MacBook (13-inch Early 2009)

MacBook (13-inch Early 2009)
MacBook
Getting Started
Welcome to the MacBook course.
Reviewing this course will enable you to efficiently
troubleshoot and service this latest Mac consumer portable
offering.
Target Audience
This course is intended for technicians who support and service Apple products.
Prerequisite Courses
Basic Computer Theory and Terms
Underlying Technologies
References
Diagnostics
Troubleshooting Theory
ESD Precautions
Hardware Tools
Technician Safety
Hardware Service Issues
Liquid Crystal Displays
Wireless Networking
Time Required
90 minutes
Course Objectives
Applicable to all models covered in this course:
Given an isolated hardware device issue and a possible resolution, use Apple documentation, approved
tools, and service inventory to safely repair the hardware device in 45 minutes.
Using Apple technical documentation as a reference, remove and then replace a specified component
of a given supported product in the time allocated for that repair procedure.
Given a hardware service repair and the correct Apple technical documentation for a specified
supported product, identify the service and safety issues for that product in 2 minutes.
Given a hardware service repair and the correct Apple technical documentation for a specified
supported product, identify specialized tools/fixtures or procedures required to service that product in 2
minutes.
Use hardware service diagnostics to thoroughly verify that a given hardware service repair was
completed correctly in 5 minutes.
Reseat identified connectors to resolve a hardware issue on a given device before replacing any service
parts on that device in 10 minutes.
Return to top
Next: MacBook Overview
MacBook Overview
MacBook Models
Documentation
MacBook Ports
MacBook Models
The MacBook series was introduced in May of 2006. It brought Intel-based processors to Apple's consumer
portable line.
The MacBook series consists of the following models:
MacBook (13-inch)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2006)
MacBook (13-inch Mid 2007)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2007)
MacBook (13-inch Early 2008)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2008)
MacBook (13-inch Aluminum Late 2008)
MacBook (13-inch Early 2009)
MacBook (13-inch Mid 2009)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2009)
MacBook (13-inch Mid 2010)
Documentation
Here are the Service Manuals and Tech Guides for these products.
Manual/TechGuide
Models Covered
MacBook (13-inch)
MacBook (13-inch)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2006)
MacBook (13-inch Mid 2007)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2007)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2007)
MacBook (13-inch Early 2008)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2008)
MacBook (13-inch Aluminum
Late 2008)
MacBook (13-inch Aluminum Late 2008)
MacBook (13-inch Early 2009)
MacBook (13-inch, Early 2009)
MacBook (13-inch Mid 2009)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2009)
MacBook (13-inch Late 2009)
MacBook (13-inch Mid 2010)
MacBook Ports
MacBook computers have differing collections of I/O ports. These articles can assist you in understanding the
ports and connectors on each MacBook model.
HT1562, "MacBook (White or Black): External ports and connectors"
HT3388, "MacBook (13-inch, Aluminum, Late 2008): External ports and connectors"
HT3921, "MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009): External ports and connectors"
HT4167, "MacBook (13-inch, Mid 2010): External ports and connectors"
Back to top
Next: Course Exercise
Course Exercise
Open this page separately and keep it open while you review the course.
As you go through the course answer the following questions.
1. Access the MacBook service manual and review the Additional Procedures in the Take Apart section.
Note the new procedures for replacing key caps.
2. Also review the What's New section in Take Apart section.
3. A customer states that his MacBook (13-inch) is running hot. What is the first thing you should find
out?
4. Another customer states that his MacBook (13-inch) is suffering intermittent shutdowns. What is the
first thing you should confirm?
5. Yet another customer states that their MacBook (13-inch) will not start after a RAM upgrade. What is
the first step you should take?
6. As you are opening up a MacBook (13-inch Early 2009) you see that several Liquid Contact Indicators
are red. What effect does this have on the repair?
7. How do you replace the backup battery in a MacBook (13-inch Early 2009) model?
Next: Product Differences
Significant Features
MagSafe Connectors
Target Disk Mode and MacBooks
MacBook Battery Life
Battery End of Life
Disc Drive Issues
Physical Appearance
MacBook (13-inch Early 2009) Differences
MagSafe Connectors
The MacBook 60-Watt power adapter with MagSafe connector uses a magnetic connection instead of a
physical plug. This means that tripping over a power cord won't send your MacBook flying off the table or
desk; the cord simply breaks cleanly away, without damage to either the cord or the computer.
There are a number of service issues for such connectors. Your best resource for learning about these issues
is support article TS1713 "Apple Portables: Troubleshooting MagSafe adapters".
Review this article before continuing.
Target Disk Mode and MacBooks
If you attempt to mount an Intel-based MacBook in Target Disk Mode on a Mac running Mac OS X 10.3.9 or
earlier, you'll see an alert message that says "You have inserted a disk containing no volumes that Mac OS X
can read."
The computer you are mounting to must be running Mac OS X 10.4 or later for Target Disk Mode to work.
MacBook Battery Life
Review the following resources on battery life.
Apple Notebooks
HT1490 - "Apple Portables: Calibrating your computer's battery for best performance"
HT1446 - "Apple Portables: Tips for maximizing your battery charge"
Battery End of Life
When a lithium polymer battery reaches its end of life, the battery simply ceases function. There is no
downward ramp in performance. This means that any battery issue should prompt questions as to how long
the battery has been used.
More information about this topic is found at Battery Replacement.
Disc Drive Issues
The optical drive on this computer has narrow tolerances for the recommended optical media. If the drive
does not accept discs, the wrong kind of disc could be inserted. Advise customer to use discs no thicker than
1.5 mm.
For more information please see the Apple support article HT2801 "Apple Portables: Troubleshooting the
slot load optical disc drive".
In addition, the optical drives in the MacBook can be adversely affected by pressure from misaligned
components surrounding the optical drive module. For this reason, be sure to carefully follow the
replacement instructions in the service manual.
Physical Appearance
Many MacBooks are very similar in appearance. Apple Support Article HT1635- "How to visually identify
your black or white MacBook model" will assist you in determining what MacBook you are working with.
MacBook (13-inch Early 2009) Differences
Backup Battery
Summary:The backup battery is no longer a separate part, but rather a surface mount capacitor build onto the
underside of the logic board.
Mini-DVI Port Compatibility
Summary: The Mini-DVI port on the MacBook (13-inch, Early 2009 drops compatibility with composite
video out and S-video out. Therefore, the Apple Mini-DVI to Video adapter (M9319G/A) does not work with
this product.
Symptom: Customers may report issues with using the Apple Mini-DVI to Video adapter with this product,
such as no video out from the adapter, etc.
Solution: Inform customers who raise this issue that this product does not support this adapter.
Back to top
Next: Troubleshooting Issues
Troubleshooting Issues
Troubleshooting Issues
Troubleshooting Issues
Graphics and Memory - For best graphics performance, your MacBook (13-inch) ships from Apple
with two equal-sized SO-DIMMs installed, one in each slot.
When memory is installed in MacBook (13-inch) in equal-sized pairs, the computer gains some
performance benefits from this memory being interleaved.
If you upgrade the memory in your MacBook (13-inch), make sure you have matching size SODIMMs (both in terms of memory size and in speed) in each slot for best graphics performance.
Hard Drive Partition Compatibility - Boot up a MacBook in Target Disk mode and it will not appear
on a a Desktop of a computer running Mac OS X 10.3.9 or earlier.
Lithium Polymer Batteries - Batteries are sensitive to temperature extremes and shocks. At end of
life, this type of battery goes completely dead. There is no gradual loss of capacity before end of life.
Optical drive - Media tolerances in the optical drives are quite stringent. Be careful to use only
standard size and shape optical media.
SO-DIMMs - SO-DIMMs must be fully seated to avoid start up issues. If the power LED is blinking,
check RAM seating.
Optical Drive Bezel Clips - When replacing an optical drive, make sure that the four bezel clips are
correctly placed. They can slip during reassembly and make the drive inoperative.
Backup Battery in MacBook (13-inch Early 2009)
Summary:The backup battery is no longer a separate part, but rather a surface mount capacitor
build onto the underside of the logic board.
Mini-DVI Port Compatibility in MacBook (13-inch Early 2009)
Summary: The Mini-DVI port on the MacBook (13-inch, Early 2009 drops compatibility with
composite video out and S-video out. Therefore, the Apple Mini-DVI to Video adapter
(M9319G/A) does not work with this product.
Symptom: Customers may report issues with using the Apple Mini-DVI to Video adapter with
this product, such as no video out from the adapter, etc.
Solution: Inform customers who raise this issue that this product does not support this adapter
Back to top
Next: Tools
Tools
Issues with Tools
Required Tools
Issues with Tools
Using Correct Tools
MacBooks contain small parts that are held together with a wide variety of small screws and bolts. One of the
most common mistakes in working with MacBooks is to use the wrong size or type of tool when repairing the
unit.
All too often, the wrong tool means that screws are worn or screw attachment points are stripped.
Apple service manuals have sections that describe the tools needed to perform repairs and part replacement
procedures. These procedures work as long as you use the recommended tools as a part of the recommended
procedure.
Keeping Track of Parts
One of the recommended tools for any repair is a tray with numerous compartments. If you do not use some
means of keeping track of the screws and other small parts that you remove from a MacBook, you will have a
very difficult time reassembling the computer.
A partitioned tray along with the Screw Matrix in the Service Manual will save you a great deal of time and
ensure that a completed repair has not added problems to the computer.
Issues with Metal tools
Be very careful whenever using metal tools anywhere around a MacBook. It's very easy to scratch outer
surfaces with metal tools.
Remember to only use plastic pry tools to carefully unlatch cable connectors and release catches on plastic
case parts. Apple recommends the Nylon Probe Tool. This is a black plastic pry tool that should not damage
plastics or scratch metals if used carefully.
More details on tools for computer repair are found in the Hardware Tools course.
Required Tools
You need the following tools to work on MacBook computers.
Clean, soft, lint-free cloth
Coin
ESD wrist strap and mat
Magnetic Phillips #0 screwdriver
Magnetic Phillips #00 screwdriver (preferably with a long handle)
Black stick (Apple probe tool, part number 922-5065) or other nonconductive nylon or plastic
flatblade tool
Access card (Apple part number 922-7172) to open the top case
Jeweler’s flatblade screwdriver
Needlenose pliers
Stack of books, weighted boxes, or other means of support for display while removing
screws from hinge
Thermal grease (Apple thermal compound syringe, part number 922-7144)
Alcohol wipes
Permanent marking, felt-tip pen
Standard size CD or DVD disc
Metric ruler (for checking the size of screws)
Flashlight or bright lamp
Next: Repair Issues
Repair Issues
Repair Issues
Special Issues for MacBook (13-inch Late 2008)
Special Issues for MacBook (13-inch Early 2009)
Repair Issues
The following tips are taken from the MacBook service manual. If you have any questions regarding any of
these tips, consult the manual before proceeding with a repair.
A soft touch is crucial in working on these computers.
A metric ruler is extremely useful for measuring screw lengths. In the MacBook, it is sometimes easy
to misidentify a screw during assembly of the unit. Using an incorrect screw could damage the case,
logic board or other components.
Because the components are very tightly packed together, you need to be aware of cable routing in
order to reassemble the unit correctly. Be sure to review the service manual before repairing the
computer. One procedure that helps is to mark cable routing in the computer with a marker before
removing the cable. This ensures that you will be able to replace the cable in its proper position.
Review how to open Vertical Insert connectors (also known as Zero Insertion Force (ZIF) connectors)
before performing a repair. These connectors requires straight down insertion and straight up extraction
to avoid damage. Use the nylon probe tool to open these connectors and be very gentle when you do
so.
You need to observe MagSafe Connector precautions such as keeping metal objects away from the
MagSafe slot on the MacBook and being sure that the slot is clear of any debris.
The Sleep Switch connector is quite fragile and should be handled very delicately.
When replacing the Bluetooth Board, avoid pressing it. Only handle it on the edges.
Replacing Optical Drive Bezel Clips requires care. Consult the manual for details of this process. If
they are installed incorrectly, the bezel will not reassemble correctly.
Replacing Display Bezel Brace Shims is a very delicate procedure. Again, consult the manual.
Antenna Receptors are very delicate and must be handled carefully when attaching antennas.
The LCD panel must be handled by the Bezel Brace Sides.
The Inverter Board must be handled by edges to avoid damage.
For MacBook (13-inch Late 2007 and Early 2008) computers:
Most of the cable connectors on the logic board use a JST design that requires special vertical insertion
and extraction. To prevent damage to the connectors, remove and install them from a completely level
position.
To disconnect JST connectors, use a black stick and your finger to help support the cables and keep the
connectors level.
To connect the cables and avoid damage to the sensitive contacts in the JST connectors, make sure the
mated parts are completely aligned, level, and flush to each other before applying pressure. Then use
your finger or a black stick to press them straight down into place.
The MacBook (13-inch Early 2008) improved environmental impact means that the majority of circuit
board laminates are free of brominated flame retardants and the majority of internal cables are PVCfree.
Cable connector names are printed on the logic board.
Backup battery located on bottom case rather than underside of logic board.
Captive bezel clips at slot-load optical drive.
Shims at display bezel scoops.
Special Issues for the MacBook (13-inch Late 2008)
MacBook (Late 2008) display clamshell removal / replacement requires the use of a 'wedge-shaped' servicing
fixture (which is available as a tool in GSX) to properly align the display clamshell's clutches and hinges with
the top case
Special Issues for the MacBook (13-inch Early 2009)
Liquid Contact Indicators
Summary: To help determine accidental damage, the MacBook’s top case, logic board and battery cable
connector include spill sensors called liquid contact indicators (LCIs). These small white dots turn red when
they come in contact with liquid, such as an accidental spill.
Tips:
The Liquid Contact Indicator is very accurate in determining whether liquid has entered the product.
The indicator will turn red or pink when the product has been exposed to enough moisture to cause
damage to the product's internal components.
There are three LCIs under the keyboard of the top case, one LCI on the battery cable connector, and
one LCI on the main logic board.
If this product has been damaged by liquid, the repair will not be covered by either the Apple limited
warranty or the AppleCare Protection Plan.
Because of these new LCIs, for research and engineering purposes the top case will now be a
returnable 661- part instead of a 922- part.
Note: Service technicians should refer to the Apple support article HT3400, "About liquid submersion
indicators (LSI) on portable and desktop computers".
Special Issues for the MacBook (13-inch Late 2009)
No IR Remote Support
Summary: MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) does not support the IR-based Apple Remote.
Symptom: Some customers may try to use an Apple IR Remote with MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009), and
will find that it does not work to control functions such as Front Row. They may think this is a malfunction
and therefore a service issue.
Solution: There is no IR receiver in MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009), so this is normal behavior and is not a
service issue. However, it is still possible to enter Front Row without using an IR remote. Here's how:
To enter Front Row, press Command-Esc on the keyboard.
- Press the cursor keys and the Return key to select items in Front Row.
- Press Esc to back up in the menu.
- Type Command-Q to leave Front Row.
Remote for iPhone and iPod touch (available from the iTunes Store) is supported because it works over
AirPort.
Note: Remote for iPhone and iPod touch is not a free application. Price varies by region.
No Exterior Battery Indicator Lights
Summary: MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) has no exterior battery indicator lights.
Solution: Use the battery information in the Battery menu or System Profiler to troubleshoot power-related
symptoms.
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Next: Exercise Answer Key
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