55 Series Manual - Boonton Electronics

55 Series Manual - Boonton Electronics
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
55 Series
Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor
and
Peak Power Analyzer Suite
MANUAL P/N 98407400A
Revision 20160421
Wireless Telecom Group
25 Eastmans Road, Parsippany, NJ 07054
Tel:
Fax:
Email:
Web:
973-386-9696
973-386-9191
[email protected]
www.wtcom.com
CD P/N 98407499A
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
INSTRUCTION MANUAL, 55 SERIES Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor with Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite
Revision date 20160421
P/N 98407400A
© Copyright 2016, by BOONTON Electronics, a subsidiary of the Wireless Telecom Group, Inc.
Parsippany, NJ, USA.
All rights reserved.
This manual covers instrument serial numbers: 11001 and higher.
The 55 Series Firmware and Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite is licensed by Boonton Electronics, a subsidiary
of the Wireless Telecom Group, Inc.
ii
Contents
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
SAFETY SUMMARY
The following general safety precautions must be observed during all phases of operation and maintenance of this instrument.
Failure to comply with these precautions or with specific warnings elsewhere in this manual violates safety standards of design,
manufacture, and intended use of the instrument. Boonton Electronics assumes no liability for the customer’s failure to comply
with these requirements.
DO NOT OPERATE THE INSTRUMENT IN AN EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERE
Do not operate the instrument in the presence of flammable gases or fumes.
KEEP AWAY FROM LIVE CIRCUITS
Operating personnel must not remove instrument covers. Component replacement and internal adjustments must be made
by qualified maintenance personnel. Do not replace components with the power cable connected. Under certain conditions
dangerous voltages may exist even though the power cable was removed, therefore; always disconnect power and discharge
circuits before touching them.
DO NOT SERVICE OR ADJUST ALONE
Do not attempt internal service or adjustment unless another person, capable of rendering first aid and resuscitation, is present.
DO NOT SUBSTITUTE PARTS OR MODIFY INSTRUMENT
Do not install substitute parts or perform any unauthorized modifications on the instrument. Return the instrument to Boonton
Electronics for repair to ensure that the safety features are maintained.
Contents
iii
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
SAFETY SYMBOLS
This safety requirement symbol has been adopted by the International Electro-technical
Commission, Document 66 (Central Office) 3, Paragraph 5.3, which directs that an instrument be
so labeled if, for the correct use of the instrument, it is necessary to refer to the instruction manual.
In this case it is recommended that reference be made to the instruction manual when connecting
the instrument to the signal source and USB host.
The CAUTION symbol denotes a hazard. It calls attention to an operational procedure, practice or
instruction that, if not followed, could result in damage to or destruction of part or all of the
instrument and accessories. Do not proceed beyond a CAUTION symbol until its conditions are fully
understood and met.
The NOTE symbol is used to mark information which should be read. This information can be very
useful to the operator in dealing with the subjects covered in this section.
The HINT symbol is used to identify additional comments which are outside of the normal format
of the manual, however can give the user additional information about the subject.
iv
Contents
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Table of Contents
1.
General Information ..........................................................................................................................................1-1
1.1
Organization...............................................................................................................................................1-1
1.2
Description .................................................................................................................................................1-2
1.3
Architecture ...............................................................................................................................................1-3
1.4
55 Series Features ......................................................................................................................................1-4
1.5
Accessories.................................................................................................................................................1-5
1.6
Boonton 55 Series USB Power Sensor Models & Specifications ...............................................................1-6
Model Specific Specifications ............................................................................................................1-6
55 Series Specifications (all models) ..................................................................................................1-7
1.7
2.
3.
Boonton Resources on RF Power Measurements .....................................................................................1-8
Hardware Installation ........................................................................................................................................2-1
2.1
Unpacking & Repacking .............................................................................................................................2-1
2.2
Installing the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite Software ....................................................................2-3
2.3
Sensor Connections ...................................................................................................................................2-7
2.4
Power Requirements .................................................................................................................................2-8
2.5
Status LED codes ........................................................................................................................................2-8
Getting Started ..................................................................................................................................................3-1
3.1
Learning About RF Power Measurements .................................................................................................3-1
3.2
Connecting the 55 Series Sensor ...............................................................................................................3-1
3.3
Introduction to Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite ................................................................................3-2
Docking Windows ..............................................................................................................................3-4
Main Application ................................................................................................................................3-5
Available Resources Window:............................................................................................................3-5
The Main Toolbar ...............................................................................................................................3-5
Trace View Window ...........................................................................................................................3-6
Channel Control Window...................................................................................................................3-8
Time / Trigger Settings Window ........................................................................................................3-9
Marker Settings Window .................................................................................................................3-10
Pulse Definitions Window ................................................................................................................3-10
Automatic Measurements Window.................................................................................................3-11
Display Settings Window .................................................................................................................3-13
CCDF View Window .........................................................................................................................3-14
Statistical Measurements Window ..................................................................................................3-15
Contents
v
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
4.
Operation ...........................................................................................................................................................4-1
4.1
Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite Application ......................................................................................4-1
Initializing the Software .....................................................................................................................4-1
Connecting the 55 Series Power Sensor ............................................................................................4-2
The Trace View Display ......................................................................................................................4-3
The Main Toolbar ...............................................................................................................................4-6
Time/Trigger Control Window ...........................................................................................................4-8
Channel Control Window.................................................................................................................4-12
Automatic Measurements Display...................................................................................................4-15
Pulse Definitions Window ................................................................................................................4-16
Marker Settings Window .................................................................................................................4-17
Statistical CCDF Graph Display .........................................................................................................4-19
Statistical Mode Control Window ....................................................................................................4-20
Statistical Measurements Display ....................................................................................................4-21
Modulated Mode Measurements Display .......................................................................................4-22
Acquisition Status Bar ......................................................................................................................4-24
Archiving Measurement Setups .......................................................................................................4-24
4.2
Multichannel Operation...........................................................................................................................4-25
Multichannel Measurements...........................................................................................................4-25
Multichannel Triggering ...................................................................................................................4-27
Multichannel Individual Sensor Tabs ...............................................................................................4-29
4.3
Data Buffer Mode (API remote programming only) ................................................................................4-30
Overview ..........................................................................................................................................4-30
Data Buffer Mode Operation ...........................................................................................................4-32
Data Buffer Mode User Settings ......................................................................................................4-37
5.
6.
Remote Programming ........................................................................................................................................5-1
5.1
Introduction ...............................................................................................................................................5-1
5.2
Examples ....................................................................................................................................................5-1
5.3
Communication overview ..........................................................................................................................5-2
Making Measurements ......................................................................................................................................6-1
6.1
Pulse Measurements .................................................................................................................................6-1
Pulse Definitions ................................................................................................................................6-1
Standard IEEE Pulse ...........................................................................................................................6-1
Automatic Pulse Measurements........................................................................................................6-2
vi
Contents
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Automatic Pulse Measurement Criteria ............................................................................................6-4
Automatic Pulse Measurement Sequence ........................................................................................6-4
6.2
Marker Measurements ..............................................................................................................................6-8
Average Power Over a Time Interval .................................................................................................6-9
6.3
7.
Automatic Statistical Measurements.......................................................................................................6-10
Maintenance ......................................................................................................................................................7-1
7.1
Safety Recommendation. ..........................................................................................................................7-1
7.2
Cleaning .....................................................................................................................................................7-1
7.3
Inspection and Performance Verification ..................................................................................................7-1
7.4
Connector Care ..........................................................................................................................................7-1
7.5
Software and Firmware Updates ...............................................................................................................7-3
Firmware Update Procedure .............................................................................................................7-3
Peak Power Analyzer Suite Update Procedure ..................................................................................7-6
8.
Appendix A Software License ............................................................................................................................8-1
9.
Appendix B Warranty & Repair ..........................................................................................................................9-1
9.1
Repair Policy ..............................................................................................................................................9-1
9.2
Contacting Boonton ...................................................................................................................................9-1
9.3
Limited Warranty .......................................................................................................................................9-2
Contents
vii
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
1. General Information
The user manual provides the information needed to install, operate and maintain the Boonton 55 Series Wideband
USB Peak Power Sensor.
Chapter 1 is an introduction to the manual and the instrument. Throughout the manual, the designation “55 Series”
is used to mean the 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor, which includes models 55006, 55318, 55340,
55518, and 55540.
1.1
Organization
The manual is organized into seven chapters, as follows:
Chapter 1 - General Information presents summary descriptions of the instrument and its principal features,
accessories and options. Also included are specifications for the instrument.
Chapter 2 – Hardware Installation provides instructions for unpacking the instrument, setting it up for
operation, connecting power and signal cables, and initial power-up.
Chapter 3 - Getting Started describes the basic operation of 55 Series Power Sensor and the Boonton Peak
Power Analyzer Suite software.
Chapter 4 - Operation describes, in detail, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) of the Boonton Peak Power
Analyzer Suite software and the 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor.
Chapter 5 - Remote Programming explains the command set and procedures for operating the instrument
remotely.
Chapter 6 – Making Measurements provides definitions for key terms used in this manual and on the GUI
displays as well as methodologies used to calculate automated pulse, marker and statistical measurements.
Chapter 7 - Maintenance includes procedures for installing software and verifying fault-free operation.
1-1
General Information
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
1.2
Description
Boonton once again sets the standard for fast RF power measurements with the 55 Series Wideband USB
peak power sensors. Built with Boonton’s Real-Time Power Processing™ technology (patent pending), this
modular product line offers speed and accuracy never before seen in a USB form factor. The new line
includes 6, 18 and 40 GHz models, and is designed for measurement of wideband modulated signals.
The 55 series power sensors are the latest series of products from Boonton Electronics that turn your PC or
laptop using a standard USB 2.0 port into a state of the art peak power analyzer without the need for any
other instrument. Power measurements from the 55 Series can be displayed on your computer or can be
integrated into a test system with a set of user-defined software functions.
The 55 Series include the models 55006, 55318, 55340, 55518, and 55540 wideband USB peak power
sensors. Collectively they cover a frequency range of 50 MHz to 40 GHz. Offering broad band
measurements with risetimes from 3 ns, 100ps time resolution and video bandwidths of 195 MHz the 55
Series enables rapid pulse integrity determinations. Effective sampling rate up to 100x faster than
conventional power meters so finer waveform details are visible. Capture over/undershoot, droop, edge
delay and skew timing, ringing, rise/fall transition times.
The 55 Series power sensors have exceptional trigger stability of less than 100 ps trigger jitter regardless of
the trigger source which yields much greater waveform detail because a stable trigger point yields a stable
waveform. Using dedicated trigger circuitry rather than software-based triggering provides precise
timestamping of relative trigger-to-sample delay. This precision permits the use of random interleaved
sampling (RIS) for repetitive waveforms with resulting effective sampling rate of 10 GS/s which permits
accurate, direct measurement of fast timing events without requiring interpolation between samples.
Real Time Power Processing offers new possibilities for power integrity measurements because every pulse
is analyzed and none are discarded. Trace acquisition, averaging and envelope times are drastically reduced
resulting in simultaneous analysis of average, peak and minimum Power.
The 55 Series Wideband USB peak power sensors are supported by Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite, a
Windows based software package that provides control and readout of the sensors. It is an easy to use
program that provides both time and statistical domain views of power waveforms with variable peak hold
and persistence views. Power measurements are supported using automated pulse and statistical
measurements, power level and timing markers. The GUI application is easily configured with dockable or
floating windows and measurement tables that can be edited to show only the measurements of interest.
The Boonton 55 Series API Programming Reference provides basic information on driver features as well as
installing and configuring the driver for use in an end-user application. The driver includes fully compliant
IVI-COM and IVI-C drivers, which are required for use of the Boonton Power Analyzer front panel
application. The driver includes a programming reference, as well as code examples for LabVIEW, MatLab,
C++, C# and Visual Basic.
The 55 Series sensors are ideal for manufacturing, design, research, and service in commercial and military
applications such as telecommunications, avionics, RADAR, and medical systems. They are the instrument
General Information
1-2
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
of choice for fast, accurate and highly reliable RF power measurements, equally suitable for product
development, compliance testing, and site monitoring applications.
1.3
Architecture
The Sensor functions as an ultra-fast, calibrated power measurement tool, which acquires and computes
the instantaneous, average and peak RF power of a wideband modulated RF signal. The internal A/D
converter operates at up to 100Msamples/second, and a digital signal processor carries out the work
required to form the digital samples into a correctly scaled and calibrated trace on the display. Figure 1.1
shows a block diagram of the peak power sensor.
Figure 1.1 55 Series Block Diagram
The first and most critical stage of a peak power sensor is the detector, which removes the RF carrier signal
and outputs the amplitude of the modulating signal. The width of the detector’s video bandwidth dictates
the sensor’s ability to track the power envelope of the RF signal. The picture on the left in Figure 1.2 below
shows how a detector with insufficient bandwidth is unable to faithfully track the signal’s envelope,
therefore affecting the accuracy of the power measurement. The detector on the right has sufficient video
bandwidth in order to track the envelope accurately. The fast detectors used in peak power sensors are by
their nature non-linear, so shaping procedures within the digital processor must be used in order to linearize
their response. When measuring instantaneous peak power, a high sample rate is important in order to
ensure that no information is lost. The 55 Series has a sample rate of 100MHz, enabling capture and analysis
of power versus time waveforms at very high resolution.
Figure 1.2 Detector Envelope Tracking Response
1-3
General Information
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
1.4
55 Series Features
Features
Benefits
Real-Time Power ProcessingTM (Patent pending)
By combining a dedicated acquisition engine, hardware
trigger, deep sample memory, and a real-time optimized
parallel processing architecture, the 55 Series achieves
sustained acquisition speeds exceeding 100,000 triggered
sweeps per second.
Real-Time processing ensures that no signal information is
missed due to the “snapshot” approach employed by
traditional power meters and USB sensors where
processing and re-arm latency can range from 10 to 300
milliseconds for typical triggered pulse measurements.
Gap-free gated and continuous statistical analysis can be
performed concurrently at a sustained 100 MSPS.
High Sample Rate
Continuous sample rate is 100 MSPS, with a 10 GSPS
effective sample rate and 100 picosecond time resolution
for repetitive signals.
The high sample rate is more than one hundred times faster
than most existing USB power sensors, and enables
exceptional trigger stability and waveform fidelity when
characterizing complex modulation and pulsed signals.
Advanced triggering features
The Boonton 55 Series can be triggered on the internal RF
or an external TTL signal. It includes trigger holdoff, which
delays the re-arming of the trigger when multiple trigger
events are available.
Multiple trigger sources allow greater measurement
flexibility.
Trigger Delay/offset for precision propagation
measurements.
Trigger holdoff is useful when working with signals with
multiple trigger events such as packetized communications.
Excellent Trigger stability
Trigger with less than 100 ps trigger jitter.
Better measurement uniformity especially when making
multi-channel measurements.
High Video Bandwidth
The 55 Series has a class leading video bandwidth of up to
195MHz for spread-spectrum signals and measures
risetimes as fast as 3ns.
High video bandwidth enables the analysis of both very
short bursts and very broadband signals including timing,
average power and crest factor measurements.
Simultaneous Display of Average and Envelope Power.
Trace view may be configured to show the average power
trace overlaid on a shaded representation of the peak-topeak RF envelope.
Get the total picture of power by seeing the minimum,
peak, and average power all at the same time.
Automatic Measurements
Power displays complemented by fully customizable
automatic measurement parameters along with user
settable markers and reference levels.
Fully characterize measurements with numeric
measurement parameters, markers, and reference levels.
Customizable measurements let you show only the desired
parameters.
General Information
1-4
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Statistical analysis
Display a signal’s statistical power distribution using
complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF)
graphs.
The 100 MSPS sustained statistical acquisition rate enables
statistical analysis vital for showing dynamic effects such as
RF compression and analyzing modern multi-carrier
communications systems.
Support of Multi-Channel Analysis
Data from up to eight sensors can be displayed and
measured on a common computer.
Simultaneous analysis of input/output and multi-channel
measurements, showing functional relationships.
Compact Size, Rugged Construction
The 55 Series sensors are compact and rugged, with allmetal construction.
Portable form factor makes it easy to integrate into a
system. Rugged construction helps guarantee long life,
durability and reliability.
Stable Calibration
55 Series sensors are factory calibrated and require no
routine calibration before or during use.
Quicker measurement with minimum downtime due to lack
of routine calibration.
Very flexible set-up and system integration
Small size, universal USB connection, multi-channel
compatibility, and no need for routine calibration make it
an ideal system instrument.
1.5
Accessories
The 55 Series products are shipped in a carrying case which includes the following accessories:
 USB Type-A Cable (6 ft)
 External Trigger Multi-I/O Cable (SMB to BNC)
 Trigger Sync Cable (SMB to SMB) for triggering multiple sensors
 Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite Software (on a CD-ROM or from Boonton website)
 Quick Start Guide (on a CD-ROM or from Boonton website)
1-5
General Information
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
1.6
Boonton 55 Series USB Power Sensor Models & Specifications
Model Specific Specifications
Specifications
55006
55318
55340
RF Frequency Range
50 MHz to 6 GHz
50 MHz to 18 GHz
50 MHz to 40 GHz
Average Dynamic Range -60 to +20 dBm
-34 to +20 dBm
-34 to +20 dBm
Pulse Dynamic Range
-50 to +20 dBm
-24 to +20 dBm
-24 to +20 dBm
Internal Trigger Range
-38 to +20 dBm
-10 to +20 dBm
-10 to +20 dBm
Risetime (fast/slow)
3 ns/<10 µs
5 ns/<10 µs
5 ns/<10 µs
Video Bandwidth
195 MHz/350 kHz
70 MHz/350 kHz
70 MHz/350 kHz
Single-shot Bandwidth
35 MHz
35 MHz
35 MHz
RF Input
Type N, 50 ohm
Type N, 50 ohm
2.92 mm, 50 ohm
VSWR
1.25 (0.05 to 6 GHz)
1.15 (0.05 to 2.0 GHz)
1.28 (2.0 to 16 GHz)
1.34 (16 to 18 GHz)
1.25 (0.05 to 4.0 GHz)
1.65 (4 to 38 GHz)
2.00 (38 to 40 GHz)
Specifications
55518
55540
RF Frequency Range
50 MHz to 18 GHz
50 MHz to 40 GHz
Average Dynamic Range
-50 to +20 dBm
-50 to +20 dBm
Pulse Dynamic Range
-40 to +20 dBm
-40 to +20 dBm
Internal Trigger Range
-27 to +20 dBm
-27 to +20 dBm
Risetime (fast/slow)
<100 ns/<10 µs
<100 ns/<10 µs
Video Bandwidth
6 MHz/350 kHz
6 MHz/350 kHz
Single-shot Bandwidth
6 MHz
6 MHz
RF Input
Type N, 50 ohm
2.92 mm, 50 ohm
VSWR
1.15 (0.5 to 2.0 GHz)
1.20 (2.0 to 6.0 GHz)
1.28 (6.0 to 16 GHz)
1.34 (16 to 18 GHz)
1.15 (0.05 to 2.0 GHz)
1.65 (4.0 to 38 GHz)
2.00 (38 to 40 GHz)
Table 1.1 55 Series Model-specific Specifications
General Information
1-6
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
55 Series Specifications (all models)
Sampling Techniques
Real-time/Equivalent Time/Statistical Sampling
Continuous sample rate
100 MHz
Effective sample rate
10 GHz
Time Resolution
100 ps
Statistical Analysis
Continuous or gated CCDF
Statistical Speed
100M points/sec
Trigger Sources
Internal or External TTL
External Trigger in/out
TTL in (slave) or out (master)
Minimum Trigger Width
10 ns
Maximum Trigger Frequency
50 MHz
Trigger Jitter
0.1 ns rms
Trace Acquisition Speed
100K sweeps/second
Measurement Speed
over USB
100K meas/sec (buffered mode)
800 meas/sec (continuous)
Trigger Modes
Auto, Normal, Single, Free run
Trigger Arming
Continuous, Trigger Holdoff,
Frame (gap) Holdoff
Remote Connectivity
USB 2.0, type B connector
Command Protocol
IVI-C and IVI-Com
Maximum Input Power
200mW avg, 1W for 1us peak
Size
(LxWxH) 145 x 43 x 43 (mm)
5.7 x 1.7 x 1.7 (inches)
Weight
363 grams/0.8 lbs.
Cable (with locking USB)
1.8 m / 6 ft
Power Consumption
2.5W max (USB high power device)
Operating Temperature
0 to 55°C
Storage Temperature
-40 to 70°C
Table 1.2 55 Series Common Specifications
1-7
General Information
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
1.7
Boonton Resources on RF Power Measurements
Information regarding power measurement and Boonton Power Meter products is available free of charge
from the Resource Library section of the Boonton website. All Boonton power meter instruction manuals
cover the details of RF power measurement techniques. The following links highlight a few of the available
application notes, articles, webinars and white papers related to RF Power measurements and techniques:






Principles of RF Power Measurements:
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library/power-measurement-reference-guide
Videos:
http://boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=videos
Application Notes:
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=application_notes
Whitepapers:
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=white_papers
Articles:
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=articles
Webinars:
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=webinars
General Information
1-8
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
2. Hardware Installation
This section contains unpacking and repacking instructions, power requirements, connection descriptions and
preliminary checkout procedures.
2.1
Unpacking & Repacking
Figure 2.1 55 Series Sensor kit contents
The 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor is shipped complete and is ready to use upon receipt. Figure 2.1
illustrates the various pieces included with the 55 Series sensor and where they are loaded into the container.
Actual details may vary from the illustration.
NOTE: Save the packing material and container to ship the instrument, if necessary. If the original
materials (or suitable substitute) are not available, contact Boonton Electronics to purchase
replacements. Store materials in a cool, dry environment.
2-1
Hardware Installation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Before you start, make sure you have the following items in your 55 series USB Power Sensor package as shown in
Figure 2.2.
1. Boonton 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor
2. USB Type-A Cable (6 ft)
3. External Trigger Multi-I/O Cable (SMB to BNC)
4. Trigger Sync Cable (SMB to SMB) for triggering multiple sensors
5. Software includes desktop app, API, examples and product documentation.
NOTE: The software and manual may be distributed on a USB memory stick or on a CDROM
Figure 2.2 55 Series sensor and accessories as packed for shipping
If any of these items are missing or damaged, then please contact your local representative immediately and refer
to “Contact and Support” section of this guide.
Hardware Installation
2-2
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
2.2
Installing the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite Software
This section describes the installation and use of Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite software for 55 series
wideband USB sensors. Before you start, check your PC for software compatibility.
CAUTION: Do not connect the 55 Series to your PC until you have installed the Boonton Power Analyzer
software.
The Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite software requires the following minimum computer characteristics:
Windows XP SP3 and above
512 MB RAM
1 GHz Processor
USB Port (2.0 or greater)
Procedure:
To install the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite software, follow these steps:
(1) Install Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite by selecting
. The installation package can
be downloaded from "Manual & Software" section of the product page on Boonton website:
http://boonton.com/products/sensors/55-series-wideband-usb-power-sensor?go=manuals_software
(2) The Installation process is initiated by running “BoontonLauncher.exe” with admin permissions. When
you select the
for the first time, select "Yes" and then click on "Install" in order to
proceed with the installation process.
Figure 2.3
2-3
Figure 2.4
Hardware Installation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
(3) Initially Boonton USB driver will be installed. You might receive a windows security warning message as
below. The USB driver will be installed once you select the checkbox to accept the windows security.
Figure 2.5
Figure 2.6
(4) Next IVI Shared Components installation wizard will appear as a part of the installation process. This will
install necessary API files for remote communications. Select
process.
to continue the installation
Figure 2.7
Figure 2.8
(5) Once IVI Shared Components installation is completed, then Microsoft DirectX setup wizard will appear
and will guide you through the installation process.
Figure 2.9
Figure 2.10
Hardware Installation
2-4
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
(6) Now the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite software installation wizard will appear. Select "Run" in
order to continue with the installation process.
(7) Read the license agreement, accept it and then follow the instruction by clicking several
buttons.
Figure 2.11
Figure 2.12
(8) By default the main software application will be installed in the following folder:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Boonton\Peak Power Analyzer Suite\
Figure 2.13
2-5
Hardware Installation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
(9) Start the installation process by following windows wizard instructions, accepting license agreement and
click several
buttons. This will install all necessary driver files and required DLL files. During
installation, you will notice the software installation progress as below.
Figure 2.14
(10)Once the installation is done successfully, Click
button to exit the wizard. Now, the
Boonton Peak Power Analyzer software will open automatically.
Figure 2.15
Hardware Installation
2-6
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
2.3
Sensor Connections
The end panel of the 55 Series Power sensor shown in Figure 2.16, has two connectors and the Status LED. The
center connector is a USB ‘Type B’ receptacle used to connect the 55 Series power sensor to the host computer.
The connector labelled Multi I/O is an SMB plug and can serve as a trigger input, status output, or as a trigger
synchronization interconnect when multiple 55 Series sensors are used.
Connect the Boonton 55 Series USB sensor to your PC through the supplied
USB cable. Note that the cable should be secured to the sensor using the
captive screw on the USB plug. The power sensor is USB 2.0 compatible. It is
recommended that you use the USB cable supplied with your sensor.
Connect USB Sensor to RF Source. All 55 series sensor models are equipped
with either a precision Type-N male RF connector or a precision, 2.92 mm male
RF connector. Connect the sensor to the RF signal to be measured.
2-7

CAUTION: Do not rotate the body of the sensor when
connecting the sensor to a unit under test (UUT). To avoid
internal sensor damage, connect and disconnect the sensor by Figure 2.16 The 55 Series end
panel showing the connectors
turning the metal nut only.
and Status LED.

CAUTION: Ensure that you do not apply any excessive force on
the sensor once it has been connected.

CAUTION: Do not apply RF power levels greater than +20 dBm to the RF input of the sensor.
Hardware Installation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
2.4
Power Requirements
The 55 Series sensors require 2.5 Watts at 5 Volts, this is supplied via a USB port. The 55 Series MUST be connected
to a USB 2.0 port that is able to supply the full 500mA.
NOTE: Usually a USB 2.0 port is capable of supplying
500 mA current through its port.
When an
unpowered USB hub is used (sometimes the hub is
internal), available current may need to be shared
between connected devices.
To assess the available power, on the USB 2.0 port the 55 Series
sensor is connected to, open the host computer’s Device
Manager > USB Controllers > Generic USB Hub and then right click
and check the properties windows under "Power" tab. Figure
2.17 shows an example
Figure 2.17 Windows USB Power Dialog
2.5
Status LED codes
The end panel, shown in Figure 2.16, includes a Status LED. The color and flash pattern indicates the sensors status
as indicated on the label on the side panel shown in Figure 2.18.
Figure 2.18 The information label on the side of the 55 Series sensor contains
information on the maximum power levels the device can handle and the meaning of the
various status LED flash patterns.
The 55 Series Power Sensor is now ready to operate as described in Chapter 3 Getting Started.
Hardware Installation
2-8
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
3. Getting Started
This chapter will introduce the 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor, and will discuss basic connection and
operation. For additional information please see Chapter 4 "Operation."
3.1
Learning About RF Power Measurements
The Boonton resource library may be browsed free of charge from the Boonton website. All Boonton power meter
instruction manuals cover the details of RF power measurement techniques, and the Power Principles guide offers
a comprehensive view of power measurement history, techniques, applications and reference information.
Visit the following links to find more application notes, articles, webinars and white papers related to RF Power
measurements and techniques:
RF Power Principles:
Application Notes:
Whitepapers:
Articles:
Webinars:
Videos:
3.2
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library/power-measurement-reference-guide
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=application_notes
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=white_papers
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=articles
http://www.boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=webinars
http://boonton.com/resource-library?brand=Boonton&go=videos
Connecting the 55 Series Sensor
Following unpacking and software installation discussed in Chapter 2 of this guide, a sensor device can be connected
to the USB port of the PC.
When the sensor device is first connected to the USB port, there will be a one-time driver file installation. Wait
until you see an automatic device detection message and Windows OS installs the driver file. Note, older operating
system may behave differently. Contact Boonton Electronics if you have a problem.
Figure 3.1 Windows popup showing that the 55 Series device driver has been installed.
3-1
Getting Started
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
3.3
Introduction to Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite
Once you have installed the software, configured your USB drivers and connected the 55 Series sensor to the PC,
you are ready to make measurements using the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite software application.
NOTE: The 55 Series USB driver file is provided by Boonton Electronics/Wireless Telecom Group, and
digitally signed by Microsoft Corporation.
Open Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite from the “Boonton” group in the Windows Start Menu or by double
clicking on the desktop icon
.
A splash screen will welcome you to the application.
Figure 3.2 The Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite splash screen.
Getting Started
3-2
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Under "Available Resources", a pop up box will appear as below with the list of connected devices name and
hardware information. The initial view of the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer software is shown in Figure 3.3,
although display colors may be different.
Figure 3.3 The Available Resources box shows connected devices
In the Available Resources window, check the “Select” box for one or more connected sensors, then click "New
Virtual Pwr Analyzer". This will launch a new Virtual Power Analyzer instance containing trace and control
windows. If you have a RF signal connected already to the USB sensor, the measured signal’s waveform will appear
in the trace window.
A “Virtual Power Analyzer” is analogous to a benchtop RF Peak Power Analyzer with one or more sensors connected.
Time and trigger controls are typically common to all sensors within a Virtual Power Analyzer, while channel-specific
controls are available for most other settings. This offers users the familiar, multi-channel approach common to
power meters and oscilloscopes.
When independent control of timebase-related settings is desired, it is possible to open multiple Virtual Power
Analyzers, each with their own full set of controls.
3-3
Getting Started
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Docking Windows
Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite uses dockable windows to allow the user to arrange the various windows in
the configuration of their choice. You can drag a docked window by clicking its title bar. This action enables you to
move the window to a different docked position or undock it.
To dock tool windows
 Click the tool window you want to dock.

Drag the window toward the middle of the software main window.

A guide diamond will appear with four arrows pointing toward the four sides of the main window.

When the tool window you are dragging reaches the location where you want to dock it, move the pointer
over the corresponding portion of the guide diamond. The designated area is shaded blue.

To dock the window in the position indicated, release the mouse button. Note that docked windows can
be overlapped. By selecting individual tab it is possible to resize each tool windows and can be repositioned
as below picture.

Alternatively, you can dock a tool window to a portion of one of the side walls of the software by dragging
it to the side until you see a secondary guide diamond. Click one of the four arrows to dock the tool window
to that portion of the side wall.
The following diagram shows the guide diamonds with arrows that appear when you drag a tool window toward
the center of the Boonton software main window. The diamond on the right edge only appears when you drag a
tool window toward the edge of the main application window.
Figure 3.4 Docking a sidebar to the left side of the display
Getting Started
3-4
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
NOTE: Each of the tool windows is highlighted as a rectangular box to be positioned by dragging in any
direction within the main window. Figure 3.4 is one example, but you can always rearrange these tool
windows as you prefer to see them within your main software window.
Main Application
The main application window is divided into several major sections and dockable windows depending on the type
of measurement selection. These windows can be arranged easily by docking and undocking within the main
application display area.
Available Resources Window:
Sensors can be selected from the "Available Resources" window. A description for each connected resource will
indicate the hardware version, model and channel information including alias. User can select up to eight resources
per Virtual Power Analyzer. Following resource selection, click on "New Virtual Pwr Analyzer" and a new Virtual
Power Analyzer instance will open with a default configuration suitable for pulse measurements.
Figure 3.5 Selecting a sensor using the Available Resources box
The Main Toolbar
Each Virtual Power Analyzer displays a Main Toolbar at the top of its window which hosts shortcuts to commonly
used functions and measurements. The Main Toolbar is shown grouped; individual groups can be dragged to reorder or compact the toolbar.
Figure 3.6 Main Toolbar Controls, shown grouped
3-5
Getting Started
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Trace View Window
In order to display a pulse measurement users must select the
icon from the Main Toolbar.
The
settings and
settings related to pulse measurement can be selected from Main
Toolbar and can be applied to the measurement.
Figure 3.7 Use the Trace button on the Main Toolbar to display and setup a pulse measurement
A measurement window configuration suitable for pulse measurements is shown in Figure 3.8. This shows a large
trace window, automatic measurements, and a tabbed control box for time and channel settings.
Figure 3.8 Main application window of Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite.
The Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite application allows the user to directly enter numeric values for most
settings in the Channel Control and Time/Trigger windows. For many of the controls, additional methods such as
increment/decrement or preset buttons are available.
Getting Started
3-6
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Trace Pan and Zoom
The mouse can be used to select a zoom area to view detail in an area of interest on the displayed waveform. The
highlighted dragged rectangular area indicates the minimum area that will be shown when the zoom operation
completes.
Horizontal pan or zoom adjusts the timebase (within preset values) and the trigger delay to highlight an area of
interest without vertical rescaling.
The user can also directly pan or zoom to waveform areas of interest by selecting any option from the lower toolbar
of the trace window. Available options for zoom/pan control are: Horizontal & Vertical, Horizontal, Pan and None
with Undo and Redo selections.
Figure 3.9 Clicking on the Trace View display and dragging will open a zoom box, releasing the mouse
button will result in the trace being expanded to show the area contained in the zoom box
AutoSet
The
button below the trace window attempts to configure level scaling, trigger level and timing for a
“best fit” display based upon amplitude and timing of the applied signal. All other parameters are set back to
defaults. If the AutoSet process fails, all settings are left untouched.
Trace Data Export
Any trace window can be exported, and saved or printed as a PDF or CSV document by selecting
button from the lower toolbar of the trace window. An exported trace file can easily be imported into a spreadsheet
or other report file or documentation.
3-7
Getting Started
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Channel Control Window
Select
icon and a dockable sidebar will appear on the right
hand side of the main application window by default. This allows you to
change all related settings to control one or more sensor channels.
Channel control setting is defined by several parameters as listed below.
Channel: Select one or all channels (for multi-channels) via the drop
down list. Selecting the "All" permits simultaneous update on all
measurement channels (up to 8) for most settings.
Units: Selects dBm, Watts or Volts measurement units. Selection
affects displayed text, measurements, and trace.
Vert Scale / Center: Sets vertical amplitude scaling and centering of
the displayed waveform. These settings affect only the trace display.
Sensor Enabled: Enable or disable individual connected sensors.
Trace Avg: Sets number of acquired sweeps averaged together for
displayed trace in pulse/triggered modes. Useful for noisy signals.
Mod Filter/Filter Mode: Sets manual or automatic filter integration
time window for measurements in modulated (non-triggered)
acquisition modes.
Peak Hold Mode/Decay Count: Sets peak hold duration (# of
sweeps). Tracks Trace Avg setting or may be independent.
Video BW: Selects sensor video bandwidth, high or low.
Frequency: Sets measurement frequency for the applied RF signal.
Cal&Corrections: Offset compensates reading for external gain/loss.
Zeroing and Fixed cal: Sensor zeroing and fixed calibration can be
performed by selecting each specific button.
Figure 3.10 Channel Control Menu
Getting Started
3-8
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Time / Trigger Settings Window
By selecting
pulse signal.
icon you will be able to customize all related settings for both timebase and trigger of a
Timebase: Acquisition time in seconds per division. Boonton peak power
meters use a fixed grid of 10 divisions for the sweep extents. Settings are
in a 1-2-5 sequence. Consult series specifications for timebase range.
Trigger Delay: Trigger delay can be adjusted by manually entering a
numerical value into the field or using the up-down arrow keys. Click the
“0” icon to reset the trigger delay to zero seconds.
Trigger Position: Trigger position can be changed by entering numerical
values into the “Divisions” field, clicking the scroll arrows, dragging the
slide control, or by clicking the L/M/R (Left/Middle/Right) indicators.
Trigger Source: Several trigger modes are available for each trigger
source under "Trigger Control" section. Multiple trigger sources are
available under the drop down list including both "Internal" and
"External" selection.
Trigger Mode: Select Normal, Auto, AutoLevel or Free run.
Trigger Level: Sets trigger level when trigger source is INT and trigger
mode is Auto or Normal.
Slope: Select rising or falling edge triggering.
Holdoff: Sets trigger holdoff time and selects between Normal or Gap
holdoff mode.
Trigger Skew Adjustment: This feature allows the user to adjust the skew
for internal trigger with master trigger output, and also external and slave
triggers. Skew adjustments allows to calibrate out trigger delay between
sensors so the user can measure propagation delay of the DUT from input
to output. Manual skew adjustments can be made by entering the skew
value in the numeric entry field. The button to the right of each skew
adjustment is the Auto-Skew button which is described in detail in section
4.1.5. This feature allows automatic adjustment of the skew.
Figure 3.11 Time/Trigger Menu
3-9
Getting Started
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Marker Settings Window
Clicking the
button will open a window to control
settings for time markers and amplitude reference lines of a
pulse signal.
Markers: Time Marker position settings will allow you to
change both marker 1 and marker 2 time positions by using
either arrow keys or entering numerical values into the field.
It will also display the time delta value between the two
markers.
Reference Lines: Also known as Horizontal Markers, can be
enabled by selecting On/Off button for each individual
channel. Once enabled, users may select several options for
automatic amplitude tracking from the Tracking drop down
list:
Off, Markers, TopBottom, DistalMesial and
DistalProximal. Two reference lines can be set by using
up/down arrow keys. Horizontal markers are useful to
determine the difference with regard to loss.
Figure 3.12 Marker Settings Menu
Pulse Definitions Window
Pulse Thresholds: Pulse definition setting allows user to
define distal, mesial and proximal values for pulse thresholds.
It is also possible to change pulse unit from watts to volts.
Pulse Gate: Pulse start and end gate can be changed both
numerically and by changing up/down arrow keys.
Chapter 6 contains a detailed description of each pulse
threshold level and the pulse measurement process.
Figure 3.13 Pulse Definitions Menu
Getting Started
3-10
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Automatic Measurements Window
Selecting
icon will allow you to display a tabulated field with a list of parameters for RF pulse
measurements including marker measurements. Below is an example screenshot for automatic parameters
displayed for a typical pulse measurement.
NOTE: All field parameters are customizable, can be edited or deleted from the list. The whole table
can be copied and pasted into a spreadsheet in order to make any custom report file along with captured
screenshots by selecting export button as provided by the software.
Figure 3.14 A list of automatic
parameters displayed for a pulse
signal measurement.
3-11
Figure 3.15 A list of marker
measurements displayed for a pulse
signal.
Getting Started
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Customize Field Parameters:
All field parameters under automatic measurement are
customizable, can be edited or deleted from the list by selecting
individual parameter fields and then by using right click button of the
mouse.
Figure 3.16 Right click on a parameter
to access the edit pop up.
Export or Copy Field Parameters:
The whole automatic table or individual parameter field can be copied
and then pasted into a simple spreadsheet or document in order to
make a custom report file along with captured screenshots provided
by the application.
Figure 3.17 Select multiple
parameters and right click to copy.
Getting Started
3-12
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Display Settings Window
This option allows the user to customize data and trace colors for each measurement channel, and enable or disable
trace display features such as Average, Envelope, Maximum, Minimum and Persistence. It is also possible to adjust
marker color, background, grid colors and more under "Graph Colors" section of the display settings.
Figure 3.18 Use Display Settings to customize the display.
3-13
Getting Started
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
CCDF View Window
For statistical measurements, select the
icon from menu bar to view a CCDF graph. The sidebar on the
CCDF screen allows adjustment of horizontal scale, horizontal offset, cursor type, cursor position and dB offset. The
user can also enable/disable capture or reset the statistical data acquisition.
Figure 3.19 Complementary Cumulative Distribution Function (CCDF) graph is selected by pressing the
CCDF button on the Main Toolbar
Getting Started
3-14
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Statistical Measurements Window
By selecting
icon, a tabulated list of statistical
measurements will be displayed. Here is an example parameters text
display for statistical measurements.
Figure 3.20 Statistical
Measurements Window
This completes the introduction to the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite application. Chapter 4 provides a more
detailed look at user of Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite.
3-15
Getting Started
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
4. Operation
This section presents the procedures for operating the Boonton 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor using
the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite application. All the display windows that control the sensor are illustrated
and accompanied by instructions for using each in the window.
4.1
Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite Application
Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite is a Windows-based software program that provides immediate RF power
measurements from a 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor without the need for programming on your
Windows OS based computer. RF power measurements from the USB sensor can be displayed on your computer
or can be integrated into a test system using an Application Program Interface (API).
NOTE: This section of the manual assumes that Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite has been installed
on a computer using the instruction provided in the Getting Started Guide or Chapter 3 of this manual.
Initializing the Software
Open Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite on the computer.
Use a mouse or other pointing device to click on the View tab on the top of the window.
Click on Load Defaults – this will load the default Windows Theme ‘Visual Studio 2012 Dark’ and will reset all
application measurement settings to default values provide a known initial state.
Click on the down arrow adjacent to the theme to view the pull down menu showing the available themes.
The themes establish the look of the Windows environment setting colors, fonts, and backgrounds.
The balance of this chapter will use the ‘Default” theme.
Click on any of the available themes to see what they look like. Select the theme you wish to use.
Figure 4.1 Selecting the Windows Theme using the Setting
Operation
4-1
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Connecting the 55 Series Power Sensor
Connect the Boonton 55 Series wideband power sensor to one of the USB ports of a computer using the supplied
USB cable.
Connect USB Sensor Head to RF Source using the standard Type N or 2.9mm connection port on the sensor.

CAUTION: Do not turn the body of the sensor when connecting the sensor to a unit under test
(UUT). To avoid internal sensor damage, connect and disconnect the sensor by turning the metal
nut of the N connector only until it is ‘hand tight’.

CAUTION: Ensure that you do not apply any excessive force on the sensor once it has been
connected.

CAUTION: Do not exceed the specified RF power at the RF input of the sensor.
Once the power sensor is connected, a pop up box will appear in the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite
application as in Figure 4.2 with the list of connected devices name and hardware information.
Figure 4.2 Once the power sensor is connected the software will list it as a resource in the Available
Resources window.
Up to eight sensors can be connected to the software. Click on the “Select” box of one of the sensors, click "New
Virtual Pwr Analyzer" button at the bottom, a new Virtual Power Analyzer window will show up. If you have an RF
signal connected already to the 55 Series sensor, the measured signal should display in the Trace View window
which appears along with the Channel Control tool window as shown in Figure 4.3.
4-2
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Figure 4.3 Upon selecting a sensor resource and pressing the New Virtual Pwr analyzer button the
Graphical view of the power waveform will be displayed.
The Trace View Display
The Trace View window in Figure 4.3 displays a trace of power versus time. The readout in the upper left corner
shows the channel number of the trace, the vertical scale factor and the vertical center. In Figure 4.3 Channel 1 is
displayed with a vertical scale of 10 dB/div(ision) and a vertical center of -20 dBm.
The horizontal scale of the trace in the Trace View window is shown at the bottom of the grid. At the center of the
horizontal axis is the horizontal scale factor. Numbers at the beginning and end of the horizontal axis show the
span of the axis. In the example shown the horizontal scale factor is 100µs/div and the axis extends from -500µs to
500µs.
The two vertical blue lines labeled 1 and 2 are markers used for measurements of the displayed signals. These will
be discussed later in the manual.
The bar at the bottom of the Trace View window provides a number of useful tools that can be used to optimize
the trace display and archive the trace(s):
The Export button is used to export any trace window as a PDF or CSV document. These exported trace
files can be used for a report or document.
The Undo and Redo buttons work in conjunction with the display expansion (zoom) function to remove
(Undo) and restore (Redo) changes in display scaling.
Operation
4-3
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Autoset provides an automatic setup of the trace display scaling which optimizes the trace view in the
Trace View window.
The pull down menu box is used to select the zoom mode.
Horiz(zontal) & Vert(ical) lets the graphical drag and drop zoom control both horizontal and
vertical expansion.
Horizontal limits the zoom controls to affecting the horizontal scaling only
Pan allows the user to click and drag the trace either horizontally or vertically.
None turns off both zoom and panning.
4.1.3.1 Trace Pan and Zoom
The application has a trace zoom feature which lets a user to drag a rectangular box (like the one shown in Figure
4.4) around the trace in order to zoom onto a special area of the displayed waveform. The highlighted dragged
rectangular area indicates the minimum area that will be shown when the zoom operation completes. The zoom
area is constrained to the preset timebase settings and trigger Vernier limits. Note in Figure 4.4 that the zoom
horizontal scale changes from 10 µs/div to 1µs/div the nearest available fixed timebase setting. Vertical scaling is
similarly constrained.
Figure 4.4 Horizontal or horizontal and vertical display expansion (zoom) is accomplished by clicking on
the trace view and dragging the mouse diagonally while holding the mouse button down. A box will outline
the area to be expanded. Releasing the mouse button will rescale the trace.
4-4
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
4.1.3.2 Formatting Trace View Display Settings
On upper left hand corner click View (next to File) and then click Graph Settings icon. This will open the Display
Settings popup as shown in Figure 4.5.
Figure 4.5 The Display Settings popup is used to configure the Graph View. The elements to be displayed
can be chosen and their colors may be selected along with the background color.
The upper section of the Display Settings labeled Trace controls the configuration of the selected trace. There can
be a maximum of eight traces. The configuration of each trace includes the trace color, the choice of five viewable
trace attributes, and the trace refresh time. Trace attributes include graphical view of the average value, envelope,
maxima, minima, and persistence (trace history). The defaults are to Show Avg and Show Envelope. Each of the
selected elements is overlaid on the trace.
NOTE: Whether enabled to view or not, the sensor always acquires all three "traces" (average, min and
max). These are used for several of the marker measurements such as interval peak-to-average, and
others. For the marker intervals, Min and Max (highest maximum trace and lowest minimum trace
points) as well as MinF and MaxF (min and max filtered) which are the highest and lowest points on the
average trace. The former measurements are useful for looking at modulation, while the latter are most
useful for seeing systematic peaks and dips (for example, ringing) of a repetitive waveform with the noise reduced.
A check box for Disable HW Acceleration can be checked if the computer does not have a monitor or graphics card
or if it is being operated remotely using remote desktop. Note: This change will not take effect until the next time
a trace window is opened.
Operation
4-5
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
The lower section of the Display Settings popup provides controls for color choices for trace grid, border, and
background. Markers, axis label, crosshair color selections are also included. Color choices are made by clicking on
the ellipsis symbol (…) adjacent to each element. This will bring up the Color Dialog palette used to set the desired
color for the element
The Main Toolbar
The power analyzer software always displays the Main Toolbar that is located at the top of the main program
window and contains shortcuts to commonly used functions and measurements. The Main Toolbar can be
customized as discussed below. Figure 4.6 shows the Main Toolbar:
Figure 4.6 The main toolbar containing three sets of shortcuts to commonly used functions and
measurements.
The Main Toolbar contains three sections called Toolstrips. The group of shortcuts on the left, including CCDF,
Trace, Auto Meas(urement) and Stat(istical) Meas(urement) are the Measurement Windows Toolstrip and will
bring up trace display or measurement windows. The middle group with Time/Trig, Channel, Mark, Pulse
Def(initions) and Stat(istical) Cntl(Control) are the Control Windows Toolstrip, and will cause setup and control
windows to be displayed. The final group including Run, Stop, Single, Clear and Init(ialize) are the Acquisition
Control Toolstrip and affect the state of the acquisition.
Any of the toolstrips may be separated from the Main Toolbar and re-positioned by clicking on the ellipsis symbol
at the left end of any of the groups and dragging the toolstrip.
The drop down menu bar on the right of each section allows the user to edit the tools bar by adding or removing
any of the items under the Items tab. The Toolstrips tab allows the user to show or hide the tools strips.
4.1.4.1 The Acquisition Control Toolstrip
The buttons on this toolstrip control the state of the acquisition:
Run – Starts the measurement acquisition and allows it to run continuously until stopped.
Stop – Stops the measurement acquisition.
Single – Starts a single measurement acquisition and then stops.
Clear – Erases the acquired data trace. Useful in clearing a single or averaged acquisitions.
Init – Initializes or resets all settings for the active Virtual Power Meter to default values.
4-6
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
4.1.4.2 The Measurement Control Toolstrip
The buttons on this toolstrip create Trace View and CCDF Graph displays as well as the automated power
measurement and statistical Measurement tabular display windows:
CCDF – This button turns on the complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF) display. If the
CCDF display is already opened but hidden behind the Trace View display this button will bring the CCDF
trace to the foreground.
Trace - This button turns on the Trace View trace that displays power versus time.
Auto Meas – This button opens Automatic Measurement windows showing the automatic Pulse and
Marker Measurements tables.
Stat Meas – This button opens the Statistical Measurements window displaying the measurements
associated with the CCDF Graph.
4.1.4.3 The Control Windows Toolstrip
The buttons on this toolstrip control the setup windows for the acquisition, and measurement functions.
Time/Trig – This button displays the Trigger and Timebase control windows.
Channel – This button brings up the Channel Control Window allowing control of the vertical range and
offset as well as sensor related settings
Mark – This button causes the Marker Settings window to be displayed. Marker and reference lines can be
controlled from here.
Pulse Def – This button displays the Pulse Definitions window controlling the pulse measurement
thresholds, units, and gating.
Stat Cntl – This button brings up the Stat(istics) Mode Control window with scaling and population control
for the CCDF display.
4.1.4.4 Memory Channel Toolstrip
The Memory Channel toolstrip contains Swap/Change, Save Mem(ory) Chan(nel), and Upload Mem(ory) Chan(nel),
and controls the sensor connection source and saving and recalling Mem(ory) traces. The Memory Channel is a
reference trace that appears on the Trace View when Mem+ is enabled.
Swap/Change - Swap/change allows you to change sensors for a particular session if more than one is
connected.
Save Mem(ory) Chan(nel) – Saves the current Memory channel to a user selected folder on the computer.
Upload Mem(ory) Chan(nel) – recalls a stored Memory Channel to the Memory Channel Trace on the Trace
View.
4-7
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Time/Trigger Control Window
Pressing the Time/Trig button icon the Control Windows toolstrip will bring up the Timebase / Trigger Control
window shown in Figure 4.7.
This window has four sections Time(base), Trigger Position, Trigger Control, and
Trigger Skew Adj(ust). Any of these sections can be opened or collapsed by
clicking on the up/down arrow buttons to the left of the section titles.
Time and Trigger Position Controls
Settings in the Time and Trigger Position Control groups affect horizontal scaling
and position of the acquired waveform.
Timebase controls the timebase or horizontal scale of the acquisition and is
noted on the horizontal axis label of the Trace View. The Timebase pulldown
menu permits selection of fixed timebase ranges from 5 ns/div to 50ms/div
(sensor series dependent) in a 1-2-5 progression.
Trig(ger) Delay can be adjusted either manually entering a numerical value into
the field or using the up-down arrow keys.
The trigger delay time is set in seconds with respect to the trigger. Positive
values mean that the trace display shows a time interval after the trigger event.
This positions the trigger event to the left of the trigger point on the display, and
is useful for viewing events during a pulse, or some fixed delay time after the
rising edge trigger. Negative trigger delay mean that the trace display shows a
time interval before the trigger event, and is useful for looking at events
preceding the trigger edge.
Pressing the ‘0’ button to the right of the trigger delay entry field resets the
trigger delay to zero.
The range of trigger delay times is dependent on the timebase setting and is
summarized in Table 4.1. Note the range will also depend upon the trigger
position.
Figure 4.7 The Time/Trig
Control window
Timebase Setting
5 ns/div to 10 us/div
20 us/div
50 us/ div
100 us/ div
200 us/div
500 us/div
1 ms/div
2 ms/div to 10 ms/div
20 ms/div
50 ms/div
Trigger Delay Range
-1.26 ms to 100 ms
-1.26 ms to 200 ms
-5.04 ms to 200 ms
-6.3 ms to 500 ms
-12.6 ms to 1
-31.5 ms to 1 s
-63 ms to 1 s
-126 ms to 1 s
-252 ms to 1 s
-628 ms to 1 s
Table 4.1
4-8
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
NOTE: Trigger delay ranges in Table 4.1 are for the trigger position set to 0 divisions (Left). If trigger
delay and position settings result in a pre-trigger capture interval greater than 1.26ms, the sensor will
automatically reduce the sample rate to avoid overflowing its pre-trigger memory.
Trigger Position controls are used to set the location of the trigger point on the acquired trace waveform. It can be
changed by entering numerical values into the Divisions field from -30 to +30 divisions, by positioning the horizontal
slider bar, or by clicking on the L, M or R indicators to select one of three default positions: Left (zero divisions),
Middle (five divisions) or Right (ten divisions).
Trigger Controls
Settings in the Trigger Control group provides control to affect the trigger source, mode, trigger level, slope, and
trigger holdoff.
Trigger Source
The trigger source can be any of the resource channels (CH1, CH2, etc.), or the Ext(ernal) trigger input signal. The
Ind(ependent) trigger setting allows each connected sensor to trigger independently from its own RF input.
The external trigger is attached to the 55 Series via the Multi-I/O connector adjacent to the USB port on the 55
Series sensor. The connector is an SMB type. The external trigger requires a TTL signal level, minimum pulse width
of 10 ns, and maximum frequency of 50 MHz.
In a multichannel set-up, the sensors can be triggered independently as described above or in a master/slave
configuration. In master/slave configuration one channel (CH1, CH2, etc.) is selected as the source (master) and
the remaining sensors automatically operate in slave mode. See multichannel mode for additional information.
Trigger Mode
There are four available trigger modes: Normal, Auto, Autolevel, and Freerun.
Normal – The unit triggers when the amplitude of selected trigger source transitions above the preset
trigger level when positive trigger slope is selected or if it transitions below the preset trigger level when
negative trigger slope is selected. No automatic trigger actions take place.
Auto - Auto trigger mode operates in much the same way as Normal trigger mode, but will automatically
generate a trace if no trigger edges are detected for a period of time. If a triggerable signal edge occurs
during auto-trigger operation, the trigger system will resynchronize with the signal. For trigger rates below
approximately 10 Hz, the Auto trigger time delay may interfere with resynchronization. Use Normal mode
if this occurs.
AutoLevel - performs the same function as Auto and, in addition, automatically sets the trigger level based
on the peak-to-peak amplitude of the signal. For many signals this will provide a fully automatic trigger
system. For slow rate signals and complex level patterns, it may not produce the desired display. Use
Normal mode if this occurs.
Freerun - Free Run generates horizontal sweeps asynchronously, without regard to trigger conditions. This
mode is useful for locating low duty-cycle events visually.
Operation
4-9
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Trigger Level
Sets the threshold level for the trigger signal in the Auto and Normal trigger modes. The trigger level can be entered
numerically or changed by using arrow keys. The trigger level range has a maximum value of 20 dBm and a minimum
range that is sensor model dependent (see the sensor specifications for your specific sensor model)
The trigger range is automatically adjusted to include the dB Offset parameter selected in the Cal & Corrections
section of the Channel Control window. For example, if the trigger level = 10 dBm and the dB Offset is changed
from 0 to 20 dB, then the offset-adjusted trigger level will be displayed to the user as 30dBm. Likewise, the
maximum trigger level range will be extended to 40 dBm. The trigger level set point and setting range are both
shifted upward by 20 dB
Trigger Slope
Sets the trigger slope or polarity. When set to Pos(itive), trigger events will be generated when a signal’s rising edge
crosses the trigger level threshold. When Neg(ative) is selected, trigger events are generated when the falling edge
of the pulse crosses the threshold. Trigger slope can be selected by using Pos and Neg button boxes under slope.
Holdoff (Time)
The holdoff time can be entered and adjusted numerically to 0.01 us resolution, or using the up and down arrow
keys in 1 us increments. The effect of Holdoff time depends on the Holdoff Mode. Set the trigger holdoff time in
microseconds.
Holdoff Mode
There are two trigger holdoff modes: Normal and Gap.
Normal Holdoff
Normal trigger holdoff is used to disable the trigger for a specified amount of time after each trigger event.
The holdoff time starts immediately after each valid trigger edge, and will not permit any new triggers until
the time has expired. When the holdoff time is up, the trigger re-arms, and the next valid trigger event
(edge) will cause a new sweep. This feature is used to help synchronize the 55 Series sensor with burst
waveforms such as a TDMA or GSM frame. For periodic burst signals, the trigger holdoff time should be set
slightly shorter than the burst or frame repetition interval.
Gap Holdoff
Gap or frame holdoff is very useful for packet-based communication signals where the transmission burst
contains deep modulation which may fall briefly below the trigger threshold, or when bursts or pulses are
of varying length and spacing, making normal holdoff ineffective. In most cases, the "off" time between
transmission bursts, or frames, is considerably longer than the instantaneous modulation dips.
In gap holdoff the trigger is not armed until the trigger source remains inactive (below the trigger threshold
for positive trigger slope, or vice versa for negative slope) for at least the set duration. So if trigger polarity
is positive, and gap holdoff is set for 1us, then the signal must stay below the trigger level for at least 1us
before the trigger is armed. Then, the next rising edge following a gap of 1us or longer will trigger the
acquisition.
4-10
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Trigger Skew Adj(ust)
Trigger Skew aligns the edge crossing with the trigger point for each of the trigger sources. This is done internally
by adding a trim value to the trigger delay setting. Since the different trigger sources (internal, external, and slave)
have different delays, the system stores a value for each.
Trigger Skew requires a fast RF pulse (Trise < 10ns) to adjust 'Int' skew. To auto-adjust 'Ext' requires a fast RF pulse
aligned with a fast external trigger pulse applied to the sensor's MIO input. Adjusting the 'Slave' source requires
two sensors connected to a common, fast RF pulse (Trise < 10ns) and interconnected for cross-trigger via their MIO
inputs. You can de-skew one setting at a time until all three sources are calibrated.
Deskewing can be done automatically by clicking on the double slope icon on the left of “ns”, shown in Figure 4.8.
Automatic deskewing requires a fast edge, repetitive signal.
Figure 4.8 The automatic deskew icons.
Operation
4-11
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Channel Control Window
The Channel Control window allows you to change all related settings
to control sensor channels. The Peak Power Analyzer software has the
capability of handling multiple control channels by selecting each
individually from the drop down list. Channel control setting is defined
by several parameters as listed below:
Channel
You can select an individual channel or all measurement channels (for
multi-channel operation) by using the drop down list. The channel
labeled MEM1 is a memory channel which is a reference trace that can
be stored or recalled as need.
The  Mem button causes the current trace to be stored in the
Memory Channel. The current memory channel can be stored to the
computer hard drive using the Save Mem Chan button in the Memory
channel toolstrip. Likewise, a previously stored memory trace can be
recalled using the Upload Mem Chan button.
To turn off the Memory Channel, select MEM1 or MEM2 from the
Channel drop down menu, then click on the “On” button next to
"Enabled" in the Sensor menu (see below) to select “Off”.
Info
The Info group shows the pertinent information for the selected
sensor. Sensor model number, serial number, and firmware and FPGA
versions for the selected channel are displayed in this group.
Pressing the Advanced button will result in a Sensor Info popup with
three tabs: Sensor Data, Cal Factors, and Hardware Info.
Sensor Data contains identification
information for the sensor.
and
calibration
Cal Factors contain the frequency response calibrations
factors for both high and low bandwidth calibration.
Hardware Info contains information on the current state of
the sensor hardware including the detector temperature and
key power source voltage readings.
Figure 4.9 Channel Control Window
4-12
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Vertical
The Vertical group contains controls that affect vertical settings for the selected power sensor.
Scale - Vertical scale sets the scaling of the level axis of the Trace View based on the selection of units as shown in
Table 4.2.
Units
dBm
Watts
Volts
Scale
0.1, 0.2, 0.5 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 dB/div
1pW to 500 MW/div in a 1-2-5 progression
1 µV to 100 kV/ div in a 1-2-5 progression
Table 4.2 Vertical Scale range for each Units setting
Units - The trace presentation may be shown in units of dBm, Watts or Volts. The Units selection determines the
range of the scale values. Note that the Units setting also affects text measurement values in the Measurement
windows.
Center - Set the power or voltage level of the horizontal centerline of the graph for the specified channel in the
selected channel units. The center position can be entered numerically or adjusted by using up and down arrow
keys.
Sensor
The Sensor group controls acquisition parameters for the selected power sensor.
Enabled - Individual sensors or all the selected sensors can be enabled or disabled by using the alternate action
On/Off button. This functionality also enables or disables the MEM channels.
Trace Avg – Trace averaging can be used to reduce display noise on both the visible trace, and on automatic marker
and pulse measurements. Trace averaging is a continuous process in which the measurement points from each
sweep are weighted (multiplied) by an appropriate factor and averaged into the existing trace data points. In this
way, the most recent data will always have the greatest effect upon the trace waveform, and older measurements
will be decayed at a rate determined by the averaging setting and trigger rate. This averaging technique is often
referred to as ‘exponential’ averaging because averaging imposes a first-order Infinite Impulse Response (IIR)
exponential filter with a time constant of "n" where n is the Trace Avg (number of averages) setting.
Sensor averaging can be set by selecting a number of averages from 1 (no averaging) to 16384 in binary steps using
the up and down arrow buttons in the Trace Avg field.
NOTE: For timebase settings of 200 ns/div and faster, the sensor acquires samples using a technique
called equivalent time or random interleaved sampling (RIS). In this mode, not every pixel on the
trace gets updated on each sweep, and the total number of sweeps needed to satisfy the average
setting will be increased by the sample interleave ratio of that particular timebase. At all times the
average trace is the average of all samples for each pixel, and the min/max are the lowest and
highest of that same block of samples for each pixel.
Operation
4-13
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Mod Filter sets the modulation filter integration time. It is used in modulated mode measurements and does not
affect the pulse mode (triggered) measurements shown in the trace view. The modulation filter is a “sliding
window” filter which averages samples taken within a time window whose duration is set by this field. All samples
within the time window are equally weighted.
Filter Mode controls the modulation filter. The filter can be set to On (manual filter time setting), None (integration
time is set to the minimum 1ms value), or Auto (integration time automatically selected based upon input level).
Peak Hold settings control the operating mode of the selected channel’s peak hold function. Peak Hold affects the
envelope trace (if displayed) as well as peak or dynamic range marker and pulse measurements.
In Tracking mode the maxima and minima traces "decay" towards the average with a time constant that is
the same as the averaging setting. So if averaging is set fast (Trace Avg is set to a low value), then the
maxima and minima are not held very long, and long averaging (Trace Avg is set to a high value) settings
give you a ‘flatter’ trace and maxima and minima peaks decay slowly back to the average power level.
In Manual mode the averaging and peak time constants are independent (do not track each other). Rather,
peaks are held for a time proportional to the Decay Count setting. Decay Count can be set from 1 to 16384
and increments in binary steps.
Manual mode can be useful if you want to set averaging short to see short-term signal fluctuations from
one trace to the next, yet want the peaks held for a long time to get a better feel of longer-term peak stress
on your system.
The Infinite Hold button sets the Decay Count to infinity. Signal peaks and dips are held indefinitely and
never decayed. This is useful for long-term monitoring for glitches, spikes, dropouts, or other intermittent
signal events.
NOTE: The effects of the peak hold, i.e. min/max decay, are only visible when the "envelope" or
"min/max" display is enabled in the view options (See paragraph 3.3.11 and the associated Figure 3.18).
However, marker min/max values are always affected.
Video BW sets the sensor video bandwidth for the selected sensor. High is appropriate for most measurements,
and the actual bandwidth depends upon the sensor model Low bandwidth offers additional noise reduction for CW
or signals with very low modulation bandwidth. If Low bandwidth is used on signals with fast modulation,
measurement errors may result if the sensor cannot track the fast changing envelope of the signal.
Frequency should be set to the RF frequency that is applied to the sensor for the current measurement. The
appropriate frequency calibration factor from the sensor’s calibration table will be interpolated and applied
automatically. Application of this calibration factor compensates for the effect of variations in the flatness of the
sensor’s frequency response.
The power sensor has no way to determine the carrier frequency of the applied signal so the user must always enter
the frequency.
4-14
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Cal & Corrections
The Calibration and Corrections group controls coarse and fine corrections to the measurements.
Offset - Sets a measurement offset in dB for the selected sensor. This is used to compensate for external
couplers, attenuators or amplifiers in the RF signal path ahead of the power sensor.
Zero - Performs a zero offset null adjustment. The sensor does not need to be connected to any calibrator
for zeroing. This action removes the effect of small, residual power offsets, and should be performed prior
to low-level measurements. Note that there should be no RF signal applied to the sensor input prior to
zeroing.
Fixed Cal - Performs a calibration at 0dBm at the currently set frequency. This requires a calibrated 0 dBm
(1.00 mW) signal source at the current measurement frequency.
Automatic Measurements Display
Clicking on the AutoMeas icon in the Measurement
Control Toolstrip will bring up the Automatic
Measurements window to the left of the Trace View
as shown in Figure 4.10. This window includes two
related sub-windows, Pulse Measurements and
Marker Measurements. The Pulse Measurements
window shows the sixteen default field pulse
parameters.
The field pulse parameter
measurements are computed with methods
described in IEEE Std 181™-2011 and detailed in
Section 6 on pulse terms and definitions.
The Marker Measurements window shows twenty
one marker measurements.
NOTE:
All field parameters are
customizable, can be edited or deleted
from the list by selecting individual
parameter fields and then by using right
click button of the mouse. The whole
table can be copied and pasted into a spreadsheet in
order to make any custom report file along with
captured screenshots by selecting export button as
provided by the software.
Any individual parameter or group of parameters on
pulse or marker measurements can be highlighted by
Figure 4.10 The Automatic Measurements window
left clicking with the mouse and using the up and containing the Pulse and Marker Measurements
down arrow keys a group of them can be selected. tables.
Selected cells can be copied by right clicking on the
Operation
4-15
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
parameter(s) and selecting copy. The copied cells can be pasted into a spreadsheet or document.
Clicking on the printer icon next to either table will open a Print Preview window allowing the user to print the
table.
Clicking on the Export button will open a viewer showing the whole table. The contents of the viewer can be saved
or printed as PDF or CSV files if desired.
Pulse Definitions Window
Clicking on the Pulse Def button in the Pulse Measurement title bar or
on the Pulse Meas button on the Measurement Control Toolstrip will
open the Pulse Definitions window shown in Figure 4.11. This window
contains the pulse thresholds, pulse analysis units and gate settings for
the selected sensor.
Pulse Thresholds
Pulse definition settings allows user to define distal, mesial, and
proximal values for pulse thresholds, and the pulse units.
Distal - Sets the pulse amplitude percentage that defines the end of
a rising edge or beginning of a falling edge transition. Typically, this
is 90% voltage or 81% power relative to the top level of the pulse.
This setting is used when making automatic pulse risetime and
falltime calculations.
Mesial – Sets the pulse amplitude percentage that defines the
midpoint of a rising or falling edge transition. Typically, this is 50%
voltage or 25% power relative to the top level of the pulse. This
setting is used when making automatic pulse width and duty cycle
calculations.
Proximal – Sets the pulse amplitude percentage that defines the
beginning of a rising edge or end of a falling edge transition.
Typically, this is 10% voltage or 1% power relative to the top level Figure 4.11 The Pulse Definitions
window for setting measurement
of the pulse. This setting is used when making automatic pulse
thresholds, units, and gate locations.
risetime and falltime calculations.
Pulse Units – Controls whether the distal, mesial, and proximal thresholds are computed as voltage or power
percentages of the top/bottom amplitudes. If Volts is selected, the pulse transition thresholds are computed
as voltage percentages, and if Watts, they are computed as power percentages.
Many pulse measurements call for 10% to 90% voltage (which equates to 1% to 81% power) for risetime and
falltime measurements, and measure pulse widths from the half-power (–3dB, 50% power, or 71% voltage)
points. The Pulse Units setting is independent of the channel’s display units setting.
4-16
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Pulse Gate
The Pulse Gate settings define the measurement interval for the following power related pulse measurements:
Pulse Average, Pulse Peak, Pulse Minimum and Pulse Droop/Tilt. Pulse timing measurements between mesial
crossings such as width and period are not affected. The purpose of the Pulse Gate setting is to exclude edge
transition effects from the pulse power measurements. Automatic pulse measurements are then performed
between Start Gate and End Gate points.
Start Gate - Sets the beginning of the pulse measurement region as a percentage of the pulse width. The
Start Gate has a continuous range of 0.0 % to 40.0 % of the pulse width and may be entered numerically or
varied using the up or down arrows.
End Gate - Sets the end of the pulse measurement region as a percentage of the pulse width. The End Gate
has a continuous range of 60.0 % to 100.0 % of the pulse width and may be entered numerically or varied
using the up or down arrows.
Marker Settings Window
Clicking on the Mark Cntrl button in the Marker Measurement title bar
or on the Mark button on the Measurement Control Toolstrip will open
the Marker Settings window shown in Figure 4.12. This window
contains vertical marker locations, marker delta, and horizontal
reference line locations for the selected sensor.
Markers
Time Markers are a pair of vertical cursors that allow level
measurements at specific times relative to the trigger event. Markers
can be moved to any portion of the trace that is visible on the screen,
and these can be used to identify regions of interest for detailed power
analysis. Power measurements can be performed at each marker, as
well as average, minimum and maximum power in the time interval
between the two markers.
Marker 1 and Marker 2
Marker settings will allow you to change both marker 1 and marker 2
positions by using either arrow keys or entering numerical values into
the field. The Marker locations can also be set graphically by clicking Figure 4.12 The Marker Settings
on the marker in the Trace View and dragging the marker left or right. window for controlling markers and
reference lines on the Graph View
Marker Delta
The Marker Delta window indicates the time interval between Marker
1 and Marker 2.
Operation
4-17
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Reference Lines
Reference lines Refline 1 and Refline 2 are horizontal lines displayed on the Trace View, and may be used to indicate
user set amplitude levels for each sensor, or measurement-specific levels.
Channel
Selects the channel that the reference lines will be applied to.
Enabled
Turns the reference lines on or off for the selected channels. When off, reference lines are not visible.
Tracking
The Reference Line Tracking setting allows the selection of either manual control of the reference line amplitudes
or selection of a set of commonly used reference amplitudes.
Off – Allows the reference levels to be set independently using the Refline 1 and Refline 2 entry fields.
Levels can be entered numerically or by using the up and down arrows. The reference levels can also be
set graphically by clicking on the reference line in the Trace View and dragging the line up or down. The
vertical units match the Units selection in the Channel Control window.
Markers – Links the reference levels to the amplitudes where the markers cross the pulse waveform on the
Trace View. Reference level Refline 1 will track the amplitude where Marker 1 crosses the pulse waveform
and Refline 2 will track the amplitude where Marker 2 crosses the pulse waveform.
TopBottom – Moves Refline1 to the measured Top amplitude and Refline 2 to the measured Bottom
amplitude.
DistalMesial - Moves Refline 1 to the measured distal (upper pulse threshold) amplitude and Refline 2 to
the measured mesial (mid pulse threshold) amplitude. Pulse threshold levels are those set in the Pulse
Definitions window.
DistalProximal - Moves Refline 1 to the measured distal (upper pulse threshold) amplitude and Refline 2 to
the measured proximal (lower pulse threshold) amplitude. Pulse threshold levels are those set in the Pulse
Definitions window.
4-18
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Statistical CCDF Graph Display
The statistical analysis of the current sample population is displayed using a normalized Complementary Cumulative
Distribution Function (CCDF) presentation shown in Figure 4.13. The CCDF expresses the probability of occurrence
of a range of peak-to-average power ratios on a log-log scale, and a cursor (green diamond) allows measurement
of power or percentage at a user-defined point on the CCDF. As with all other graphical displays, the trace can be
easily scaled and zoomed, or the statistical data may be presented in a tabular format.
Figure 4.13 The CCDF Graph view provides a statistical view of the peak-to-average power ratio.
The CCDF has become a useful tool for analyzing communication signals that have a Gaussian like distribution
(CDMA, OFDM) where signal compression can be observed at rarely occurring peaks. It is most often presented
graphically using a log-log format where the X axis represents the relative offset in dB from the average power
level and the log-scaled Y axis is the percent probability that power will exceed the X-axis value.
At the bottom of the CCDF Graph window is a status bar reporting Stat Capturing status (On or Off), Gating type
(Markers or Freerun), Total Time (HH:MM:SS) and the number of Points (MegaSamples) in the statistical
population.
Additionally, there is an Export button and a Show Gaussian Ref check box. Clicking on the Export button will
bring up a Viewer popup window offering the ability to export the CCDF Graph in PDF or CSV format. Actuating
the Show Gaussian Ref displays a Gaussian CCDF reference curve on the graph, as shown in Figure 4.13.
Operation
4-19
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Statistical Mode Control Window
The Stat Mode Control window, shown in Figure 4.14, will appear when the CCDF Graph is displayed or by pressing
the Stat Cntl button on the Control Windows toolstrip. The Stat Mode Control window controls the data acquisition
for the CCDF Graph.
Capture – Select “On” to begin acquiring samples.
acquisition.
“Off” stops the
Reset – Clicking on Reset clears the acquired statistical sample population.
If Capture is ON, a new acquisition will begin.
Term Action – Selects the action to take when either the terminal count is
reached or the terminal time has elapsed. The available choices are Stop,
Restart, or Decimate.
Stop - Stop accumulating samples and hold the result.
Restart - Clears the statistical sample population starts a new one.
Decimate - Divide all sample bins by 2 and continue. The total sample
count will be halved each time decimation occurs. This should have
very little visible effect on the CCDF values, since the entire population
is decimated uniformly and the shape of the distribution is maintained.
Term Count – Sets the terminal sample count for the CCDF acquisition. The
range of values is 0.1 to 1,000,000 megasamples.
Terminal Time – Terminal Time sets the terminal running time for the
Figure 4.14 The Stat Mode
CCDF acquisition. The range of values is 1 to 3600 seconds.
Control window displaying key
parameters of the CCDF Graph.
Horiz Offset – Horiz(ontal) Offset sets the horizontal offset for the CCDF
Graph statistical display. The value in dBr chosen will appear at the
leftmost edge of the graph. The range of values is -50.00 dBr to +50.00
dBr.
Horiz Scale - Selects the horizontal scale for CCDF Graph statistical display. Scale factors are from 0.1 to 5 dB/div in
a 1-2-5 progression.
Cursor Type - Select the independent variable for the CCDF cursor. If Percent is selected, relative power at the
cursor's intersection with the CCDF curve will be measured. If Power is selected, probability at the cursor's
intersection with the CCDF curve will be measured.
Cursor Pos – Sets the CCDF cursor to the desired probability or power depending on the setting of Cursor Type.
4-20
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Gating – Selects Marker or Freerun gating for statistical acquisition. If Markers are selected, then only samples
within the time marker interval on the Pulse Mode triggered sweep will be included in the statistical sample
population. If Freerun is selected then all the samples are acquired without regard to sweep acquisition.
Mark Cntrl – Clicking on this button will bring up the Marker Settings window allowing Marker locations to be set
easily when marker gating is used for statistical capture.
Statistical Measurements Display
Clicking on the Stat Meas icon on the Measurement Control
toolstrip brings up the Statistical Measurements window
shown in Figure 4.15. This display of tabulated field parameters
is displayed on the left side of the CCDF Graph by default.
These key statistical parameters are described in Table 4.3.
Parameter
10%
to
0.0001%
Pct at 0dB
Cursor Pct
Cursor Pwr
Average
Max
Min
Peak/Avg
Dynamic
Rng
Measurement Description
Displays crest factor relative to population
average power at each specified %CCDF.
Displays %CCDF at the average power.
Displays %CCDF at the stat mode cursor.
Displays crest factor relative to population
average power at the Stat Mode cursor.
Displays absolute average power of the
statistical sample population.
Displays absolute maximum power.
Displays absolute minimum power.
Displays crest factor (pk/avg ratio).
Displays dynamic range (max/min ratio).
Table 4.3
At the bottom of the Statistical Measurements window status
is reported by four fields: Stat Capturing status (On or Off),
Gating (Markers or Freerun), Total Time (HH:MM:SS), and
number of Points (Megasamples) in the statistics. Additionally,
there is an Export PDF button. Clicking on the Export PDF
button will bring up a PDF Viewer popup window offering the
ability to export the CCDF Graph in PDF format.
Figure 4.15 The statistical Measurements
window displaying key parameters of the
CCDF Graph.
Operation
4-21
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Modulated Mode Measurements Display
Modulated measurement mode is designed for continuous, true average power measurements of complex
modulated signals. The mode is similar to the operation of a conventional CW power meter, but does not suffer
the measurement inaccuracies that occur when some diode sensors are used to measure modulated signals.
Modulated measurement mode is a continuous measurement mode primarily for continuously modulated or CW
signals. Continuous (untriggered / free run) sample acquisition is performed using “sliding window” filtering on the
samples. Filtered average power, peak power and minimum power measurements are continuously performed.
The measured result is the average power of the signal. Since the graphic display would basically just show a straight
line, measurements in this mode are best viewed using the Modulated Measurements display window. Figure 4.16
shows a Modulated Mode measurement displaying the average, minimum and maximum power in modulated
signal.
Since this mode performs a continuous measurement, it does not differentiate when a pulsed or periodic signal is
off, and when it is on. If you wish to make measurements that are synchronous with a period of a waveform,
consider using a triggered sweep and marker analysis instead.
Figure 4.16 The Modulated Mode measurement display window showing the average, minimum, and
maximum power of a modulated waveform.
NOTE: The 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensors belong to the family of Peak Power sensors
which respond to the amplitude modulation of a modulated carrier. Constant amplitude modulation
schemes such as frequency and phase modulation (FM/PM) can be considered as a continuous wave
(CW) carrier for power measurement purposes. Therefore, the Trace View display for a CW, PM/FM
modulated (PSK, QPSK, etc) signal will appear as a flat line trace in the time domain.
4-22
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Modulated Measurement is recommended for measuring the following signal types:


Noise-like digitally modulated signals such as CDMA and OFDM when only average measurements are
needed.
When simple, non-synchronous measurements on a periodic or non-periodic signal are needed (overall
average and peak power).
Modulated Measurement controls can be found on the Channel Control panel’s Sensor section.
Modulation Filter Mode sets the current setting of the integration filter on the selected channel.
Off provides minimal filtering (1ms integration window), and can be used at high signal levels when
minimum settling time is required.
On allows a user-specified integration time as entered in the Mod Filter setting.
Auto uses a variable amount of filtering, which is set automatically by the power meter based on the current
signal level to a value that gives a good compromise between measurement noise and settling time at most
levels.
Mod Filter sets the current length of the modulation mode integration filter on the selected channel when Filter
Mode is set to On. The integration time can be set from 2 milliseconds to 2.048 seconds in 1ms increments.
Operation
4-23
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Acquisition Status Bar
Figure 4.17 highlights the acquisition status bar in red. This bar, located beneath the graphical display, contains
three status readouts: Meas State, Sample Rate and Trigger Rate.
The acquisition status bar provides useful information on the acquisition setup. The sampling rate and trigger rate
are not reported in any other control window. Both are affected by the Timebase setting in the Time/Trigger Control
window.
Figure 4.17 The acquisition status bar reports Meas State, Sample Rate, and Trigger Rate.
Archiving Measurement Setups
Measurement setups can be stored and recalled using the Save and Load buttons under
the File tab as shown in Figure 4.18.
Once Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite has been configured for a particular
measurement, the application state can be saved by pressing the Save button. After
pressing the Save button the user is prompted to enter a file name and path to save the
measurement state. Measurement States are stored in Boonton .BMS file format.
Saved measurement states can be recalled using the Load button. When activated it Figure 4.18 Load and
prompts the user to choose the desired .BMS file. Upon selection the desired Save buttons for
saving and recalling
measurement state is restored.
measurement setups
4-24
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
4.2
Multichannel Operation
Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite supports simultaneous operation of up to eight 55 Series USB Sensors. Figure
4.19 shows an example using two 55 Series sensors. The Trace View shows both power traces each in a distinct
color which matches the annotation.
Multichannel Measurements
When multiple sensors are connected to the USB ports of the computer, make sure all sensors are displayed in the
Available Resources. If certain sensors are not selectable, this means they are already assigned to a virtual power
analyzer. All sensors in a virtual power analyzer will be displayed on the same Trace Window, if enabled.
Figure 4.19 Up to eight 55 Series Sensors can be supported by the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite
application. In this example two sensors are connected.
The Channel Control selection list offers control of individual sources CH1, CH2, …,CH8 as well as corresponding
memory channels MEM1, MEM2, ….,MEM8 and ALL. If an individual measurement or memory channel is selected,
then the channel control settings will only affect that channel. If ALL is selected, then the channel control settings
affect all measurement simultaneously (memory channels are not grouped with some “ALL” settings). The timebase
settings are common to all measurement channels displayed with the same Virtual Power Analyzer instance.
Multichannel Automatic Measurement
Clicking on the Auto Meas button on the measurement toolstrip will display the pulse measurement and marker
measurement windows. Note, in Figure 4.19, that pulse and marker measurements now show measurements for
each active sensor. Pulse definitions, like channel control, can be applied to each trace source individually or to all
Operation
4-25
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
sources simultaneously. Marker location settings, being time locations, are common to all traces. Reference Lines
are also associated, individually, with each displayed trace. Reference lines are color coded to match each trace.
Multichannel CCDF Graph View
Statistical analysis behaves identically to the trace view. Both channel CCDF traces will be displayed on a common
axis. Statistical measurements will have a measurement column for each sensor as shown in figure 4.20.
Figure 4.20 The CCDF Graph window in common multichannel operation. Multiple color coded traces are
displayed on a common grid.
Similar to the Trace View there is a color coded trace for each sensor in the CCDF Graph View displayed on a common
grid. Statistical Mode controls affect all traces in the common display.
Statistical Measurements are listed with a column for each sensor in the common multichannel tab.
4-26
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Multichannel Triggering
When more than one sensor is present, there are different triggering
options as shown in Figure 4.22.
Triggering Options
Unless they are intended to be triggered independently, power sensors
should be connected to each other using the Multi-I/O connector as
shown in Figure 4.21. To establish a communications path between the
modules, a "trigger sync bus" is used to control both arming and
triggering.
Multi-Channel Internal Triggering
When the Trigger Source for a multi-channel Virtual Power Analyzer is
set to CH1, CH2, etc, one of the connected sensors is used as a common
trigger for all channels. To facilitate this, the Multi-I/O connectors of all
active sensors (channels) must be interconnected to create a "trigger
distribution bus". The "master" sensor (selected trigger source) detects
the trigger condition and distributes that event to other "slave" sensors
to ensure synchronized triggering of all channels.
Figure 4.22 illustrates this connection. Note when three or more
channels are present, a "tee adapter" will be required to interconnect all
in parallel.
Figure 4.21 Coupling the Multi-I/O ports to establish a
communication path between modules.
Figure 4.22 Trigger Source
selection when two sensors are
used.
Due to propagation delays in the master-to-slave trigger distribution, there is a small amount of timing skew
between the master and slave channels. Sensors come pre-adjusted to minimize this skew, but it is possible to
perform a fine trigger skew adjustment for performing critical channel-to-channel timing measurements. See the
Trigger Skew Adjust paragraph in Section 4.1.5, Trigger Setup.
Operation
4-27
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
External Triggering
When the Trigger Source for a single or multi-channel Virtual Power Analyzer is set to EXT, a single user-supplied
TTL signal is used as a common trigger for all channels. To facilitate this, the Multi-I/O connectors of all active
sensors (channels) must be driven by the external trigger signal to ensure synchronized triggering of all channels.
Figure 4.23 illustrates this connection.
When two or more channels are present, a
"tee adapter" will be required to drive all
Multi-I/O connectors in parallel.
Due to propagation delays in the external
trigger system, there is a small amount of
timing skew between the external trigger
edge and RF signal for each channel.
Sensors come pre-adjusted to minimize this
skew, but it is possible to perform a fine
trigger skew adjustment for performing
critical
channel-to-channel
timing
measurements. See the section on Trigger Figure 4.23 Multi I/O setup for using a common external trigger
Skew adjustment in Section 4.1.5,
Time/Trig Control Window.
Independent Triggering
Each sensor is internally triggered from its RF input signal. Select Ind from the drop down menu of Source located
in the Trigger Control panel of the Time/Trigger control window. Note that Ind source does not use the Multi-I/O
connector.
4-28
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Multichannel Individual Sensor Tabs
Multiple sensors can also be employed individually. Starting with multiple sensors listed in the Available Resources
window, click on one sensor, then click the New Virtual Power Analyzer button. A Virtual Power Analyzer (VPA) tab
will be opened listing the model and serial number of the selected sensor.
Click on another sensor in the Available Resources window and then click on the New Virtual Power Analyzer button
again. A second VPA tab will be opened as shown in Figure 4.24. This mode of multichannel operation treats each
sensor individually. Select a VPA tab and all the control windows apply only to the selected sensor. Each VPA Trace
View will show the selected sensor as Channel 1 (CH1). They are differentiated by the model and serial number
listed on the tab. Likewise, all measurement windows will list measurements only for the selected sensor.
Figure 4.24 Multi-channel sensors using individual Virtual Power Analyzer (VPA) tabs. Each sensor has
its own control and measurement windows associated with it which are available when the sensor VPA
tab is selected.
In this mode it is like having two different instances of Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite and switching between
them by selecting the appropriate VPA tab. There is no option to add a second sensor to an existing single-channel
VPA. The only way to do that is to close the VPA channel and restart as a multichannel VPA.
Operation
4-29
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
4.3
Data Buffer Mode (API remote programming only)
The 55 Series Data Buffer Mode works in conjunction with Real Time Power Processing™ to provide all relevant
burst information including power and crest factor while eliminating the need to buffer, download and post-process
large sample buffers.
Data Buffer Mode captures and analyzes the input signal during time intervals of interest and discards information
that occurs during non-relevant intervals. This mode of operation performs most analysis in real-time during
capture. The big advantage this data buffer mode offers to the user is that it reduces the stream of sample data to
a single data record for each pulse, burst or event. Even for the fastest pulse rates, the data rate to the user is
orders of magnitude less than the sample data rate, so in most situations it becomes possible to store and transfer
power analysis results to the user in real time with no gaps in acquisition or analysis.
The Data Buffer Mode circuitry can analyze and buffer points at better than 2M buffered points per second
(depending upon operating mode). The 55 Series internal data buffer can capture, analyze and store measurements
for up to 2048 bursts at full rate. Additionally, a "circular" or FIFO capability allows continuous readout of buffered
measurements by a host computer during capture and analysis. This real-time feature effectively removes the 2048
point internal buffer limitation, and permits capture and storage of test sequences of any size or duration to an
external host data buffer. Continuous buffered capture is possible at sustained rates of better than 100K buffered
points per second to a host memory array or disk file.
Overview
The 55 Series measurement buffer consists of 2048 buffer entries, each containing information about a unique time
interval.
Buffer Entries. Each "Buffer Entry" contains the following measurement values for that time interval:
Average interval power
Peak interval power
Minimum interval power
Interval start time (relative to start time of first entry)
Interval duration (time from start to end of interval)
Entry count (buffer reading number - increments each entry)
A 32-bit "Entry Count" counter (called “sequence number” in the IVI driver) keeps track of how many buffer entries
have been processed and stored.
4-30
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Table 4.4 shows a sample measurement buffer consisting of seven buffer entries. In this example, the buffer
consists of seven entries, each corresponding to a single burst.
Entry
Count
Interval
Start
Interval
Duration
Interval
Average
Interval
Minimum
Interval Peak
0
0.00 us
5.01 us
-0.043 dBm
-39.042 dBm
8.826 dBm
1
9.99 us
5.00 us
-0.006 dBm
-38.431 dBm
8.827 dBm
2
19.99 us
5.01 us
0.039 dBm
-41.549 dBm
9.742 dBm
3
30.00 us
5.00 us
0.017 dBm
-38.551 dBm
9.802 dBm
4
40.01 us
5.00 us
0.022 dBm
-40.699 dBm
9.477 dBm
5
49.99 us
5.00 us
-0.020 dBm
-39.706 dBm
8.102 dBm
6
60.00 us
5.00 us
0.036 dBm
-37.803 dBm
9.750 dBm
Table 4.4 Example of a Data Buffer Mode measurement containing seven entries
Figure 4.25 Sample burst signal showing buffer entry elements.
Buffer Gates. The measurement interval for each Buffer Entry is defined by a "gate" signal that controls the start
and end of data acquisition for that entry. At the start of each gate interval, a fresh acquisition interval is initiated,
and at the end of the gate, the acquisition interval is concluded and the result (the "buffer entry"), as shown in
Figure 4.25, is written to memory. The gate signal may be internally or externally generated in several different
ways - see "Gating Modes" section below.
Buffer Sessions. Each "Buffer Session" consists of a series of acquired buffer entries, stored in sequential order to
an onboard memory. The duration of a session may be monitored and controlled by user command, by an external
"run" signal, or limited to a preset number of entries or a preset time period. See "Session Arming" and "Session
AutoStop" sections below. In the example above, the session consists of seven buffer entries, acquired over
approximately 65 microseconds.
Operation
4-31
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Data Buffer Mode Operation
Gating Modes. Each Buffer Entry is controlled by a "buffer gate" that defines the start and end of the entry time
interval. The gate signal may be internally or externally generated in several different ways.
Marker Gate: Each buffer entry is "between markers" interval for one triggered sweep. This mode is used
with the power sensor operating in triggered pulse mode, and the sweep system and markers are used to
define the start and end of each gate interval. The entire gate interval must fall within the limits of the
visible trace, so trigger and timebase settings must be appropriate for the signal.
Burst AutoGate: Each buffer entry consists of a single pulse or burst. The start and end of the burst are
automatically identified by comparing the measured input signal to a preset signal threshold. Gate
qualifying and delay options are available to align the gate interval with the desired portion of a burst.
External Gate: Each buffer entry consists of a single measurement interval gated by the logic state of the
Multi-I/O input. Qualifying and delay options are available to align the gate interval with the Multi-I/O
input.
External Trigger Gate: Each buffer entry is initiated by assertion of the Multi-I/O input and ends after a
user-defined duration. Qualifying and delay options are available to align the gate start with the Multi-I/O
input. If a qualified Multi-I/O assertion (rising edge) occurs prior to the programmed duration, the gate
interval in progress will end immediately and a new interval will begin with no gap between intervals.
Periodic Gate: Buffer entries are self-timed intervals with user-defined period and duration. If period
setting is less than or equal to duration setting, the period setting will be used for both and there will be no
gap between successive intervals.
Acquisition of each entry begins upon assertion of the buffer gate, and concludes upon deassertion of the buffer
gate. When the gate interval starts, a fresh accumulation of power samples begins. When the entry interval ends,
the accumulated power samples are processed to yield one set of avg/min/max and duration values for the entire
interval, and this result is stored to the next available buffer location in memory.
Power samples are not accumulated when the gate is inactive. Buffer entries (gates) may not overlap, however
gap-less buffering (zero "gate inactive" time) is possible in certain modes. In this case, a new gate interval begins
immediately upon the end of the preceding gate interval.
4-32
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Gate Qualify. If the Gate Mode is set for Burst AutoGate or External Gate/Trigger, additional criteria and time
delays may be imposed to aid in aligning the gated measurement on a desired signal interval. Start and End
qualifying values indicate the time that the controlling input (RF signal level or MIO external gate) must remain
above or below the qualifying threshold to be recognized.
The Start qualifier can be used to reduce sensitivity to brief noise spikes while the burst is "off". Typically the start
qualify time will be short - perhaps 10 to 50ns.
The End qualifier is commonly used to avoid premature burst end detection when burst modulation causes the RF
signal to briefly fall below the qualifying threshold. For wideband modulation, this value must be longer than
expected modulation dips, but shorter than intra-burst gaps - typically 50 to 200ns.
The internal gate signal is automatically adjusted to align with the beginning of recognized qualifying intervals - no
user adjustment is necessary. This means that the qualified gate which controls buffering will correspond to the
actual start and end of the burst, and not be delayed by the qualifying times.
Gate Start/End Delay. If time adjustment of the qualified gate interval is needed to align the desired gate interval
with signal timing, the start and end times may be delayed by a user-controlled value. Gate delays may be positive
or negative to permit moving the gate interval ahead or back in time, respectively.
A positive start delay can be used to exclude the rising edge of a burst, or to exclude a training sequence of known
duration. Similarly, a negative end delay will cause the qualified gate to end early, so can be used to exclude the
falling edge of a burst.
Since all processing is done in real-time, a built-in signal FIFO is used to permit the "look-back" action necessary to
start or end a gate interval prior to the qualifying event. Therefore, the difference of the qualifying time and gate
delay for both the start and end gates cannot exceed the FIFO depth of 20 microseconds (implementation specific).
This means that if the end qualify time is 2us, the end delay may be no more negative than -18us. To simplify
settings control, the available time is split in half between the qualify and negative delay limits.
Operation
4-33
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Figure 4.26 Gate Qualify and Delay
Figure 4.26 illustrates how gate qualify and delay options may be combined to align the desired buffer gate with a
signal burst.




The StartQualify time is set to 0.2us so the start of the burst will only be recognized when the signal remains
above the gate threshold for 0.2us or longer. This ensures that brief noise spikes while the burst is off are
not recognized as a valid burst.
The EndQualify time is set to 1.0us so the end of the burst will only be recognized when the signal remains
below the gate threshold for 1.0us or longer. This ensures that brief modulation dips during the burst do
not prematurely end the gate interval.
The StartDelay time is set to 0.5us. This begins the gate interval 0.5us after the beginning of the
StartQualify interval, and is used to exclude rising edge effects such as transition time or overshoot from
the gate measurement.
The EndDelay time is set to -0.5us. This ends the gate interval 0.5us before the beginning of the EndQualify
interval, and is used to exclude falling edge effects such as transition time from the gate measurement.
The entire qualified "burst interval" is 5us long - starting and ending at the beginning of the StartQualify and
EndQualify times. The final "gate interval" is offset at the start and end of the burst to exclude rising and falling
edge effects. Therefore, the measured "duration" stored in the buffer for the 5us burst shown will be about 4us.
4-34
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Session Arming (Start) control. Although buffered acquisition may be enabled ("running"), no data is collected
unless the session is "armed" to accept gate signals (see "Gating Modes"). Recognition of the selected gate signal
is controlled by arming or disarming the session.
When a session is armed, one buffer entry will be written to the buffer memory at the conclusion of each gate
interval. When the session is not armed, gate signals are ignored, and no entries are saved. This permits a session
to be launched or controlled via user software or an external signal.
The following settings are available to arm or control Mbuf sessions.
Immediate: The session is armed immediately - each valid gate signal will generate a buffer entry. The
session remains armed until disarmed by other means (see "Session Stop" below).
ExtStart:
The session is armed upon assertion of an external start (arming) pulse on the Multi-I/O.
Following arming, the buffer system will remain armed, and each valid gate signal will generate
a buffer entry. The session remains armed until disarmed by other means (see "Session Stop"
below).
ExtEnable:
The session is armed when the external enable signal to the Multi-I/O is asserted, and will
remain armed as long as the Multi-I/O is asserted. If the Multi-I/O is deasserted, the system
disarms and sample acquisition halts. Asserting the Multi-I/O signal again re-arms and
continues collecting buffer entries from the previous location - it does not reset the buffer.
At the start of any Buffer session, the buffer status is reset. This clears the entry count and discards any unread
entries.
Session Auto-Stop conditions. Each Buffer Session may be automatically terminated - this disarms the session so
no further entries are stored. Entries which have already been started are aborted without being written.
Automatic stop can occur in several ways:
Counted:
The current buffer session is terminated when "N" buffer entries have been acquired during
the current buffer session.
Timed:
The current buffer session is terminated "T" seconds after the start of the session.
ExtEnable: The current buffer session is terminated upon deassertion of an external buffer enable signal
on the Multi-I/O.
Overflow:
The current buffer session is terminated if the number of unread entries reaches the capacity
of the buffer.
NOTE: Auto-stop criteria are all examined, therefore the session will terminate for whichever event
occurs first. Users may opt to configure or disable any or all of the auto-stop criteria.
Operation
4-35
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Mbuf Enable Modes. Overall control of the Mbuf system is handled in much the same way as other measurements
- user controls for "Run", "Stop" and "Reset" are available.
MbufEnable=ON: Reset the MBuf system and enable a new MBUF session. Acquisition will begin with the
first buffer entry once the system is armed (see "Session Arming (Start) control") and a valid
gate signal is received (see "Gating Modes").
MbufEnable=OFF: Halts any MBUF session in progress. If the gate is currently active, its acquisition data
will be lost. This functions as a "stop" command and all acquired buffer data will still be
available to read. Note that sessions may already be stopped due to "auto-stop" conditions
being met
MbufReset Halts and clears the Mbuf system. This will force MbufEnable to OFF. The read count and
write index are returned to zero and no buffer data will be available to read.
Buffer Read. Users may read the entire buffer contents once the session is complete, or may read any newly
acquired entries while the buffer session is in progress. User settings control the maximum number of entries to
be returned for each I/O read, up to the full capacity of the buffer. However, the number of returned entries will
be limited to the number of "new" (acquired, unread) buffer entries.
Each time the user reads entries from the buffer, a read pointer is incremented by the number of entries returned,
and subsequent user reads will return new buffer elements beginning with the first unread entry.
Circular/Continuous Buffer Acquisition. If the number of entries in a buffer session reaches the end of the
measurement buffer without stopping, buffered acquisition will continue in circular fashion - that is entries will
"wrap" and begin refilling the buffer from the start.
Ordinarily, this would overwrite the buffer contents, resulting in loss of acquired measurements. However, since
users can read buffer sessions during acquisition, it is possible to periodically empty the buffer so overwrite of old
data does not occur.
From a user perspective, the buffer appears as a 2048 element FIFO. Provided the user avoids FIFO overflow by
reading the buffer periodically, the buffer entries may be stored externally by the user to create buffers of any size
desired.
If the user is not able to read the buffer before overflow occurs, two options are available to control behavior:
Overflow Protection ON: Enables auto-stop for pending buffer overflow. Buffer entries continue to be
acquired in circular fashion provided the user periodically reads the buffer. But if the buffer
fills to capacity (2048 unread entries) without being emptied, the session is terminated and no
further entries are stored. This mode gives priority to the earliest acquired entries and ignores
events after the session terminates. DEFAULT MODE.
Overflow Protection OFF: Disables auto-stop for buffer overflow. Buffer entries continue to be acquired in
circular fashion without regard to read status by the user. If the buffer fills to capacity (2048
unread entries) without being emptied, new entries will continue to be stored, and will
overwrite the oldest entries. This mode gives priority to the latest acquired entries, and
discards older events whether or not they have been read by the user.
4-36
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Data Buffer Mode User Settings
The following settings, queries and controls are exposed to the user. Applicable modes and argument options or
numeric ranges shown. Note that this is the SENSOR command interface, and may not align exactly with the API
interface. Please consult API documentation for available settings and queries.
Gate Settings
MbufGateMode
[ MarkerGate | BurstAutoGate | ExtGate | ExtTrigGate | PeriodicGate ]
MbufGateStartQual
0.0 to 10us
MbufGateStartDelay
-10us to 100ms (BurstAutoGate, ExtGate and ExtTrigGate)
MbufGateEndQual
0.0 to 10us
MbufGateEndDelay
10us to 100ms (BurstAutoGate and ExtGate)
MbufGatePeriod
100ns to 10s
MbufGateDuration
100ns to 100ms (ExtTrigGate and PeriodicGate)
(BurstAutoGate, ExtGate and ExtTrigGate)
(BurstAutoGate and ExtGate)
(PeriodicGate)
Session Control Settings
MbufStartMode
[ Immediate | ExtStart | ExtEnable ]
MbufStopCount
1 to 1M rdgs
(<=0 disables counted auto-stop)
MbufStopTime
1ms to 1000s
(<=0 disables timed auto-stop)
MbufProtection
[on | off]
Enables auto-stop for buffer overwrite
MbufEnable
[on | off]
"run/stop" control
MbufReset
Stops and resets mbuf
Measbuf Readback Settings
MbufFetchCount
1 to 2048
Sets # of entries to be returned to user
MbufAvailCount?
Returns # of unread entries in MBUF
MbufFetchNext?
Returns next "MbufFetchCount " entries, incr ptr
MbufFetchIndex[?]
Sets or returns current read pointer index
Operation
4-37
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Multi-I/O Priority. The 55 Series Multi-I/O connector may be used as input or output in several different ways.
When conflicts occur, priority must be determined or undefined behavior will result.
Multi-Channel Operation: When synchronized buffering between multiple channels is required, the concept of
"master" and "slave" will again be needed to ensure gate intervals align between sensors. The "Trigger Source"
logic can be used here.
In all configurations requiring a separate master and slave, the supplied "TriggerSync" cable must be used to
interconnect the Multi-I/O connectors of the master and all slaves. Where more than one slave is present,
additional cables and a "T" adapter will be needed for the parallel connection.
The Multi-I/O connector is not required by the Mbuf system in many Single-channel configurations
Mode
Master
Slave
Required Connections
Marker
Gate
Pulse mode trigger out/arm
status in signal to/from the
Multi-I/O connector. Mbuf
gate signal is internally
generated by sweep system in
each sensor.
Pulse mode trigger in/arm status
out signal to/from Multi-I/O.
Mbuf gate signal internally
generated by sweep system using
same marker settings as master,
so will be synchronized.
Interconnect Multi-I/O
inputs of master and
all slaves.
Burst
AutoGate
RF Burst is qualified/delayed
by master to create the Mbuf
gate. Master Multi-I/O
outputs the Mbuf gate to all
slaves.
Multi-I/O receives
qualified/delayed burst-detect
signal from master. Each slave
operates in "Ext Gate" Mbuf
mode, so will follow master.
Interconnect Multi-I/O
inputs of master and
all slaves.
External
Gate
There is no "master" or "slave" for this mode. All Multi-I/O inputs
receive the ExtGate signal from a user source to gate each Mbuf
entry. Mbuf entries for all connected sensors start and end in sync
upon assertion and de-assertion of user ExtGate signal.
Drive Multi-I/O inputs
of all sensors from
user-supplied External
Gate logic signal.
External
TrigGate
There is no "master" or "slave for this mode. All Multi-I/O inputs
receive the ExtTrigGate signal from a user source to initiate each
Mbuf entry. Mbuf entries for all connected sensors start in sync
upon assertion of user ExtTrigGate signal and end after userconfigured time duration.
Drive Multi-I/O inputs
of all sensors from
user-supplied External
Gate logic signal.
Periodic
Master uses internal period
and duration timers to control
start and end of each Mbuf
entry. Multi-I/O of master
outputs 100ns "start pulse" at
the start of each Mbuf period.
Interconnect Multi-I/O
inputs of master and
all slaves.
Gate
Slaves operate in External Trigger
Mbuf mode. All slave Multi-I/O
inputs receive the start pulse
from master to initiate each
Mbuf entry. Each slaves times
the duration to end each entry.
Table 4.5 Summary of the Data Buffer functions in a multi-channel environment
4-38
Operation
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
IVI Driver Functionality. The IVI driver exposes all of the measurement buffer controls and functions described in
this section. However, for most use cases, the IVI driver offers a simplified set of methods (IVI-COM) or functions
(IVI-C) and attributes to allow the user to specify an arbitrary number of measurements to capture. This allows the
programmer to specify the pertinent modes and gate qualifications, acquire a user-specified number of
measurements, and then retrieve the buffered measurement arrays.
For further information see the AcquireMeasurements function, AcquisitionControl and Measurements
interfaces in the MeasurementBuffer interface (IBoonton55xxx.Channels.MeasurementBuffer) in
the 55 Series Programming Reference.
Operation
4-39
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
5. Remote Programming
5.1
Introduction
The 55 series USB Power Sensor may be remote controlled by end users using an IVI (Interchangeable Virtual
Instruments) driver. The IVI driver can be used by many programming environments and languages including C/C++,
Visual Basic, Visual C#, LabVIEW, MATLAB, and others. This driver provides an Application Program Interface (API)
which permits user applications to access power sensor control and measurement functions via a C DLL (Dynamic
Link Library) or COM (Common Object Module) interface. Additionally, Boonton provides a .NET wrapper and
MATLAB wrapper for convenience. For more information, please see the Boonton 55 Series Programming
Reference.
For more information on IVI drivers, please consult http://www.ivifoundation.org/about/Overview.aspx
5.2
Examples
Boonton provides programming examples using C#, Visual Basic, LabVIEW, MATLAB. These can be found in a
subdirectory where Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite was installed under Docs/Examples/ or may be accessed
on the 55 Series “Manuals and Software” page on the Boonton website:
http://www.boonton.com/products/sensors/55-series-wideband-usb-power-sensor?go=manuals_software .
An online command reference for the 55 Series IVI driver is available at:
http://engineering.boonton.com/wtgftp/Boonton_55_Series_API_HTML/boonton55xxx.html
5-1
Remote Programming
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
5.3 Communication
overview
User software interfaces with the sensor via
IVI driver. Settings and measurements can
be set and queried using functions and
properties defined in the IVI driver
programming manual.
The IVI driver
communicates with the sensor using low
level calls to Microsoft’s Windows USB
driver (WinUSB). WinUSB then sends and
receives proprietary binary commands and
responses from the sensor. Figure 5.1
shows a graphical representation of the
data flow between a user application and a
55 Series power sensor.
Figure 5.1 A graphical representation of the
communications data flow
Remote Programming
5-2
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
6. Making Measurements
6.1
Pulse Measurements
Pulse Definitions
IEEE Std 181™-2011 IEEE Standard for Transitions, Pulses, and Related Waveforms, provides fundamental
definitions for general use in time domain pulse technology. Several key terms defined in the standard are
reproduced in this subsection, which also defines the terms appearing in the 55 Series text mode display of
automatic measurement results.
Standard IEEE Pulse
The key terms defined by the IEEE standard are abstracted and summarized below. These terms are referenced to
the standard pulse illustrated in Figure 6.1.
Figure 6.1 IEEE Standard Pulse (IEEE Std 181™-2011)
6-1
Pulse Measurements
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
NOTE: IEEE Std 194™-1977 IEEE Standard for Pulse Terms and Definitions has been superseded by IEEE
Std 181™-2003 and -2011. Many of the terms used below have been deprecated by the IEEE. However,
these terms are widely used in the industry and familiar to users of Boonton power meters. For this
reason, they are retained.
TERM
Base Line
Top Line
First Transition
Last Transition
Proximal Line
Distal Line
Mesial Line
DEFINITION
The two portions of a pulse waveform which represent the first nominal state
from which a pulse departs and to which it ultimately returns.
The portion of a pulse waveform which represents the second nominal state of a
pulse.
The major transition of a pulse waveform between the base line and the top line
(commonly called the rising edge).
The major transition of a pulse waveform between the top of the pulse and the
base line. (Commonly called the falling edge.)
A magnitude reference line located near the base of a pulse at a specified
percentage (normally 10%) of pulse magnitude.
A magnitude reference line located near the top of a pulse at a specified
percentage (normally 90%) of pulse magnitude.
A magnitude reference line located in the middle of a pulse at a specified
percentage (normally 50%) of pulse magnitude
Table 6.1 Pulse Measurement Amplitude Threshold Terms
Automatic Pulse Measurements
The 55 Series Wideband power sensor and Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite application or API automatically
analyzes the waveform data in the buffers and calculates key waveform parameters. The calculated values are
displayed in Auto Meas window.
Table 6.2 summarizes the automatic field parameters available. Note that the Pulse Measurements can be edited
and customized. Amplitude related parameters will be displayed in the same units as selected in the Channel
Control Window.
Field Label
Width
Parameter
Pulse Width
Rise
Risetime
Fall
Falltime
Period
Pulse Period
PRF
Pulse Repetition
Frequency
Definition
The interval between the first and second signal crossings of the
mesial line.
The rising edge time interval from the first crossing of the proximal
line to the first crossing of the distal line.
The falling edge time interval from the last crossing of the distal
line to the last crossing of the proximal line.
The time interval between two successive rising edges or two
successive falling edges. (Reciprocal of the Pulse Repetition
Frequency)
The number of cycles of a repetitive signal that take place in one
second.
Pulse Measurements
6-2
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Duty
Offtime
Duty Cycle
Off-time
WavAv
Waveform
Average Power
Pulse Average On
Power
PulsAv
PulsPk
OvrSht
Pulse Peak Power
Overshoot
Droop
Pulse Droop
Top
IEEE Pulse Top
Amplitude
IEEE Pulse Bottom
Amplitude
Edge Delay
Bot
EdgDly
Skew
Channel-toChannel Skew
The ratio of the pulse on-time to off-time.
The time a repetitive pulse is off. (Equal to the pulse period minus
the pulse width).
Waveform Average Power
The average “on” power level across the pulse width, defined by
the intersection of the pulse rising and falling edges with the
mesial line, and offset by the StartGate and EndGate settings.
The maximum power level of the captured waveform
Leading edge overshoot (The difference between the maximum
amplitude of the overshoot and the top line).
Rise or Droop in amplitude between the start and end of the pulse,
as defined by the StartGate and EndGate settings.
The amplitude of the top line. (See IEEE definitions)
The amplitude of the base line. (See IEEE definitions)
The delay time relative to the trigger of the first onscreen mesial
level transition of either polarity. The Edge Delay value will be
negative if the mesial transition occurs before the trigger event,
and positive if it occurs after the trigger event.
The time between the mesial level of a pulse on Channel 1 and a
pulse on Channel 2. The pulse can be the power or trigger signal.
Table 6.2 Automatic Measurement Parameters
6-3
Pulse Measurements
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Automatic Pulse Measurement Criteria
Automatic measurements are made on repetitive signals that meet the following conditions:
Amplitude. The difference between the top and bottom signal amplitudes must exceed 6 dB to calculate
waveform timing parameters (pulse width, period, duty cycle). The top-to-bottom amplitude difference
must exceed 13 dB to measure rise and falltime.
Timing. In order to measure pulse repetition frequency and duty cycle, there must be at least three signal
transitions. The interval between the first and third transition must be at least 1/5 of a division (1/50 of the
screen width). For best accuracy on rise and falltime measurements, the timebase should be set so the
transition interval is at least one- half division on the display.
Automatic Pulse Measurement Sequence
The automatic measurement process analyzes the captured signal data in the following sequence:
1. Approximately 500 samples of the waveform (equivalent to one screen width) are scanned to determine the
maximum and minimum sample amplitudes.
2. The difference between the maximum and minimum sample values is calculated and stored as the Signal
Amplitude.
3. The Transition Threshold is computed as one-half the sum of the maximum and minimum sample amplitudes.
Figure 6.2 Step Waveforms
4. The processor locates each crossing of the Transition Threshold.
Pulse Measurements
6-4
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
5. Starting at the left edge of the screen, the processor classifies each Transition threshold crossing according to
whether it is positive-going (– +) or negative-going (+ –). Because the signal is repetitive, only three transitions are
needed to classify the waveform, as shown in Table 6.3:
Type
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Edge Sequence
none
Not used
+–
–+
+–+
–+–
+–+–
–+–+
Description
No crossings detected
One falling edge
One rising edge
One falling, followed by one rising edge
One rising, followed by one falling edge
Two falling edges
Two rising edges
Table 6.3 Waveform Classification Types
6. If the signal is Type 0, (No crossings detected) no measurements can be performed and the routine is terminated,
pending the next reload of the data buffers.
7. The process locates the bottom amplitude (baseline) using the IEEE histogram method. A histogram is generated
for all samples in the lowest 12.8 dB range of sample values. The range is subdivided into 64 power levels of 0.2 dB
each. The histogram is scanned to locate the power level with the maximum number of crossings. This level is
designated the baseline amplitude. If two or more power histograms contain equal counts, the lower is selected.
8. The process follows a similar procedure to locate the top amplitude (top line). The power range for the top
histogram is 5 dB and the resolution is 0.02 dB, resulting in 250 levels. The level-crossing histogram is computed
for a single pulse, using the samples which exceed the transition threshold. If only one transition exists in the buffer
(Types 2 and 3), the process uses the samples that lie between the edge of the screen and the transition threshold
as shown in Figure 6.2.
9. The process establishes the proximal, mesial, and distal levels as a percentage of the difference between top
amplitude and bottom amplitude power. The percentage can be calculated on a power or voltage basis. The
proximal, mesial, and distal threshold values are user settable from 1% to 99%, with the restriction that the proximal
< mesial < distal. Normally, these values will be set to 10%, 50% and 90%, respectively.
10. The process determines horizontal position, in pixels, at which the signal crosses the mesial value. This is done
to a resolution of 0.1 pixel, or 1/5000 of the screen width. Ordinarily, the sample values do not fall precisely on the
mesial line, and it is necessary to interpolate between the two nearest samples to determine where the mesial
crossing occurred. This process is illustrated in the example shown in Figure 6.3.
6-5
Pulse Measurements
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Figure 6.3 Time Interpolation example
Item
dBm
mW
Mesial value
Sample n
Sample n+1
10.0
8.0
11.0
10.0
6.3
12.6
The interpolated crossing time, tx, is calculated as follows:
where P is in watts and n is the number of the sampling interval, referenced to the trigger event.
For this example:
Pulse Measurements
6-6
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
11. The processor computes the rise and/or falltimes of waveforms that meet the following conditions:
a) The waveform must have at least one usable edge (Types 2 through 7, as shown in Table 6.3)
b) The signal peak must be at least 13 dB greater than the minimum sample value.
The risetime is defined as the time between the proximal and distal crossings (– +).
The falltime is defined as the time between the distal and proximal crossings (+ –).
If no samples lie between the proximal and distal values for either edge (rise or fall), the risetime for that edge is
set to 0 seconds.
12. The processor calculates the output values according to the following definitions:
a) Pulse Width Interval between rising and falling edge mesial points
b) Risetime See Step 11
c) Falltime See Step 11
d) Period Cycle time between successive mesial points of the same polarity
e) Pulse Repetition Frequency Reciprocal of Period
f) Duty Cycle Pulse Width/Period
g) Off-time (Period) - (Pulse Width)
h) Peak Power Maximum sample value between StartGate time and EndGate time (See Step 1)
i) Pulse Power Average power between StartGate time and EndGate time
j) Overshoot (Peak Power) - (Top Amplitude)
k) Average Power See Step 13
l) Top Amplitude See Step 8
m) Bottom Amplitude See Step 7
n) Droop between StartGate time and EndGate time
o) Skew See Step 14
6-7
Pulse Measurements
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
6.2
Marker Measurements
Table 6.4 summarizes the Marker Measurements available. Note that the Marker Measurements can be edited and
customized. Amplitude related measurements will be displayed in the same units as selected in the Channel Control
window.
Field Labelt
MkAvg
MkMin
MkMax
MkMaxF
MkMinF
MkPk2A
Mk1Lvl
Mk2Lvl
MkMaxAv
MkMinAv
Mk1Min
Mk1Max
Mk2Min
Mk2Max
MkRatio
MkDelta
MkRDelta
MkRRatio
Mk1Time
Mk2Time
MkTimeDelt
Parameter
Marker Average
Marker Minimum
Marker Maximum
Marker Maximum Filtered
Marker Minimum Filtered
Marker Peak to Average
Marker 1 Level
Marker 2 Level
Marker Max Interval Average
Marker Min Interval Average
Marker 1 Minimum
Marker 1 Maximum
Marker 2 Minimum
Marker 2 Maximum
Marker Ratio
Marker Amplitude Difference
Marker Reverse Difference
Marker Reverse Ratio
Marker 1 Time
Marker 2 Time
Marker Time Difference
Definition
Average power over marker interval
Minimum instantaneous power over marker interval
Maximum instantaneous power over marker interval
Maximum average (filtered) power over marker interval
Minimum average (filtered) power over marker interval
Peak-to-Average power ratio over marker interval
Average power at marker 1
Average power at marker 2
Highest value of average-between-markers
Lowest value of average-between-markers
Minimum power or voltage at the Marker 1
Maximum power or voltage at the Marker 1
Minimum power or voltage at the Marker 2
Maximum power or voltage at the Marker 2
Ratio of Marker 1 to Marker 2
Amplitude difference between Marker 1 and Marker 2
Amplitude difference between Marker 2 and Marker 1
Ratio of Marker 2 to Marker 1
Time at Marker 1
Time at Marker 2
Time Difference between Marker 1 and Marker 2
Table 6.4 Marker Measurements
Pulse Measurements
6-8
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Average Power Over a Time Interval
13. The average power of the signal over a time interval is computed by:
a) Summing the power values at each point within the interval
b) Dividing the sum by the number of points
This process is used to calculate Pulse Power, Average Power and the average power between markers.
Since each point represents the power over a finite time interval, the endpoints are handled separately to avoid
spreading the interval by one-half pixel at each end of the interval (See Figure 6.4). For the interval in Figure 6.4,
the average power is given by:
Figure 6.4 Sampling Intervals
14. To compute channel-to-channel Skew, the processor calculates the delay between the two measurement
channels. The time reference for each channel is established by the first signal crossing (starting from the left edge
of the screen) which passes through the mesial level (or 50% point in trigger view). The signal excursion must be at
least 6 dB.
6-9
Pulse Measurements
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
6.3
Automatic Statistical Measurements
Statistical Measurements based on the CCDF Graph are summarized in Table 6.5.
Field Label
10%
1%
0.1%
0.01%
0.001%
0.0001%
Parameter
Power at 10% probability
Power at 1% probability
Power at 0.1% probability
Power at 0.01% probability
Power at 0.001% probability
Power at 0.0001% probability
Pct at 0 dB
Cursor Pct
Cursor Pwr
Probability (percent) at 0 dB
Cursor Probability (percent)
Cursor Power
Average
Average
Max
Maximum
Min
Minimum
Peak/Avg
Dynamic Range
Peak /Average Ratio
Dynamic Range
Definition
Peak to average power corresponding to 10% probability
Peak to average power corresponding to 1% probability
Peak to average power corresponding to 0.1% probability
Peak to average power corresponding to 0.01% probability
Peak to average power corresponding to 0.001% probability
Peak to average power corresponding to 0.0001%
probability
Probability corresponding to 0 dB on the CCDF Graph
Probability at the Cursor Position on the CCDF Graph
Peak to average power at the Cursor position on the CCDF
Graph
The unweighted average of all power samples occurring
since acquisition started
The highest power sample occurring since acquisition was
started
The lowest power sample occurring since acquisition was
started
The ratio (in dB) of the Peak Power to the Average Power
The ratio (in dB) of the Peak Power to the Minimum Power
Table 6.5 Automatic Statistical Measurements
Pulse Measurements
6-10
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
7. Maintenance
This section presents procedures for maintaining the 55 Series Wideband USB Peak Power Sensor.
7.1
Safety Recommendation.
Although the 55 Series has been designed in accordance with international safety standards, general safety
precautions must be observed during all phases of operation and maintenance. Failure to comply with the
precautions listed in the Safety Summary located in the front of this manual could result in serious injury or
performance issues. Service and adjustments should be performed only by qualified service personnel.
Below is the safety recommendation for the 55 Series USB Power sensor:

Only rotate the connector nut, DO NOT use the sensor body or device to tighten the connector.
7.2

Do not overtighten the RF connector.

Do not use a connector with deformed threads, or a bent or broken conductor.

Do not touch mating-plane surfaces with oily, or wax-like non-conductive substances.

Do not apply a lateral force to the center conductor.
Cleaning
Painted surfaces and the RF connector can be cleaned very carefully with a mild cleaning solution (a solution of pure
isopropyl or ethyl alcohol) but make sure to keep in mind its flammable nature. Also you can use a clean, waterdampened cloth to clean the body of the 55 Series USB power sensor.
CAUTION: When cleaning the USB power sensor, do not allow any liquid to enter into the device. Avoid
using chemical cleaning agents which can damage painted or plastic surfaces.
7.3
Inspection and Performance Verification
If a 55 Series power sensor malfunctions, perform a visual inspection of the instrument. Inspect for signs of damage
caused by excessive shock, vibration or overheating. Inspect for broken or damaged connection port at sensor
head, or accumulations of dust or other foreign matter. Correct any problems you discover and verify basic
functionality with Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite.
If desired, conduct a performance verification according to the procedure in the 55 Series Calibration and
Verification Guide to verify that the instrument is properly recognized by the Windows OS and operational. If the
malfunction persists or the sensor device fails the performance verification, contact Boonton Electronics for service.
7.4
Connector Care
The most common cause of power sensor problems is excess input power. Applying power exceeding the labeled
damage levels will damage the sensing elements such that its voltage versus power relationships are changed,
resulting in erroneous power readings. The other most common cause of power sensor problems is damaged
connectors. Connections should be tightened with the proper torque wrench applied to the coupling nut only. Any
7-1
Maintenance
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
attempt to torque or un-torque a connection using the body of the power sensor may result in either connector
damage, or in the connector becoming unthreaded from the body.
The following handling precautions must be observed to prevent connector damage when using Boonton 55 Series
USB power sensors.

Keep connectors clean and protect using the plastic end caps provided with each sensor.

Inspect connectors regularly and look for metal debris, scratches or dents.

Clean contact surface and threads with clean, dry compressed air.

Align connectors first and only rotate the connector nut.

Always follow MIL-C-39012 standards for making a connection

A MIL-C-39012 or precision type “N” connector is recommended for the RF line signal source connection.

After proper alignment, rotate the connector nut by hand to connect or disconnect the connector of the
sensor from a signal source as shown in Figure 7.1.
Figure 7.1 Hold the connector body while rotating the
knurled nut to tighten or loosen the connector.

If the connector nut is not equipped with a hex, it should be hand tightened only.

Do not over-tighten the connector by using the sensor body for additional leverage.

Avoid mechanical shock.

Avoid applying excessive power.

Observe proper ESD (electrostatic discharges) precautions.
Maintenance
7-2
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
7.5
Software and Firmware Updates
Starting with version 2.3.5.0 the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite (BPPAS) software included the ability to check
online for updates to both itself (BPPAS) and the firmware in connected 55 Series sensors.
Firmware Update Procedure
On the main menu bar select the View tab then click the “Check For Updates” button.
Figure 7.2 The Check for Update button is used to check for available firmware and software updates.
7-3
Maintenance
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
The Software Updates popup will appear. In the row labeled “55 Series Firmware”, click the “Launch” button.
Figure 7.3 The Software available popup is used to select updates of either the 55 Series
sensor firmware or the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite application.
NOTE: Firmware current with the release of the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite software is
embedded in the program and does not have to be downloaded.
The “Select Sensor” popup will appear. Select the desired sensor from the drop-down and click “OK”.
Figure 7.4 Selecting sensor for firmware update.
Maintenance
7-4
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
A dialog will appear and the firmware update will begin. This process will take several minutes, and a progress bar
will indicate programming.
Figure 7.5 The firmware update progress bar
Following successful firmware update, a status dialog will be displayed.
Figure 7.6 Firmware update succeeded
7-5
Maintenance
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Peak Power Analyzer Suite Update Procedure
On the main menu bar select the View tab then click the “Check For Updates” button.
Figure 7.7 Checking for Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite application software updates
The “Available Software Updates” popup will appear. In order to upgrade the software, you must first download
the update. In the row labeled “Peak Pwr Analyzer Suite”, click the “Download” button.
Figure 7.8 Download the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite Software.
Maintenance
7-6
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
A save file dialog box will appear. Choose the location you wish to save the software update.
Figure 7.9 Saving the downloaded software to a selected file location
The following message will appear when the download completes.
Figure 7.10 Indication that the download has been completed.
7-7
Maintenance
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Click the “Launch” button to begin the upgrade.
Figure 7.11 Launch button begins the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite update.
A progress bar will appear in the “Launch” column. Before the upgrade begins, the update package must be
unzipped. This process will take several minutes.
Figure 7.12 The progress bar appears while the software is being updated
Maintenance
7-8
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Once the installation begins, the Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite program will close and the following window
will appear.
Figure 7.13 This window will appear as the software is updated.
Next, the installer will begin. Follow the prompts to complete the installation.
Figure 7.14 Click Install to begin the software installation.
Confirm any additional prompts if needed.
7-9
Maintenance
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
Checking for new Firmware after the Initial Installation
When new features are added to Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite, a sensor firmware update is sometimes
required to fully support the new capabilities. After the update of Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite, it is
recommended that users check for new firmware using the following procedure.
On the main menu bar select the View tab then click the “Check for Updates” button
Figure 7.15 Checking for available firmware upgrades
Maintenance
7-10
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
If a new version of firmware is available, there will be a yellow triangle with an exclamation point next to the version
under “Local Version”.
Figure 7.16 The yellow triangle icon indicates a firmware upgrade is available.
To begin downloading the newest firmware images, click the download button.
Figure 7.17 Press the download button to begin downloading the firmware.
7-11
Maintenance
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
A progress bar will appear in the “Download” column. This process may take several minutes.
Figure 7.18 Waiting for the firmware download.
Once the download is complete, a green check mark will appear next to the firmware version number.
Figure 7.19 The green checkmark indicates that the new firmware is current.
Maintenance
7-12
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
8. Appendix A Software License
END-USER LICENSE AGREEMENT
License below is hereby granted for the following product(s):


Boonton 55 Series Operating Firmware
Boonton Peak Power Analyzer Suite application software
IMPORTANT-READ CAREFULLY: This End-User License Agreement ("EULA") is a legal agreement between you (either
an individual or a single entity) and Boonton Electronics, a subsidiary of the Wireless Telecom Group, Inc., for the
Boonton Electronics software product identified above, which includes instrument software and may include
associated media, printed materials, "online" or electronic documentation, and Internet-based services ("Product").
An amendment or addendum to this EULA may accompany the Product.
YOU AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THE TERMS OF THIS EULA BY INSTALLING, COPYING, OR OTHERWISE USING THE
PRODUCT. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE, DO NOT INSTALL OR USE THE PRODUCT; YOU MAY RETURN IT TO YOUR PLACE
OF PURCHASE FOR A FULL REFUND.
1. GRANT OF LICENSE. Boonton Electronics grants you the following rights provided that you comply with all
terms and conditions of this EULA:
*Installation and use. You may install, use, access, display and run this Product only in conjunction with a
Boonton 55 Series, 54 Series or 4540 Series RF Power Meter. The Product may not be used on any other
hardware.
*Reservation of Rights. Boonton Electronics reserves all rights not expressly granted to you in this EULA.
2. UPGRADES. To use a Product identified as an upgrade, you must first be licensed for the product identified
by Boonton Electronics as eligible for the upgrade. After upgrading, you may continue to use the product
that formed the basis for your upgrade eligibility.
3. TRANSFERABILITY. This product is transferable only to other Boonton models listed in Paragraph 1.
4. LIMITATION ON REVERSE ENGINEERING, DECOMPILATION, AND DISASSEMBLY. You may not reverse
engineer, decompile, or disassemble the Product, except and only to the extent that it is expressly
permitted by applicable law notwithstanding this limitation.
5. TERMINATION. Without prejudice to any other rights, Boonton Electronics may cancel this EULA if you do
not abide by the terms and conditions of this EULA, in which case you must destroy all copies of the Product
and all of its component parts.
8-1
Appendix A
Software License
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
6. NOT FOR RESALE SOFTWARE. This software product is "Not for Resale" and may not be separately resold,
transferred or used for any purpose other than operation with Boonton instrument models listed in the
paragraph 1.
7. EXPORT RESTRICTIONS. You acknowledge that the Product is of U.S. origin and subject to U.S. export
jurisdiction. You agree to comply with all applicable international and national laws that apply to the
Product, including the U.S. Export Administration Regulations, as well as end-user, end-use, and destination
restrictions issued by U.S. and other governments.
8. U.S. GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS. All Product provided to the U.S. Government pursuant to solicitations
issued on or after December 1, 1995 is provided with the commercial license rights and restrictions
described elsewhere herein. All Product provided to the U.S. Government pursuant to solicitations issued
prior to December 1, 1995 is provided with "Restricted Rights" as provided for in FAR, 48 CFR 52.227-14
(JUNE 1987) or DFAR, 48 CFR 252.227-7013 (OCT 1988), as applicable.
9. APPLICABLE LAW. If you acquired this Product in the United States, this EULA is governed by the laws of
the State of New Jersey. If this Product was acquired outside the United States, then local law may apply.
10. ENTIRE AGREEMENT. This EULA (including any addendum or amendment to this EULA which is included
with the Product) are the entire agreement between you and Boonton Electronics relating to the Product
and the support services (if any) and they supersede all prior or contemporaneous oral or written
communications, proposals and representations with respect to the Product or any other subject matter
covered by this EULA. To the extent the terms of any Boonton Electronics policies or programs for support
services conflict with the terms of this EULA, the terms of this EULA shall control.
11. The Product is protected by copyright and other intellectual property laws and treaties. Boonton
Electronics owns the title, copyright, and other intellectual property rights in the Product. The Product is
licensed, not sold.
Appendix A
Software License
8-2
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
9. Appendix B Warranty & Repair
9.1
Repair Policy
If the Boonton 55 Series RF Power Sensor is not operating correctly and requires service, contact the Boonton
Electronics Service Department as indicated in Section 9.2 Contacting Boonton for return authorization. You will
be provided with an RMA number and shipping instructions. Customers outside the USA should contact the
authorized Boonton distributor for your area. The entire instrument must be returned in its original packing
container. If the original container is not available, Boonton Electronics will ship a replacement container and you
will be billed for the container cost and shipping charges. See section 2.1 of this manual for packing instructions.
Note that sensors which have failed due to overloading, improper mating, or connecting to an out-of-tolerance
connector are not considered defective and will not be covered by the Boonton Warranty
9.2
Contacting Boonton
RMAs for service or calibration may be obtained directly from the Boonton website:
http://www.boonton.com/service-and-support/request-an-rma
Customers in the United States having questions or equipment problems may contact Boonton Electronics directly
during business hours (8 AM to 5 PM Eastern) by phoning (973) 386-9696. FAX messages may be sent at any time
to (973) 386-9191.
Email inquiries should be sent to [email protected] International customers should contact their authorized
Boonton Electronics representative for assistance. A current list of authorized US and international representatives
is available on the Boonton website at www.boonton.com.
9-1
Appendix B
Warranty and Repair
Boonton 55 Series USB Peak Power Sensor
9.3
Limited Warranty
Boonton Electronics warrants its products to the original Purchaser to be free from defects in material and
workmanship and to operate within applicable specifications for a period of one year from date of shipment for
instruments, probes, power sensors and accessories. Boonton Electronics further warrants that its instruments will
perform within all current specifications under normal use and service for one year from date of shipment. These
warranties do not cover active devices that have given normal service, sealed assemblies which have been opened,
or any item which has been repaired or altered without Boonton’s authorization.
Boonton’s warranties are limited to either the repair or replacement, at Boonton’s option, of any product found to
be defective under the terms of these warranties.
There will be no charge for parts and labor during the warranty period. The Purchaser shall prepay inbound shipping
charges to Boonton or its designated service facility and shall return the product in its original or an equivalent
shipping container. Boonton or its designated service facility shall pay shipping charges to return the product to the
Purchaser for domestic shipping addresses. For addresses outside the United States, the Purchaser is responsible
for prepaying all shipping charges, duties and taxes (both inbound and outbound).
At Boonton's option, an extended Warranty period may be available for an additional charge. If an extended
warranty option has been purchased, the extended period is substituted for the 1 year period above. Note that the
extended warranty does not extend the instrument's calibration interval past 12 months. The instrument must be
maintained in a calibrated state throughout the warranty period to be eligible for warranty service to remedy "out
of spec" operation.
THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Boonton will not be liable for any incidental damages or for any consequential damages, as defined in Section 2715 of the Uniform Commercial Code, in connection with products covered by the foregoing warranties
END OF 55 SERIES MANUAL
Appendix B
Warranty and Repair
9-2
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement