Site Supervisor User Guide 2.0
Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Emerson Climate Technologies Retail Solutions
1065 Big Shanty Road NW, Suite 100
Kennesaw, GA 30144, USA
Phone 770-425-2724
Fax 770-425-9319
SITE SUPERVISOR FIRMWARE VERSION AND PART NUMBER
2.0 F01
P/N 860-1200
WARNING! The enclosure should
never be opened. Warranty void if
seal is tampered with or removed.
FCC COMPLIANCE NOTICE
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules Class A. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and
(2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation.
CE COMPLIANCE NOTICE
Class A Product Information for Site Supervisor controllers:
The Emerson Retail Solutions Site Supervisor controllers are Class A products. In a
domestic environment this product may cause radio interference in which case the user
may be required to take adequate measures.
ULE211299
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE CAUTION
This integrated circuit can be damaged by ESD. Failure to observe proper handling and
installation procedures can cause damage. ESD damage can range from subtle
performance degradation to complete device failure. Precision integrated circuits may
be more susceptible to damage because very small parametric changes may cause the
device to not meet its published specifications.
Table of Contents
1 HARDWARE OVERVIEW...................................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS .....................................................................................................................................
1.2 HOUSING DIMENSIONS AND MOUNTING ...................................................................................................................
1.3 WIRING DIAGRAMS ...................................................................................................................................................
1.4 DEVICE WIRING .........................................................................................................................................................
1.5 SITE SUPERVISOR POWER, SERIAL, AND IO POSITIONS ............................................................................................
1.5.1 Termination Jumpers .........................................................................................................................................
1.5.2 Removing The SD Card......................................................................................................................................
1.5.3 LEDs...................................................................................................................................................................
1.6 WIRING TERMINAL DETAIL .......................................................................................................................................
1.7 DIGITAL INPUTS ........................................................................................................................................................
1.8 RELAY OUTPUTS .......................................................................................................................................................
1.9 ANALOG INPUTS .......................................................................................................................................................
1.10 SERIAL CONNECTIONS ............................................................................................................................................
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-6
1-6
1-7
1-8
2 RS485 I/O NETWORK BOARDS AND PERIPHERALS..................................................................................... 2-1
2.1 THE I/O NETWORK .................................................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.2 I/O BOARD NAMES AND TERMINOLOGY ................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.2.1 MultiFlex Boards ............................................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.2.1.1 MultiFlex 16 Input Board ........................................................................................................................................ 2-1
2.2.1.2 MultiFlex Combination Input/Output Boards.......................................................................................................... 2-2
2.2.2 MultiFlex RTU Support...................................................................................................................................... 2-3
2.2.2.1
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.3
2.2.2.4
2.2.2.5
2.2.2.6
2.2.2.7
2.2.2.8
I/O Network and MultiFlex RTU Setup on Serial Port ........................................................................................... 2-3
Creating an Instance of RTU Application ............................................................................................................... 2-3
Deleting/Checking Status of RTU Board ................................................................................................................ 2-3
Zone Management ................................................................................................................................................... 2-4
Scheduling................................................................................................................................................................ 2-4
Alarming .................................................................................................................................................................. 2-4
Real Time Clock Updates ........................................................................................................................................ 2-4
Hand-Held Terminal Support .................................................................................................................................. 2-4
2.2.3 MultiFlex RCB Support...................................................................................................................................... 2-4
2.2.3.1
2.2.3.2
2.2.3.3
2.2.3.4
2.2.3.5
2.2.3.6
2.2.3.7
2.2.3.8
I/O Network and MultiFlex RCB Setup on Serial Port ........................................................................................... 2-4
Creating an Instance of RCB Application ............................................................................................................... 2-5
Deleting/Checking Status of RCB Board ................................................................................................................ 2-5
Zone Management ................................................................................................................................................... 2-5
Scheduling................................................................................................................................................................ 2-5
Alarming .................................................................................................................................................................. 2-5
Real Time Clock Updates ........................................................................................................................................ 2-5
Hand-Held Terminal Support .................................................................................................................................. 2-5
2.2.4 MultiFlex RTU ...................................................................................................................................................
2.2.5 MultiFlex Rooftop Control Board (RCB)...........................................................................................................
2.2.6 The MultiFlex ESR Board ..................................................................................................................................
2.2.7 Hand-held Terminal (P/N 814-3110).................................................................................................................
2.2.8 The 8RO and 8ROSMT Relay Boards................................................................................................................
2.2.9 4AO Analog Output Board.................................................................................................................................
2.2.10 8DO Digital Output Board ..............................................................................................................................
2.2.11 XM Series of Case Controllers.........................................................................................................................
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-8
2-9
2.2.11.1 XM670 ................................................................................................................................................................... 2-9
2.2.11.2 XM679 ................................................................................................................................................................... 2-9
2.2.11.3 XM678 ................................................................................................................................................................... 2-9
2.2.12 Site Supervisor Display.................................................................................................................................. 2-10
Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Table of Contents • i
3 WIRING EXAMPLES............................................................................................................................................... 3-1
4 SITE SUPERVISOR DISPLAY ............................................................................................................................... 4-1
4.1 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS .....................................................................................................................................
4.2 MOUNTING .................................................................................................................................................................
4.2.1 Panel Mount Dimensions ...................................................................................................................................
4.2.2 Wall Mount Dimensions .....................................................................................................................................
4.3 ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS .......................................................................................................................................
4.3.1 Panel Mount Version..........................................................................................................................................
4.3.2 Wall Mount Version ...........................................................................................................................................
4.4 DIP SWITCH CONFIGURATION....................................................................................................................................
4.5 SITE SUPERVISOR DISPLAY SCREENS ........................................................................................................................
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-6
5 SOFTWARE OVERVIEW ....................................................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1 SUCTION GROUPS ...................................................................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1.1 Introduction........................................................................................................................................................ 5-1
5.1.2 The (Standard) Suction Group Application ....................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1.2.1 Overview of PID Control Strategy .......................................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1.2.2 Variable-Speed Compressors................................................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1.2.3 Floating Setpoint Control......................................................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1.3 The Enhanced Suction Group Application......................................................................................................... 5-1
5.1.3.1
5.1.3.2
5.1.3.3
5.1.3.4
5.1.3.5
Learning Mode......................................................................................................................................................... 5-2
Circuit Load Analysis .............................................................................................................................................. 5-2
The Control/Cycles Parameter................................................................................................................................. 5-2
Variable-Speed, Digital Scroll, and Digital Discus Compressor Support ............................................................... 5-2
Floating Suction Control.......................................................................................................................................... 5-2
5.1.4 Hardware Overview ........................................................................................................................................... 5-2
5.2 ANALOG SENSOR CONTROL ...................................................................................................................................... 5-3
5.2.1 Control Strategy ................................................................................................................................................. 5-3
5.2.2 Control Alarming ............................................................................................................................................... 5-4
5.2.3 Alarm Output When On/Off Parameters............................................................................................................ 5-5
5.2.4 Control Bypass ................................................................................................................................................... 5-5
5.3 DIGITAL SENSOR CONTROL ....................................................................................................................................... 5-5
5.3.1 Control Strategy ................................................................................................................................................. 5-5
5.3.2 Command Alarming ........................................................................................................................................... 5-6
5.3.3 Alarm Output When On/Off Parameters............................................................................................................ 5-6
5.3.4 Control Bypass ................................................................................................................................................... 5-6
5.4 LIGHTING CONTROL .................................................................................................................................................. 5-6
5.4.1 Lighting Control Logic....................................................................................................................................... 5-6
5.4.2 Light Level Sensor Verification.......................................................................................................................... 5-7
5.4.3 Solar Calculation ............................................................................................................................................... 5-7
5.4.4 Digital Lighting Output...................................................................................................................................... 5-7
5.4.5 Light Proofing .................................................................................................................................................... 5-7
5.4.6 Minimum On/Off Times...................................................................................................................................... 5-7
5.4.7 Dimming Control (Analog Output) .................................................................................................................... 5-8
5.4.8 External Schedule............................................................................................................................................... 5-9
5.4.9 Lighting Bypass Inputs ....................................................................................................................................... 5-9
5.4.10 Demand Shed Behavior.................................................................................................................................... 5-9
5.5 GLOBAL DATA ........................................................................................................................................................... 5-9
5.5.1 Location From.................................................................................................................................................... 5-9
5.5.2 Sundown ............................................................................................................................................................. 5-9
5.6 HVAC CONTROL ..................................................................................................................................................... 5-10
5.6.1 Active Setpoint Determination ......................................................................................................................... 5-10
5.6.2 Setpoint Reset ................................................................................................................................................... 5-10
ii • Table of Contents
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.6.3 Demand Shed ...................................................................................................................................................
5.6.4 Heating and Cooling Control ..........................................................................................................................
5.6.5 Control Logic ...................................................................................................................................................
5.6.6 Heat/Cool Lockout Based on Outside Air Temperature ..................................................................................
5.6.7 System Shutdown..............................................................................................................................................
5.6.8 Fan Control......................................................................................................................................................
5.6.9 Fan Mode .........................................................................................................................................................
5.6.10 Plenum Warmup/Purge..................................................................................................................................
5.6.11 Fan Proof Failure ..........................................................................................................................................
5.6.12 System Shutdown............................................................................................................................................
5.6.13 Economization (Damper) Control .................................................................................................................
5.6.14 Determine the Analog Damper Position........................................................................................................
5.6.15 Determine the Digital Damper Position ........................................................................................................
5.6.16 Heat Pump Control ........................................................................................................................................
5.6.17 Reversing Valve..............................................................................................................................................
5.6.18 Compressor Output ........................................................................................................................................
5.6.19 Curtailment ....................................................................................................................................................
5.7 TIME SCHEDULE APPLICATION ................................................................................................................................
5.7.1 Time Schedule Method .....................................................................................................................................
5.7.2 Standard Schedule............................................................................................................................................
5.7.3 Event Names.....................................................................................................................................................
5.7.4 Maintenance Schedule .....................................................................................................................................
5.7.5 Output Calculation...........................................................................................................................................
5.7.6 Scheduling Logic..............................................................................................................................................
5.7.7 Control Override..............................................................................................................................................
5.7.8 Control Bypass.................................................................................................................................................
5.7.9 Control Override..............................................................................................................................................
5.7.10 Special Conditions .........................................................................................................................................
5.7.11 Priority of Services.........................................................................................................................................
5.7.12 Control Alarming ...........................................................................................................................................
5.7.13 Schedule Category .........................................................................................................................................
5.8 DEMAND CONTROL .................................................................................................................................................
5.8.1 KWH Calculation.............................................................................................................................................
5.8.2 Demand Calculation ........................................................................................................................................
5.8.3 Shed Outputs ....................................................................................................................................................
5.8.4 Application Alarms ..........................................................................................................................................
5.8.5 KW Load Specification.....................................................................................................................................
5.8.6 Performance Requirements..............................................................................................................................
5.9 UTILITY MONITORING .............................................................................................................................................
5.9.1 Utility Usage Calculation ................................................................................................................................
5.9.1.1
5.9.1.2
5.9.1.3
5.9.1.4
5-10
5-11
5-11
5-11
5-11
5-11
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-12
5-13
5-13
5-13
5-13
5-13
5-13
5-14
5-14
5-14
5-14
5-14
5-15
5-15
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-16
5-17
5-17
5-17
5-17
5-17
5-18
5-18
5-18
5-19
5-19
5-19
Utility Type............................................................................................................................................................ 5-19
Analog Input .......................................................................................................................................................... 5-19
Digital Pulse Input ..................................................................................................................................................5-19
Current/Voltage Inputs - Single/Three Phase ........................................................................................................ 5-19
5.9.2 Consumption Totalizing ................................................................................................................................... 5-19
5.9.2.1 Totalizer Output ..................................................................................................................................................... 5-19
5.9.2.2 Fixed Period Totalizers .......................................................................................................................................... 5-20
5.9.3 Demand Trip .................................................................................................................................................... 5-20
5.9.3.1
5.9.3.2
5.9.3.3
5.9.3.4
Shed Output ........................................................................................................................................................... 5-20
Average Rate of Consumption Output................................................................................................................... 5-20
Demand Alarm....................................................................................................................................................... 5-20
Time In Shed Output.............................................................................................................................................. 5-20
5.9.4 Application Specific Logs................................................................................................................................. 5-20
5.9.5 Units of Measurement ...................................................................................................................................... 5-20
5.10 ONBOARD I/O ....................................................................................................................................................... 5-20
Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Table of Contents • iii
5.9.1 Licensing .......................................................................................................................................................... 5-20
5.9.2 Adding and Deleting Onboard I/O Application ............................................................................................... 5-20
5.9.3 Status and Detail Screen .................................................................................................................................. 5-21
5.9.4 Alarming........................................................................................................................................................... 5-22
5.10 XR75CX 5.6.......................................................................................................................................................... 5-22
5.11 XR35CX 5.6 AND 2.6............................................................................................................................................ 5-23
5.11.1 Overview......................................................................................................................................................... 5-23
5.11.2 Command-Alarm Matrix ............................................................................................................................... 5-24
5.12 XC645CX 2.5........................................................................................................................................................ 5-26
5.12.1 Application Advisories ................................................................................................................................... 5-26
5.12.2 Command-Alarm Matrix ............................................................................................................................... 5-27
5.13 XR75CX CASE DISPLAY ....................................................................................................................................... 5-29
5.13.1 Overview......................................................................................................................................................... 5-29
5.13.2 Application Advisories ................................................................................................................................... 5-29
5.13.3 Inputs.............................................................................................................................................................. 5-30
5.14 XR75CX 2.6.......................................................................................................................................................... 5-31
5.14.1 Application Advisories .................................................................................................................................. 5-31
5.14.2 Command ....................................................................................................................................................... 5-32
5.15 EMERSON T-STAT .................................................................................................................................................. 5-32
5.15.1 General Control .............................................................................................................................................. 5-32
5.15.2 Alarms ............................................................................................................................................................ 5-32
5.15.3 Device Commissioning................................................................................................................................... 5-32
5.16 ENERGY METER ..................................................................................................................................................... 5-33
5.17 DATA LOGGING AND GRAPH ................................................................................................................................. 5-33
5.18 FLEXIBLE COMBINER ............................................................................................................................................. 5-33
5.19 RLDS (REFRIGERANT LEAK DETECTOR SYSTEM) ................................................................................................ 5-34
5.19.1 Communication .............................................................................................................................................. 5-34
5.19.2 Supported Gases............................................................................................................................................. 5-34
5.20 MRLDS (MODULAR REFRIGERANT LEAK DETECTOR SENSOR) ........................................................................... 5-34
5.21 CONTROL LINK ANTI-CONDENSATE CONTROLLER (CL ACC) ............................................................................. 5-34
5.21.1 Alarm Handling Logic.................................................................................................................................... 5-34
5.21.2 Alarms Configuration..................................................................................................................................... 5-34
5.22 HVAC ZONE.......................................................................................................................................................... 5-34
5.22.1 How It Works.................................................................................................................................................. 5-34
5.22.2 Compatible Applications to be Connected to HVAC Zones........................................................................... 5-35
5.22.3 Temperature Control...................................................................................................................................... 5-35
5.22.4 HVAC Zone Temperature............................................................................................................................... 5-35
5.22.5 Economizer Control ....................................................................................................................................... 5-35
5.22.6 Economization Enable.................................................................................................................................... 5-35
5.22.7 The Effect of Enabling Economization........................................................................................................... 5-36
5.22.8 Dehumidification Control .............................................................................................................................. 5-36
5.22.9 HVAC Zone Humidity Input ........................................................................................................................... 5-36
5.22.10 Enabling Dehumidification Effect................................................................................................................ 5-37
5.22.10.1 MultiFlex RTUs and RCBs................................................................................................................................ 5-37
5.22.11 Optimum Start/Stop (OSS) ...........................................................................................................................
5.22.12 Intelligent Pre-Starts and Pre-Stops ............................................................................................................
5.22.13 Setpoint Reset ...............................................................................................................................................
5.23 AHU ......................................................................................................................................................................
5.24 ANALOG AND DIGITAL COMBINER ........................................................................................................................
5.25 ANTI-SWEAT CONTROL .........................................................................................................................................
5.26 STANDARD CIRCUITS .............................................................................................................................................
5.27 CASE CONTROL CIRCUITS .....................................................................................................................................
5.27.1 Overview.........................................................................................................................................................
5.27.2 Case Circuit Control Software Overview.......................................................................................................
iv • Table of Contents
5-37
5-37
5-37
5-38
5-38
5-39
5-40
5-40
5-40
5-41
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.27.2.1 Valve Control....................................................................................................................................................... 5-41
5.27.3 Refrigeration Control..................................................................................................................................... 5-42
5.27.3.1 EEVs (Liquid Pulse and Liquid Stepper)............................................................................................................. 5-42
5.27.3.2 EEPRs (Suction Stepper) ..................................................................................................................................... 5-42
5.27.4
Defrost Control ............................................................................................................................................. 5-42
5.27.4.1
5.27.4.2
5.27.4.3
5.27.4.4
5.27.4.5
Defrost States ....................................................................................................................................................... 5-43
Defrost Types....................................................................................................................................................... 5-43
Defrost Termination............................................................................................................................................. 5-43
Demand Defrost ................................................................................................................................................... 5-43
Emergency Defrost .............................................................................................................................................. 5-44
5.28 IRRIGATION CONTROL ...........................................................................................................................................
5.29 TD CONTROL .........................................................................................................................................................
5.29.1 Overview ........................................................................................................................................................
5.29.2 Temperature Differential (TD) Strategy ........................................................................................................
5.29.3 TD Control Fail-Safes....................................................................................................................................
5.29.4 Configuration .................................................................................................................................................
5.29.5 Setpoints .........................................................................................................................................................
5.29.6 Inputs..............................................................................................................................................................
5.29.7 Alarms ............................................................................................................................................................
5.30 LOOP/SEQUENCE CONTROL ...................................................................................................................................
5.31 XM CIRCUIT CONTROL .........................................................................................................................................
5.31.1 Associations ...................................................................................................................................................
5.31.1.1
5.31.1.2
5.31.1.3
5.31.1.4
5-44
5-44
5-44
5-45
5-45
5-45
5-45
5-46
5-46
5-47
5-47
5-47
Case Circuit Association Support ........................................................................................................................ 5-47
Dual Association Not Supported ......................................................................................................................... 5-47
Synchronized Parameters..................................................................................................................................... 5-48
Visibility of Associated Parameters..................................................................................................................... 5-48
5.31.2 Suction Group Interaction ............................................................................................................................. 5-48
5.31.2.1 Standard Suction .................................................................................................................................................. 5-48
5.31.2.2 Enhanced Suction................................................................................................................................................. 5-48
5.31.3 Supervisory Control Functions ...................................................................................................................... 5-48
5.31.3.1
5.31.3.2
5.31.3.3
5.31.3.4
5.31.3.5
5.31.3.6
Dewpoint Value ................................................................................................................................................... 5-48
Lighting Control................................................................................................................................................... 5-48
Active Setpoint Output ........................................................................................................................................ 5-48
Defrost Scheduling............................................................................................................................................... 5-48
Case States ........................................................................................................................................................... 5-49
Case Type............................................................................................................................................................. 5-49
5.31.4 Application Advisory...................................................................................................................................... 5-49
5.31.4.1 Synchronized Alarm Parameters.......................................................................................................................... 5-49
5.31.5 Application Commands .................................................................................................................................. 5-49
5.31.5.1 Start Defrost ......................................................................................................................................................... 5-49
5.31.5.2 Stop Defrost ......................................................................................................................................................... 5-49
5.31.6 Product Probe Support ..................................................................................................................................
5.32 XR75CX CASE DISPLAY .......................................................................................................................................
5.33 CONDENSER ...........................................................................................................................................................
5.34 XJ CONDENSING UNIT ...........................................................................................................................................
5.35 SITE MANAGER COMPATIBILITY ...........................................................................................................................
5-50
5-50
5-50
5-50
5-50
6 BASIC NAVIGATION .............................................................................................................................................. 6-1
6.1 MENUS AND SUBMENUS ............................................................................................................................................ 6-1
6.2 OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................................................................. 6-2
6.2.1 Conditional Visibility ......................................................................................................................................... 6-2
6.2.1.1 User View Details .................................................................................................................................................... 6-2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
BASIC SCREEN PARTS AND ELEMENTS .....................................................................................................................
LANGUAGE SETTINGS ................................................................................................................................................
LOCATING APPLICATIONS..........................................................................................................................................
USING THE HELP MENU ............................................................................................................................................
Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-4
Table of Contents • v
6.7 ICONS OR BUTTONS APPEARING ON THE HOME SCREEN .......................................................................................... 6-5
7 ALARM CONFIGURATION ................................................................................................................................... 7-1
7.1 ALARM CONFIGURATION ..........................................................................................................................................
7.2 ALARM COMMUNICATIONS SETTING ........................................................................................................................
7.3 ALARM LOG AND VIEW HISTORY .............................................................................................................................
7.4 TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL ALARMS ...................................................................................................................
7.5 LIGHTING CYCLE ALARMS .......................................................................................................................................
7-2
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-6
8 BASIC SETUP INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................. 8-1
8.1 USING THE HELP MENU ............................................................................................................................................. 8-1
8.2 HOW TO LOCATE THE IP ADDRESS OF SITE SUPERVISOR ......................................................................................... 8-2
9 REVISION HISTORY............................................................................................................................................... 9-1
APPENDIX A: ALARM ADVISORIES ................................................................................................................... A-1
APPENDIX B: TROUBLESHOOTING .................................................................................................................... B-1
vi • Table of Contents
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
1
Hardware
Overview
Site Supervisor (P/N 860-1200) is a system that
combines energy management with the ability to monitor
various facility systems and provide alerts when there are
issues that need attention. This system provides HVAC
control, Refrigeration System Monitoring and Control, as
well as Lighting Control. In addition, the Site Supervisor
can monitor and report energy consumption and take
action to reduce the energy demand during peak periods.
This can have a direct impact on utility bills by reducing
total energy costs. Site Supervisor ensures that the HVAC
and lighting systems are on and off at the appropriate
times. This ability to monitor store conditions can
potentially minimize energy consumption.
1.1
Digital Inputs
4
Relay Outputs
4
Agency Approvals
ULE211299, CE
Table 1-1 - Site Supervisor Specifications
1.2
Housing Dimensions
and Mounting
Technical
Specifications
Operating
Temperature
14°F to 140°F (-10°C to
60°C)
Relative Humidity
20-85% RH noncondensing
Enclosure Rating
UL 94 V-0
Dimensions
103.7 x 34.7mm
24 VAC
20VA required
24VAC/20VA
1 Can Bus
Expansion Module
Connections Only
4 RS485 ports
MODBUS Com Ports 1, 2,
3, and 4 (Site Supervisor
Display)
3 Ethernet ports
Ports 1, 1, 0
Analog Inputs
8
2 USB Ports
1, 2
MicroSD
1
Figure 1-1 - Site Supervisor Housing Dimensions and
Mounting
The Site Supervisor is DIN Rail mounting compatible.
Snap the orange tabs to the down position to fasten. If not
using the DIN Rail mounting option, fasten to the
mounting surface using the openings in the mounting tabs.
NOTE: Dimensions below can be DIN Rail
mounted or attached via the mounting pads.
NOTE: The Can Bus port is for expansion I/O
such as the IPX206D and IPX225D.
Table 1-1 - Site Supervisor Specifications
Technical Specifications
Hardware Overview • 1-1
1.3
Wiring Diagrams
Figure 1-2 - Site Supervisor 2.0 Wiring Diagram
1-2 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Figure 1-3 - Site Supervisor 2.0 Detail
Wiring Diagrams
Hardware Overview • 1-3
1.4
Device Wiring
See Section 3, Wiring Examples for typical power and COM wiring.
1.5
Site Supervisor Power, Serial, and IO Positions
Figure 1-4 - Site Supervisor Power, Serial, and IO Positions
1.5.1
Termination Jumpers
Depending on the orientation of the board, the termination jumpers are set in the down position (always toward the
board - ON) for termination and up (always away from the board - OFF) for no termination. Position 1 = Termination and
Position 2 = Bias. Refer to the enclosure diagram for termination jumper direction.
Figure 1-5 - Termination Jumper/Dip Switch Positions
1-4 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
1.5.2
Removing The SD Card
CAUTION! If removing the SD card, first
power OFF the controller. Then remove the
SD card. DO NOT remove the cover.
Removing the cover will void the warranty.
1.5.3
LEDs
Figure 1-6 - LEDs on Front Enclosure
STATE
DESCRIPTION
Solid red
Starting up
Flashing red - 1 Hz
Loading OS/Application
Solid green
Running - Normal Status
Flashing red - 2 Hz
Failure to load
Table 1-2 - LED States and Definitions
Site Supervisor Power, Serial, and IO Positions
Hardware Overview • 1-5
1.6
Wiring Terminal Detail
Figure 1-7 - Site Supervisor Wiring Terminal Detail
1.7
Digital Inputs
• Can read pulses up to 10Hz
1.8
Relay Outputs
Figure 1-8 - Digital Inputs
• Can read both dry and wet (24VAC) contact
closures
Figure 1-9 - Relay Outputs
• Dry contact wire to DI 1 – DI 4 and Cdry
• Relays are Form C rated 5A at 125/240VAC
• Wet (live) contact wire to DI 1 – DI 4 and Cac
• General Purpose
1-6 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
• 100K Cycles
NOTE: General purpose relays are costeffective 5-15 Amp switching devices used in a
wide variety of applications.
• Pin 24 is common for relays 3 & 4
• Relay 1 (RL 1) - Pin 15 NC / Pin 16 NO
Features:
• Electrical loads of 5 to 15 Amps.
• Contact configurations through 3PDT.
• Coils molded in polyester for environmental
protection.
1.9
• Pin 17 is common for relays 1 & 2
• Relay 2 (RL 2) - Pin 18 NC / Pin 19 NO
• Relay 3 (RL 3) - Pin 20 NC / Pin 21 NO
• Relay 4 (RL 4) - Pin 22 NC / Pin 23 NO
Analog Inputs
Figure 1-10 - Analog Inputs
• Supports 0-10VDC, 0-1 DC, 0-5VDC, 2-20mA, 4-20mA, Emerson NTC temperature and dry contact digital input.
• Supports engineering units for temperature, pressure, humidity, light level and generic percentage.
• When wiring transducers or amplifiers (for example, outdoor light level) the odd numbered terminal is the + or signal and the even numbered terminal is the – or common.
• Provides (2) 12VDC (160mA) and (2) 5VDC (40mA) power supply terminals for humidity sensors, pressure
transducers, and more.
Type
Ratings
Terminal
Relay 1 (N.O. & N.C.)
5A, 125/240 VAC, General Purpose, 100K cycles;
4FLA/4LRA, 250VAC, Motor Load, 100K cycles;
J5-2, J5-3, J5-4 (Base Board)
Relay 2 (N.O. & N.C.)
5A, 125/240 VAC, General Purpose, 100K cycles;
4FLA/4LRA, 250VAC, Motor Load, 100K cycles;
J5-1, J5-2, J6-6 (Base Board)
Relay 3 (N.O. & N.C.)
5A, 125/240 VAC, General Purpose, 100K cycles;
4FLA/4LRA, 250VAC, Motor Load, 100K cycles;
J6-1, J6-4, J6-5 (Base Board)
Relay 4 (N.O. & N.C.)
5A, 125/240 VAC, General Purpose, 100K cycles;
4FLA/4LRA, 250VAC, Motor Load, 100K cycles;
J6-1, J6-2, J6-3 (Base Board)
Table 1-1- Site Supervisor UL Relay Ratings
Analog Inputs
Hardware Overview • 1-7
1.10 Serial Connections
Figure 1-11 - Serial Connections
Site Supervisor 2.0 is equipped with four (4) RS485 serial Com ports and one (1) Can Bus port.
• Com ports 1-4 support MODBUS and Emerson (CPC) IO Net. (Com Port 4 = Site Supervisor display only)
• Com ports 1-4 support 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, and 115200 baud connection speeds. (Com Port 4 = Site Supervisor display only)
• The Can Bus port is for Dixell expansion I/O such as the IPX206D and IPX225D.
• The Can Bus port is for expansion I/O such as the IPX206D and IPX225D.
• Com ports 1-4 wiring polarity:
• Same polarity – XR75CX, Emerson Energy Meter, and Site Supervisor Display.
• Opposite polarity – Emerson T-Stat, Control Link ACC, MRLDS, MultiFlex RTU, and MultiFlex RCB/RCB-P.
1-8 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
2
RS485 I/O Network Boards and
Peripherals
all of which are based on a single universal hardware
platform. The board design uses flash-uploadable
firmware and plug-in expansion boards to configure the
base platform board and apply it for use as an input board,
relay output board, analog output board, or a combination
I/O board.
2.2.1.1
MultiFlex 16 Input Board
Site Supervisor has up to two RS485 network ports,
each of which may be configured as an I/O network or
MODBUS port.
2.1
The I/O Network
Most of the general purpose input and output
communications devices required by the Site Supervisor to
control refrigeration systems are connected via the I/O
Network. The I/O Network is a simple RS485 three-wire
connection that allows data interchange between input
boards, which read sensor values and digital closures,
output boards, which carry out commands from Site
Supervisor's control applications, and the Site Supervisor
itself. All boards and controllers manufactured by
Emerson Retail Solutions for communication with Site
Supervisor via RS485 are generally referred to as I/O
boards, and the network they are connected to is referred
to as the I/O Network (or I/O Net).
A COM port configured as I/O Net may connect with
up to 127 I/O boards. This network is used by the Site
Supervisor to read data from the input boards and to send
commands to the analog and digital output boards. Some
unit controllers, such as CCB case controllers and
MultiFlex RCBs, also communicate with the Site
Supervisor via the I/O Network.
2.2
I/O Board Names and
Terminology
There are many input, relay output, analog output, and
combination I/O boards available from Emerson Retail
Solutions for use with the Site Supervisor. However,
separate from the various MultiFlex unit controller
models, Site Supervisor only recognizes four different
types of I/O boards: 16AI, 8RO, 4AO, and 8DO. All Site
Supervisor-compatible I/O boards communicate with Site
Supervisor as if they are one or more of these types of
boards.
2.2.1
Figure 2-1 - MultiFlex 16 Input Board
The MultiFlex 16 input board offers sixteen
combination analog/digital input points for use by Retail
Solutions Site Supervisor, Einstein, and REFLECS control
systems. The MultiFlex 16 may be used in retrofits with
no additional hardware or software setup or upgrades.Site
Supervisor
The MultiFlex 16 is designed to be 100% compatible
with the previous generation of Retail Solutions input
boards (the 16AI), communicates with the site controller
via an RS485 connection to a REFLECS COM A&D
Network or an Site Supervisor I/O Network. Dip switches
on the board set the network ID (board number) and baud
rate.
The board also provides both +5VDC and +12VDC
output voltage points for use in powering transducers or
other input devices that require power.
The MultiFlex 16 has a Hand-held Terminal interface
Section 2.2.7, Hand-held Terminal (P/N 814-3110) that
may be used by technicians to view the input voltage and
engineering unit values for each input point without need
of a voltmeter or front panel controller display.
MultiFlex Boards
The MultiFlex line of control system boards provides a
wide variety of input, output, and smart control solutions,
The I/O Network
RS485 I/O Network Boards and Peripherals • 2-1
Table 2-1 shows the part number of the MultiFlex 16.
P/N
810-3013
Model Name
MultiFlex 16
Description
16 analog/digital
inputs, no outputs
Table 2-1 - MultiFlex 16 Input Board Model
The MultiFlex 16 is designed with several features that
make it easy to install, wire, and configure. These main
user interface features are shown in Figure 2-1.
2.2.1.2
MultiFlex Combination Input/
Output Boards
Figure 2-4 - RoHS MultiFlex Combination Input/Output Board
(Side View)
Figure 2-2 - Non-RoHS MultiFlex Combination Input/Output
Board (Side View)
Figure 2-5 - RoHS MultiFlex Combination Input/Output Board
(Top View)
There are several models of the MultiFlex board that
combine the functionalities of input boards, relay output
boards, digital output boards, and analog output boards.
The MultiFlex combination input/output boards are
designed to be replacements for the 8IO Combination
Input/Output Board, but the MultiFlex board provides
several new hardware options and software features.
Figure 2-3 - Non-RoHS MultiFlex Combination Input/Output
Board (Top View)
2-2 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
The MultiFlex combination I/O boards consist of up
to 16 combination digital/analog inputs, and a
combination of relay outputs, digital outputs, and analog
outputs.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
All boards feature both +5VDC and +12VDC output
voltage points for use in powering transducers or other
input devices that require power.
On the RS485 Network, the MultiFlex combination
input/output boards present themselves to site controllers
as 16AI Analog Input Boards, 8RO Relay Output Boards,
8DO Digital Output Boards, and/or 4AO Analog Output
Boards, depending on what type of inputs or outputs are
equipped. Dip switches are used to assign network ID
numbers to each board type.
The MultiFlex combination input/output boards also
support a Hand-held Terminal interface, Section 2.2.7,
Hand-held Terminal (P/N 814-3110) which allows technicians to view input values, check relay and analog output
states, and override output points with fixed digital or analog values. For more information on MultiFlex I/O boards,
refer to the MultiFlex I/O Board Installation and Operation Manual (P/N 026-1704).
This MultiFlex RTU (Rooftop Unit Board) support
allows you to set the inputs, outputs, setpoints and alarms
on the user interface, and transmit the data through I/O
network between RTU board and Site Supervisor.
2.2.2.1
1.
Navigate to serial port configuration screen,
select an unused port and configure it as an I/O
network port.
2.
Configure the baud rate of the I/O network port,
then select MultiFlex RTU from the supported
board types for this port. Set the number of board
needed to setup, click Save to add the RTU
devices. RTU board status will appear “Online”.
3.
Navigate to the “HVAC - RTU_0X” device status
screen through the site map, the status screen displays the following sections:
• General
Table 2-2 shows the available models of MultiFlex
combination input/output boards with description and part
numbers.
P/N
Model Name
810-3063
MultiFlex
88AO
8 analog/digital inputs, 8
relay outputs, 4 analog outputs
810-3064
MultiFlex 88
8 analog/digital inputs, 8
relay outputs
810-3065
MultiFlex
168AO
16 analog/digital inputs, 8
relay outputs, 4 analog outputs
810-3066
MultiFlex
168
16 analog/digital inputs, 8
relay outputs.
810-3067
MultiFlex
168DO
16 analog/digital inputs, 8
relay outputs, 4 digital outputs
810-3072
MultiFlex
1616L
16 analog/digital inputs, 16
low-voltage (24VAC rated)
relay outputs
810-3073
MultiFlex
1616LAO
16 analog/digital inputs, 16
low-voltage (24VAC rated)
relay outputs, and 4 analog
outputs.
810-3077
MultiFlex
1616LDO
16 analog/digital inputs, 16
low-voltage (24VAC rated)
relay outputs, and 4 pulsewidth modulating digital
outputs
• Inputs
• Outputs
• RTU Outputs
Description
4.
Click Details on the status screen, the system will
display the properties of the RTU board by the
properties group. You can now view and
configure the properties of the RTU board.
5.
After configuring the properties, the new values
can be sent to RTU application on the Site
Supervisor and RTU board on the I/O network.
The RTU board can now work correctly on the
controller.
2.2.2.2
MultiFlex RTU Support
I/O Board Names and Terminology
Creating an Instance of RTU
Application
You can create an instance of RTU application even if
the RTU board is not connected to the Site Supervisor
controller, however the board status is displayed “Offline”.
If the RTU board is connected to Site Supervisor
through the I/O network, the Site Supervisor should find
the RTU board and its property values and should be read
on the controller through the I/O network.
2.2.2.3
Deleting/Checking Status of RTU
Board
You can navigate to Network Summary screen to do
the following operations:
1.
View all the devices connected to the Site
Supervisor from the I/O network and its online
status.
2.
Delete a device.
Table 2-2 - MultiFlex Combination Input/Output Board Models
2.2.2
I/O Network and MultiFlex RTU
Setup on Serial Port
RS485 I/O Network Boards and Peripherals • 2-3
3.
View the I/O network traffic status.
2.2.2.7
4.
Navigate to the summary screen of a specific
device.
Current system date or time is sent to the RTU board
periodically with a 10-second interval.
2.2.2.4
Zone Management
You can associate an RTU application with a zone.
Zone is a group of RTUs and/or AHU (air handling unit)
applications that shares the same heating, cooling,
dehumidification setpoints, and other control parameters.
The primary purpose of zone control is to maintain a
specific temperature and humidity level throughout a wide
area using multiple rooftop units.
When an RTU application is associated with a zone,
some inputs of RTU application should use the output
values from zone. These are the property mapping list:
2.2.2.8
Real Time Clock Updates
Hand-Held Terminal Support
1.
You can connect to the RTU board with a handheld terminal (HHT) to read or write the
configuration of this RTU board.
2.
When a HHT is connected to a RTU board, any
setpoint change made from UI will not be sent to
the RTU board. Some controllers will accept the
changes but some will not.
3.
The Site Supervisor downloads all setpoints and
configuration parameters you changed from UI
upon receipt of a message from the RTU that the
hand-held terminal is disconnected. This will
overwrite any changes made using the HHT.
4.
The Site Supervisor does not accept permanent
changes made via the hand-held terminal to the
Site Supervisor.
RTU Inputs
Zone Outputs
ZONE OCC
ZONE_OCC_STATE
ZONE TEMP
ZONE_TEMP_OUT
ECONMIZE
ZONE ECON OK
2.2.3
MultiFlex RCB Support
DEHUMDIFY
ZONE DEHUM ACTIVE
2.2.3.1
OCC HEAT
ZONE HEAT OCC OUT
I/O Network and MultiFlex RCB
Setup on Serial Port
UNOCC HEAT
ZONE HEAT UOC OUT
OCC COOL
ZONE COOL OCC OUT
UNOCC COOL
ZONE COOL UOC OUT
OCC DEHUM
ZONE FB HUMID STPT
SEASON
ZONE_SUM_WIN_MODE_OUT
1.
Navigate to serial port configuration screen,
select an unused port and configure it as an I/O
network port.
2.
Configure the baud rate of the I/O network port,
then select MultiFlex RCB from the supported
board types for this port. Set the number of board
needed to setup, click Save to add the RCB
devices. RCB board status will appear Online.
Table 2-3- RTU and Zone Property Mapping List
2.2.2.5
3.Navigate to the “HVAC - RCB_0X” device
status screen through the site map, the status
screen displays the following sections:
Scheduling
Daily (from Monday to Sunday) schedules of
Occupied/Unoccupied state can be set and send to the
RTU board.
2.2.2.6
• General
•Alarm Outs
Alarming
Alarms generated from RTU board will be received
and reported by Alarm management in Site
Supervisor.You can configure the attribution, type and
category of the alarms generated from RTU board.
Any reset or clear actions performed on the UI is
forwarded to the RTU board.
NOTE: The RTU does not have the capability
of resetting individual alarms. All alarms on
the RTU will be reset or cleared by the RTU if
anyone reset or clear the alarms in the Site
Supervisor.
2-4 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
• Inputs
• Outputs
• RCB Outputs
4.
Click Details on the status screen, the system will
display the properties of the RCB board by the
properties group. You can now view and
configure the properties of the RCB board.
5.
After configuring the properties, the new values
can be sent to RCB application on the Site
Supervisor and RCB board on the I/O network.
The RCB board can now work correctly on the
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
2.2.3.5
controller.
2.2.3.2
Creating an Instance of RCB
Application
You can create an instance of RCB application even if
the RCB board is not connected to the Site Supervisor
controller, however the board status is displayed “Offline”.
If the RCB board is connected to Site Supervisor
through the I/O network, the Site Supervisor should find
the RCB board and its property values and should be read
on the controller through the I/O network.
2.2.3.3
Deleting/Checking Status of RCB
Board
You can navigate to Network Summary screen to do
the following operations:
1.
View all the devices connected to the Site
Supervisor from the I/O network and its online
status.
2.
Delete a device.
3.
View the I/O network traffic status.
4.
Navigate to the summary screen of a specific
device.
2.2.3.4
Zone Management
You can associate an RCB board with a zone.
When an RCB board is associated with a zone, some
inputs of RCB should use the output values from zone.
The are the property mapping list you can use:
Scheduling
Daily (from Monday to Sunday) schedules of
Occupied/Unoccupied state can be set and send to the
RCB board.
2.2.3.6
Alarming
Alarms generated from RCB board will be received
and reported by Alarm management in Site
Supervisor.You can configure alarms properties such as:
• Alarm repeat rate
• Alarm type
• Alarm category
• Alarm displayed message
• Alarm monitoring flag
The Alarms generated from the Site Supervisor for the
RCB application are the following:
• Control Temp High
• Supply Temp High
• Return Temp High
• Control Temp Low
• Supply Temp Low
• Return Temp Low
You can set the following attributions for each of the
alarms above:
• Alarm repeat rate
• Alarm delay
RCB Inputs
Zone Outputs
OCC STATE
ZONE_OCC_STATE
ZONE TEMP
ZONE_TEMP_OUT
ECON OK
ZONE ECON OK
DEHUM ACTIVE
ZONE DEHUM ACTIVE
OCC HEAT
ZONE HEAT OCC OUT
UNOCC HEAT
ZONE HEAT UOC OUT
OCC COOL
ZONE COOL OCC OUT
UNOCC COOL
ZONE COOL UOC OUT
OCC DEHUM
ZONE FB HUMID STPT
SEASON
ZONE_SUM_WIN_MODE_OUT
UNOCC DEHUM
ZONE_DEHUM_UNOC_OUT
OCC HUMIDITY
ZONE_FB_HUMID_STPT
UNOCC HUMIDITY
ZONE_HUM_OUT
Table 2-4- RCB and Zone Property Mapping List
I/O Board Names and Terminology
• Alarm type
• Alarm category
• Alarm displayed message
• Alarm monitoring flag
For the alarms generated by the RCB board, any reset
or clear actions you performed in the Site Supervisor will
be forwarded to the RCB.
NOTE: The RCB does not have the capability
of resetting individual alarms. All alarms on
the RCB will be reset or cleared by the RCB if
anyone is reset or clear the alarms in the Site
Supervisor.
2.2.3.7
Real Time Clock Updates
Please refer to Section 2.2.2.7, Real Time Clock
Updates.
2.2.3.8
Hand-Held Terminal Support
Please refer to Section 2.2.2.8, Hand-Held Terminal
RS485 I/O Network Boards and Peripherals • 2-5
Support
2.2.4
MultiFlex RTU
Similar in design to the MultiFlex combination input/
output boards, the MultiFlex RTU board is designed
specifically for operating package rooftop HVAC units as
part of an Site Supervisor or REFLECS BCU building
control system. The MultiFlex RTU is designed to be a
replacement for the previous generation ARTC, and is
100% compatible with all legacy Site Supervisor and BCU
systems.
The MultiFlex RTU board has 16 analog inputs, 8
relay outputs and 4 analog outputs. Most of these I/O
points are reserved for sensors and input devices required
to read environmental data (such as space and supply air
temperature) and control all output devices that control the
environment (such as heat/cool stages and dampers). Both
auxiliary inputs can be configured for a variety of sensor
types including any type of linear sensor.
For linear sensors, the auxiliary inputs can be configured
as Satellites. By doing this, the minimum and maximum
voltage and minimum and maximum Engineering Unit
parameters are user configurable for these inputs.
The RTU relay outputs are rated for line voltage
(240VAC).
The RTU board controls the rooftop unit directly with
its built-in heating, cooling, and humidity control
algorithms. It may operate in stand-alone mode, or it may
interface with an Site Supervisor or BCU to control the
store environment in zones and pass along logging and
alarm information.
The MultiFlex RTU has its own installation and
operation manual, (P/N 026-1705).
2.2.5
MultiFlex Rooftop Control
Board (RCB)
The MultiFlex Rooftop Control Board (RCB)
(P/N 810-3062) is a rooftop HVAC control board for use
either as a stand-alone controller or in zone control
applications using a Retail Solutions Site Supervisor
building control system. The MultiFlex RCB is capable of
controlling heat and cool stages, fans, humidification and
dehumidification devices, economizers using on-board I/O
and control algorithms, as well as monitor and interact
with other building control systems and peripherals (such
as smoke alarms and CO2 sensors).
The RCB is an improved version of the MultiFlex
RTU. The RCB has sixteen fully configurable analog and
digital input points, whereas the RTU has only eight
inputs, two of which are configurable. The RCB has four
2-6 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
analog outputs for use in controlling variable speed fans,
economizers or modulating heating and/or cooling valves,
whereas the RTU has only two analog outputs for use only
with VS fans and economizers. The RCB also features a
more sophisticated HHT interface and updated algorithms
for controlling heating, cooling, dehumidification, and air
quality.
The MultiFlex RCB-P (pulse control board P/N 8103076) uses an alternate control strategy that incorporates
logic for controlling heating and cooling functions.
The MultiFlex RCB has its own installation and
operation manual, (P/N 026-1707).
LEGEND
1
INPUT POWER
(24VAC)
9
RS485 TERMINATION JUMPERS
2
RS485 I/O NETWORK
10
HAND-HELD TERMINAL JACK
3
RCB INPUTS 1-8
11
RELAY OUTPUT
CONNECTORS
4
RCB INPUTS 9-16
12
RELAY OUTPUT
FUSES (2A rated, 250V
slow-blow)
5
NETWORK ID DIP
SWITCHES (S3, S4)
13
RELAY STATUS LEDs
6
INPUT TYPE DIP
SWITCHES (S1, S2)
14
OUTPUT FAIL-SAFE
SWITCHES
7
BOARD STATUS
LEDs (Code A, Code
B, General Status)
15
ANALOG OUTPUTS
8
DC POWER OUTPUTS (3 at +5VDC, 1
at +12VDC)
16
NETWORK STATUS
LEDs
Table 2-5 - MultiFlex RCB
2.2.6
The MultiFlex ESR Board
The MultiFlex ESR Valve Regulator board (P/N 8103199), shown in Figure 2-7, is an RS485 I/O Network
electronic stepper valve regulator capable of driving up to
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
eight stepper motor valves, which are typically used to
control temperature.
peripheral equipment. The HHT includes a standard male
RJ-11 to male RJ-11 cable.
NOTE: The 9V battery and 9-12V DC adapter
connection are not used on this HHT model
(P/N 814-3110).
10
3
9
1
7
2
14
8
1
2
3
4
5
Valve Connectors (8)
24VAC CT 75 VAC Power Input
General Status LED
I/O Network Input
TX and RX LEDs
6
7
8
9
10
Termination Jumpers
HHT Jack
Network Address Switches
Open LED (8)
13
Close LED (8)
12
11
10
3
4
5
6
Figure 2-7 - MultiFlex ESR Board Layout
7
The MultiFlex ESR uses suction side variable-position
evaporator regulators (ESRs) to vary evaporator pressure
for an entire circuit and is an alternative to mechanical
EPR control.
The MultiFlex ESR receives input data from a Retail
Solutions Site Supervisor controller (via the I/O Network)
and then regulates the stepper valves according to the data
from the Site Supervisor.
Each MultiFlex ESR board requires a Class 2, 80VA
24VAC center-tapped transformer for power. Retail
Solutions transformer (P/N 640-0080) is a multi-tapped
primary transformer that may be used with the MultiFlex
ESR board.
2.2.7
Hand-held Terminal (P/N
814-3110)
The Hand-held Terminal (HHT) is used by
manufacturers and service technicians to diagnose and test
several of Retail Solutions' existing and legacy products.
The HHT can be used on any Retail Solutions product
with an RJ-11 connector. The most common applications
include:
• All MultiFlex I/O boards and the 8ROSMT
• All Gateway boards
• Stand-alone MultiFlex boards (RTU, RCB, PAK,
CUB)
• CCB and CC-100 case controllers
The HHT does not require a separate power source.
The unit is powered from the RJ-11 connector on the
I/O Board Names and Terminology
8
9
1 The power switch determines if the HHT is
LEGEND
8 Scrolls list selections and scrolls through
ASCII characters if in a text field
in self-powered mode (BATT), ext power (EXT),
or if powered from a target device (HOST)
2 External Power Connector (9-12 VDC)
3 F2- Main Menu
9 RS-485 Connector
10 Cancel - clears/erases text in editable field;
4 Up Arrow - moves to previous screen,
editable field, or top of screen
5 Right Arrow - selects last editable field
starting from bottom of screen; selects
last editable field from bottom to top
6 Enter - save into memory
7 Numeric keypad
11 Down Arrow - moves to next screen,
editable field, end of screen, or advances
12 Left Arrow - selects first editable field from
top of screen, and next editable field from
top to bottom
13 F1 - Home Screen
cancels overrides
14 LCD - four lines of 16 characters
Figure 2-8 - Hand-held Terminal (814-3110)
2.2.8
The 8RO and 8ROSMT Relay
Boards
The 8RO (P/N 810-3005) board is a general-purpose
board used to connect an Site Supervisor to any of eight
standard control relay outputs, but is now obsolete and has
been replaced by the 8ROSMT (P/N 810-3006) board.
To function, the 8RO board must be connected through
either the Echelon Network or the RS485 I/O Network to
the Site Supervisor. When properly installed, the 8RO
receives an electrical impulse from the Site Supervisor,
which either opens or closes any of eight contact relays.
Output definitions within the Site Supervisor allow the
user to configure the 8RO board to interact with any
refrigeration system or environmental control component.
The 8RO board is the direct link between the Site
RS485 I/O Network Boards and Peripherals • 2-7
Supervisor and component operation. Information
gathered by the controller from the input boards is checked
against current stored setpoints. If differences in the
received input data and the setpoint information are
detected, a signal is either sent to the proper 8RO relay, or
an existing signal is discontinued. Through the use of this
relay signal, control functions that can be properly
maintained by a simple contact closure sequence are
effectively operated by the Site Supervisor.
The 8RO board is easily installed and operated within
the Retail Solutions Network environment because of its
straightforward design. Several of these features are
shown in Figure 2-9.
2.2.9
4AO Analog Output Board
The 4AO Analog Output Board (P/N 815-3030)
(Figure 2-11) is configured with four analog output
connections that provide a variable voltage signal to any of
four analog devices that may be controlled by a single Site
Supervisor. Two 4-20mA outputs are provided for
channels 1 and 2. The 4-20mA outputs provide a variable
current for applications that are either externally powered
or that require power from the 4AO board.
9
4
5
7
8
Transmitting (TX ) and Receiving (RX) LEDs
Alarm and Status Indicator LEDs
8 Analog Outputs (4)
9 4-20mA Channels (2)
Hand-held Terminal (HHT) Jack
Figure 2-11 - 4AO Analog Output Board (P/N 815-3030)
Figure 2-9 - 8RO Relay Output Board
2.2.10 8DO Digital Output Board
For control of anti-sweat heaters, Retail Solutions
supplies the 8DO Digital Output board (P/N 810-3050).
The 8DO has eight outputs which may pulse up to 150mA
at 12VDC.
The 8DO is primarily designed to control anti-sweat
heaters. The 8DO is shown in Figure 2-12.
Figure 2-10 - 8ROSMT Relay Output Board
Figure 2-12 - 8DO Digital Output Board
2-8 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
2.2.11 XM Series of Case
Controllers
about the device.
The XM series is a set of digital case controllers for
low to medium units. The XM series control refrigeration
solenoids and defrost (electric or hot gas), evaporator fans,
lights and have an auxiliary output.
2.2.11.1 XM670
Figure 2-14 - XM679
2.2.11.3 XM678
Figure 2-13 - XM670
The XM670 is high level microprocessor based controllers for multiplexed cabinets suitable for applications
on medium or low temperature. It can be inserted in a
LAN of up to 8 different sections which can operate,
depending on the programming, as stand alone controllers
or following the commands coming from the other sections. The XM670 is provided with 6 relay outputs to control the solenoid valve, defrost (which can be either
electrical or hot gas) the evaporator fans, the lights, an
auxiliary output and an alarm output. The devices are also
provided with four probe inputs, one for temperature control, one to control the defrost end temperature of the
evaporator, the third for the display, and the fourth can be
used for application with virtual probe or for inlet/outlet
air temperature measurement. Finally, the XM670 is
equipped with the three digital inputs (free contact) and
are fully configurable. For more information about the
XM670 controller, refer to the controller manual,
P/N 026-1218.
The XM678 is similar to the XM670, but with one
stepper valve output to drive an electronic expansion
valve. The XM678 also contains two probes that are dedicated for superheat measurement and regulation. Refer to
the XM678 manual (P/N 026-1219) for more information
about the device.
Figure 2-15 - XM678
2.2.11.2 XM679
The XM679 is similar to the XM670, but with one
relay output to drive pulsed electronic expansion valves.
The XM679 also contains two probes that are dedicated
for superheat measurement and regulation. Refer to the
XM679 manual (P/N 026-1218) for more information
I/O Board Names and Terminology
RS485 I/O Network Boards and Peripherals • 2-9
2.2.12 Site Supervisor Display
See Section 4, Site Supervisor Display for more information.
Figure 2-16 - Site Supervisor Display
The Site Supervisor display (P/Ns 818-9022 and 8189023) is a remote UI for the Site Supervisor that connects
to the controller using RS485 network to Serial Port D.
The Site Supervisor display shows a simplified UI that
allows users to perform critical actions in the controller
quickly and easily such as overriding lights, heating and
cooling stages, viewing alarms and status information.
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3
Wiring Examples
Figure 3-1 - Site Supervisor and MultiFlex Wiring
Wiring Examples • 3-1
Figure 3-2 - Site Supervisor and XR35CX 120V Wiring
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Figure 3-3 - Site Supervisor and XR35CX 230V Wiring
Wiring Examples • 3-3
Figure 3-4 - Site Supervisor and XR75CX and IPX Wiring
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Figure 3-5 - Site Supervisor and XR75CX Wiring
Wiring Examples • 3-5
Figure 3-6 - Site Supervisor and XM670 Wiring
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Figure 3-7 - Site Supervisor and XM678 Wiring
Wiring Examples • 3-7
Figure 3-8 - Site Supervisor and XM679 Wiring
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Figure 3-9 - Site Supervisor and XEV22 Wiring
Wiring Examples • 3-9
Figure 3-10 - Site Supervisor and XEV30 Wiring
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Figure 3-11 - Site Supervisor and XEV32 Wiring
Wiring Examples • 3-11
Figure 3-12 - Site Supervisor and Energy Meter Wiring
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Figure 3-13 - Site Supervisor and Thermostat Wiring
Wiring Examples • 3-13
Figure 3-14 - Site Supervisor and the Display
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Figure 3-14 - Site Supervisor and iPro-S Wiring
Wiring Examples • 3-15
Figure 3-15 - Site Supervisor and iPro-G Wiring
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4
Site Supervisor
Display
Figure 4-1 - Site Supervisor Display
The Site Supervisor display (P/Ns 818-9022 and 8189023) is a remote UI for the Site Supervisor that connects
to the controller using RS485 network to Serial Port D,
and shows a simplified UI that allows users to perform
critical actions in the controller quickly and easily such as
overriding lights, heating and cooling stages, viewing
alarms and status information.
Verify the supply voltage is correct before connecting
the Site Supervisor display to the Site Supervisor. Do not
expose to water or moisture, and use the controller only
within its operating limits. Avoid sudden temperature
changes with high atmospheric humidity to prevent the
formation of condensation.
WARNING! When using an external power
supply it is necessary to separate the power of
the device from the rest of the electrical
devices connected inside the electrical panel. The secondary of the transformer must never be connected to
earth ground.
WARNING! Disconnect all electrical connections before any kind of maintenance is performed. Do not open the Site Supervisor
display.
CAUTION! Keyboard polarity must be
observed: A wrong connection can cause possible malfunctioning and damage to the controller or keyboard.
Site Supervisor Display • 4-1
4.1
Technical
Specifications
Housing:
Mounting:
Self-extinguishing ABS
Panel and wall mounting
capability
Frontal IP Protection
IP20 with UR/NTC sensor
IP54 with UR/NTC sensor
Rear IP Protection
IP20
Connections
Panel Version: STELVIO
90° screw connectors.
Wall Version: wiring minimum 0.5 mm2 to maximum 2.5 mm2
Power Supply
12-24 VAC/DC ±15%
Power Absorption
5W to 5VA
Analog Input
NTC Dixell (-50T110°C;
10KÙ±1% at 25°C)
Digital Input
Voltage free
Buzzer
Yes
Display (TFT)
4.3”
Resolution
480x272 px
Colors
256 (8 bit)
Touch
Resistive
Measuring Range
On-board NTC sensor:
14 to 122°F (-10 to 50°C)
Remote NTC sensor:
-58 to 230°F (-50 to
110°C)
RH Sensor: 20 to 85%
NTC Resolution
32.18°F (0.1°C)
Accuracy Humidity
Sensor
±3% (20 to 80%)
±5% (elsewhere)
Operating Temperature
-4 to 140°F
(-20 to 60°C)
Storage Temperature
-13 to 158°F
(-25 to 70°C)
Relative Humidity
20 to 85% (no condensing)
CE COMPLIANCE: The Emerson Retail
Solutions Site Supervisor controllers are Class
A products. In a domestic environment this
product may cause radio interference in which case the
user may be required to take adequate measures.
Table 4-1 - Site Supervisor Specifications
4.2
Mounting
4.2.1
Panel Mount Dimensions
Figure 4-2 - Dimensions for Panel Mounting - Sizes in mm
Table 4-1 - Site Supervisor Specifications
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4.2.2
Wall Mount Dimensions
Figure 4-3 - Dimensions for Wall Mounting - Sizes in mm
Mounting
Site Supervisor Display • 4-3
4.3
Electrical Connections
4.3.1
Panel Mount Version
Figure 4-4 - Power and Network Connections for Panel-Mount Site Supervisor Display - Back View of Site Supervisor Display
1.
Verify the Site Supervisor display is powered OFF before making any wiring connections.
The Site Supervisor display connects to the Site Supervisor via the RS485 Network using Belden #8761 cable or
equivalent.
2.
Connect to the Site Supervisor using only Com 4. This is a dedicated Com port for the Site Supervisor display
and therefore does not require software setup.
CAUTION! Do not use any other serial port
other than Com 4 for this connection. Possible
malfunctioning and damage to the equipment
may occur.
3. Use an external 24VAC power supply and cycle power back ON to the unit after wiring connections are made.
Site Supervisor Display Firmware Update
To update the Site Supervisor display firmware:
1.
Insert the USB drive into the Site Supervisor display USB port (located on the back of the Site Supervisor
display (Figure 4-4).
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2.
Press OK on the Site Supervisor display. The display will turn itself off momentarily and show a blank screen.
3.
Two separate audible tones will sound followed immediately by a third longer tone to indicate the firmware has
been successfully updated.
4.
Remove the USB drive.
4.3.2
Wall Mount Version
Figure 4-5 - Power and Network Connections for Wall-Mount Site Supervisor Display- Back View
Electrical Connections
Site Supervisor Display • 4-5
4.4
Dip Switch
Configuration
Figure 4-6 - Dip Switch Configuration
4.5
Site Supervisor
Display Screens
Figure 4-9 - Select A User Type and Log In
User Permission Settings
View Only - View only (no overriding or editing).
Lowest permission setting.
Manager - Viewing and Overriding permissions.
Tech - Viewing, overriding, and editing permissions.
Highest permission setting.
Your login type will display in the lower right corner
of the display under the BACK button.
Figure 4-7 - Keypad - Back, Delete, and SUBMIT
Once the Site Supervisor display has been powered up,
the first screen that appears is the Emerson launch screen
below (Figure 4-8). It will appear for five seconds:
Figure 4-10 - Logged In As User Type and Entering Password
Figure 4-8 - Launch Screen
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Figure 4-11 - Enter Internet Values (Setup Wizard on Factory-
Figure 4-13 - Choose Desired Category
New Units)
Once logged in, depending on user permissions, select
the desired category.
The Site Supervisor may be configured to communicate across an Ethernet computer network using TCP/IP
protocol. To enable Ethernet communication, you will
need to enter IP address information for the controller on
the Internet Values screen. The Internet Values screen
allows you to change, update, or view settings for Internet
(TCP/IP) networks connected to the Site Supervisor. Note
to record these settings so that you may refer to them later.
Once entered, press SUBMIT.
Default Values:
Icon
Definition
Refrigeration Applications
Lighting Control Applications
IP Address 192.168.0.250
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway 192.168.0.1
HVAC Applications
Energy Applications
Other Applications
Figure 4-12 - Set Date, Time, and Zip Code
Table 4-2 - Site Supervisor Display Icons and Definitions
Site Supervisor Display Screens
Site Supervisor Display • 4-7
Alarms
Enable the override and set the override time for
LIGHT_Name_2.
Manual override information for LIGHT_Name_2
displays in left side of the screen.
Scheduling
HVAC Control Example
System Configuration
Table 4-2 - Site Supervisor Display Icons and Definitions
Lighting Control Example
Figure 4-16 - HVAC Applications and Status Information
Touch the HVAC icon to view, edit, or override HVAC
information.
Figure 4-14 - Lighting Control Applications and Status
Under Lighting control, choose from the available
options and touch the scroll bar arrows to page up and
down:
Figure 4-17 - HVAC Status Information
HVAC_Name_1 Cooling information.
Set the heating and cooling setpoint by using the up
and down arrows. In this example, the cooling setpoint has
been set to 25°C.
Figure 4-15 - Lighting Control Override Information
For overriding the circuit, select the desired lighting
application, (in this example, LIGHT_Name_2 is chosen)
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Refrigeration Control Example
Figure 4-18 - Refrigeration Applications and Status
Touch the Refrigeration icon to view, edit, set defrost,
or override Refrigeration information:
Figure 4-19 - Refrigeration Information Display
In this example, REF_Name_2 is selected and shows
status information and Defrost Trigger options.
Scheduling Information
Figure 4-21 - Scheduling Example
In this example, CAL_Name_1 has been selected and
point information for that schedule is displayed.
Figure 4-22 - Scheduling Example
Weekly on and off scheduling times are displayed for
the selected application.
Energy Control Examples
Figure 4-20 - Select The Desired Application Schedule
Touch the Lighting, HVAC, Energy, or Other icons to
access those applications and see Scheduling options.
Figure 4-23 - Energy Applications Display
Site Supervisor Display Screens
Site Supervisor Display • 4-9
Touch an application to select.
“Other” Application Example
System Settings/Configuration
Figure 4-27 - System Settings/Configuration Screen
Figure 4-24 - Available “Other” Category Applications
Alarm Examples
Touch the alarm icon for alarm system information:
To change your PIN/Password, touch System Settings
(orange gear icon) and touch RESET USER PIN and follow the prompts to change the PIN/password. When complete, press SUBMIT.
Figure 4-25 - Alarm Display
Alarm severity is displayed by the following color indicators: gray (lowest severity level), yellow (medium severity level), or red (highest severity level).
In this example, Emrs T-Stat_004 has been selected.
Alarm information for that application displays:
Figure 4-28 - PIN/Password Change
To access IP Address information, select IP
ADDRESS in System Settings:
Figure 4-26 - Alarm Display Information (T-Stat)
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Figure 4-29 - IP Address Information
Figure 4-32 - Site Supervisor Product Information
To access Date and Time information, touch DATE &
TIME in System Settings and the time and date screen
displays:
The auto log out screen will appear after several minutes of inactivity. Select LOGOUT or CONTINUE (stay
logged in the system and continue your session).
Figure 4-30 - Date, Time, and Zip Code Information
For Emerson contact information, touch CONTACT
EMERSON in System Settings and the contact screen displays:
Figure 4-33 - Auto Log Out Screen
Figure 4-31 - Emerson Contact Information
To access Site Supervisor information, touch PRODUCT INFO in System Settings:
Site Supervisor Display Screens
Site Supervisor Display • 4-11
5
Software Overview
5.1
Suction Groups
5.1.1
Introduction
The Site Supervisor RX refrigeration controller uses
suction group applications to cycle compressors in an
effort to maintain a constant suction pressure or temperature in a refrigeration system. A suction group may contain up to 16 compressor stages (standard, variable-speed,
or unloader).
There are two different types of suction group applications:
• Suction Group - The “standard” suction group
application that has existed since the first version of
Site Supervisor firmware. The Suction Group uses
PID Control and with proper optimization it can
achieve very tight suction pressure or temperature
control, but compressor cycling is not based on load
analysis and can be inefficient, especially in larger
racks. All versions of Site Supervisor support the
standard Suction Group application.
• Enhanced Suction Group - Introduced in Site
Supervisor version 2.30F01, the Enhanced Suction
Group has all of the important features of the older
Suction Group application, but instead of employing user-configured PID constants to optimize operation, the Enhanced Suction Group determines
optimum control by “learning” the effect each compressor and circuit load has on the suction input.
The Enhanced Suction Group is easier to configure
and more conservative with compressor cycling
than the standard Suction Group. In addition, the
Enhanced Suction Group also supports use of the
Copeland Digital Scroll and Copeland Digital Discus compressors.
5.1.2
The (Standard) Suction
Group Application
5.1.2.1
Overview of PID Control Strategy
A Suction Group application looks at suction pressure
or suction temperature to determine how many compressor
stages should be ON or OFF. The application compares
the suction pressure or temperature to its control setpoint
using PID control. The result of this comparison is a percentage from 0% to 100% that corresponds to the total
Suction Groups
capacity of the compressor rack that should be active.
The Suction Group application then takes that percentage and determines what combination of compressors
should be switched ON or OFF to best fulfill the requirement. For example, if the application says that 60% of the
total compressor rack’s power should be active, and the
rack has compressors totaling 50 HP, then Site Supervisor
will try to switch on compressors totaling 30 HP.
For more information on PID, see Appendix D: PID
Control.
5.1.2.2
Variable-Speed Compressors
Suction Group applications are compatible with variable-speed compressors. VS compressors allow Suction
Group applications to “fine-tune” the amount of total
active rack horsepower to react to small changes in suction
pressures or temperatures. As a result, the rack does a better job of controlling suction, requiring less compressor
switches.
When a variable-speed compressor is present, it will
generally be treated as the primary pressure controlling
device, and any other standard compressors in the rack are
secondary devices used only if the VS compressor is
unable to fully handle the required horsepower. The variable-speed compressor will be the first compressor on and
the last compressor off.
5.1.2.3
Floating Setpoint Control
The Floating Setpoint strategy within the Site Supervisor RX provides a method for varying the suction setpoint
of the group based on the temperature within a circuit.
When Floating Setpoint Control is enabled, the Site Supervisor RX monitors either a circuit temperature or a case
temperature from a CC-100 and adjusts the suction setpoint if the temperature is too low or too high.
The user establishes a range outside of which the Site
Supervisor RX is instructed to make a one PSI adjustment
to the suction pressure setpoint to either reduce or increase
the case temperature. If the temperature continues to
remain outside of the range for a user-defined period of
time, the Site Supervisor RX continues to make pressure
setpoint adjustments until the temperature is within the
established range.
By varying the suction pressure setpoint to match the
temperature requirements of the circuit, the Site Supervisor RX is able to ensure product integrity while achieving
maximum rack efficiency.
5.1.3
The Enhanced Suction
Group Application
A Suction Group application looks at suction pressure
or suction temperature and compares it to the suction set-
Software Overview • 5-1
point to determine whether compressor stages should be
cycled ON or OFF. Unlike the Suction Group application,
which uses a PID percentage to determine how many
stages to turn ON or OFF, the Enhanced Suction Group
keeps historical data of the effects each compressor stage
has on the suction pressure or temperature, and analyzes
that data to determine which stages to cycle.
The Enhanced Suction Group application is designed
to balance tight control of suction pressure with economic
management of compressor cycling to reduce power usage
and compressor wear.
5.1.3.1
Learning Mode
When an Enhanced Suction Group application runs for
the first time, it undergoes a “Learning Mode” period to
collect data on the compressor stages. During Learning
Mode, the Enhanced Suction Group will control suction
pressure, but it will purposely cycle the compressor stages
in different combinations to measure the effect they have
on the suction input value.
The Learning Mode lasts for several minutes. After
Learning Mode ends, the Enhanced Suction Group will
require up to 24 hours of operation before compressor
cycling is operating at maximum efficiency. If compressor
cycling seems too frequent after 24 hours of operation,
you may reduce compressor cycling by changing the Control/Cycles parameter (see Section 5.1.3.3, The Control/
Cycles Parameter).
5.1.3.2
Circuit Load Analysis
Unlike the standard Suction Group algorithm, the
Enhanced Suction Group includes Circuit Setup where
you associate all circuits connected to the suction group.
Once the circuits are set up, the suction group will use the
circuit states to help determine current loads on the suction
group. For example, when one or more circuits go into
defrost, the Enhanced Suction Group determines that there
is less of a load on the suction group than if all circuits
were in refrigeration. With the appropriate circuits associated, the Enhanced Suction Group tailors its capacity to
meet the load. Over time, the Enhanced Suction Group
will build and store a profile for all the different combinations of circuit states encountered in the algorithm.
5.1.3.3
The Control/Cycles Parameter
Unlike the standard Suction Group, which used PID
constants as a means of optimizing suction control and had
limited features for controlling compressor cycle counts,
the Enhanced Suction Group has one parameter with five
preset settings to allow users to alter suction control performance or compressor cycling frequency.
If tighter control is needed, setting the field to “Tight Control” or “Tightest Control” will increase the application’s
reaction to suction changes, resulting in tighter control
(usually at the expense of more frequent cycling). If fewer
compressor cycles are desired, setting the field to “Less
Cycling” or “Least Cycling” will decrease the number of
cycles but also increase the amount of fluctuation in the
suction pressure.
5.1.3.4
Variable-Speed, Digital Scroll,
and Digital Discus Compressor
Support
The Enhanced Suction Group supports variable-speed
compressors similar to the Suction Group application.
When a variable-speed compressor is present, it is the first
compressor stage ON and the last stage OFF, and its
capacity is varied to attempt to correct small fluctuations
in the suction pressure or temperature.
In addition, the Enhanced Suction Group application
supports use of one or multiple Copeland Digital Scroll or
Digital Discus compressors for use as a variable-capacity
compressor. With several Digital Scroll or Digital Discus
compressors, the Enhanced Suction Group will modulate
one of those compressors at a time to control suction pressure. As compressor capacity is added or removed, the
Enhanced Suction Group may modulate another Digital
Scroll compressor to distribute compressor resources and
solenoid wear.
The operating capacities of the Copeland Digital Scroll
and Copeland Digital Discus compressors are determined
in the same way as a variable-speed compressor, except
the Copeland Digital Scroll and Copeland Digital Discus
controlled by pulse-width modulation (PWM).
5.1.3.5
Floating Suction Control
Floating suction control in the Enhanced Suction
Group behaves identically to the way it works in the Suction Group application. Refer to Section 5.1.2.3, Floating
Setpoint Control.
5.1.4
Hardware Overview
An overview of the input and output devices that make
up a Suction Group is shown in Figure 5-1. These devices
should be wired to input and output boards in the manner
outlined in Table 5-1 and Table 5-2.
The default setting, “Moderate Control,” seeks to balance good suction pressure control with efficient cycling.
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LIQUID RECEIVER
CIRCUIT
CASE TEMP
(FOR FLOATING)
CASE CIRCUIT
LIQUID LINE
SOLENOID
SUCTION
PRESSURE
DISCHARGE
PRESSURE
CONDENSER
Input
OIL RESET SWITCHES
D
D
OIL
PRESSURE
D
26507005
Wiring
Instructions
Sensor Type
Suction
Pressure
100 lb. Eclipse
transducer
(see Table 9-1 on
page 9-3)
Discharge
Pressure
500 lb. Eclipse
transducer
(see Table 9-1 on
page 9-3)
Oil Pressure
200 lb. Eclipse
transducer
(see Table 9-1 on
page 9-3)
Case Circuit
Temperature
Temperature
(see Table 9-1 on
page 9-3)
Oil Reset
Switches
Digital
(see Table 9-1 on
page 9-3)
Figure 5-1 - Diagram of a Suction Group
Table 5-1 - Suction Group Inputs
Wire Output
Board
Contacts to:
Output Device
Set Failsafe
Dip Switch
to:
Notes
Compressor
N.C.
N.C. (up)
If you want a compressor to be OFF during network/power
loss, use N.O. fail-safes instead.
Unloader
N.C.
N.O. (down)
These fail-safe settings are specifically for unloaders.
Liquid Line
Solenoid (LLS)
N.C.
N.C. (up)
Keeps solenoid energized during network/power loss.
Electric Defrost
N.O.
N.O. (down)
Keeps contacts de-energized during network/power loss.
Table 5-2 - Suction Group Outputs
5.2
Analog Sensor Control
The Analog Sensor Control reads the values from one
or more analog sensors, compares them to a set of Cut In/
Cut Out setpoints, and operates a digital output (such as a
relay) based on the analog input in relation to the
setpoints.
An Analog Sensor Control module performs three
functions:
• COMBINER - Up to four analog inputs are
combined into a single analog value.
• CUT IN/CUT OUT CONTROL - The combined
input value is compared to a Cut In/Cut Out
setpoint. Based on this comparison, a digital output
Analog Sensor Control
will be turned ON or OFF.
• ALARMING - Alarms and notices can be
generated based on the combined value of the
inputs and its relation to a set of high and low alarm
and notice setpoints.
5.2.1
Control Strategy
The application combines multiple analog inputs into a
single output, using either the primary combination
method or the alternate combination mode, depending on
the state of the Use Alternate Combination property.
The primary and alternate combination methods may
be configured to be one of the following:
• Average - of all defined inputs
Software Overview • 5-3
• Minimum value
ramped back to normal.
• Maximum value
5.2.2
• First - first input value that is not NONE
There is a high and low limit alarm and notice for the
inputs after they are combined and filtered. The user sets
occupied and unoccupied, high and low setpoints. If the
combined/filtered value exceeds either the notice or alarm
setpoints, a notice or alarm is generated. If the Alarm
Disable or Notice Disable input is high, the Alarm or
Notice output, respectively, is forced to OFF. There are
Notice and Alarm digital outputs that the user can connect
to. In addition, the alarm and notice is automatically sent
to AdvisoryServices.
• Mix of first two inputs (using mix ratio property)
• Span - difference between the highest and lowest
input values (multiple inputs)
• Select - single value chosen by the input select (if
input select is 5, use in5)
• Sum - sum all inputs
• (in1 + in2) + in3
Control Alarming
• (in1 - in2) - in3
• (in1 * in2) * in3
• (in1 + in2) / in3
• (in1 * in2) + in3
• (in1 - in2) * in3F
• |in1 - in2| / in3
• |in1 - in2| * in3
• sqr(|in1 - in2|) * in3
The combined values can be filtered. The filter’s
primary function is to slow the rate of change of the
combined input. The difference between the current input
value and the input's value x seconds ago, where x =
Factor Time, is multiplied by the filter ratio to produce the
filter output.
The filtered output is run through a CutIn / CutOut calg
that trips a digital output (Command Out) based on the
CutIn / CutOut setpoints.
There is also a counter on the Command Out that
provides a running count that increase every time the
Command Out cycles to ON and a digital Counter Trip
Output that is ON when the Counter value is greater than
the Counter's trip point. The user enters the initial value
and the count increases by the Count Inc value. The Count
output value is reset by sending a signal to the Reset Count
input. The Count Reset Type parameter specifies whether
the Count is reset based on the logic level, the rising edge
or the falling edge. The counter increase based on the
digital output after the bypass block.
The PRI DEMAND SHED and SEC DEMAND SHED
inputs provide a way to have the cell shut down in demand
shed situations. If the PRI DEMAND SHED is ON, the
Cut In/Cut Out setpoints is bumped by the amount set in
the Pri Demand Bump parameter. Likewise, for the SEC
DEMAND SHED except the primary demand shed has
priority if they are both ON. The Stpt Bump Rst Int
indicates the amount of time over which the setpoint is
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5.2.3
Alarm Output When On/Off
Parameters
• AND - logical AND of inputs
Alarm When On redefines the definition of “active” as
it refers to the state of the Alarm output. When the Sensor
Control application calls for the Alarm output to be ON
the Alarm output will change to the state specified in the
Alarm When On field. Select either ON, OFF, or NotAct
in this field. Alarm When Off redefines the definition of
“inactive” as it refers to the state of the Alarm output.
When the Sensor Control application calls for the Alarm
output to be OFF, the Alarm output will change to the state
specified in the Alarm When Off field. Select either OFF,
ON, or NotAct in this field.
• XOR - logical XOR of inputs
5.2.4
Control Bypass
The digital output may be bypassed with a timed
bypass. The output may be bypassed to ON, OFF or
NONE. Once the STRT TIMED BYP goes high, the
bypass remains in effect until the Bypass Time has
expired. The CNCL TIMED BYP will cancel any bypass
and operation will return to normal. If STRT TIMED BYP
is still on, it must go low for one update before it will activate another bypass.
5.3
Digital Sensor Control
The Digital Sensor Control read the values from one or
more digital sensors, combine them using a series of
logical commands, and operate a digital output (such as a
relay) based on the result of the logical combination.
The Digital Sensor Control module performs three
basic functions:
• LOGICAL COMBINATION - up to four inputs
may be combined using standard logical
combination methods (such as AND, OR, XOR).
The result is the command output value, which can
be used to operate a relay.
• BYPASS - The command output may be
configured to be bypassed to a fixed value by a
switch or button press.
• ALARMING - Alarms and notices can be
generated based on the command value of all the
digital inputs of the cell, plus occupancy, and
schedules.
5.3.1
Control Strategy
The Digital Output Module cell provides a mechanism
for combining multiple Digital Outputs into a single
output that can be used as an input to other cells.
The inputs can be combined as the following:
Digital Sensor Control
• OR - logical OR of inputs
• VOTE - result will be ON if the number of inputs
ON > number of inputs OFF
• FIRST - returns the logical value of the first good
(non-DV_NONE) input. There is also a First Good
output which shows the number 1-4 of the first
good input.
The Digital Output Module allows for a user to specify
two different input combination strategies: a primary
combination type, and an alternate combination type. The
module reads the state of the Use Alternate Combination
method input to determine which combination method to
use.
The combined value is then sent to a Schedule
Interface strategy. The Schedule Interface strategy allows
the user to modify the combined value based upon the
occupied or unoccupied state of the system. Two different
combination strategies may be specified by the user; a
primary combination strategy and an alternate
combination strategy. When the Use Alt Shed input is
LOW, the primary combination is used. When the Use Alt
Shed input is HIGH, the alternate combination strategy is
used.
The output is then sent to a Min On/Min Off property
that sets its output based on the Min On/Min Off delay
times.
The resulting output is passed to a One-Shot
calculation for applications that require a pulse rather than
a logic level. The output of the One-Shot can be a pulse of
length Pulse Width seconds that starts when the input to
the One-Shot rises or falls depending on the Timer Type
selection.
The Proof Fail output will be active as a result of
comparing the final control value with the Proof input. If
the input and output do not match for a length of time
equal to the Proof Delay, the Proof Fail output will go to
ON. It will stay ON for at least Proof Latch Dur seconds.
The user can select to use the actual value from the
Command output or the output from the Min On/Min Off
property. The proof will generate an alarm if the Proof
Alarm Type property is not set to Disabled.
There is also a counter on the Command Out that
provides a running count that increments every time the
Command Out cycles to ON and a digital Counter Trip
Output that is ON when the Counter value is greater than
the Counter's trip point. The user enters the initial value
and the count increments by the Count Inc value. The
Count output value is reset by sending a signal to the Reset
Count input. The Count Reset Type parameter specifies
Software Overview • 5-5
whether the Count is reset based on the logic level, the
rising edge or the falling edge. The counter increments
based on the digital output after the bypass block.
The PRI DEMAND SHED input provides a way to
have the cell shut down in demand shed situations. If the
PRI DEMAND SHED is ON, the output will be set to the
logical OFF position by using the bypass functionality.
The Cmd When Off param will set the proper off value for
the output. The counter will not increment when in
demand shed regardless of the inputs.
5.3.2
When the command value changes to alarm condition,
the delay timer will start. If the state changes, the timer
will stop and no alarm will be issued. If the state stays for
the duration of the timer, an advisory will be issued. If a
state change occurs to the opposite state after the advisory
has been issued, it will be returned to normal.
If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice condition
still exists, the delay period will be honored. Advisories
will return to normal if the command value stays in the
non-alarm/notice condition for the duration of the clear
delay. If the command value changes back to the alarm
condition, during the clear timer, the advisory will not
return to normal.
Alarm Output When On/Off
Parameters
Alarm When On redefines the definition of the
command “ON” as it relates to the state of the command
output. When the Sensor Control application calls for the
output to be “ON,” the command output will switch to the
state selected in the Cmd When On parameter. Select
either ON, OFF, or NotAct in this field.
5.3.4
Control Bypass
The digital output may be bypassed with a timed
bypass. The output by be bypassed to ON, OFF or NONE.
Once the STRT TIMED BYP goes high, the bypass
remains in effect until the Bypass Time has expired. The
CNCL TIMED BYP will cancel any bypass and operation
will return to normal. If STRT TIMED BYP is still on, it
must go low for one update before it will activate another
bypass.
Lighting Control
The Lighting Control application controls indoor and
outdoor lights. The number of Lighting Applications
allowed is based on the total number of applications
allowed in the controller. Additional applications (more
than 24) may be added with a separate license key.
NOTE: the View Lighting application status
events can be viewed from the device Status
screen.
Command Alarming
The command value will be used to determine the
alarm state. The command value is the combined value of
all the digital inputs of the cell, plus occupancy, and
schedules.
5.3.3
5.4
5.4.1
Lighting Control Logic
The user can specify the combination of inputs
required to turn the lights on and a different combination
of inputs to turn the lights off. The four inputs that may be
combined are:
1.
Digital Input - The digital input includes: Light
Level Sensor Input, Logic Input, Schedule Input
and Solar Input.
2.
Light Level Sensor - If Light Level and Solar are
used together, Light level sensor checking will be
enabled if light level proof is enabled. If the Light
Level Sensor and Solar Calculation do not match
for a user-specified time delay, an alarm will be
generated. This alarm will be submitted to the
alarm subsystem. The text of the alarm will be
“Light Level Sensor - Possible Failure”.
3.
Schedule - The controller's Lighting Application
will not provide an internal schedule capability.
An external time schedule application is required
to control the lighting output based on a schedule.
4.
Solar (Sunrise/Sunset) - If Light Level and
Solar are used together, Light Level sensor
checking will be enabled if Light Level Proof is
enabled. If the Light Level Sensor and Solar
Calculation do not match for a user-specified
time delay, an alarm will be generated. This
alarm will be submitted to the alarm subsystem.
The text of the alarm will be “Light Level Sensor
- Possible Failure”.
The following parameters are provided by the
application to configure the logic for turning the light
output on or off.
• Input 1 - Chooses the type of input value that is
used as the first value in the logical equation.
Choose Logic, Sched, Llev, or Solar.
• Logic 1 - Chooses the method of combining Input
Source 1 with Input Source 2 (AND or OR). If you
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026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
are only using one Input Source for this equation,
leave the Logic 1 field blank.
• Input 2 - Choose the type of input value that is used
as the second value in the logical equation. Choose
Logic, Sched, Llev, or Solar.
• Logic 2 - Chooses the method of combining the
result of the Input 1 and Input 2 combination with
Input Source 3 (AND or OR). If you are only using
two Input Sources for this equation, leave the Logic
2 field blank.
• Input 3 - Chooses the type of input value that will
be used as the third value in the logical equation.
Choose Logic, Sched, Llev, or Solar.
• Logic 3 - Chooses the method of combining the
result of the Input 1, 2, and 3 combination with
Input Source 4 (AND or OR). If you are only using
three Input Sources for this equation, leave the
Logic 3 field blank.
• Input 4 - Chooses the type of input value that is
used as the fourth value in the logical equation.
Choose Logic, Sched, Llev, or Solar.
5.4.2
Light Level Sensor
Verification
If Light Level and Solar are used together Light Level
sensor checking is enabled if light level proof is enabled.
If the Light Level Sensor and Solar Calculation do not
match for a user-specified time delay, an alarm is
generated. This alarm is submitted to the alarm subsystem.
The text of the alarm is “Light Level Sensor - Possible
Failure”.
5.4.3
Solar Calculation
5.4.5
Light Proofing
Light output proofing is supported by the application.
The following parameters are provided by the
application to configure proofing:
• Proof Type - Determines what light state(s) the
application will use proof checking for in the Proof
Type field.
There are three options:
-ALL Values - Proof checking verifies the lights
come ON when called to be ON and OFF when
called to be OFF.
-ON Values - Proof checking verifies only that the
lights have turned ON when called to be ON.
-OFF Values - Proof checking verifies only that the
lights have turned OFF when called to be OFF.
• PROOF IN - Proof input.
• Proof Delay - When the Lighting Control
application detects a proof failure, it waits for the
Proof Delay time period to pass before turning on
the Proof Status output. If during this delay the
proof input returns to normal, the delay is canceled
and the Proof Status output remains OK.
• Proof Latch - Once the Proof logic has recorded a
proof failure and the Proof Status output has
transitioned to FAIL, the output remains in FAIL
until the control input has been equal to the proof
input for an amount of time equal to the Proof Latch
delay. If during this delay the proof fails again, the
delay is canceled and the output remains in FAIL.
• Clear Any Match - Enter YES to clear the proof on
any match. If a proof failure should be cleared
whenever a match of any kind is made between the
proof input and the light state, set this to 'Yes.' If the
proof failure is to be cleared only when a match of
the type listed in the Proof Type field is made, set
this to “No.”
The Sundown input tells the Lighting Control application when sundown begins and ends (ON when sunset
occurs, and OFF at sunrise). It is automatically tied to the
SUNDOWN output of the Time and Date cell, and should
not be redefined if you plan on using solar calculations for
this Lighting Control application.
5.4.6
To set up the solar cell calculation (sunrise/sundown),
this can be configured in the Global Data application.
The application supports minimum on and off times
for the digital lighting output.
In Global Data, the Lighting application automatically
receives the information when the sun sets.
The following user parameters are provided to
configure the minimum on/off times and the on/off delays
for the lighting output.
5.4.4
Digital Lighting Output
The application supports a digital lighting output. The
state of this output is determined based on the outcome of
the lighting control method that is selected.
Lighting Control
Minimum On/Off Times
• Min ON Time - The least amount of time the
command value must remain ON before the Min
On/Off logic allows a transition to OFF. If the
command value has not been ON for at least this
value, the Min On/Off logic replaces the command
value with an ON signal until the Minimum ON
Software Overview • 5-7
time has been met.
• Min OFF Time - The least amount of time the
command value must remain OFF before the Min
On/Off logic allows a transition to ON. If the
command value has not been OFF for at least this
value, the Min On/Off logic replaces the command
value with an OFF signal until the Minimum OFF
time has been met.
• ON Delay - delay between ON cmd and turning
lights ON. When the Min On/Off logic detects a
transition in the command value from OFF to ON,
it waits for the ON delay period to pass before
switching its output ON. If during this delay the
command value switches OFF again, the delay is
canceled and the lighting output remains OFF.
• OFF Delay - delay between OFF cmd and turning
lights OFF. When the Min On/Off logic detects a
transition in the command value from ON to OFF, it
waits for the OFF delay period to pass before
switching its output OFF. If during this delay the
command value switches ON again, the delay is
canceled and the lighting output remains ON.
5.4.7
Dimming Control (Analog
Output)
The application supports a dimming (analog) lighting
output. This output is intended to be used to control a
dimming module by specifying the percentage of
maximum output of the connected dimming module.
In dimming mode, dimming is controlled on the Light
Level sensor input to the application. If there is no Light
Level sensor or it reads NONE, the lights are forced to
default brightness (specified by the “Dim Fail %”
parameter).
As the Light Level changes, the output ramps at a user
defined rate. The minimum % output corresponds to
maximum Light Level input. Anything above the
maximum Light Level results in the minimum % output.
The maximum % output corresponds to a minimum Light
Level input. Anything below the minimum Light Level
input results in the maximum % output.
The ramp is defined in terms of Light Level per
second. The ramp is linear between the minimum %
output and the maximum % output. The bypass dimming
percentage input forces the dimming percentage when in
bypass operation.
Theory of Operation
As the Light Level input increases above minimum
light level, the Light Level analog output begins ramping
5-8 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
to accommodate. As the Light Level input increases above
the maximum light level but below the cut off light level,
the Light Level analog output ramps to the minimum
percentage. As the Light Level input increases above the
cut off Light Level, the ramped analog output is minimum,
and the minimum on time has been satisfied, the cut off
delay begins counting down.
If the light level continues above the cut off light level
for the duration of the cut off delay timeout, the lights
output goes OFF. If the light level dims to below the cut on
light level, the light's output turns ON. The Light Level
analog output will ramp to the appropriate percentage for
that light level.
The following parameters are provided to allow
configuration of the light dimming output.
NOTE: For the properties below, Light Level
Engineering Units should be displayed as fc
(foot candle).
• CUTON - Normal light level cut ON setpoint.
• CUTOFF - Normal light level cut OFF setpoint.
• UNOCC CUTON - Unoccupied light level cut ON
setpoint.
• UNOCC CUTOFF - Unoccupied light level cut
OFF setpoint
• LLEV OCCUP - Occupancy input for light level
setpoints
• Cut ON Delay - Light Level cut ON delay.
• Cut OFF - Light Level cut OFF delay.
• Cut ON Dly UNOC - Light Level cut ON delay
[unoccupied].
• Cut OFF Dly UNO - Light Level cut OFF delay
[unoccupied].
• LIGHT LEVEL IN - Light Level sensor input.
The LIGHT LEVEL IN input, which is the input to
which the Light Level sensor is connected, is by
default connected to Global Data’s LIGHT LEVEL
OUT output. If there is no Site Supervisor
controller on the network with a Light Level sensor
connected to Global Data, it will need to be set up.
• En Llev Proof - Enables light level proofing to
SUNDOWN input. The Enable Light Level
Proofing field enables or disables a feature in
Lighting Control that allows failures to be detected
in the Light Level sensor if the sensor does not fall
below the cutoff setpoint after sundown, or rise
above the cut on setpoint after sunset. If “Yes” is
selected, the Llev Pr Delay parameter specifies the
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
time to wait before alarming if the above conditions
are not satisfied.
• Llev Pr Delay - Light level proofing alarm delay.
The Light Level Proof Delay is the amount of time
after sunrise or sunset that, if the light level sensor
does not cut ON or OFF appropriate to the light
level of a sunrise or sunset, generates an alarm. In
other words, if the Light Level Proof Delay is set
for 1 hour, the light level must fall below the cut-off
setpoint at least one hour after sundown, or an
alarm is generated. Likewise, if the cut-on Light
Level setpoint is not reached by at least one hour
after sunrise, an alarm is generated.
• Dim Upper % - Upper dimmer percentage.
• Dim LL @ Upper% - Light level at upper dimmer
percentage.
• Dim Lower % - Lower dimmer percentage.
• Dim LL @ Lower% - Light level at lower dimmer
percentage.
• Dim Ramp Speed - Ramp speed in percent per
minute.
• Dim Fail % - Percentage when light level sensor
fails.
• Dim Shed % - Percentage when a demand shed
event is present.
5.4.8
External Schedule
An input is provided to allow a time schedule
application to be connected to the Lighting Application.
5.4.9
Lighting Bypass Inputs
The application provides two bypass inputs:
• Bypass ON - When ON, this input will force the
digital lighting output ON.
• Bypass OFF - When ON, this input will force the
digital lighting output OFF.
5.4.10 Demand Shed Behavior
The application provides a demand shed input. When
this input is ON, the Lighting Application turns the
lighting output OFF. Generally, this input is connected to
the Demand Control application.
5.5
Global Data
The Global Data application is the central location for
commonly used data values and limited data calculations
such as degree days and seasonal determination.
The following are the global data outputs:
• SUMMER WINTER - Summer/Winter indication
output.
• COOLING DEGREE DAY - Indicates the current
cooling degree day calculation based on the
“integration” method. The calculation starts over at
midnight for the new day and the previous day's
calculation is logged.
• HEATING DEGREE DAY - Indicates the current
heating degree day calculation based on the
“integration” method. The calculation starts over at
midnight for the new day and the previous day's
calculation is logged.
• ENTHALPHY DEGREE DAY - Indicates the
current enthalpy day calculation based on the
“integration” method. The calculation starts over at
midnight for the new day and the previous day's
calculation is logged.
• DAY SCHED OUT - Indicates current day of week
or holiday.
5.5.1
Location From
Sunrise and sunset times are calculated based on either
zip code or latitude/longitude. If US Zip Code is chosen in
the Unit Location From field, enter the zip code in which
the controller is located. If outside the United States,
choose Lat/Long and enter the latitude and longitude
values in which the controller is located. Once a value has
been chosen, the controller is able to calculate the sunrise
and sunset times. The Sunset output will turn ON at
sunset, and OFF at sunrise and can be connected to a
lighting circuit.
5.5.2
Sundown
Sundown is an output that calculates when the sun sets
based on latitude and longitude, and is ON when the sun
sets. (When a Lighting Schedule is configured to use
Sundown information, the Lighting Schedule application
automatically connects to the Sundown output).
If the lighting application is configured to use
dimming, the lighting output is set to the “Dim Shed %”
value while a shed event is active.
Global Data
Software Overview • 5-9
5.6
HVAC Control
The HVAC control application controls HVAC
equipment, rooftop units, or air handlers.
The number of AHU applications allowed is based on
the total number of applications allowed on the device.
The AHU application provides basic functionality to
control a typical packaged HVAC unit. The packaged
HVAC units have up to four stages of heating and cooling
and may have a fresh air damper installed to allow free-air
cooling (economization) when conditions permit.
NOTE: The AHU application provides support
for Constant Air Volume (CAV) systems only.
The Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems are
not supported.
5.6.1
Active Setpoint
Determination
The active setpoint used by the heating and cooling
logic is selected from the following setpoint inputs:
• SUMMER HEAT OCC - This field is the setpoint
that is used for heating control during summer
occupied mode. If this AHU has been assigned to a
Zone application, this input is automatically be
defined so that the Zone application supplies the
setpoint value. You do not need to change this
definition.
• SUMMER HEAT UOC - This field is the setpoint
that is used for heating control during Summer
Unoccupied mode. If this AHU has been assigned
to a Zone application, this input is automatically
defined so that the Zone application supplies the
setpoint value. You do not need to change this
definition.
• SUMMER COOL OCC - This field is the setpoint
that is used for cooling control during Summer
Occupied mode. If this AHU has been assigned to a
Zone application, this input is automatically defined
so that the Zone application supplies the setpoint
value. You do not need to change this definition.
• SUMMER COOL UOC - This field is the setpoint
that is used for cooling control during Summer
Unoccupied mode. If this AHU has been assigned
to a Zone application, this input is automatically
defined so that the Zone application supplies the
setpoint value. You do not need to change this definition.
• WINTER HEAT OCC - This field is the setpoint
5-10 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
that is used for heating control during Winter
Occupied mode. If this AHU has been assigned to a
Zone application, this input is automatically defined
so that the Zone application supplies the setpoint
value. You do not need to change this definition.
• WINTER HEAT UOC - This field is the setpoint
that is used for heating control during Winter
Unoccupied mode. If this AHU has been assigned
to a Zone application, this input is automatically
defined so that the Zone application supplies the
setpoint value. You do not need to change this
definition.
• WINTER COOL OCC - This field is the setpoint
that is used for cooling control during Winter
Occupied mode. If this AHU has been assigned to a
Zone application, this input is automatically defined
so that the Zone application supplies the setpoint
value. You do not need to change this definition.
• WINTER COOL UOC - This field is the setpoint
that is used for cooling control during Winter
Unoccupied mode. Enter the desired setpoint value
in this field. If this AHU has been assigned to a
Zone application, this input is automatically defined
so that the Zone application supplies the setpoint
value. You do not need to change this definition.
NOTE: The active setpoint chosen from the
above list is based on the current occupancy
status, the season (Summer/Winter), and
whether the AHU is in heating or cooling
mode. If the AHU is neither heating nor cooling, the
last mode used will determine the active setpoint.
5.6.2
Setpoint Reset
The active setpoint may be changed by a Reset Sensor
input. A Reset Sensor is used to allow reset on the setpoint
based on an external sensor, such as humidity or outside
temperature. The user selects an input range for the sensor
and a maximum offset. The offset value is calculated
proportional to the output range while the input value is
calculated proportional to the input range.
5.6.3
Demand Shed
The active setpoint may be changed by the primary or
secondary demand shed inputs. If either demand shed is
active (ON), the active setpoint is adjusted by the amount
specified by the demand bump parameters.
Control Temperature Determination
The AHU determines which sensor should be used to
provide overall control to the space being conditioned, for
example, the control temperature. The control temperature
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
can be a single space temperature, a combination of two
space temperatures, or the return air temperature.
The Controlled By parameter specifies which sensor
is used as the control temperature.
NOTE: Either Space or Return may be
selected.
The Num Space Temps parameter specifies the
number of space temperature inputs that will be used. Note
that either one or two may be selected.
The Temp Comb Meth parameter specifies how two
space temperature sensors are combined. The possible
selections are:
• Average - The control temperature is the average
value of all sensors.
• Min - The lowest temperature value is used as the
control value.
• Max - The highest temperature value is used as the
control value.
5.6.4
Heating and Cooling Control
The AHU application supports up to four stages of
heating and four stages of cooling. Additionally, the
application supports up to two heat pump stages.
5.6.5
Control Logic
The application will control heat and cool stages using
a T-Stat strategy. This strategy utilizes a deadband to
determine when heating or cooling stages should be
switched on or off.
Deadband
T-Stat Deadband specifies the range of temperatures
around the heat and cool setpoints within which the
temperature is considered acceptable. When the control
temperature is between the current setpoint plus 1/2 the TStat Deadband and the current setpoint minus 1/2 the TStat Deadband, the AHU will keep all stages in their
current states and will not activate or deactivate any
stages.
Multiple Stage Support
Multiple Stage Support is activated based on a stage delay
in conjunction with the T-Stat Deadband parameter when
multiple heating or cooling stages are defined.
The Two Delay Parameters are the Following:
• Cool Stage Delay - The delay between cool stage
activations or deactivations. After a cool stage is
activated, the AHU waits an amount of time equal
HVAC Control
to the Cool Stage Delay. If the temperature is still
above the cool setpoint (plus one-half the
deadband) it activates the next stage of cooling.
Similarly, after a cool stage is deactivated, the AHU
waits until the Cool Stage Delay has elapsed, and if
the temperature is still below setpoint (minus onehalf the deadband) it deactivates the next cool
stage.
• Heat Stage Delay - The delay between heat stage
activations or deactivations. After a heat stage is
activated, the AHU waits an amount of time equal
to the Heat Stage Delay. If the temperature is still
below the heat setpoint (minus one-half the
deadband) it activates the next stage of heating.
Similarly, after a stage is deactivated, the AHU
waits until the Heat Stage Delay has elapsed, and if
the temperature is still above setpoint (plus one-half
the deadband) it deactivates the next heat stage.
5.6.6
Heat/Cool Lockout Based on
Outside Air Temperature
The heating and cooling functions can be disabled if
the outside air temperature is outside of a specified range.
Cooling can be configured for OAT lockout by setting
the “Cool Lockout En” parameter to Yes. When enabled, if
the outside air temperature falls below the value specified
by “COOL OAT LO, C”, all cooling functions are
disabled. When the outside air temperature rises above this
setpoint, cooling is enabled.
Heating can be configured for OAT lockout by setting
the “Heat Lockout En” parameter to Yes. When enabled, if
the outside air temperature rises above the value specified
by “HEAT OAT LOC”, all heating functions are disabled.
When the outside air temperature falls below this setpoint,
heating is enabled.
5.6.7
System Shutdown
If the SHUTDOWN input is turned ON, the
application goes into a shutdown mode that immediately
turns off any heating or cooling stages presently on. The
heating and cooling stages remain OFF as long as the
SHUTDOWN input is ON.
5.6.8
Fan Control
The AHU application supports a single-speed indoor
fan.
NOTE: The variable speed fan support may be
incorporated into this application in a later
phase of the product.
Software Overview • 5-11
5.6.9
Fan Mode
The fan can be designated as Continuous, Auto, or
Summer On/Winter Auto. There are separate fan mode
settings for occupied heating, unoccupied heating,
occupied cooling and unoccupied cooling. When the fan
mode is set to “Auto”, the fan only turns on if there is an
active stage of heating/cooling or if economization is
enabled. When the fan mode is set to “Continuous”, the
fan runs continuously in the selected heating or cooling
mode, regardless of whether any stages of heating or
cooling are currently active. When the fan mode is set to
“Sum ON/Win Auto”, the fan runs continuously during the
summer season, and runs in Auto mode during the winter
season.
5.6.10 Plenum Warmup/Purge
The application supports a plenum warmup/cooldown
delay on startup and a purge delay when turning off. There
are separate delays for both heating and cooling modes,
and these are only used when the fan is in Auto mode. The
warmup/cooldown delays allow the plenum to reach a
target temperature before turning on the fan to prevent
undesirable supply air from reaching the building
occupants. The purge delays are used to extract the
remaining heat/cold from the plenum after the heating/
cooling has turned off.
5.6.11 Fan Proof Failure
When Fan Prf Fail En is enabled and a fan proof failure
is detected, heating and cooling loads are shut down until
the proof failure goes away or the fan proof alarm is reset
or cleared. If the fan is configured to shut down on a fan
proof failure, the system is restarted by setting the FAN
FAIL RST input to ON or clearing the fan proof failure
from the advisory log.
5.6.12 System Shutdown
If the SHUTDOWN input is turned ON, the
application goes into a shutdown mode that turns off the
fan. The fan remains OFF as long as the SHUTDOWN
input is ON.
5.6.13 Economization (Damper)
Control
HVAC economizers can save energy in buildings by
using cool outside air as source of cooling the indoor
space. When the temperature of the outside air is less than
the temperature of the re-circulated air, conditioning the
outside air is more energy efficient than conditioning recirculated air. When the outside air is both sufficiently
cool and sufficiently dry (depending on the climate), the
amount of enthalpy in the air is acceptable and no
5-12 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
additional conditioning of it is needed; this portion of the
air-side economizer control scheme is called free cooling.
The AHU economizer control operation depends on
whether a two-position or variable position damper control
is used. The user may also select “None” as the
economizer damper type if no economization is desired.
The Two Basic Operations of the Economizer
Algorithm are Divided into:
1.
Determine if economization should occur:
• Is the outdoor air suitable for economizing?
• Is the AHU in heat mode?
• Is there a failure in the AHU?
• Does the control temperature require cooling from
economization?
• Is the supply temperature too low?
2.
Determine the analog damper position:
Steps to Determine if Economization Should Activate
The algorithm begins with determining whether
economization should occur. This is determined by five
inputs:
1.
Is the outdoor air suitable for economizing?
2.
Is the AHU in heat mode?
3.
Is there a failure in the AHU?
4.
Does the control temperature require cooling
from economization?
5.
Is the supply temperature too low?
Outdoor Air Suitability
The economizer outdoor air suitability algorithm
determines whether outdoor air conditions are suitable for
the algorithm to enable economization. The result of the
algorithm is an “Econ OK” signal. The suitability is
determined by comparing the outdoor air temperature to
the control temperature. If the outside air temperature is
cooler, then the Econ OK signal is set to ON.
In addition to the outdoor air temperature, there is a
user-defined maximum outdoor air humidity setpoint
(Max OA Hum) above which outdoor air is not used for
economization. In this case, the Econ OK signal is set to
OFF.
Heat Mode
If the AHU is in heating mode, economization is
disabled. Economization is a cooling function and would
therefore be counterproductive to heating.
Failure Lockout
If the AHU application has detected a failure,
economization is disabled. Failures that can lock out
economization are:
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
• Fan Proof Fail - When fan proof failure is
detected, heating and cooling loads are shut down
until the proof failure goes away or the fan proof
alarm is reset or cleared. If the fan is configured to
shut down on a fan proof failure, the system is
restarted by setting the FAN FAIL RST input to ON
or clearing the fan proof failure from the advisory
log.
stage (HEAT STAGE 1). If a second stage of heat is
required, two heat stages should be defined. Likewise, for
cooling, if one heat pump stage and one standard cooling
stage are defined, and a call for cooling occurs, the heat
pump stage is considered cool stage one and it turns on
along with the COOL STAGE 1 output. If a second stage
of cooling is required (not a heat pump stage), two cool
stages should be defined.
• SHUTDOWN input is ON - The application goes
into a shutdown mode that turns off the fan. The fan
remains OFF as long as the SHUTDOWN input is
ON.
5.6.17 Reversing Valve
Control Temperature above Economization Setpoint
If the control temperature is greater than the occupied
cooling setpoint minus the occupied economization delta,
then economization is permitted. If the control
temperature is greater than the unoccupied cooling
setpoint minus the unoccupied economization delta, then
economization is permitted. If the either the control
temperature or the setpoint minus the economization delta
has a value of NONE, then economization is not
permitted.
Low Supply Temp Lockout
If the supply temperature is below “Econ Lock Temp”,
the economizer is disabled.
5.6.14 Determine the Analog
Damper Position
The analog damper position is determined by using a
PID loop. The output is based on the mixed air
temperature compared to the occupied or unoccupied
mixed air setpoint (“Occ CL Mix Temp” or “Unoc CL Mix
Tmp”). The output is limited to the occupied or
unoccupied minimum damper position. If the
economization is inactive, the analog damper is set to the
occupied or unoccupied minimum damper position, based
on the current occupancy state. If the economization is
active, the output from the Economizer PID loop is written
to the analog damper output.
5.6.15 Determine the Digital
Damper Position
The digital damper output turns ON when
economization is active.
5.6.16 Heat Pump Control
If any heat pump stages are defined, they activate in
parallel with the first cooling and heating stages defined.
For example, if one heat pump stage and one heat stage are
defined, when a call for heat occurs, the heat pump stage is
considered stage one and it turns on along with the heat
HVAC Control
The reversing valve must be identified as either a
heating or cooling reversing valve by setting the
“Reversing Valve” parameter. When the reversing valve is
set to cooling, the reversing valve turns on when a call for
cooling is active and turns off when a call for heating is
active. Likewise, when the reversing valve is set to
heating, the reversing valve turns on when a call for
heating is active and turns off when a call for cooling is
active. Once the call for heating or cooling is no longer
active, the reversing valve remains in its last known state.
When the AHU application is reset, the reversing valve
output initializes the OFF state.
5.6.18 Compressor Output
When either a call for heating or cooling is active, the
compressor output for the called stage turns on. When the
heating or cooling call is no longer active, the compressor
turns off.
Control Temperature
A control temperature advisory occurs after a userspecified time delay for both high and low temperature
conditions. This advisory must have associated parameters
to allow the user to specify the high and low advisory
value and the delay, and must be separate setpoints for
occupied and unoccupied mode.
Supply Fan Proof Failure
A supply fan proof failure advisory is generated when
the AHU is calling for the supply fan to be ON and the fan
status input indicates the fan is not operating. This
advisory should have an associated parameter to allow the
user to enable or disable the advisory and a parameter to
specify the time delay before the advisory is activated.
5.6.19 Curtailment
To set up curtailment in the system software, the user
must designate which specific heating and cooling stages
is subject to curtailment. When the power company sends
a curtail command (for example, the value of the
curtailment device switches to “CLOSED”), all stages that
are set up to be curtailed is shut off and locked out.
Software Overview • 5-13
NOTE: Fan control is not directly affected by
a call for curtailment.
5.7
Time Schedule
Application
The Time Schedule application schedules lighting or
occupancy state activities. The allowed number of Time
Schedule Applications is based on the total number of
applications allowed in the controller. Support for
additional applications may be added with a separate
license key.
5.7.1
Time Schedule Method
The Time Schedule application is enabled when the
ENABLE input is ON. The schedule feeds its time
schedule output and acts as an independent schedule.
The Time Schedule Types are:
Standard Schedule:
The user defines a “Standard Schedule” that specifies
the ON/OFF times for each day of the week, and the ON/
OFF times for the holidays/special days.
For the schedule, the ON/OFF times are absolute
times.
For the Standard Schedules the user may specify the
date range that the schedule is active. This allows the user
to have multiple schedules based on the time of year.
Master Schedule:
The Master Schedule feeds its time schedule output to
the Slave Schedule(s) or acts as an independent schedule.
Slave Schedule:
The user defines a “Standard Schedule” that spec fies
the ON/OFF times for each day of the week, and the ON/
OFF times for the holidays/special days. These ON/OFF
times have different implications depending on whether
the schedule is a master or slave type.
The Slave Schedule needs a Master Schedule as one of
its inputs. Provides offset capability to the Master's events.
The user defines a “Standard Schedule” that specifies the
ON/OFF times for each day of the week, and the ON/OFF
times for the holidays/special days. These ON/OFF times
have different implications depending on whether the
schedule is a master or slave type.
For Slave Schedules, the ON/OFF times are either
absolute times or relative times to the Master Schedule, in
which positive time represents how much time after and
negative time represents how much time ahead of what is
5-14 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
specified in the Master Schedule. There can be at most one
relative ON time and one relative OFF time for a single
day. For the Master Schedule, the ON/OFF times are
absolute times.
For the Standard Schedules the user may specify the
date range that the schedule is active. This allows the user
to have multiple schedules based on the time of year. The
schedules can be combined using a combiner application.
NOTE: The Schedule time ranges can be
modified by dragging the schedule bar to
adjust time.
Schedules (Master Slave) are now easier and
flexible to create during setup. The system can now
show all created schedules in the summary screen
(master and slave schedules).
5.7.2
Standard Schedule
Each standard schedule is made up of up to 15 daily
event schedules. Each daily event schedule is made up of
two times (typically an On/Off pair). For each daily event
schedule the user can assign which days of the week that
daily schedule should be used (seven days plus four
holiday/special days). This allows a unique daily schedule
for each day of the week or one where it is followed
multiple days during the week. If a user needs more than
two On/Off events in one day, they can combine multiple
daily schedules together (they still are limited to 15 daily
event schedules per overall schedule).
5.7.3
Event Names
The user can assign an event name on each event. By
default the name of the event is Event x, where x is the
event number (1-15).
5.7.4
Maintenance Schedule
A user can define three maintenance schedule changes
for each time schedule.
The following information is included:
• START DATE - The start date at which the Time
Schedule will start ignoring its standard events and
following its maintenance overrides.
• START TIME - The start time at which the Time
Schedule will stop following its standard events and
start using its maintenance overrides. If you want
the maintenance override to be followed for the
entire day, leave this field set to 0:00 and the End
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Time to 23:59.
NOTE: The Start Time is not the time you wish
for the maintenance override to make a state
transition - it is the time when you want to start
the schedule override.
• END DATE - the date the maintenance override
should end in this field. If the maintenance override
is only going to last one day, enter the same date in
this field as is in the Start Date.
• END TIME - the end time at which the Time
Schedule will stop following the maintenance
override and start using its standard events. If you
want the maintenance override to be followed for
the entire day, leave this field set to 23:59 and the
Start Time to 0:00.
Note that the End Time is not the time you wish for
the Time Schedule to make a state transition, it is
the time when you want to end the schedule
override.
• ON EVENT TIME - The time of day you wish the
schedule output to be ON when the Time Schedule
application is following this maintenance override.
• OFF EVENT TIME - The time of day you wish
the schedule output to be OFF when the Time
Schedule application is following this maintenance
override.
Once the maintenance schedule is complete (moved
past the END DATE), the schedule application returns to
following its standard schedule. Maintenance Schedule is
active for the entire day and for all days between (and
including) the START DATE and END DATE.
5.7.5
Output Calculation
The Time Schedule control algorithm calculates the
current On/Off status, the time until change of state
(TUCOS) and time since change of state (TSCOS) for all
the schedules. This information is available for the other
applications that are making use of a particular schedule.
The schedules output status reflects the results of any
bypass or override, but there is also an output that reflects
the actual calculated value based on the time of day.
The Time Schedule control algorithm runs every
minute to determine the state of the schedule, but a new
bypass request or a new demand shed request is processed
immediately. A termination of a bypass or a demand shed
request is also processed immediately. The Time
Scheduling control algorithm is composed of a core
scheduling algorithm, bypass, override, and demand
control handling.
There may be outputs that the Time Schedule does
Time Schedule Application
control directly and in these cases the user is able to enable
demand shedding of the output. If the Demand Control
Input indicates shed and if the schedule output is On, it is
turned Off. The load is turned back On at the next minute
advance when the Demand Control Input indicates restore.
5.7.6
Scheduling Logic
The core scheduling algorithm determines the state of
the active schedule. It does not take bypass, override, and
demand shed inputs into account. The core scheduling
algorithm operates under two different modes: either
Master or Slave as determined by the “Schedule Type”
input. The difference among these two operation modes is
the different usage of some inputs/outputs and their
corresponding values.
Schedule Priority
The schedule used is based on the following priority
scheme and within the following categories.
• Maintenance Schedule - If any of the maintenance
schedules are active, (in the Master Schedule) that
maintenance schedule is used as the current
schedule. Time until next change of state and time
since previous change of state will be given in
minutes.
• Holiday/Special Schedule - The DAY SCHED
input provides which day of the week or holiday
schedule to follow. When DAY SCHED input
indicates that a holiday is active, all schedules
follow the selected holiday schedule. If a holiday is
entered and a schedule does not have the selected
special daily schedule defined, then it reverts back
and use the regular schedule for that day of the
week.
• Standard Weekly Schedule - If a daily schedule is
not defined for a day of the week then the control
algorithm searches back in time for the last defined
state change. If no daily schedules are defined, the
output of the schedule is set to Off.
Overlapping Events
The user is allowed to enter overlapping events,
however, the first ON event and first OFF event of out-ofsequence events is picked up.
Operation When Not Within Programmed Date Range
If the current system date does not fall into any of the
date ranges specified, the schedule control loop is
considered not active. A special value (NO_VALUE) is
written to the output, and TUCOS is set to a maximum
TUCOS value (2 days or 2880 minutes) while TSCOS still
reflects the actual elapsed time since last change of state.
The Master Schedule
Software Overview • 5-15
If a daily schedule is not defined for a day of the week,
the control algorithm searches back in time for the last
defined state change. If no daily schedules are defined, the
output of the schedule is set to OFF. The DAY SCHED
input provides which day of the week or holiday schedule
to follow. When DAY SCHED input indicates that a
holiday is active, all schedules follow the selected holiday
schedule. If a holiday is entered and a schedule does not
have the selected special daily schedule defined, then it
reverts back and uses the regular schedule for that day of
the week.
If any of the maintenance schedules are activated, that
maintenance time schedule shall be used as the current
schedule. Time until next change of state and time since
previous change of state will be given in minutes. During
bypass, override, or demand control, TUCOS output is set
to maximum TUCOS value and TSCOS reflects the actual
time since change of state.
5.7.7
Control Override
When the EMERGENCY input is active, the normal
control algorithm is overridden and CONTROL OUT is
immediately forced to the value specified by the
EMERGENCY OUT parameter.
Slave Schedule
The ON/OFF times of the schedules (except for
maintenance schedules) can either be absolute or relative.
When the times are relative to the corresponding Master
events, positive time represents how much time after the
Master event and negative time represents how much time
ahead of the Master event. There is at most one relative
time for either ON time or OFF time for a single day.
The following illustrates the Master Schedule DAY
SCHED Output with the Slave schedule behavior:
• Maintenance Schedule - follow the Master's
maintenance schedule. Normal day of week schedules are
ignored even if they are active.
• Holiday Schedule/Normal Day of Week - if
Maintenance Schedule is active, run a Maintenance
Schedule. A relative event time of the corresponding
schedule is used to modify the master's schedule while the
absolute event times take precedence over the Master's
events.
• Bypass, Override, or Demand Shed active
(TUCOS=MAX_TUCOS) - events with negative relative
times start immediately. If the delay (as indicated by
positive relative time of Slave's event) is longer than the
duration of the Master's special event, the Slave does not
react to that Master's special event.
5-16 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
5.7.8
Control Bypass
When the BYPASS TO ON input is active, the control
output is forced to the ON state regardless of normal
schedules. Likewise, when BYPASS TO OFF is active,
control is forced to the OFF state. BYPASS TO ON has
the higher priority over BYPASS TO OFF.
5.7.9
Control Override
When the EMERGENCY input is active, the normal
control algorithm is overridden and CONTROL OUT is
immediately forced to the value specified by the
EMERGENCY OUT parameter.
5.7.10 Special Conditions
• Cold Reset - When the application has a Cold
Reset request, the OUTPUT will be set to
NO_VALUE.
• Warm Reset - When the application restarts from a
power outage or something else, a Warm Reset is
requested. The control loop scans back to find out
the last event before the current time.
• Uninitialized Inputs - If a NO_VALUE appears on
DAY SCHED input, the control's OUTPUT falls
back to the normal day of the week.
If a NO_VALUE appears on any other input, the
input value is forced to a predetermined (hard
coded) default value and the control algorithm
continues to operate normally.
• Failed Inputs - If a failure is detected on the DAY
SCHED input, the control's OUTPUT falls back to
the normal day of the week.
If a failure is detected on any other input, the input
value is forced to a predetermined (hard coded)
default value and the control algorithm continues to
operate normally.
5.7.11 Priority of Services
The application prioritizes its activities such as:
1.
ENABLE input - The Enable input determines
whether the schedule will be enabled (ON) or
disabled (OFF). When disabled, all the schedule's
outputs, are set to NONE. If this input is not
defined, the controller assumes it to be ON.
2.
EMERG OVERRIDE - The Emergency
Override input allows the user to override the
schedule Output to a fixed digital value. When
ON, the schedule overrides the Output to the
value specified in the Emergency Out field.
3.
BYPASS - When the Bypass to ON input is ON,
the schedule ignores its own scheduled events
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
and bypasses the schedule output ON. When the
Bypass to OFF input is ON, the schedule ignores
its own scheduled events and bypasses the
schedule output OFF.
If both Bypass to ON and Bypass to OFF are ON
at the same time, Bypass to ON takes priority
over Bypass to OFF.
4.
DEMAND SHED - If this input is turned ON it
will turn the output of the Time Schedule to the
OFF (unoccupied) state. This input is used for
demand shedding in Power Monitoring and
Demand Control applications, and typically it is
only used when the schedule output is directly
controlling a load (lights, fans, and more).
5.
Standard scheduling activities - The user
defines a “Standard Schedule” that specifies the
ON/OFF times for each day of the week, and the
ON/OFF times for the holidays/special days.
5.7.12 Control Alarming
There are no alarms associated with Time Scheduling
Control.
5.7.13 Schedule Category
The Time Schedule application provides a category for
the user to specify how the time schedule application is
used.
5.8
Demand Control
The Demand Control application monitors power
demand on a metered system (for example, main panel,
sub panel, or unitary equipment and shed configured
loads) in response to high demand situations in the controller.
varying sampling frequency of the input signal to
produce an energy calculation.
• Digital Energy Pulse Input (Digital KWh pulse
input) - When a digital energy pulse input is
selected, the application calculates energy
consumption on an hourly, daily, and monthly basis
by accumulating the energy pulses detected on the
digital input. The digital input is able to support
energy pulse rates up to 50 pulses per second.
Also, an instantaneous power (KW) output is
calculated. This calculation uses the energy
consumed over a one minute period to calculate the
average power over the minute period.
5.8.2
Demand Calculation
Average KW (Demand) Calculation
The power company's peak demand charge is an
average KW value over an interval window.This interval
is usually in the 15 to 30 minute range, but can be as short
a five minutes. Some pulse meters provided by the power
company provides a signal that determines when a new
demand interval is starting. In general the control strategy
cannot count on this signal being available. Therefore, the
demand control window used by the application must be
set to the same value as the power company's demand
window.
Load Shedding Activation
The application integrates the power level above and
below the setpoint on a rolling demand window of the
same length as the utility demand window. That way, if the
average KW in the rolling window is kept below the
setpoint, the electric utility never detect a demand usage
exceeding the setpoint.
Once the KW input rises above the setpoint, levels
start to shed.
The amount shed depends on several factors:
NOTE: There is a single licensed Demand
Control application in the controller.
Additional Demand Control applications can
be added with a separate license key.
5.8.1
KWH Calculation
The controller has the ability to calculate energy
consumption based on:
• Analog KW Input (Analog KW signal) - When an
analog KW input is selected, the application
calculates the energy consumption on an hourly,
daily, and monthly basis by integrating the
instantaneous power samples (approximation by
finite steps). The application can take into account a
Demand Control
• If the integral error is approaching zero, the amount
shed is the KW input minus the setpoint.
• If the KW input has been continuously above the
setpoint for 1/4th of the demand window and the
KW input is not going down, shed two levels at a
time.
• Shed one level at a time. If the KW input goes
below the setpoint, it starts to shed one level at a
time.
If the KW input goes below the setpoint minus the
hysteresis and the integral error is less than zero, the levels
start to restore. They continue to restore until the KW
input goes above the setpoint.
Demand Setpoint Determination
Software Overview • 5-17
The demand setpoint is determined based on the
current season - Summer or Winter. For each season, there
are two setpoints available. The active setpoint is chosen
based on the state of a setpoint switch input. In this way,
different demand setpoints may be selected depending on
the time of day or some other signal.
5.8.3
Shed Outputs
There are up to 60 shed requests for a system. These
shed requests are placed into three categories.
During the configuration of the various control
applications, a user assigns a particular shed request to any
of the following control loop:
• First Shed - Loads assigned to First Shed Requests
are shed first when the demand goes above setpoint
and are the last loads to be restored. They are shed
sequentially in assigned order.
• Rotational Shed - Loads assigned to Rotational
Shed Requests are shed in a rotational scheme after
the First Shed loads are shed. On each new demand
condition the next rotational load in the sequence is
shed first. This is done so that the DLC burden is
shared equally.
• Last Shed - Loads assigned to Last Shed Requests
are only shed once the First Shed and all available
Rotational loads are shed. They are shed
sequentially in assigned order. These loads are the
first loads to be restored.
When a level is shed, the shed timer is started and the
staging interval timer (minimum time to wait before
shedding the next load) is set to the value programmed for
this shed level.
The shed sequence depends on the type of loads that
are available to be shed. Loads assigned as first shed are
always the first shed in the user assigned sequence. Once
all the first shed loads are shed, the rotational loads are
shed. Assigning a load to be a rotational scheme is done to
balance the burden of demand shedding among all the
loads. This means that the application will not shed the
same load until all other rotational loads are shed. After all
available rotational loads are shed, the last shed loads are
shed in the user assigned sequence.
The loads are restored based on the following rules:
• Last shed loads are restored first in a last shed first
restore order.
• Rotational loads are restored based on which one
are shed the longest.
• First shed loads are restored in a last shed first
restore order.
• After a load is restored, the staging interval timer is
5-18 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
set (set to the same value used when this load is
shed). Once the staging interval expires the next
load is restored if the power level is still below the
setpoint minus the deadband.
• If a load is restored due to maximum shed time-out
that counts for the restored load for that application
update interval.
There are several factors that affect the order of how the
loads are shed and restored:
• Minimum shed time - the minimum time that a
shed load must stay in shed
• Minimum restore time - the minimum time that a
shed load must stay in restore (not shed)
• Maximum shed time - the maximum time that a
shed load may remain actively shed
Another load is not shed to replace a load that is
restored due to the maximum shed time expiring unless the
power level is still above setpoint.
If a shed level is in restore mode but its minimum
restore time is not met, levels in the next higher category
will not be shed. For instance, if all the first sheds are shed
and one of the first sheds times out due to max shed time,
rotate and last shed loads will not continue to shed until all
first shed loads are shed again.
Multiple loads can be assigned to each shed level, but a
user should assign the same KW to each shed level. The
KW assigned to a shed level is used by the application in
determining how many shed requests should be shed at
one time. However, since the application doesn't know the
On/Off status of the loads assigned to a shed level and
since the total KW that can be shed is usually only a
portion of the total electrical power used, the application
cannot accurately predict the actual results of a shed
request. To compensate for this, the application assumes
only 75% of the reported load being On. Additionally, the
application is always taking immediate action when the
power level is exceeding the KW Demand setpoint and it
can bring the power level under control without a new
demand level being recorded by the power company.
5.8.4
Application Alarms
The Demand Control an application provides application alarm to signal a high demand. The demand alarm
limit and alarm delay should be configurable.
5.8.5
KW Load Specification
The application allows the user to specify the KW
rating for each load connected to the Demand Control
application. The application uses this information to help
determine how many loads to shed at one time to prevent
exceeding the demand setpoint.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.8.6
Performance Requirements
KWH Pulse Input
1.
2.
When configured for KWH pulse input, the
Demand Control application must detect 100% of
all pulses present on the input, as long as the
pulses occur no faster than 50 pulses/second
(PPS) and have pulse width of at least 20ms.
The local digital inputs on the controller are able
to support 50 PPS. Digital inputs located on
expansion modules (such as IPEX60) will not
support KWH pulse inputs.
5.9
Utility Monitoring
The Utility Monitoring application tracks the
consumption of metered services (such as electricity, gas,
and water) and monitors the usage or rate of usage of other
utilities such as door openings and door openings per hour.
The number of Utility Monitoring applications allowed
is based on the total number of applications allowed in the
controller. Additional applications may be added with a
separate license key.
5.9.1
Utility Usage Calculation
5.9.1.1
Utility Type
The user can specify the type of utility to monitor by
selecting an engineering unit that represents the type of
input connected. For example, if an analog rate signal
from a power meter is connected, the engineering unit will
be “KW.” Similarly, if a digital pulse signal from a water
meter is connected, the engineering unit will be “Liters.”
The controller will have the ability to calculate utility
consumption based on:
• Analog usage rate signal (for example, KW, GPM)
• Digital pulse input (for example, KWh, gallons/
liters, CCF)
• Analog Current/Voltage Input(s) - Single or Three
Phase (only used if monitoring power)
5.9.1.2
Analog Input
When an analog usage rate signal input is selected, the
application calculates energy consumption on a weekly,
daily, and monthly basis by integrating the instantaneous
power samples (approximation by finite steps). The
application considers a varying sampling frequency of the
input signal to produce an energy calculation.
5.9.1.3
Digital Pulse Input
When a digital energy pulse input is selected, the
application calculates energy consumption on a weekly,
daily, and monthly basis by accumulating the energy
pulses detected on the digital input. The digital input
supports energy pulse rates up to 50 pulses per second.
An instantaneous power output is also calculated. This
calculation uses the energy consumed over a one-minute
period to calculate the average power over the minute
period.
The Pulse Input displays the count of the number of
pulses it has received. The user will configure the Units
Per Pulse property so the algorithm knows what the pulse
represents.
5.9.1.4
Current/Voltage Inputs - Single/
Three Phase
NOTE: The Three Phase mode only applies if
the engineering unit selected is either KW or
KWh.
When a current input is selected, the application
calculates energy consumption by calculating
instantaneous power and then integrating the power
calculation by finite step approximation. The application
supports a single current input for single phase
monitoring, or three current inputs for three phase
monitoring. Additional voltage and power factor inputs is
provided so that the power can be calculated. These inputs
can be set to fixed values, or can be driven by real-time
voltage and power factor outputs from a smart power
meter.
5.9.2
5.9.2.1
Consumption Totalizing
Totalizer Output
The Utility Monitoring application provides a totalized
output that accumulates while the quantity being measured
is consumed. The user can specify duration of logs in days
that the Totalizer Output will accumulate before it resets to
zero. The duration can also range from 1 minute to 24
hours. Before the automatic reset of the totalizer, the
application sends to the totalizer a maximum value
through a log.
Utility Monitoring
Software Overview • 5-19
5.9.2.2
Fixed Period Totalizers
The application provides Weekly, Daily, and Monthly
totalizer outputs. The Weekly output accumulates throughout the week and reset to zero at 00:00 hours every Sunday. The Daily output accumulates throughout the day and
reset to zero at 00:00 every day. The Monthly output accumulates throughout the calendar month and reset to zero at
00:00 on the first day of every month. Before the fixed
period totalizers are reset, their values will be logged.
5.9.3
Demand Trip
5.9.3.1
Shed Output
The application provides a demand shed digital output
that turns ON when the average or instantaneous rate of
usage (configurable) exceeds a threshold setpoint. Note
that the “Demand Deadband” configuration is not
considered.
5.9.3.2
Average Rate of Consumption
Output
The application calculates the average rate of
consumption over a window of time (demand window).
The window will be configurable between 1 and 60
minutes.
5.9.3.3
Demand Alarm
The application provides an application alarm to signal
a high demand. The demand alarm limit and alarm delay
will be configurable.
5.9.5
Units of Measurement
The Utility Monitoring application will use several
units of measurement. All measurement units is added to a
common list in the controller and can be assigned or customized as required during initial configuration (except for
Voltage and Current, which always use Volts and Amps as
units).
On initial configuration, the user can select the desired
application usage from a selection (Electricity/Gas/Water/
Misc.) and the default units will apply. Default units are
dependent on the localization settings configured on the
controller. Some units will be standard, some will require
customization and others have no unit.
5.10 OnBoard I/O
Most of the general purpose input and output
communications devices required by the Site Supervisor to
control refrigeration systems are connected to the
controller via the I/O Network. The I/O Network is a
simple RS485 three-wire connection that allows data
interchange between input boards (which read sensor
values and digital closures), output boards (which carry
out commands from the controller), and the controller.
The Site Supervisor has the onboard inputs and outputs
which are initially supported by the controller.
The demand alarm delay is the amount of time the
application waits after the Shed Output turns on before the
demand alarm is generated. The Shed Output can be
configured to be controlled by either the average or
instantaneous usage rate.
If the average or instantaneous usage rate drops down
below the threshold setpoint (DEMAND SP) minus
“Demand Deadband” configuration, the demand alarm
will return to normal.
5.9.3.4
Time In Shed Output
The application provides a Time In Shed output that
indicates the total time that the Shed Output has been on.
This output resets to zero every day at 00:00 hours.
5.9.4
Application Specific Logs
All Utility Monitoring related logs is processed
through the logging system of the controller. Application
specific logs will not be used.
Figure 5-2 - Onboard Inputs and Outputs
5.9.1
Licensing
The number of Onboard I/O applications allowed is
based on the total number of applications allowed on the
Site Supervisor platforms. Additional applications may be
added with a separate license key.
5.9.2
Adding and Deleting
Onboard I/O Application
The Onboard I/O application is initially installed by
the system. The user is not able to add or delete it.
5-20 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Description
Size
Limits
0
Conf Probe 1
4 bit
ntc(0) - Ptc(1) - 2/20mA(2) - 4/20mA(3) - 0/10V(4) - 0/1V(5) - 0/5V(6) - DIG(7)-e_ntc(8)
1
Conf Probe 2
4 bit
ntc(0) - Ptc(1) - 2/20mA(2) - 4/20mA(3) - 0/10V(4) - 0/1V(5) - 0/5V(6) - DIG(7)-e_ntc(8)
2
Conf Probe 3
4 bit
ntc(0) - Ptc(1) - 2/20mA(2) - 4/20mA(3) - 0/10V(4) - 0/1V(5) - 0/5V(6) - DIG(7)-e_ntc(8)
3
Conf Probe 4
4 bit
ntc(0) - Ptc(1) - 2/20mA(2) - 4/20mA(3) - 0/10V(4) - 0/1V(5) - 0/5V(6) - DIG(7)-e_ntc(8)
4
Conf Probe 5
4 bit
ntc(0) - Ptc(1) - 2/20mA(2) - 4/20mA(3) - 0/10V(4) - 0/1V(5) - 0/5V(6) - DIG(7)-e_ntc(8)
5
Conf Probe 6
4 bit
ntc(0) - Ptc(1) - 2/20mA(2) - 4/20mA(3) - 0/10V(4) - 0/1V(5) - 0/5V(6) - DIG(7)-e_ntc(8)
6
Conf Probe 7
4 bit
ntc(0) - Ptc(1) - 2/20mA(2) - 4/20mA(3) - 0/10V(4) - 0/1V(5) - 0/5V(6) - DIG(7)-e_ntc(8)
7
Conf Probe 8
4 bit
ntc(0) - Ptc(1) - 2/20mA(2) - 4/20mA(3) - 0/10V(4) - 0/1V(5) - 0/5V(6) - DIG(7)-e_ntc(8)
8
Conf DI1
4 bit
Normal DI (0) - Pulse Counter (1)
9
Conf DI2
4 bit
Normal DI (0) - Pulse Counter (1)
10
Conf DI3
4 bit
Normal DI (0) - Pulse Counter (1)
11
Conf DI4
4 bit
Normal DI (0) - Pulse Counter (1)
Table 5-3 - Size and Limits of the Inputs and Outputs
5.9.3
Status and Detail Screen
The Onboard I/O status screen, contains the following
information:
• Relays status
• Digital inputs status
• Analog inputs status.
• General status
• Setup status
• Inputs status
• Outputs status
• Invert status
Figure 5-4 - Onboard I/O Status Screen
Figure 5-3 - Onboard I/O Status Screen
OnBoard I/O
Software Overview • 5-21
The Onboard I/O properties can be configure by
setting the Edit Mode to ON on the screen drop-down
menu on the upper right side of the screen.
Figure 5-5 - Onboard I/O Detail Screen
5.9.4
Alarming
The alarm Read Data Failed AI# is generated if
sensors are configured but disconnected.
If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice condition
still exists, the delay period is honored.
How To Add an XR75CX 5.6 Device on the Site
Supervisor:
1.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Refrigeration, click the screen drop-down arrow
on the upper right of the screen, click Add
Controls.
2.
Select the Control or Application Type XR75CX 5.6, enter the Quantity, Control Name
and Serial Type. Note that Serial Type
information can be enter later. Click Save to add
the application.
3.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
5.
Click the XR75CX 5.6 application panel box to
view the application.
6.
The system will display the XR75CX 5.6
application parameters.
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to “ON”
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
Advisories returns to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
5.10 XR75CX 5.6
The XR75CX is a microprocessor based controller,
suitable for applications on medium or low temperature
ventilated refrigeration units. It has four (4) relay outputs
to control compressor, fan, and defrost, which can be
either electrical or reverse cycle (hot gas) and light
(configurable).
It can also have up to four (4) NTC, CtC (EU or US
type) probe inputs. The first probe is used for temperature
control. The second probe is used to control the defrost
termination temperature at the evaporator. One of the two
(2) digital inputs can operate as a third temperature probe.
The fourth probe is used to control the condenser
temperature (for condenser alarm management) or to
display a temperature value. Set the PbC parameter to CtC
to support standard Emerson Retail Solutions temperature
sensors (factory default).
The controller is fully configurable through special
parameters that can be easily programmed through the
keyboard.
5-22 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.11 XR35CX 5.6 and 2.6
of the screen.
The Model XR35CX (32 mm x 74 mm) is a digital
thermostat with off-cycle, defrost, designed for
refrigeration applications at normal temperature. It has
two relay outputs to control compressor and light
(configurable). It can have a Real Time Clock (RTC) that
allows programming of up to six daily defrost cycles,
divided into holidays and workdays. A “Day and Night”
function with two different setpoints is fitted for energy
savings. It can also have up to four NTC or PT1000 probe
inputs: the first one for temperature control, the second
one located on the evaporator to control the defrost
termination temperature. One of the two digital inputs can
operate as a third temperature probe. The fourth probe is
used to signal the condenser temperature alarm or to
display a temperature value.
The RS485 serial output enables the controller to be
connected to a network line that is MODBUS RTU
compatible such as the monitoring units of XWEB family.
The Hot Key receptacle allows the controller to be
programmed by means of the Hot Key programming
keyboard.
The controller is fully configurable through special
parameters that can be easily programmed through the
keyboard.
How To Add an XR35CX 5.6/ XR35CX2.6 Device
on the Site Supervisor:
1.
2.
3.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Refrigeration, click the screen drop-down arrow
on the upper right of the screen, click Add
Controls.
Select the Control or Application Type XR35CX-5.6/ XR35CX2.6, enter the Quantity,
Control Name and Serial Type. Note that Serial
Type information can be enter later. Click Save to
add the application.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
5.
Click the XR35CX-5.6/ XR35CX 2.6 application
panel box to view the application.
6.
The system will display the XR35CX-5.6/
XR35CX 2.6 application parameters.
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to “ON”
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
XR35CX 5.6 and 2.6
Figure 5-6 - XR35CX 5.6 and 2.6 Device
Alarm
Description/Alarm Text
EXTERNAL
External Alarm
DOOR OPEN
Open Door Alarm
2EEPROM FAILURE
EEPROM Failure Alarm
CASE TEMP FAIL Case temperature probe failure alarm
DEFR TERM FAIL Defrost termination probe failure alarm
HIGH CASE ALM
High case temperature alarm
LO CASE ALM
Low case temperature alarm
RTC DATA LOST
RTC data lost alarm
RTC FAILURE
RTC failure alarm
Table 5-4 - Diagnostic Alarms
5.11.1 Overview
The Site Supervisor will provide an interface to the
XR35CX and alarming. The XR35CX is networked with
the Site Supervisor to share sensor data with a Case
Circuit application that controls the case refrigeration. It
has two on-board relays that can be used as satellite
outputs by the other Site Supervisor applications.
Please refer to the XR35CX I/O Installing and
Operating Manual (P/N 026-1203) for more information.
Software Overview • 5-23
5.11.2 Command-Alarm Matrix
Command
Keyboard LOCK
Description/Alarm Text
The front panel is locked and cannot be
used.
Keyboard UNLOCKThe front panel is unlocked and can be
used.
Alarms Muting
Silences the alarm output.
Table 5-5 - Diagnostic Alarms
5-24 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
The following is an example of the application status screen in UltraSite. This property can be added to the Site
Supervisor’s general property.
Input
Property:
Value:
Units:
Status:
Output Property:
Value:
Units:
Status:
CONTROL TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
DEFR TERM TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
MIXED TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
ACTIVE SETPT
NONE
DF
NA
DIG IN 1
NOTACT
DIG
NA
DIG IN 2
NOTACT
DIG
NA
ALARM
NOTACT
DIG
NA
LIGHTS
NOTACT
DIG
NA
COMPRESSOR
NOTACT
DIG
NA
ENRGY SAVE ACT
NOTACT
DIG
NA
REFG ACTIVE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
DEFROST ACTIVE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
KEYBOARD ACTIVE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
BUZZER ACTIVE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
HOLIDAY ACTIVE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
EXTERNAL ALARM
NOTACT
DIG
NA
DOOR OPEN
NOTACT
DIG
NA
EEPROM FAILURE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
CASE TEMP FAIL
NOTACT
DIG
NA
DEFR TERM FAIL
NOTACT
DIG
NA
HIGH CASE ALM
NOTACT
DIG
NA
LO CASE ALM
NOTACT
DIG
NA
RTC DATA LOST
NOTACT
DIG
NA
RTC FAILURE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
PROBE 3
NONE
DF
NA
PROBE 4
NONE
DF
NA
SET POINT OUT
NONE
DF
NA
Table 5-6 - XR35CX 5 6 and 2 6 Status Screen Properties
XR35CX 5.6 and 2.6
Software Overview • 5-25
5.12 XC645CX 2.5
The XC645CX is designed to manage both
compressors and fans in a condensing system such as a
pack. The compressors can be digital scroll, simple,
multistage. Control is by means of a neutral zone or
proportional band and is based on the pressure or
temperature sensed in the LP suction (compressors) and
HP (condenser) circuits. A special algorithm balances the
run hours of the compressors to distribute the work load
uniformly. The controllers can convert both LP and HP
pressures and displays them as temperatures. The front
panel offers complete information on the system's status
by displaying the suction and condenser pressure
(temperatures), the status of the loads, possible alarms or
maintenance conditions. Each load has its own alarm input
that is able to stop it when activated. Additionally, there
are two inputs for low and high pressure switches: when
these are activated, the system is stopped. The controller
can be easily programmed at power-on by using the Hot
Key. The controller can be connected to the XWEB
controlling and monitoring system, through the TTL
output, using the standard MODBUS RTU protocol.
Figure 5-7 - XC645CX 2.5 Device
How To Add an XC645 2.5 Device on the Site
Supervisor:
1.
2.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Refrigeration, click the screen drop-down arrow
on the upper right of the screen, click Add
Controls.
Figure 5-8 - XC645CX 2.5 Wiring
Select the Control or Application Type XC645CX 2.5, enter the Quantity, Control Name
and Serial Type. Note that Serial Type
information can be enter later. Click Save to add
the application.
ERROR PB1
Error Pb1
ERROR PB2
Error Pb2
5.12.1 Application Advisories
Alarm
Description
ERROR PB3
Error Pb3
LIQUID LEVEL
Liquid Level Alarm
LOW SUCT ALARM
Low Suction Alarm
HIGH SUCT ALARM
High Suction Alarm
LOW COND ALARM
Low Condens. Alarm
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
HIGH COND ALARM
High Condens. Alarm
LOAD 1 ALARM
Load 1 Alarm
5.
Click the XC645CX 2.5 application panel box to
view the application.
LOAD 2 ALARM
Load 2 Alarm
LOAD 3 ALARM
Load 3 Alarm
6.
The system will display the XC645CX 2.5
application parameters.
LOAD 4 ALARM
Load 4 Alarm
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to ON
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
LOAD 5 ALARM
Load 5 Alarm
3.
4.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
5-26 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Table 5-7 - XC645CX 2.5 Application Advisories
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
LOAD 6 ALARM
Load 6 Alarm
LP SWITCH ALARM
Low Press. LP Switch
HP SWITCH ALARM
High Press. HP Switch
ELECTRONIC LP
Electronic low press
DGS DLT ALARM
Digital Scroll High Discharge Line
temp
Table 5-7 - XC645CX 2.5 Application Advisories
5.12.2 Command-Alarm Matrix
Command
Keyboard LOCK
Description/Alarm Text
The front panel is locked and cannot be
used.
Keyboard UNLOCKThe front panel is unlocked and can be
used.
Alarms Muting
Silences the alarm output.
Table 5-8 - Diagnostic Alarms
XC645CX 2.5
Software Overview • 5-27
Input Property:
Value:
Units:
Status:
Output Property:
Value:
Units:
Status:
COMP SETPT IN
NONE
PSI
SUCTION TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
FAN SETPT IN
NONE
PSI
DISCHARGE TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
SUCTION PRESS
NONE
PSI
NA
DISCHARGE PRESS
NONE
PSI
NA
COMP SETPT OUT
NONE
PSI
NA
FAN SETPT OUT
NONE
PSI
NA
COMPRESSOR 1
NOTACT
DIG
NA
COMPRESSOR 2
NOTACT
DIG
NA
FAN 1
NOTACT
DIG
NA
FAN 2
NOTACT
DIG
NA
FAN 3
NOTACT
DIG
NA
VALVE OUTPUT
NOTACT
DIG
NA
ON
NOTACT
DIG
NA
KEYBOARD
NOTACT
DIG
NA
ALARMS MUTING
NOTACT
DIG
NA
DIGITAL % MOD
NONE
PCT
NA
SUCTION AVERAGE
NONE
PSI
NA
ERROR SUCT
NOTACT
DIG
NA
ERROR DISCH
NOTACT
DIG
NA
CFG ERROR AL
NOTACT
DIG
NA
EEPROM FAIL AL
NOTACT
DIG
NA
Table 5-9 - XC645 Status Screen Properties
5-28 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.13 XR75CX Case Display
setting of status information:
The XR75CX-Case Display is a microprocessor based
controller, suitable for applications on medium or low
temperature ventilated refrigeration units. The Site
Supervisor will communicate with the XR75CX Case
Display via MODBUS using the Open MODBUS
infrastructure.
dA sensor failure
Non-Critical
Discharge air temperature
Pr sensor failure
Non-Critical
How To Add an XR75CX CaseDsp Device on the
Site Supervisor:
Product temperature
sensor fails
Co sensor failure
Non-Critical
Coil out temperature
sensor fails
dF sensor failure
Non-Critical
Defrost temperature
sensor fails
EEPROM failure
Non-Critical
Select the Control or Application Type XR75CX CaseDsp, enter the Quantity, Control
Name and Serial Type. Note that Serial Type
information can be enter later. Click Save to add
the application.
an alarm condition
exists in the XR75CX
Case Display application
Wrong device
Notice
The device code contained in the device ID
information is not correct
3.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
Network device
offline
Critical
Network device offline
alarm
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
5.
Click the XR75CX CaseDsp application panel
box to view the application.
6.
The system will display the XR75CX CaseDsp
application parameters.
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to “ON”
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
1.
2.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Refrigeration, click the screen drop-down arrow
on the upper right of the screen, click Add
Controls.
5.13.1 Overview
Advisory
(Display Name)
Category
Description
Table 5-10 - Application Advisories
NOTE: When an XR75CX-CD is associated
with a Standard Circuit application in Site
Supervisor, a Case Temp Hi Limit Exceeded or
Case Temp Lo Limit Exceeded alarm that
occurs for the XR75CX-CD’s associated case will cause
the main module and remote display’s Alarm LED to
turn ON, indicating an active alarm. Unlike XR75CXCD’s temperature sensor alarms, a “No Alarm”
message is shown on the display if a case temperature
alarm occurs.
Site Supervisor will provide an interface to the
XR75CX CD and alarming. The XR75CX CD can be
networked with Site Supervisor to share sensor data with a
Standard Circuit application that controls the case
refrigeration, and it has four on-board relays that can be
used as satellite outputs by the other Site Supervisor
applications.
5.13.2 Application Advisories
The application is facilitate the various alarming and
XR75CX Case Display
Software Overview • 5-29
The following is an example of the application status screen in UltraSite. This property can be added to the Site Supervisor’s general property.
Input Property:
Value:
Units:
Status:
Output Property:
Value:
Units:
Status:
COMM STATUS
No Port
NA
DISPL TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
DISCHARGE AIR
NONE
DF
NA
PRODUCT TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
COIL OUT TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
DEFROST TEMP
NONE
DF
NA
DIGITAL INPUT2
NOTACT
DIG
NA
RELAY 1 STATE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
RELAY 2 STATE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
CD ALARM OUT
NOTACT
DIG
NA
RELAY 3 STATE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
RELAY 4 STATE
NOTACT
DIG
NA
EEPROM ALARM
NOTACT
DIG
NA
Table 5-11 - XR75CX Case Display Status Screen Properties
5.13.3 Inputs
RelayNCommand - The XR75CX CD has four onboard relays that may be used as satellite outputs by the
other Site Supervisor applications. “RelayNCommand”
can be connected to the output of the other applications
and control other physical device, such as fan and light.
QA can test the output for the corresponding relay and test
the relay output of IPX and Onboard IO.
Digital InputN - The two points show status for the
two digital inputs of XR75CX CD, they can be used as the
output source for pointers.
RelayNFailSafe - The XR75CX-CD can operate in
Normal mode and Standalone (failsafe) mode. When the
case display is communicating normally with the Site
Supervisor, it is operating in Normal mode. If the
communication between the case display and the Site
Supervisor is interrupted, the case display will go into
Standalone (failsafe) mode. The value of Realy1FailSafe
could be tested by the value of the corresponding relay in
Standalone mode.
5-30 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.14 XR75CX 2.6
Model XR75CX 2.6 (32 mm x 74 mm) is a microprocessor based controller, suitable for applications on
medium or low temperature ventilated refrigeration units.
It has four relay outputs to control compressor, fan, and
defrost, which can be either electrical or reverse cycle (hot
gas) and light (configurable). It can have a Real Time
Clock (RTC) that allows programming of up to six daily
defrost cycles, divided into holidays and workdays. A
“Day and Night” function with two different setpoints is
fitted for energy saving.
It can also have up to four NTC or PT1000 probe
inputs; the first one for temperature control and the second
probe is located on the evaporator to control the defrost
termination temperature and to manage the fan. One of the
two digital inputs can operate as a third temperature probe.
The fourth probe is used to signal the condenser
temperature alarm or to display a temperature value.
the application by setting the Edit Mode to “ON”
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
Figure 5-9 - XR75CX 2.6 Device
The RS485 serial output enables the unit to be
connected to a network line that is MODBUS-RTU
compatible, such as the monitoring units of the XWEB
family. The Hot Key receptacle allows the controller to be
programmed by means of the Hot Key programming
keyboard.
The controller is fully configurable through special
parameters that can be easily programmed through the
keyboard.
How To Add an XR75CX 2.6 Device on the Site
Supervisor:
1.
2.
3.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Refrigeration, click the screen drop-down arrow
on the upper right of the screen, click Add
Controls.
Select the Control or Application Type XR75CX 2.6, enter the Quantity, Control Name
and Serial Type. Note that Serial Type
information can be enter later. Click Save to add
the application.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
Figure 5-10 - XR75CX 2.6 Wiring Connection
5.14.1 Application Advisories
Alarm
Description
EXTERNAL
ALARM
External alarm
DOOR OPEN
Open Door alarm
EEPROM FAILURE
EEPROM Failure alarm
CASE TEMP FAIL Case temperature probe failure alarm
DEFR TERM FAIL Defrost termination probe failure alarm
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
HIGH CASE ALM High case temperature alarm
5.
Click the XR75CX 2.6 application panel box to
view the application.
RTC DATA LOST RTC data lost alarm
6.
The system will display the XR75CX 2.6
application parameters.
7.
LO CASE ALM
RTC FAILURE
Low case temperature alarm
RTC failure alarm
Table 5-12 - XR75CX 2.6 Application Advisories
The user can view and configure the properties of
XR75CX 2.6
Software Overview • 5-31
5.14.2 Command
Command
Keyboard LOCK
Description/Alarm Text
The front panel is locked cannot be used.
Keyboard UN-LOCK The front panel is unlocked and can be
used.
Alarms Muting
Silences the alarm output.
Defrost Periodic
Sends the Disable Standalone Defrost
command.
5.15.1 General Control
• The Site Supervisor communicates with the device
via Modbus. The thermostat communicates using 8
data bits, and 1 stop bit. Baud rate and parity can be
changed on the device using dip switches.
• The Site Supervisor will just provide an interface to
the devices. The White Rodgers Thermostat
monitors all information.
5.15.2 Alarms
Table 5-13 - XR75CX 2.6 Commands
• Online/Offline - Standard Site Supervisor
communication alarms
5.15 Emerson T-Stat
• White Rodgers Thermostat defined alarm outputs
from the device.
The Emerson T-Stat communicates with the Site
Supervisor controller using the MODBUS network. The
thermostat enables the controller to read status information
from the device as well as send operational setpoints to the
device. The device communicates using 8 data bits and 1
stop bit. For the full thermostat user manual, refer to P/N
026-1729.
This thermostat replaces thermostats for the following
types of system:
• Standard Heat & Cool Systems
• Two Stage Heat & Two Stage Cool Systems
• Air Source Heat Pump (with Aux. or Emergency
Heat)
• Ground Source Heat Pump (with Aux. or
Emergency Heat)
5.15.3 Device Commissioning
• To add a White Rodgers Thermostat to the Site
Supervisor network, from the Site Supervisor:
•This is accomplished using Commissioning from
the Add & Remove Device screen.
• Addressing the thermostat:
•The address can be set by adjusting dip switches
on the device. Follow the instructions in the White
Rodgers Thermostat installation guide for more
details.
•If the addresses match and the serial port and
physical wiring are correct, the device should be
shown as online in the Network Status screen.
• Air or Ground Source Heat Pump (No Aux. or
Emergency Heat)
• Standard Heat Only Systems
• Standard Central Air Conditioning
• Gas or Oil Heat
• Electric Furnace
• All Systems Listed Above with Economizer
Control
5-32 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.16 Energy Meter
5.18 Flexible Combiner
Energy Meter provides a flexible energy monitoring
solution. The pulse output and the unique phase alarm
feature allow the device to support a wide variety of
applications. The device is also compatible with many
types of current transformers that allow easy retrofits.
The Flexible Combiner application is a highly
advanced and versatile I/O control program used to combine multiple analog and digital input values using programmed equations similar to those used in spreadsheets.
How To Add an Energy Meter Device on the Site
Supervisor:
1.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Energy, click the screen drop-down arrow on the
upper right of the screen, click Add Controls.
2.
Select the Control or Application Type Emerson Energy Meter 0.2, enter the Quantity,
Control Name and Serial Type. Note that Serial
Type information can be entered later. Click Save
to add the application.
3.
A Confirmation box will appear to notify that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
5.
Click the Energy Meter application panel box to
view the application.
6.
The system will display the Energy Meter
application parameters.
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to ON
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
5.17 Data Logging and
Graph
A Flexible Combiner application may have up to eight
analog outputs and four digital outputs, each of whose values are determined by user-programmed equations that
mathematically combine up to eight analog inputs and
eight digital inputs. Four of the analog outputs have the
ability to remember their output state over an Site Supervisor power cycle. Additionally, up to four alarms can be set
up whose trigger and alarm delays are equations. Alarm
type, priority, and the message for each alarm are userconfigurable.
Equations used to calculate output values and time
delays may use mathematical combinations of any of the
Flexible Combiner's analog and digital inputs, as well as
numeric and named constants, operators, functions, and
even rudimentary if-then logic functions. For control of
digital outputs, the Flexible Combiner also supports
separate equations that determine ON and OFF delays.
The user can set up to four alarms whose trigger and
alarm delays are equations. The user may also choose the
alarm type, priority, and the message for each alarm.
The Flexible Combiner may also be programmed to
operate a digital output as a PWM (pulse width
modulation) output. In this instance, the equation written
for a PWM output determines its period and pulse width.
A typical Flexible Combiner application consists of three
types of components: inputs, equations, and outputs. For
more information about this application, see the Flexible
Combiner manual (P/N 026-1620).
The Data Logging and Graph Enhancement includes
navigation to Single Log, Multi-Point, or Real-Time
graphing screens. It also has download, email and print
capabilities of log data from Multi-Point and Real-Time
logging group.
Energy Meter
Software Overview • 5-33
5.19 RLDS (Refrigerant
Leak Detector System)
The RLDS device detects the presence of gas leaks and
provides for the continuous monitoring of refrigerant gas
levels in up to 16 separate test zones or channels. The
system is programmed to monitor a variety of gases and
independent leak (small), spill (medium), and evacuation
(large) levels may be designated for each zone. The RLDS
also retains a log of previous readings that can be accessed
for analysis. For more information on the RLDS, refer to
the RLDS user manual (P/N 026-1309).
5.19.1 Communication
The RLDS features full two-way communications via
the RS485 interface. MODBUS RTU is the
communication protocol standard and can be connected
directly to Site Supervisor.
5.21 Control Link AntiCondensate Controller
(CL ACC)
CL ACC can be added, deleted, and commissioned,
can take actions on alarm instances, and support data
handling.
The Serial Connection Manager can create the
MODBUS Master process based on the settings in System
Settings. If no MODBUS connections are defined, no
MODBUS processes can be created. Also, if a connection
is changed, the previous connection will stop, and the new
connection is created. In the case of MODBUS, Serial
Connection Manager will stop the associated MODBUS
process.
5.21.1 Alarm Handling Logic
• Data size - 8
If any alarm condition exists, the General Alarm
Output is set to ON. The individual alarm outputs is set
according to which is alarm is present. If the condition
clears, the alarm is reset automatically.
• Parity - N
5.21.2 Alarms Configuration
• Stop bits - 1
The alarms can be individually set to their advisory
type (Notice, Non-Critical, Critical), Category, Display
Message, Repeat Rate, and Monitoring. (The device will
generate the alarm and does not have any way to
externally disable it).
The device default serial setup values are:
• Baud rate - 19200
5.19.2 Supported Gases
The RLDS gas software library allows each zone to be
independently selected to monitor any commonly used
refrigerant including, but not limited to, the following:
R22, R134a, R404A, R407A, R407C, R410A, R422A,
R422D, R427A, R507, CO2, and Ammonia.
5.20 MRLDS (Modular
Refrigerant Leak
Detector Sensor)
The MRLDS continuously monitors for low levels of
refrigerants most commonly used in commercial refrigeration systems.
The MRLDS communicates with the Site Supervisor
or analog input via MODBUS. Site Supervisor provides an
interface while the MRLDS provides the leak monitoring
functionality. For more information on MRLDS, refer to
the MRLDS user manual (P/N 026- 1307).
5-34 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
5.22 HVAC Zone
An HVAC Zone is a collection of up to sixteen rooftop
units or air handling units that work together to maintain
the same temperature and humidity throughout a particular
volume of space. The primary function of an HVAC Zone
is to “manage” the operation of each individual HVAC
unit by providing the temperature setpoints that will be
used in Temperature Control. Zones are also responsible
for ordering HVAC units to dehumidify and determining
when outside air conditions are favorable to economize.
HVAC Zones can be edited, deleted, and associated
with other applications and devices and copy built-in
properties of an instance of an HVAC Zone.
5.22.1 How It Works
An HVAC Zone is built by creating an HVAC Zone
application in the Site Supervisor device. All HVAC unit
applications that are part of the HVAC Zone must be
connected with the HVAC Zone application. This
connection process is known as “association.”
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
When a rooftop unit or AHU is associated with an
HVAC Zone, the Site Supervisor automatically makes a
series of I/O connections between the HVAC Zone
application and the individual MultiFlex RTU or AHU
application. From that point, the HVAC Zone is
responsible for passing the following information to the
individual unit:
•
The heating and cooling setpoints that the unit
will use during occupied and unoccupied building
times.
•
A command to operate in either occupied or
unoccupied mode (based on the HVAC Zone
application’s own time schedule input).
•
•
Outdoor air and outdoor relative humidity values.
A signal to enable or disable economization
(based on the Zone application’s own
economization checking method).
•
A signal to begin or end dehumidification (based
on the Zone application’s own humidity reading
and dehumidification setpoint).
•
A signal indicating the current season is either
SUMMER or WINTER.
•
The combined HVAC Zone Temperature and
HVAC Zone humidity (based on a combination of
each HVAC unit’s space temperature and space
humidity).
•
The fallback temperature and humidity setpoints
to use in case the unit loses contact with its HVAC
Zone application.
5.22.2 Compatible Applications to
be Connected to HVAC
Zones
There are three different HVAC applications that may
be associated with an HVAC Zone application:
• a MultiFlex RTU application
• a MultiFlex RCB application
• an AHU application
The MultiFlex RTU and RCB applications interface
with the MultiFlex RTU and RCB I/O Network boards that
control rooftop units. AHU applications use input and
output points on the I/O Network to control air handling
units.
5.22.3 Temperature Control
HVAC Zone applications do not control temperature
themselves. HVAC Zone applications pass along the
setpoints that an HVAC unit will use. The individual unit
HVAC Zone
is responsible for controlling the setpoint using its own
temperature input.
The HVAC Zone application pass along eight different
setpoints, which are shown in Table 5-14. The application
that receives the setpoints can only use one cooling and
one heating setpoint. The pair of setpoints the application
will use determines whether the current season is SUMMER or WINTER and whether the building is OCCUPIED or UNOCCUPIED (both of which are supplied by
the Zone).
Cooling
Heating
SUMMER COOL OCC
SUMMER HEAT OCC
SUMMER COOL UOCC
SUMMER HEAT UOCC
WINTER COOL OCC
WINTER HEAT OCC
WINTER COOL UOCC
WINTER HEAT UOCC
Table 5-14- Cooling/Heating Setpoints
5.22.4 HVAC Zone Temperature
Each MultiFlex RTU and AHU application has a space
temperature output that is equal to the unit’s current
Control Temperature. When associated with an HVAC
Zone application, this space temperature output is
connected to one of the 16 HVAC Zone Temperature
inputs in the HVAC Zone application. These 16 inputs are
combined using a user-defined combination method to
yield the HVAC Zone Temperature.
HVAC Zone Temperature provides an overview of the
unit’s performance in heating and cooling within the
HVAC Zone. The HVAC Zone Temperature can be used as
a temperature control input by one or all of the HVAC
Zone’s application.
5.22.5 Economizer Control
An HVAC Zone application is responsible for
analyzing outside air conditions and determining if the
conditions are suitable for bringing in outside air. If the air
condition is suitable, the HVAC Zone sends a signal to its
associated HVAC units telling them that economization is
OK. If not, it sends a signal to disable economization.
It is up to the associated HVAC unit to process the
economization information and open the dampers.
5.22.6 Economization Enable
There are possible ways an HVAC Zone application
may determine when conditions are favorable for
economization:
1.
Enthalpy Switch - An enthalpy switch is a digital
Software Overview • 5-35
2.
device that is pre-set to detect when the
temperature and humidity levels are appropriate
for economization. When the conditions are
appropriate, this switch sends an OK (ON) signal
to the Zone application. Otherwise, the switch
sends a NOT OK (OFF) signal.
behave like a first stage of cool. When analog economizers
are enabled, the MultiFlex RTU or AHU will modulate the
opening percentage of the dampers based on its own
mixed air temperature measurements.
Dewpoint Setpoint - A dewpoint probe measures
the dewpoint of the outside air and is compared to
a setpoint. If the outside air dewpoint is less than
the setpoint, economization is enabled. If it is
higher than the setpoint, economization is
disabled.
An HVAC Zone application is responsible for reading
the relative humidity level within the HVAC Zone,
comparing it to a dehumidification setpoint, and sending a
command to dehumidify when the humidity is above the
setpoint.
3.
Calculated Enthalpy - The HVAC Zone
application calculates the outside air enthalpy by
reading the value of a relative humidity sensor
and an outdoor air temperature sensor. This
calculated enthalpy is compared to a setpoint. If
the enthalpy is less than the setpoint,
economization is enabled. If greater,
economization is disabled.
4.
Dewpoint Fail-Safe - This is similar to method
Dewpoint Setpoint, except that an outdoor
temperature sensor value is compared to the
setpoint instead of a dewpoint probe’s value. This
comparison is a poor substitute for actual
dewpoint readings and is recommended for use as
a fail-safe only. When possible, use humidity or
dewpoint sensors.
5.
Temperature Comparison - The AHU Control
application simply compares the temperature of
the inside air with the temperature of the outside
air. If the outside air is cooler than the inside air,
economization is enabled.
6.
In vs. Out Enthalpy - This strategy requires
indoor and outdoor humidity sensors and also
indoor and outdoor temperature sensors. The
enthalpy of the outdoor air is calculated and compared to the enthalpy of the indoor air. If the
outdoor air enthalpy is less than the indoor air
enthalpy, economization is enabled. Otherwise,
economization is disabled.
You can choose a different method to use in summer
and winter months. Also, an alternate method may be
specified that will be used as a fail-safe when the primary
method is not available (due to sensor failure).
5.22.7 The Effect of Enabling
Economization
Both MultiFlex RTU and AHU applications support
the use of both two-position (digital) and variable-position
(analog) economizers. Digital economizers, when enabled,
5-36 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
5.22.8 Dehumidification Control
Once the HVAC Zone humidity level rises above the
setpoint, dehumidification will be active in all the HVAC
Zone application’s associated HVAC units until the indoor
relative humidity falls below the setpoint minus the
dehumidification hysteresis value. An example of is
shown in the figure below:
Figure 5-11 - Dehumidification Control
The need for dehumidification may also be determined
by a digital humidistat. In this case, dehumidification is
active only when the humidistat input is ON.
5.22.9 HVAC Zone Humidity Input
Unlike HVAC Zone Temperature, which has 16 inputs
that combine into a single value, HVAC Zone humidity is
designed to be provided by a single input. However, there
may be some instances where one or more relative
humidity sensors exist within an HVAC Zone (such as an
installation where each MultiFlex RTU has its own
humidity sensor for use in Stand-Alone mode). If you have
multiple humidity sensors in an HVAC Zone and you want
to combine these humidity sensor values to calculate
HVAC Zone Humidity, use an Analog Combiner
application to make the combination, and tie the HVAC
Zone application’s HVAC Zone Humidity input to the
output of the combiner.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.22.10 Enabling Dehumidification
Effect
“coast” down to the unoccupied setpoint.
When an HVAC Zone application determines that
dehumidification is needed, it sends an ON signal to all its
associated controllers, signaling them to begin
dehumidification. It is up to the individual MultiFlex RTU,
RCB, or AHU to perform the dehumidification.
5.22.10.1 MultiFlex RTUs and RCBs
Once the MultiFlex RTU and RCB applications
acknowledge the signal to begin dehumidification, it will
search its outputs for a dehumidification device. If one is
configured, this device will be turned ON. Afterwards,
cool stages will be cycled ON (up to a user-defined maximum number of stages) until all stages are ON or until the
Zone application signals dehumidification is complete.
When dehumidification is complete, the stages will cycle
OFF followed by the dehumidification device.
5.22.11 Optimum Start/Stop (OSS)
Optimum Start/Stop (OSS) is a feature that works
along with the HVAC Zone application’s occupied and
unoccupied temperature control modes. OSS takes control
of heating and cooling several minutes before the Zone
application is scheduled to change occupancy states. It
prepares the area for the upcoming change in setpoints. As
a result, when the occupancy state changes, the
temperature is comfortably within the range of the new
setpoint.
NOTE: OSS applies only to Zone applications
that use a time schedule to change occupancy
states.
Overrides initiated by the digital BYPASS TO OCC or
BYPASS TO UNOCC inputs will not initiate pre-starts or
pre-stops.
The figure below shows an example of how pre-starts
and pre-stops work in a heating application. From
unoccupied mode, the pre-start period slowly increase the
temperature up so that when the scheduled change from
unoccupied to occupied mode occurs, the temperature is
already at or near the occupied heating setpoint. During
the pre-stop, which occurs before the HVAC Zone
application goes from occupied to unoccupied mode,
heating is suspended and the temperature is allowed to
Figure 5-12 - Optimum Start/Stop (OSS)
5.22.12 Intelligent Pre-Starts and
Pre-Stops
OSS is designed to handle pre-starts and pre-stops in
the most energy-efficient manner possible. Every time a
pre-start or pre-stop occurs, OSS measures the amount of
time it takes to bring the temperature from the previous
setpoint to within the “comfort zone” of the new setpoint
(a user-defined range of values above and below the
setpoint within which the temperature is considered
acceptable). This duration is used to determine the average
rate of temperature change, called the K-factor.
The K-factor is stored in the memory, along with the
average value of the outdoor air temperature during the
pre-start or pre-stop. Over time, collected K-factor data is
sorted and combined into a table. As a result, by
constantly observing and recording the results of previous
pre-starts and pre-stops, OSS is able to intelligently guess
how much time a pre-start or pre-stop mode should last
based on the outside temperature.
AHU Control keeps track of three different kinds of Kfactors:
• Heat K-factor - used to guess pre-start durations for
AHUs operating in heating mode.
• Cool K-factor - used to guess pre-start durations for
AHUs operating in cooling mode.
• Coast K-factor - a measurement of the change in
temperature when no heating or cooling is active.
This is used to determine pre-stop durations for
both heating and cooling AHUs.
5.22.13 Setpoint Reset
If desired, Heat/Cools may be configured with a Setpoint Reset that varies the value of the heating and/or
cooling setpoints based on an analog value from a reset
sensor. This is most often used to vary the value of a heating or cooling setpoint based on the outside air temperature.
HVAC Zone
Software Overview • 5-37
To set up a setpoint reset for heating or cooling, the
user must specify the minimum and maximum range of
reset sensor values, and the maximum range of setpoint
adjustment.
As the value of the reset sensor varies within the minimum and maximum range, an equivalent portion of the
maximum setpoint adjustment will be added or subtracted
from the heating or cooling setpoint. When the reset sensor value is directly in between the minimum and maximum range values, nothing will be added or subtracted
from the setpoint. Between the halfway point and the minimum value, part of the setpoint adjustment will be subtracted from the setpoint. Between the halfway point and
the maximum value, part of the setpoint adjustment will be
added to the setpoint. An example of this is shown in
Figure 5-13.
RESET
SENSOR
RANGE
SET
POINT
CHANGE
MAX
RANGE
ADD
MAX
CHANGE
MIDPOINT
SUBTRACT
+0
MIN
RANGE
MAX
CHANGE
Figure 5-13 - Setpoint Reset Diagram
5-38 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
5.23 AHU
The AHU control application controls HVAC
equipment, rooftop units, or air handlers. The number of
AHU applications allowed is based on the total number of
applications allowed on the device. The AHU application
provides basic functionality to control a typical packaged
HVAC unit. The packaged HVAC units have up to four
stages of heating and cooling and may have a fresh air
damper installed to allow free-air cooling (economization)
when conditions permit.
How To Add an AHU Device on the Site
Supervisor:
1.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
HVAC, click the screen drop-down arrow on the
upper right of the screen, click Add Controls.
2.
Select the Control or Application Type - AHU,
enter the Quantity, Control Name and Serial
Type. Note that Serial Type information can be
enter later. Click Save to add the application.
3.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
5.
Click the AHU application panel box to view the
application.
6.
The system will display the AHU application
parameters.
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to ON
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
5.24 Analog and Digital
Combiner
The Analog Combiner application is used for analog
inputs. Instead of using a single output source as an
application input, 16 input source combinations may be
used. For multiple inputs, a Multiple Input cell must be
used. The Multiple Input cell is a simple application that
reads data values from its inputs, combines them using a
user-defined combination strategy, and sends the
combined value to the desired application input. A
common application for this is in the HVAC control where
a single heating control value comes from the average
number of temperature sensors throughout the building.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Two different types of Multiple Input cells may be used if
the inputs to be combined are analog or digital sources.
Inputs:
In addition to the 16 analog inputs, combined Analog
Input 1 to 16, these inputs is combined based upon the
CombMethod parameter setting. If they are not connected
to any of the Analog Inputs, the input value will not be
used in the calculation.
The user can connect a digital value to the Use Alt
input to select an alternate combiner method – as defined
in the AltCombMethod parameter. When the Use Alt
input is true, the combiner logic will use the
AltCombMethod parameter to calculate the combined
value instead of the CombMethod parameter.
The user can also provide a digital value to the
InputSelect. If this input is true, then the parameter
InputSelect will indicate which AnalogInputXX the user
would like to set to the combiner output value.
Outputs:
The Output value is the calculation of the combined
analog sensor inputs. The Alternate-Out value is always
filled with the calculated value as specified by the
AltCombMethod parameter. The ActiveInput value is set
to a specific value (1-16) and serves as the analog input
value when the CombMethdod is set to FIRST or
SELECT.
5.25 Anti-Sweat Control
A case controller manages its anti-sweat heaters by
monitoring the dewpoint in and around the case area. The
dewpoint input value is compared to the anti-sweat application’s control setpoints (the Full ON setpoint and the
Full OFF setpoint). Based on this comparison, the antisweat heaters will do one of three things:
• If the input is equal to or above the Full ON setpoint, the heaters remain ON 100% of the time.
• If the input value is equal to or below the Full OFF
setpoint, the heaters will be ON 0% of the time
(fully OFF).
• If the input value is between the Full ON and Full
OFF setpoint, the heaters will be pulsed ON for a
percentage of the specified time interval. The percentage is determined by proportionately measuring
where the dewpoint falls between the range of values formed by the two setpoints.
Figure 5-14 shows an example of how anti-sweat control works. The setpoints (Full ON dewpoint= 80°F, Full
OFF dewpoint = 20°F) form the range of dewpoints across
which the heaters will be pulsed. When the measured dewpoint is 45°F (directly in between both setpoints), the percentage will be 50%, and the heaters will be pulsed ON for
5 seconds of the defined 10-second interval. If the dewpoint drops to 30°F, the percentage will lower to 20%, and
the heaters will be on only 2 seconds out of every 10.
Figure 5-14 - Illustration of Anti-Sweat Control
Anti-Sweat Control
Software Overview • 5-39
5.26 Standard Circuits
Refrigerated cases that do not use case controllers are
controlled by Standard Circuit applications. In a Standard
Circuit application, the Site Supervisor is responsible for
all case monitoring and control; it uses the RS485 I/O Network to both gather case temperature inputs and activate
or deactivate the liquid line solenoids, defrost modes, and
fans. Also, circuits that use ESR8s and MultiFlex ESRs
are controlled using Standard Circuits.
NOTE: Do not set up a Standard Circuit
application for a case that uses a CC-100 or
CCB case controller. These cases must use
Case Circuit Control applications.
The Standard Circuits application provides supervisory
control of controllers. It keeps the temperature setpoint
and other basic configuration parameters synchronized
across all associated devices.
How To Add a Standard Circuits Device on the Site
Supervisor:
1.
From the Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Refrigeration, click the screen drop-down arrow
on the upper right of the screen, click Add
Controls.
2.
Select the Control or Application Type Circuits (Standard), enter the Quantity, Control
Name and Serial Type. Note that Serial Type
information can be enter later. Click Save to add
the application.
3.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
5.
Click the Standard Circuits application panel box
to view the application.
6.
The system will display the Standard Circuits
application parameters.
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to ON
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
Licensing:
The maximum number of Standard Circuit
applications that can be licensed is 48.
Open Associations
The following applications can be associated with
Standard Circuits:
• MultiFlex ESR
• Control Link CD
• XR75CD
• XR35CD
5.27 Case Control Circuits
5.27.1 Overview
Case circuits that use CC-100s, CS-100s, EC-2s, or
CCBs for case control rely on Case Circuit Control applications in the Site Supervisor to provide them the necessary setpoints, defrost scheduling, and other control
parameters. Unlike Standard Circuit applications, Case
Control Circuits do not directly control temperature in the
case circuits; instead, the case controller controls temperature for each individual case based on the setpoint(s) supplied to them by their associated Site Supervisors.
Setup of a case-controlled refrigerated case system is a
two-fold process:
1.
For each case circuit in the refrigeration system, a
separate Case Control Circuit application is created with its own set of control parameters.
2.
Each CC-100, CS-100, EC-2, and CCB is associated with a Case Control Circuit application in
the Site Supervisor. Association creates a network link between the case controller and the
application which supplies the information necessary to control temperature, defrost, lights, fans,
and anti-sweat heaters.
This section of the manual covers both the programming of a Case Circuit Control application and the process
of associating a CC-100, CS-100, EC-2, or CCB with a
Case Circuit Control application.
5.27.2 Case Circuit Control
Software Overview
vary the aperture rates of both valves between 0% and
100% as required by their temperature control algorithms
(see Section 5.27.3, below).
There are six different versions of case control software in the Retail Solutions case control family:
Pulse Valves
• CC-100P - This version controls temperature in a
case using a pulse modulated valve, which is pulsed
ON for a percentage of a fixed amount of time to
achieve the necessary refrigerant flow.
A pulse valve is a device capable of being in only two
states: fully open or fully closed. To achieve the necessary
percentage of refrigerant flow, CC-100s repeatedly
“pulse” these valves open for a percentage of an interval
called the valve period (which defaults to six seconds).
• CC-100LS - This version controls temperature in a
case using a liquid-side stepper valve. This valve is
capable of various positions in between 0% and
100%. As a result, the CC-100 is capable of supplying the exact refrigerant flow necessary to achieve
the case setpoint.
For example, to achieve a 20% valve output in a CC100 with a valve period of six seconds, a pulse valve
would be opened for 20% of six seconds (or 1.2 seconds)
and closed for the remaining 80% of the valve period (4.6
seconds). This same six-second sequence will repeat for as
long as the CC-100 calls for a 20% valve output.
• CC-100H - This version controls temperature in a
case using a suction-side evaporator pressure regulator (EEPR). This valve is capable of various positions in between 0% and 100%. As a result, the CC100 is capable of providing the exact suction pressure necessary to achieve the case setpoint.
Stepper Valves
• CS-100 - This controller uses suction-side evaporator suction regulators (ESRs) to control suction
pressure for an entire circuit. Unlike the CC-100,
which controls only one case, the CS-100 controls
all cases on an entire circuit.
• EC-2s - The EC-2 is a liquid-side pulse valve case
controller that doubles as a case temperature and
information display. Unlike the CC-100, it is
designed to be mounted on the front of the case, and
has a push-button front panel interface for programming and viewing status. (The EC-2 29x version
controls the refrigeration solenoid valve to allow
the passage of refrigerant to the TXV valve,
whereas the 39x version controls a pulse valve on
the liquid side of the evaporator to regulate superheat.)
Stepper valves are devices that may opened to many
different positions between fully closed (0%) and fully
open (100%). Stepper valves usually have hundreds or
thousands of “steps” in between fully closed and fully
open. To achieve the desired opening percentage, the CC100 moves the valve the required number of steps.
To properly control a stepper valve, the CC-100 must
know the operating characteristics of the valve, such as its
maximum steps per second change rate, the total number
of steps between 0% and 100%, and its hysteresis rate (the
number of steps required for the valve to change direction).
• CCBs - An I/O Network-based controller used primarily in old RMCC installations. Like the CC-100
family, the CCB was available in several different
models that controlled liquid pulse, liquid stepper,
suction stepper, and suction lineup.
NOTE: There are several variations of the
EC-2. Contact Retail Solutions at 1-800-8292724 for more information.
5.27.2.1
Valve Control
The CC-100 is capable of supporting two types of
valves: pulse and stepper. The CC-100 uses PID control to
Case Control Circuits
Software Overview • 5-41
5.27.3 Refrigeration Control
time, Superheat Control will begin.
5.27.3.1 EEVs (Liquid Pulse and Liquid
Stepper)
Recovery Mode always lasts for a specific number of
seconds. The case controller determines the duration based
on past performance of the evaporator during previous
Recovery Modes.
In CC-100P, CC-100LS, EC2, and CCB (liquid and
pulse stepper) case controllers, there are two different control systems that work together to regulate refrigeration:
temperature control and superheat control.
Temperature Control
Temperature Control measures the case temperature
and turns refrigeration ON or OFF as required to keep the
case within a certain proximity of the user-specified temperature setpoint.
The user supplies Temperature Control with the setpoint and a deadband, which is the range of case temperatures equally above and below the setpoint within which
the case temperature will be considered acceptable. When
the case temperature is above the setpoint plus one-half the
deadband, refrigeration will be turned ON. It will remain
ON until the temperature drops to below the temperature
setpoint minus one-half the deadband, at which point
refrigerant flow will be turned OFF.
Case temperature may be supplied to Temperature
Control by a supply air sensor, a return air sensor, or a
mixture of both the supply and return air sensor values.
Temperature Control itself does not vary the opening
percentage of the pulse or stepper valve; it simply
addresses the case’s need for refrigerant flow to maintain
its setpoint. Once refrigeration is started, control of the
valve is handled by Superheat Control.
Superheat Control
The difference between the temperature of the refrigerant going in to the evaporator inlet (the coil in temperature) and the refrigerant leaving the evaporator outlet (the
coil out temperature) is called Superheat. When refrigerant is flowing through an evaporator, Superheat Control
uses PID Control to keep the Superheat at a user-defined
Superheat setpoint. Superheat Control positions the valve
to increase or decrease refrigerant flow in an effort to keep
the Superheat equal to a user-defined Superheat setpoint.
Recovery Mode
Recovery Mode is a special part of Superheat Control
that occurs at the beginning of every refrigeration cycle.
When refrigeration has been OFF and Temperature Control calls for refrigeration to be ON, a Recovery Mode
begins, during which the valve is fixed to a user-defined
percentage (usually 70%) for a fixed amount of time. This
floods the previously empty evaporator with refrigerant
and gradually establishes a differential between the coil in
and coil out temperatures. When the Recovery Mode ends,
the superheat will be relatively close to the setpoint; at this
5-42 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Thermostatic Expansion Valves (TXVs)
As an alternative to regulating superheat using EEVs,
case controllers also support cases that use mechanical
thermostatic expansion valves (TXVs). When TXVs are
being used, the case controllers use only Temperature
Control to turn refrigeration ON and OFF. Superheat
Control is disabled, since it is assumed the TXV is taking care of the superheat.
5.27.3.2
EEPRs (Suction Stepper)
The CC-100H, CS-100, and CCB (suction stepper and
lineup) control case temperature from the suction side of
the evaporator by using an EEPR to regulate suction pressure.
Suction-side control differs from liquid-side control in
that Superheat Control is not used. In liquid-side control,
the valve aperture is controlled in order to achieve a superheat setpoint. In suction-side control, the CC-100 changes
the valve aperture to achieve the case temperature setpoint.
Case temperature may be supplied by a supply air sensor, return air sensor, or a mixture of the two values.
Temperature Control uses PID control to operate the
valve and keep the case temperature input value equal to
the case temperature setpoint.
Recovery Mode
Recovery Mode for suction-side case controllers is
slightly different than Recovery Mode for liquid-side
controllers. Suction-side case controllers enter Recovery
Mode only after a defrost or cleaning cycle, and it does
so in order to bring the case temperature down to a level
that is controllable by Temperature Control.
During Recovery Mode, the valve is opened to a fixed
percentage until the case temperature falls below the
case setpoint. When this occurs, the case controller exits
Recovery Mode and begins normal Temperature Control.
5.27.4
Defrost Control
The physical aspects of defrost control, such as shutting off valves and turning on defrost heat sources, is handled by the case controller. When operating on its own, a
case controller initiates defrost cycles at programmed time
intervals. When connected to a Case Circuit application,
the case controllers’ defrost times are coordinated and
scheduled by the Site Supervisor.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.27.4.1
Defrost States
The defrost cycle for a Case Circuit application consists of three steps. Of these three, steps #1 and #3 apply
only to cases with heated defrosts:
1.
Pump Down - The defrost cycle begins with this
step immediately after the refrigeration solenoid
is turned OFF. During the Pump Down phase, the
application waits for a user-specific amount of
time to elapse before turning on the defrost heat.
This allows refrigerant in the evaporator to be
evacuated before defrost heat is activated. The
compressor(s) remain ON during Pump Down.
Pump Down times may only be used for hot gas
and electric type defrosts.
2.
3.
Defrost - During the defrost phase, refrigeration
is disabled. If using electric defrost heaters will
be ON. If using hot gas, heated refrigerant will be
pumped through the coil. This phase will continue until the defrost is terminated (see Section
11.3.2.3 for information on how defrost is terminated).
Run-Off - After defrost heat is deactivated, the
application waits for the Run-Off time to pass
before re-entering refrigeration mode. This
allows melted frost on the evaporator to drain
from the coil so that it will not re-freeze when
refrigeration begins again. After the user-specified Run-Off time has passed, the defrost cycle
has ended.
Run-Off times may only be programmed for hot
gas and electric type defrosts.
5.27.4.2 Defrost Types
There are many different ways used to defrost a refrigerated case. A case controller is capable of using three different types of defrost.
Off Cycle (Timed)
Off Cycle defrost (also known as Timed defrost) is
simply a period of time during which refrigeration is suspended. No heat is applied to the evaporator. The application simply turns refrigerant flow OFF for the duration of
the defrost cycle.
When these defrost types are used, Pump Down and
Run-Off times are not necessary; therefore, they will not
be part of the defrost cycle.
defined Pump Down and Run-Off times will be observed
as normal.
Electric Defrost
Electric defrost uses electric heaters to defrost the
evaporator coil. During electric defrost, the application
will turn the Defrost output ON, which will likewise activate the heaters connected to the power module’s defrost
relay.
Any user-defined Pump Down and Run-Off times will
be observed as normal.
5.27.4.3
Defrost Termination
Both the start time and the end time of a defrost cycle
are determined by the user. The Pump Down, Defrost, and
Run-Off stages all have fixed durations, and when the last
stage of the cycle is complete, defrost is terminated.
However, a case controller may be programmed to terminate the Defrost stage of the defrost cycle early if the
temperature inside the case rises above a fail-safe temperature setpoint. For certain defrost types, defrost heat may
also be “pulsed” in order to keep the temperature below
the setpoint without terminating defrost.
Temperature Termination
One or more temperature sensors in the case circuit
may be designated as termination temperature sensors.
The values of these sensors are combined into a single
control value, and this value is compared to the setpoint. If
the termination control value is greater than the userdefined setpoint, defrost will end, and the defrost cycle
will begin the Run-Off period (if applicable).
Termination sensors may be either analog temperature
sensors or digital closures (Klixons). Also, Case Circuit
applications may use the value of the analog case temperature sensors for use in temperature termination.
Pulsed Defrost
Pulsed Defrost is only available if the circuit is using
Electric or Hot Gas defrost.
Pulsed Defrost is similar to Temperature Termination,
except when the termination temperature rises above the
setpoint, defrost does not terminate. Instead, the output
that applies defrost heat is turned OFF. The output will
remain OFF until the temperature falls below the setpoint,
at which time the output will come back ON.
Hot Gas and Reversed Cycle Hot Gas
The Case Circuit application will continue to pulse
defrost in this manner until the defrost time has passed.
The defrost cycle will then begin the Run-Off period.
Hot Gas and Reversed Cycle Hot Gas require the use
of hot gas from the refrigeration lines. During these types
of defrost, the application will open the valve and pump
heated refrigerant through the evaporator coil. Any user-
If a case is configured with a demand defrost sensor, a
case controller may use their inputs as a means of keeping
scheduled defrost cycles from occurring when frost levels
Case Control Circuits
5.27.4.4
Demand Defrost
Software Overview • 5-43
are not high enough to require a defrost.
allowed in the CX controller.
The optical demand defrost sensor may be either an
analog or digital type sensor. When this sensor detects no
major build-up of frost, the Case Circuit application
ignores all scheduled calls for defrost and continues in
refrigeration mode. When the sensor detects frost, the
defrost inhibit is canceled, and the case circuit will enter
defrost at the next scheduled time.
The master water valve is turned ON and OFF as water
is needed for a zone. When disabled, no application control of any outputs will be possible and the System Status
output will indicate Disabled.
A demand defrost inhibit only keeps scheduled
defrosts from occurring. Any manual calls for a defrost
cycle will occur as normal. CCB demand defrost is currently not supported in Site Supervisor. Demand sensors, if
present on the circuit, will be ignored.
Demand Fail-Safe Time
To protect against demand defrost sensors that may not
be working properly, a demand fail-safe time may be set
up. Demand fail-safe times limit the amount of time a
defrost inhibit may last. If a demand defrost sensor does
not detect frost for an amount of time equal to the Demand
Fail-Safe Time, the defrost inhibit is lifted and the circuit
will enter defrost at the next scheduled time.
5.27.4.5
Emergency Defrost
When necessary, a user can initiate an emergency
defrost cycle from a circuit. Emergency defrost cycles are
similar to normal defrost cycles, except an emergency
defrost cycle will ignore all calls for termination and
remain in defrost for the entire programmed defrost time.
• Emergency defrosts are initiated by the user.
• The WAIT State
When a Case Control Circuit application enters defrost
mode, it sends a message out to all case controllers in the
circuit to begin defrost at the same time. However, since
each case in a circuit will have its own termination sensors, it is possible for some cases to terminate defrost
while defrosts in other cases continue.
When a case controller terminates defrost, it enters a
state of operation called “the WAIT state.” While in the
WAIT state, all refrigeration and defrost heat will remain
OFF. When the Case Control Circuit application detects
that all case controllers have entered the WAIT state, the
application will consider the defrost cycle completed, and
refrigeration will restart.
5.28 Irrigation Control
Irrigation control is an application used for the controlling of sprinkler systems. This application controls
watering by duration of time or water usage parameters.
Days of the week and times for watering are set by the
user with a maximum of two Irrigation applications
5-44 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Under normal control only one zone will be active at a
time.
How To Add a Irrigation Control Device on the Site
Supervisor:
1.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Other, click the screen drop-down arrow on the
upper right of the screen, click Add Controls.
2.
Select the Control or Application Type Irrigation Control, enter the Quantity, Control
Name and Serial Type. Note that Serial Type
information can be enter later. Click Save to add
the application.
3.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
5.
Click the Irrigation Control application panel box
to view the application.
6.
The system will display the Irrigation Control
application parameters.
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to ON
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
Application Advisories
Heating
Flow obstructed
Non-critical
Leak detected
Non-critical
Inhibit Sensor Failed
Non-critical
Table 5-15- Irrigation Control Advisories
5.29
TD Control
5.29.1 Overview
The TD Control application controls fans sequentially
based on the temperature differential (TD) of the condenser. When an increase is called for, the next fan will
turn on when the time since the last fan state change is
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
greater than the Fan On Delay Time setpoint (or will turn
on immediately if the last change was more than the Fan
On Delay). Additional fans will be staged on at Fan On
Delay intervals while an increase in capacity is called for.
When a decrease is called for, the next fan will stage off
when the time since the last fan state change is greater
than the Fan Off Delay Time setpoint (or will turn off
immediately if the last change was more than Fan Off
Delay). Additional fans will be staged off at Fan Off Delay
intervals while a decrease in capacity is called for.
Setpoint
If the Drop Leg temperature drops below the minimum drop leg temperature setpoint (Drop Leg Min) a
decrease will be called for until Drop Leg Temp rises
above Drop Leg Min. This protects against the possibility
of the Drop Leg Temp falling too low as a result of low
plenum temperature.
Plenum Temperature Not Available
If plenum temperature is not available (due to probe
or communication failure), control will be based on the
Drop Leg Min and Max setpoints.
5.29.2 Temperature Differential
(TD) Strategy
5.29.4 Configuration
TD strategy attempts to maintain a constant difference
(i.e., TD setpoint) between the temperature of the refrigerant and the ambient temperature. The TD setpoint allows
you to set the constant that is to be maintained.
TD strategy uses drop leg temperature for the refrigerant temperature and plenum temperature for the ambient
temperature. The formula for determining the TD control
value is:
TD = (dropleg temp) + (dropleg offset*) - plenum
temp.
TD Control allows the user to operate a condenser at
its designed temperature differential and saves energy by
maintaining optimal condenser TD with the least amount
of fans on as possible.
Standard discharge pressure control may attempt to
operate the condenser below its designed TD and turn on
more fans than necessary.
Set the number of condenser fans to be controlled in
the Num Cond Fans field under Setup (4 is the default
value).
* DropLeg Offset is a user-configured parameter to allow fine-tuning of the drop leg temperature measurement.
In TD condenser control operation, when the TD rises
above TD setpoint + (TD deadband / 2), an increase in fan
capacity is called for. Similarly, when the TD drops below
TD setpoint - (TD deadband / 2), a decrease in fan capacity is called for. TD can control up to four condenser fans.
5.29.3 TD Control Fail-Safes
TD Control operates as long as plenum and drop leg
temperature inputs are available and the drop leg temperature remains within a minimum/maximum range configured by the user. Otherwise, TD control uses various failsafe modes to control the condenser fans.
In the event drop leg temperature is not available (due
to probe failure), all fans will be staged on.
Drop Leg Temperature Above Maximum Drop Leg
Setpoint
If the Drop Leg temperature (Drop Leg Temp) rises
above the maximum drop leg temperature setpoint (Drop
Leg Max), an increase will be called for until Drop Leg
Temp drops below Drop Leg Max. This protects against
the possibility of the Drop Leg Temp rising too high as a
result of high plenum temperature.
Drop Leg Temperature Below Minimum Drop Leg
TD Control
5.29.5 Setpoints
TD setpoints are configured to allow control of the
condenser at its designed TD during swings in ambient
temperature.
For the Drop Leg Minimum setpoint, if the drop leg
temperature falls below this setpoint, condenser fans will
be cycled OFF regardless of the value of the TD setpoint.
For the Drop Leg Maximum setpoint, it is the maximum allowable value of the drop leg temperature. If the
drop leg temperature rises above this setpoint, the condenser fans are cycled ON regardless of the value of the
TD.
The Drop Leg Offset setpoint is an adjustment
entered, if needed, after measuring liquid subcooling
during operation of an individual condensing unit.
The TD setpoint is the optimal difference between the
refrigerant drop leg temperature and the ambient (plenum)
temperature. When the TD (i.e., drop leg temp + drop leg
offset - plenum temp) begins to climb above this setpoint,
fans will be cycled ON to bring down the drop leg temperature, thus lowering the TD measurement.
The TD deadband setpoint is a range of values around
the TD Setpoint within which the value of the TD calculation is acceptable. When the TD rises above the setpoint
plus 1/2 the deadband value, fans will begin cycling ON.
When the TD falls below the setpoint minus 1/2 the deadband value, fans will cycle OFF.
Software Overview • 5-45
For the Condenser Fan On Delay setpoint, fans are
cycled ON when the TD is above the setpoint at the rate
set for Condenser Fan On Delay. For example, if this field
is set to 30 seconds, each fan is staged ON in 30-second
intervals until all fans are ON, or until the TD falls back
below the setpoint.
For the Condenser Fan Off Delay setpoint, fans are
cycled OFF when the TD is below the setpoint at the rate
set for Condenser Fan Off Delay. In other words, if this
field is set to 30 seconds, each fan is staged OFF in 30-second intervals until all fans are OFF, or until the TD rises
back above the setpoint.
5.29.6 Inputs
The Drop Leg Temperature input is the current drop
leg temperature used for TD control.
The Plenum Temperature input provides the current
value of the ambient temperature used for TD calculation.
5.29.7 Alarms
For Drop Leg High alarm, the alarm setpoint is the
drop leg temperature that, if exceeded, will cause an alarm
to be generated. If you wish to generate an alarm for high
drop leg temperature, enter the desired setpoint. Otherwise, to disable this alarm, leave the value set to NONE.
For Drop Leg Delay, if the drop leg alarming feature
is used, enter the amount of time the drop leg temperature
must be higher than the setpoint before an alarm will be
generated (HHH:MM).
For TD High alarm, the TD alarm setpoint is the value
of the TD calculation that, if exceeded, will cause an alarm
to be generated. If you wish to generate an alarm for high
TD, enter the desired setpoint. Otherwise, to disable this
alarm, leave the value set to NONE.
For TD Delay, if the TD alarming feature is used,
enter the amount of time the TD must be higher than the
setpoint before an alarm will be generated (HHH:MM)
5-46 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
5.30 Loop/Sequence
Control
The Loop Sequence Control application’s main function is to read the value of an analog input, comparehone
the value to a setpoint, and generate a single analog output
value. This output value is represented in three different
forms: a single analog value from 0% to 100%, up to eight
digital stage outputs, and a digital pulse width modulation
output.
The output value(s) are generated by a PID Control
cell, which takes into account both the input’s
instantaneous value and its rate and direction of change.
The PID Control algorithm is similar to the PID algorithm
used by Pressure Control, except the Loop Sequence
Control application is designed to be used in a wider array
of applications.
How To Add a Loop/Sequence Control Device on
the Site Supervisor:
1.
2.
From Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Summaries and Floor Plans> Site Summaries>
Other, click the screen drop-down arrow on the
upper right of the screen, click Add Controls.
Select the Control or Application Type - Loop/
Sequence Ctrl, enter the Quantity, Control Name
and Serial Type. Note that Serial Type
information can be enter later. Click Save to add
the application.
Supervisor, specific configuration parameters in the Case
Control application apply and synchronize only with CC100, CS-100, and CCB case controllers. The XM Circuit
Control application is specifically designed to support XM
controllers and its parameters, and does not support other
types of case controllers.
This section of the manual covers both the programming of an XM Circuit application and the process of
associating an XM670, XM678, or XM679 with an XM
Circuit application.
5.31.1 Associations
Case circuits that use XM670, XM678, or XM679 for
case control rely on the XM Circuit Control application in
the Site Supervisor to provide them the necessary setpoints, defrost scheduling, and other control parameters.
XM Circuits do not directly control temperature in the
case circuits; instead, the case controller controls temperature for each individual case based on the setpoint(s) supplied to them by their associated XM Circuit.
Setup of a case-controlled refrigerated case system is a
two-fold process:
8.
For each case circuit in the refrigeration system, a
separate XM Circuit application is created with
its own set of control parameters.
9.
Each XM670, XM678, and XM679 is associated
with an XM Circuit application in the Site Supervisor. Association creates a network link between
the case controller and the application which supplies the information necessary to control temperature, defrost, lights, fans, and anti-sweat
heaters.
3.
A Confirmation box will appear saying that the
application is successfully added to the system,
click Close or Edit these controls.
4.
The system will display the new application(s) on
the Site Summary screen.
5.31.1.1 Case Circuit Association Support
5.
Click the Loop/Sequence Control application
panel box to view the application.
6.
The system will display the Loop/Sequence
Control application parameters.
7.
The user can view and configure the properties of
the application by setting the Edit Mode to ON
on the screen drop-down arrow on the upper right
of the screen.
The XM series of case controllers can be associated
with either an XM Circuit application or an existing Case
Circuit application. This allows users to upgrade the Site
Supervisor firmware without the need of any re-programming of XM controller associations. However, the Case
Circuit application provides a limited functionality for any
XM controller. For full circuit functionality, it is recommended that the XM controllers be associated with the
XM Circuit application.
5.31 XM Circuit Control
The XM Circuit Control application is an application
that provides supervisory control over the XM series of
case controllers (Section 2.2.11, XM Series of Case Controllers). Although the XM case controllers can also be
controlled by the Case Control Circuit application in Site
Loop/Sequence Control
5.31.1.2 Dual Association Not Supported
Once an XM case controller is associated to a circuit
(either an XM Circuit or a Case Circuit), it can no longer
be associated with any other circuit.
For example, if an XM controller is associated with a
Case Circuit application, it will not be available in the XM
Circuit association screen. Once the Case Circuit association is removed, the XM controller will then be available
Software Overview • 5-47
on the XM Circuit association screen.
Suction applications will be visible.
5.31.1.3 Synchronized Parameters
5.31.3 Supervisory Control
Functions
The following XM Circuit parameters are synchronized to any associated XM case controllers:
The XM Circuit application provides supervisory control and coordination of associated case controllers.
Fan Mode
Case Alarm LO
Defrost Type
Case Alarm DLY
Pump Down Delay
Case Alarm Prior
Defr Duration
Case Alarm Cfg
Drip Time
Case Alm Hi Type
Term Temp SP
Case Alm Lo Type
5.31.3.2 Lighting Control
Stand Alone Time
DLY After Defrost
The value present on the LIGHT SCHEDULE input of
the XM Circuit application will be sent to all associated
XM case controllers.
Case Alarm HI
5.31.3.1 Dewpoint Value
When a dewpoint sensor is connected to the DEWPOINT input of an XM Circuit application, the value of
this sensor will be sent to all associated XM case controllers. The dewpoint value will be used by the XM case controllers to modulate the anti-condensate heater, if
equipped.
Table 5-16 - Synchronized parameters
Lights During Defrost
The XM Circuit application does not use these parameters in any internal logic within the circuit and the values
of these parameters are only synchronized with any associated XM case controllers.
If the Lts During Defr is set to ON, the XM case controller lights will follow the schedule connected to the
LIGHT SCHEDULE input at all times. However, if Lts
During Defr is set to OFF, the XM case controller lights
will be turned off during defrost periods, regardless of the
LIGHT SCHEDULE input.
5.31.1.4 Visibility of Associated
Parameters
All existing XM controllers integrated in Site Supervisor (for example, XM678) are modified to support conditional visibility on parameters that are associated to the
XM Circuit. If an XM controller is associated with an XM
circuit, the XM controller application will hide the associated parameters. If the XM controller application is not
associated to an XM Circuit application, all of its parameters will be visible.
5.31.2 Suction Group Interaction
Circuits have specific interaction with suction groups.
Similar to the Case Circuit application, the XM Circuit
application interacts with both Standard and Enhanced
Suction applications.
5.31.2.1 Standard Suction
The XM Circuit can be associated to a standard Suction Group application using the lookup (F4) function
while editing the Suction Group parameter.
5.31.2.2 Enhanced Suction
The XM Circuit can be associated to Enhanced Suction
Group applications. However, the association to Enhanced
Suction groups is performed from within the Enhanced
Suction group setup. When editing the Suction Group
parameter in the XM Circuit application, only Standard
5-48 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
5.31.3.3 Active Setpoint Output
When the USE DUAL STPT input is OFF, the XM
Circuit will use the Case Temp Stpt parameter as the
active case setpoint, which means the value of Case Temp
Stpt will be written to the ACTIVE SETPT output.
When the USE DUAL STPT input is ON, the XM Circuit will switch over to using the “Dual Temp Stpt” parameter as the active case setpoint, which means the value of
Dual Temp Stpt will be written to the ACTIVE SETPT
output. All associated XM case controllers will use the
ACTIVE SETPT from the XM Circuit as the current case
temperature setpoint.
Demand Setpoint Bump
If the PRI DEMAND SHED input is ON, the active
setpoint will be adjusted by the amount specified by the
Pri Demand Bump parameter.
If the SEC DEMAND SHED input is ON, the active
setpoint will be adjusted by the amount specified by the
Sec Demand Bump parameter.
If both the PRI DEMAND SHED and SEC DEMAND
SHED inputs are ON, the SEC DEMAND SHED will take
priority.
5.31.3.4 Defrost Scheduling
The XM Circuit application provides defrost schedul-
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
ing to the associated XM case controllers.
Defrost Start Mode
Defrosts may be initiated with one of the following
methods - Numbered or Scheduled.
• Numbered - the starting time of the first defrost
(called Reference Time) is defined by the user and
all the subsequent defrosts are equally spaced out
throughout a 24-hour period. For example, if four
defrosts are specified with a reference time of
00:00, the remaining three defrosts will begin at
06:00, 12:00, and 18:00. Up to 24 numbered
defrosts may be specified.
• Scheduled - the absolute start time for each defrost
is specified by the user. Up to 12 scheduled defrosts
may be specified.
STA and CASE DEFR STA. Based on the value of these
two input properties, one of the three case states listed in
Table 5-17 is selected and written to the corresponding
CASE STATE OU output property.
5.31.3.6 Case Type
The Case Type parameter permits the user to select the
type of refrigerated case that will be used for the XM Circuit application. Based on this setting, the case temperature setpoint and certain defrost parameters will be set to
suitable values.
5.31.4 Application Advisory
The following advisories are generated by the XM Circuit application:
• Combined Case Temperature High/Low
Days Between Defrost
• Product Temperature High/Low
The DaysBetweenDfr parameter specifies the number
of days to skip scheduled defrosts. This feature is useful
for cases that do not require a defrost cycle every day. If
set to zero, defrosts will occur every day. If set to one,
defrosts will occur every other day. If set to two, defrosts
will occur every after two days. The user may specify up
to six days to skip defrosts.
• Defrost did not start
5.31.3.5 Case States
The XM Circuit application provides a circuit status
output (CASE STATE OUT) to indicate the mode of operation of the circuit.
The XM Circuit application supports the following
case states:
State
Description
Off
The circuit is shut down. All
associated case controllers are neither
refrigerating nor defrosting.
Refrigeration
The circuit is refrigerating. Most
associated case controllers are in the
refrigeration state (maintaining case
temperature setpoint).
Defrost
The circuit is in defrost. Most
associated case controllers are in a
defrost cycle. (The defrost cycle
includes several sub-states, for
example, pump down, drip, and more.)
Table 5-17 - Case States
The XM Circuit application determines the state of
each associated case controller by evaluating CASE REFR
XM Circuit Control
5.31.4.1 Synchronized Alarm Parameters
The XM Circuit application will synchronize the Case
Alarm High and Low setpoints with associated XM
devices. The circuit will not perform the alarming functionality for Case Temperature as it is handled in each XM
device.
Because XM devices support relative and absolute
alarming for Case Temperature, the XM Circuit will support the Case Alarm Hi and Case Alarm Lo parameters
as either temperature or  temperature Engineering Units.
5.31.5 Application Commands
The following application commands will be supported by the XM Circuit application:
5.31.5.1 Start Defrost
When the user selects this command, a defrost cycle is
immediately initiated. The START DEFR OUT output will
turn ON and will stay ON for the duration specified in the
Min Defr Time parameter. If at anytime during this period
the user issues a Stop Defrost command, the START
DEFR OUT output will immediately turn OFF.
NOTE: The behavior of the START DEFR
OUT output is the same whether it is started by
the Start Defrost command or by a regularly
scheduled defrost.
5.31.5.2 Stop Defrost
When the user selects this command, a defrost cycle is
immediately stopped. The STOP DEFR OUT output will
turn ON and will stay ON for a period of one minute, and
then will switch OFF. If at anytime during this period the
Software Overview • 5-49
user issues a Start Defrost command, the STOP DEFR
OUT output will immediately turn OFF.
5.31.6 Product Probe Support
The XM Circuit application supports a product probe
temperature input for each case controller associated. To
enable support for product temperature inputs, set the “En
Product Prob” parameter to Yes.
If one or more product probe inputs are used, high and
low temperature alarming may be enabled.
5.32 XR75CX Case Display
The XR75CX-Case Display is a microprocessor based
controller, suitable for applications on medium or low
temperature ventilated refrigeration units. It has up to four
(4) analog inputs: discharge air temperature, product
temperature, defrost temperature and coil out temperature,
four (4) relay outputs, and up to two (2) digital inputs.
diagnostics and warnings). These error codes can be seen
by an LED display for troubleshooting and maintenance.
Medium and low temperature units are available in single
and three phase 208/230 volts. The -002 and -012 BOM
product is approved for operation in ambients from120°F
to -10°F. For more information, refer to the Copeland
Scroll™ Outdoor Condensing Unit literature P/N AE51377 R3.
5.35 Site Manager
Compatibility
Site Manager Versions
16.1
Site Supervisor Version
2.0F01

Table 5-18 - Site Supervisor Specifications
5.33 Condenser
An air-cooled condenser consists of one or more fans
that blow air across a manifold of tubing to cool heated
refrigerant and condense it into a liquid. In an evaporative
condenser, water is sprayed across a condenser coil, which
cools the refrigerant as water is evaporated. Control of the
evaporative condenser is similar in ways to the air cooled
strategy in that the Condenser Control application uses
PID control to activate or deactivate fans (thus increasing
or decreasing the amount of evaporative cooling).
5.34 XJ Condensing Unit
The XJ Condensing Unit is a device for controlling the
XJ Condensing Unit, also known as the XJ Scroll Unit.
Site Supervisor will perform tasks for coordination, logging, alarming, and access for configuration and status.
The XJ Scroll Unit follows the typical MODBUS commissioning method. In the XJ Scroll Unit, the device address
is determined using dip switches on the device itself. The
range of allowable addresses is 1 through 255.
Copeland Scroll™ outdoor condensing units provide
scroll compressor technology with advanced diagnostic
controls to ensure reliable performance and operation in
food service applications. Protection and diagnostic features are controlled by an electronic integrated control
board. This control board provides base control functions
related to temperature controller, defrost, evaporator fan
control, compressor protection (for example, current overload, phase reversal, liquid/vapor injection control, self
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6
Basic Navigation
related to this miscellaneous category. Default device examples and applications: Analog Combiner, Analog and Digital Sensors, Flex Combiner,
Irrigation, Loop Sequence, and Schedules.
Log into Site Supervisor by clicking the Main Menu
icon (three horizontal lines) in the upper left part of the
screen next to the Emerson Climate Technologies logo.
The Main Menu panel will slide open. Click to the right of
the panel to close.
• System - Select to access devices and applications
related to the System category. Default device examples and applications: 16AI, 4AO, 8DO, and
8RO boards, IPX Modules, Global Data, and Onboard IO.
The three icons at the first row along the top of the
screen are the Main Menu, Home, and the back arrow.
Refer to (Table 6-1) for icon descriptions.
6.1
Menus and Submenus
1.
Login - Logs you into Site Supervisor. Click and
enter your username and password. Once logged
in, clicking Logout will log you back out of the
system. (You will automatically be logged out of
the system after a specified period of idle time.)
2.
Home - Returns you to the set Home screen of
the Site Supervisor. Click the Home icon to
return to the Home screen from anywhere in the
system.
3.
Summaries and Floor Plans - Four submenus
will display: Site Summaries, Alarms, Network,
and Floor Plans. Click each selection or dropdown arrow (caret) to expand.
• Site Summaries - Shows the six system categories
and the number of applications that have been set
up in each category. Once a device or application is
selected, the main screen for that device or application displays where control parameters may be configured. Users can move devices and applications
under the category of their choosing.
• Alarms - The Active Alarms screen and Alarms
History can be accessed from this submenu. The
number of active alarms in the system and detailed
status information for each alarm is displayed on
the Active Alarms screen.
• Network - Displays all applications on the network.
• Floor Plans - Displays the Floor Plan screen where
you can select and work with floor plans.
4.
Schedules - Displays events and timeline of
events in the system. When you click the Events
submenu, the event summary screen will display.
5.
Systems Logs & Statistics - Contains controller
system information for technical personnel-level
users:
• System Logs:
• Service Log - Contains records of system-level
events, failures, and troubleshooting information,
including records of system shutdowns and startups. Resetting or a cleanout of the Site Supervisor
can be performed from a submenu on this page.
• Program Error Log - Contains information about
assertions that occur in the controller. The system
records the assertion failure in ascending order.
• Refrigeration - Select to access devices and applications related to refrigeration. Default device examples and applications: XR and XC devices,
MRLDS and RLDS leak detectors, Anti-Sweat
controllers, CL ACC (anti-condensate controllers) and Standard Circuits.
• Alarm Communications Log - Contains custom
notification of alarm conditions or set default values for each device.
• HVAC - Select to access devices and applications
related to HVAC. Default device examples and
applications: AHU, ARTC/RTU boards, HVAC
Zones, CC T-Stats, and MultiFlex RCB boards.
• Audit Log - Contains a list of logs with event and
detail information.
• Lighting - Select to access devices and applications related to Lighting Control. Default device
examples and applications: Lighting.
• Energy - Select to access devices and applications
related to Energy Control. Default device examples and applications: Demand Control, Energy
Meters, and Utility Monitoring.
• Other - Select to access devices and applications
Menus and Submenus
• Exception Log - Contains controller system information for technical personnel such as process ID
and memory information.
• System Statistics:
• CPU Usage - Provides information for technical
service personnel about memory usage, CPU usage per time period, and load average usage since
the last reset (reboot) in the controller.
• Free Memory & Disk Space - Shows the
amount(s) of used and free memory and disk
space in the controller (total free and largest
block, by memory device).
Basic Navigation • 6-1
tains the following submenu Install Application
Description File, Backup System Configuration,
Restore System Configuration, Install Floorplan
and Upgrade Firmware.
• Communication Statistics - Contains information
for technical service personnel about the state of
the RS232, RS485 I/O, Modbus, and TCP/IP network messaging.
• Scheduler Statistics - Contains information about
scheduler usage and performance for technical
service personnel.
• Watchdog Report - Contains controller system information for technical personnel such as number
of reboots and other monitored controller processes.
• Monitoring Service:
• Advisories Sent - Displays the number of monitoring advisories that are sent and individual entries that repeat the content of each advisory.
• Connection Log - Displays the first attempts,
number of retries, and subsequent successful reconnection of monitoring connections.
• Master Parameter Default - Displays the monitoring master log details in the controller.
• Pending Reports - Displays the contents of monitoring reports that are waiting for transmission.
6. Configure System - Contains navigation on Logging Groups, Control Programming, Alarm Communications, File Management, General System
Properties, Manage Users (performs account creation and role assignment for system users, view,
edit, and remove users) and My Profile (allows
you to create or edit your personal profile page,
create keyboard shortcuts, set localization and
engineering unit settings and more).
Contains navigation on logging groups adding
and removing control, alarm communications,
file management, general system properties,
managing user profiles, file management, and
managing your own user profile. Your user profile page includes keyboard shortcuts, screen settings, localization settings, engineering unit
settings, and more.
• Logging Groups - Allows you to view log parameters, add new logging groups, edit parameters of
existing logging groups, and delete logging groups.
• Control Programming - Allows you to perform
the following functions: create groups and add
devices to the groups, add controls and applications, commission and associate controls to existing
groups, and edit the Commission information for
existing controls and applications.
• Alarm Communications - View, edit, or delete
alarm notices from this page. Enable All to view all
notices in the system.
• General System Properties - Contains a dropdown menu that includes these submenus: COM
Ports (com ports and baud rate settings), Network
Settings (Internet, subnet mask, DNS, MAC
Address, E-Mail (SMTP), Text messaging (SMS)
and more), Licensing (add a license and view application licenses in the system), Localization (language and engineering unit settings), and System
Values (general setup parameters, Web server and
UI setup).
• Manage Users - Allows you to create new users
and view and edit existing users in the system.
• My Profile - Allows you to manage your profile
and preference settings with options such as screen
settings, keyboard shortcuts, localization, engineering unit settings and more.
6.2
Overview
6.2.1
Conditional Visibility
Conditional Visibility allows points to be viewed that
are applicable to the defined view level (Basic or
Advanced) for certain applications.
NOTE: The mobile Site Supervisor view does
not support conditional visibility.
6.2.1.1
User View Details
NOTE: When you navigate to a specified
screen, you will see the points equal to or less
than your View Level available on the Site
Supervisor’s rule.
The basic user level does not see the Advanced view
level point.
Some screen information and contents are editable,
which when clicked can either display additional or related
information or move to another screen.
NOTE: The screen will only display applicable
points according to your view level and Site
Supervisor’s rules.
• File Management - File Management menu con-
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6.3
Basic Screen Parts and
Elements
• Main display - This is the main section of the
screen, which contains and displays the content of
the chosen selection such as reports, device information, configuration settings, and more.
• Main Menu (three horizontal lines) - When
clicked, the Main Menu panel will slide open containing the menus and submenus of the controller.
• Home button - Returns you to the default Home
screen of the controller.
• Back button - This button will return you to the
previous screen. The Back button is indicated by a
left arrow icon.
• Active Alarms icon (red circle with exclamation
mark) - When this icon is clicked, the screen will
display the current active alarms. The number of
alarms is displayed in parentheses next to the exclamation mark.
NOTE: When some screen information and
contents are clicked, additional or related
information can be displayed or additional
screens accessed.
6.4
Language Settings
The default for the language selection is English
(United States). The system will store a setting for the
preferred system language (internal language code). This
is used when no authorized user is logged in. The default
language is used as a fall back when the currently active
preferred language doesn’t contain a translation for the
given label, prompt, or display text.
To change the language setting:
1.
Log into the Site Supervisor controller.
2.
Click the Main Menu icon.
3.
Click Configure System> General System
Properties> Localization.
4.
Choose the preferred language on the Language
drop-down menu.
5.
An Information box will appear, click OK to
confirm the language change.
6.
Click the Save button.
7.
The Confirmation pop-up box will appear on the
screen showing the summary of changes, click
OK or Cancel button.
Supported languages in Site Supervisor:
• English (United States)
Future release language support:
• Spanish (Español)
• Portuguese (Brazil) - Portuguȇs (Brasil)
• Italian (Italy) - Italiano (Italia)
• German (Germany) - Deutsch (Deutschland)
• French (France) - Francais (France)
• Chinese (Simplified)
6.5
Locating Applications
Applications in the controller are located on the Home
screen and from individual application screens and are
easy to find.
Each of the five categories can be seen on the Home
screen and if applications have been set up, they will display under the category to which they have been assigned.
For example, in Figure 6-2 all of the five categories are
displayed with Refrigeration containing two applications
that have been set up. Choose an application and the categories will then be displayed as icons across the top that
are easily accessible. Click the icons to see the applica-
Basic Screen Parts and Elements
Basic Navigation • 6-3
tions
username and password.
Figure 6-3 - Logging into Site Supervisor Controller
2.
From anywhere in Site Supervisor, click the Help
icon (question mark inside a circle):
Figure 6-1 - Home Screen Application Menus
The five categories are displayed on each application
screen. Click each icon to view applications that have been
set up for each category. For example, in Figure 6-2, the
Refrigeration icon has been clicked and the applications
for that category are displayed (Standard Circuits and
XR75CX). Click the application to go directly to that
screen.
Figure 6-4 - Click Help Icon for Page Help
3.
The online help page will open for the screen you
are currently viewing.
4.
The help menu can also be used while using or
programming an application or a device. To learn
more about the current step, application, or
device, click the Help icon.
5.
A search field is available at the top of each help
page. Enter a keyword into the search field and
the help page you are currently viewing will be
searched for that keyword.
Figure 6-2 - Application Screen Menus
6.6
Using the Help Menu
This section contains instructions for using the help
menu on the Site Supervisor controller.
1.
Log into the Site Supervisor and enter the
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6.7
Icons or Buttons
Appearing on the
Home Screen
Icon
Function
Main Menu
(three
horizontal
line)
Found at the top left-hand
side of the page. When
Main Menu button is
clicked, main menu panel
will slide open containing
the menus and submenus
of the controller.
Home
Opens the main menu
panel when clicked. The
main menu panel contains
menus and submenus of
the controller.
Back Arrow The Back button will
return you to the previous
screen.
Active
When the Active Alarm
Alarms
icon is clicked, the screen
will display the current
active alarms.
Filter
Clicking the Filter icon
opens the Filter Alarms
screen which allows you
to choose or filter the type
of alarm you want to see
on your Active Alarms
screen.
Control
Click to manage the sysInventory tem-wide inventory of
applications. Edit, delete,
and add applications from
this screen.
Schedules Click to add and edit
and Events schedules and events.
Screen Drop-The screen drop-down
down Menu menu is activated when
the current screen is
active/online. This menu
contains other options
such as Download, Email, Print, and View History.
Refrigeration Displays on Home screen
and application screens.
Shows all applications in
the controller that are categorized under Refrigeration.
HVAC
Displays on Home screen
and application screens.
Shows all applications in
the controller that are categorized under HVAC.
Lighting
Displays on Home screen
and application screens.
Shows all applications in
the controller that are categorized under Lighting.
Energy
Displays on Home screen
and application screens.
Shows all applications in
the controller that are categorized under Energy.
Other
Displays on Home screen
and application screens.
Shows all applications in
the controller that are categorized under Other.
System
Displays on Home screen
and application screens.
Shows all applications in
the controller that are categorized under System.
Table 6-1 - Top Screen Icons and Buttons
Table 6-1 - Top Screen Icons and Buttons
Icons or Buttons Appearing on the Home Screen
Basic Navigation • 6-5
7
Alarm
Configuration
XR75CX 5.6 controller is used. Select the
XR75CX 5.6 device on the Site Summary>
Refrigeration screen to access the device status
page.
Alarms in Site Supervisor can be generated from
different sources including external networked devices,
applications, value-added applications, and sub-systems.
Alarm configuration, transmission, and history settings
can be defined by the user.
1.
Log in to Site Supervisor by clicking Login on
the Main Menu, located on upper right side of the
screen and enter your username/password.
Figure 7-3 - XR75CX Under Refrigeration
4.
On the drop-down menu on the upper right of the
sreen, click Edit and Advanced to access
configuration properties and alarms for the
XR75CX 5.6 device.
Figure 7-4 - Accessing the Configuration Properties of
Figure 7-1 - Site Supervisor Login
2.
XR75CX 5.6
Click each tab to see the XR75CX parameters:
From the Home screen, navigate to Summaries
and Floor Plans> Site Summaries> Refrigeration.
Figure 7-5 - XR75CX 5.6 Tabs
Note that under the Status tab on any device application page the wrench icon can be clicked for customizing
the summary tile information. New category icons are
located across the top and when clicked go to those application pages.
Figure 7-2 - Accessing Site Summaries - Refrigeration
3.
In this example, alarm configuration for
Alarm Configuration • 7-1
7.1
1.
Alarm Configuration
For alarm configurations, scroll down to the
Alarm Cfg parameter section.
7.2
Alarm
Communications
Setting
Configure alarm communications setting on Alarm
Communications screen for SMTP (emailing), and texting
alarms.
1.From the Home screen, navigate to Main Menu>
Configure System> Alarm Communications and click
Create New Alarm Notice at the top.
Figure 7-5 - Configuring Alarms
2.
On the Alarm Cfg parameter section, click the
arrow beside the name of the parameter to
configure other settings for alarming.
• Alarm descriptions can be overridden from this
page. Enter the name of each application alarm you
wish to appear in the alarm log. If no name has been
entered, the default alarm message will display in
the alarm log.
Figure 7-7 - Alarm Comm Page - Create New Alarm Notice
The Alarm Communications screen creates a custom
notification of alarm conditions or set default values for as
many as 20 notifications for each device.
NOTE: This screen will not be accessible if you
are not logged into the controller.
• Each alarm type (urgency level) can be categorized
as Non-Critical, Critical, or Notice (the least
urgent).
• Each alarm category (where it is categorized in the
Site Supervisor) can be set under the Category
field: Refrigeration, HVAC, Lighting, Energy, or
Other.
• Set the repeat time for the alarm on the Repeat
Rate field, which is the time the advisory is next
scheduled to repeat if not acknowledged. A
repeated advisory will re-queue to the system as if it
had just been generated. However, it will not create
a new instance; it will only update the existing
instance with the next repeat time. All other
processing and propagation will act as a new
instance of an advisory.
• Set the Monitor Alarm field to ON (if the alarm
will go to the call center for monitoring) or OFF
(for no call center monitoring).
3.
Figure 7-8 - Alarm Communications Page
Once configurations have been set, select Save
on the upper right side of the screen.
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When creating a new alarm notice, there are four steps
on the Alarm Communications page:
Step 1: Enter a unique name
• Name the alarm notice by entering a unique identifier. Create a unique name or a reminder message
will appear to enter a different name.
Step 2: Select all of the desired options under each
category
7.3
Alarm Log and View
History
Select the Active Alarms icon to open the Alarm Log
screen and view the list of active alarms in the system:
• Category – The category menu options: All,
Refrigeration, HVAC, Lighting, Energy, Other,
System, and ProAct.
• Schedule – Select None or from night and various
lighting schedules with which to associate the alarm
notice.
• Alarm type – The alarm-type menu options are the
following: All, Critical Alarm, Non-critical Alarm
and Notice (least urgent).
• Resolution – Select how the alarm notice should be
handled. The resolution menu options are the
following: All, Acknowledge, Reset to Normal, and
Return to Normal.
Select View More Options for additional Relay
(audio, visual, and more) options.
Step 3: Select Application Output
• Choose the Target (the application) and Property
output (belonging to that application) to tie the
alarm input to.
Step 4: Add Users
1.
Select a recipient from the recipients list, if the
desired recipient is not on the recipients list, new
recipients may be created by clicking the Create
New User button. The Create New User page
will open where the desired fields can be filled
out.
Figure 7-9 - Alarm Log
The alarm name appearing in the Description column
is the default name or custom name assigned to the alarm.
Click View History to see the collection of alarms that
have been resolved.
Figure 7-10 - Alarm History
Active alarms also appear as default on the Home
screen.
NOTE: Only 20 notices can be created. To edit
the current notice, a specific role is required in
this function.
When all fields for the new alarm notice are
completed, a confirmation pop-up screen will appear.
Alarm Log and View History
Alarm Configuration • 7-3
7.4
Temperature Differential Alarms
Once the newly requested points are correctly set, alarms are generated when the real values do not meet the TD
setpoint.
Property Details
Name
Visibility
Value Range
Differential Tempera- Space, Zone, Mixed,
ture Selection
Return or None.
Default
Log
N/A
N/A
When the point is set as Space, Zone,
Mixed or Return respectively, the Heat
Alarm Diff, Cool Alarm and Diff Alarm
properties are visible.
Heat Alarm Diff (Differential)
0~54.00DDF
18.00DDF
N/A
Refer to the interpretation above.
Cool Alarm Diff (Differential)
0~54.00DDF
18.00DDF
N/A
Refer to the interpretation above.
Differential Alarm
Notice; Critical;
Non-critical; Disable
Notice
N/A
Refer to the interpretation above.
Table 7-1- Alarm Properties
The four points added to the AHU application are to ensure that two kinds of alarms are generated respectively, and
they are listed in the table below:
Alarms Type
(Same alarm short
description)
Conditions Alarms Generate
Alarms by Heat Alarm Diff
The supply temperature value is not higher than the user-specified sensor’s value by at
least the Heat Alarm Diff amount.
If the supply temp value is higher than the user-specified sensor’s value by the Heat
Alarm Diff amount or more, the previously generated alarm returns to normal.
Alarms by Cool Alarm Diff
The supply temperature value is not lower than the user-specified sensor’s value by at
least the Cool Alarm Diff amount.
If the supply temp value is lower than the user-specified sensor’s value by the Cool
Alarm Diff amount or more, the previously generated alarm returns to normal.
Table 7-2- Alarms Generated from AHU Application
For the CC T-Stats device, three properties need to be added in the Alarms tab, and they are listed in the table below:
Property Details
Name
Visibility
Value Range
Default
Log
Diff Alarm
Notice; Critical;
Non-critical; Disable
Disable
N/A
When this property is set as
Disable, below 2 properties
will not be visible.
Heat Alarm Diff
0~54.00DDF
18.00DDF
N/A
Refer to the interpretation above.
Cool Alarm Diff
0~54.00DDF
18.00DDF
N/A
Refer to the interpretation above.
Table 7-3- Alarm Properties in Emerson T-Stats
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The points added to the Emerson T-Stat devices are to ensure that two kinds of TD alarms are generated respectively,
and they are listed in the table below:
Alarms Type
(Same alarm short
description)
Conditions Alarms Generate
Alarms by Heat Alarm
When the system goes to heating control, an alarm is generated when the Supply Air Temp
Diff
value is not higher than the Space Temp value by at least the Heat Alarm Diff amount.
If the Supply Air Temp value is higher than the space temp value by the Heat Alarm Diff
amount or more, then the previously generated alarm returns to normal.
About the Space Temp Value:
1.
System uses the Rem Space Temp value as the space temp value if Remote Spc Temp
is set as Yes.
1.
System uses the value from a physical space temp probe as the space temp if such a
probe is installed.
2.
Remote Spc Temp is set as No
Alarms by Cool Alarm
When the system goes to cooling control, an alarm is generated when the Supply Air Temp
Diff
value is not lower than the Space Temp value by at least the Cool Alarm Diff amount.
If the Supply Air Temp value is lower than the Space Temp value by the Cool Alarm Diff
amount or more, then the previously generated alarm returns to normal.
The rules that system chooses the Space Temp value is the same as those for alarms by Heat
Alarms Diff.
Table 7-4- Alarms Generated from Emerson T-Stat
Temperature Differential Alarms
Alarm Configuration • 7-5
7.5
Lighting Cycle Alarms
Once the newly requested points are correctly set, alarms are generated when the real values exceed the set ones. For
the lighting control application, three properties need to be added in the Alarms tab, and they are listed in the table below:
Name
Property Details
Max Excessive Light Cycles
There are four types, critical, noncritical
and notice, Disable (by default).
Lts Cycle Max
The value can be set in the range of
0~999.
Visibility
This property is not visible to users
when Disable is set for Lts Cycle Type.
Table 7-5- Alarm Properties
The two points added to the lighting control application are to ensure that the lights are operated correctly in a single
day. Once the real value of light cycle exceeds the max cycle set in Table 7-5, alarms are created. The starting time for calculating the lighting cycles is set at midnight and ends after 24 hours, which is clearly operated in the background.
For the lighting control application, another two properties needs to be added in the Alarms tab, and they are listed in
the table below:
Name
Property Details
Lts On Too Long
There are four types, critical, noncritical
and notice, Disable (by default).
Lts On Lng Del
The value can be set in the range of
0~999.
Visibility
N/A
This property is not visible to users
when Disable is set for Lts on lng Type.
Table 7-6- Alarm Properties Added in Lighting Control Application
An alarm is generated if the lights are on for more than the Lts On Lng Del value set by users in Table 7-6.
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8 Basic Setup
Information
8.1
are currently viewing.
Using the Help Menu
This section contains instructions for using help menu
on the Site Supervisor controller.
1.
Log into the Site Supervisor by clicking LOGIN
at the top right of the screen. Enter “user” in the
Enter Username field and enter “pass” in the
Enter Password field.
Figure 8-3 - Keyword Search for Help Menu
4.
The help menu can also be used while using or
programming an application or a device. To learn
more about the current step, application or
device, click the Help icon.
5.
A search window is available at the top of each
help page. Enter a keyword into the search field
and the help page you are currently viewing will
be searched for that keyword.
Figure 8-1 - Logging into Site Supervisor Controller
2.
From anywhere in the Site Supervisor, click the
Help icon.
Figure 8-2 - Navigating to Site Map Screen
3.
The online help page will open for the screen you
Using the Help Menu
Basic Setup Information • 8-1
8.2
1.
How to Locate the IP Address of Site Supervisor
On a blank USB drive, create a new Text Document.
Figure 8-4 - Creating a Blank Text Document
2.
Name the text document ipme.txt.
Figure 8-5 - Saving the Document as ipme.txt
3.
Remove the USB drive from the PC, power down
the Site Supervisor, then insert the USB drive.
4.
Power up the Site Supervisor; its green status will
flash during the power-on cycle. Once the light
stops blinking and turns solid, remove the USB
Drive.
5.
Insert the USB drive into the PC, then open the
USB drive.
8-2 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Figure 8-6 - Opening the USB drive
6.
Open the text document and the IP address of the Site Supervisor is displayed.
Figure 8-7 - Site Supervisor IP Address Display
How to Locate the IP Address of Site Supervisor
Basic Setup Information • 8-3
9
Revision History
What’s new in Site Supervisor version 2.0 Manual:
• Hardware Updates
2.0 Hardware
Site Supervisor Display
• Basic UI Navigation Updates
• Software Overview Updates:
Control Link ACC
Revision History • 9-1
Appendix A: Alarm Advisories
The table below is a list of all alarm messages that may appear in Site Supervisor Alarm Advisory
Log. Each alarm message is listed by its Alarm Items, Alarm Category and Cell Name.
Alarm Items
Category
Cell Name
Read Data Failed AI 01
Device Alarm IPX6/IPX15/
IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 02
Device Alarm IPX6/IPX15/
IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 03
Device Alarm IPX6/IPX15/
IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 04
Device Alarm IPX6/IPX15/
IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 05
Device Alarm IPX6/IPX15/
IPX25
Description
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Appendix A: Alarm Advisories • A-1
Alarm Items
Category
Cell Name
Read Data Failed AI 06
Device Alarm IPX6/IPX15/
IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 07
Device Alarm IPX6/IPX15/
IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 08
Device Alarm IPX15/IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 09
Device Alarm IPX15/IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 10
Device Alarm IPX15/IPX25
Read Data Failed AI 01
System Alarm OnBoard
A-2 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Description
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Can be configured to different sensor types; they can
be configured as “Input not used” or “Digital Input”. If
configured to a specific type sensor, whereas there is
no sensor connected to this port or there is something
wrong with the connected sensor, and no valid data can
be read from the analog input, the corresponding alarm
will be generated. The alarm is not applicable if the
analog input is configured to “Input not used” or “Digital Input”.
Should be generated if sensors are configured but disconnected. If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice
condition still exists, the delay period will be used.
Advisories will return to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Alarm Items
Category
Cell Name
Read Data Failed AI 02
System Alarm OnBoard
Read Data Failed AI 03
System Alarm OnBoard
Read Data Failed AI 04
System Alarm OnBoard
Read Data Failed AI 05
System Alarm OnBoard
Read Data Failed AI 06
System Alarm OnBoard
Read Data Failed AI 07
System Alarm OnBoard
Read Data Failed AI 08
System Alarm OnBoard
Network Device Offline
System Alarm None
Control Temp High Alarm
Application
Alarm
AHU
Description
Should be generated if sensors are configured but disconnected. If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice
condition still exists, the delay period will be used.
Advisories will return to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
Should be generated if sensors are configured but disconnected. If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice
condition still exists, the delay period will be used.
Advisories will return to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
Should be generated if sensors are configured but disconnected. If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice
condition still exists, the delay period will be used.
Advisories will return to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
Should be generated if sensors are configured but disconnected. If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice
condition still exists, the delay period will be used.
Advisories will return to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
Should be generated if sensors are configured but disconnected. If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice
condition still exists, the delay period will be used.
Advisories will return to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
Should be generated if sensors are configured but disconnected. If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice
condition still exists, the delay period will be used.
Advisories will return to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
Should be generated if sensors are configured but disconnected. If the advisory is reset, and the alarm/notice
condition still exists, the delay period will be used.
Advisories will return to normal if the command value
stays in the non-alarm/notice condition.
The current controller could not find the specified
device controller. Device applications will generate an
Offline advisory if the device fails to communicate
after it is commissioned. When the advisory is generated, the status of the application will be offline.
A control temperature advisory should occur after a
user specified time delay for both high and low temperature conditions. This advisory should have associated parameters to allow the user to specify the high
and low advisory value and the delay. This advisory
should have separate setpoints for occupied and unoccupied mode.
Appendix A: Alarm Advisories • A-3
Alarm Items
Category
Cell Name
Control Temp Low Alarm
Application
Alarm
AHU
Fan Proof Fail
Application
Alarm
AHU
Control Value Limit Exceeded Application
Alarm
AnalogSensorControl
Demand Limit Exceeded
Application
Alarm
DemandControl
Command Value Trip
Application
Alarm
DigitalSensorControl
Proof Failure
Application
Alarm
Application
Alarm
DigitalSensorControl
Lighting
LLev Proof Fail
Application
Alarm
Lighting
Curtail On
System Alarm GlobalData
Proof Fail
A-4 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Description
A control temperature advisory should occur after a
user specified time delay for both high and low temperature conditions. This advisory should have associated parameters to allow the user to specify the high
and low advisory value and the delay. This advisory
should have separate setpoints for occupied and unoccupied mode.
When enabled (Fan Prf Fail En) and a fan proof failure
is detected, heating and cooling loads will be shut
down until the proof failure goes away or the fan proof
alarm is reset or cleared. If the fan is configured to shut
down on a fan proof failure, the system may be
restarted by setting the FAN FAIL RST input to ON or
clearing the fan proof failure from the advisory log.
There is a high and low limit alarm for the inputs after
they are combined and filtered. The user sets occupied
and unoccupied, high and low setpoints. If the combined/filtered value exceeds the alarm setpoints an
alarm is generated based on the Alarm Type setting.
The application will provide an application alarm to
signal a high demand. The demand alarm limit and
alarm delay should be configurable.
The command value will be used to determine the
alarm state. The command value is the combined value
of all the digital inputs of the cell, plus occupancy, and
schedules. When the command value changes to an
alarm condition, the delay timer will start. If the state
changes, the timer will stop and no alarm will be
issued. If the state stays for the duration of the timer,
an advisory will be issued. If a state change occurs to
the opposite state after the advisory has been issued, it
will be returned to normal.
A proof checking device is registering a failure in one
of the Application’s control devices.
Proof delay. When the Lighting Control application
detects a proof failure, it will wait for the Proof Delay
time period to pass before turning on the Proof Status
output. If during this delay the proof input returns to
normal, the delay is canceled and the Proof Status output remains OK.
Light level proofing alarm delay. The Light Level
Proof Delay is the amount of time after sunrise or sunset that, if the light level sensor does not cut ON or
OFF appropriate to the light level of a sunrise or sunset, will generate an alarm. In other words, if the Light
Level Proof Delay is set for 1 hour, the light level must
fall below the cut-off set point at least one hour after
sundown, or else an alarm will be generated. Likewise,
if the cut-on light level setpoint is not reached by at
least one hour after sunrise, an alarm will be generated.
A Curtailment device set up in Global Data has activated to begin curtail.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Alarm Items
All Lights On
HVAC Shutdown
REFR Shutdown
HVAC Phase Loss
REFR Phase Loss
Archive Percentage Full
Demand Limit Exceeded
Heating Problem
Heat Shutdown
Failed Sensor
Stuck Key
Unexpected Temp Change
Cooling Problem
Proof Fail
Category
Cell Name
Description
System Alarm GlobalData
All Lights On input in Global Data application has
turned ON to switch on all the lights.
System Alarm GlobalData
A Global Data application’s HVAC Shutdown input
has turned ON to shut down all HVAC systems.
System Alarm GlobalData
A Global Data application’s REFR Shutdown input has
turned ON to shut down all suction groups, condensers, and circuits.
System Alarm GlobalData
A phase loss device connected to Global Data has
switched ON to shut down all HVAC systems.
System Alarm GlobalData
A phase loss device connected to Global Data has
switched ON to shut down all refrigeration systems.
System Alarm LogGroup
The controller supports the ability to archive log data
to the SD card if installed. The controller allows the
end user to specify on a per log group basis the destination of the archive. If configured and the SD card is
subsequently removed or if the SD card becomes
Archive Notice percentage full, a NOTICE advisory is
generated and log data archiving is suspended (Log
Archive disabled).
Application
UtilityMonitoring The application will provide an application alarm to
Alarm
signal a high demand. The demand alarm limit and
alarm delay should be configurable. The demand alarm
delay is the amount of time the application will wait
after the Shed output turns on, before the demand
alarm is generated. Also, the Shed Output may be configured to be controlled by either the average or instantaneous usage rate.
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat Heating Two Hours – Thermostat did not see a rise in
supply temperature when heating was called for.
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat Heat Continuous – In heat or backup heat mode, thermostat shall open latching relay contacts if temperature
is over 10°F above setpoint.
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat Temperature Sensor Fail – Thermostat has detected a
failure of the internal space temperature sensor.
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat A stuck key (closed) has been detected on the thermostat.
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat If heating or cooling is engaged, and either the indoor
temperature sensor reading, or the supply air temperature sensor reading starts moving the opposite way at a
higher rate than it was before the heating or cooling
was engaged, the thermostat shall report a diagnostic
message, and shut down the operation.
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat Cool Eight Hours – If cool runs for over 8 hours continuously, the thermostat shall set anticipator to zero
until call for cool is satisfied.
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat Fan Not Detected – Any time, when the fan is activated and if the Fan Detect input is enabled, the Thermostat shall check its status 15 seconds after the fan is
energized, and if the fan is not on, it shall disable any
active heat or cool calls, and report an alarm.
Appendix A: Alarm Advisories • A-5
Alarm Items
Category
Cell Name
Frost Protection Activated
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Long Run Time
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
System Pressure Trip
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Short Cycling
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Locked Rotor
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Open Circuit
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Open Start Circuit
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Open Run Circuit
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Welded Contactor
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Low Voltage
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
Protector Trip
Device Alarm Emerson T-Stat
A-6 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Description
The thermostat shall allow a frost protection menu
option. When enabled, frost protection is enabled in all
system modes including OFF, when temperature drops
below 42 °F (5.6 °C). All other heat / cool calls are disabled, and indoor heat is activated until the temperature rises above the frost protection threshold.
Compressor is running extremely long run cycles (typically for over 18 hours). The possible causes are: Low
refrigerant charge, Evaporator blower is not running,
Evaporator coil is frozen, Faulty metering device, Condenser coil is dirty, Thermostat is malfunctioning,
Compressor Second Stage Cooling Wiring.
Discharge or pressure out of limits or compressor overloaded. The possible causes are: High head pressure,
Condenser coil poor air circulation (dirty, blocked,
damaged), Condenser fan is not running, Return air
duct has substantial leakage.
Compressor is running only briefly. The possible
causes are: Thermostat demand signal is intermittent,
Time delay relay or control board is defective, High
pressure switch present.
Locked rotor. The possible causes are: Run capacitor
has failed, Low line voltage, Excessive liquid refrigerant in compressor, Compressor bearings are seized.
Compressor open circuit. The possible causes are: Outdoor unit power disconnect is open, Compressor circuit breaker or fuse(s) is open, Compressor contactor
has failed open, High pressure switch is open and
requires manual reset, Open circuit in compressor supply wiring or connections, Unusually long compressor
protector reset time due to extreme ambient temperature, Compressor windings are damaged.
Compressor current only in run circuit. The possible
causes are: Run capacitor has failed, Open circuit in
compressor start wiring or connections, Compressor
start winding is damaged.
Compressor current only in start circuit. The possible
causes are: Open circuit in compressor run wiring or
connections, Compressor run winding is damaged.
Compressor always runs. The possible causes are:
Compressor contactor has failed closed, Thermostat
demand signal is not connected to module.
Control circuit < 17VAC. The possible causes are:
Control circuit transformer is overloaded, Low line
voltage (contact utility if voltage at disconnect is low).
Thermostat demand signal Y is present, but the compressor is not running. The possible causes are: Compressor protector is open, Outdoor unit power
disconnect is open, Compressor circuit breaker or
fuse(s) is open, Broken wire or connector is not making contact, High pressure switch open if present in
system, Compressor contactor has failed open.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Alarm Items
Category
Cell Name
Case Temp Fail
Device Alarm XR75CX
Defr Term Fail
Device Alarm XR75CX
High Case Alarm
Device Alarm XR75CX
Low Case Alarm
Device Alarm XR75CX
RTC Data Lost
RTC Failure
External Alarm
Device Alarm XR75CX
Device Alarm XR75CX
Device Alarm XR75CX
Door Open
EEPROM Failure
Device Alarm XR75CX
Device Alarm XR75CX
Description
(Case temperature probe failure alarm) Alarm when
the case termination probe fails.
(Defrost termination probe failure alarm) Alarm when
the defrost termination probe fails.
Alarm if case temperature exceeds maximum case
temperature setpoint.
Alarm if case temperature falls below minimum case
temperature setpoint.
Alarm when the real time clock data is lost.
Alarm when the real time clock fails.
Alarm that indicates whether the relay is configured
for alarming.
The door open alarm is activated.
Alarm when the flash memory in the device fails.
Appendix A: Alarm Advisories • A-7
Appendix B: Troubleshooting
The chart below describes symptoms and solutions if troubleshooting the system or equipment is
needed. For further information, contact Emerson Retail Solutions Service at 1-800-829-2724.
SYMPTOM
POSSIBLE PROBLEM
SOLUTION
Getting Started
First Steps - Where Do I Start?
Call Technical support 770-425-2724 or refer
to the Quick Start Guide (P/N 026-4144).
Unable to Connect to Site Supervisor
IP Address Unknown
Connect to Site Supervisor - get IP Address.
For instructions for how to set a fixed IP
Address, refer to the Quick Start Guide
(P/N 026-4144).
Browser Connection Problems
Browser is Unsupported
Supported Browsers:
IE9 and newer, FireFox 13 and newer, Chrome
(all versions), and Safari (all versions).
Unable to Determine IP Address
or Unknown IP Address
Trouble Connecting
Check IPme text file procedure:
1.
Place file on USB drive. Save the .txt
to the root of the USB drive.
2.
Insert USB drive into the USB port.
After 3-5 minutes, the Ipme.txt will
display.
3.
Check the extension Ipme.txt.
4.
Remove USB drive.
5.
Insert the USB drive into your PC.
6.
View the profile.
Unable to Log into Site Supervisor
Incorrect password is being
used.
Site Supervisor is password protected. Contact
your Site Supervisor Administrator to request
a password.
Unable to Access Site Supervisor Remotely
Connection method is set up
incorrectly.
•
•
•
Check network connections.
Check Ethernet connection.
Check cellular modem connection.
Appendix B: Troubleshooting • B-1
SYMPTOM
Device Communication Problems
I/O Network Problems
POSSIBLE PROBLEM
SOLUTION
XR75CX
Refer to the XR75CX manual (P/N 026-1210)
for more information.
IPX-Expansion Modules
Refer to the iPro DAC manual (P/N 026-1727)
for more information.
Emerson T-stat
Refer to the Emerson T-Stat manual (P/N 0261729) for more information.
Energy Meter
Refer to the Energy Meter manual
(P/N 026-1726) for more information.
ACC
Refer to the ACC manual (P/N 026-4704) for
more information.
MRLDS
Refer to the MRLDS manual (P/N 026-1307)
for more information.
Mechanical Overrides
Check continuity tester - verify if the override
is showing a closure.
X Line Condensing Unit
Unsupported
I/O board not getting power.
Check I/O board power--is the green STATUS
light on? If not, check power wiring connections, and use a multimeter to verify the board
is getting 24VAC.
Reset power to board.
I/O board not communicating or
won’t come online.
Check I/O network connections:
1.
Check wire polarity (positive to
positive/negative to negative)
2.
Check for broken or loose wires.
Dip switches are set incorrectly.
Check I/O board network dip switches. Verify
network ID number is not a duplicate and that
baud rate switches are set to 9600. (If switches
are wrong, make changes and then reset the
controller).
Terminating resistance jumpers
are set incorrectly.
Check for proper setting of terminating resistance jumpers. Network segment should be
terminated on the two endpoints of the daisy
chain and unterminated everywhere else.
Boards are not powered.
Check Network/Power voltages.
B-2 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
SYMPTOM
Problems with Temp Sensor or
Pressure Transducer Displaying
Proper Value
POSSIBLE PROBLEM
SOLUTION
16AI input dip switches are set
improperly.
The 16 dip switches on the 16AI board correspond to each of the inputs:
Dip Switches Up = Temperature Sensor
Dip Switches Down = Pressure Transducer
Incorrect board and point
address.
Set proper board and point settings for both
input and output: Go to the Inputs tab in the
application’s Setup screen and check Board
and Point.
Incorrect sensor type.
Verify that the sensor type in Site Supervisor is
the same as the sensor installed. (For example,
“5V-200PSI” is a 5-volt powered 200PSI pressure transducer, and “Temperature” is the standard Emerson Retail Solutions temperature
sensor.
NOTE: The previous Eclipse and Standard
sensors are now 5V and 12V respectively.
For 16AI boards:
1.
Log into Site Supervisor.
2.
Click the Site Map icon.
3.
Under Control Status, select
System.
4.
Click Details.
5.
Under 16AI Board DETAILS, select
AI01.
6.
Check the value of the Sensor Type.
7. Click Edit to change.
For Onboard I/O:
1. Log into Site Supervisor.
2. Click the Site Map icon.
3. Under Control Status, select
System.
4. Click Onboard IO along the bottom
of the screen.
5. Click Details.
6. Under Onboard IO DETAILS, click
Setup.
7. Check the desired sensor type value
from the list and click Edit to make
changes.
Appendix B: Troubleshooting • B-3
SYMPTOM
No Heat Will Come On
POSSIBLE PROBLEM
Incorrect board and points
assignment. Check the Heat
OAT lockout temps.
SOLUTION
Make sure that your board and points are
assigned to the correct compressors and heat
stages.
1.
No Cool Will Come On
Incorrect board and points
assignment. Check the Cool
OAT lockout temps.
B-4 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Log into Site Supervisor.
2.
Click the Site Map icon.
3.
Under Control Status, click HVAC.
4.
Click Details.
5.
If Heat Lockout En is enabled (set to
ON), check that Heat OAT LOCK is
set to a valid setpoint (temperature)
for heat lock out.
Make sure that your board and points are
assigned to the correct compressors and heat
stages.
1.
Log into Site Supervisor.
2.
Click the Site Map icon.
3.
Under Control Status, click HVAC.
4.
Click Details.
5.
If Cool Lockout En is enabled (set to
ON), check that Cool OAT LOCK is
set to a valid setpoint (temperature)
for cool lock out.
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
SYMPTOM
Lighting Control Problems
POSSIBLE PROBLEM
Lights will not come on.
SOLUTION
Make sure you have a Time Schedule set up. A
Time Schedule is not Lighting Control. You
can use the same Time Schedule for several
Lighting Controls. Set up the Time Schedule
first and then assign it to a Lighting Control.
Set up a Time Schedule and go to Lighting
Control.
1.
Log into Site Supervisor.
2.
Click the Site Map icon.
3.
Under Control Status, click
Lighting.
4.
Click Details.
5.
Click Inputs (found in the right-side
of the screen).
6.
Click Edit. Select and expand
SCHEDULE IN.
7.
Select and expand TARGET and
select the desired schedule from the
drop-down list.
8.
Select and expand PROPERTY and
set to OUTPUT. This will feed the
schedule into Lighting.
Make sure Lighting Control output is
assigned.
Lights Will Not Come On With
The Photocell
Photocell is not recognized by
the controller.
Make sure the photocell is configured as an
analog input.
Verify that the type of light sensor is correct.
If using a light level sensor from another Site
Supervisor controller, set it up on the controller it is associated with in the Global Data section.
Appendix B: Troubleshooting • B-5
Index
Numerics
4AO Analog Output Board
features 2-8
4AO Boards 2-8
8DO Boards 2-8
8DO Digital Output Board
defined 2-8
features 2-8
8RO Boards 2-7
8RO Relay Output Board
defined 2-7
features 2-8
8RO/8ROSMT Board 2-7
-AACC 5-34
AHU 5-38
Alarm Information 7-1
Analog Combiner 5-38
Analog Inputs 1-7
Analog Sensor Control 5-3
Anti-Sweat 5-39
case-controlled
how setpoints work 5-39
Application Locations 6-3
Applications 6-3
-BBasic Setup 8-1
-CCan Bus 1-8
Case Control Circuits 5-40
defrost in 5-42
overview 5-40
Case Controllers
CC-100H
defined 5-41
CC-100LS
defined 5-41
CC-100P
defined 5-41
CS-100
defined 5-41
defrost 5-42
pump down delay 5-43
defrost types 5-43
EEPRs
recovery mode 5-42
recovery mode
EEPRs 5-42
EEVs 5-42
superheat control 5-42
temperature control 5-42
valves 5-41
EEPRs 5-42
EEVs 5-42
liquid pulse 5-42
liquid stepper 5-42
pulse 5-41
stepper 5-41
suction stepper 5-42
CC-100H. See Case Controllers.
CC-100LS. See Case Controllers.
CC-100P. See Case Controllers.
Com Port 4 1-8
Com Ports 1-8
Combiners 5-38
Condenser 5-50
Control Link ACC 5-34
Copeland Digital Discus Compressor 5-1, 5-2
CS-100 5-41
CS-100. See Case Controllers, CS-100
-DData Logging 5-33
Defrost
defrost cycle 5-43
demand 5-43
fail-safe time 5-44
drip time. See Defrost, run-off time.
electric 5-43
emergency 5-44
hot gas 5-43
in case controlled circuits 5-42
inhibiting, using demand sensors 5-43
off-cycle 5-43
pulsed 5-43
pump down delay 5-43
reverse cycle hot gas 5-43
run-off time 5-43
termination 5-43
pulsed defrost 5-43
• I-1
temperature 5-43
timed (off-cycle) 5-43
Demand Control 5-17
Demand Defrost. See Defrost, demand.
Digital Combiner 5-38
Digital Discus Compressor 5-1, 5-2
Digital Inputs 1-6
Digital Scroll Compressor Support 5-2
Digital Sensor Control 5-5
Dimensions 1-1
Discus Compressor 5-1, 5-2
Display 2-10, 4-1
Display Firmware Update 4-4
Display Specifications 4-1
-EElectric Defrost. See Defrost, electric.
Emerson T-Stat 5-32
Energy Meter 5-33
Enhanced Suction Group 5-1
-FFlexible Combiner 5-33
-GGlobal Data 5-9
-HHand-held Terminal 2-7
Hand-held Terminal (HHT) 2-7
Hardware Overiew 1-1
Help Menu 6-4, 8-1
Hot Gas Defrost. See Defrost, hot gas.
HVAC Control 5-10
HVAC Zone 5-34
-I
I/O Boards 2-1
I/O Network 1-1
problems with B-1
Icons 6-5
Inputs 1-6, 1-7
IP Address Location 8-2
Irrigation Control 5-44
-LLanguages 6-3
Lighting Control 5-6
Logging 5-33
Loop Sequence Control 5-47
-MMenus 6-1
I-2 • Site Supervisor Controller User Guide 2.0
Mounting 1-1
MRLDS 5-34
MultiFlex 16 Board
features 2-1, 2-2
MultiFlex Boards 2-1
16 2-1
combination input/output 2-2
RCB 2-6
RTU 2-6
MultiFlex ESR Board 2-6
MultiFlex RCB 2-6
MultiFlex RTU 2-6
MultiFlex RTU Satellite Inputs 2-3
-NNavigation 6-1
-OOff-Cycle Defrost. See Defrost, off-cycle.
OnBoard I/O 5-20
Online Help Menu 6-4, 8-1
Outputs 1-6
-PPMAC II
defined 2-8
Pulse Modulating Anti-Sweat Controller. See
PMAC II.
Pulsed Defrost. See Defrost, pulsed.
-RRCB 1-6
Recovery Mode, for Case Controllers 5-42
Relay Outputs 1-6
Reverse Cycle Hot Gas. See Defrost, reverse cycle hot gas.
Revision History 9-1
RLDS 6-34
RS485 Network 2-1
RTU 2-6
-SSD Card 1-5
Serial Connections 1-8
Serial Ports 1-8
Site Manager Compatibility 5-50
Site Supervisor Display 2-10
Software Applications 5-1
Specifications 1-1
Standard Circuits 5-40
Suction Group 5-1
026-1800 Rev 3 02-AUG-2016
Suction Groups 5-1
Enhanced 5-1
floating setpoint control 5-1
hardware overview 5-2
Introduction 5-1
PID control strategy overview 5-1
variable-speed compressors 5-1
Superheat Control 5-42
-TTD Control 5-44
Temperature Control
case controllers 5-42
Temperature Differential (TD) Control
alarms 5-46
configuration 5-45
inputs 5-46
setpoints 5-45
TD failsafes 5-45
TD strategy 5-45
Termination Jumpers 1-4
Thermostatic Expansion Valves. See TXVs.
Time Schedule 5-14
Troubleshooting B-1
T-Stat 5-32
TXVs
control using CC-100s 5-42
-UUL Ratings 1-7
User Interface 6-1
Utility Monitoring 5-19
-WWiring 1-2
Wiring Examples 3-1
-XXC645CX 5-26
XJ Condensing Unit 5-50
XM Circuit
advisories 5-49
associations 5-47
case circuit support 5-47
commands 5-49
data synchronization
parameters 5-48
visibility 5-48
suction group interaction 5-48
supervisory control functions 5-48
active setpoint output 5-48
case states 5-49
case type 5-49
defrost scheduling 5-48
dewpoint 5-48
lighting 5-48
XM Circuit Control 5-47
XM Controllers 2-9
XM Series of Controllers 2-9
XM670 2-9
XM678 2-9
XM679 2-9
XR35CX 5-23
XR75CX 5-31
XR75CX Case Display 5-29
• I-3
The contents of this publication are presented for informational purposes only and they are not to be construed as warranties or guarantees, express or implied, regarding the products or
services described herein or their use or applicability. Emerson Climate Technologies Retail Solutions, Inc. and/or its affiliates (collectively “Emerson”), reserves the right to modify the designs or
specifications of such products at any time without notice. Emerson does not assume responsibility for the selection, use or maintenance of any product. Responsibility for proper selection, use
and maintenance of any product remains solely with the purchaser and end-user.
026-1800 02-AUG-2016 Emerson is a trademark of Emerson Electric Co. ©2016 Emerson Climate Technologies Retail Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
For more information go to http://www.emersonclimate.com/qrcode006 or contact Emerson Retail Solutions at 770-425-2724.
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