oscillator
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0001777 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Azo compound, azo pigment, dispersion containing the azo compound or azo
pigment, coloring composition, ink for inkjet recording, ink tank for inkjet recording,
inkjet recording method and recorded material
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001785 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Image forming system
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007107 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
High speed high resolution fluid ejection
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007115 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Perovskite oxide material, ferroelectric compound, piezoelectric body, piezoelectric
device, and liquid discharge device
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0011306 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Azo pigments, pigment dispersion, coloring composition, and ink for inkjet recording
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012973 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Printed matter seasoning apparatus and method, and inkjet recording apparatus
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0018946 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Azo compounds, azo pigments, and dispersion, coloring composition and ink for
inkjet recording containing the azo compounds or azo pigments, ink tank for inkjet
recording, inkjet recording method, and recorded products
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0025753 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Inkjet ink composition, ink set, and image forming method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025807 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Medium holding apparatus and image forming apparatus
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0037805 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Ink set and image formation method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037812 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Columnar structure film and method of forming same, piezoelectric element, liquid
ejection apparatus and piezoelectric ultrasonic oscillator
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0039027 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Aqueous ink composition, method of manufacturing composite particles, ink set and
image forming method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043563 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Inkjet recording apparatus and inkjet recording method
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0043566 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Ink composition, ink set and image formation method
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0043578 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Image forming method
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
31
DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0046275 A1
Fujifilm Corporation
Aqueous colorant dispersion, method of producing aqueous colorant dispersion, and
aqueous ink for inkjet recording
Jan-11
H
EP 2 269 826 A2
Fujifilm Dimatix Inc
Print head with thin membrane
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 826 A2
Fujifilm Dimatix Inc
Cavity plate
Feb-11
H
EP 2 285 577 A1
Fujifilm Dimatix Inc
Ink jetting
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 006 A1
Fujifilm Dimatix Inc
Adjustable mount printhead assembly
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001780 A1
Fujifilm Dimatix, Inc.
Positioning jetting assemblies
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007117 A1
Fujifilm Dimatix, Inc.
MEMS jetting structure for dense packing
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 002747 A2
Fujifilm Dimatix, Inc.
Positioning jetting assemblies
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 005699 A2
Fujifilm Dimatix, Inc.
Mems jetting structure for dense packing
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 012872 A1
Fujifilm Imaging Colorants Limited
Phthalocyanines and their use in ink jet printing
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0014439 A1
Fujifilm Imaging Colorants Ltd
Ink, process and use
Jan-11
M
WO 2011 002457 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Ink-jet overcoats including latex polymers and inorganic nano particles
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 005255 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Printhead fabrication methods, printhead substrate assembly fabrication methods,
and printheads
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 005256 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Printhead fabrication methods and printheads
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 010999 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Inkjet printing system
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 011004 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Accurate printing of a target colour
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 011012 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Fluid dispensing apparatus and method thereof
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 014157 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Fluid-ejection printhead die having an electrochemical cell
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 014173 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Encapsulated pigments containing cross-linking agent
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 014180 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Inkjet printhead and method employing central ink feed channel
Feb-11
M
WO 2011 014185 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Inkjet ink and intermediate transfer medium for inkjet printing
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 014190 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Phthalocyanines and naphthalocyanines with near-ir absorptions for inkjet inks
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 014196 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Ink set with near infrared detection capability and method of using the same
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 016801 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Fluid dispensing apparatus
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 022001 A1
Hewlett Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Ink-jet inks including inter-crosslinkable latex particles
Jan-11
M
US 2011 0003097 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
High quality porous ink-jet media
Jan-11
M
US 2011 0008542 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Inkjet recording material
Jan-11
M
US 2011 0012955 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Ink-jet overcoat composition and related systems and methods
Jan-11
M
US 2011 0012974 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Inkjet printable article and method of making the same
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018930 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Feed slot protective coating
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018938 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Printing device
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025757 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Apparatus for wiping
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025782 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Microfluidic device and a fluid ejection device incorporating the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025784 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Flexible circuit seal
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025785 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Heating element
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025788 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Fluid interconnection
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0038657 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Print system
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043557 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Stabilization of ink concentration in a solid ink add system
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0043577 A1
Hewlett-Packard Company
Black ink-jet inks with reduced lightness and haze
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001786 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company L.P.
Printhead assembly having grooves externally exposing printhead die
32
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Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012957 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company L.P.
Web
Jan-11
M
US 2011 0012970 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company L.P.
Composition, method and system for making high whiteness inkjet media
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018948 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company L.P.
Carriage for carrying a fluid ejector cartridge
Jan-11
H
EP 2 271 496 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Printing device
Jan-11
H
EP 2 271 497 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Feed slot protective coating
Jan-11
H
EP 2 271 498 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Ink cartridges having heat-staked vent sealing members
Jan-11
I
EP 2 271 719 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Inks and ink sets for improved performance and image quality
Jan-11
H
EP 2 274 171 A2
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Carriage for carrying a fluid ejector cartridge
Jan-11
H
EP 2 274 172 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Fluid container
Jan-11
H
EP 2 274 173 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Partial fill ink cartridges
Jan-11
H
EP 2 274 174 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Printer ink delivery systems
Jan-11
H
EP 2 274 175 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Printer ink delivery systems
Jan-11
H
EP 2 276 633 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Print head feed slot ribs
Jan-11
H
EP 2 276 634 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Printing device and control method
Jan-11
H
EP 2 276 951 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Seal and seal/boss assembly
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 868 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Printing-fluid container
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 827 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Flexible circuit seal
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 828 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Ink container supports
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 829 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Refillable ink tanks
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 832 A2
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Printing
Feb-11
H
EP 2 282 893 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Supply tube connectors for connection with an ink container
Feb-11
H
EP 2 285 578 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Fluid-jet precision-dispensing device having one or more holes for passing gaseous
bubbles, sludge, and/or contaminants during priming
Feb-11
M
EP 2 285 920 A1
Hewlett-Packard Development
Company, L.P.
Ink-jet overcoat composition and related systems and methods
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 018841 A1
Hitachi Industrial Equipment
Systems Co., Ltd.
Inkjet recording device and printing head
Jan-11
I
EP 2 277 955 A1
Hitachi Maxell, Ltd.
Energy ray-curable ink composition
Jan-11
I
EP 2 277 956 A1
Hitachi Maxell, Ltd.
Energy ray-curable inkjet ink composition
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012952 A1
Hon Hai Precision Industry Co.,
Ltd.
Method for printing on a workpiece
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012959 A1
Hon Hai Precision Industry Co.,
Ltd.
Inkjet head
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012961 A1
Hon Hai Precision Industry Co.,
Ltd.
Three-dimensional printer
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012966 A1
Hon Hai Precision Industry Co.,
Ltd.
Apparatus for regulating air pressure in ink tank and ink-supplying system having the
same
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 018274 A1
Huntsman Advanced Materials
(Switzerland) Gmbh
Fibre-reactive azo dyes, their preparation and their use
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0005428 A1
Il Dong Chemical Co., Ltd.
Silver organo-sol ink for forming electronically conductive patterns
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
33
DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Jan-11
M
US 2011 0011547 A1
International Paper Company
Paper substrate having enhanced print density
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001784 A1
Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba
Ink-jet application method and display device producing method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007105 A1
Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba|Toshiba
TEC Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink jet apparatus and liquid circulating method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043562 A1
Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba|Toshiba
TEC Kabushiki Kaisha
Inkjet recording apparatus
Jan-11
I
EP 2 272 924 A1
Kao Corporation
Aqueous ink for inkjet recording
Jan-11
I
EP 2 272 925 A1
Kao Corporation
Aqueous ink for inkjet recording
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 021665 A1
Kao Corporation
Inkjet recording method
Jan-11
H
EP 2 275 261 A1
Karl Pedross AG
Device for printing rigid workpieces
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012944 A1
Kerong Yuan
Ink refill kit
Jan-11
H
EP 2 272 672 A1
Kimoto Co., Ltd.
Image data creation device, image data creation method, and ink-jet system
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032289 A1
Komori Corporation
Ink supply amount adjustment method and apparatus for printing press
Feb-11
H
EP 2 284 009 A1
Konica Minolta Holdings, Inc.
Image recording method, and image recording device
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001779 A1
Konica Minolta Holdings, Inc.
Inkjet recording apparatus and inkjet recording method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0020043 A1
Konica Minolta Holdings, Inc.
Device and method for drawing a web of printable carrier material
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032308 A1
Konica Minolta Holdings, Inc.
Nozzle sheet and method for manufacturing the same
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 007645 A1
Konica Minolta Holdings, Inc.
Thin-film actuator and inkjet head
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018922 A1
Konica Minolta IJ Technologies, Inc
Ink jet head
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0018929 A1
Konica Minolta IJ Technologies, Inc
Nonaqueous ink jet ink, process for producing nonaqueous ink jet ink, and ink jet
recording method
Jan-11
H
EP 2 275 263 A1
Konica Minolta IJ Technologies,
Inc.
Inkjet recording apparatus and drive method of inkjet recording head
Jan-11
H
EP 2 275 264 A1
Konica Minolta IJ Technologies,
Inc.
Inkjet recording apparatus
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 000 A1
Konica Minolta IJ Technologies,
Inc.
Method for production of ink-jet head
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 021475 A1
Konica Minolta IJ Technologies,
Inc.
Nozzle plate holding device and method for manufacturing ink-jet head
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 018786 A1
Kornit Digital Ltd.
Inkjet compositions and processes for stretchable substrates
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032300 A1
Kornit Digital Technologies Ltd.
Matrix printing device
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0032304 A1
Kornit Digital Technologies Ltd.
Inkjet compositions and processes for stretchable substrates
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032319 A1
Kornit Digital Technologies Ltd.
Digital printing device with improved pre-printing textile surface treatment
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018923 A1
Kyocera Mita Corporation
Image forming system
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018931 A1
Kyocera Mita Corporation
Inkjet recording apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012945 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Fluid height backpressure device in a system for supplying fluid to a printhead
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012946 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Fluid height backpressure device in a system for supplying fluid to a printhead
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012964 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Fluid height backpressure system for supplying fluid to a printhead and backpressure
device used therein
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0012968 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Cyan inkjet ink having improved print quality with porous photo media
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0014374 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Yellow inkjet ink having improved print quality with porous photo media
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0014375 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Magenta inkjet ink having improved print quality with porous photo media
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0014376 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Inkjet ink having improved high resolution nozzle plate compatibility
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032290 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Methods and systems using printhead tank memory to determine printhead tank
configuration
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032312 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Multi-color ink tank with features spaced by distances ensuring interface with
printhead
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032313 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Individual ink tank with features spaced by distances ensuring interface with
printhead
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032316 A1
Lexmark International Inc.
Mono ink tank with features spaced by distances ensuring interface with printhead
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 008794 A1
Lexmark International, Inc.
Inkjet ink having improved high resolution nozzle plate compatibility
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 008795 A1
Lexmark International, Inc.
Yellow inkjet ink having improved print quality with porous photo media
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 008796 A1
Lexmark International, Inc.
Magenta inkjet ink having improved print quality with porous photo media
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 008797 A1
Lexmark International, Inc.
Cyan inkjet ink having improved print quality with porous photo media
34
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 019638 A1
Lexmark International, Inc.
Mono ink tank with features spaced by distances ensuring interface with printhead
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 019640 A1
Lexmark International, Inc.
Individual ink tank with features spaced by distances ensuring interface with
printhead
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 019642 A1
Lexmark International, Inc.
Multi-color ink tank with features spaced by distances ensuring interface with
printhead
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001771 A1
Linx Printing Technologies Ltd.
Inkjet printer and flow restriction system therefor
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0012954 A1
Markem-Imaje Corporation
Solvent-based inkjet ink formulations
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 011359 A1
Markem-Imaje Corporation
Solvent-based inkjet ink formulations
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 012641 A1
Markem-Imaje Corporation
Directivity detection device of trajectories of drops issuing from liquid jet, associated
electrostatic sensor, print head and continuous ink jet printer
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043571 A1
Marvell International Technology
Ltd.
Inkjet printhead system and method using laser-based heating
Jan-11
H
EP 2 277 706 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Printing density adjusting apparatus, printing density adjusting method and printing
density adjusting program
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 866 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Inkjet printer
Feb-11
H
EP 2 281 688 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Ink supplying device for inkjet printer and inkjet printer with the same
Feb-11
M
EP 2 281 940 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Printed product and aqueous coating agent
Feb-11
H
EP 2 283 932 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Three-dimensional inkjet printer
Feb-11
H
EP 2 284 011 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Printing apparatus
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 722 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Print data generating device, print data generating method, and print data generating
program
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 007611 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Flushing unit
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 013190 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Printer cutter
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 021403 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Inkjet printer and inkjet printing method
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 021422 A1
Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd.
Printer and method of control of printer
Feb-11
M
WO 2011 019052 A1
Mitsubishi Paper Mills Limited
Inkjet recording material
Jan-11
H
EP 2 277 705 A1
Miyakoshi Printing Machinery
Co., Ltd.
Method for applying sealer in inkjet recorder
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025745 A1
Miyakoshi Printing Machinery
Co., Ltd.
Method for applying an undercoat in an ink jet recording apparatus
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 019970 A1
Nano-C, Inc.
Solvent-based and water-based carbon nanotube inks with removable additives
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 016172 A1
NEC Corporation
Carbon nanotube ink composition
Feb-11
M
US 2011 0037818 A1
Newpage Corporation
Inkjet recording medium
Feb-11
M
WO 2011 019866 A1
Newpage Corporation
Inkjet recording medium
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0007110 A1
Nippon Kayaku Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink composition and textile printing method using the same
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0032302 A1
Nippon Kayaku Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink set, recording method, and colored object
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 013503 A1
Nippon Kayaku Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink composition and method for printing textile using same
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 831 A1
Oce Tech Bv
Adjustment of a print array and a substrate in a printing device
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0002727 A1
Olympus Corporation
Medium cutting device, image recording apparatus having the medium cutting
device, and controlling method of the medium cutting device
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0008092 A1
Olympus Corporation
Image recording apparatus and controlling method thereof
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025751 A1
Olympus Corporation
Inkjet printer with ink temperature adjustment mechanism
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 082 A1
Padaluma Ink Jet Solutions Gmbh
& Co Kg
Method for calibrating an inkjet printer and print product
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018927 A1
Panasonic Corp.
Method for manufacturing plasma display panel
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025735 A1
PCH Technologies
Printer for edible sheets
Jan-11
I
EP 2 271 718 A1
Pelikan Hardcopy Production AG
Ink concentrate for the production of inkjet inks
Jan-11
H
EP 2 272 674 A1
Pelikan Hardcopy Production AG
Ink cartridge and inkjet printer for receiving such an ink cartridge
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 830 A1
Pelikan Hardcopy Production AG
Device and method for refilling an ink cartridge for an ink-jet printer
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001773 A1
Pelikan Hardcopy Production AG
Ink cartridge and inkjet printer for accepting such an ink cartridge
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 006633 A1
Pernutec GmbH
Apparatus for labeling containers, particularly specimen containers for medical
specimen, method for labeling containers and use of a labeling apparatus
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 007487 A1
Photo Craft Co., Ltd.
Method for printing on both sides of paper, paper feeding apparatus, and printer
paper
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
35
DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001770 A1
Pitney Bowes Inc.
Mail processing system with printer maintenance operations to prevent potential
clogging of print head when different inks are utilized
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 018003 A1
Print-Rite Technology
Development Co., Ltd Of Zhuhai
Chip and method for resetting data about remaining amount of consumable
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0045254 A1
Rehau AG & Co.
Method for producing a decorated profile body
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0008725 A9
Research Laboratories of Australia
Pty Ltd.
Marking liquid
Jan-11
H
EP 2 271 499 A1
Ricoh Co Ltd
Image processing method, computer program, recording medium, image processing
apparatus, and image forming apparatus
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 789 A1
Ricoh Co Ltd
Image forming apparatus and foam application device
Feb-11
I
EP 2 283 090 A1
Ricoh Co Ltd
Inkjet recording ink and image forming method
Feb-11
I
EP 2 283 091 A1
Ricoh Co Ltd
Colorant dispersion of recording ink, and recording ink using the same
Jan-11
H
EP 2 275 265 A1
Ricoh Company, Ltd.
Liquid-discharging head for producing toner
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007112 A1
Ricoh Company, Ltd.
Recording apparatus and non-transitory computer-readable recording medium
storing a recording program
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007116 A1
Ricoh Company, Ltd.
Liquid-discharging head for producing toner
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025789 A1
Ricoh Company, Ltd.
Image forming apparatus
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 002072 A1
Ricoh Company, Ltd.
Aqueous ink for liquid jetting device and ink cartridge containing the same
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 007888 A1
Ricoh Company, Ltd.
Inkjet recording ink, ink cartridge and inkjet recording apparatus
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 021591 A1
Ricoh Company, Ltd.
Image forming method, and image formed matter
Feb-11
I
EP 2 284 228 A1
Riso Kagaku Corporation
Non-aqueous pigment ink
Non-aqueous pigment ink
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0045257 A1
Riso Kagaku Corporation
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0046298 A1
Riso Kagaku Corporation
Non-aqueous pigment ink
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037813 A1
Rohm Co., Ltd.
Inkjet printer head
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007119 A1
Roland DG Corporation
Ink jet recording apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025736 A1
Roland DG Corporation
Ink jet recording apparatus equipped with ultraviolet light irradiation device that
moves with ink head
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025746 A1
Roland DG Corporation
Ink jet recording apparatus equipped with ultraviolet light irradiation device
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0026998 A1
Roland DG Corporation
Ink jet recording apparatus equipped with cutting head and ultraviolet light
irradiation device
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025793 A1
Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co.,
Ltd
Inkjet head and method of manufacturing the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025792 A1
Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co.,
Ltd.
Ink recovery device
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025794 A1
Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co.,
Ltd.
Inkjet head and inkjet head assembly
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032309 A1
Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co.,
Ltd.
Inkjet head, method of manufacturing the same, and electrical connection device
therefor
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032314 A1
Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co.,
Ltd.
Inkjet head and method of manufacturing the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043564 A1
Samsung Electro-Mechanics
Co., Ltd.
Inkjet head and method of manufacturing the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043567 A1
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd
Wiping assembly and image forming apparatus having the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032291 A1
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Inkjet head and method thereof
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043568 A1
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Scrapping unit and image forming apparatus having the same, and cleaning methods
thereof
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0046295 A1
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Capsulated colorant, method of preparing the same, ink composition including
the capsulated colorant
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0007118 A1
Sawgrass Technologies, Inc.
High viscosity heat sensitive ink printing process
Jan-11
I
WO 2011 006057 A2
Sawgrass Technologies, Inc.
High viscosity heat sensitive ink printing process
Jan-11
H
EP 2 272 675 A2
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid container
Jan-11
H
EP 2 275 262 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid discharge apparatus and method
Jan-11
I
EP 2 275 599 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Ink compositions for ink jet textile printing
Jan-11
H
EP 2 277 707 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Printing material container, and board mounted on printing material container
Feb-11
H
EP 2 283 785 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Fluid ejection device and method to control fluid ejection device
Feb-11
I
EP 2 284 227 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Ink composition for inkjet recording
36
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DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 001 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Droplet ejecting head, droplet ejecting apparatus, piezoelectric device, and ceramic
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 935 A2
Seiko Epson Corporation
Piezoelectric element and method for producing the same, piezoelectric actuator and
liquid ejecting head using the same
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001783 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid ejecting apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007108 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid discharge apparatus and method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007111 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Inkjet printer and inkjet print method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0007114 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Piezoelectric element, method for manufacturing the same, piezoelectric actuator,
liquid ejecting head, and liquid ejecting apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0008091 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Cutting device and printer with a cutting device
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012947 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Image processing apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012948 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Fluid ejecting apparatus, fluid ejecting head control method in fluid ejecting
apparatus, and driving waveform generating apparatus for fluid ejecting head
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012951 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Printing apparatus having appropriate correction of feed amount
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012956 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Ink-jet recording apparatus, recording method, and flushing method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012962 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Connector holder unit, carriage, recording apparatus, and liquid ejecting apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012963 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid-ejecting head, liquid-ejecting apparatus, and piezoelectric element
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0014440 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Inkjet-recording non-aqueous ink composition, inkjet recording method, and recorded
matter
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018917 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Printing device and printing method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018919 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Capacitive load driving circuit, liquid ejection device, and printing apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018920 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Printing device and printing method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018921 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Printing device and printing method
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018942 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid ejecting head and liquid ejecting apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018943 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid ejecting head, manufacturing method thereof, and liquid ejecting apparatus
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018944 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Piezoelectric actuator and liquid ejecting head
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018947 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid supply flow path device and liquid ejecting apparatus using the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025737 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Fluid ejecting apparatus and fluid ejecting method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025744 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid ejecting apparatus and liquid ejecting method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025756 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Recording apparatus
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0025783 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Surface-treated pigment, ink composition, and ink jet recording method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025795 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Light irradiating apparatus, light irradiating process, and image recording process
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032297 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Printing method, computer-readable medium, and printing apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032305 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Recording apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032310 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid ejecting head and method of inspecting liquid ejecting head
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0036266 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Ink set, ink container, inkjet recording method, recording device, and recorded matter
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037795 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Fluid ejection method and fluid ejection device
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037798 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid ejecting apparatus and method of setting signal for micro vibration
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037800 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Fluid ejecting apparatus and fluid ejecting method
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0037804 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Ink set, ink jet recording method, recorded matter, and ink jet recording apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037810 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid ejecting head and liquid ejecting apparatus using the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037811 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid ejecting head and liquid ejecting apparatus using the same
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037817 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Printing apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037819 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Recording apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0038658 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Sheet feeding apparatus, image forming apparatus, and image reading apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043559 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Load driving circuit, liquid ejection device, and printing apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043560 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Fluid ejecting apparatus and fluid ejecting method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043573 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Piezoelectric actuator, method for manufacturing piezoelectric actuator, liquidejecting head, and liquid-ejecting apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043574 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Droplet ejecting head, droplet ejecting apparatus, piezoelectric device, and ceramic
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043575 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Piezoelectric element, piezoelectric actuator, liquid ejecting head, liquid ejecting
apparatus, and method for producing piezoelectric element
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043576 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Liquid cartridge, loading/unloading device of liquid cartridge, recording apparatus,
and liquid ejection apparatus
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
37
DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0044746 A1
Seiko Epson Corporation
Roll paper transportation device and printing apparatus
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025796 A1
Seiko I Infotech Inc.
Medium press device and ink jet printer
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 007615 A1
Seiko I Infotech Inc.
Inkjet recording device and recording method
Jan-11
I
EP 2 277 957 A1
Sensient Imaging Technologies
Inc.
Ink-jettable flavored fluids for printing on edible substrates
Jan-11
I
EP 2 277 958 A1
Sensient Imaging Technologies
Inc.
Ink-jettable flavored fluids for printing on edible substrates
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 021051 A1
Sericol Limited
Printing ink
Feb-11
I
WO 2011 021052 A2
Sericol Limited
Printing ink, apparatus and method
Feb-11
H
EP 2 284 013 A1
Shandong New Beiyang
Information Technology Co., Ltd.
Printer
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 011992 A1
Shanghai Zunlin Industries &
Trading Co., Ltd.
Printing and embroidering integrative machine, its control device and control method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032293 A1
Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha
Ink ejector, and ink ejection control method
Feb-11
H
EP 2 285 575 A1
Silverbrook Res Pty Ltd
Thermal bend actuator comprising bent active beam having resistive heating bars
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012971 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system having media loop dryer
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018935 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printhead having polysilsesquioxane coating on ink ejection face
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018936 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printhead having polymer incorporating nanoparticles coated on ink ejection face
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018937 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printhead having ink ejection face complementing ink or other features of printhead
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018939 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Inkjet printhead assembly having backside electrical connection
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018940 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printhead integrated circuit configured for backside electrical connection
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018941 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printhead integrated comprising through-silicon connectors
Feb-11
I
US 2011 0023751 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Aqueous formulation comprising low visibility naphthalocyanine dye
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0024492 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Digitizing system having printed base, imaging pen and relay device
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025738 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printer system with printhead carriage connected to ink supply from a single side
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025739 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with printhead carriage connected to ink supply from a
single side
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025742 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Print engine with ink supply conduits extending from a long side of elongate
printhead carriage
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025747 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system for media of different sizes
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025748 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with fixed printheads and movable vacuum platen
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025749 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with input roller and movable media engagement output
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025750 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with input roller and movable media engagement output for
simultaneously engaging media
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025754 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with independently operable printhead service modules
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025755 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with independently operable printhead service modules
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025758 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with spittoon and aerosol collection
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025759 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with multiple printheads each supplied by multiple conduits
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025760 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with printheads supplied by multiple ink conduits connected by
a bypass line
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025761 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with multiple ink accumulators
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025762 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with pump to prime printheads
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025763 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with pump to create pressure difference across printheads
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025764 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with pump to prime multiple printheads
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025765 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with datum features on printhead carriage
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025766 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with adjustable aerosol collection
Wide format printer with ink accummulators for hydrostatic pressure regulation
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025767 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025768 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with multiple printheads each supplied by multiple conduits
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025769 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with printheads supplied by multiple ink conduits connected
by a bypass line
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025770 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with multiple ink accumulators
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025771 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with pump to prime printheads
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025772 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with pump to create pressure difference across printheads
38
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025773 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with spittoon and aerosol collection
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025774 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with pump to prime multiple printheads
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025775 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with aerosol collection from both sides of media path
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025776 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with datum features on printhead carriage
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025777 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printer having multiple nozzle ics and cappers
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025778 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printhead assembly with profiled exterior surface
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025781 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Inkjet printer with printhead modules having individual ink interfaces
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025787 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printhead support structure with cavities for pulse damping
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025797 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with fixed printheads and movable vacuum platen
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025798 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with input media roller and output vacuum belts
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025799 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with scanner to align printhead assembly
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025800 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Method of printing using input roller and movable media engagement output
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025802 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with independently movable printhead service modules
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025803 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with input media roller and output vacuum belts
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025804 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with media encoder in the platen
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025805 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer with independently movable printed service modules
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025806 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Wide format printer for media of different sizes
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032307 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Inkjet printhead having nozzle chambers with redundant ink inlets
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037796 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Compact nozzle assembly of an inkjet printhead
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037797 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Control of a nozzle of an inkjet printhead
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037809 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Nozzle assembly for an inkjet printhead
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037816 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Ink pressure regulator with regulator channel positioned in chamber roof
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043554 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Continuous web printer for printing non-identical copies within a print run
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043580 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Continuous web printer with short media feed path
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043581 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Web printer with dual print zones having opposing feed directions
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043582 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Continuous web printer with automated web threading mechanism
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043583 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Continuous web printer with air platen
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043584 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Continuous web printer with pagewidth printhead in a printhead drawer
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043585 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Continuous web printer with upper and lower print zones for opposing sides of
web
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0043586 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Continuous web printer with flat print zones for printing opposing sides of the
web
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 009153 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printhead having polysilsesquioxane coating on ink ejection face
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 011807 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Inkjet printhead assembly having backside electrical connection
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 011824 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Printing system with fixed printheads and movable vacuum platen
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 020152 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Continuous web printer with short media feed path
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025801 A1
Silverbrook Research Pty Ltd.
Printing system with media simultaneously engaging input roller and movable media
engagement output
Jan-11
M
WO 2011 006641 A1
Stichting Dutch Polymer
Institute
Method for generating photonically treated printed structures on surfaces,
apparatus, and use thereof
Feb-11
M
WO 2011 012225 A1
Stichting Dutch Polymer Institute
Method for generation of ionic conducting surface structures and use
Jan-11
I
EP 2 268 750 A1
Sun Chemical BV
A jet ink and ink jet printing process
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0020970 A1
Sun Chemical Corporation
Etching or plating process and resist ink
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0008547 A1
Sun Chemical, B.V.
Jet ink and ink jet printing process
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0001774 A1
Technotrans AG
Ink-saving ink supply of printing machines
Jan-11
H
EP 2 276 632 A1
Telecom Italia SpA
Ink-jet print head having improved adhesion with time, its process of manufacturing
and its use in combination with a water-based ink containing acidic species
Feb-11
M
EP 2 284 232 A1
Ten Cate Advanced Textiles B.V.
Composition for continuous inkjet finishing of a textile article
Feb-11
M
US 2011 0033691 A1
Ten Cate Advanced Textiles B.V.
Composition, method and device for digitally coating textile
Jan-11
I
US 2011 0017291 A1
Tokyo Ohka Kogyo Co., Ltd.
Diffusing agent composition for ink-jet, and method for production of electrode
or solar battery using the composition
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 015665 A1
Topconsulting sagl
Method and inkjet printer with automatic compensation of the thickness of a
printable substrate
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
39
DIRECTIONS
Pivotal Resources
Month
Ref
Publication Number
Assignee/Applicant Name
Title
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032311 A1
Toshiba Tec Kabushiki Kaisha
Inkjet print head and method of manufacture therefor
Jan-11
I
EP 2 269 719 A1
Toyo Ink Manufacturing Co., Ltd.
Dispersant and pigment composition, pigment dispersing substance, and inkjet ink
using the dispersant
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 016895 A1
Ui Technologies, Inc.
Universal printer chip with a single data table
Feb-11
H
EP 2 285 574 A1
Univ Cape Town
Inkjet printing of nanoparticulate functional inks
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0018932 A1
University of Kuwait
Pagewidth inkjet printer
Feb-11
H
EP 2 280 833 A1
Videojet Technologies Inc
Printing method
Feb-11
H
EP 2 285 579 A2
Videojet Technologies Inc
An ink containment system and ink level sensing system for an inkjet cartridge
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032298 A1
Videojet Technologies Inc.
Printing method
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037814 A1
Videojet Technologies Inc.
Ink supply system
Jan-11
H
WO 2011 008485 A2
Videojet Technologies Inc.
A thermal inkjet print head with solvent resistance
Jan-11
H
EP 2 275 266 A1
Xerox Corporation
Staggered head stitch shifts in a continuous feed direct marking printer
Jan-11
H
EP 2 275 505 A1
Xerox Corporation
Hydrophobic coatings and their processes
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 872 A1
Xerox Corporation
Paper skew detection system
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 875 A1
Xerox Corporation
Rollers for phase-change ink printing
Feb-11
H
EP 2 281 689 A1
Xerox Corporation
Drum maintenance system for reducing duplex dropout
Feb-11
H
EP 2 281 690 A1
Xerox Corporation
System for reducing metering blade wear in a drum maintenance unit
Feb-11
H
EP 2 281 691 A1
Xerox Corporation
Beveled edge doctor blade for drum maintenance
Feb-11
H
EP 2 281 693 A1
Xerox Corporation
Apparatuses useful in printing, fixing devices and methods of stripping media from
surfaces in apparatuses useful in printing
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 003 A1
Xerox Corporation
Dual imaging of erasable and non-erasable media
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 004 A1
Xerox Corporation
Dual mode printer write heads
Feb-11
H
EP 2 287 005 A1
Xerox Corporation
Erase and writing continuous for erasable media
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012958 A1
Xerox Corporation
Staggered head stitch shifts in a continuous feed direct marking printer
Jan-11
H
US 2011 0012969 A1
Xerox Corporation
Dual mode printer
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025743 A1
Xerox Corporation
Paper skew detection system
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025752 A1
Xerox Corporation
Fabrication of improved aluminum rollers with low adhesion and ultra/super
hydrophobicity and/or oleophobicity by electrospinning technique in solid ink-jet
marking
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0025791 A1
Xerox Corporation
Rollers for phase-change ink printing
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032287 A1
Xerox Corporation
Beveled edge doctor blade for drum maintenance
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032288 A1
Xerox Corporation
Drum maintenance system for reducing duplex dropout
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0032306 A1
Xerox Corporation
System for reducing metering blade wear in a drum maintenance unit
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037802 A1
Xerox Corporation
Dual mode printer write heads
Feb-11
H
US 2011 0037803 A1
Xerox Corporation
Write heating architecture for dual mode imaging systems
Feb-11
M
US 2011 0045186 A1
Xerox Corporation
Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane image conditioning coating
Feb-11
H
EP 2 279 867 A1
ZIH Corp.
Memory system and method for the print head of a printer
Feb-11
H
WO 2011 011818 A1
Zydex Pty Ltd
3d Printing On A Rotating Cylindrical Surface
40
Copyright © 2011 Pivotal Resources Limited
About Directions
Patents and patent applications provide raw intelligence, but few executives, managers,
engineers or scientists have time to read them every month, let alone pick out the interesting
ones, analyse them and decide what’s relevant. Pivotal Resources therefore set up a new service - Directions. Experts in printhead, ink
and substrate technology scan the main ink jet patents and technical papers published. Subscribers receive six reports a year with the most significant ink jet printhead, ink and
substrate US, European and PCT patent applications reviewed. Illustrated throughout, it
provides a fast, easy way to stay in touch. ISSN 1746-5079
About Pivotal Resources Limited
Pivotal Resources was set up in 1995 to offer both vendors and users expert support for the
development of new products, processes and services. We operate primarily in the electronic
printing industry, covering technology, products and markets.
For further information contact:
Pivotal Resources Limited
11 Glebe Way, Histon
Cambridge CB24 9HJ
England
Telephone +44 1223 235900 Fax +44 1223 235901 email [email protected]
www.pivotal.co.uk
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