Human Performance Systems, Inc.

Human Performance Systems, Inc.
Human Performance Systems, Inc.
FITNESS TRAINING PROGRAM
FOR VIRGINIA BEACH POLICE OFFICER
CANDIDATES AND INCUMBENTS
Deborah L. Gebhardt, Ph.D.
Submitted By:
Human Performance Systems, Inc.
5000 Sunnyside Avenue
Suite 203
Beltsville, Maryland 20705
May 2009
Copyright © Human Performance Systems, Inc. May 2009
5000 Sunnyside Avenue ♦ Suite 203 ♦ Beltsville, Maryland 20705♦ Phone (301) 595-9509
FITNESS TRAINING PROGRAM
FOR VIRGINIA BEACH POLICE OFFICER
CANDIDATES AND INCUMBENTS
Deborah L. Gebhardt, Ph.D.
Submitted By:
Human Performance Systems, Inc.
5000 Sunnyside Avenue
Suite 203
Beltsville, Maryland 20705
May 2009
Copyright © Human Performance Systems, Inc. May 2009
i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1
Medical Screening .................................................................................................................... 1
Overview of Fitness Program ................................................................................................... 1
Self Test and Exercise Prescription .......................................................................................... 1
General Training Principles ............................................................................................................ 2
Overload ................................................................................................................................... 2
Specificity................................................................................................................................. 2
Motivation ................................................................................................................................ 2
Fitness Training Program................................................................................................................ 3
Exercise Session Phases .............................................................................................................. 3
Warm-Up .................................................................................................................................. 3
Workout .................................................................................................................................... 3
Cool Down ............................................................................................................................... 3
Precautions Before Exercise..................................................................................................... 4
Designing Your Daily Exercise Program ................................................................................. 5
Warm Up Program....................................................................................................................... 5
Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 5
Warm-Up Exercises ................................................................................................................. 6
Weight Training Workout ........................................................................................................... 6
Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 6
Weight Training Exercises ....................................................................................................... 8
Aerobic Workout ......................................................................................................................... 9
Aerobic Exercises ................................................................................................................... 11
Cool Down Program .................................................................................................................. 11
Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 11
Cool Down Exercises ............................................................................................................. 11
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ii
LIST OF APPENDICES
Page
Appendix A: Warm-Up and Cool-Down Exercises.................................................................... 12
Appendix B: Weight Training Exercises .................................................................................... 20
Appendix C: Aerobic Training Programs ................................................................................... 33
Appendix D : Weight Training Workout Record ....................................................................... 41
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iii
LIST OF FIGURES
Page
Figure 1: Quadriceps Stretch ....................................................................................................... 14
Figure 2. Hamstring Stretch. ........................................................................................................ 15
Figure 3: Hamstring Stretch Alternate Position – Single Leg ..................................................... 15
Figure 4. Calf Stretch. .................................................................................................................. 16
Figure 5: Side Bend with Straight Arms ...................................................................................... 17
Figure 6: Single Arm Cross Over ................................................................................................ 18
Figure 7: Single Knee Tuck ......................................................................................................... 19
Figure 8: Chest Press ................................................................................................................... 21
Figure 9: Chest Fly....................................................................................................................... 22
Figure 10: Leg Press .................................................................................................................... 23
Figure 11: Dumbbell Pullover ..................................................................................................... 24
Figure 12: Bent-Over Row........................................................................................................... 25
Figure 13: Shoulder Press ............................................................................................................ 26
Figure 14: Lateral Raise ............................................................................................................... 27
Figure 15: Biceps Curl ................................................................................................................. 28
Figure 16: Triceps Extension (Kickback) .................................................................................... 29
Figure 17: Push Ups ..................................................................................................................... 30
Figure 18: Toe Raises .................................................................................................................. 31
Figure 19: Crunches ..................................................................................................................... 32
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1
INTRODUCTION
The job of a police officer requires a certain level of physical fitness. For example, upper body
muscle strength is necessary to handcuff a resistive individual or drag a passive offender. Lower
body muscle strength and muscle endurance are required to pursue individuals, climb steps,
fences, or ladders. Tasks such as pursuing an individual and extracting a person who is resisting
arrest from a vehicle also require muscular strength and muscular endurance. However, they
utilize the anaerobic system which supplies the energy for short duration tasks. Although most
pursuits occur over a short distance (e.g., up to 100 yards), some may require moving over
obstacles and arresting a resistive individual. This type of activity has been show to require a
moderate level of aerobic capacity (aerobic endurance).
The levels of muscle strength, muscle endurance, and aerobic capacity necessary to perform the
physically demanding job tasks safely and efficiently can be attained and maintained through
regular participation in a fitness program. The fitness program in this document has been
specifically designed to improve your fitness to complete the physically demanding job tasks of a
police officer and to improve your ability to perform the components of the Police Officer Test.
Medical Screening
Before you start this fitness program, evaluate your current health. As recommended by the
American College of Sports Medicine, men aged 40 or greater and women aged 50 or greater
need a medical exam and clearance before starting a fitness program. If you are at risk for heart
disease, it is extremely important that you consult your physician before you start a fitness
program. Your risk of heart disease increases with high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol,
smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, and a family history of diabetes or heart disease. If you have other
medical conditions or musculoskeletal injuries, you should seek medical approval before starting
the program. If you are a man less than 40 years of age or a woman less than 50 years of age,
have a low risk of heart disease, and lead an active lifestyle, you can probably start the program
immediately.
Overview of Fitness Program
The fitness program consists of flexibility, strength, anaerobic, and aerobic exercises. The
program provides instruction on each of the fitness components. The goal of the program is to
provide a fitness plan that can be structured to meet the requirements of most police officers. The
exercise prescription outlines individualized routines in the areas of strength, flexibility, and
aerobic capacity. The goal of the fitness program is to make exercise a part of your lifestyle.
Self Test and Exercise Prescription
The fitness program consists of self tests to establish the intensity and duration of the initial
exercise prescription and the progressions for the remaining weeks of the program. The self tests
consist of assessments of aerobic capacity (stair climb), upper body muscular strength (push-ups
and chin-ups), and muscular endurance (sit-ups).
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GENERAL TRAINING PRINCIPLES
There are three general training principles that should be incorporated into a fitness program.
Adherence to these principles will enable you to meet your exercise goals. These principles are
overload, specificity, and motivation.
Overload
To improve fitness you must increase your physical activity. The exercises performed must be at
a level that exceed or overload your current capabilities. To attain an overload you must alter the
FIT parameters.
F or frequency of exercise per week (e.g., 3 times per week)
I or intensity of the exercise (e.g., walk a mile in 11 minutes rather than 12 minutes)
T or time spent exercising (e.g., increase the duration of a bicycle ride from 20 to 30 minutes)
One or a combination of the FIT parameters may be increased to overload the body. For
example if you wish to increase muscular strength, you can increase exercise intensity by
increasing the amount of weight lifted and decreasing the number of times the weight is lifted.
To increase aerobic capacity (aerobic fitness) you can increase the time spent performing the
activity and/or the frequency of the activity (e.g., running).
Specificity
The human body responds to the specific demand placed upon it. To improve performance of
police officer tasks involving upper body strength, one must select exercises that use the muscles
in the upper body. For example, to effectively train to pull/drag an incapacitated person you need
to perform exercises that involve the muscles in the shoulders and upper arms (e.g., deltoid,
biceps, and triceps), as well as the back (e.g., erector spinae). Since the body’s response to
training is specific, the exercises in your fitness program must place specific demands upon the
same physiological systems and muscle groups used to perform police officer tasks.
Motivation
To achieve the desired fitness level you must be motivated to participate on a scheduled basis
and use the overload principle. Staying motivated is the key to success and can be achieved if
you select exercise activities you enjoy. If motivation is a problem (1) set aside a specific time to
exercise, (2) vary your program (e.g., use different strength exercises to train the same body
parts), (3) keep a record of your progress, and (4) exercise with a partner. It is widely accepted
that an exercise partner will encourage improvement and participation.
If you reach a plateau or time period when there is not evidence of improvement, use the
motivation tips above to stay motivated. A plateau should not last long if you are applying the
FIT principles.
Applying the FIT principles will increase your fitness level. However, remember that some
discomfort such as sore muscles and/or breathing heavily will be experienced as you increase the
intensity and duration of your exercises. If muscle soreness and/or fatigue occur on a frequent
basis, you may take a multiple day rest period. If these signs are persistent, contact a medical
professional.
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FITNESS TRAINING PROGRAM
Exercise Session Phases
Exercise sessions are defined as each time you participate in some type of training. An exercise
session should consist of three phases: (1) warm-up, (2) workout, and (3) cool down. Completion
of these three exercise phases will decrease the risk of injury and muscle soreness, and facilitate
the performance of job tasks by improving flexibility and other fitness characteristics. The
purpose and activities included in each phase are described below, along with a list of
precautions to observe before each exercise session.
Warm-Up
The warm-up includes stretching exercises for the arms, legs, and back, along with light aerobic
activities (e.g., jogging in place). Warm-up activities increase blood flow and body temperature
which prepares the body for exercise and reduces the risk of muscle and joint injuries during the
workout.
The stretching exercises improve flexibility. Improved flexibility reduces the risk of muscle
soreness and injury after performing physically demanding job tasks. Increased flexibility of
lower back and upper leg muscles also helps to alleviate low back pain.
Workout
The workout is the most strenuous phase of the exercise session and includes muscular strength,
muscular endurance, flexibility, and aerobic fitness exercises. Muscular strength and endurance
is the ability of the muscles to exert force for a single activity (e.g., lift and carry items weighing
30-50 lbs.) or a continuous activity (e.g., physically restrain suspect). Muscular strength and
endurance is increased through weight/resistance training. The workout also includes aerobic
activities that increase the efficiency of your cardio-respiratory system. These aerobic activities
are rhythmical, use large muscle groups, and can be sustained for a given period of time. Aerobic
activities include walking, running, stair climbing, swimming, rowing, and bicycling. Workout
activities vary with the goals of the fitness program.
If you experience dizziness, nausea, a rapid heart rate, chest pains, or difficulty breathing during
the workout, gradually stop all exercise. Notify your exercise partner or a coworker of your
condition and seek medical assistance. However, remember that some discomfort will be
experienced (e.g., breathing heavily) as you increase the intensity of your exercises.
The physically demanding police officer tasks require moderate to high levels of muscular
strength and aerobic fitness. For example, upper and lower body muscular strength and aerobic
fitness are required to pursue and handcuff an individual. Other job tasks that require police
officers to use muscular strength and endurance include crowd control and use of an expandable
baton.
Cool Down
The cool down includes light aerobic activities and stretching exercises. The light aerobic
activities precede the stretching to prevent blood from pooling in the arms and legs and reduce
the likelihood of dizziness and fainting. The stretching exercises improve flexibility which
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4
reduces the risk of muscle soreness after the workout and after the performance of physically
demanding job tasks.
Precautions Before Exercise
Pre-Exercise Dos
1.
Drink small amounts (e.g., 6 ounces or less) of water before, during, and/or after
exercise. If the workout exceeds an hour, a sports drink will provide electrolyte
replacement
2.
Wear comfortable clothing that does not restrict movement (e.g., sweatpants, T-shirt)
and good running, walking or cross training shoes.
Pre-Exercise Don'ts
1.
Do not eat.
2.
Do not smoke.
3.
Do not drink alcohol or caffeinated beverages.
Partaking in these items less than one hour before exercise may result in dizziness or
nausea and may increase your heart rate.
Exercise Sessions
Exercise sessions consist of flexibility, strength, and/or aerobic activities. Each training session
should include stretching exercises in the warm-up and cool down phases to improve flexibility.
The workout phase of an exercise session can include strength and/or aerobic components. If an
exercise session includes a strength training workout, it should be designed to improve muscle
strength in several body areas (e.g., shoulders, thighs). Strength training workouts should be
included in the exercise session three times per week on nonconsecutive days (e.g., Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday, or Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday). To avoid injury and enhance
strength development, always allow at least 48 hours of rest after each strength training workout.
Exercise sessions that include an aerobic workout are designed to improve cardiovascular
endurance and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Aerobic workouts should be included in
the exercise session three times per week. The aerobic workout may be completed on the same
day as the weight training workout, (before or after weight training) or on a separate day.
General instructions for participation in the warm-up, strength and aerobic training workouts,
and the cool down are outlined in the following sections. Detailed instructions for the
stretching/flexibility, strength training, and aerobic exercises are located in Appendices A, B, and
C.
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Designing Your Daily Exercise Program
This fitness program is divided into two types of exercise sessions: (1) strength and flexibility
exercises that should be performed 3 days per week and (2) aerobic and flexibility that should be
performed 3-5 times per week. The two types of exercises sessions may be completed on the
same or alternate days.
The order in which the strength or flexibility exercises are performed is important. The flexibility
exercises should be performed in the order listed in Appendix A. Strength exercises should be
performed in the order listed, starting with larger muscle groups that involve multi-joint
exercises. The weight training recording sheet in Appendix D provides the recommended order
for a strength training exercise session. If you elect to perform both strength and aerobic training
exercises on the same day, it is suggested that you complete the aerobic exercise activity before
completing the strength training exercises. For example, your exercise session may consist of
flexibility exercises and light aerobic activities, followed by 10 minutes of stair climbing. The
stair climbing would be followed by a strength training workout and a cool down consisting of
light aerobic and flexibility exercises.
Follow all of the exercise directions closely and refer to previous sections of the manual for
detailed information about flexibility, muscular strength/endurance, and aerobic fitness.
Warm Up Program
Introduction
The warm-up for each exercise session consists of stretching and light aerobic exercises. Follow
the "General Directions" listed below to complete the warm-up.
General Directions
1.
Find a comfortable spot or matted area.
2.
Follow the directions for each flexibility exercise.
3.
Make sure you assume the correct start position and slowly move into the stretched
position.
4.
Hold the stretched position for 5-15 seconds.
5.
Do not bounce.
6.
Do not hold your breath.
7.
When you begin the program hold the stretch for 5-10 seconds. As you progress hold
the stretch for 10-15 seconds.
8.
Concentrate on feeling the stretch in the muscle groups described for the exercise.
9.
Perform the light aerobic activities before or after the stretching exercises.
Precautions
1.
Do not stretch recently injured muscles or joints.
2.
Do not stretch to a point where you feel pain or the muscle group being stretched
begins to quiver.
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Warm-Up Exercises
The Warm-Up exercises are listed below. A detailed explanation of each exercise is located in
Appendix A.
1.
Lower Body Light Aerobic Exercise - walk briskly or jog in place for 1-2 minutes.
2.
Quadriceps Stretch
3.
Hamstring Stretch
4.
Calf Stretch
5.
Side Bend
6.
Arm Cross
Weight Training Workout
Introduction
Weight or resistance training is one of the best methods to develop muscular strength. Your
initial weight training workouts will be used to determine the amount of weight to lift for each
exercise. To determine the weight to use for each weight training exercise follow the instructions
listed below. Remember that it is better to use lower weights in the beginning and gradually
build to heavier weights. The weight training instructions provide guidance related increasing the
exercise weight and the number of repetitions. The following instructions provide tips for
performing each exercise correctly and will assist in determining whether the weight should be
increased. The "General Directions" outline how to perform the weight training exercises. The
guidelines for determining the amount of weight to lift and how to safely increase the weight
lifted are described in “Starting Level Determination”.
General Directions
1.
Weight training may produce calluses on the hands. Wearing weight lifting gloves
will reduce calluses and help you maintain a firm grip on the bar. You also may elect
to wear a weight lifting belt to support your back and abdominal area.
2.
Make sure to assume the correct starting position and lift and lower the weight as
outlined.
3.
If you use an Olympic bar with adjustable weight plates or adjustable dumbbells,
attach collars to each end of the bar to secure the plates.
4.
Lift and lower the weights with slow controlled movements. Take 1-2 seconds to lift
the weight and 2-3 seconds to lower it.
5.
DO NOT hold your breath during any phase of the exercise. Exhale as you lift and
inhale as you lower the weight.
6.
Complete 8-12 repetitions of each exercise then rest for 45-60 seconds. This series of
repetitions is called a set.
7.
Complete 3 sets of each exercise with a 45-60 second rest between each set. When
you first begin the program, you may only be able to complete 2 sets, but the goal is
to work until you can complete 3 sets at a specific weight.
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8.
To decrease the risk of injury, perform each weight exercise as outlined in the
directions in Appendix B.
9.
After completing the weight training workout, perform the cool down light aerobic
exercises followed by the stretching exercises.
Starting Level Determination
When using weights in an exercise follow the steps listed below to determine the weight to
use that is appropriate with your fitness level. Then, perform the exercise as listed in the
instructions (Appendix B). If a weight training exercise does not involve a weight, perform
it as listed in the instructions.
1.
Choose a weight that feels comfortable to complete one repetition of the exercise as
it is listed in the instructions. If you are unable to complete one repetition using
proper form with the selected weight, the weight is too heavy. Chose a lighter weight
and move to step 2.
2.
Perform 10 repetitions with the weight.
3.
If you cannot complete 10 repetitions, drop down to the next lower weight (e.g., 20
lbs. to 15 lbs.).
4.
If you complete 10 repetitions with the weight, choose a heavier weight (e.g., 12 lbs.
to 15 lbs.).
5.
Rest 30 to 45 seconds and attempt to perform 10 repetitions with the heavier weight.
If you are unable to perform 10 repetitions, this is your starting point.
6.
Example for choosing the correct starting weight for bicep curls using dumbbells.
a.
b.
c.
d.
If adjustable dumbbells are used, place the weight plates (e.g., 2.5 lbs.) on each
end of the bar and lock them in place with a clip or collar. Remember, that the
bar weight is approximately 4 to 5 lbs. If unit weighted dumbbells are used,
select the weight you think you can curl (e.g., 5, 10, 12, 15, 20, 30 lbs.).
Stand in an erect position with the knees slightly flexed and perform the
curling motion. If it is a struggle to complete one curl remove weight from the
dumbbell or select a lighter dumbbell (e.g., 20 lbs. to 15 lbs.).
If it was very easy to perform one repetition, increase the weight (e.g., 15 lbs.
to 20 lbs.).
Perform 10 repetitions with the adjusted (lower or higher) weight level.
1)
If you are unable to perform one repetition using the proper form, reduce
the weight a second time.
2)
If you can perform two or more repetitions but are unable to perform 10
repetitions (e.g., 7 completed), this is your starting weight.
3)
If you can easily perform 10 repetitions using the proper form, increase
the weight a second time and repeat this process. When able to complete
less than 10 repetitions using the proper form, this is the starting weight.
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Performing Weight Training Session
After determining the starting weight for each weight training exercise, begin the weight training
session. The goal is to perform three sets of each weight training exercise. For example, if you
are performing arm curls, attempt to complete 8-12 repetitions in the first set, rest 45-60 seconds
and complete the second set of 8-12 repetitions. This is followed by a second rest period and the
third set of 8-12 repetitions. It is normal to be unable to complete 8-12 repetitions for each set.
However, it is important to complete the three sets. When you can comfortably complete three
sets, increase the weight as outlined in steps 2-5 above. Use this procedure each time you need to
increase the weight.
Precautions
1.
If you have high blood pressure or other cardiovascular problems, obtain medical
clearance from your physician before starting the weight training program.
2.
Complete the exercises that use large muscle groups first (e.g., bench press, lunges).
Next perform the exercises that use smaller muscle groups (e.g., curls, toe raises).
3.
Complete the full range of motion for each exercise, but DO NOT lock the joints
(e.g., elbows, knees) when the exercising limbs are in the extended position.
Weight Training Exercises
The primary weight training exercises are listed below and explained in Appendix B. Alternate
exercises can be added to the program after 3-6 weeks depending upon your improvement. All
exercises use dumbbells, but barbells or an Olympic bar may be used for the exercises marked
with an asterisk (*). Some exercises use only your body weight (e.g., push-ups). Follow the
directions in Appendix B for each exercise.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Chest (Bench) Press*
Chest Fly
Leg Press
Dumbbell Pullover
Bent-Over Row*
Shoulder (Military) Press*
Lateral Raise
Biceps Curl*
Triceps Extension (Kickbacks)
Push-Ups
Toe Raises
Crunches
Recording Your Progress
A progress recording form is located in Appendix D. The form provides spaces to record the
weight and the number of repetitions completed for each set within an exercise. This form allows
for four weeks of exercise. To continue recording after the four week period, photocopy a blank
form.
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Aerobic Workout
Introduction
Cardiovascular fitness can be improved by regular participation in aerobic activities. The
"General Directions" and Precautions for aerobic workouts are listed below. Guidelines for
increasing the frequency, intensity, and time of aerobic workouts are located in Appendix C
along with record keeping information.
General Directions
1.
Select an activity that you enjoy and that uses the large muscle groups (e.g., legs) for
greater than 10 minutes. Examples of aerobic activities include walking briskly,
running, bicycling, and swimming.
2.
If running or walking, invest in the appropriate shoes for weight bearing activities
(e.g., running, walking).
3.
Complete the warm-up exercises before the aerobic workout. If both aerobic and
weight training are performed in the same session, complete the aerobic training
first. Further, the warm-up exercises only need to be perform one time in a session if
aerobic and weight training are completed.
4.
Start the workout slowly and continue the activity for at least 15 minutes without
stopping. Your workout time will vary with your fitness level. If your current aerobic
fitness is low, your initial duration may be 10 minutes.
5.
Exercise at a pace or intensity that allows you to carry on a normal conversation
without gasping for air. This pace should produce a heart rate within 5 beats of the
training heart rate. Training heart rate is the number of times your heart beats per
minute when performing aerobic exercise. The number of beats per minute indicates
your exercise intensity. To calculate your training heart rate, refer to the next section
Training Heart Rate Calculation.
6.
After completing the aerobic workout perform the cool down light aerobic activities
followed by the stretching exercises found in the “Warm-up” section.
Training Heart Rate Calculation
1.
Locate your pulse at the wrist or the neck.
a.
2.
3.
Wrist: With your left palm facing upward, place two fingers from your right
hand on the thumb side of the wrist. If you have difficulty finding the pulse,
move the finger tips down and toward the edge of your arm (thumb side).
b.
Neck: Place two fingers on one side of the neck and the thumb on your voice
box. Slide your hand up to a position just below the jaw line. Lightly press
with the fingers to feel the carotid pulse.
Determine your resting heart rate by sitting quietly for 15 minutes. Then count your
heart rate for 60 seconds. Write this heart rate on a sheet of paper.
Complete the following blanks to determine the maximum heart rate.
a.
Record 220 for a man or 230 for a woman.
______
b.
Record your age.
______
c.
Subtract a from b (a-b=c)
______
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This is your maximum heart rate.
4.
d.
Record your resting heart rate.
______
e.
Subtract your resting heart rate (d) from your maximum heart
rate (c) to determine your base heart rate.
______
Determine the upper and lower limits of your training heart rate zone.
Lower Limit is 60% of your maximum heart rate.
a.
Record your base heart rate
______
b.
Multiple your base heart rate by 60% (base heart rate X 0.60).
______
Upper Limit is 85% of your maximum heart rate.
5.
c.
Record your base heart rate
______
d.
Multiple your base heart rate by 85% (base heart rate X 0.85).
______
Identify your training heart rate (THR) for the upper and lower limits.
Lower Limit = 60%.
a.
Add your resting heart rate from 3d above to the lower limit value
in 4b above (3d + 4b=lower limit training heart rate).
______
Upper Limit = 85%.
b.
Add your resting heart rate from 3d above to the lower limit value
in 4d above (3d + 4d=upper limit training heart rate).
______
When performing aerobic exercises, your heart rate should be between your upper and
lower limits as defined in number 5 “a” and “b”. To increase aerobic capacity, the heart
rate should be closer to, but not greater than the upper limit.
Precautions
1.
Monitor your exercise intensity to avoid overexertion, particularly if you exercise
outside in hot, humid weather. If at any time you feel lightheaded, dizzy, or
nauseous, slow down and then stop all exercise. Inform your exercise partner how
you feel.
2.
To avoid dehydration, drink small amounts of water before, during, and/or after
aerobic workouts.
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11
Aerobic Exercises
Several examples of aerobic exercises are listed below. Descriptions of a stair climbing and,
jogging/running programs are located in Appendix C. These programs were selected because
they do not require special equipment and are known to be effective in making aerobic gains in a
relatively short period of training.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Brisk walking
Jogging/running
Cycling
Stair climbing
Elliptical training
Nordic Track
Swimming
Cool Down Program
Introduction
The cool down consists of the light aerobic activities and stretching exercises, as performed in
the warm-up. The light aerobic activities must be completed first to gradually bring the heart rate
down to normal levels. Follow the "General Directions" listed below to complete the cool down.
General Directions
1.
For all flexibility exercises assume the correct start position and slowly move into
the stretched position.
2.
Hold the stretched position for 5-15 seconds. Do not bounce. Do not hold your
breath. When you begin the program hold the stretch for 5-10 seconds. As you
progress hold the stretch for 10-15 seconds.
3.
Concentrate on feeling the stretch in the muscle groups described for the exercise.
Precautions
1.
Do not stretch recently injured muscles or joints.
2.
Do not stretch to a point where you feel pain or the muscle group being stretched
begins to quiver.
Cool Down Exercises
Follow the directions for each exercise. Cool down exercises are listed below and explained in
Appendix A.
1.
Lower Body Light Aerobic Exercise - walk briskly or jog in place for 1-2 minutes.
2.
Quadriceps Stretch
3.
Hamstring Stretch
4.
Calf Stretch
5.
Side Bend
6.
Arm Cross
7.
Single Knee Tuck
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12
APPENDIX A:
WARM-UP AND COOL-DOWN EXERCISES
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13
Warm-up
Warm-Up exercises are prescribed to prepare your muscles and joints for exercise. Repeat each
exercise twice for each arm and leg.
1.
Lower Body Light Aerobic Exercise - walk briskly or jog in place for 1-2 minutes.
2.
Quadriceps Stretch
3.
Hamstring Stretch
4.
Calf Stretch
5.
Side Bend
6.
Arm Cross
Cool Down
Cool down exercises are prescribed to develop flexibility. Repeat each exercise three times for
each arm and leg.
1.
Lower Body Light Aerobic Exercise - walk briskly or jog in place for 1-2 minutes.
2.
Quadriceps Stretch
3.
Hamstring Stretch
4.
Calf Stretch
5.
Side Bend
6.
Arm Cross
7.
Single Knee Tuck
Light Aerobic Exercise (Lower Body)
Jogging
Jog in place or around a room for 1-2 minutes. Lift the knees during each step. Make sure that
your heart rate increases.
Brisk Walking
Walk quickly around a known area for 1-2 minutes. Make sure that your heart rate increases.
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14
Quadriceps Stretch
Starting Position
Stand erect with the feet shoulder-width apart.
Grasp a stable surface (e.g., chair, table) with the right hand.
Movement
Flex the knee of the right leg and then the right foot behind you with the left hand.
Slowly and gently pull the right heel upward toward the buttocks as you move the bent leg back.
The heel does not need to touch the buttocks.
Only go as far as is comfortable.
Hold
Hold the stretched position for 10-20 seconds. Feel the stretch in the quadriceps/front of thigh
and across the hip joint. If not, continue to gently pull the bent leg back.
Repetitions
Repeat the exercise 2-3 times for each leg.
Figure 1: Quadriceps Stretch
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15
Hamstring Stretch
Starting Position
Sit on the floor with your legs together. The knees should be slightly flexed.
Feet should be perpendicular to the floor with the toes pointed upward.
Movement
Slowly reach forward toward the ankles, while keeping the back flat and knees slightly bent.
Grasp the toes and move the chest toward the knees.
Keep the head up, the back flat and the toes pointed upward and attempt to slowly straighten the
knees.
Only go as far in the knee extension as is comfortable.
Hold
Hold the stretched position for 10-20 seconds. Feel the stretch in the hamstrings. If not, check to
see that you are not rounding the back and are attempting to straighten the knees (Figure 2).
Repetitions
Repeat the exercise 2-3 times for each leg.
Variation
One leg at a time (Figure 3: Single Leg). Assume sitting position, place sole of right foot on
inner side of left knee. Perform the movement and the hold as described above.
Figure 2. Hamstring Stretch.
Figure 3: Hamstring Stretch Alternate Position – Single Leg
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16
Calf Stretch
Starting Position
Stand facing the wall at approximately arms length away.
Place the hands on the wall at shoulder height.
Step back with the one leg, keeping it straight but allowing the knee of the other leg to flex.
Keep both heels on the floor and both feet pointed directly towards the wall. (Figure 4)
Movement
Flex the knee of the forward leg and slowly lean to the wall.
Continue to lean forward until you feel a stretch in the calf.
Hold
Hold this position for 10-20 seconds. Feel the stretch in the Achilles tendon and calf. If not, be
sure that the toes are pointing directly towards the wall. You may also lean further into the wall
to obtain a stretch.
Repetitions
Repeat the exercise 2-3 times for each leg.
Figure 4. Calf Stretch.
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17
Side Bend with Straight Arms
Starting Position
Stand with feet approximately shoulder distance apart, knees slightly bent (Figure 5).
Movement
Reach arms overhead with palms facing out. Keeping arms straight, lean from waist to one side,
reaching with both arms.
Keep the head facing forward.
Only go as far in side bend as is comfortable.
Hold
Hold the stretched position for 10-20 seconds. Feel the stretch in the muscles on the side of the
torso and back.
Repetitions
Repeat the exercise 2-3 times for each side.
Figure 5: Side Bend with Straight Arms
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18
Single Arm Cross
Start Position
Stand erect with the feet shoulder width apart.
Place the left arm in front of the body at shoulder height, elbow straight, palm down.
Movement
Grasp the left elbow with the right hand.
Slowly pull the left arm across the body towards the right shoulder. Keep the left arm straight
and the palm down.
Keep both shoulders facing forward.
Do not twist the trunk.
Hold
Hold this position for 5-15 seconds. Feel the stretch in the shoulder and upper back.
Repetitions
Repeat the movement 2-3 times per arm.
Figure 6: Single Arm Cross Over
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19
Single Knee Tuck
Starting Position
Lie on the back with the legs straight, feet together, and arms at your sides.
Movement
Flex one leg, grasp it at the knee and slowly pull it in towards the chest with both arms. Be sure
to keep the lower back flat against the floor.
Keep the other leg straight and on the floor.
Hold
Hold the bent knee at the chest for 10-20 seconds. Feel the stretch in the hamstrings and gluteals.
If not, pull the knee closer to the chest and check the position of the straight leg. The straight leg
should remain on the floor from the hip to the foot.
Repetitions
Repeat the exercise 2-3 times for each leg.
Figure 7: Single Knee Tuck
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20
APPENDIX B:
WEIGHT TRAINING EXERCISES
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21
Chest (Bench) Press
Start
Lie back on the bench in a position where the bar is directly above your chin.
Reach up and grasp the bar with the hands slightly wider than shoulder width.
Place your feet flat on the ground, one on each side of the bench, or both feet on the bench.
Remove the bar from the racks and hold it directly above the shoulders.
Lower
Slowly lower the bar until it reaches a point just above the chest.
Inhale as you lower the weight.
Lift
Slowly press the bar up until your arms arm straight. Do not lock the elbows as the arms become
straight.
Exhale as you lift the weight.
Keep the lower back flat on the bench throughout the exercise.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Note: if you are unable to bench press 45 pounds, that is the weight of the Olympic bar, use
dumbbells for this exercise.
Figure 8: Chest Press
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22
Chest (Dumbbell) Fly
Start
Sit on the bench holding a dumbbell in each hand with an overhand grip (i.e., palms down).
Place your feet flat on the ground, one on each side of the bench, or both feet on the bench.
Flex the arms at the elbows, placing the dumbbells at your shoulders, and lie back on the bench.
Straighten the arms and hold the dumbbells above the chest with the palms together.
Lower
With the elbows slightly bent, slowly lower the arms out to the sides until you feel a stretch
across your chest.
Inhale as you lower the weight.
Lift
Keeping your elbows slightly bent, slowly lift the dumbbells as if you were hugging a large tree.
Exhale as you lift the weight.
Keep your lower back flat on the bench.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 9: Chest Fly
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23
Leg Press
Start
Using a leg press machine, adjust the seat until the knees are flexed to 90 degrees.
Place the hands on the side handles and feet on the footrests.
Lift
Slowly extend the legs fully. Do not lock the knees as the legs become extended.
Exhale as you extend your legs.
Lower
Slowly flex your knees, returning the weight to the starting position.
Inhale as you flex your legs.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 10: Leg Press
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24
Dumbbell Pullover
Start
Sit on the bench holding one dumbbell in both hands.
Flex both knees and place your feet on the bench.
Flex the arms at the elbows and lie back on the bench with your head on the bench.
Raise the dumbbell up, over and behind the head, towards the floor.
Keep the elbows slightly bent while holding the dumbbell in this starting position.
Lift
Keeping the elbows slightly bent, slowly lift the dumbbell up over the head and chest so it is
above the abdomen.
Exhale as you lift the weight.
Keep your lower back flat on the bench.
Lower
With the elbows slightly bent, slowly lower the dumbbell back over the chest and head until it
nearly touches the floor.
Inhale as you lower the weight.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 11: Dumbbell Pullover
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25
Bent-Over Rows
Start
Bend over and place the left knee and hand on a bench. Keep the back flat from the buttocks to
the shoulders.
Grasp a dumbbell in the right hand with an overhand grip (i.e., palm down).
Lift
Slowly pull the dumbbell straight up towards the shoulder by flexing at the elbow.
Keep the back flat.
Exhale as you lift the weight.
Lower
Slowly lower the dumbbell almost to the floor by straightening the arm. Do not lock the elbow as
the arm becomes straight.
Inhale as you lower the weight.
Repetitions
After completing 8-12 repetitions, one set, with the right arm, complete the second set with the
left arm, then complete the next set with the right arm, etc.
For each arm, complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 12: Bent-Over Row
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26
Shoulder (Military) Press
Start
Sit erect in a straight back chair with the knees bent and the feet flat on the floor.
Grasp one dumbbell in each hand with an overhand grip (palms down) OR grasp the weighted
barbell, which is resting on your knees, with an overhand grip.
Flex at the elbows to place the dumbbells/barbell just outside the shoulders at shoulder height.
Use a spotter if needed.
Lift
Slowly press the dumbbells/barbell overhead by straightening the arms. Do not lock the elbows
as the arms become nearly straight.
Do not arch the lower back. Keep the low backer pressed flat against the back of the chair.
Exhale as you lift the weight.
Lower
Slowly flex the elbows to return the dumbbells/barbell to the starting position, just outside the
shoulders at shoulder level.
Inhale as you lower the weight.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 13: Shoulder Press
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27
Lateral Raise
Start
Sit erect in a straight back chair with the knees bent and the feet flat on the floor.
Grasp a dumbbell in each hand with an overhand grip (i.e., palms down) and let the arms hang
down at your sides with your palms towards your body.
Lift
Keeping the elbows slightly flexed, slowly raise the dumbbells up and out to your sides to a
position where the upper arms are parallel to the floor.
Do not arch the lower back. Keep the lower back pressed flat against the back of the chair.
Exhale as you lift the weight.
Lower
Keeping the elbows slightly bent, slowly return the dumbbells to your sides.
Inhale as you lower the weight.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 14: Lateral Raise
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28
Biceps Curl
Start
Grasp a dumbbell in each hand with an underhand grip (i.e., palms up).
Stand with the feet flat on the floor, shoulder width apart, and the arms hanging down at your
sides, palms forward.
Lift
Keeping the upper arms at you sides, slowly flex the elbows to lift the dumbbells up to the
shoulders.
Do not arch the lower back. Keep the lower back flat.
Do not rest the elbows on the hips as you lift the weight.
Exhale as you lift the weight.
Lower
Slowly return the dumbbells to your sides by straightening the arms. Do not lock the elbows as
the arms straighten.
Keep the upper body erect and do not allow it to sway back and forth as you lift and lower the
weight.
Inhale as you lower the weight.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 15: Biceps Curl
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29
Triceps Extension (Kickbacks)
Start
Bend over and place the left knee and hand on a bench. Keep the back flat from the buttocks to
the shoulders.
Grasp a dumbbell in the right hand with an overhand grip (i.e., palm down).
Move the right arm to a position where the upper arm is parallel to the floor and the lower arm is
perpendicular to the floor (i.e., 90 degrees at the elbow).
Lift
Keeping the upper arm parallel with the floor, slowly straighten the right arm until the right
elbow is just slightly bent. Do not lock the elbow.
Keep your back flat.
Exhale as you lift the weight.
Lower
Slowly lower the dumbbell by flexing the elbow until it returns to the start position of 90
degrees.
Inhale as you lower the weight.
Repetitions
After completing 8-12 repetitions, one set, with the right arm, complete the second set with the
left arm, then complete the next set with the right arm, etc.
For each arm, complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 16: Triceps Extension (Kickback)
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30
Push-Ups
Start
Get into a standard push-up position with the feet and palms on the floor and the arms straight.
The body should form a straight line from the heels to the shoulders. (Note: If needed, a
modified push-up position may be used, that is with the knees and hands on the floor).
Place the hands a little wider than shoulder width.
Lower
Keeping you’re the torso straight, lower the body to within 4 inches of the floor by flexing the
elbows.
Inhale as you lower the body.
Lift
Lift the body by extending the elbows until the arms are straight. Do not lock the elbows.
Exhale as you lift the body.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 17: Push Ups
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31
Toe Raises
Start
Stand erect on a 2-inch high surface (e.g., a board) with the feet parallel and shoulder width
apart.
The heels should be hanging over the back of the board.
Use an overhand grip (i.e., palms down) to hold a dumbbell in each hand.
Lift
Extend up on the ball of the foot as far as possible.
Exhale as you extend the ankles.
Lower
Lower the body so that the heels are below the top edge of the board.
As you extend the ankles and lower the body keep the knees slightly bent, but do not bend and
straighten the knees to perform the exercise.
Inhale as you lower your body.
Repetitions
Complete 8-12 repetitions and 2-3 sets with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 18: Toe Raises
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32
Crunches
Start
Lie on the back with the knees bent and the low back and feet flat on the floor.
Cross the arms across the chest, placing a hand on each shoulder. (Note: for an easier exercise
keep the arms and hands at the sides.)
Tuck the chin up to the chest.
Lift
Slowly curl up by tightening the abdominal muscles to lift the shoulder blades up off the floor.
Do not do a full sit-up, curl up only to a point where the shoulder blades come off the floor.
Keep the chin tucked to the chest.
Exhale as you curl up.
For an easier version of this exercise, slide the arms forward just a few inches to lift only the
shoulders slightly off the floor.
Lower
Slowly uncurl to return the shoulders/shoulder blades to the floor.
Inhale as your uncurl.
Repetitions
Start with 8-12 repetitions per set and work towards 30 - 35 repetitions per set. Complete 2-3 sets
with a one minute rest period between sets.
Figure 19: Crunches
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33
APPENDIX C:
AEROBIC TRAINING PROGRAMS
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34
AEROBIC TRAINING PROGRAMS
Determining a Starting Level
The starting level for each aerobic program will depend on your current level of aerobic fitness.
Two aerobic programs are presented in this manual: jog/run and stair climbing. Other activities
such as bicycling, swimming, or rowing may also be used. To increase your aerobic fitness you
should participate in one of these programs three to five days per week for at least 30 to 45
minutes at your training heart rate (THR) on page 13.
Jog/Run Program
The jog/run program involves jogging (slow run) and running. The program is divided into 21
levels of increasing difficulty. For each level, the distance to be covered (e.g., jogged), the time
to complete the distance, and the pace per mile are listed. The levels for the jog/run program are
listed in Table 1. To determine your starting level go to a track and attempt to complete 1.5
miles. You may walk, jog, or run. Remember to monitor your heart rate and fatigue level during
this pre test. If you are unable to walk 1.5 miles, begin by walking for 10 minutes at your own
pace. This can include stopping for rest periods. Continue to increase the time until you can walk
continuously for 15 minutes. Once you can walk continuously for 15 minutes go to the Table 1
below and start at Level 1.
If you can walk, jog, or run 1.5 miles, refer to the guidelines shown in the left hand column of
Table 1. For example, if you completed the 1.5 mile Self-Test in 28 minutes, you should start at
Level 1. However, if you completed the 1.5 mile Self-Test in less than 22 minutes, you may start
at level 6.
If you start at Level 6, you should already be able to jog (1) mile in 14:00 (14 minutes). When
you jog the mile you should check your heart rate after 10 minutes to ensure that you are within
5 beats of your THR. If your heart rate is exceeding your THR slow down. If your heart rate is
below your THR walk faster.
The goal at each level is to complete the distance in the time specified at the appropriate
intensity. That is, your heart rate should remain within ± 5 beats of your THR. When you
accomplish this goal for three consecutive exercise sessions, you may move to a higher level.
Safety Tips
1.
Walk/jog/run with someone who runs at your pace.
2.
Walk/jog/run in a residential area on a paved shoulder rather than on the pavement,
obey traffic lights and signs and watch for cars and potholes.
3.
Walk/jog/run on a track, street, or treadmill to alternate your courses for safety and
variety.
4.
Avoid running in the same direction on sloped or banked surfaces for an extended
period of time.
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35
Table 1: Jogging/Running Program
Jogging Goals
Starting Level 1.5 Mile Finish
Time
Level
Distance
Covered (mile)
Time to
Complete
(min:sec)
Pace (min/mile)
> 24 Minutes
1
1
16:00
16:00
2
1-1/4
19:00
15:20
3
1-1/2
22:00
14:40
4
1-3/4
25:00
14:17
5
2
28:00
14:00
6
2-1/2
36:00
14:24
Distance
Covered (mile)
Time to
Complete
(min:sec)
Pace (min/mile)
Jog ¼
3:45
15:00
Run ¼
3:00
12:00
2
27:00
Jog ½
7:30
15:00
Run ½
6:00
12:00
2
27:00
Jog ¼
3:45
15:00
Run ¾
9:00
12:00
2
25:15
24 Minutes
< 22 Minutes
Jogging/Running Goals
Level
7
Repeat 4 Times
Total
8
Repeat 2 Times
Total
9
Repeat 2 Times
Total
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36
Jogging/Running Goals
Level
10
Repeat 3 Times
Total
11
Repeat 1 Time
Total
12
Repeat 2 Times
Total
13
Repeat 2 Times
Total
14
Repeat 3 Times
Total
15
Repeat 3 Times
Total
Distance
Covered (mile)
Time to
Complete
(min:sec)
Pace (min/mile)
Jog ¼
3:45
15:00
Run ¾
9:00
12:00
3
37:30
Run 1
12:00
12:00
Jog ¼
3:45
15:00
Run ½
6:00
12:00
Jog ½
7:30
15:00
2¼
29:15
Run 1
12:00
12:00
Jog ¼
3:45
15:00
2½
31:30
Jog 1/4
3:45
15:00
Run 1
11:30
11:30
2½
30:30
Jog ¼
3:45
15:00
Run 1
11:30
11:30
3¾
45:45
Jog ¼
3:45
15:00
Run 1
11:15
11:15
3¾
45:00
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37
Table 1: Jogging/Running Goals (Cont’d.)
Running Goals
Level
16
17
18
19
20
21
Distance
Covered (mile)
Time to
Complete
(min:sec)
Pace (min/mile)
1
11:00
11:00
½
6:00
12:00
Total
3
34:00
Repeat 1 Time
3
33:00
Total
3
33:00
1
10:00
10:00
1
11:00
11:00
1
10:00
10:00
Total
3
31:00
Repeat 1 Time
3
30:00
Total
3
30:00
1
9:15
9:15
1
10:00
10:00
1
9:15
9:15
Total
3
28:30
Repeat 1 Time
3
27:45
Total
3
27:45
Repeat 2 Times
Repeat 1 Time
Repeat 1 Time
11:00
10:00
9:15
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38
Stair Climbing Program
The stair climbing program involves walking up and down stairs at a normal pace. To begin the
program, locate a set of stairs that has a handrail. You may use one long flight of stairs (13-15
steps) or a set of stairs with two flights of stairs between floors (6-8 steps per flight). Make sure
the stairs are well lit to prevent risk of injury.
To determine your starting level in the stair climbing program follow the instructions listed
below. To safely participate in the stair climbing program walk at a normal pace. A stop watch or
watch that records seconds is needed to monitor your progress in the stair climbing program.
Stair Climbing: Determination of Your Starting Level
1.
Determine number of flights per floor where you intend to
climb stairs and record number here (A)
_________(A)
2.
Record your training heart rate (THR) from page 13
_________(B)
3.
Start at the bottom of the stairs. Start the stop watch as soon as you
begin to walk up the stairs at a normal pace. Stop the watch as soon
as you reach the top of the stairs. Immediately take your pulse for 6
seconds and add a zero to determine a per minute value. If your pulse is
less than your calculated THR (B), start the stop watch and walk down
and then immediately back up the stairs. Stop the watch when you reach
the top of the stairs. Take your pulse for 6 seconds, add a zero, and
compare it to your THR (B). Continue to walk down and up the stairs until
your pulse at the top of the stairs is within ±5 beats of your THR (B).
4.
Record total number of floors ascended to get within 5 beats
of your THR.
_________(C)
Record the total time (min:sec) (D) taken to walk up and down the
stairs, excluding the time taken to count the pulse. Place this time
here (D). Do not include pulse counting time in climbing time. For
example, if it took you 3 minutes and 15 seconds to climb the stairs 6
times record 3:15 in (D).
_________(D)
5.
6.
Determine start level using Table 2.
a.
Locate the number of floors climbed at the top of the page on
the horizontal scale labeled "Number of Floors".
b.
Go down that column to the first entry (i.e., "x"), then go over to
the left to locate start level on the vertical scale labeled "Level".
For example, if you climbed 6 floors you would locate "6" at the
top of Table 1. Next draw a line straight down until you see an
"X". Then draw a line to the left and read the level. For 6
floors the level is "4".
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39
7.
Record your start level here (E).
_________(E)
8.
Determine the number of sets of stairs to be completed at that level to
achieve a 10 minute stair climbing goal for first 3 weeks of your program.
The number of sets (F) required is 10 minutes divided by time (D)
taken to climb up and down (10 minutes/(D) = (F)).
_________(F)
For example, if it took you 3 minutes and 15 seconds (3:15) to climb 6 floors of stairs, you will
need to complete 3 sets to equal 10 minutes. You can calculate this by converting the minutes to
seconds. This is done by multiplying the minutes by 60.
For the first 3 weeks of the program, you must complete "F" sets at your starting level with a one
minute rest between sets. The approximate time should be 10 minutes of stair climbing. Prior to
moving to a new level, you should complete your current level successfully for three sessions.
Check the intensity of your exercise at least once during each set of stair climbing by taking your
heart rate and comparing it to your THR. Make adjustments to your pace if necessary (e.g.,
increase if your heart rate is below THR) and recheck your exercise intensity.
If you are unable to successfully meet either the duration or intensity (i.e., THR) goals at a
certain level, stay at that level until you successfully complete it for three consecutive exercise
sessions.
The intensity of stair climbing can be increased by working at a higher THR. Begin by working
at the 60% level and as your ability increases move up and down the stairs at a faster pace. This
will increase your heart rate to a point closer to the 75% THR. Remember you do not want to
allow your heart rate to be greater than the 75% THR. After completing the first three weeks of
stair climbing, progress to 15 or 20 minutes duration. This will require increasing the number of
stair climbing. This should occur naturally as you progress from your starting level to each
higher level.
As your aerobic fitness improves, the number of floors you climb, the time you spend climbing,
and the intensity of your climbing will be increased. These changes will place a continual
overload on your cardiorespiratory systems resulting in improved aerobic fitness. At any point
after the first three weeks in which you completed three stair climbing sessions, you may reevaluate your level as described above.
If you successfully complete Level 15 for 30 minutes with a 75% THR, you may continue to
increase only the duration, not the intensity of your exercise. Your THR should not exceed 75%.
GOAL: complete 20 -25 minutes of stair climbing 3 times per week.
REMEMBER:
• Walk up and down continuously.
• Monitor and adjust your exercise intensity.
• Slow down and stop if you begin to feel dizzy or lightheaded.
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40
Table 2: Stair Climbing Exercise
Number of Floors
Level
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
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COPYRIGHT © HUMAN PERFORMANCE SYSTEMS, INC. All rights reserved. May 2009
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APPENDIX D :
WEIGHT TRAINING WORKOUT RECORD
COPYRIGHT © HUMAN PERFORMANCE SYSTEMS, INC. All rights reserved. May 2009
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Weight Training Workout Record Date:______ Exercise Set Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Reps/ Wgt Chest Press 1 2 3 Chest Fly 1 2 3 Bent‐Over Row 1 2 3 Dumbbell Pullover 1 2 3 Shoulder Press 1 2 3 Lateral Raise 1 2 3 Biceps Curl 1 2 3 COPYRIGHT © HUMAN PERFORMANCE SYSTEMS, INC. All rights reserved. May 2009
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Date: __________ Exercise Set Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Reps/Wgt Triceps Extension 1 2 3 Chin‐Ups 1 2 3 Push‐Ups 1 2 3 Lunges 1 2 3 Toe Raises 1 2 3 Crunches 1 2 3 COPYRIGHT © HUMAN PERFORMANCE SYSTEMS, INC. All rights reserved. May 2009
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COPYRIGHT © HUMAN PERFORMANCE SYSTEMS, INC. All rights reserved. May 2009
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