Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0

Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers
and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
June 2008
Document Number: 274041-014US
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Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
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June 2008
Document Number: 274041-014US
Contents
Contents
1.0
Introduction............................................................................................................. 11
1.1
Purpose ........................................................................................................... 12
1.2
Intended Audience ............................................................................................ 12
1.3
Related Documents ........................................................................................... 12
1.4
Conventions ..................................................................................................... 13
1.5
New Features for Version 9.0 .............................................................................. 14
1.6
Acronyms and Terminology................................................................................. 15
1.7
Downloading the IEGD and Video BIOS ................................................................ 17
2.0
Architectural Overview ............................................................................................ 19
2.1
Introduction ..................................................................................................... 19
2.1.1 Display Options...................................................................................... 21
2.1.1.1 Types of Displays...................................................................... 21
2.1.1.2 Display Configuration ................................................................ 21
2.2
Features .......................................................................................................... 22
2.2.1 Chipsets Supported ................................................................................ 22
2.2.2 OS and API Support................................................................................ 22
2.2.3 EDID-Less Configuration ......................................................................... 23
2.2.3.1 EDID-Less Panel Type Detection ................................................. 23
2.2.4 sDVO Devices ........................................................................................ 23
2.2.5 Rotation................................................................................................ 24
3.0
Platform Configuration Using CED............................................................................ 25
3.1
Before You Begin............................................................................................... 26
3.2
Creating a Configuration in CED – Summary Steps................................................. 26
3.3
Starting the CED ............................................................................................... 28
3.4
Creating a New Configuration.............................................................................. 29
3.4.1 Setting Color Correction .......................................................................... 31
3.4.1.1 Overlay Color Correction ............................................................ 31
3.4.1.2 Color Correction Attributes (Framebuffer)..................................... 32
3.4.2 Changing Windows CE OS Options ............................................................ 34
3.4.3 Configuring Ports ................................................................................... 36
3.4.3.1 Changing Port Attribute Settings ................................................. 38
3.4.3.2 Changing I2C Settings ............................................................... 40
3.4.3.3 Changing Flat Panel Settings ...................................................... 41
3.4.4 Configuring Fastboot............................................................................... 43
3.4.4.1 Configuring Splash Video ........................................................... 45
3.4.4.2 How to Select the Video_Offset................................................... 46
3.4.5 Configuring the Video BIOS and EFI .......................................................... 46
3.5
Creating a New Package ..................................................................................... 50
3.5.1 Entering Linux OS Options ....................................................................... 52
3.5.2 Entering Windows OS Options .................................................................. 53
3.5.3 Generating a VBIOS Package ................................................................... 55
3.5.4 Entering EFI Options ............................................................................... 55
3.6
Creating a New Customized DTD ......................................................................... 58
3.6.1 DTD Example Specifications..................................................................... 60
3.7
Generating an Installation .................................................................................. 61
3.8
Configuring The System BIOS For Use With The IEGD ............................................ 62
3.9
System BIOS Settings........................................................................................ 62
3.9.1 GMCH PCI Device Enabling ...................................................................... 62
3.9.2 Graphics Mode Select (GMS) .................................................................... 63
3.9.3 AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) Aperture Size ........................................... 63
3.10 VBIOS and Driver Configuration .......................................................................... 63
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Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
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Contents
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
3.15
3.16
Configuration Options.........................................................................................67
Display Detection and Initialization.......................................................................74
3.12.1 Display Detect Operation .........................................................................74
3.12.2 Detectable Displays.................................................................................76
Advanced EDID Configuration..............................................................................76
3.13.1 Sample Advanced EDID Configurations ......................................................77
3.13.2 User-Specified DTDs ...............................................................................78
Using an External PCI Graphics Adaptor as the Primary Device.................................81
Enhanced Clone Mode Support ............................................................................84
3.15.1 Extended Clone Mode CED Configuration....................................................85
3.15.2 Sample Clone Mode Configurations............................................................86
Scaling and Centering Configurations ...................................................................87
3.16.1 Upscaling for the Chrontel CH7308 LVDS Transmitters .................................87
3.16.2 Internal LVDS Scaling with EDID Panels .....................................................88
3.16.3 Centering Primary Display with Scaling Encoders.........................................88
3.16.4 Enabling Render Scaling on Port Encoders without Hardware Scaling .............89
3.16.5 Alignment in Clone Mode .........................................................................89
4.0
Generating the VBIOS ..............................................................................................91
4.1
Overview ..........................................................................................................91
4.2
System Requirements ........................................................................................91
4.3
Configuring and Building the VBIOS with CED ........................................................92
4.3.1 Selecting the Build Folder ........................................................................92
4.3.2 Configuring the Video BIOS ......................................................................93
4.3.2.1 COMMON_TO_PORT...................................................................93
4.3.2.2 post_display_msg .....................................................................94
4.3.2.3 OEM Vendor Strings...................................................................94
4.3.2.4 Default Mode Settings................................................................94
4.3.2.5 Default Refresh Settings.............................................................94
4.3.2.6 default_vga_height....................................................................94
4.3.3 Building the VBIOS .................................................................................95
4.4
VBIOS, Driver Compatibility, and Data Dependencies..............................................98
4.5
Supported VGA Display Modes for the IEGD Video BIOS ..........................................98
4.6
Supported VESA Display Modes for the IEGD Video BIOS ...................................... 100
5.0
Configuring and Installing Microsoft Windows Drivers ...........................................103
5.1
Editing the Microsoft Windows INF File................................................................ 103
5.1.1 Universal INF Configuration.................................................................... 103
5.1.2 INF File Backward Compatibility .............................................................. 104
5.1.2.1 INF File Backward Compatibility with IEGD Version 4.0................. 104
5.1.3 Dual Panel Configuration........................................................................ 104
5.1.4 Chipset Dual Display Example ................................................................ 104
5.1.5 Creating Registry Settings for Graphics Driver INF File ............................... 105
5.1.6 Dynamic Port Driver Configuration .......................................................... 106
5.1.6.1 iegd.PortDrvs_xxx ................................................................... 107
5.1.6.2 SourceDisksFiles ..................................................................... 107
5.1.6.3 PortDrivers Registry Key .......................................................... 108
5.1.7 Creating an .sld file for Microsoft Windows XP Embedded Systems............... 108
5.1.8 Changing Default Display Mode............................................................... 109
5.2
Installing the IEGD on Microsoft Windows ........................................................... 109
5.3
Uninstalling the Current Version of the Driver ...................................................... 111
5.4
Run-Time Operation ......................................................................................... 112
5.5
Viewing and Changing the Driver Configuration from Microsoft Windows.................. 112
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
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Document Number: 274041-014US
Contents
6.0
Configuring and Building the IEGD for Microsoft Windows CE Systems .................. 119
6.1
Microsoft Windows CE Installation...................................................................... 119
6.1.1 Prerequisites ....................................................................................... 120
6.1.2 Integrating IEGD with Microsoft Windows CE Platform Builder .................... 120
6.1.2.1 Catalog Feature File ................................................................ 121
6.2
Microsoft Windows CE Configuration .................................................................. 122
6.2.1 Basic Driver Configuration ..................................................................... 122
6.2.1.1 Graphics Memory Configuration ................................................ 123
6.2.1.2 Defining Graphics Memory Size................................................. 124
6.2.1.3 Framebuffer and Video Surface Size .......................................... 124
6.2.1.4 Video Surface Allocation Rule ................................................... 125
6.2.1.5 System to Video Stretch Blit..................................................... 125
6.2.1.6 iegd.reg File Backward Compatibility ......................................... 126
6.2.1.7 Blend Filtering ........................................................................ 126
6.2.2 Configuration Sets................................................................................ 126
6.2.3 General Configuration ........................................................................... 127
6.2.3.1 PortOrder Information ............................................................. 128
6.2.3.2 Vertical Extended Mode ........................................................... 129
6.2.4 Per Port Platform Customization ............................................................. 130
6.2.4.1 Per Port Customization – General Port Configuration .................... 130
6.2.4.2 Per Port Customization – Custom DTD Timings ........................... 131
6.2.4.3 Per Port Customization — Custom Flat Panel Controls .................. 132
6.2.4.4 Per Port Customization — Attribute Initialization.......................... 132
6.2.5 Miscellaneous Configuration Options ....................................................... 132
6.2.5.1 Text Anti-Aliasing ................................................................... 133
6.2.6 D3D Mobile Support.............................................................................. 133
6.2.7 Sample iegd.reg File ............................................................................. 134
7.0
Installing and Configuring Linux OS Drivers .......................................................... 147
7.1
Overview ....................................................................................................... 147
7.2
Prerequisites................................................................................................... 148
7.2.1 Supported Hardware............................................................................. 149
7.3
Installation ..................................................................................................... 149
7.3.1 Installing Fedora Core 5 or Fedora 7 ....................................................... 149
7.3.2 Installing SUSE 10................................................................................ 151
7.3.3 Installing Novell Linux POS 9 SP3 ........................................................... 153
7.3.4 Installing Other Kernels......................................................................... 155
7.4
IKM Patch Instructions ..................................................................................... 156
7.4.1 Finding and Installing the Kernel Source (Headers) ................................... 156
7.4.2 Installing IKM with Fedora ..................................................................... 156
7.4.3 Installing IKM with SUSE ....................................................................... 158
7.4.4 Using the IEGD Kernel Module................................................................ 159
7.5
Uninstalling the IKM ........................................................................................ 159
7.6
GART Patch Instructions (for Fedora Core 5 Only) ................................................ 160
7.7
Editing the Linux OS Configuration File ............................................................... 161
7.7.1 Configuration Overview ......................................................................... 161
7.7.2 Linux OS Configuration Using CED .......................................................... 161
7.7.3 Editing the Linux OS Configuration File Directly ........................................ 162
7.7.4 The Linux OS Configuration File.............................................................. 162
7.7.4.1 Device Section........................................................................ 165
7.7.4.2 Screen Section ....................................................................... 166
7.7.4.3 Monitor Section ...................................................................... 166
7.7.4.4 ServerLayout Section .............................................................. 166
7.7.4.5 ServerFlags Section ................................................................ 167
7.7.5 XFree86 and Xorg Configuration Options ................................................. 167
7.7.6 Sample Dual Independent Head (DIH) Configuration ................................. 171
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Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
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Contents
7.7.7
7.7.8
7.8
7.9
Video Memory Management ................................................................... 173
Configuring Accelerated Video Decode for IEGD driver and US15W .............. 173
7.7.8.1 Hardware Video Acceleration..................................................... 173
7.7.8.2 IEGD Driver............................................................................ 173
7.7.8.3 VA Library (version 0.29) ......................................................... 174
7.7.8.4 IEGD Video Acceleration Driver ................................................. 174
7.7.8.5 Helix Framework Installation..................................................... 174
7.7.8.6 Intel® Media Codec Installation ................................................. 175
7.7.8.7 Playing Video .......................................................................... 175
7.7.8.8 Troubleshooting ...................................................................... 175
7.7.9 Graphics Port Initialization ..................................................................... 176
7.7.10 OpenGL Support ................................................................................... 176
7.7.10.1 OpenGL Installation ................................................................. 177
7.7.10.2 OpenGL Use Considerations ...................................................... 178
7.7.11 Sample Advanced EDID Configurations for Linux OS .................................. 178
7.7.12 AGP GART Errors .................................................................................. 179
Using the IEGD Runtime Configuration GUI on Linux Systems ................................ 179
7.8.0.1 iegdgui Setup ......................................................................... 179
7.8.0.2 Using the iegdgui Runtime Configuration Utility ........................... 180
Enabling Damn Small Linux ............................................................................... 184
7.9.1 Damn Small Linux OS Introduction.......................................................... 185
7.9.1.1 Extending Damn Small Linux OS ............................................... 185
7.9.2 XFree86 Versus TinyX ........................................................................... 186
7.9.3 Running IEGD on Damn Small Linux OS................................................... 186
7.9.4 RAM Size Constraint.............................................................................. 187
7.9.5 Shrinking and Modifying the Extension..................................................... 187
A
Example INF File ....................................................................................................189
B
Port Driver Attributes .............................................................................................197
B.1
Standard Port Driver Attributes.......................................................................... 197
B.1.1 Internal LVDS Port Driver Attributes (Mobile chipsets only)......................... 199
B.1.2 CRT (Analog) Port Driver Attributes ......................................................... 199
B.1.3 HDMI Port Driver Attributes.................................................................... 199
7.9.5.1 Audio..................................................................................... 199
B.1.3.1 SDVO-HDMI (CH7315) ............................................................. 200
B.1.3.2 Internal HDMI......................................................................... 200
B.1.3.3 HDCP..................................................................................... 200
B.1.4 Internal TV Out Port Driver Attributes (Mobile chipsets only)....................... 200
B.1.5 Chrontel CH7307 Port Driver Attributes.................................................... 201
B.1.6 Chrontel CH7308 Port Driver Attributes.................................................... 202
B.1.7 Chrontel CH7315/CH7317/CH7319/CH7320 Port Driver Attributes ............... 202
B.1.8 Silicon Image SiI 1362/SiI 1364 Port Driver DVI Attributes......................... 203
B.2
Default Search Order........................................................................................ 203
B.3
Default GPIO Pin Pair Assignments ..................................................................... 204
B.4
Default I2C Device Address Byte Assignment....................................................... 204
C
Intel® 5F Extended Interface Functions .................................................................205
C.1
BIOS Extended Interface Functions .................................................................... 206
C.1.1 5F01h – Get Video BIOS Information....................................................... 206
C.1.2 5F05h – Refresh Rate............................................................................ 206
C.1.2.1 5F05h, 00h – Set Refresh Rate.................................................. 206
C.1.2.2 5F05h, 01h – Get Refresh Rate ................................................. 207
C.1.3 5F10h – Get Display Memory Information ................................................ 208
C.1.4 5F1Ch – BIOS Pipe Access ..................................................................... 208
C.1.4.1 5F1Ch, 00h – Set BIOS Pipe Access ........................................... 208
C.1.4.2 5F1Ch, 01h – Get BIOS Pipe Access ........................................... 208
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
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Contents
C.1.5
C.1.6
C.2
D
C.1.7
Hooks
C.2.1
C.2.2
C.2.3
C.2.4
C.2.5
C.2.6
5F29h – Get Mode Information............................................................... 209
5F61h – Local Flat Panel Support Function ............................................... 209
C.1.6.1 5F61h, 05h – Get Configuration ID ............................................ 209
5F68h – System BIOS Callback .............................................................. 210
for the System BIOS .............................................................................. 210
5F31h – POST Completion Notification Hook............................................. 210
5F33h – Hook After Mode Set ................................................................ 211
5F35h – Boot Display Device Hook.......................................................... 211
5F36h – Boot TV Format Hook ............................................................... 212
5F38h – Hook Before Set Mode .............................................................. 212
5F40h – Config ID Hook ........................................................................ 213
Intel® OpenGL APIs ............................................................................................... 215
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User’s Guide
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Contents
Figures
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Intel Embedded Graphics Suite...................................................................................19
Graphics Driver Architecture ......................................................................................20
Firmware Architecture ...............................................................................................20
Sample CED Configuration Start Page .........................................................................27
Chipset Configuration Page ........................................................................................29
Overlay Color Correction Page ....................................................................................32
Overlay Color Correction Page ....................................................................................33
Chipset Configuration Page ........................................................................................34
Port Configuration Page.............................................................................................36
Attribute Settings Page .............................................................................................39
sDVO Settings Page ..................................................................................................40
Panel Settings Page ..................................................................................................41
Fastboot Configuration Page ......................................................................................43
Splash Video with 8 MBytes of Stolen Memory Example .................................................45
Video BIOS Configuration Page...................................................................................47
IEGD Package Editor Page .........................................................................................50
Linux Options Page ...................................................................................................52
Windows Options Page ..............................................................................................54
VBIOS Generation Page.............................................................................................55
EFI Generation Page .................................................................................................56
EFI Generation Page .................................................................................................57
IEGD DTD Page ........................................................................................................58
IEGD DTD Page ........................................................................................................64
LVDS Configuration Page ...........................................................................................65
IEGD Configuration Editor Page ..................................................................................66
IEGD DTD Editor ......................................................................................................79
External PCI Graphics Card as Primary Driver and IEGD as Secondary Driver....................82
IEGD as Primary Driver and External PCI Graphics Card as Secondary Driver....................83
IEGD as Primary Driver With Two Displays and External PCI Driving a Tertiary Display.......84
Video BIOS Directory Structure ..................................................................................93
Example Runtime Configuration GUI — Driver Info Tab................................................ 113
Example Runtime Configuration GUI — Display Config Tab ........................................... 114
Example Runtime Configuration GUI — Display Attributes Tab ...................................... 115
Example Runtime Configuration GUI — Color Correction Tab ........................................ 116
Sample FILES Block from platform.bib File ............................................................ 121
Typical Memory Map Using Static Memory Model......................................................... 123
Sample XF86Config File ........................................................................................... 163
Sample DIH Configuration ....................................................................................... 171
Example Linux Runtime Configuration GUI — Display Config Tab................................... 181
Example Linux Runtime Configuration GUI — Display Attributes Tab.............................. 182
Example Linux Runtime Configuration GUI — Color Correction Tab (Framebuffer)............ 183
Example Linux Runtime Configuration GUI — Color Correction Tab (Overlay) .................. 184
Damn Small Linux Partition...................................................................................... 185
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Contents
Tables
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Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS 9.0 New Features ............................. 14
Acronyms and Terminology ....................................................................................... 15
Types of Displays ..................................................................................................... 21
Display Configuration Definitions ................................................................................ 21
Supported Display Configurations............................................................................... 21
Chipsets Supported by the Intel Embedded Graphics Suite ............................................ 22
SDVO Devices Supported .......................................................................................... 23
Chipset Configuration Page Settings ........................................................................... 30
Overlay Color Correction Values (applies to ALL color)................................................... 31
Framebuffer Color Correction Values (applies to R, G, B color) ....................................... 32
Windows CE OS Settings ........................................................................................... 35
Port Configuration Settings........................................................................................ 37
I2C Settings ............................................................................................................ 40
Panel Settings Options .............................................................................................. 42
Fastboot Options...................................................................................................... 44
Video BIOS Settings Options...................................................................................... 48
IEGD Package Editor Setting Options .......................................................................... 51
Linux OS Settings Options ......................................................................................... 53
Windows OS Setting Options ..................................................................................... 54
IEGD DTD Setting Options......................................................................................... 59
Timing Specification Example Values .......................................................................... 60
GMCH Device 2, Function 1 BIOS Setting .................................................................... 62
GMS Settings .......................................................................................................... 63
Parameter Configuration Format ................................................................................ 67
Detectable Displays .................................................................................................. 76
Sample Advanced EDID Configurations ....................................................................... 77
DTD Parameter Descriptions ...................................................................................... 80
Supported VGA Video Display Modes........................................................................... 99
VESA Modes Supported by Video BIOS .................................................................... 100
Example of Chipset Dual Display Parameter Setting .................................................... 104
Framebuffer Color Correction Values (applies to R, G, B color) ..................................... 116
Overlay Color Correction Values (applies to ALL color)................................................. 116
[HKLM\DRIVERS\Display\Intel] Registry Keys ............................................................ 122
[HKLM\Drivers\Display\Intel\<platform>\<config id>\]Registry Keys............................ 127
PortOrder Information ............................................................................................ 128
X.org and X-version Conversion Reference ................................................................ 147
Supported Driver Options........................................................................................ 167
Sample Advanced EDID Configurations for Linux OS ................................................... 178
Standard Port Driver Attributes ................................................................................ 197
Internal LVDS Port Driver Attributes ......................................................................... 199
CRT (Analog) Port Driver Attributes .......................................................................... 199
HDMI Port Driver Attributes ..................................................................................... 200
Internal TV Out Port Driver Attributes ....................................................................... 200
Chrontel CH7307 Port Driver Attributes ..................................................................... 201
Chrontel CH7308 Port Driver Attributes ..................................................................... 202
Chrontel CH7315/CH7317/CH7319/CH7320 Port Driver Attributes ................................ 202
Silicon Image SiI 1362/SiI 1364 Port Driver DVI Attributes .......................................... 203
Default Search Order .............................................................................................. 203
Default GPIO Pin Pair Assignments ........................................................................... 204
Default I2C Device Address Byte Assignment ............................................................. 204
Summary of Intel 5F Extended Interface Functions .................................................... 205
Supported Intel® OpenGL APIs ................................................................................ 215
Non-Supported Intel® OpenGL APIs.......................................................................... 216
June 2008
Document Number: 274041-014US
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
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Contents
Revision History
This document may have been updated since the release shown below. See http://www.intel.com/
design/intarch/manuals/274041.htm for the most recent version.
Date
Revision
June 2008
014
Updated for use with Version 9.0 of the product.
Description
October 2007
013
Updated for use with Version 8.0 of the product.
June 2007
012
Updated for use with Version 7.0 of the product.
December 2006
011
Updated for use with Version 6.1 of the product.
September 2006
010
Updated for use with Version 6.0 of the product, including
support for the Intel® Q965 and Damn Small Linux*.
June 2006
009
Updated for use with Version 5.1 of the product, including
support for the Texas Instruments TFP410* DVO encoder,
Microsoft Windows Embedded for Point of Service (WEPOS)*
operating system, and SuSE 10.
February 2006
008
Updated for use with Version 5.0 of the product, including
support for the Intel® 852GM, Intel® 945G, and Intel® 945GM
chipsets, the Silicon Image SiI 1362* and SiI 1364* sDVO
transmitters, and External PCI as a Primary graphics adaptor.
October 2005
007
Updated for use with Version 4.1 of the product.
June 2005
006
Updated for use with Version 4.0 of the product, including
support for the Intel® 915GV and Intel® 915GM chipsets, the
Chrontel CH7307* and Chrontel CH7308* sDVO transmitters,
and Advanced EDID Configuration.
May 2005
005
Updated for use with Version 3.4 of the product, including use
of the enhanced Video BIOS, Windows* installer/uninstaller,
runtime configuration GUIs, and display discovery feature.
July 2004
004
Updated for use with Version 3.2 of the product, including use
of the dynamic port driver feature.
May 2004
003
Updated for usage with version 3.1 of the product, including
details on PCF format and usage, Universal INF format, and
updates to the User Build System.
February 2004
002
Updated chipset support to reflect current Embedded IA32
roadmap.
February 2004
001
Initial Release
§§
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
10
June 2008
Document Number: 274041-014US
Introduction
1.0
Introduction
The Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers (IEGD) comprise a suite of multi-platform
graphics drivers designed to meet the requirements of embedded applications.
Featuring Intel® Dynamic Display Configuration Technology (DDCT), the drivers run on
the following Embedded Intel® Architecture (eIA) chipsets:
• Intel® GM45Express chipset
• Intel® System Controller Hub US15W chipset
• Intel® Q35 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® GME965 Express chipset
• Intel® Q965 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GSE Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GME Express chipset
• Intel® 945G Express chipset
• Intel® 915GV Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 915GME Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 910GMLE Express chipset
Note:
If you need support for a chipset that is not listed above but is in the same family as
those listed, please contact your Intel representative.
The IEGD supports five types of display devices:
• Analog CRT
• LVDS flat panels
• TMDS DVI displays
• HDMI
• TV Output
The IEGD is designed to work with fixed-function systems, such as Point-of-Sale (POS)
devices, ATM machines, gaming devices, In-vehicle Information/Entertainment
systems, etc. It can be configured to work with various hardware and software systems
and supports both Microsoft Windows* and Linux* operating systems, including
embedded versions of these operating systems.
The Intel Embedded Graphics Suite consists of both the IEGD and a Video BIOS
(VBIOS) component. These two components are configurable and work together to
provide a wide range of features. This document provides information on configuring
and using both the IEGD and the VBIOS.
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Introduction
The IEGD provides the following features:
• Enhanced VBIOS support
• Dynamic Port Drivers
• Support for Dual Independent Head (DIH) displays
• Support of a Universal INF file
• EDID and EDID-less display support
• Display discovery and initialization
• Direct 3D* support
• Installer/Uninstaller GUI for Microsoft Windows OS
• Runtime configuration GUI for Microsoft Windows OS and Linux OS
1.1
Purpose
This manual provides information on both firmware and software, providing hardware
design considerations, installation requirements, and static configuration options.
1.2
Intended Audience
This document is targeted at all platform and system developers who need to interface
with the graphics subsystem. This includes, but is not limited to: platform designers,
system BIOS developers, system integrators, original equipment manufacturers,
system control application developers, as well as end users.
1.3
Related Documents
The following documents provide additional information on the hardware supported by
the IEGD.
• Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers for Embedded Intel® Architecture-based
Chipsets Product Brief
(Document Number: 315587)
• Intel® 35 Express Chipset Family Datasheet
(Document Number: 31696602)
• Mobile Intel® 965 Express Chipset Family Datasheet
(Document Number: 316273)
• Intel® 965 Express Chipset Family Datasheet
(Document Number: 313053)
• Mobile Intel® 915PM/GM/GMS and 910GML Express Chipset Datasheet
(Document Number: 305264)
• Intel® 915G/915GV/915P Express Chipset Datasheet
(Document Number: 304467)
• Intel® I/O Controller Hub 6 (ICH6) Family Datasheet
(Document Number: 301473)
• Integrated Dual Independent Display on Intel® Digital Security Surveillance
Multifunction Platforms Application Brief
• Display Panel Debugging with the Intel Graphics Memory Controller Hub
(Document Number: 305964)
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Introduction
• VESA BIOS Extensions/Display Data Channel Standard, available at the following
Web address:
http://www.vesa.org/public/VBE/VBEDDC11.PDF
This document provides information on the 4F VBE functions, which are supported
by the Intel embedded Video BIOS.
• VESA BIOS Extension (VBE) Core Functions Standard Version 3.0, available at the
following Web address:
http://www.vesa.org/public/VBE/vbe3.pdf
Contains information on the VESA BIOS Extension (VBE) specification for standard
software access to graphics display controllers that support resolutions, color
depths, and framebuffer organizations beyond the VGA hardware standard.
1.4
Conventions
The following conventions are used throughout this document.
Boldface
Represents text that you type and text that appears on a screen.
Italics
Introduces new terms and titles of documents.
Courier New
Identifies the names of files, executable program names, and text that appears in
a file.
Angle Brackets (<>)
Encloses variable values in syntax or value ranges that you must replace with
actual values.
Vertical Bar ( | )
Used to separate choices (for example, TRUE | FALSE)
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Introduction
1.5
New Features for Version 9.0
The table below presents new IEGD features and capabilities.
Table 1.
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS 9.0 New Features
New Features
®
Intel System Controller Hub US15W Support
• 2D (Xserver, Display, Overlay, Video Gamma Correction, Display Resolution/timings, Dynamic mode
change, Render scaling, Twin, Clone, Extended, Dual Independent Display, Vertical Extended for CE,
panning, centering, Rotation and Inverted Display)
• GUI support
• US15W supports all IEGD 9.0 supported OSes with the following condition:
— US15W supports XP, XPe, Windows CE 6.0, Wind River Linux, Red Flag MIDINUX 2.0 and Red Hat
Embedded.
— US15W does NOT support Windows CE 5.0.
— US15W does NOT support DSL.
• Windows CE 2D
— Scaling, Rendered Scaling, Panning, Centering.
• Wind River Linux support (X.org version 7.3, Red Hat Embedded: Xorg 7.2, Red Flag: Xorg 7.2).
• 3D (OpenGL 1.5) support
• 3D (Direct3D)Compliant with DirectX 9.0c.
• IEGD Configuration Editor (CED) support.
• EFI# Support, including VESA mode support.
— EFI supports only graphics mode but no text mode.
— US15W requires fast boot in EFI + Linux.
• Quick Boot + Sprite C Overlay handoff.
• VBIOS Support
• Hardware Accelerated Decode support (does not apply to Windows CE)
• Second Overlay
sDVO Port driver support for HDMI with HDCP on CH7315
Intel® GM45 Express Chipset Support
• 2D (Xserver, Display, Overlay, Video Gamma Correction, Display Resolution/timings, Dynamic mode
change, Render scaling, Twin, Clone, Extended, Dual Independent Display, Vertical Extended for CE,
panning, centering, Rotation and Inverted Display).
• CED support.
• HDMI support:
— Internal HDMI (iHDMI) with HDCP (including Azalia audio) for GM45 only.
— External HDMI with HDCP for sDVO enabled encoder supported on all platforms.
Intel® Mobile 945GSE Chipset Support
•
Linux Power Management (ACPI Support of all C states, S States, Backlight modulation, Clock gating,
interaction with system BIOS using ACPI)
This release also contains resolutions for errata. For details on errata, including status
information, refer to the specification update located at the following Web address:
http://www.intel.com/design/intarch/specupdt/309380.htm
A manual process is available for obtaining the IEGD and the VBIOS. See “Downloading
the IEGD and Video BIOS”.
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Introduction
1.6
Acronyms and Terminology
The table below lists the acronyms and terminology used throughout this document.
Table 2.
Acronyms and Terminology (Sheet 1 of 3)
Term
Description
ADD Card
APG Digital Display. An adapter card that can be inserted into the PCIe
x16 port of Intel chipset family-based systems. ADD cards allow
configurations for TV-out, LVDS, and TMDS output (i.e., televisions,
digital displays, and flat panel displays).
AIM
Add In Module.
API
Application Programming Interface.
BDA
BIOS Data Area. A storage area that contains information about the
current state of a display, including mode number, number of columns,
cursor position, etc.
BIOS
Basic Input/Output System. The IEGD interacts with two BIOS systems:
system BIOS and Video BIOS (VBIOS). VBIOS is a component of the
system BIOS.
CED
Configuration EDitor. Graphical pre-installation utility allows easy creation
of consolidated driver installation packages for Windows, Windows CE,
and Linux operating systems, and VBIOS across numerous platforms and
display combinations.
Clone Display Configuration
A type of display configuration that drives two display devices, each
displaying the same content, but can have different resolutions and
(independent) timings. Compare Twin Display Configuration and DIH
Display Configuration.
DDCT
Intel® Dynamic Display Configuration Technology
DirectDraw*
A component of the DirectX* Graphics API in Microsoft Windows OS.
DIH Display Configuration
Dual Independent Head. A type of display configuration that supports two
displays with different content on each display device. The IEGD supports
Extended mode for Microsoft Windows systems and Xinerama for Linux
systems.
DTD
Detailed Timing Descriptor. A set of timing values used for EDID-less
devices.
DVI
Digital Video Interface.
EBDA
Extended BIOS Data Area. An interface that allows the system BIOS and
Option ROMs to request access to additional memory.
EDID
Extended Display Identification Data. A VESA standard that allows the
display device to send identification and capabilities information to the
IEGD. IEGD reads all EDID data, including resolution and timing data,
from the display, thus negating the need for configuring DTD data for the
device.
EDID-less
A display that does not have the capability to send identification and
timing information to the driver and requires DTD information to be
defined in the driver.
eIA
Embedded Intel® Architecture.
EMI
Electromagnetic Interference.
Extended Clone Mode
A feature that allows you to have different sized displays in Clone mode.
Framebuffer
A region of physical memory used to store and render graphics to a
display.
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Introduction
Table 2.
Acronyms and Terminology (Continued) (Sheet 2 of 3)
Term
Description
GEN3
Napa Graphics Core in 910/915 family chipset.
GEN3.5
Napa+ Graphics Core in 945 family chipset.
GEN4
Graphics Core in 965 family chipset.
GDI
Graphics Device Interface. A low-level API used with Microsoft Windows
operating systems.
GMA
Intel Graphics Media Accelerator. Refers to both the graphic hardware in
Intel chipsets as well as the desktop/mobile driver. The GMA driver is not
intended for use in embedded applications.
GMCH
Graphics and Memory Controller Hub.
GMS
Graphics Mode Select (stolen memory).
HAL
Hardware Abstraction Layer. An API that allows access to the
Intel® chipsets.
HDMI
High-Definition Multimedia Interface, an uncompressed, all-digital audio/
video interface.
IAL
Interface Abstraction Layer. An API that allows access to graphics
interfaces including the GDI, DirectDraw*, XFree86*.
IEGD
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers
IEGS
Intel® Embedded Graphics Suite. Runtime graphics driver plus a VBIOS
component.
INF file
A standard Microsoft Windows text file, referred to as an information file,
used by Microsoft Windows OS to provide information to the driver. The
default .inf file for the IEGD is iegd.inf. You can create customized
parameters using the CED utility.
LVDS
Low Voltage Differential Signaling. Used with flat panel displays, such as a
laptop computer display.
Linux/XFree86
Open Source for X Window* System used on Linux systems.
NTSC
National Television Standards Committee. A TV standard used in North
and Central America and in Japan.
OAL
Operating System Abstraction Layer. An API that provides access to
operating systems, including Microsoft Windows and Linux.
Option ROM
Code which is integrated with the system BIOS and resides on a flash chip
on the motherboard. The Intel Embedded Video BIOS is an example of an
option ROM.
PAL
Phase Alternating Lines. A TV standard used in Europe, South America,
Africa, and Australia.
PCI
Peripheral Component Interface.
Port Driver
A driver used with the sDVO interfaces of the Graphics and Memory
Controller Hub (GMCH).
POST
Power On Self Test.
Reserved Memory
A region of physical memory in a Windows CE* system set aside for BIOS,
VBIOS, and Graphics Driver operations. Reserved memory can be
configured to be used by the operating system and other applications
when not in use by the BIOS.
sDVO
Serial Digital Video Output.
Single Display Configuration
A type of display configuration that supports one and only one display
device.
Stolen Memory
A region of physical memory (RAM) set aside by the system BIOS for
input and output operations. The amount of stolen memory is
configurable. Stolen memory is not accessible to the operating system or
applications.
System BIOS
The standard BIOS used for basic input and output operations on PCs.
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Introduction
Table 2.
Acronyms and Terminology (Continued) (Sheet 3 of 3)
Term
1.7
Description
TMDS
Transitioned Minimized Differential Signaling. Used with DVI displays,
such as plasma TVs.
TOM
Top Of Memory.
TSR
Terminate and Stay Resident. A program that is loaded and executes in
RAM, but when it terminates, the program stays resident in memory and
can be executed again immediately without being reloaded into memory.
Twin Display Configuration
A type of display configuration that supports two display devices each of
which has the same content, resolution, and timings. Compare Clone
Display Configuration.
UBS
User Build System. A process for building a VBIOS.
VBIOS
Video Basic Input Output System. A component of system BIOS that
drives graphics input and output.
VESA
Video Electronics Standards Organization.
VGA
Video Graphics Array. A graphics display standard developed by IBM* that
uses analog signals rather than digital signals.
Downloading the IEGD and Video BIOS
The IEGD and the Video BIOS (VBIOS) are available via the Download Drivers link
(under Related Information) at http://www.intel.com/go/iegd or directly via the Intel
Embedded Graphics Drivers Downloads page, where the following is available:
• Intel Embedded Graphics Driver Configuration Editor (CED) release
— includes the IEGD drivers for VBIOS, Linux OS, and all Windows operating
systems, plus an online help system
Note:
The Embedded Video BIOS version 9.0 is recommended for use with each of the
graphics drivers in most cases. Click the following link to see the FAQ page for details
on the differences of these versions.
http://www.intel.com/design/intarch/swsup/graphics_faq.htm
After you have downloaded, installed, and run CED, you can configure and customize
the drivers and VBIOS following the procedures in this document. Once they have been
configured, you can integrate the VBIOS with the system BIOS ROM and install the
IEGD on your operating system.
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Introduction
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Architectural Overview
2.0
Architectural Overview
2.1
Introduction
The Intel Embedded Graphics Suite (IEGS) is composed of a runtime graphics driver
and a Video BIOS (VBIOS) firmware component. (See the illustrations below.) Both the
driver and VBIOS control the GMCH to perform display and render operations. The
VBIOS is predominantly leveraged by System BIOS during system boot but is also used
at runtime by the driver to handle full-screen text mode on Microsoft Windows*
operating systems.
Figure 1.
Intel Embedded Graphics Suite
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Architectural Overview
Figure 2.
Graphics Driver Architecture
Figure 3.
Firmware Architecture
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Architectural Overview
2.1.1
Display Options
The following section describes the types of displays and configurations supported by
the Intel Embedded Graphics Driver.
2.1.1.1
Types of Displays
The table below lists the types of displays supported by the IEGD.
Table 3.
Types of Displays
Display
Description
CRT
Analog CRT, natively supported with RGB signaling.
TMDS and LVDS compliant flat panels are supported with the use of an external
transmitter via an sDVO port. Integrated LVDS flat panels are also natively supported on
the Mobile Intel® 910GMLE, Mobile Intel® 915GME Express, Mobile Intel® 945GME,Mobile
Intel® 945GSE Express, and Mobile Intel® GME965 chipsets.
Flat Panel
TV-out is supported via an external encoder sDVO port.
TV
2.1.1.2
Note:
TV-Out is enabled via supported internal capability, or external transmitters sDVO
(where available).
Display Configuration
IEGD supports driving two displays simultaneously. Several configurations are
supported, dependent on operating system and chipset. The various display
configuration are described in the table below.
Table 4.
Display Configuration Definitions
Display Configuration Mode
Single
Description
Normal desktop configuration, single monitor
Twin
Two displays, same content, single resolution, same timings
Clone
Two displays, same content, different resolutions, independent timings
Extended
DIH
Two displays, continuous content
Dual Independent Head. Two displays, different content, independent
resolutions
The table below summarizes which display configurations are supported by Intel
chipsets.
Table 5.
Supported Display Configurations
Operating System
Chipset
Windows XP*
Windows CE*
Linux
Intel Q35
Intel® GME965,
Intel® Q965,
Intel® 945GM,
Intel® 945G,
Intel® 915GME,
Intel® 910GMLE
Single, Twin, Clone,
Extended
Single, Twin, Clone
Single, Twin, Clone,
DIH
Intel® 915GV
Single, Twin, Clone
Single, Twin, Clone
Single, Twin, Clone
®
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Architectural Overview
Twin and Clone modes are supported by IEGD through custom APIs. In contrast,
Extended and DIH are supported natively by both Microsoft Windows and Linux
operating systems (XFree86 and X.org*).
2.2
Features
The following sections describe major features supported by IEGD.
2.2.1
Chipsets Supported
The table below lists IEGD-supported chipsets.
Table 6.
Chipsets Supported by the Intel Embedded Graphics Suite
Chipset
IEGD VBIOS Support
IEGD Support
GM45
Yes
Yes
US15W
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Intel GME965,
Intel® Q965
Yes
Yes
Intel® 945G
Intel 945GME
Intel 945GSE
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Intel® 915GV
Intel® 915GME
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Intel® 910GMLE
Yes
Yes
Intel
®
Intel®
Intel® Q35
®
All supported chipsets provide support for a single analog output for CRTs. In addition,
digital monitors, flat panels and TVs are supported through the GMCH sDVO interface.
2.2.2
OS and API Support
The IEGD and Video BIOS support the following operating systems and APIs. For
OpenGL APIs, see Appendix D, “Intel® OpenGL APIs”.
• Linux XFree86 and X.org
• Damn Small Linux
• Microsoft Windows XP, Windows XP Embedded*
— DirectX* 8.1 (DirectDraw* and Direct3D*)
— DirectX 9 (DirectDraw and Direct3D)
• Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and 6.0
Note:
The following features are NOT supported in IEGD 9.0:
• Microsoft Vista 2D + 3D
• Vista DirectX 9.0L, DirectX 10.0 (Combine with MS Vista 2D + 3D)
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Architectural Overview
2.2.3
EDID-Less Configuration
EDID-less support is the ability to run a display panel that does not have display timing
information within the panel. Therefore, the user has to provide the display timing
information to the graphics drivers. For the IEGD, this must be done through:
• CED
• Configuration file for the graphics drivers.
This document describes only the necessary edits to the configuration files that are
required to implement the graphics driver and VBIOS, and not specific settings for
EDID-less panel configuration. Please refer to the manufacturer’s specifications for the
DTD settings to use for your EDID-less panels.
2.2.3.1
EDID-Less Panel Type Detection
The Intel Embedded Graphics Suite supports EDID-less displays that do not export
timing modes. This is accomplished by allowing configuration of a Detailed Timing
Descriptor (DTD), and associating that DTD with a specific display port. The IEGS
provides further flexibility in allowing numerous DTDs to be defined and having the
selection of the DTD be configurable though selection of Configuration IDs. The
selection of the Configuration ID can be done from the System BIOS, as long as it
supports the Intel 5F40h function and passes the appropriate Configuration ID to the
VBIOS. The VBIOS in turn notifies the Graphics Driver of which Configuration ID is
active. This is not required however, but the VBIOS and/or Graphics Driver require the
Configuration ID to be set prior to installation.
2.2.4
sDVO Devices
The IEGD supports many third-party digital transmitters connected to the sDVO ports
of the GMCH. The driver code that supports each of these devices is abstracted and is a
separate driver called a port driver. Port drivers can be dynamically loaded at the time
IEGD is initialized, and IEGD can be configured to allow any number of these port
drivers to be loaded. By default, all the port drivers for the devices listed in the
following table as Included in Release Package will be loaded by default if the
corresponding transmitter is detected. If a port driver is not specified in the
configuration before installation, that device will not be detected, and the port driver
will not be loaded. The configuration can be modified before installation to prevent
certain port drivers from being loaded or to include additional port drivers to load.
Table 7.
SDVO Devices Supported (Sheet 1 of 2)
Device
Internal LVDS
VBIOS/EFI Video Driver
Support
Graphics Driver
Support
√
√
√
Internal TV Out
Chrontel CH7021*
√
√
Chrontel CH7305*
√
√
Chrontel CH7301*
√
√
Chrontel CH7307*
√
√
Chrontel CH7308*
√
√
Chrontel CH7317*
√
√
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Table 7.
SDVO Devices Supported (Continued) (Sheet 2 of 2)
VBIOS/EFI Video Driver
Support
Graphics Driver
Support
Chrontel CH7315/CH7319/CH7320*
√
√
Silicon Image SiI 1362*
√
√
Silicon Image SiI 1364*
√
√
Device
2.2.5
Rotation
Rotation is the ability to rotate the display for the Intel Embedded Graphics Driver.
Rotation support includes 0°, 90°, 180°, 270°. Rotation is supported only on the
following chipsets using Windows XP and Linux operating systems:
• Intel® Q35 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® GME965 Express chipset
• Intel® Q965 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GSE Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GME Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GM Express chipset
• Intel® 945G Express chipset
• Intel® 915GV Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 915GME Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 910GMLE Express chipset
Note:
Rotation is not supported with the VBIOS.
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Platform Configuration Using CED
3.0
Platform Configuration Using CED
The Intel® IEGD Configuration Editor (CED) is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that
allows you to create configurations, package the configurations, and create installations
that can be loaded directly on a specific OS or Video BIOS platform. Configurations are
associated with a specific chipset and can be created for any one of the following
supported chipsets:
• Intel® GM45 Express chipset
• Intel® System Controller Hub US15W chipset
• Intel® Q35 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® GME965 Express chipset
• Intel® Q965 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GSE Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GME Express chipset
• Intel® 945G Express chipset
• Intel® 915GV Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 915GME Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 910GMLE Express chipset
IEGD configurations can be created for the following supported operating systems and
Video BIOS:
• Linux XFree86 and X.org
• Fedora Core 5
• Fedora 7
• SUSE 10 SP1
• Novell Linux POS 9 SP3
• Damn Small Linux
• Microsoft Windows XP, Windows WP Embedded*
— DirectX* 8.1 and 9.0 (DirectDraw* and Direct3D*)
• Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 and 6.0 (Note that Intel® System Controller Hub US15W
chipset does NOT support Windows CE 5.0)
Note:
The following features are NOT supported in IEGD 9.0:
• Microsoft Vista 2D + 3D (WDDM)
• Vista DirectX 9.0L, DirectX 10.0 (Combine with MS Vista 2D + 3D)
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Platform Configuration Using CED
The CED GUI is designed for ease of use and configuration of the IEGD. Online help is
available for each configuration page and each data field is validated. If you enter an
incorrect value, the CED displays an error message at the top of the page and displays
the valid range of values for the field. You will not be able to finish a configuration until
all fields contain valid values.
The following sections show how to create a configuration for any of the supported
chipsets, operating systems, and the IEGD Video BIOS.
• “Starting the CED” on page 28
• “Creating a New Configuration” on page 29
• “Creating a New Package” on page 50
• “Creating a New Customized DTD” on page 58
• “Generating an Installation” on page 61
3.1
Before You Begin
To configure the IEGD software using CED, you will need some information on the panel
you are using. This information is usually found in the product specifications. In some
cases the terminology used in the CED may not match the labels used in your panel’s
product specification. Refer to Table 21, “Timing Specification Example Values” on
page 60 for hints on which specs correspond to CED DTD fields. After you obtain the
correct specification values, you may need to derive other values for the DTD fields.
3.2
Creating a Configuration in CED – Summary Steps
The following steps present a sample CED configuration.
1. If you have custom panels and timings you may want to create your own Detailed
Timings Descriptor (DTD); otherwise you can use the standard DTDs provided by
CED. If needed, select New DTD.
— Choose the DTD Type that most closely aligns with your display parameters,
enter parameters, and then click Finish. For details, see “Creating a New
Customized DTD” on page 58.
2. Select New Configuration.
— Enter a name for the configuration, select the mode, chipset, ports, port
drivers, DTDs, etc., for the configuration and then click Finish. For details, see
“Creating a New Configuration” on page 29.
3. Select New Package.
— Enter a name for the package, select the configurations for your package, the
platforms for the installation, and then click Finish. For details, see “Creating a
New Package” on page 50.
4. Select the created package and then select Generate Installation.
The generated files are placed in the installation folder. The zip files (for Linux,
Windows CE, and Windows operating systems) contain the generated XFree86,
iegd.reg, or INF file. For details, see “Generating an Installation” on page 61.
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Platform Configuration Using CED
Figure 4.
Sample CED Configuration Start Page
From this window, you can create configurations, package the configurations, and
create installations from the packages that can be installed directly on a platform. The
main window also provides a Console tab that displays information when you build a
package or an installation.
The following sections show how to create a configuration for any of the supported
chipsets, operating systems, and the IEGD Video BIOS.
• “Creating a New Configuration”
— “Configuring Ports”
• “Changing Port Attribute Settings”
• “Changing I2C Settings”
• “Changing Flat Panel Settings”
— “Configuring Fastboot”
— “Configuring the Video BIOS and EFI”
• “Creating a New Package”
— “Entering Linux OS Options”
— “Entering Windows OS Options”
• “Creating a New Customized DTD”
• “Generating an Installation”
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Platform Configuration Using CED
3.3
Starting the CED
To start the IEGD CED, open the folder where you installed the CED and click the
iegd-ced.exe icon. The IEGD CED splash window appears for a few moments
followed by the IEGD Configuration Editor main window.
From this window, you can create configurations, package the configurations, and
create installations from the packages that can be installed directly on a platform. The
main window also provides a Console tab that displays information when you build a
package or an installation.
The following sections show how to create a configuration for any of the supported
chipsets, operating systems, and the IEGD Video BIOS.
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3.4
Creating a New Configuration
To create a new configuration, click the New Configuration selection located on the
top of the IEGD CED main window. The Chipset Configuration Page appears.
Figure 5.
Chipset Configuration Page
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The Chipset Configuration Page allows you to specify settings that apply to all OS,
VBIOS, and EFI platforms.
The table below describes each setting on the Chipset Configuration page.
Table 8.
Chipset Configuration Page Settings (Sheet 1 of 2)
Setting
Description
Configuration Name
Provide a name for the configuration you are creating. This name is
required and is used when you create packages. The name can consist
of any alphanumeric characters and any special characters and must be
between 1 and 50 characters. You must enter a configuration before you
can enter any other information on this page.
Platform Chipset
Select the target chipset for this configuration from the drop-down list.
Display Configuration Mode
Select the type of display configuration from the drop-down list. You can
select any one of the following display configurations:
• Single — Single display configuration
• Twin — Two displays where both displays have the same resolution,
refresh rate, and content
• Clone — Two displays where both displays have the same content
but can have different resolutions and timings.
• DIH — Dual Independent Head. This is a configuration where both
displays can have different resolutions, different refresh rates, and
different content.
Note:
On Microsoft Windows* DIH configurations, the display DOES
NOT automatically come up in extended display mode. You
must go into the Display properties on the Control Panel and
manually set the display to DIH mode.
Overlay Color Correction
Overlay Color Correction allows the Overlay plane to have colorcorrection settings that are different from the main frame buffer colorcorrection settings. See “Overlay Color Correction” on page 31.
Note: Overlay color correction is not supported on the Intel® GM45
chipset.
Microsoft Windows CE Settings
If you are creating a package for a Microsoft Windows* CE platform,
click the WinCE Settings button for additional settings that may be
required for your configuration. Please see “Changing Windows CE OS
Options” on page 34 for descriptions of these settings.
Display Detection
Display Detection allows you to specify if the driver should detect
displays on the system. The default is Disabled. For more information on
Display Detection, refer to “Display Detection and Initialization” on
page 74.
Port Devices (Available Ports, Port
Order)
The Port Devices section lists the ports available based on the chipset
selected.
The Available Ports box lists the ports that are available. You can move
these port devices to the Port Order box to determine the search order
for detecting attached displays. To move a port device to the Port Order
box, either double-click the port device or click the port device to
highlight it, and then click the right arrow button to move it from the
Available Ports to the Port Order box.
The Port Order section allows you to determine the search order for
detecting attached displays for the Display Detection feature. When
Display Detection is enabled, the Port Order determines which display is
primary and which display is secondary.
You can choose default ordering by not moving any of the Available Ports
to the Port Order box and leaving the Port Order box empty. Default
ordering is chipset-specific. See Table 48, “Default Search Order” on
page 203 for more information on default port ordering based on
chipset.
When you move one or more ports to the Port Order box, you can
configure each port by clicking Next. For each port listed in the Port
Order box, you can click Next to configure each port. See “Configuring
Ports” on page 36 for information on configuring ports.
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Table 8.
Chipset Configuration Page Settings (Sheet 2 of 2)
Setting
Description
Clone Settings
Clone Width
Clone Height
Clone Refresh
Enable interlace mode
If you are creating a clone display configuration, you can specify the
width, height, and refresh rate for the clone display in this section. For
more information about clone display configurations, refer to “Enhanced
Clone Mode Support” on page 84.
Disable off screen BMP support (No
DFB)
This field enables the IEGD to pass the DIB call back to the OS. This is
required in certain circumstances to improve performance.
This field allows you disable Overlay support, which is enabled by
default.
Overlay Off
Note:
This field is only for Microsoft Windows* and Microsoft Windows
CE operating systems only. The Linux* OS configuration for the
XF86Conf provides a standard option that performs the same
function.
See also the following topics:
• “Setting Color Correction”
• “Changing Windows CE OS Options”
• “Configuring Ports”
• “Configuring the Video BIOS and EFI”
• “Creating a New Package”
3.4.1
Setting Color Correction
Color Correction is available for both overlays and framebuffers, and is accessed under
the New Configuration link at the top of the main CED window. For both overlay and
framebuffer color correction, user-assigned values must be between 0.6 to 6. By
default, gamma is 1.0 (no correction).
Note:
Overlay color correction is not supported on the Intel® GM45 chipset.
3.4.1.1
Overlay Color Correction
Overlay Color Correction allows the Overlay plane to have color-correction settings that
are different from the main framebuffer color-correction settings. This feature allows
you to color-correct for red, green, and blue, plus it enables you to adjust brightness,
contrast, and saturation.
Table 9.
Overlay Color Correction Values (applies to ALL color)
Gamma:
0.6 to 6.0 (default value is 1)
Brightness:
0 to 200 (default value is 100)
Contrast:
0 to 200 (default value is 100)
Saturation:
0 to 200 (default value is 100)
To assign overlay color correction, click the Overlay Color Correction button on the
Chipset Configuration Page. The Overlay Color Correction Page appears, as shown in
the figure below.
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Figure 6.
Overlay Color Correction Page
Add your desired values to the correction fields and then click Finish.
3.4.1.2
Color Correction Attributes (Framebuffer)
Color Correction Attributes allow you to adjust the main Framebuffer color attributes.
This feature allows you to color-correct for red, green, and blue, and enables you to
adjust brightness and contrast.
Table 10.
Framebuffer Color Correction Values (applies to R, G, B color)
Gamma:
0.6 to 6.0 (default value is 1)
Brightness:
-127 to 127 (default value is 0)
Contrast:
-127 to 127 (default value is 0)
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To assign overlay color correction, click the Color Correction Attributes button on the
Chipset Configuration Page. The Overlay Color Correction Page appears, as shown in
the figure below.
Figure 7.
Overlay Color Correction Page
Add your desired values to the correction fields and then click Finish.
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3.4.2
Changing Windows CE OS Options
The WinCE Options Page allows you to enter Windows CE OS-specific options into the
configuration. When you click the WinCE Settings button from the IEGD Package
Page, the following page appears.
Figure 8.
Chipset Configuration Page
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The table below describes each field on this page.
Table 11.
Windows CE OS Settings
Windows CE OS Option
Description
Reserved Memory Base
Reserved Memory Size
These two fields let you specify the amount and the starting point of
statically reserved video memory. Video memory can be statically
reserved or dynamically allocated on demand. If both Reserved Memory
Base and Reserved Memory Size are non-zero, video memory allocation
utilizes the static model. Base plus the Size must extend to TOM (Top Of
Memory) and not conflict with other reserved memory arenas in the
config.bib file.
The default for both Reserved Memory Base and Reserved Memory Size
is zero, indicating a dynamic allocation model.
Default behavior disables static memory model.
Maximum Frame Buffer Size
The maximum size of the expected frame buffer. By providing this hint,
the display driver can more efficiently organize GART memory, leading
to a smaller video memory consumption. This value must be greater
than or equal to the expected size of the frame buffer. Units represent
the number of bytes and are specified in hexadecimal. Specifying zero
causes the default frame buffer reservation sizing.
The default is 0x300000
Page Request Limit
The Page Request Limit controls the maximum allocations of offscreen
video surfaces, buffers, etc. This value represents the number of pages
(4K) allocated and is independent of dynamic or static memory
configuration.
The maximum is 128MB (0x8000)
Minimum Video Surface Width
Minimum Video Surface Height
In pixels, the minimum width and height of surfaces in order to be
acceptable for allocation in video memory. Due to hardware restrictions
that optimize memory access, it is advisable to reserve video memory
for larger surfaces and allow GDI and DirectDraw* to allocate small
surfaces from system memory.
Default value for both width and height is 16.
Enable System to Video Stretch
Blits
When checked, this enables system-to-video memory stretch blit
operations to take advantage of hardware-accelerated filtering.
Normally, it is more efficient to allow GDI to conduct system-to-video
stretch blits, but the default filtering used by GDI is Nearest. See the
Blend Filter below for hardware accelerated filtering options.
The default is disabled.
Specify whether to disable or enable D3D graphics.
Disable D3D
Note:
Blend Filter
Provides selection of hardware-accelerated filtering methods for stretch
blit operations. The choices are:
• Nearest
• Bilinear
• Anisotropic
Default: Nearest
Enable No Tearing Option
If enabled, all blit operations to the frame buffer are synchronized with
video sync to eliminate any visible tearing on the display screen.
Disabling this feature achieves a performance gain.
Display
Use Default
Width
Height
Color Quality
Refresh
Enable interlace mode
The Display section allows you select the default resolution, color depth,
and refresh rate for the configuration. If you do not select a default
display mode, the configuration uses the default display mode for the
operating system it is installed on.
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For Windows CE 5.0 OS, this box must be checked as the IEGD
drivers currently do not support D3D on Windows CE 5.0
systems.
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3.4.3
Configuring Ports
You can configure each port listed in the Port Order box of the Chipset Configuration
Page by clicking Next. When you do, a port Configuration Page appears similar to the
one shown here.
Figure 9.
Port Configuration Page
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The Port Configuration Page allows you to specify whether to use EDID timings or
customized DTD timings for the display connected to this specific port. From this page,
you can also specify Attribute Settings, I2C Settings, and Flat Panel Settings and create
a new DTD that can be used with any configuration.
The table below describes each field on this page.
Table 12.
Port Configuration Settings (Sheet 1 of 2)
Port Configuration Field
Description
Readable Port Name
Enter a name for the port. This is a required field and the name must be
between 1 and 50 characters and may contain spaces.
Port Rotation
This list allows you select a rotation for the display connected to this
port. You can choose between 0, 90, 180, and 270 degrees. The default
is 0.
Flip Port
Check this box if you want the display connected to this port to be
inverted horizontally. The default is not to invert horizontally.
EDID Options
This section allows you to set EDID options for the display. The IEGD
supports three different types of EDID display modes:
• Built-in display modes: These modes are hard-coded in the IEGD.
These modes can be filtered based on the EDID block.
• EDID Block: These are Detailed Timing Descriptors read from an
EDID display. An EDID display can contain DTD as well as other
information about the display.
• User-specified DTDs.
If you want to use the display's EDID information if it is available, click
the Use EDID Display if Available check box.
If the display attached to this port contains EDID information, you can
choose one or more of the following options from the If EDID Device
section to determine which set of timings to use for the display
connected to the port:
• Use driver built in standard timings — If this box is checked, the
standard timings built into the IEGD are used.
• Use EDID block — If this box is checked, the EDID block is used.
• Use user defined DTDs — If this box is checked, a user-defined DTD
is used. You can select which DTD to use by checking the
appropriate box in the Custom Display Timings Descriptors (DTDs)
section. If no DTDs are defined, you can click New DTD and create
a custom DTD. For information on creating custom DTD, refer to
Table 19 on page 54.
If you select both Use driver built in standard timings and Use EDID
block, the IEGD uses its built-in display timings and the timings
provided by the display.
If the display attached to this port does not contain EDID information,
you can choose one or both of the following options from the If Not EDID
Device section:
• Use driver built in standard timings — If this box is checked, the
standard timings are used.
• Use user defined DTDs — If this box is checked, a user defined DTD
is used. You can select which DTD to use by checking the
appropriate box in the Custom Display Timings Descriptors (DTDs)
section. If no DTDs are defined, you can click New DTD and create
a custom DTD. For information on creating custom DTD, refer to
Table 19 on page 54.
See “Sample Advanced EDID Configurations” on page 77 for example
configurations.
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Table 12.
Port Configuration Settings (Sheet 2 of 2)
Port Configuration Field
Description
Encoder Configuration
This section lets you to specify the type of encoder connected to an
sDVO port and encoder Attributes, I2C settings, and Flat Panel settings
for the port.
The Select sDVO Device drop-down list contains the list of all
supported sDVO devices. Select the device that will be connected to this
port.
To change the device's attributes, click the Attribute Settings button.
Refer to “Changing Port Attribute Settings” for information on device
attributes.
To change the device's I2C settings, click the I2C Settings button. See
“Changing I2C Settings” on page 40 for information on I2C settings.
To change the device's flat panel settings, click the Flat Panel Settings
button. See “Changing Flat Panel Settings” on page 41 for information
for changing flat panel settings.
Color Correction Attributes
Color Correction Attributes allow you to adjust the main Frame Buffer
color attributes. See “Color Correction Attributes (Framebuffer)” on
page 32.
Native DTD
The Native DTD list lets you choose whether to use a display's built in
timings.
See also the following topics:
• “Changing Port Attribute Settings”
• “Changing I2C Settings”
• “Changing Flat Panel Settings”
• “Color Correction Attributes (Framebuffer)”
• “Creating a New Customized DTD”
3.4.3.1
Changing Port Attribute Settings
When you click the Attributes Settings button from the Encoder Configuration section
of the Port Configuration Page, the CED displays a page of attributes for the selected
encoder device. The actual page that appears depends upon the encoder device
selected and only the attributes that apply to the selected encoder appear. For a full
description of all attributes for all supported encoders, refer to “Port Driver Attributes”
on page 197.
The figure below shows a sample Attributes Settings Page for the Chrontel CH7021,
CH7307, and CH7308 encoder.
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Figure 10.
Attribute Settings Page
When the Attributes Settings Page first appears, it shows the Use Default box checked
for all attributes.
To change a default value, clear the Use Default check box and enter a new value. For
a description of all attributes for all supported encoders, see “Port Driver Attributes” on
page 197.
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3.4.3.2
Changing I2C Settings
The I2C Settings Page allows you to specify the I/O interface connections to devices on
an sDVO port. When you click I2C Settings from the Port Configuration Page, the
following screen appears.
Figure 11.
sDVO Settings Page
To change the default settings for the I2C Bus Configuration or the DDC Bus
Configuration, clear the Use Default box and enter new values. The following table
describes each field on this page.
Table 13.
I2C Settings
I2C/DDC Bus Setting
Description
I2C pins/DDC pins
This drop-down list allows you to select the pins that are used for I/O to
the display connected to the encoder. This is the GPIO pin pair used on
the I2C and DDC buses to read and write to device registers. You can
choose between CRT DDC or sDVO I2C. The default is CRT DDC.
Device Address Byte
You can enter a device address byte for the device that this port is
connected to in these boxes.
The I2C device address is for reading and writing device registers. The
device address byte must be in 8-bit format with the 7-bit slave address
assigned to its bits 7:1 and bit 0 set to 0.
The DDC Device Address Byte is the I2C device address for reading EDID
data from the display through the DDC bus.
Speed (KHz)
Speed of I2C bus for the device and for the EDID device. The range for
these two fields is 10-400 KHz.
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3.4.3.3
Changing Flat Panel Settings
The Panel Settings Page allows you to specify settings for a flat panel display connected
to this sDVO port. When you click Flat Panel Settings from the Port Configuration
Page, the following screen appears.
Figure 12.
Panel Settings Page
The table below describes each section of this page.
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Table 14.
Panel Settings Options
Flat Panel Settings
Description
Fixed Timing
This section indicates whether the attached display is a fixed timing
display.
GPIO Pin Connections
If you select Port Driver, GMCH, or ICH from the Flat Panel Backlight
Options list, you can specify the following GPIO pin connections.
• Panel Power Signal — GPIO connection for panel power.
• VDD backlight sequence signal — GPIO connection for backlight
power on/off sequencing signal.
• Backlight signal — GPIO connection to enable backlight signal.
Bit Depth
This list lets you select a color depth for the panel. You can choose either
18 or 24 bit color depth. The default is 18.
Single/Dual Channel
This check box determines the chip channel mode. Unchecked, the
default, is for single channel mode. Checked is for Dual mode. Single
mode is recommended for TV displays. For flat panels, refer to the
panel's specification.
Flat Panel Backlight Options
This section provides options for controlling the backlight of the flat
panel display and specifying timing delays.
• The Backlight Control Methods list lets you choose among No
Backlight, Port Driver, GMCH, or ICH to control the backlight. If
choose Port Driver, GMCH, or ICH, you can specify the timing delays
in the Timing Delays section and the GPIO pin connections in the
GPIO Pin Connections section. The default is No Backlight.
Timing Delays
This section lets you specify timing delays for the backlight signals as
follows:
• VDD active and clock/data active: 1-512, increment by 1. Default is
255.
• sDVO active and backlight enable: 2-256, increment by 2. Default
is 127.
• Backlight disable and sDVO clock/data inactive: 2-256, increment
by 2. Default is 127.
• Clock/data active and inactive: 1-512, increment by 1. Default is
255.
• Minimum from VDD inactive and active: 1-1600, increment by 50.
Default is 800.
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3.4.4
Configuring Fastboot
Figure 13.
Fastboot Configuration Page
The table below describes each section of this page.
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Table 15.
Fastboot Options (Sheet 1 of 2)
Fastboot Settings
Description
Disable Seamless Mode Set
The Seamless mode set feature ensures that on a properly configured
embedded device there is only 1 mode set between power on and a fully
functional system. Under normal circumstances a PC will set the mode
several times during initialization which causes screen flicker and
latency that is undesirable for an embedded device. With seamless
mode set, the firmware sets the mode and the driver adopts the existing
mode without altering the hardware state. This feature can be combined
with splash screen or splash video for optimal effect. EFI does not
support this feature.
Splash Screen
The Splash screen feature provides a user-configurable splash screen
image that is loaded to the framebuffer at the earliest possible time by
the EFI graphics driver and remains in place until overwritten by the OS
or driver. Additionally the IEGD graphics driver can be configured to
suppress OS drawing to the on-screen framebuffer until notified by an
application. Instead, drawing is redirected to an off-screen framebuffer.
When notified by the application, the IEGD driver will flip the already
prepared off-screen framebuffer to be on-screen and cease redirection
of drawing. In this manner the configured splash screen will be displayed
early during boot and remain in place until a time when the OS is fully
loaded and the application interface has been prepared.
Quickboot
The quickboot feature optimizes the speed that IEGD loads at the
expense of compatibility and ease of use. Quickboot disables non-critical
features that affect the initialization time of the driver that are not
needed for targeted embedded applications.
Splash Video
The Splash Video feature provides a mechanism to use a portion of the
off-screen pre-allocated video memory (“Stolen Memory”) as a video
image that is displayed on an overlay to the framebuffer. The intention is
that a video capture device external to IEGD will be configured to
transfer a video stream to the configured location in video memory
using DMA. The splash video remains in place until the IEGD driver is
notified by an external application to disable the overlay.
Splash Screen BG Color (EFI only)
Splash Screen BG Color must be between 0x000000 and 0xFFFFFF.
Splash Screen X (EFI only)
The X location, in pixels, where the Firmware Splash Screen will be
placed. This number is a signed number in 2's complement. Positive
numbers are offset from the left of the screen. Negative numbers are
offset from the right of the screen.
Splash Screen Y (EFI only)
The Y location, in pixels, where the Firmware Splash Screen will be
placed. This number is a signed number in 2's complement. Positive
numbers are offset from the top of the screen. Negative numbers are
offset from the bottom of the screen.
Splash Screen File (EFI only)
The full path to a 32-bit bitmap file to be used as the splash screen.
Note: Enter file path on the Package Page. See Figure 16 on page 50.
Splash Video Offset (EFI only)
The offset, in bytes, from the base of video memory where the Splash
Video will be placed. Care must be taken to ensure that this location is
past the end of the on-screen framebuffer and that the full Splash Video
image within the pre-allocated video memory.
Splash Video Pixel Format (EFI
only)
The pixel format of the Splash Video image in memory. The available
pixel formats are encoded values used within the IEGD driver.
Splash Video Source Width (EFI
only)
The width, in pixels, of the Splash Video image in memory.
Splash Video Source Height (EFI
only)
The height, in pixels, of the Splash Video image in memory.
Splash Video Source Pitch (EFI
only)
The pitch, in bytes, of the Splash Video image in memory.
Pitch must be >= bytes per pixel * source width.
Splash Video Destination X (EFI
only)
The X location, in pixels, where the Splash Video will be placed. This
number is a signed number in 2’s complement. Positive numbers are
offset from the left of the screen. Negative numbers are offset from the
right of the screen.
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Table 15.
Fastboot Options (Sheet 2 of 2)
Fastboot Settings
3.4.4.1
Description
Splash Video Destination Y (EFI
only)
The Y location, in pixels, where the Splash Video will be placed. This
number is a signed number in 2’s complement. Positive numbers are
offset from the top of the screen. Negative numbers are offset from the
bottom of the screen.
Splash Video Destination Height
(EFI only)
The height, in pixels, of the Splash Video window on the screen. This
number must currently be the same as SrcHeight.
Splash Video Destination Width
(EFI only)
The width of the screen. This number must currently be the same as
SrcWidth.
Configuring Splash Video
The splash video feature can be used to display a video while the system is booting to
the operating system. This section describes how to configure the options needed.
Figure 14.
Splash Video with 8 MBytes of Stolen Memory Example
1GB RAM with 128KB GTT and 8MB
Stolen Memory Example
Top of RAM (TR)
1GB = 1024*1024*1024
GTT
Stolen Memory
Scratch
Page
TR-size of (GTT)
4KB for scratch page
Splash
Video
1GB - 128KB (Start Physical Address of GTT)
1GB - 132KB
(Start Physical Address of Scratch Page)
Max size of Video = Start_Addr_Scratch_Pg – Start Addr_of_Video
BGSM + Video_Offset
(Start Physical Address of Video Data)
Frame
Buffer
1GB – 8MB = BGSM
(Base of Graphics Stolen Memory)
System
Memory
0
0
B6872-01
The Video DMA area is where the video will be streamed. It is part of the stolen
memory of our Graphics Device.
The external PCI device that is connected to the camera needs to know the exact DDR
RAM physical address to stream. Or dump the video data at that memory location.
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To calculate the Start DDR RAM physical address:
Start_Phy_Ram_Addr =
BGSM + Video_Offset
where BGSM = Base of Graphics Stolen Memory
and Video_Offset = Offset where the video data is present. This is what you enter
into the CED tool.
There are two ways to calculate BGSM:
• The recommended method is to use the “setpci” command in Linux to find the
BGSM from the PCI Config space.
At the Linux command prompt, type the following:
$setpci -s 0:2.0 0x5C.L
OR
• Find the amount of physical RAM populated in the system, for example, 1 Gbyte,
and the stolen memory selected by the user in the system BIOS, for example,
8 Mbyte.
BGSM =
3.4.4.2
1 Gbyte - 8 Mbytes = 0x4000 0000 - 0x80 0000 = 0x3F80 0000
How to Select the Video_Offset
Determine the size of the maximum resolution of the framebuffer.
Size = framebuffer_height * framebuffer_pitch
where framebuffer_pitch = framebuffer_width * Bytes_per_Pixel (page aligned)
For example, 1024x768 at 32-bit BPP:
Size =
768 * (1024 * 4) = 3145728 = 0x30 0000
For some usage models, the framebuffer pitch is set to 8192 bytes. In that case:
Size = 768 * (8192) = 6291456 = 0x60 0000
The Video_Offset can start from 0x30 0000 or 0x60 0000 (if the pitch is 8192). See
the notes below on the recommended values for the Video Offset.
Max Size of Splash Video =
Size of Stolen Memory - Max Frame buffer size –
Size of GTT – Size of Scratch Page (4 KB)
Notes:
1. For the Splash Video option the stolen memory MUST be a minimum of 8 Mbytes.
This is selected in the BIOS menu.
2. The recommended Video Offsets for the splash video are 0x600000 and
0x700000.
3. If the Size of the Video frame is more than 1 Mbyte, please choose 0x600000.
3.4.5
Configuring the Video BIOS and EFI
The final page of the IEGD Configuration allows you to configure your video BIOS (if
you are creating a configuration that includes the Video BIOS!) and EFI. You can
configure the Video BIOS by clicking Next after you configure each port. When you do,
the following Video BIOS and EFI Configuration Page appears.
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Figure 15.
Video BIOS Configuration Page
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From this page, you can customize POST (Power On Self Test) messages and default
display modes as well as matching port devices to System BIOS ports.
The table below describes each field on this page.
Table 16.
Video BIOS Settings Options (Sheet 1 of 2)
Video BIOS Settings
Description
Primary Display Mode
This section allows you to specify a standard or a customized display
mode for the primary display. You can select a standard mode from any
of the standard modes listed in the drop-down list. If you want to use a
customized mode for the primary display, check the Custom check box
and enter the mode number in the box. For a complete list of
customized VGA and VESA modes, refer to Table 28, “Supported VGA
Video Display Modes” on page 99 and Table 29, “VESA Modes Supported
by Video BIOS” on page 100.
Secondary Display Mode
This section allows you to specify a standard or a customized display
mode for the secondary display. You can select a standard mode from
any of the standard modes listed in the drop-down list. If you want to
use a customized mode for the secondary display, check the Custom
check box and enter the mode number in the box. For a complete list of
customized VGA and VESA modes, refer to Table 28, “Supported VGA
Video Display Modes” on page 99 and Table 29, “VESA Modes Supported
by Video BIOS” on page 100.
5F Functions
These settings allow you to enable or disable the five System BIOS 15h
interrupt hooks. (Please see “Intel® 5F Extended Interface Functions”
on page 205 for more information on 5F functions.)
All five functions are enabled by default.
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Table 16.
Video BIOS Settings Options (Sheet 2 of 2)
Video BIOS Settings
Description
The Common to Port section lets you match port devices with common
System BIOS ports. This allows the Video BIOS to retrieve information
about the port from the System BIOS. It allows you to associate
standard display names used in most system BIOSs to specific ports
that are recognized by IEGD (for example, LVDS, sDVO). The VBIOS
makes this association when the VBIOS calls the System BIOS Intel® 5F
interrupt functions.
This setting consists of six numbers, where each number is associated
with one of the System BIOS displays:
1
2
3
4
5
6
Common to Port
:
:
:
:
:
:
CRT - Standard analog CRT
TV1 - TV Output 1
EFP1 - DVI Flat Panel 1
LFP - Local Flat Panel (Internal LVDS display)
TV2 - TV Output 2
EFP2 - DVI Flat Panel 2
The values above are an example of the typical displays and
corresponding order used by a system BIOS. However, this may vary
depending on how your system BIOS has implemented the displays and
the Intel 5F interrupt functions.
The value in each position in the setting should be the associated port
device. Using the typical settings above, if you want to associate CRT in
the system BIOS with the internal CRT (port 1) and LFP in the system
BIOS with internal LVDS (port 4) in the VBIOS, select CRT from the
VBIOS Port Devices list and click the left arrow button next to the CRT
row in the Matches column, and then select LFP from the VBIOS Port
Devices list and click the left arrow button next to the LFP row in the
Matches column.
Notes: This feature must be compatible with the System BIOS. If the
System BIOS does not properly implement the Intel 5F
functions, then using the Common to Port feature could cause
unpredictable results with the displays. If you are unsure, leave
the Matches column blank for all ports to disable this feature.
The Display Detect field on the Chipset Configuration page must
be set to Enable in order for the Common to Port values to be
used.
Enable POST messages to display
To enable Power On Self Test (POST) messages to display during the
power on sequence, check this box. If left unchecked, the POST
messages do not display.
OEM String
Enter a string of up to 100 characters. This string appears on the display
when the Video BIOS starts up. The default is a blank string.
OEM Vendor Name
Enter a string of up to 80 characters that identifies the OEM Vendor. This
string appears on the display when the Video BIOS starts up. The
default is a blank string.
OEM Product Name
Enter a string of up to 80 characters that identifies the OEM Product
Revision. This string appears on the display when the Video BIOS starts
up. The default is a blank string.
OEM Product Revision
Enter a string of up to 80 characters that identifies the OEM Product
Revision. This string appears on the display when the Video BIOS starts
up. The default is a blank string.
Number of Seconds to Display
Enter the number of seconds to display the above information. The
default is 1.
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3.5
Creating a New Package
A package consists of one or more configurations and is used to create an installation
that works for multiple operating systems and chipset platforms and displays.
To create a new package, click the New Package link at the top of the main CED
window. The IEGD Package Page appears.
Figure 16.
IEGD Package Editor Page
The table below describes each field on this page.
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Table 17.
IEGD Package Editor Setting Options
Package Option
Package Name
Description
Enter a name for the package. This is a required field and the name
must be between 1 and 50 characters and may contain spaces.
This blocks shows the configurations that are available to be packaged.
Each package consists of one or more configurations, each of which is
associated with a specific chipset.
To select a configuration, click the check box next to the configuration
name. You can select all available configurations by clicking the Select
All button located below the Configurations block and clear all
configurations by clicking the Clear All button.
Configurations
The Configuration Name column shows the name of each configuration
and the Chipset column shows the chipset associated with each
configuration.
In the Config ID column, you must enter a configuration ID for each
configuration. The configuration ID must be a number between 1 and
15. By default, the Package Editor automatically assigns the next
available configuration ID when you select a configuration. You can
change the default configuration ID by clicking in the edit box and
entering a different value.
Default Configuration
The Default Configuration list box allows you to select a default
configuration from the configurations you selected in the Configurations
block. The default is None, which means that if you do not select a
default, the lowest numbered configuration ID is used as the default.
Linux Settings
If you are creating a package for a Linux OS platform, click the Linux
Settings button for additional settings that may be required for your
configuration. Please see “Entering Linux OS Options” on page 52 for
descriptions of these settings.
Microsoft Windows Settings
If you are creating a package for a Microsoft Windows* CE platform,
click the WinCE Settings button for additional settings that may be
required for your configuration. Please see “Changing Windows CE OS
Options” on page 34 for descriptions of these settings.
Target OS
This block allows you to select one or more operating systems and Video
BIOS for the package. For each target you select, the CED produces a
configuration file for the selected OS or Video BIOS platform. Please see
the following section for settings on the Target OS:
• “Entering Linux OS Options” on page 52
• “Entering Windows OS Options” on page 53
• “Generating a VBIOS Package” on page 55
• “Entering EFI Options” on page 55
If you are not creating a VBIOS package, click Finish. When you click Finish, the CED
creates a package that can be used for generating an installation.
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3.5.1
Entering Linux OS Options
The Linux Options Page allows you to enter Linux OS-specific options into the
configuration. When you click Linux Settings from the IEGD Package Page, the
following page appears.
Figure 17.
Linux Options Page
The table below describes each of these settings.
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Table 18.
Linux OS Settings Options
Linux OS Option
3.5.2
Description
Default Display Modes
The Default Display Modes section allows you select the default
resolution, color depth, and refresh rate for the configuration. If you do
not select a default display mode, the package uses the default display
mode for the operating system it is installed on.
Disable Hardware Acceleration
Disable or enable hardware 2D acceleration. The default is to enable
hardware acceleration, so to disable acceleration, click the check box.
Enable Hardware Cursor
Enable the use of the hardware cursor. By default, the hardware cursor is
disabled.
Enable Use Double Buffer
(Shadow Framebuffer)
Enable double buffering on the framebuffer. By default, is that double
buffering is disabled. To enable it, click the check box.
Disable No Tearing Option
Disable No Tearing. By default, the No Tearing is enabled. Disabling this
option results in a performance penalty as the driver is forced to
synchronize page flips to the vertical blanking signal.
No Xinerama
Xinerama support. Xinerama is an extension to the X Window System
which allows applications and window managers to use the two (or
more) physical displays as one large virtual display. By default,
Xinerama is enabled. To disable it, click the check box.
OpenGL* Installation (Enable the
DRI Option)
OpenGL* (Enable the Direct Rendering Infrastructure (DRI) Option). DRI
allows the client to directly write to DMA buffers that are used by the
graphics hardware. To enable the DRI Option, click the check box. For a
list of related application programming interfaces, see “Intel® OpenGL
APIs” on page 215.
Disable XVideo Support
Disable XVideo support. In a dual independent head configuration, either
the first display or the second display supports XVideo. Both displays can
not support XVideo simultaneously. The default is XVideo support is
enabled.
Disable XVideo Blend
Disable XVideo support using the 3D blend manager. This provides
XVideo support in configurations that cannot be supported with overlay.
For example, this is supported on both displays in a dual independent
head setup. It is also supported when the display is rotated or flipped.
Color key is only supported if ShadowFB is enabled and the VideoKey is
defined. The default is XVideoBlend support is enabled.
XVideo Color Key
This sets the color key for XVideo and XVideoBlend. This value is either a
24-bit value or a 16-bit value, depending on the pixel depth of the
screen. The color key is always enabled for XVideo, even when it is not
defined. The color key is always disabled for XVideoBlend unless both
this option is defined and the ShadowFB option is enabled. The default
color key for XVideo is 0x0000ff00. For XVideo Blend, the color key is
disabled by default.
Entering Windows OS Options
The Windows Options Page allows you to enter Windows OS-specific options into the
configuration. When you click Windows Settings from the IEGD Package Page, the
following page appears.
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Figure 18.
Windows Options Page
The table below describes each field on this page.
Table 19.
Windows OS Setting Options
Windows OS Option
Description
Default Display Modes
The Default Display Modes section allows you select the default
resolution, color depth, and refresh rate for the configuration. If you do
not select a default display mode, the package uses the default display
mode for the operating system it is installed on.
Disable 3D Support
Specify whether to enable D3D. The default is to enable 3D support (not
checked).
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3.5.3
Generating a VBIOS Package
If you are creating a package for a VBIOS installation, click Next. The CED displays the
VBIOS Generation page.
Figure 19.
VBIOS Generation Page
To generate a VBIOS, click the Generate VBIOS check box and select the
configurations to include. After selecting the chipset and the configurations, click
Finish. The CED generates a package that includes both the OROM and the TSR for the
chipsets and the configurations you selected.
3.5.4
Entering EFI Options
If you are creating a package for a EFI installation, click Next. The CED displays the
EFI Generation page.
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Figure 20.
EFI Generation Page
To generate an EFI:
1. In the Fastboot and/or General modes sections, click the Generate EFI checkbox
2. Select the chipset and configuration(s) to include.
3. Click Finish.
The CED generates a package that includes the EFI driver for the modes, chipsets
and the configurations you selected.
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Figure 21.
EFI Generation Page
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3.6
Creating a New Customized DTD
The CED allows you to create Dynamic Timings Definitions (DTD) for EDID-less displays
or for displays for which you do not want to use the display's EDID settings.
You can create a new DTD by selecting the New DTD by clicking the New DTD link at
the top of the main CED window, or you can create DTDs for each configured port when
you create a new configuration. Please see “Creating a New Configuration” on page 29
for details on creating customized DTDs for specific configurations.
If you create a DTD from the Create New DTD link, the DTD is available for all
configurations. When you select New DTD from the main CED window, the following
IEGD DTD Page appears.
Figure 22.
IEGD DTD Page
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The table below describes each field on this page.
Table 20.
IEGD DTD Setting Options
DTD Parameter
Description
Enter DTD File Name
Enter a name for this customized DTD. This is a required field and the
name must be between 1 and 50 characters and may contain spaces and
underscores.
DTD Type
Select the DTD Type that most closely aligns with your display
parameters. Options are:
• IEGD Parameters
• VESA Parameters
• Hardware Parameters
• Simple Parameters
• Mode Line
• EDID Block
IEGD Parameters
The IEGD Parameters are the same as the current PCF/CED DTD
parameters.
VESA Parameters
The VESA Parameters allow the user to create a DTD from a VESA
monitor timing standard.
Hardware Parameters
The Hardware Parameters are the parameters that are used by IEGD.
Simple Parameters
The Simple Parameters (CVT Standard) is a process for computing
standard timing specifications. The method for developing Reduced
Blanking timings is not included.
Mode Line
The Mode Line is a video timing spec used by XFree86. The Xfree86
timing setting for Mode Line is “name” I A B C D E F G H. For example:
“[email protected]” 25.175 640 672 728 816 480 489 501 526.
EDID Block
The EDID Block is the detailed timing section (18 bytes) of the basic
128-byte EDID data structure. The detailed timing section starts at 36h
of the 128-byte EDID data structure. Enter the EDID block 1 byte at a
time. Example:
a0 0f 20 00 31 58 1c 20 d2 1a 14 00 f6 b8 00 00 00 18
Horizontal Sync Offset
Specifies the amount of time after a line of the active video ends and the
horizontal sync pulse starts (Horizontal Front Porch). Range 0-1023 [10
bits].
Horizontal Sync Pulse Width
Width of the Horizontal Sync Pulse (Sync Time) which synchronizes the
display and returns the beam to the left side of the display. Range 01023 [10 bits].
Horizontal Sync Start
This parameter specifies the start of the horizontal active time. Range 040957.
Horizontal Sync End
This parameter specifies the end of the horizontal active time. Range 049148.
Horizontal Blank Width
This parameter indicates the amount of time it takes to move the beam
from the right side of the display to the left side of the display (Blank
Time). During this time, the beam is shut off, or blanked. Range 0-4095
[12 bits].
Horizontal Blank Start
This parameter specifies the start of one line of the video and margin
period. Range 0-32766.
Horizontal Blank End
This parameter specifies the end of one line of the video and margin
period. Range 0-65533.
Horizontal Active
Number of pixels displayed on a horizontal line (Width). Range 0-4095
[12 bits].
Pixel Clock
Pixel clock value in KHz. Range 0-0x7fffffff
Refresh
Also known as the Vertical Refresh, the rate the full display updates.
Standard refresh rates are 50Hz, 60Hz, 75Hz, and 85Hz.
Vertical Sync Offset
Specifies the amount of time after last active line of video ends and
vertical sync pulse starts (Vertical Front Porch). Range 0-4095 [12 bits].
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Table 20.
IEGD DTD Setting Options
DTD Parameter
Description
Vertical Sync Pulse Width
Specifies the Width of the Vertical Sync Pulse which synchronizes the
display on the vertical axis and returns the beam to the top, left side of
the display. Range 0-63 [6 bits].
Vertical Sync Start
This parameter specifies the start of the vertical sync. Range 0-4157.
Vertical Sync End
This parameter specifies the start of the vertical sync. Range 0-4220.
Vertical Blank Width
The amount of time for the complete vertical blanking operation to
complete. It indicates the time it takes to move the beam from the
bottom right to the top, left side of the display (Blank Time). During this
time, the beam is shut off, or blanked. Range 0-4095 [12 bits].
Vertical Blank Start
This parameter specifies the start of display vertical blanking including
margin period. Range 0-4094.
Vertical Blank End
This parameter specifies the end of vertical blanking. Range 0-8189.
Vertical Active
The number of active lines displayed (Height). Range 0-4095 [12 bits].
This section allows you to set flags for Interlace, Vertical Sync Polarity,
Horizontal Sync Polarity, and Blank Sync Polarity. Each field in this
section is described below.
Interlaced Display:
• Check for Interlaced
• Unchecked for Non-interlaced
DTD Settings Flags
Vertical Sync Polarity:
• Active Low (Default)
• Active High
Horizontal Sync Polarity:
• Active Low (Default)
• Active High
Note:
3.6.1
These flags are IEGD-specific and do not correspond to VESA
3.0 flags.
DTD Example Specifications
The following table shows example product specifications that can be used in the timing
fields.
Table 21.
Timing Specification Example Values
Item
Frequency
Period
Clock
Hi-time
Low-time
DUTY ratio
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Symbol
Standard value
Unit
Min.
Typ.
Max.
1/ts
29.91
33.231
36.55
ts
27.36
30.06
33.43
ns
tsh
7
–
–
ns
MHz
tsl
7
–
–
ns
th/tl
35
50
65
ns
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Table 21.
Timing Specification Example Values (Continued)
Item
Data
H sync.
H display
Enable
V sync.
V display
Phase
difference
3.7
Symbol
Setup time
tds
Hold time
tdh
Period
tlpl, tlpd
Standard value
Min.
Typ.
Max.
7
–
–
Unit
ns
4
–
–
ns
24.51
31.75
32.05
us
880
1056
1088
clk
Pulse width
tlw
3
128
200
clk
Term
thd
800
800
800
clk
Setup time
tdrs
7
–
–
ns
Hold time
tdrh
4
–
–
ns
Period
tfpf, tfpd
520
525
680
Line
Pulse width
tfw
1
2
3
Line
Term
tvd
480
480
480
Line
Start
tfd
10
33
40
Line
H sync. ~
enable
tdrds
50
216
260
clk
H sync. ~
clock
tls
7
–
–
ns
H sync. ~V
sync.
tn
7
–
–
ns
Generating an Installation
After you have created a package, you can generate an installation for the package by
following this procedure.
1. Select a package from the Package folder located on the left pane of the CED main
window.
2. Click Generate Installation. While the installation is building, the CED displays a
progress bar. When the installation is complete, the CED places the output in the
Installation folder on the left pane of the CED window.
For each OS and VBIOS platform specified in the package, the CED generates a folder
in the ...\workspace\installation folder under the current folder. For example,
if you select a package that contains configurations for all supported operating systems
and the VBIOS, the CED generates the following folders, where X is the major version
and x is the minor version:
...\workspace\installation\<package name_installation>\IEGD_X_x_Linux
...\workspace\installation\<package name_installation>\IEGD_X_x_WINDOWS
...\workspace\installation\<package name_installation>\IEGD_X_x_WINCE50
...\workspace\installation\<package name_installation>\IEGD_X_x_WINCE60
...\workspace\installation\<package name_installation>\IEGD_X_x_VBIOS
...\workspace\installation\<package name_installation>\IEGD_X_x_EFI
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These folders contain all the subfolders required for the installation onto the target
systems. To complete the installations on the target systems, refer to the following
sections:
• “Installing and Configuring Linux OS Drivers” on page 147
• “Configuring and Installing Microsoft Windows Drivers” on page 103
• “Configuring and Building the IEGD for Microsoft Windows CE Systems” on
page 119
• “Entering Linux OS Options” on page 52
3.8
Configuring The System BIOS For Use With The IEGD
Some aspects of configuring the Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers are common across
the Video BIOS (VBIOS), EFI, and the drivers for the supported operating systems. The
following topics provide an overview for configuring both the VBIOS and the Intel
Embedded Graphics Drivers and describe in detail the common components and tools.
These topics also describe how to configure the system BIOS for the supported
systems.
• “System BIOS Settings”
• “VBIOS and Driver Configuration”
• “Display Detection and Initialization”
• “Advanced EDID Configuration”
• “Using an External PCI Graphics Adaptor as the Primary Device”
• “Enhanced Clone Mode Support”
3.9
System BIOS Settings
Before installing the Intel Embedded Graphics Drivers, you must first configure the
system BIOS. The following sections describe the required settings. These descriptions
are based on AMIBIOS8* from American Megatrends, Inc., which is the recommended
system BIOS to use with the Intel Embedded Graphics Drivers. Settings may vary if a
different system BIOS is used.
3.9.1
GMCH PCI Device Enabling
The PCI Device Enabling feature on the Graphics and Memory Controller Hub (GMCH)
should be set as specified in the table below.
Table 22.
GMCH Device 2, Function 1 BIOS Setting
Chipset
OS
Intel® Q35, Intel® GME965, Intel® Q965, Intel® 945GM, Intel® 945G,
Intel® 915GME, Intel® 915GV, Intel® 910GMLE
Microsoft Windows XP* and
Microsoft Windows XPe*
Disabled
Microsoft Windows CE*
Disabled
Linux
Disabled
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3.9.2
Graphics Mode Select (GMS)
The System BIOS typically allows a portion of physical memory to be dedicated to
firmware and graphics driver use. This dedicated memory is known as stolen memory
since it is not available to the operating system. The size of this memory is selectable
and chipset-specific. Stolen memory is typically used by the firmware and graphics
driver to locate the framebuffer, but can also be used as scratch and surface memory.
Because it is programmatically set aside during boot by the System BIOS, access to it
is direct and does not require OS memory allocation services. Firmware is fully
responsible for stolen memory management.
Graphics Mode Select (GMS), or stolen memory, can be set to any of the sizes listed in
the table below. Smaller sizes limit the framebuffer size during firmware boot. Larger
sizes marginally increase surface allocation performance for the graphics driver.
Table 23.
GMS Settings
Chipset
®
Intel Q35, Q965/
GME965
0, 1 Mbyte, 4 Mbytes, 8 Mbytes, 16 Mbytes, 32 Mbytes, 48 Mbytes, 64 Mbytes
Intel® 945G/
945GME/945GSE
0, 1 Mbyte, 8 Mbytes
Intel®
915GV/
915GME/910GMLE
3.9.3
GMS Settings
0, 1 Mbyte, 8 Mbytes
AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port) Aperture Size
The AGP Aperture size controls the total amount of graphics memory that can be
mapped in the AGP Aperture. This value can be set from 64 Mbytes up to 256 Mbytes,
depending on the chipset. Refer to specific chipset details for information on the valid
range.
3.10
VBIOS and Driver Configuration
The Intel Embedded Graphics Suite allows user configuration of both the VBIOS and
graphics driver as well as programming of Detailed Timing Descriptors (DTDs) for
EDID-less panels for both the VBIOS and graphics driver. This is accomplished using
CED, which offers several ways to input DTDs, each associated with a potential target
panel and display mode for the system. CED generates DTD and configuration settings
used by the IEGD VBIOS, Linux, and/or Windows drivers.
The following example is for a 945GME system setup with just an internal LVDS and
sample timing parameters for illustration purposes only. You can use this example to
set up DTD timings that are specific to your non-standard panels and then activate the
panels using a custom mode.
To create a custom DTD setting:
1. From the CED main screen, select New DTD.
2. Enter a name for the DTD in the text box provided, for example, test_LVDS.
3. Using the data sheet from the panel being used, enter the DTD timings in the
appropriate fields.
The screen will be similar to the example below.
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Figure 23.
IEGD DTD Page
4. Click Finish.
The custom DTD is complete.
To create a configuration and configure the LVDS options:
1. From the CED main screen, select New Configuration.
2. Enter a name for the configuration in the text box provided, for example,
LVDS_test.
3. Select the platform chipset. This example uses the 945GME chipset.
4. In the list of available ports, select LVDS and then click Next.
5. On the LVDS Configuration Page, clear the checkboxes for Use EDID Display if
available and Use driver built-in standard timings.
6. Select the checkbox for Use user-defined DTDs.
7. In the Encoder Configuration section, select Internal LVDS.
8. In the Custom Display Timing Descriptors (DTDs) list, select the DTD you created in
the previous section, for example, test_LVDS.
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The screen will be similar to the example below.
Figure 24.
LVDS Configuration Page
9. Click Next.
10. (Optional) Configure Fastboot options as described in “Configuring Fastboot” on
page 43.
11. Click Next.
To set the custom mode:
1. From the IEGD Configuration Editor screen, in the Primary Display Mode section,
clear the Use Default checkbox.
2. In the Primary Non-standard Modes section, select the checkbox for Custom.
3. In the Primary Non-standard Modes section, enter 0x120 in the Default Mode
Settings text box. (See a description of the custom modes.)
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The screen will be similar to the example below.
Figure 25.
IEGD Configuration Editor Page
Custom Modes
The custom modes begin with 0x120 (0x121 and 0x122 are the same modes in
different pixel formats). If there was a second custom mode entered it would begin
with 0x123 to 0x125.
From the above DTD 200x200 example, this is what the custom modes represent:
0x120 [email protected]
0x121 [email protected]
0x122 [email protected]
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And if the second custom mode was a 400x400 panel, its custom modes would be:
0x123 [email protected]
0x124 [email protected]
0x125 [email protected]
3.11
Configuration Options
The table below describes available IEGD settings. The gray rows are block headings
and the non-gray rows that follow each heading are settings within the block. Some of
these block headings are contained within prior block headings.
Table 24.
Parameter Configuration Format (Sheet 1 of 7)
Name
Range/Value
Description
configid
Integer (1-15)
Optional keyword used to specify which
configuration is used. The config ID specified
here must match one of the configuration IDs
defined with CED. If this keyword is omitted, all
configurations specified in the config file are
used.
Note that this keyword is not required for Linux
OS and VBIOS configurations.
config
Integer (1-15)
More than one configuration is valid.
comment
A quoted string used to identify the origin of the
.bin or .inf file.
name
A quoted string used to identify the
configuration name.
Name is a required field for VBIOS
configuration.
general
displayconfig
Settings that are generic to the configuration.
1
2
4
8
–
–
–
–
Single
Clone
Twin
Extended
Default: 8
displaydetect
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0 - Disable
1 - Enable
Used to configure initial state of attached
displays.
1 – Single. A single display.
2 – Clone. Primary and secondary displays
enabled and configured with separate timing
pipes. This allows different timings to be applied
to each display. Resolutions can be different on
both displays.
4 – Twin. Primary and secondary displays are
enabled, but with only a single pipe. Both
displays share the same resolutions and
timings.
8 – Extended. Configures separate pipes to
allow primary and secondary displays to have
different resolutions and display different
content. Upon first boot after the driver
installation, this option will enable only the
primary display, as the extended modes must
be enabled in the operating system (i.e.,
Extended Desktop in the Display Properties
sheet within Microsoft Windows).
Enable or disable Display Detection. Note that
this parameter must be Enabled in order to use
COMMON_TO_PORT values.
Default is 0. Please see Section 3.12, “Display
Detection and Initialization” on page 74 for
detailed information on this parameter.
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Table 24.
Parameter Configuration Format (Sheet 2 of 7)
Name
Range/Value
PortOrder must be specified as a
quoted string containing five digits.
The valid values are:
PortOrder
clonewidth
cloneheight
clonerefresh = 60
1 - Integrated TV Encoder (mobile
chipsets only)
2 - sDVO B port
3 - sDVO C port
4 - Integrated LVDS port (mobile
chipsets only)
5 - Analog CRT port
6 - Internal HDMI
Default: 0 for all keys
Typical sizes:
clonewidth – 800, cloneheight - 600
clonewidth – 1024, cloneheight - 768
clonewidth – 1280, cloneheight - 768
clonewidth – 1400, cloneheight –
1050
Typical refresh rates (expressed in
Hz):
Description
Search order for detecting attached displays for
the Display Detection feature. When Display
Detection is enabled, the PortOrder determines
which display is primary and which display is
secondary.
The port search order can be specified to ensure
the port device (sDVO device) is found, based
on the system integrator’s routing choices.
Default ordering is chosen by specifying zeros in
the PortOrder keys.
Default ordering is chipset specific; see
Table 48, “Default Search Order” on page 203.
Please see Section 3.12, “Display Detection and
Initialization” on page 74 for more information
on using PortOrder in combination with the
Display Detect feature.
Width and height for a cloned display.
Refresh rate for a cloned display.
60 Hz, 75 Hz, 85 Hz
OverlayOff
0 - Overlay on (default)
1 - Overlay off
This parameter allows you disable Overlay
support, which is enabled by default.
Note: This parameter is only for Microsoft
Windows* and Microsoft Windows CE. The
Linux* OS configuration for the XF86Config
provides a standard option that performs the
same function.
No_DFB
0 - Off (Default)
1 - On
This parameter enables the IEGD to pass the
DIB call back to the OS. This is required in
certain circumstances to improve performance.
vbios
This block contains settings for the new Video
BIOS. Note that you only need to specify the
parameters you are actually using. You do not
need to specify all the parameters in this block.
If you omit any parameters, the vbios uses the
default values.
COMMON_TO_PORT
Maps the ports from the system BIOS to a port
number used by the graphics hardware. Please
see Section 4.3.2, “Configuring the Video BIOS”
on page 93 for more information on this
parameter. Note that the displaydetect
parameter must be set to Enabled in order for
the COMMON_TO_PORT values to be used.
The default is all zeroes: 000000
6 digit value
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Table 24.
Parameter Configuration Format (Sheet 3 of 7)
Name
Range/Value
Description
Enables or disables the POST (Power On Self
Test) message. When you specify a value
greater than 0, the message is displayed for the
specified number of seconds. For example:
post_display_msg
0 - disable
greater than 0 - enable and display
POST message for the specified
number of seconds
post_display_msg = 5
This enables the POST message and displays it
for approximately 5 seconds. The maximum
value that can be entered here is 65535.
The default is 1, enable and display the POST
message for approximately 1 second.
oem_string
oem_vendor
oem_product_name
oem_product_rev
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double-quoted string
This string appears on the display when the
post_display_msg is enabled and the VBIOS
starts up. The maximum string length is 100
characters.
The default is " " (two double quotes with a
single space in between).
double-quoted string
This string appears on the display when the
post_display_msg is enabled and the VBIOS
starts up. The maximum string length is 80
characters.
The default is " " (two double quotes with a
single space in between).
double-quoted string
This string appears on the display when the
post_display_msg is enabled and the VBIOS
starts up. The maximum string length is 80
characters.
The default is " " (two double quotes with a
single space in between).
double-quoted string
This string appears on the display when the
post_display_msg is enabled and the VBIOS
starts up. The maximum string length is 80
characters.
The default is " " (two double quotes with a
single space in between).
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Table 24.
Parameter Configuration Format (Sheet 4 of 7)
Name
Range/Value
Description
This parameter allows you to enable or disable
the five System BIOS 15h interrupt hooks. The
value must be 5 digits in length. Each digit is
associated with one of the five System BIOS
interrupt 15h hooks as shown below (left to
right)
1 - 5F31h, POST Completion Notification Hook
2 - 5F33h, Hook After Mode Set
3 - 5F35h, Boot Display Device Hook
4 - 5F36h, Boot TV Format Hook
5 - 5F38h, Hook Before Set Mode
int15
5 digits
(Please see Appendix C for more information on
5F functions.)
The value of each digit must be a 0 or a 1 as
follows:
0 - disable a System BIOS 15h hook
1 - enable a System BIOS 15h hook
For example,
int15 = 11001
Enables 5F31h, 5F33h, and 5F38h hooks only.
The 5F35h and 5F36h hooks are disabled.
The default is 11111, enable all five hooks.
port
1 - Integrated TV Encoder (mobile
chipsets only)
2 -sDVO B port
3 - sDVO C port
4 - Integrated LVDS port (mobile
chipsets only)
5 - Analog CRT port
name
Used to define port specific settings.
A quoted string used to identify the port.
general
Settings that are generic to the port.
Windows* OS Range:
0x0 or 0 – 0 degrees
0x5A or 90 – 90 degrees
0xB4 or 180 – 180 degrees
0x10E or 270 – 270 degrees
rotation
Linux OS Range:
0 – 0 degrees
90 – 90 degrees
180 – 180 degrees
270 – 270 degrees
Rotation of the display.
Default: 0
Windows OS:
0x0 or 0 – turn off horizontal flip
0x1 or 1 – turn on horizontal flip
Default: 0
flip
Flip of the display.
Linux OS Boolean:
on - horizontal flip
off - no horizontal flip
Default: off
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Table 24.
Parameter Configuration Format (Sheet 5 of 7)
Name
Range/Value
Description
centeroff
Default: 0 – disabled, allow centering
and add compatibility modes
1 – enabled, no centering, no added
compatibility modes
When this option is enabled it DISABLES
centering. Also, depending on the combination
of “edid” + “user-dtd” + connected hardware,
IEGD will add missing compatibility modes (6x4,
8x6, 10x7& 12x10) via centering. Use this
option to disable this feature.
edid
0 – Do not read EDID from panel/CRT
1 – Attempt to extract EDID timing
data from panel/CRT
If VBIOS/Driver reads EDID from panel/CRT.
edid_avail
edid_not_avail
Range [16 bits]
Valid values (specified in hex):
bit 0
-----------0 - Do not use driver built-in
standard timings
1 - Use driver built-in standard
timings
bit 1 (not applicable to
edid_not_avail)
-----------0 - Do not use EDID block
1 - Use EDID block and filter
modes
bit 2
-----------0 - Do not use user-defined DTDs
1 - Use user-defined DTDs
bit3 - bit15
-----------Reserved for future use.
multidvo
0 – Do not attempt to detect a
second decoder of same type
1 – After detect of a decoder,
continue to attempt detection of
same type of decoder until fail
dvo
These two parameters are used to control the
available timings for any display. edid_avail
is used when EDID values are read from the
display. If an attempt to read EDID from the
display fails or the edid parameter is set to 0,
then the driver uses the edid_not_avail
flags.
The value for both parameters must be specified
as a hex value.
Defaults:
edid_avail: 3 (hex). Bit 0 = 1, Bit 1 = 1, Bit 2
=0 (Use driver built-in standard timings and
EDID block and filter modes.)
edid_not_avail: 1 (hex). Bit 0 = 1, Bit 1 = 0, Bit
2 = 0. (Use driver-built-in standard timings.)
Please see Section 3.13, “Advanced EDID
Configuration” on page 76 for detailed
information.
If VBIOS/Driver detects a second decoder of
same type.
This value is hard-coded to “1” for Windows
configuration and will ignore this setting.
sDVO device information.
i2cpin
<0-6>
The GPIO pin pair used on the I2C bus to read
and write to sDVO device registers.
ddcpin
<0-6>
The GPIO pin pair used as DDC bus to read
panel EDID data.
i2cdab
<0x00-0xff>
I2C device address for reading and writing
device registers.
The device address should be in 8-bit format
with the 7-bit slave address assigned to its bits
7:1 and bit 0 set to 0.
ddcdab
<0x00-0xff>
I2C device address for reading EDID data from
display through the DDC bus.
i2cspeed
[10-400]. Units in KHz
Speed of I2C bus for sDVO device.
ddcspeed
[10-400]. Units in KHz
Speed of I2C bus for EDID device.
fpinfo
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Panel-specific information.
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Table 24.
Parameter Configuration Format (Sheet 6 of 7)
Name
bkltmethod
Range/Value
Range [0-3]
0 – no backlight
1 – Port Driver
2 – GMCH
3 – ICH
Note:
The only supported
parameter for internal LVDS
is 1 – Port Driver
bkltt3
Instructs which backlight method is required for
the panel attached to the given port.
If zero is supplied, or the key is not present,
then no backlight control is provided.
(T1) Time delay between VDD active, and sDVO
clock/data active. Zero indicates no delay
required.
bkltt1
bkltt2
Description
Range [0 -0xfff].
Units of 0.1ms => the limit specified
in your hardware specifications. For
example, the maximum for the
CH7307 is 409 ms.
(T2) Time delay between sDVO clock/data
active and Backlight enable.
(T3) Time delay between Backlight disable and
sDVO clock/data inactive.
bkltt4
(T4) Time delay between sDVO clock/data
inactive and VDD inactive.
bkltt5
(T5) Minimum delay between VDD inactive, and
active.
gpiopinvee
Valid ICH GPIO pin, 0 indexed
GPIO connection for panel power.
gpiopinvdd
For example:
gpiopinvdd = 3
gpiopinvee = 5
gpiopinenable = 1
GPIO connection for backlight power on/off
sequencing signal.
gpiopinbklt
GPIO to enable backlight signal.
UseGMCHClockPin
1 - Flat panel is connected to the
clock pin
0 - Flat panel is not connected to the
clock pin
This entry is needed when GMCH is selected as
backlight control method.
UseGMCHDataPin
1 - Flat panel is connected to the
data pin
0 - Flat panel is not connected to the
data pin
This entry is needed when GMCH is selected as
backlight control method.
Denotes a Detailed Timing Descriptor (DTD)
block. Settings in this section, except for the
flags parameter, correspond to the Detailed
Timing Block described in the VESA standard
"Extended Display Identification Data
Standard", Version 3, November 13, 1997.
dtd
p_clock
Range [0-0x7fffffff]
Pixel clock value in KHz.
h_active
Range 0-4096 [12 bits]
Horizontal Active.
v_active
Range 0-4096 [12 bits]
Vertical Active.
h_sync
Range 0-1024 [10 bits]
Horizontal Sync Offset.
v_sync
Range 0-64 [6 bits]
Vertical Sync Offset.
h_syncp
Range 0-1024 [10 bits]
Horizontal Sync Pulse Offset.
v_syncp
Range 0-64 [6 bits]
Vertical Sync Pulse Width.
h_blank
Range 0-4096 [12 bits]
Horizontal Blanking.
v_blank
Range 0-4096 [12 bits]
Vertical Blanking.
h_border
Range 0-256 [8 bits]
Horizontal Border. Currently not supported.
v_border
Range 0-256 [8 bits]
Vertical Border. Currently not supported.
h_size
Range 0-4096 [12 bits]
Horizontal Size. Currently not supported.
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Table 24.
Parameter Configuration Format (Sheet 7 of 7)
Name
v_size
Range/Value
Description
Range0-4096 [12 bits]
Vertical size. Currently not supported.
Range [32 bits]
Valid values:
bit 31
-----------0 - Non-interlaced
1 - Interlaced
low
bit 27
-----------0 - vertical sync polarity active
1 - vertical sync polarity active
high
flags
low
bit 26
-----------0 - horizontal sync polarity active
1 - horizontal sync polarity active
high
Interlace, Horizontal polarity, Vertical polarity,
Sync Configuration, etc. Note that these flags
are IEGD specific and do not correspond to
VESA 3.0 flags. For example, to set Interlaced
with Horizontal Sync Polarity high (bits 31 and
26), then the flags value = 0x84000000.
(Binary =
10000100000000000000000000000000)
bit 25
-----------0 - blank sync polarity active high
1 - blank sync polarity active low
bit 17
-----------0 - Normal DTD
1 - Panel/display Native DTD
All other bits
----------------Do not use any other bits; all other
bits must be set to 0.
attr
0-0xFFFF
Attribute values that are specific to the sDVO
device for the port. See Appendix B, “Port Driver
Attributes” for specific attribute IDs and
associated values.
id = <value>.
id <Attribute ID>
0 - 232
Both the Attribute ID and its value should be
specified in decimal. For example, to set
brightness to 50, you specify
id 0 = 50
See Appendix B, “Port Driver Attributes”.
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3.12
Display Detection and Initialization
The Display Detection and Initialization feature, when enabled, automatically detects
displays and allocates ports without the need to change any configuration files. This
feature is off by default and can be enabled either through CED or by directly editing
the iegd.inf file for Microsoft Windows or the XF86Config/xorg.conf file for the
Linux OS.
To enable the feature via CED, select the DisplayDetect option on the CED Chipset
Configuration page. Please see Section 3.4, “Creating a New Configuration” on
page 29.
Alternatively, you can enable the feature in Microsoft Windows by entering the following
line in the [iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings] section of the iegd.inf file:
HKR, All\<ConfigID>\General, DisplayDetect, %REG_DWORD%, 1
where <ConfigID> is the configuration ID (without the angle brackets).
To enable the feature in the Linux OS, enter the following line Option setting in the
XF86.conf or xorg.conf file:
Option “Config/<ConfigID>/General/DisplayDetect” “1”
When the display detection feature is enabled, ports are allocated only when the
display satisfies the following conditions:
1. The port is not in use (that is, it is not already allocated).
2. The display is detected by the port driver.
The first port that passes these conditions is allocated. If condition 2 fails for all ports,
then the first port in the PortOrder setting that passes condition 1 is allocated. If the
port is not detectable (specifically the internal LVDS or external LVDS using CH7308),
the driver assumes the display is connected. Condition number 2. always passes for
these displays.
When this feature is disabled, display allocation is done based on PortOrder and no
display detection is performed.
See also:
• “Display Detect Operation”
• “Detectable Displays”
3.12.1
Display Detect Operation
This section describes the logic of the Display Detection feature and provides several
examples.
1. If Display Detect is disabled, the driver uses the first two ports identified in the
PortOrder.
2. If Display Detect is enabled and you are using the 9.0 version of the VBIOS, the
VBIOS performs the display detection. The driver then checks to see if the VBIOS
returns the display allocations and if it does, the driver does not re-execute the
display detection steps.
If you are not using the 9.0 Legacy VBIOS, then the driver performs display
discovery as described in the following steps.
3. The number of displays to be detected is based on the DisplayConfig settings in
the configuration. If this is set to Single, then only one display is detected. If it is
set to any other value, a maximum of two displays will be detected.
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4. The IEGD goes through each port in the PortOrder settings and attempts to
detect a display using the following algorithm:
a.
If a display is detected, it is based on the PortOrder sequence. Display allocation
of the port is performed once the display has been detected. For example:
PortOrder = “53240” (CRT, sDVO, LVDS)
Displays Connected = CRT
Primary display allocation: Searches for a display connected according to
the PortOrder sequence. The first detected display is a CRT, so the Primary
display is CRT.
Secondary display allocation: Searches for a display connected according to
the PortOrder sequence. The first detected and non-allocated display is sDVO,
so the Secondary display is sDVO.
b.
If no display is detected on any of the ports, then the DisplayDetect option is
turned off and ports are allocated in the order defined by PortOrder. For
example:
PortOrder = “32000”
Displays Connected = None
Primary display allocation: Searches for a connected display according to
the PortOrder. Because no displays are detected, the Primary display is set to
sDVO-C.
c.
The driver cannot detect the presence of a display connected to the Internal
LVDS and external LVDS displays connected to some sDVO devices (for
example, an LVDS connected to the CH7308). Consequently, the driver assumes
that an LVDS display is connected if it is in the PortOrder. If you only want to use
the internal LVDS when no CRT and devices are connected, then put LVDS in the
PortOrder after them. For example:
PortOrder = “53240” (CRT, LVDS)
Display Connected = None
Primary display allocation: Searches for a display connected according to
PortOrder sequence. Since no display is connected and since LVDS is specified
in the PortOrder, the driver assumes that an LVDS display is connected.
Consequently, the Primary display is set to LVDS.
d.
Because the driver cannot detect the presence of a display connected to the
Internal LVDS and certain external LVDS displays, it therefore always assumes
that they are connected if they are listed in the PortOrder. Be careful not to set
the PortOrder that prevents the driver from detecting a connected display. For
example:
PortOrder = “54320” (CRT, LVDS sDVO)
Displays Connected = CRT
Primary display allocation: Searches for a connected display according to
the PortOrder. In this case, the Primary display is set to CRT.
Secondary display allocation: Searches for a connected display according to
the PortOrder. Even though sDVO is connected, the driver assumes that the
internal LVDS is also connected. Consequently, the driver never detects the
display connected to the sDVO port. To change this, move sDVO-C before LVDS
in the PortOrder (“53420” rather than “54320”).
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e.
3.12.2
If the port drivers are not loaded for any of the ports specified in the PortOrder,
the driver enables port 5 (CRT) only. For example:
PortOrder = “32000” (sDVO)
PortDrivers = “” (None)
Primary display allocation: Searches for displays connected according to the
PortOrder. Since no port drivers are available for the specified ports, CRT port 5
is enabled. Consequently, the Primary display is set to CRT.
Detectable Displays
The table below provides a list of displays that are detectable by the IEGD.
Table 25.
Detectable Displays
Transmitter
Display Type
Detectable by IEGD?
VGA
Yes
GMCH Analog CRT
GMCH Integrated LVDS
LVDS
No (assumed attached)
TV Out
N/A
CH7021
VGA Bypass
TBD
CH7307
DVI
Yes
CH7308
LVDS
No (assumed attached)
CH7315
HDMI/DVI
TBD
CH7317
VGA Bypass
TBD
CH7319
DVI
Yes
CH7320
DVI
Yes
SiI 1362
DVI
Yes
SiI 1364
DVI
Yes
GMCH Integrated TV Out
3.13
Advanced EDID Configuration
Shown in the following EDID Options example, the If EDID Device (edid_avail) and
If Not EDID Device (edid_not_avail) options in CED are found on the CRT, sDVO,
LVDS, and TV Out configuration pages.
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These options control the available timings for any display. The edid_avail
parameter is used when EDID information is read from the display. If the driver is
unable to read EDID information from the display or if the edid parameter is set to “0”
(disable), then the settings of the edid_not_avail parameter are used.
The default behavior of edid_avail is to use the driver’s built-in standard timings and
EDID block and filter modes. The default for edid_not_avail is to use the driver’s
built-in standard timings. Please see Table 24 for more information on these
parameters.
The IEGD supports three different types of EDID display modes:
1. Built-in display modes. These modes are hard-coded in the IEGD. These modes
can be filtered based on the EDID block.
2. EDID-DTDs: These are Detailed Timing Descriptors read from the EDID block.
EDID can have these DTDs along with other information about the display.
3. User-specified DTDs defined in CED. See Section 3.13.2.
The Advanced EDID Configuration supports different possible combinations of display
modes when an EDID display is present along with user-specified DTDs.
3.13.1
Sample Advanced EDID Configurations
The table below presents various EDID configurations and the EDID settings in CED
used for those configurations.
Table 26.
Sample Advanced EDID Configurations (Sheet 1 of 2)
Configurations
1. Use only filtered built-in and any EDID-DTDs
when the display has EDID information
2. Use all built-in modes when the display
doesn’t contain EDID information
1. Use only filtered built-in modes and EDIDDTDs when the display has EDID.
2. Use only user-DTDs otherwise.
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Description
edid = 1
edid_avail = 3
edid_not_avail = 1
Default values.
edid = 1
edid_avail = 3
edid_not_avail = 4
This configuration allows the
IEGD to use its built-in display
modes and the modes
provided by the display.
If the IEGD is unable to read
EDID information from the
display, then the IEGD uses
the user-DTDs defined in CED.
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Table 26.
Sample Advanced EDID Configurations (Sheet 2 of 2)
Configurations
1. Use only user-DTDs regardless of connected
display. (Typically used for a custom panel that
only supports user-defined DTDs.)
2. Use limited set of timings when a panel EDID
is present, but the IEGD cannot read the EDID
information.
1. Use EDID-DTDs for an EDID display.
2. Use user-DTDs for a non-EDID display.
1. Use only EDID-DTDs and user-DTDs for an
EDID display.
2. Use user-DTDs only for a non-EDID display.
3.13.2
CED Settings
Description
edid = 0
edid_avail = (any value)
edid_not_avail = 4
Only user-DTDs defined in CED
are used.
edid = 1
edid_avail = 2
edid_not_avail = 4
This configuration uses the
EDID-DTDs when an EDID
display is detected and EDID
information is read from the
display.
If the driver detects a nonEDID display, then the IEGD
uses user-DTDs defined in
CED.
edid = 1
edid_avail = 6
edid_not_avail = 4
This configuration uses both
EDID-DTDs and user-DTDs
when the IEGD detects an
EDID display.
If the driver detects a nonEDID display, then the IEGD
uses user-DTDs defined in
CED.
User-Specified DTDs
CED provides the ability to input DTD data directly. There are numerous sources of DTD
data: VESA, panel manufacturers, etc. The figure below shows an example DTD Editor
page, and the table below presents DTD parameter descriptions.
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Figure 26.
IEGD DTD Editor
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Table 27.
DTD Parameter Descriptions
Parameter
Description
Enter DTD File Name
Enter a name for this customized DTD. This is a required field and the
name must be between 1 and 50 characters and may contain spaces and
underscores.
DTD Type
Select the DTD Type that most closely aligns with your display
parameters. Options are:
• IEGD Parameters
• VESA Parameters
• Hardware Parameters
• Simple Parameters
• Mode Line
• EDID Block
IEGD Parameters
The IEGD Parameters are the same as the current PCF/CED DTD
parameters.
VESA Parameters
The VESA Parameters allow the user to create a DTD from a VESA
monitor timing standard.
Hardware Parameters
The Hardware Parameters are the parameters that are used by IEGD.
Simple Parameters
The Simple Parameters (CVT Standard) is a process for computing
standard timing specifications. The method for developing Reduced
Blanking timings is not included.
Mode Line
The Mode Line is a video timing spec used by XFree86. The Xfree86
timing setting for Mode Line is “name” I A B C D E F G H. For example:
“[email protected]” 25.175 640 672 728 816 480 489 501 526.
EDID Block
The EDID Block is the detailed timing section (18 bytes) of the basic
128-byte EDID data structure. The detailed timing section starts at 36h
of the 128-byte EDID data structure. Enter the EDID block 1 byte at a
time. Example:
a0 0f 20 00 31 58 1c 20 d2 1a 14 00 f6 b8 00 00 00 18
Horizontal Sync Offset
Specifies the amount of time after a line of the active video ends and the
horizontal sync pulse starts (Horizontal Front Porch). Range 0-1023 [10
bits].
Horizontal Sync Pulse Width
Width of the Horizontal Sync Pulse (Sync Time) which synchronizes the
display and returns the beam to the left side of the display. Range 01023 [10 bits].
Horizontal Sync Start
This parameter specifies the start of the horizontal active time. Range 040957.
Horizontal Sync End
This parameter specifies the end of the horizontal active time. Range 049148.
Horizontal Blank Width
This parameter indicates the amount of time it takes to move the beam
from the right side of the display to the left side of the display (Blank
Time). During this time, the beam is shut off, or blanked. Range 0-4095
[12 bits].
Horizontal Blank Start
This parameter specifies the start of one line of the video and margin
period. Range 0-32766.
Horizontal Blank End
This parameter specifies the end of one line of the video and margin
period. Range 0-65533.
Horizontal Active
Number of pixels displayed on a horizontal line (Width).
[12 bits].
Pixel Clock
Pixel clock value in KHz. Range 0-0x7fffffff
Refresh
Also known as the Vertical Refresh, the rate the full display updates.
Standard refresh rates are 50Hz, 60Hz, 75Hz, and 85Hz.
Vertical Sync Offset
Specifies the amount of time after last active line of video ends and
vertical sync pulse starts (Vertical Front Porch). Range 0-4095 [12 bits].
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Table 27.
DTD Parameter Descriptions (Continued)
Parameter
Description
Vertical Sync Pulse Width
Specifies the Width of the Vertical Sync Pulse which synchronizes the
display on the vertical axis and returns the beam to the top, left side of
the display. Range 0-63 [6 bits].
Vertical Sync Start
This parameter specifies the start of the vertical sync. Range 0-4157.
Vertical Sync End
This parameter specifies the end of the vertical sync. Range 0-4220.
Vertical Blank Width
The amount of time for the complete vertical blanking operation to
complete. It indicates the time it takes to move the beam from the
bottom right to the top, left side of the display (Blank Time). During this
time, the beam is shut off, or blanked. Range 0-4095 [12 bits].
Vertical Blank Start
This parameter specifies the start of display vertical blanking including
margin period. Range 0-4094.
Vertical Blank End
This parameter specifies the end of vertical blanking. Range 0-8189.
Vertical Active
DTD Settings Flags
The number of active lines displayed (Height). Range 0-4095 [12 bits].
This section allows you to set flags for Interlace, Vertical Sync Polarity,
Horizontal Sync Polarity, and Blank Sync Polarity. Each field in this
section is described below.
Interlaced Display:
Check for Interlaced
Unchecked for Non-interlaced
Vertical Sync Polarity:
Active Low (Default)
Active High
Horizontal Sync Polarity:
Active Low (Default)
Active High
Note:
3.14
These flags are IEGD-specific and do not correspond to VESA
3.0 flags.
Using an External PCI Graphics Adaptor as the Primary Device
The IEGD can be configured to work with an external PCI graphics adaptor card as the
primary graphics adaptor device with the Intel internal graphics device (GMCH) as the
secondary graphics device. You can configure your system to boot with a PCI graphics
adaptor in the System BIOS. When an external PCI graphics adaptor is designated as
the primary graphics adaptor, the Intel GMCH becomes the secondary graphics device.
Note:
The term secondary adaptor refers to the adaptor that is not the boot-up, or VGACompatible, adaptor. The secondary adaptor is not necessarily the secondary display as
assigned by the OS.
You can configure an external PCI card to work with the IEGD as follows:
• The external PCI card as the primary graphics adaptor and the GMCH internal
graphics device as the secondary.
• The external PCI card as the secondary graphics adaptor and the GMCH internal
graphics device as the primary.
Note:
This feature is not supported on Microsoft Windows CE systems.
The IEGD allows you to specify which display is primary, secondary, and tertiary. It
allows Twin and Clone configurations on the internal graphics device when the external
PCI display is the primary graphics adaptor. It also allows Twin and Clone configurations
on the internal graphics device when the external PCI device is the secondary graphics
adaptor.
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An external PCI graphics driver runs independently without sharing resources with the
IEGD.
The following figures show several configurations when an external PCI adaptor is the
primary graphics device and when it is the secondary graphics device.
The figure below shows an External PCI card as the primary graphics adaptor card and
the IEGD driver as the secondary. The drivers do not share hardware resources. The OS
decides the framebuffer content and handles that by drawing to the respective driver
independently.
Figure 27.
External PCI Graphics Card as Primary Driver and IEGD as Secondary Driver
The figure below shows the interaction between the IEGD driver and the External VGA
driver when the IEGD is booted as the primary driver. Again, the drivers do not share
hardware resources. The OS decides the framebuffer content and handles it by drawing
to the respective driver independently.
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Figure 28.
IEGD as Primary Driver and External PCI Graphics Card as Secondary Driver
The figure below shows a sample configuration where the internal graphics device is
primary and configured to use two ports to drive two displays while an external PCI
graphics adaptor is used to drive a tertiary display. Note that regardless of the number
of ports being assigned to a driver, the external PCI graphics run independently without
sharing resources with the IEGD driver.
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Figure 29.
IEGD as Primary Driver With Two Displays and External PCI Driving a Tertiary
Display
3.15
Enhanced Clone Mode Support
The Enhanced Clone Mode feature allows you to specify a clone display size that is
different from the primary display. It also allows you to change the clone display size at
runtime using the IEGD Runtime GUI (see Section 5.5, “Viewing and Changing the
Driver Configuration from Microsoft Windows” on page 112 or Section 7.8, “Using the
IEGD Runtime Configuration GUI on Linux Systems” on page 179 for Linux systems).
In Clone mode, the framebuffer is always allocated to match primary display size. On
the clone display (secondary display) the image is centered if the display is bigger than
the framebuffer. Centering is done only if the requested resolution and refresh rate is
not available for the clone display.
Extended Clone mode is implemented through the use of four CED parameters:
• Clone Width — allows you to specify a width for the clone display
• Clone Height — allows you to specify a height for the clone display
• Clone Refresh — allows you to specify a refresh rate for the clone display
• Enable interlace mode — allows you to use interlace mode for the clone display
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3.15.1
Extended Clone Mode CED Configuration
The following CED screenshot shows a sample Extended Clone mode setting
configuration.
See also “Sample Clone Mode Configurations”.
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3.15.2
Sample Clone Mode Configurations
The following examples illustrate Clone Mode configurations for the following
combinations:
• CRT + integrated LVDS (Example 1 on page 86)
• CRT + Fixed size DVI display (Example 2 on page 86)
Example 1.
Mobile Intel® GM45 Express Chipset, Internal LVDS, CRT, and LVDS
This example shows how to set up a clone mode configuration consisting of an internal
LVDS, CRT, and external LVDS device.
1. Choose a CRT that supports resolutions larger than 1024x768 and configure the
following settings on the Chipset Configuration Page:
— Platform Chipset = Mobile Intel® GM45 Express Chipset
— Display Configuration Mode = Clone
— Clone Width = 1024
— Clone Height = 768
— Clone Refresh = 60
— Port Order = CRT, LVDS
2. Click Next on the Chipset Configuration Page and provide port names for the CRT,
LVDS, and sDVO-B port devices.
3. On the LVDS Port Configuration Page, click the Flat Panel Settings button and set
the Width and Height to 1024 and 768 respectively.
4. Package and generate an installation for the configuration and move the resulting
iegd.inf file to the target machine. (Please see “Creating a New Package” on
page 50 for specific instructions.)
After you have moved the iegd.inf file to the target machine, do the following:
1. Set 800x600 on CRT and ensure that an 800x600 image appears at the top, left
corner of the LVDS display or that the image has been scaled to match the panel
size based on panel used.
2. Set 1280x1024 on CRT and check that the LVDS display is panning. Ensure that the
clone mouse pointer is in sync with the primary display.
Example 2.
Intel® 915GV, Chrontel 7307, CRT, and DVI
This sample shows how to set up a clone mode configuration consisting of a CRT and
DVI display on a Chrontel* 7307 serial sDVO transmitter.
1. Choose a CRT that supports resolutions larger than 1024x768 and configure the
following settings on the Chipset Configuration Page:
— Platform Chipset = Intel® 915GV
— Display Configuration Mode = Clone
— Clone Width = 1024
— Clone Height = 768
— Clone Refresh = 60
— Port Order = CRT, sDVO-B
2. Click Next on the Chipset Configuration Page and provide port names for the CRT
and sDVO-B port devices.
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3. On the sDVO-B Port Configuration Page, click the Flat Panel Settings button and
set the Width and Height to 1024 and 768 respectively. Select CH7307 from the
Select sDVO Device list.
4. Package and generate an installation for the configuration and move the resulting
iegd.inf file to the target machine. (Please see “Creating a New Package” on
page 50 for specific instructions.)
After you have moved the iegd.inf file to the target machine, do the following:
1. Set 800x600 on CRT and ensure that an 800x600 image appears at the top, left
corner of the DVI display or that the image has been scaled to match the panel size
based on panel used.
2. Set 1280x1024 on CRT and check that the DVI display is in panning mode. Ensure
that the clone mouse pointer is in sync with the primary display.
3.16
Scaling and Centering Configurations
This release supports the following scaling and centering configurations:
• Upscaling for the Chrontel CH7308 LVDS Transmitters
• Internal LVDS Scaling With EDID Panels
• Alignment in Clone mode
• sDVO as Primary
• Render Scaling modes to native panels connected to non-scaling port encoders
See the following topics for configuration details:
• “Upscaling for the Chrontel CH7308 LVDS Transmitters”
• “Internal LVDS Scaling with EDID Panels”
• “Centering Primary Display with Scaling Encoders”
3.16.1
Upscaling for the Chrontel CH7308 LVDS Transmitters
The IEGD can upscale lower-resolution modes (those smaller than the size of the
respective panel) to the native size of the panel connected to a Chrontel CH7308* LVDS
transmitter.
The IEGD uses a user-supplied DTD with the native flag set (also known as native DTD)
as native timing for the panel connected to either a CH7308 transmitter.
If a native DTD is not supplied by the user, the IEGD takes the first available matching
FP info width and height timings as native timing for the panel if standard
timings were selected as part of edid_avail or edid_not_avail flags.
In order to support upscaling, the LVDS transmitters require the pipe to be set to native
timing of the panel regardless of the user selected resolution. It also requires finding
the native timing (also known as native DTD) of the panel based on user-supplied
configuration information.
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The CH7308 (sDVO) port drivers make the list of supported modes limited up to the
size of panel. The port drivers also mark one of the timings as native DTD as follows (it
goes to the next step only if native DTD isn't found in the current step).
1. It finds the timing with the user-defined DTD with the native DTD flag set. This
becomes the native DTD for the panel.
2. If the panel is an EDID panel and user selected to use EDID DTDs, then the port
driver marks the EDID DTD as native DTD.
3. If the user supplies a DTD without the native DTD flag set, then the port driver
marks this one as the native DTD.
4. If none of the above steps works, the port driver finds the first matching timing for
FP width, height and marks it as native DTD.
If none of the above steps work, then there is no native DTD and no upscaling is
performed.
3.16.2
Internal LVDS Scaling with EDID Panels
The Internal LVDS connected to an EDID Panel supports scaling of modes other than
native mode. To support this, the port driver exports information to the EDID parser
that it can scale. The EDID parser does not remove other modes (that is, non-native
modes) from the mode table. It only marks the native mode. When the IEGD queries
the port driver on which modes are supported, the port driver then removes any modes
that cannot be scaled (up or down depending on the port's hardware capability). When
mode-setting occurs, the second display in Clone mode can indeed support non-native
modes even though the panel had EDID. This occurs only if a native mode can be found
the port driver can scale. Otherwise, the port driver ignores the scaling information and
the IEGD proceeds normally.
The driver also supports Internal LVDS Scaling on EDID-less panels. The steps that
enable this are the same as those described for the scaling of Chrontel LVDS
transmitters in Section 3.16.1.
3.16.3
Centering Primary Display with Scaling Encoders
In Clone mode, the IEGD expects the primary display to have a framebuffer size (OS
Aware mode) that matches the display’s native size of panel timings. When a display is
designated as the primary display in a Clone mode configuration, and the user wants
the primary to be centered (as explained in Section 3.16.5), users may want this setup
to align a primary display on a scaling encoder with a secondary one that can only
center. This won’t work by default for certain port encoders such as the internal LVDS,
which default to hardware scaling. But IEGD has a mechanism to override hardware
scaling thus forcing centering.
When possible, the IEGD allows centering of 640x480, 800x600, and 1024x768
resolutions on the primary display. In some cases (depending on panels), the image
may appear on the top-left. It may also produce unusable output on some displays
(such as a TV). Thus this type of configuration is more appropriate for LVDS panels.
To disable hardware scaling (and force centering for primary display on above modes),
users only need to set the “Panel_Fit” attribute (attribute “0x12”) to ‘0’ (zero).
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3.16.4
Enabling Render Scaling on Port Encoders without Hardware
Scaling
The IEGD Render Scaling feature allows the driver to support any one of the standard
modes (640x480, 800x600, 1024x768 or 1280x1024) as a drawable framebuffer size
output to a native panel and connected via a port encoder that does not hardware
scale. To achieve this, the GPU engine repeats all rendering operations twice (from the
original OS-targeted back buffer) to a separate front buffer, which is rendered via the
3D engine for scaling. This feature is enabled by turning on the “Panel-Fit” attribute
(attribute 0x12) on a port driver that does not support that attribute. But this only
happens if there is a native mode timing (see Section 3.16.1 for information about how
native mode timing is determined).
Users should be aware that this feature can impact performance and produce scaled
output which is inferior in quality to hardware encoder scaling.
3.16.5
Alignment in Clone Mode
In Clone mode, both can be configured with separate timings and different resolutions.
The content is the same on both displays. In the case where resolutions are different on
the cloned displays, the display identified as primary drives the display mode and
framebuffer size. There are three options for the cloned displays in this situation:
• Panning: If the clone display is smaller than the primary display, the displayed
image can be off the screen with only the display showing a window into the overall
image. Panning allows movement of the window, which is viewing the image based
on the movements of the cursor.
• Centering: If the clone display is larger than the primary display mode, the display
image can be centered in the clone display. Black borders are displayed around the
image on the display.
• Scaling: There are two types of scaling in Clone mode, as described below.
— Hardware Encoder Scaling: This feature adjusts the resolution of the image
from the primary display to fit the resolution of the clone display. This permits
scaling up to a larger display (upscaling), or scaling down to a smaller display
(downscaling). It also allows the full image to be displayed within the full
resolution of the clone display.
Some systems may have cloned displays that cannot scale but have a primary
display that can scale (such as an internal LVDS). In non-panning modes (i.e.,
centering/hardware scaling), this display combination will result in the primary
display being scaled up (internal LVDS) but the clone display will be centered.
Section 3.16.3 explains how to force the primary display to center — thus
allowing both displays to center. Or, Render Scaling as follows explains how to
make both displays scale up to full size.
— Render Scaling: For clone display, a situation is possible where the primary
display uses a hardware scaling port encoder and the secondary display uses a
non-scaling port encoder. Assuming both displays are output via native panels,
the resulting output should see the primary scaling of any smaller mode to full
panel size. But the secondary display will center the smaller modes. The above
explanation (see Hardware Encoder Scaling) explains how to align both
displays to be centered. Using the Render Scaling feature, the opposite can be
achieved. Ensure the non-scaling encoder is primary and enable Render Scaling
on that port (see Section 3.16.4). This will make the GPU render-scale the
smaller mode and achieve the full panel size. The clone display (now the
scaling encoder) will, however, take the render-scaled image as its input (and
output) to the clone display panel. This feature will be upgraded in the future
so that the clone display can independently take in the original framebuffer
image as its input.
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4.0
Generating the VBIOS
4.1
Overview
The Intel Embedded Video BIOS incorporates many of the features and capabilities of
the Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers. The 9.0 version of the VBIOS includes the
following new features:
• Intel® GM45 Express chipset
• Intel® System Controller Hub US15W chipset
• Support for Intel® Q35 Express chipset
4.2
System Requirements
The new Video BIOS can be built on a host Microsoft Windows* system and moved to
the target system. The host system must have a 32-bit Microsoft Windows operating
system installed with the capability to execute DOS commands from a command line
window.
The target system must contain one of the following Intel chipsets:
• Intel® GM45 Express chipset
• Intel® System Controller Hub US15W chipset
• Intel® Q35 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® GME965 Express chipset
• Intel® Q965 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GSE Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GME Express chipset
• Intel® 945G Express chipset
• Intel® 915GV Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 915GME Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 910GMLE Express chipset
The target system must contain a minimum of 64 Mbytes of RAM.
See also these VBIOS configuration topics:
• “Configuring and Building the VBIOS with CED”
• “VBIOS, Driver Compatibility, and Data Dependencies”
• “Supported VGA Display Modes for the IEGD Video BIOS”
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4.3
Configuring and Building the VBIOS with CED
The Intel® Embedded VBIOS is built with the Intel Configuration Editor (CED). The
VBIOS will use the configuration that you specify in CED. The VBIOS is selected to be
built when you specify the Video BIOS as a Target OS in your package configuration.
After specifying the Video BIOS, follow all CED prompts, and be sure to select
“Generate VBIOS” when available. The VBIOS will then be built when you select
“Generate Installation” in CED.
Before building your VBIOS, you must set up your DOS environment with two items.
1. Install the Open Watcom* C/C++ compiler.
The User Build System for the VBIOS relies on the Open Watcom C/C++ compiler
to be able to build a 16-bit DOS binary required for the BIOS. The VBIOS has been
tested with version 1.7a of the Open Watcom compiler. This can be downloaded
from the following location:
http://www.openwatcom.com
2. Set up directory paths.
You must set up the PATH environment variable in DOS to be able to execute the
Watcom compiler. If Watcom was installed with its default path, CED will by default
be able to use it.
When you generate a VBIOS, the CED produces the following folders and files:
• Compiled_VBIOS folder
— iegdtsr.exe (Terminate and Stay Resident executable)
— VGA.BIN (Option ROM)
•
IEGD_X_x_VBIOS.zip (this file is generated by the build system, where X is the
major version and x is the minor version)
The iegdtsr.exe can be copied to any folder on the target machine. To run the TSR,
boot the target machine with DOS, and then run the iegdtsr.exe from the DOS
command line.
The VGA.bin file is the binary option ROM that can be merged with your system BIOS
per the instructions provided by your system BIOS vendor.
The IEGD_X_x_VBIOS.zip file, where X is the major version and x is the minor
version, contains default builds of the TSR executable and Option ROM for the various
chipsets. The filenames are iegdtsr-def.exe and vga-def.bin and are located in
the tsr or orom folder of the specific chipset folder (see the figure Figure 30).
See also the following topics:
• “Selecting the Build Folder”
• “Configuring the Video BIOS”
• “Building the VBIOS”
4.3.1
Selecting the Build Folder
The 9.0 version of the VBIOS contains specific folders used for creating a VBIOS that is
either an option ROM (OROM) that can be merged with the system BIOS, or an
executable Terminate and Stay Resident (TSR) program for debugging purposes. There
are also separate directories for the different chipsets that are supported. CED will build
both the TSR and OROM.
Figure 30 shows the directory structure for the Video BIOS libraries contained within
CED.
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Figure 30.
Video BIOS Directory Structure
4.3.2
Configuring the Video BIOS
CED is used to configure the VBIOS. The display settings will be used in the same
manner as they are used for the driver.
4.3.2.1
COMMON_TO_PORT
This setting allows you to associate standard display names used in most system BIOSs
to specific ports that are recognized by IEGD (e.g., LVDS, sDVO-B, sDVO-C). The
VBIOS makes this association when the VBIOS calls the System BIOS Intel® 5F
interrupt functions.
This setting is a six digit number, where each digit is associated with one of the system
BIOS displays (from left to right):
1 : CRT - Standard analog CRT
2 : TV1 - TV Output 1
3 : EFP1 - DVI Flat Panel 1
4 : LFP - Local Flat Panel (Internal LVDS display)
5 : TV2 - TV Output 2
6 : EFP2 - DVI Flat Panel 2
The values above are an example of the typical displays and corresponding order used
by a system BIOS. However, this may vary depending on how your system BIOS has
implemented the displays and the Intel 5F interrupt functions.
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The value in each position in the setting should be the associated port number. Using
the typical settings above, if you want to associate CRT in the system BIOS with the
internal CRT (port 5) and LFP in the system BIOS with internal LVDS (port 4) in the
VBIOS, set COMMON_TO_PORT to be 500400.
Warning:
This feature must be compatible with the system BIOS. If the system BIOS does not
properly implement the Intel 5F functions, then using the COMMON_TO_PORT feature
could cause unpredictable results with the displays. If you are unsure, set
COMMON_TO_PORT to all zeros (000000) to disable this feature.
Note:
The displaydetect parameter must be set to Enabled in order for the
COMMON_TO_PORT values to be used.
4.3.2.2
post_display_msg
This setting is a binary setting that enables (1) or disables (0) post messages to the
display.
4.3.2.3
OEM Vendor Strings
The following settings are string values that allow you to set the values that are
returned from the Intel 4F interrupt functions.
oem_string
oem_vendor_name
oem_product_name
oem_product_rev
4.3.2.4
Default Mode Settings
These settings establish the default VGA or VESA mode to use for the primary (0) and
secondary (1) displays. The values should be set to a valid standard VGA or VESA mode
(in hexadecimal format, for example, 0x117). Note that a VGA mode can only be set on
one display and a second display is disabled unless the DisplayConfig parameter is
set to twin or clone mode.
default_mode_0
default_mode_1
4.3.2.5
Default Refresh Settings
These settings allow you to specify which refresh rate is used for certain VESA modes
on the primary and secondary displays. For example, mode 0x117 specifies refresh
rates of 60 Hz, 75 Hz, and 85 Hz. This setting allows use to specify which of those three
rates to use (specified in decimal, e.g., default_refresh_0=60).
default_refresh_0
default_refresh_1
4.3.2.6
default_vga_height
This setting allows you to specify which resolution is used for certain VGA modes.
Because only one VGA mode can be supported on both displays, this setting applies to
the primary display mode (default_mode_0). For example, mode 3 specifies three
possible resolutions: 640x200, 640x350, and 720x400. In this example, setting
default_vga_height=350 indicates the resolution 640x350.
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4.3.3
Building the VBIOS
CED is used to build the VBIOS. The following steps and screenshots outline a typical
CED VBIOS build procedure.
1. Define your configuration via CED, being sure to complete the Video BIOS
Configuration Page.
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2. When you define the package you are building, be sure to select “Video BIOS” as
“Target OS”.
3. Generate the installation. The following may display:
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4. Generated files should now be in your CED Installation folder.
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4.4
VBIOS, Driver Compatibility, and Data Dependencies
The Intel Embedded Graphics Drivers do not depend on any data from the VBIOS, and
will either use driver settings or select default values for the attached displays. This
allows the driver to properly operate with incompatible BIOS or BIOS replacements.
The Intel Embedded Graphics Drivers will retrieve settings, such as panel ID and other
display settings from the Embedded VBIOS. The Embedded VBIOS allows for
configuration of display timings that can also be used for the Intel Embedded Graphics
Drivers.
4.5
Supported VGA Display Modes for the IEGD Video BIOS
The VBIOS supports many VESA and standard VGA modes. See Table 28 and Table 29
for the VGA and VESA modes and vertical refresh rates that are supported by the
VBIOS.
Note:
Although IBM labeled certain EGA modes with a (*) suffix and the VGA modes with a
(+) suffix (such as mode 3, 3* and 3+), the VGA modes are so common that this
document does not use the (+) suffix to refer to them.
The actual availability of any particular mode depends on the capabilities of the display
device, the amount of memory installed, and other system parameters.
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Table 28.
Video
Mode
00h
01h
02h
03h
04h
05h
06h
07h
Supported VGA Video Display Modes
Pixel
Resolution
Color Depth
(bpp)
Mode
Type
Display
Adapter
Font
Size
Character
Resolution
Dot
Clock
(MHz)
Horiz.
Freq.
(KHz)
Vert
Freq
(Hz)
Video
Memory
(KBytes)
320 x 200
16 (gray)
(4 bpp)
Text
CGA
8x8
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
320 x 350
16 (gray)
(4 bpp)
EGA
8 x 14
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
360 x 400
16
(4 bpp)
VGA
9 x 16
40 x 25
28
31.5
70
256
320 x 200
16
(4 bpp)
CGA
8x8
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
320 x 350
16
(4 bpp)
EGA
8 x 14
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
360 x 400
16
(4 bpp)
VGA
9 x 16
40 x 25
28
31.5
70
256
640 x 200
16 (gray)
(4 bpp)
CGA
8x8
80 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
640 x 350
16 (gray)
(4 bpp)
EGA
8 x 14
80 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
720 x 400
16
(4 bpp)
VGA
9 x 16
80 x 25
28
31.5
70
256
640 x 200
16
(4 bpp)
CGA
8x8
80 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
640 x 350
16
(4 bpp)
EGA
8 x 14
80 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
720 x 400
16
(4 bpp)
VGA
9 x 16
80 x 25
28
31.5
70
256
320 x 200
4
Graph
All
8x8
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
320 x 200
4 (gray)
Graph
CGA
8x8
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
320 x 200
4 (gray)
EGA
8x8
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
320 x 200
4
VGA
8x8
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
640 x 200
2
Graph
All
8x8
80 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
720 x 350
Mono
Text
MDA
9 x 14
80 x 25
28
31.5
70
256
720 x 350
Mono
EGA
9 x 14
80 x 25
28
31.5
70
256
720 x 400
Mono
VGA
9 x 16
80 x 25
28
31.5
70
256
Text
Text
Text
08h-0Ch
Reserved
-
0Dh
320 x 200
16
(4 bpp)
Graph
E/VGA
8x8
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
0Eh
640 x 200
16
(4 bpp)
Graph
E/VGA
8x8
80 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
0Fh
640 x 350
Mono
Graph
E/VGA
8 x 14
80 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
10h
640 x 350
16
(4 bpp)
Graph
E/VGA
8 x 14
80 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
11h
640 x 480
2
(4 bpp)
Graph
VGA
8 x 16
80 x 30
25
31.5
60
256
12h
640 x 480
16
(4 bpp)
Graph
VGA
8 x 16
80 x 30
25
31.5
60
256
13h
320 x 200
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
VGA
8x8
40 x 25
25
31.5
70
256
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4.6
Supported VESA Display Modes for the IEGD Video BIOS
The VBIOS supports many VESA and standard VGA modes. See Table 28 and Table 29
for the VGA and VESA modes and vertical refresh rates that are supported by the
VBIOS.
The following table lists the supported VGA display modes. The actual availability of any
particular mode depends on the capabilities of the display device, the amount of
memory installed, and other system parameters.
Table 29.
VESA Modes Supported by Video BIOS (Sheet 1 of 2)
Video
Mode
101h
103h
105h
107h
111h
114h
Pixel Resolution
Colors (bpp)
Mode
Type
Display
Adapter
Vertical
Frequency
(Hz)
Video
Memory
(Mbytes)
640 x 480
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
VGA
60
0.5
640 x 480
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
VGA
75
0.5
640 x 480
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
VGA
85
0.5
800 x 600
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
60
1
800 x 600
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
75
1
800 x 600
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
85
1
1024 x 768
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
60
1
1024 x 768
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
75
1
1024 x 768
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
85
1
1280 x 1024
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
60
2
1280 x 1024
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
75
2
1280 x 1024
256
(8 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
85
2
640 x 480
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
VGA
60
1
640 x 480
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
VGA
75
1
640 x 480
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
VGA
85
1
800 x 600
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
60
2
800 x 600
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
75
2
800 x 600
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
85
2
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Table 29.
VESA Modes Supported by Video BIOS (Continued) (Sheet 2 of 2)
Video
Mode
Pixel Resolution
Colors (bpp)
Mode
Type
Display
Adapter
Vertical
Frequency
(Hz)
Video
Memory
(Mbytes)
1024 x 768
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
60
2
1024 x 768
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
75
2
1024 x 768
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
85
2
1280 x 1024
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
60
4
1280 x 1024
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
75
4
1280 x 1024
64K
(16 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
85
4
640 x 480
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
VGA
60
2
640 x 480
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
VGA
75
2
640 x 480
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
VGA
85
2
800 x 600
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
60
4
800 x 600
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
75
4
800 x 600
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
SVGA
85
4
1024 x 768
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
60
4
1024 x 768
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
75
4
1024 x 768
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
XVGA
85
4
1280 x 1024
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
60
8
1280 x 1024
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
75
8
1280 x 1024
16M
(32 bpp)
Graph
SXGA
85
8
117h
11Ah
112
115
118
11B
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Configuring and Installing Microsoft Windows Drivers
5.0
Configuring and Installing Microsoft Windows
Drivers
5.1
Editing the Microsoft Windows INF File
This section describes the driver-level information (iegd.inf ) for the Microsoft
Windows* operating system, which includes the following1:
• Microsoft Windows XP*
• Microsoft Windows XP Embedded*
• Microsoft Windows Embedded for Point Of Service* (WEPOS)
Note:
Configuration and Installation information for the Microsoft Windows CE operating
system is described in Chapter 6.0, “Configuring and Building the IEGD for Microsoft
Windows CE Systems”.
See also the following topics:
• “Universal INF Configuration”
• “INF File Backward Compatibility”
• “Dual Panel Configuration”
• “Chipset Dual Display Example”
• “Creating Registry Settings for Graphics Driver INF File”
• “Dynamic Port Driver Configuration”
• “Creating an .sld file for Microsoft Windows XP Embedded Systems”
• “Changing Default Display Mode”
5.1.1
Universal INF Configuration
Multiple display configurations can be specified in a single INF file. Each configuration is
uniquely identified by the ConfigId parameter.
The driver reads the PanelId from the System BIOS during initialization and uses the
configuration whose ConfigId matches the PanelId. If the System BIOS does not set a
valid PanelId (for example, panelId = 0), the driver reads a configuration using
ConfigId = 1. (A ConfigId value of 0 is invalid.)
You can override this behavior by specifying a ConfigId parameter as follows:
HKR,, ConfigId, %REG_DWORD%, %DEFAULT_CONFIG_ID%
In this case, the driver ignores the PanelId returned by the System BIOS. Instead, the
IEGD uses the configuration information using the specified ConfigId.
1. These versions of the drivers are not WHQL (Windows Hardware Quality Labs) certified.
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5.1.2
INF File Backward Compatibility
The current version of the IEGD uses the new INF file format. You cannot use the new
INF file with pre-5.0 versions of the IEGD. However, you can still use pre-5.0 INF file
formats with the current version of the IEGD.
5.1.2.1
INF File Backward Compatibility with IEGD Version 4.0
Version 4.0 of the IEGD provides backward compatibility with pre-4.0 versions of the
INF file. This support is implemented through the PcfVersion key in the INF file,
shown below:
HKR,, PcfVersion,
%REG_DWORD%, 0x0400
The IEGD uses this key to determine which version of the .inf file it is interpreting.
When this key is present in the .inf file and its value is 0x0400, the driver reads it as
a 4.0 .inf file. If this key is omitted from the .inf file or if its value is less than
0x0400, the driver reads the .inf file as a pre-4.0 file.
Note the following rules:
• If you use a pre-4.0 version of the .inf file with version 4.0 of the IEGD, the driver
translates pre-4.0 configuration parameters to 4.0 parameters.
• You cannot use 4.0 parameters in a pre-4.0 .inf file. If you try, the driver ignores
them.
• You cannot use pre-4.0 parameters in a 4.0 .inf file. If you try, the driver ignores
them.
For example, the usestdtimings parameter is a pre-4.0 parameter. If it is specified in
a 4.0 INF file, the driver ignores it. Similarly, if you attempt to add the edid_avail
and edid_non_avail parameters to a pre-4.0 .inf file (that is, an .inf file where
the PcfVersion key is not present), they are ignored by the driver.
The PcfVersion key is generated automatically by the CED utility and is placed in the
[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings] section of the .inf file. The default iegd.inf
file already contains the PcfVersion key. Please see Appendix A, “Example INF File”
to view a sample .inf file.
5.1.3
Dual Panel Configuration
Below are the settings required to set the INF file to enable extended display
configurations. Typically, these settings are output from the CED utility. However, the
INF file may also be edited directly. See Table 30 for a description of these settings.
HKR, Config\%DEFAULT_CONFIG_ID%\General, DisplayConfig, %REG_DWORD%, 8
HKR, Config\%DEFAULT_CONFIG_ID%\General, PortOrder, %REG_SZ%, "5200"
5.1.4
Chipset Dual Display Example
The table below presents the dual display example for an Intel chipset.
Table 30.
Example of Chipset Dual Display Parameter Setting (Sheet 1 of 2)
Dual Display Combination
CRT + Internal LVDS
Port Order
“54000”
CRT + sDVOB
“52000”
CRT + sDVOC
“53000”
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Table 30.
Example of Chipset Dual Display Parameter Setting (Sheet 2 of 2)
Dual Display Combination
5.1.5
Port Order
Internal LVDS + CRT
“45000”
Internal LVDS + sDVOB
“42000”
Internal LVDS + sDVOC
“43000”
sDVOB + CRT
“25000”
sDVOB + Internal LVDS
“24000”
sDVOB + sDVOC
“23000”
sDVOC + CRT
“35000”
sDVOC + Internal LVDS
“34000”
sDVOC + sDVOB
“32000”
Creating Registry Settings for Graphics Driver INF File
The driver settings are configured using CED. It generates the following output, which
is then inserted into the graphics driver INF file before driver installation. CED simply
translates the configuration options to the INF file. See Table 24, “Parameter
Configuration Format” on page 67 for details on the specific settings and values, which
also apply to the settings and values of the INF file. The values of the INF file may also
be directly modified. See the example below for syntax and usage. Also, see
Appendix A, “Example INF File” for a complete sample INF file.
HKR,, PcfVersion,
%REG_DWORD%, 0x0700
HKR,, No_D3D, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, “lvds”
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_nap]
HKR,, InstalledDisplayDrivers, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, iegddis
HKR,, MultiFunctionSupported, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, 1
HKR,, VgaCompatible, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PcfVersion,
%REG_DWORD%, 0x0700
HKR,, No_D3D, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, “sdvo lvds tv”
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_gn4]
HKR,, InstalledDisplayDrivers, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, iegddis
HKR,, MultiFunctionSupported, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, 1
HKR,, VgaCompatible, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PcfVersion,
%REG_DWORD%, 0x0700
HKR,, No_D3D, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, “sdvo lvds”
;===============================================================================
[Strings]
;---------------------------------------------------------------------; Localizable Strings
;---------------------------------------------------------------------Intel=”Intel Corporation”
DiskDesc=”Embedded Installation”
i865=”865 Embedded Graphics Controller”
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i915GD0=”915G/915GV/910GL Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
i915GD1=”915G/915GV/910GL Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
i915AL0=”915GM/915GMS/910GML Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
i915AL1=”915GM/915GMS/910GML Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
i945LP0=”945G Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
i945LP1=”945G Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
i945CT0=”945GM Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
i945CT1=”945GM Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
i965BW0=”965G Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
i965BW1=”965G Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
iG9650=”G965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
iG9651=”G965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
iQ9650=”Q963/Q965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
iQ9651=”Q963/Q965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
i946GZ0=”946GZ Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
i946GZ1=”946GZ Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
i965GM0=”GM965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0”
i965GM1=”GM965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1”
;---------------------------------------------------------------------; Non Localizable Strings
;---------------------------------------------------------------------SERVICE_BOOT_START
= 0x0
SERVICE_SYSTEM_START
= 0x1
SERVICE_AUTO_START
= 0x2
SERVICE_DEMAND_START
= 0x3
SERVICE_DISABLED
= 0x4
SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER
= 0x1
SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE
SERVICE_ERROR_NORMAL
SERVICE_ERROR_SEVERE
SERVICE_ERROR_CRITICAL
=
=
=
=
REG_EXPAND_SZ
REG_MULTI_SZ
REG_DWORD
REG_SZ
5.1.6
=
=
=
=
0x0;
0x1;
0x2;
0x3;
Continue on driver load fail
Display warn, but continue
Attempt LastKnownGood
Attempt LastKnownGood, BugCheck
0x00020000
0x00010000
0x00010001
0x00000000
Dynamic Port Driver Configuration
The IEGD supports many third-party digital transmitters connected to the sDVO ports of the
GMCH though device drivers called port drivers. These port drivers are dynamically loaded at
startup. The driver configuration can be modified to add or remove availability of specific port
drivers.
This section describes the portions of the iegd.inf file that can be modified to either add or
remove a port driver for the Microsoft Windows version of the Intel® Embedded Graphics
Drivers.
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5.1.6.1
iegd.PortDrvs_xxx
The first step in either adding or removing a port driver is to identify the family of the
chipset you are using. 915 and 945 are Napa (nap), and 965 is Gen 4 (gn4). Next
locate the appropriate [iegd.PortDrvs_xxx] section for your graphics family. Below are
the default settings for the blocks of associated port drivers for a particular graphics
chipset family:
[iegd.PortDrvs_nap]
sdvo.sys
lvds.sys
tv.sys
[iegd.PortDrvs_gn4]
sdvo.sys
lvds.sys
To remove one or more port drivers, delete the associated line from the
iegd.PortDrvs_xxx block. To add a port driver, add the associated line into the
appropriate iegd.PortDrvs_xxx block. For example, to add a new port driver for a
device named “NewPD”, add the following line to the iegd.PortDrvs_alm block:
NewPD.sys
5.1.6.2
SourceDisksFiles
The next step to either add or remove a port driver is to identify the specific port driver
file names in the SourceDisksFiles blocks. The default settings are as follows:
[SourceDisksFiles]
iegdmini.sys = 1
iegddis.dll = 1
iegd3dg3.dll= 1
iegd3dg4.dll= 1
lvds.sys
= 1
sdvo.sys
= 1
tv.sys
= 1
To remove a port driver, delete the associated line in the [SourceDisksFiles]
block. To add a port driver, add the associated line to the block. For example, to add a
port driver for a device whose driver is named NewPD.sys, add the following line:
NewPD.sys
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5.1.6.3
PortDrivers Registry Key
The next step is to modify the registry key in the appropriate
[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_xxx] section that defines the list of available
port drivers. Below are the default values of this registry key in the iegd.inf file:
For the [iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_nap] block:
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, “sdvo lvds tv”
For the [iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_gn4] block:
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, “sdvo lvds”
Remove or add port driver names as appropriate to the list of port drivers specified
within the quoted string. For example, to add support for a new port driver named
“NewPD”, the registry key would be defined as follows:
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, "lvds NewPD"
5.1.7
Creating an .sld file for Microsoft Windows XP Embedded
Systems
Microsoft Windows XP Embedded* operating systems require the use of an .sld
(system level definitions) file. The following steps detail how to create such a file for
IEGD from your custom iegd.inf file that you created using CED.
1. Run Component Designer.
2. In the File menu, select Import.
3. In the Choose File for Import dialog, select Setup Information files (*.inf). in
the File of type drop-down list.
4. Select iegd.inf from installation directory.
5. In the Inf Processing Options dialog, select Automatic in the Parsing Options
dialog and click OK.
6. Click Start in the Import File dialog box. Close the dialog on completion. There
should not be any errors.
7. If there are no errors, Save the .sld file.
8. Run Component Database Manager and import the .sld file created above.
Note:
Multiple versions will be created.
9. To move the binaries, copy the IEGD/Driver files into the root repository:
\Windows Embedded Data\Repository
10. In Target Designer, all the IEGD drivers are found under
Hardware\Devices\Display Adapters and can be selected by dragging and
dropping into your build.
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5.1.8
Changing Default Display Mode
When installing the Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers, Microsoft Windows selects a
default display mode for the initial startup of the system. This is a 640 x 480 resolution
in four-bit color mode.
In some cases, particularly with EDID-less LVDS displays, the 640 x 480 resolution may
not be supported, so the default mode selected by Microsoft Windows must be
changed. Otherwise, the display may not work after installation.
This default mode can be changed by adding the following registry keys to the
[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings]section of the iegd.inf file:
HKR,, DefaultSettings.XResolution, %REG_DWORD%, 1024
HKR,, DefaultSettings.YResolution, %REG_DWORD%, 768
HKR,, DefaultSettings.BitsPerPel,
%REG_DWORD%, 32
HKR,, DefaultSettings.VRefresh,
%REG_DWORD%, 60
The example above makes the default resolution 1024 x 768, with a 32-bit color depth
and a refresh rate of 60 MHz.
5.2
Installing the IEGD on Microsoft Windows
You can install and uninstall the IEGD on a Microsoft Windows system by using the
setup.exe program located in the Windows\Utilities folder. The following
procedure shows how to install the IEGD. Section 5.3, “Uninstalling the Current Version
of the Driver” on page 111 provides instructions for uninstalling the current version of
the IEGD.
Warning:
If you have a previous version of the IEGD installed on your system, you must remove
it using the Microsoft Windows Add or Remove Programs utility located in the
Control Panel. Do not use the current version of the IEGD Install program to uninstall
previous versions of the driver. If you do, unpredictable results may occur. You can use
this program only to uninstall the driver from the current version. Each version of the
driver has its own version of the installer/uninstaller utility.
1. Double-click the setup.exe icon in the Utilities folder. The following dialog
box appears.
2. To install the driver, make sure that Installs driver and application files is
selected, and then click Next. The accept license screen appears.
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3. Click I agree, and then click Install. The installation begins and shows a progress
bar as follows:
Note:
If you get an “unsigned driver” warning, disregard and click Continue to allow the
installation to continue.
4. After the driver and application files have been copied, the system must be
restarted to complete the installation. If you want the installation program to
restart your computer, click Yes.
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5.3
Uninstalling the Current Version of the Driver
You can use the setup.exe Microsoft Windows GUI program to remove the driver from
your system. When you run the uninstaller program, it removes the following items
from the system:
• The IEGD drivers
• The .inf and .pnf files from the windows\system32\inf folder.
• The DisplayPage.dll and qt-mt332.dll from the windows\system32 folder
• Data registry items by running regsvr32.exe with the uninstall option.
Warning:
You cannot use the Add or Remove Programs utility in the Control Panel to remove
previous versions of the driver (each version of the driver has its own installer/
uninstaller utility). To uninstall previous versions, click Start ->Control Panel >System ->Hardware ->Device Manager, expand Display adapters then rightclick the specific display adapter to be uninstalled, mouse-over and click Uninstall.
Repeat if there is more than one previous version of the driver loaded.
1. Click the setup.exe icon located in the Utilities subfolder of the Windows
folder.
2. In the dialog box, select Uninstalls driver and application files, and then click
Next. The following prompt appears:
3. Click Yes to remove the driver. A progress bar displays and when the driver has
been removed, the following screen appears.
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4. To complete the uninstallation, you must restart your system. If you want to restart
your system now, click Yes in the following dialog box.
5.4
Run-Time Operation
Resolution, refresh rate, and color bit depth can be changed after installation and
reboot via a Microsoft Windows display property sheet. On Microsoft Windows XP,
extended desktop can be enabled and disabled, along with swapping primary and
secondary displays. Other operations such as enabling and disabling ports (display
output), rotation, port configuration, and attribute control are accessible via the
standard display driver escape protocol.
5.5
Viewing and Changing the Driver Configuration from
Microsoft Windows
You can change certain configuration attributes of the IEGD using the iegdgui.exe
program located in the \Utilities folder. On Microsoft Windows XP systems, you
can access the IEGD Configuration tabs through the Advanced Settings tab of the
Display Properties icon from the Windows dialog box. This program launches the
IEGD Configuration GUI that consists of the following four tabs:
• Driver Info — Contains the driver information.
• Display Config — Contains current display information and allows configuration of
display configurations, display resolutions and bit depth for primary and secondary
displays, flip, rotation, and enabling/disabling for a given port.
• Display Attributes — Contains the supported Port Driver (PD) attributes and
allows configuration of PD attributes.
• Color Correction — Contains color-correction information for the framebuffer and
overlay. Using this tab, you can change the framebuffer and overlay color settings.
To view or change the driver settings using the GUI interface, follow this procedure.
1. Double-click the iegdgui.exe icon in the Utilities folder. On Microsoft
Windows XP systems, you can click the Advanced Settings tab in the Display
Properties icon from the dialog box. The IEGD Configuration GUI Driver Info tab
appears, showing information about the driver.
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Figure 31.
Example Runtime Configuration GUI — Driver Info Tab
2. Click the Display Config tab to show the current configuration.
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Figure 32.
Example Runtime Configuration GUI — Display Config Tab
The Display Status section of the above dialog shows the current configuration for
the Primary and Secondary displays.
3. In the Display Configuration section of the dialog, select the required display
configuration in the Display Config drop-down list. This allows the user to choose
between Single, Twin, Clone and Extended for all connected ports. A maximum of
two ports per display configuration is currently allowed.
4. In the Primary Mode and Secondary Mode sections of the dialog, change
resolution and bit depth of the primary and secondary displays via the Resolution
and Bit Depth drop-down lists.
5. In the Display Settings section of the dialog, view and change the settings for a
port, rotate and flip the display via the appropriate drop-down lists:
— Port: Allows you to select the required port.
— Port Status: Allows you to enable or disable the selected port.
— Rotate: You can rotate the display 0, 90, 180, and 270 degrees.
— Flip: Inverts the display horizontally.
Note:
If you change any configuration settings in the Display Config dialog box, click Apply
for the changes to take effect.
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6. Click the Display Attributes tab to view and change the attributes for a port. The
screen that appears depends upon the port drivers used.
Figure 33.
Example Runtime Configuration GUI — Display Attributes Tab
The figure Figure 33 shows the attributes that can be changed for the selected port in
the Port drop-down list. You can change the Port Driver by selecting the appropriate
one for your device. The attributes that appear on this tab depend upon the selected
port driver. Please see Appendix B, “Port Driver Attributes,” for a complete list of port
driver attributes.
7. Click the Color Correction tab to view and change color corrections. The figure
Figure 34 shows a sample Color Correction tab screen.
Color Correction is available for both overlays and framebuffers, and is accessed
under the New Configuration link at the top of the main CED window.
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Figure 34.
Example Runtime Configuration GUI — Color Correction Tab
Table 31.
Framebuffer Color Correction Values (applies to R, G, B color)
Gamma:
Table 32.
0.6 to 6.0 (default value is 1)
Brightness:
-127 to 127 (default value is 0)
Contrast:
-127 to 127 (default value is 0)
Overlay Color Correction Values (applies to ALL color)
Gamma:
0.6 to 6.0 (default value is 1)
Brightness:
0 to 200 (default value is 100)
Contrast:
0 to 200 (default value is 100)
Saturation:
0 to 200 (default value is 100)
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The following sub-steps present an example color-correction procedure:
a.
Select Framebuffer in the Surface section and select the appropriate port for
the color correction to be applied to or select Overlay in the Surface section for
color correction to be applied to the overlay.
b.
Select the required color to be corrected in the Color section.
c.
Select the required color attribute to be corrected in the Gamma Correction
section.
d.
Click Restore Defaults to restore the default values.
Note:
Note:
If you make any changes to the color-correction settings, click Apply to have
the changes take effect.
The hardware does not support brightness, saturation, and contrast of the overlay and
second overlay with RGB pixel format.
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6.0
Configuring and Building the IEGD for Microsoft
Windows CE Systems
The Microsoft Windows CE* drivers are configured and built from the options provided
on the General Settings Page (see Creating a New Configuration) and the Microsoft
Windows CE Options Page (see Creating a New Package). After you configure the IEGD
for a Microsoft Windows CE system, package the IEGD and generate an installation.
The CED produces an iegd.reg (see Sample iegd.reg File) file and a
IEGD_X_x_WINCEXX.zip file (where _X is the major version, _x is the minor version,
and XX is either 5_0 or 6_0) that you use to build an image for a Microsoft Windows CE
system using the Microsoft Windows CE Platform Builder.
To build an IEGD image for a Microsoft Windows CE system, do the following:
1. Enter IEGD configuration settings using the CED. (Please see Creating a New
Package and Creating a New Package.)
2. Package the configuration. (See Creating a New Package.)
3. Generate an installation using the Generate Installation option on the CED
main window (see Generating an Installation). This produces an iegd.reg file and
an IEGD_5_0_WINCEXX.zip file. The iegd.reg file contains registry entries and
the IEGD_X_x_WINCEXX.zip file contains required driver files.
4. Integrate the iegd.reg file with the Microsoft Windows CE Platform Builder. Please
see Integrating IEGD with Microsoft Windows CE Platform Builder.
See also the following topics:
• Microsoft Windows CE Installation
• Microsoft Windows CE Configuration
6.1
Microsoft Windows CE Installation
The following sections describe how to install the IEGD on the Microsoft Windows CE
5.0 and 6.0 operating systems.
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6.1.1
Prerequisites
The development system should have the following software installed:
• Microsoft Windows XP Professional, SP2
• Platform Builder for Microsoft Windows CE 5.0 or 6.0 (with latest service packs)
The target system must contain one of the following Intel chipsets:
• Intel® GM45 Express chipset
• Intel® System Controller Hub US15W chipset
• Intel® Q35 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® GME965 Express chipset
• Intel® Q965 Express chipset
Mobile Intel® 945GSE Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GME Express chipset
• Intel® 945G Express chipset
• Intel® 915GV Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 915GME Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 910GMLE Express chipset
The target system must contain a minimum of 64 Mbytes of RAM.
6.1.2
Integrating IEGD with Microsoft Windows CE Platform Builder
The integration/installation of the driver binaries depends upon the requirements of the
target device; while ddi_iegd.dll is required, port drivers may be optionally
included.
Note:
Windows CE 6.0 does not employ the catalog file mentioned below. For Windows CE
5.0, to integrate the driver binaries into the Platform Builder, the catalog file included
with the release should first be imported to the Platform Builder's catalog (for details
about how this is done, see Catalog Feature File). After the catalog file is imported, find
“Intel Embedded Graphics Driver” under Third Party -> Device Drivers -> Display and
drag-and-drop it into the BSP.
In order for the Platform Builder to use IEGD, the iegd.reg file included with the
release has to be properly included into the BSP. For Windows CE 5.0, this means
adding the following lines into the platform.reg file. Note that you must specify the
correct path to the iegd.reg file.
;*******************************************************
;* IEGD Section for WinCE 5.0 Platform Builder
;*******************************************************
IF BSP_DISPLAY_IEGD
; @CESYSGEN IF CE_MODULES_PCI
; GWES will be able to auto-detect the display adapter if a candidate value
; points to the adapter's PCI instance. Values from Candidate1 to Candidate32
; (decimal) are possible; GWES will examine them sequentially until it finds
; a match.
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\GDI\DisplayCandidates]
"Candidate6"="Drivers\\Display\\Intel"
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[$(PCI_BUS_ROOT)\Template\IEGD]
"DisplayDll"="ddi_iegd.dll"
"Class"=dword:03
"SubClass"=dword:00
"ProgIF"=dword:00
"VendorID"=multi_sz:"8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086",
"8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086",
"8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086", "8086"
"DeviceID"=multi_sz:"3582", "2572", "2562", "357B", "3577", "1132", "7125", "7123",
"7121", "2582", "2782", "2592", "2792", "2772", "2776", "27A2", "27A6", "2982",
"2983", "29A2", "29A3", "2992", "2993", "2972", "2973"
; include the path to the iegd.reg file in the release package
#include <specify_path_here>\iegd.reg
; @CESYSGEN ENDIF CE_MODULES_PCI
ENDIF ; BSP_DISPLAY_IEGD
Finally, to include the actual driver binaries into the OS image, you must
reference them in the BSP's BIB file by appending the path to ddi_iegd.dll and the
port drivers into platform.bib, as shown below.
Figure 35.
Sample FILES Block from platform.bib File
FILES
;
Name
Path
Memory Type
;
-----------------------
------------------------
-----------
;
@CESYSGEN ENDIF CE_MODULES_DEVICE
;
@CESYSGEN IF CE_MODULES_DEVICE
ddi_iegd.dll
6.1.2.1
<specify_path_here>\ddi_iegd.dll NK
Catalog Feature File
For Windows CE 5.0, IEGD’s Catalog Feature File, iegd.cec, is provided in the release
package. To import IEGD into the workspace’s catalog, complete the following steps:
1. From the File menu, select Manage Catalog Features.
2. Choose Import.
3. In the Import Catalog Features dialog box, select the .cec file, and then click
Open.
4. From the View menu, select Catalog to display the Catalog.
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6.2
Microsoft Windows CE Configuration
The following sections describe how to configure the IEGD on the Microsoft Windows CE
operating system. All the IEGD-specific registry keys are located within the path
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\DRIVERS\Display\Intel]
All keys use one of the following syntax:
“<keyname>”=dword:<value>,
or
“<keyname>” = <value>
where <value> in the second case is a string in double quotes.
Note:
Unless specified otherwise, the “value” field is in hex format.
The iegd.reg file contains display configuration registry entries for the IEGD. A
sample iegd.reg file is provided along with the driver package. The content of this file
may be included through the “#include” directive in platform.reg (see Integrating
IEGD with Microsoft Windows CE Platform Builder), or it may be copied into the proper
section in platform.reg.
6.2.1
Basic Driver Configuration
This section discusses basic driver configuration keys located in
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\General].
The table below lists the keys in the “Intel” folder.
Table 33.
[HKLM\DRIVERS\Display\Intel] Registry Keys
Registry Entry
Description
Possible Ranges
PCFversion
Specifies the version of the current
configuration file.
400 or 700
ConfigId
This selects the configuration set.
1, 2, 3, 4, or 5
PortDrivers
List of port drivers to be dynamically
loaded when the system boots. The
dll’s must exist in the c:\Windows
directory. sDVO transmitter port
drivers to load when the system boots.
Space separated string enclosed in
quotes, where each port driver name is
listed in the string. The default string
included with the release has all
supported port drivers.
See also the following topics:
• Graphics Memory Configuration
• Defining Graphics Memory Size
• Framebuffer and Video Surface Size
• Video Surface Allocation Rule
• System to Video Stretch Blit
• iegd.reg File Backward Compatibility
• Blend Filtering
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6.2.1.1
Graphics Memory Configuration
The Intel Embedded Graphics Suite (IEGS = VBIOS + Graphics driver) provides the
ability to dedicate additional memory for graphics functions on the Microsoft Windows
CE platform. This is known as reserved memory. The amount of reserved memory is
selected by firmware. The reservation size is passed to the graphics driver through a
scratch register available on the GMCH. Reserved memory is useful in minimizing the
amount of memory stolen from the OS for memory-limited, embedded systems. For
instance, if firmware utilizes a 640 x 480, 32-bit framebuffer, a total of 1.2 Mbytes is
required. Stolen memory would need to be configured as 8 Mbytes or higher, since the
next smaller option is only 1 Mbyte, too small for the 640 x 480, 32-bit framebuffer. In
such a case, stolen memory can be programmed to 1 Mbyte. The additional memory
required for the framebuffer can then be provided by reserved memory, allowing a
minimum amount of memory to be removed from the OS.
Note:
Reserved memory is only available on the Microsoft Windows CE operating system, and
must be accounted for in the config.bib memory layout file.
Additionally, the Microsoft Windows CE display driver can be configured for either static
or dynamic allocation of video memory. The static model preallocates physical memory
for the display driver and provides a more efficient surface allocation scheme. The
dynamic model allocates surface memory on demand from the system and will incur a
small performance hit. However, the dynamic model has the advantage of deallocation
of video memory when not required, thus making it available to other applications.
The static memory model requires a base and size specification registered in the
project.reg file. The base + size must reach to top of memory (TOM). Since this is
not required to be specified in the config.bib memory map, care must be taken not to
overlap any other memory arenas with the static allocation. See page 124 for further
details on how to configure the static memory model.
The figure Typical Memory Map Using Static Memory Model shows a typical memory
map, using a static memory model.
Figure 36.
Typical Memory Map Using Static Memory Model
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6.2.1.2
Defining Graphics Memory Size
The IEGD supports static as well as dynamic location of graphics memory. For static
video memory, the two registry settings ReservedMemoryBase and
ReservedMemorySize denote where and how big this area will be. This portion of
memory will be taken care off by the built-in GART driver. The size should include the
stolen memory (BIOS setting, if applicable).
If either of these registry settings are zero or not defined in the registry, then dynamic
memory allocation is used for video memory management. The usage will be
dependent on system resources. This is in line with the Dynamic Video Memory
Technology.
As an example of static video memory, if the stolen memory is 8 Mbytes and you want
a total of extra 56 Mbytes of graphics memory for a total of 64 Mbytes of graphics
memory you would want to have these settings: (On a 128 Mbyte machine)
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\General]
“ReservedMemoryBase”=dword:4000000
“ReservedMemorySize”=dword:4000000
Which means that the managed graphics memory pool will begin at physical address
0x4000000 (64 Mbytes) and is 64 Mbytes of size.
Note:
Always remember to include the amount of stolen memory in this number.
The lower 64 Mbytes in the above machine will be used for the NK.bin and RAM, so
therefore you must change your config.bib accordingly. The configuration for the
given machine is (debug build):
NK
80220000 01650000 RAMIMAGE
RAM
81700000 02790000 RAM
In this configuration, the NK.BIN image takes 22.3125 Mbytes and the rest of 41.6875
Mbytes is RAM. The release build should have much smaller NK area. For better control,
users may turn AUTOSIZE=OFF to calculate exactly where the image and RAM starts
and ends followed by the location of the video memory pool with no possibility of
runtime deviation.
These two settings, together with the registry settings mentioned above, will determine
the memory layout.
The example config.bib and the memory configuration settings in the iegd.reg are
validated settings that can be used for static video memory of 16 Mbytes in size
starting from the 48 Mbytes address, thus including the stolen memory.
6.2.1.3
Framebuffer and Video Surface Size
Two additional optional registry settings are available to limit the framebuffer size of
the display driver and the total size of offscreen video surfaces.
The MaxFbSize registry entry will control the maximum size of the framebuffer only.
Actual usage will depend on the mode being used.
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The PageReqLimit registry entry will control the total size in pages (4 Kbytes) of all
video surfaces, buffers allocated for any use. Both of these registry configurations
apply to both the static as well as dynamic video memory management explained in
the previous section. The default below indicates that a maximum of 2 Mbytes are used
for the framebuffer and a maximum of 16 Mbytes are permitted for all offscreen
videosurface allocations.
"MaxFbSize"=dword:200000
"PageReqLimit"=dword:1000
In the case of Microsoft Windows CE, because the OS does not allow for dynamically
setting the framebuffer size, the MaxFbSize can be changed to match the mode
setting being used in order to minimize on video memory wastage. The following are
different suggested values for MaxFbSize for different display modes. These values
have not been validated. Note that 640x480 is calculated as 640x512 and 800x600 is
calculated as 800x768 for stride alignment purposes.
640x512X16 = A0000
640x512X24 = F0000
640x512X32 = 140000
800x768X16 = 12C000
800x768X24 = 1C2000
800x768X32 = 258000
1024x768X16 = 180000
1024x768X24 = 240000
1024x768X32 = 300000
6.2.1.4
Video Surface Allocation Rule
Another two optional registries entries determine a minimum width and height
dimension that allows video surface allocations to succeed.
In the Microsoft Windows CE GDI, video surface allocations can happen with a
REQUIRE_VIDEO_MEMORY or a PREFER_VIDEO_MEMORY flag. The following options
force surface allocations with the PREFER_VIDEO_MEMORY flag to be allocated in
system memory if the width and height are lower then what is stated in the following
entries.
“MinVidSurfX”=dword:10
“MinVidSurfY”=dword:10
In this example, surfaces allocated with the PREFER_VIDEO_MEMORY where the width
and height are both less than 16 pixels are forced to be in system memory.
6.2.1.5
System to Video Stretch Blit
System to Video Memory stretch blits are not natively supported on Intel GMCH
devices. This feature allows you to enable a soft copy of system surfaces to video
surfaces in order to conduct an accelerated stretch blit. The advantage of this is that
the stretch blit then utilizes the blend engine and hardware filtering can be applied. The
filtering options are listed in Blend Filtering.
A value of 1 for the “SysToVidStretch” enables system to video stretch blits, as
described above, while a value of 0, disables this feature and forwards all system to
video stretch blits to the emulator provided by the operating system.
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\General]
"SysToVidStretch"=dword:0
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6.2.1.6
iegd.reg File Backward Compatibility
The Intel Embedded Graphics Driver expects a configuration file in the PCFVersion 700
format. However, the driver will maintain backward support with version 4.0. This
support is implemented through the PcfVersion key as shown below:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\General]
"PcfVersion"=dword:400
The IEGD uses this key to determine the format of the configuration file. When this key
is present, IEGD parses the configuration file using the format specified by the key
(400 or 700). If this key is not present, then IEGD assumes 4.0 format.
6.2.1.7
Blend Filtering
The blend filtering method can be selected via the BlendFilter registry setting. The
filter method chosen will be used for all stretch blit operations, including video to video
stretch blits, as well as system to video stretch blits. The default filtering method is
Nearest.
Available Blend Filter options:
0 == Default == Nearest
1 == Binlinear
2 == Anisotropic
3 == 4x4
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\General]
“BlendFilter”=dword:2
6.2.2
;
Blend filter to use for all stretch blits
;
BlendFilter 0 == NEAREST
;
BlendFilter 1 == BILINEAR
;
BlendFilter 2 == ANISOTROPIC
;
BlendFIlter 3 == 4X4
Configuration Sets
The Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers allows multiple configuration sets for OEMs who
wish to use the same iegd.reg file across different platforms. There can be up to 16
instances of configurations. The registry key described in the previous section,
ConfigId, ensures the display driver selects the right instance. Each instance may
contain multiple groups of per-config and per-config+per-port platform customizations.
The configuration sets are defined in the registry tree as
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\<platform>\<config id>],
Where <config id> is the configuration number. The “ConfigID” key described in the
previous section selects the active configuration set.
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6.2.3
General Configuration
Registry keys described in this section can be found in
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\<platform>\<config id>\], where
'config id' is the configuration number, and where <platform> is one of the following:
ALL, US15W, GM45, Q35, GME965, Q965, 945G, 945GME, 945GSE, 915GV, 915GME,
and 910GMLE. The driver first attempts to find the configuration or platform on which it
is booted, but if the configuration for that platform is not present, the driver uses the
ALL platform setting.
Table 34.
[HKLM\Drivers\Display\Intel\<platform>\<config id>\]Registry Keys
(Sheet 1 of 2)
Registry Entry
Description
Possible Ranges
Width
Width of the display
Width and Height must be expressed as
hexidecimal values. For example:
1024 x 768: 400 x 300
800 x 600: 320h x 258
640 x 480: 280 x IE0
Height
Height of the display
See above.
Color depth in bpp (bits per pixel)
Depth must be expressed as a
hexidecimal number and must be one of
the following values:
8bpp: 8
16bpp: 10
24bpp: 18
32bpp: 20
(Note that the Intel 915 chipsets do not
support 24 bpp.)
Depth
Refresh
The refresh rate of the display.
Refresh rate must be in hex:
60 : 3c
70 : 46
75 : 4b
85 : 55
etc...
This value can be any valid refresh rate
as long as the display port supports it. A
refresh of '0' takes the first refresh that
matches width, height and depth.
Specify whether to enable D3D.
NO_D3D
Note:
For Windows CE 5.0, this
registry entry must be set to 1
as IEGD currently does not
support D3D Mobile on
Windows CE 5.0 systems.
0 = Enable D3D
1 = Disable D3D
Default is 0.
ReservedMemoryBase
ReservedMemorySize
Video memory can be statically
reserved or dynamically allocated on
demand. If both ReservedMemoryBase
and ReservedMemorySize are nonzero, then Video memory allocation
utilizes the static model.
The ReservedMemoryBase plus the
ReservedMemorySize must extend to the
TOM (Top Of Memory) and not conflict
with other reserved memory arenas in
config.bib. Default for both base and size
is zero, indicating a dynamic allocation
model.
Default behavior disables static memory
model.
MaxFbSize
Maximum size of the expected
framebuffer. By providing this hint, the
display driver can more efficiently
organize GART memory, leading to a
smaller video memory consumption.
Must be greater than or equal to the
expected size of framebuffer. Units are in
bytes. Specifying zero causes the default
framebuffer reservation sizing.
Default:
All other chipsets: 16 Mbytes
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Table 34.
[HKLM\Drivers\Display\Intel\<platform>\<config id>\]Registry Keys
(Sheet 2 of 2)
Registry Entry
6.2.3.1
Description
Possible Ranges
MinVidSurfX
MinVidSurfY
In pixels, the minimum width and
height of surfaces in order to be
acceptable for allocation in Video
memory. Due to hardware restrictions
that optimize memory access, it is
advisable to reserve video memory for
larger surfaces and allow GDI and
DirectDraw* to allocate small surfaces
from system memory.
No limitations. Suggested values for both
width and height are 10. Default value
for both width and height is 1.
Default:
MinVidSurfX = 1
MinVidSurfY = 1
SysToVidStretch
Enables system-to-video memory
stretch blit operations to take
advantage of hardware-accelerated
filtering. Normally, it is more efficient
to allow GDI to conduct system-tovideo stretch blits, but the default
filtering used by GDI is Nearest. See
the BlendFilter key below for hardware
accelerated filtering options.
0 = Disabled
1 = Enabled
Default: 0
BlendFilter
Provides selection of hardwareaccelerated filtering methods for
stretch blit operations.
0 = Nearest
1 = Bilinear
2 = Anisotropic
Default: 0
TearFB
If enabled, all blit operations to the
framebuffer are synchronized with
video sync to eliminate any visible
tearing or flickering on the display
screen. Disabling this feature achieves
a performance gain.
0 = Disabled, tearing allowed
1 = Enabled, no visible tearing
Default: 0
DisplayConfig
The “DisplayConfig” key sets the
display configuration to be in Single,
Twin, Clone, or Vertical Extended
modes. (Unlike Microsoft Windows XP,
Microsoft Windows CE does not
support Extended mode). Does not,
however, dictate what type of display
ports will be used.
1 (single), 2 (clone), 4 (twin), 5 (vertical
extended)
DisplayDetect
The “DisplayDetect” key allows the
user to enable a display port only if a
display device is connected. Displays
without EDID will not be detected.
0 = disable
1 = enable
Default: 0
PortOrder
The PortOrder setting ensures the
correct display port types are used
based on user selection.
See PortOrder Information.
PortOrder Information
PortOrder specifies the actual ports that are used for the Primary and Secondary
display. As shown in the table below, the port numbers are slightly different among the
supported chipsets.
Table 35.
PortOrder Information
Port Number
Chipsets
1
Integrated TV Encoder
2
sDVO B Port/RGBA Port
3
sDVO C Port
4
Internal LVDS Port
5
Analog Port
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The driver attempts to use the ports in the order specified by “PortOrder”. For example,
“PortOrder” = “5420” will assign the analog port to the primary display and the LVDS
port to the secondary display (if any), assuming all the ports are present and detected.
Suppose port “5” is not present, in that case the driver tries to assign the next port (4,
in this case) in line to the primary display, resulting LVDS port for primary and sDVO B
port for secondary.
Setting PortOrder to “00000” causes the driver to use default internal settings.
*************
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\General]
;------------------------------------; Select Port Order
;------------------------------------“PortOrder”=“54320”
;
PortOrder specifies the actual of port
;
that will be taken for the Primary /
;
Secondary ports if there are duplicates
;
of the same type. For example, if both
;
Primary and Secondary are digital, then
;
port order will which sDVO ports will be
;
first and second. The section below gives
;
the port order numbers for various chipsets.
;
Specify value “0000” to use default settings.
;
On i915 chipsets:
;
================================
;
1 - Integrated TV Encoder
;
2 - sDVO B port/RGBA port
;
3 - sDVO C port
;
4 - Internal LVDS port
;
5 - Analog port
;
6.2.3.2
Vertical Extended Mode
The Windows CE IEGD driver supports Vertical Extended display mode, which is one
large framebuffer that extends across two displays by doubling the height of resolution.
The top half of the framebuffer is on the first pipe and the bottom half is on the second
pipe. The Windows CE operating system is unaware of the two displays. This feature is
supported only on the dual-pipelined chipsets, which is every supported platform stated
in Prerequisites.
This feature is enabled through the DisplayConfig key in the project.reg file. The
resolution, bit depth, and refresh rates of both displays must be the same. Vertical and
horizontal panning are not supported. DirectDraw is supported on both pipes, but
DirectDraw 3D must be disabled when Vertical Extended Display mode is enabled.
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6.2.4
Per Port Platform Customization
The Intel Embedded Graphics Drivers provide what is considered the most useful tools
to the embedded market — per port platform customizations. This includes the
following:
• Defining custom DTD panel timings
: PixelClock, HorzActive, HorzSync etc...
• Customized GPIO pin selection for I2C and DDC communication with sDVO
encoders and panels.
:I2cPin, I2cDab, I2cSpeed etc...
• Flat Panel width and height limitations and power and/or backlight control
mechanisms
:BkltMethod, BkltT1, BkltT2, GpioPinVdd etc...
• Port driver specific attribute settings for initialization at boot time.
: Brightness, Contrast, H-Position etc...
All of the above can be set for each individual port depending on the maximum number
of ports the chipset supports. Also, you can have multiple instances of these
configurations to allow different settings per configuration.
The usage model for this per-config, per-port platform customizations follows after the
same options available in the INF registry settings for the Intel Embedded Graphics
Drivers for Microsoft Windows XP. Please see Sample iegd.reg File or to the provided
registry sample file in the IEGD Windows CE driver package for examples. The following
sections provide information on these configurations:
• Per Port Customization – General Port Configuration
• Per Port Customization – Custom DTD Timings
• Per Port Customization — Custom Flat Panel Controls
• Per Port Customization — Attribute Initialization
6.2.4.1
Per Port Customization – General Port Configuration
This section describes port-specific general configuration options. These options are
located under
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\Port\1\General]
• Edid
This boolean key enables (set to 1) or disables (set to 0) the EdidAvail and
EdidNotAvail keys.
• EdidAvail and EdidNotAvail
These two 16-bit keys control the available timings for the display. If an EDID is
successfully read from the display device, then IEGD uses the EdidAvail flag to
determine what timings are available. Otherwise, if an EDID cannot be read, then
IEGD uses the EdidNotAvail key.
Bit #
Value (0 or 1)
0
Disable/Enable driver built-in timings
1
Disable/Enable EDID timings. (Only valid for
the EdidAvail flag)
2
Disable/Enable DTD
3-15
Reserved
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• CenterOff
If the selected frame buffer size is smaller than what the IEGD hardware can
support, by default the frame buffer will be centered with a black border around it.
To explicitly turn off this feature, the user may set the “CenterOff” key to “1”.
• Rotation and Flip
IEGD supports desktop rotation through the “Rotation” key in Single, Twin, and
Clone mode. Rotation is not supported in Vertical Extended Mode.
The “Rotation” key can be set to one of the four follow values.
Degree
Key Value
0
0 (default)
90
5A
180
B4
270
10E
So, “Rotation”=dword:5A will rotate the frame buffer 90 degrees.
The “Flip” key flips the desktop horizontally, displaying a mirror image. “Flip” is a
boolean value: 1 to enable, 0 to disable.
• Scale
IEGD can scale the desktop to the output panel using the panel’s DTD or EDID (in
that order). “Scale” is a boolean value: 1 to enable, 0 to disable.
6.2.4.2
Per Port Customization – Custom DTD Timings
For each configuration, each port can be added with up to 255 customized DTD modes.
The following is an example of adding 800x640 mode to the LVDS port when
ConfigId=1 is used.
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\Port\4\DTD\1]
“PixelClock”=dword:9c40
“HorzActive”=dword:320
“HorzSync”=dword:28
“HorzSyncPulse”=dword:80
“HorzBorder”=dword:0
“HorzBlank”=dword:100
“HorzSize”=dword:0
“VertActive”=dword:280
“VertSync”=dword:1
“VertSyncPulse”=dword:4
“VertBorder”=dword:0
“VertBlank”=dword:1c
“VertSize”=dword:0
“Flags”=dword:1e
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6.2.4.3
Per Port Customization — Custom Flat Panel Controls
Similarly, the flat panel native resolution and power and backlight sequencing controls
can also be configured here.
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\Port\1\FPInfo]
; “BkltMethod”=dword:0
; “BkltT1”=dword:0
; “BkltT2”=dword:0
; “BkltT3”=dword:0
; “BkltT4”=dword:0
; “BkltT5”=dword:0
; “GpioPinVdd”=dword:0
; “GpioPinVee”=dword:0
; “GpioPinBklt”=dword:0
; “BkltEnable”=dword:0
; “UseGMCHClockPin”=dword:0
; “UseGMCHDataPin”=dword:0
Note:
For Per-Config, Per-Port configuration, the subkey path includes the correct "Config"
and "Port" numbers
6.2.4.4
Per Port Customization — Attribute Initialization
Attributes are also per config and per port. However, the actual keys are dependant on
the port driver being used. Below are examples of registry keys associated with
initializing attributes for the Chrontel Port Driver.
For complete information on port driver attributes, refer to Port Driver Attributes.
Note:
For Per-Config, Per-Port configuration, the subkey path includes the correct "Config"
and "Port" numbers.
The following example sets the port driver attributes using the attribute IDs. Please see
Internal TV Out Port Driver Attributes (Mobile chipsets only) for a list of attribute IDs
and their meanings.
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\ALL\1\Port\1\Attr]
“0”=dword:32
“1”=dword:4
“3”=dword:1
“8”=dword:1
“12”=dword:0
“14”=dword:1
“19”=dword:1
6.2.5
Miscellaneous Configuration Options
This section covers registry settings not in
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel].
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6.2.5.1
Text Anti-Aliasing
The Microsoft Windows CE driver supports text anti-aliasing. To switch it on, add these
registry settings:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\GDI\Fontsmoothing]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\GDI]
"ForceGRAY16"=dword:1
Note:
Text Anti-Aliasing should always be turned on when using a TV display device.
6.2.6
D3D Mobile Support
IEGD 9.0 supports Direct3D* Mobile on Windows CE 5.0 and 6.0. Users need to ensure
that their Windows CE target machine platform workspace has been included with D3D
Mobile support. This is done by simply dragging the D3D Mobile component from the
catalog view to the workspace in Windows CE 5.0 or turning it on via the check box in
Windows CE 6.0.
Also, the new IEGD D3D mobile driver binary, “iegd3dg3.dll” (part of the IEGD driver
release for Windows CE 5.0 and 6.0) needs to be included in the workspace image. Add
this binary into the “.BIB” configuration file of the target platform workspace (see
Sample FILES Block from platform.bib File):
iegd3dg3.dll <specify_path_here>\iegd3dg3.dll NK
No other IEGD registry configuration is necessary for this feature to work.
Note:
The IEGD Windows CE D3D Mobile feature requires more memory at runtime:
• For Windows CE 5.0, it is recommended that 64 Mbytes is configured via Platform
Builder (go to the Platform menu, choose Settings, and choose the Build Options
tab. Ensure the option labeled “Run-time Image Can be Larger than 32 Mbytes
(IMGRAM64=1)” is checked).
• For Windows CE 6.0, depending on the number of components built into the target
platform workspace, the amount of memory could be significantly more, due in part
to the new kernel memory architecture adopted by the OS (assuming all
multimedia components are built-in). It is recommended that 84 Mbytes of
memory be configured for the target machine workspace image. Refer to the
following Microsoft URL for information on how configure more than 64 Mbytes on
Windows CE 6.0:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa909457.aspx
See also the Sample iegd.reg File.
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6.2.7
Sample iegd.reg File
;****************** BEGIN INTEL DISPLAY DRIVER REGISTRY ENTRY *****************
;******************************************************************************
;*---------------------------------------------------------------------------;* Copyright (c) Intel Corporation (2002 - 2008).
;*
;* The source code contained or described herein and all documents
;* related to the source code ("Material") are owned by Intel
;* Corporation or its suppliers or licensors. Title to the Material
;* remains with Intel Corporation or it suppliers and licensors. The
;* Material contains trade secrets and proprietary and confidential
;* information of Intel or its suppliers and licensors. The Material is
;* protected by worldwide copyright and trade secret laws and
;* treaty provisions. No part of the Material may be used, copied,
;* reproduced, modified, published, uploaded, posted, transmitted,
;* distributed, or disclosed in any way without Intels prior express
;* written permission.
;*
;* No license under any patent, copyright, trade secret or other
;* intellectual property right is granted to or conferred upon you by
;* disclosure or delivery of the Materials, either expressly, by
;* implication, inducement, estoppel or otherwise. Any license
;* under such intellectual property rights must be express
;* and approved by Intel in writing.
;*---------------------------------------------------------------------------[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\GDI\Drivers]
"Display"="ddi_iegd.dll"
;******************************************************************************
; The Following Sections Provide
; General Driver-Wide Registry Settings
;******************************************************************************
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel]
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Following registry entry for
; pcf version used
; 700 : IEGD version
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"PcfVersion"=dword:700
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; This value dictates the configuration to select for Per-Port settings from
; port specific regsitry. The settings mirror Windows XP IEGD drivers
; implementation. Refer to the User’s Guide for details.
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"ConfigId"=dword:1
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Provide a list of port drivers to attempt to load upon boot time
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"PortDrivers"="lvds sdvo tv"
;******************************************************************************
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; The Following Sections Provide Per-Config configuration. The Platform string in
; the path can be “ALL” for all platforms, or any of the following for
; platform-specific configurations:
; Q35, GM965, Q965, 946GZ, 945G, 945GM, 915GV, and 915GM
;******************************************************************************
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\General]
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Following registry entries for display settings:resolution, bit depth and
; refresh rate
;
; Width & Height values must be hex, for example
; 1400x1050 : 578h x 41Ah
; 1280x1024 : 500h x 400h
; 1024x768 : 400h x 300h
; 800x600 : 320h x 258h
; 640x480 : 280h x 1E0h
; etc...
;
; In vertical extented mode, height is doubled
; 640x960 : 280h x 3c0
; 800x600 : 320h x 4b0h
; etc...;
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"Width"=dword:320
"Height"=dword:258
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Bit depth must be one of:
; 8bpp : 8
; 16bpp : 10
; 24bpp : 18
; 32bpp : 20
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"Depth"=dword:10
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Refresh rate must be in hex:
; 60 : 3c
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; 70 : 46
; 75 : 4b
; 85 : 55
; etc...
; any refresh rate as long as the display port supports it refresh of '0' will
; take the first refresh that matches width, height and bpp
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"Refresh"=dword:3c
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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; Following is registry entry for controlled configuration of video memory
; usage / location
;
; The following settings are for a 64M platform, where the video memory is 14M
; at the top the above settings are assuming there is no system bios / firmware
; that has stolen memory from top of memory. If it does exist reduce
; ReservedMemorySize avoiding overlap exception for ACSFL, memory area is
; reused
;
; NOTE: CURRENTLY THESE SETTINGS ARE REMARKED FOR DYNAMIC VIDEO MEMORY
; CONFIGURATION
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; "ReservedMemoryBase"=dword:03200000
; "ReservedMemorySize"=dword:00E00000
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Below is Maximum Frame Buffer Size used to limit the maximum size in bytes
; of the main frame buffer
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"MaxFbSize"=dword:300000
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Page Request Limit is used to control the max allocations of offscreen video
; surfaces, buffers etc.. value is in number of pages (4K).
; this is independant of dynamic or static memory configuration.
;
; The max for 915s, 945s = 256 Mbytes = 0x10000
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"PageReqLimit"=dword:8000
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Above settings are to define a minimum width and heigh that would allow for
; video surface allocations to succeed, eg: surfaces with width < 16 are
; forced to be in system-mem, surfaces with height < 16 are forced to be in
; system-mem only affects allocations of surfaces with GPE_PREFER_VIDEO_MEMORY
; flag
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"MinVidSurfX"=dword:10
"MinVidSurfY"=dword:10
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Following are the registry entries for acceleration configuration
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------Installing and Configuring Microsoft Windows CE Drivers
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; Set SysToVidStrech to '1' enables driver to perform System to Video stretch
; blits
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"SysToVidStretch"=dword:1
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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; Blend filterting method selection
; The hardware must be capable of
; support, else, emulation is done.
; Possible blend methods are:
; BlendFilter 0 == NEAREST
; BlendFilter 1 == BILINEAR
; BlendFilter 2 == ANISOTROPIC
; BlendFIlter 3 == 4X4
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"BlendFilter"=dword:2
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Option for enabling/disabling TEARING - Default is OFF
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Set '1' to enable the NOTEARING option
"TearFB"=dword:1
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Specify whether to enable d3d
; NO_D3D Value: 0(default)
; : 0 --> Enable D3D
; : 1 --> Disable D3D
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"NO_D3D"=dword:0
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Select Display configuration, single, twin ...
; Possible Display Config combo:
; DisplayConfig 1 == SINGLE
; (Single is default if none specified)
; DisplayConfig 4 == TWIN
; --> (Twin mode: common timing across ports)
; DisplayConfig 2 == CLONE
; --> (Clone mode: distinct timing per port)
; DisplayConfig 5 == VEXT (vertical extend)
; --> (Vert Extended modes : "Height" )
; ( registry key value must be 2X the )
; ( intended port timings. Both ports )
; ( must use the same timings. For )
; ( example, for port timings of )
; ( 800x600, the DisplayConfig should )
; ( be 5 and the Height=1200 or 0x4b0 )
; ( Overlay wont work in VEXT mode. )
; (915GV doesn't support Vext)
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"DisplayConfig"=dword:1
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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; Select Port Order
; PortOrder specifies the actual port that will be used for the primary and
; secondary ports. IF specified port is unavailable (port driver failed or
; display detection failed or port is not available on current chipset), then
; the next port in the above order will be used. PortOrder must be set,
; based on chipset specifications:
; On i915 chipsets:
; ================================
; 1 - Integrated TV Encoder
; 2 - sDVO B port/RGBA port
; 3 - sDVO C port
; 4 - Internal LVDS port
; 5 - Analog port
;
; On i865 chipsets:
; ================================
; 1 - sDVO A port
; 2 - sDVO B port/RGBA port
; 3 - sDVO C port
; 4 - Internal LVDS port
; 5 - Analog port
;
; On 835: If RGBA is used (sDVO B & C together), then use sDVO B number
; to specify any parameter for it.
;
; On i81x chipsets:
; =================
; Port numbers:
; 3 - sDVO port
; 5 - Analog port
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"PortOrder"="5432"
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Set Clone Port resolutions
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; "CloneWidth"=dword:320
; "CloneHeight"=dword:258
; "CloneRefresh"=dword:3c
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; Set "1" to enable Display Detection
; DisplayDetect is to detect display child device before using it
; (panel/tv/etc...).BEWARE, setting this to '1' will mean display for the
; requested port wont be enabled if detection failed. Use this option wisely.
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------"DisplayDetect"=dword:0
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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; Overlay Color Correction Settings
; Gamma: 32-bit integer in 24i.8f format, ranging from 0.6 - 6.0 decimal
; Brightness: 32-bit integer ranging from 0 to 0xFFFF. 0x8000 = no correction
; Contrast: 32-bit integer ranging from 0 to 0xFFFF. 0x8000 = no correction
; Saturation: 32-bit integer ranging from 0 to 0xFFFF. 0x8000 = no correction
;-----------------------------------------------------------------------------; "OverlayGammaCorrectR"=dword:100
; "OverlayGammaCorrectG"=dword:100
; "OverlayGammaCorrectB"=dword:100
; "OverlayBrightnessCorrect"=dword:8000
; "OverlayContrastCorrect"=dword:8000
; "OverlaySaturationCorrect"=dword:8000
;******************************************************************************
; The sections below are for the more detailed per port
; registry configurations. It follows the same usage model and
; key value meanings as the Windows INF registry configuration
; file. Refer to the User’s Guide for details.
;******************************************************************************
;------------------------------------------------------------------------; Config 1 - sDVO-B Port (For Almador) |
;------------------------------------------------------------------------; Following are the registry
; entries for port's general config
;------------------------------------------------------------------------;
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2\General]
;
; Advanced Edid Configuration
; --------------------------; "Edid"=dword:1
; "EdidAvail"=dword:7 ; STD TIMINGS + EDID TIMINGS + USER TIMINGS
; "EdidNotAvail"=dword:7 ; STD TIMINGS + USER TIMINGS
;
; EdidAvail and EdidNotAvail: <only 16 bits used>
; ---------- ------------; These 2 parameters can be used to control the available timings for
; any display. 'EdidAvail' is used when EDID is read from the display
; device. If an attempt to read EDID is failed or 'Edid = 0' then
; driver uses 'EdidNotAvail' flags.
;
; See below bit definitions for both 'EdidAvail' and 'EdidNotAvail'
;
; BIT 0:
; -----; 0 - Do not use driver built-in standard timings
; 1 - Use driver built-in standard timings
;
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; BIT1: <not applicable to EdidNotAvail>
; -----; 0 - Do not use EDID block
; 1 - Use EDID block and filter modes
;
; BIT2:
; -----; 0 - Do not use user-DTDs
; 1 - Use user-DTDs.
;
; BIT3-BIT15
; ----------; Future use.
;
; Default behavior:
; ----------------; If user doesn't provide EdidAvail and EdidNotAvail, then
; EdidAvail = Use Std timings + Use EDID block and Filter modes
; EdidNotAvail = Use Std timings
;
; Rotation Configuration
; ---------------------; "Rotation"=dword:0
; Rotation entries must be at a right
; angle. An invalid entry will be ignored and
; and no rotation will happen for primary.
; In clone or twin modes, the secondary
; port defaults to follow the primary (if set)
; 0 degrees = 0 (not rotated = default)
; 90 degrees = 5A
; 180 degrees = B4
; 270 degrees = 10E
;
; Flip Configuration
; ---------------------; "Flip"=dword:0
; Flip has a valid entry of 1 to turn on
; and 0 to turn off. When turn on the display
; will be horizontally flip.
;
; Rendered Scaling Configuration
; -----------------------------; "Scale"=dword:0
; Scale works as a boolean switch. Valid
; entries are zero or 1. When "Scale" = 1,
; IEGD will scale the requested framebuffer
; resolution to the fixed native panel size
; indicated by per-port FPInfo, User-DTD or
; EDID (in that order).
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; In clone or twin modes, the secondary
; port defaults to follow the primary (if set)
;------------------------------------------------------------------------; Following are the registry entries
; for port's sDVO I2C settings
;------------------------------------------------------------------------;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2\sDVO]
; "I2cPin"=dword:2
; "I2cDab"=dword:70
; "I2cSpeed"=dword:0
; "DdcPin"=dword:0
; "DdcSpeed"=dword:0
;------------------------------------------------------------------------; Following are the registry entries
; for port's flat panel's mode-limits,
; power and backlight control
;------------------------------------------------------------------------;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2\FPInfo]
; Only need Width & Height if Panel cannot accept other timings
; "BkltMethod"=dword:3
; "BkltT1"=dword:1E
; "BkltT2"=dword:4
; "BkltT3"=dword:4
; "BkltT4"=dword:14
; "BkltT5"=dword:1F4
; "GpioPinVdd"=dword:27
; "GpioPinVee"=dword:26
; "GpioPinBklt"=dword:28
; "UseGMCHClockPin"=dword:0
; "UseGMCHDataPin"=dword:0
;------------------------------------------------------------------------; Following are the registry entries
; for ports first custom DTD mode to add
;------------------------------------------------------------------------;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2\DTD\1]
; "PixelClock"=dword:9c40
; "HorzActive"=dword:320
; "HorzSync"=dword:28
; "HorzSyncPulse"=dword:80
; "HorzBorder"=dword:0
; "HorzBlank"=dword:100
; "HorzSize"=dword:0
; "VertActive"=dword:280
; "VertSync"=dword:1
; "VertSyncPulse"=dword:4
; "VertBorder"=dword:0
; "VertBlank"=dword:1c
; "VertSize"=dword:0
; "Flags"=dword:1e
;-------------------------------------------------------------------------
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; Following are the registry entries
; for ports second custom DTD mode to add
; (Up to 255 can be added)
;------------------------------------------------------------------------;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2\DTD\2]
; "PixelClock"=dword:9c40
; "HorzActive"=dword:320
; "HorzSync"=dword:28
; "HorzSyncPulse"=dword:80
; "HorzBorder"=dword:0
; "HorzBlank"=dword:100
; "HorzSize"=dword:0
; "VertActive"=dword:258
; "VertSync"=dword:1
; "VertSyncPulse"=dword:4
; "VertBorder"=dword:0
; "VertBlank"=dword:1c
; "VertSize"=dword:0
; "Flags"=dword:1e
;------------------------------------------------------------------------; Following are the registry
; entries for the port device'
; display attribute parameters
; Use when enabling Port device
; example below is for Conexant
; on Port2 (sDVO-B for almador)
; key names depend on port driver
;------------------------------------------------------------------------;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2\Attr]
; "Brightness"=dword:32
; "Contrast"=dword:4
; "Flicker Filter"=dword:1
; "Saturation"=dword:4
; "Hue"=dword:32
; "Text Filter"=dword:0
; "Macrovision"=dword:0
; "Overscan ratio"=dword:1
; "TV Format"=dword:1
; "TV Output"=dword:1
; "Composite and S-Video"=dword:1
;-------------------------------------------------------------------------
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; Config 1 - Analog Port (For Any Chipset)
;------------------------------------------------------------------------;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\5\General]
; "Edid"=dword:1
; "EdidAvail"=dword:7 ; STD TIMINGS + EDID TIMINGS + USER TIMINGS
; "EdidNotAvail"=dword:7 ; STD TIMINGS + USER TIMINGS
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\Config\1\Port\5\attr]
; GAMMA, BRIGHTNESS, CONTRAST
; "35"=dword:a0a0a0 ; gamma: 3i.5f format for R-G-B, ranging 0.6 to 6
; "36"=dword:808080 ; brightness: 0 to FF, 0x80 is no correction
; "37"=dword:808080 ; contrast: 0 to FF, 0x80 is no correction
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\Config\1\Port\5\DTD\1]
; "PixelClock"=dword:9c40
; "HorzActive"=dword:320
; "HorzSync"=dword:28
; "HorzSyncPulse"=dword:80
; "HorzBorder"=dword:0
; "HorzBlank"=dword:100
; "HorzSize"=dword:0
; "VertActive"=dword:280
; "VertSync"=dword:1
; "VertSyncPulse"=dword:4
; "VertBorder"=dword:0
; "VertBlank"=dword:1c
; "VertSize"=dword:0
; "Flags"=dword:1e
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\5\DTD\2]
; "PixelClock"=dword:9c40
; "HorzActive"=dword:320
; "HorzSync"=dword:28
; "HorzSyncPulse"=dword:80
; "HorzBorder"=dword:0
; "HorzBlank"=dword:100
; "HorzSize"=dword:0
; "VertActive"=dword:258
; "VertSync"=dword:1
; "VertSyncPulse"=dword:4
; "VertBorder"=dword:0
; "VertBlank"=dword:1c
; "VertSize"=dword:0
; "Flags"=dword:1e
;--------------------------------------------------------------------------
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; Config 1 - Int-LVDS Port (For 915GM) |
;-------------------------------------------------------------------------;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\4\General]
; "Edid"=dword:1
; "EdidAvail"=dword:7 ; STD TIMINGS + EDID TIMINGS + USER TIMINGS
; "EdidNotAvail"=dword:7 ; STD TIMINGS + USER TIMINGS
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\4\FPInfo]
; Only need Width & Height if Panel cannot except other timings
; "BkltMethod"=dword:0
; "BkltT1"=dword:0
; "BkltT2"=dword:0
; "BkltT3"=dword:0
; "BkltT4"=dword:0
; "BkltT5"=dword:0
; "GpioPinVdd"=dword:0
; "GpioPinVee"=dword:0
; "GpioPinBklt"=dword:0
; "UseGMCHClockPin"=dword:0
; "UseGMCHDataPin"=dword:0
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\4\Attr]
; "27"=dword:1
; Attribute "27" = Dual Channel (boolean)
; "18"=dword:1
; Attribute "18" = Panel Fit Upscale (boolean)
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\4\DTD\1]
; "PixelClock"=dword:9c40
; "HorzActive"=dword:320
; "HorzSync"=dword:28
; "HorzSyncPulse"=dword:80
; "HorzBorder"=dword:0
; "HorzBlank"=dword:100
; "HorzSize"=dword:0
; "VertActive"=dword:280
; "VertSync"=dword:1
; "VertSyncPulse"=dword:4
; "VertBorder"=dword:0
; "VertBlank"=dword:1c
; "VertSize"=dword:0
; "Flags"=dword:1e
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\4\DTD\2]
; "PixelClock"=dword:9c40
; "HorzActive"=dword:320
; "HorzSync"=dword:28
; "HorzSyncPulse"=dword:80
; "HorzBorder"=dword:0
; "HorzBlank"=dword:100
; "HorzSize"=dword:0
; "VertActive"=dword:258
; "VertSync"=dword:1
; "VertSyncPulse"=dword:4
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; "VertBorder"=dword:0
; "VertBlank"=dword:1c
; "VertSize"=dword:0
; "Flags"=dword:1e
;-------------------------------------------------------------------------; Config 1 - sDVO Port-B (For Napa)
;-------------------------------------------------------------------------;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1]
; "name"="IEGD sDVO Configuration File"
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2]
; "name"="svga"
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2\FPInfo]
; For a sDVO driver, sample settings for the panel:1400x1050
; Only need Width & Height if Panel cannot except other timings
; "Width"=dword:578
; "Height"=dword:41A
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Drivers\Display\Intel\915GV\1\Port\2\Attr]
; "27"=dword:1
; Attribute "27" = Dual Channel (boolean)
; Optional - Only enable for font anti-aliasing
; Enabling this causes minor performance impact
; Only recommended for TV Output.
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\GDI\Fontsmoothing]
;
;[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\GDI]
; "ForceGRAY16"=dword:1
;******************* INTEL DISPLAY DRIVER REGISTRY ENTRY END ******************
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7.0
Installing and Configuring Linux OS Drivers
This topic describes the configuration and installation of the IEGD for Linux systems.
The IEGD supports X-servers from the X.org* and XFree86* organizations.
The Intel Linux driver is for use with the integrated graphics of Intel chipsets on the
Embedded Intel Architecture roadmap. The driver supports 8-, 16- and 24-bit pixel
depths, dual independent head configuration on capable hardware, flat panel, hardware
2D acceleration, hardware cursor, the XV extension, and the Xinerama extension.
7.1
Overview
Kernel patches, separate DRM modules, and kernel recompilation were all necessary in
previous versions of the Intel Embedded Graphics Driver. In version 9.0, the IEGD
Kernel Module (IKM) contains a combination of the agpgart and DRM modules which
must be present for the Intel Embedded Graphic Driver. Both modules have been
modified for the IEGD architecture and are combined with the Linux kernel.
The IEGD Linux distribution package contains drivers built for the following X-Servers:
• XFree86 version 4.3.0
• X.org version 6.7
• X.org version 6.8
• X.org version 7.0 (Used for X.org 6.9 or 7.0)
• X.org version 7.1
• X.org version 7.2
• X.org version 7.3
The IEGD has been tested with the official version of these servers from the
www.Xfree86.org or the www.X.org Web sites and may not operate with other versions
of these servers.
During the installation, the X -version command returns a result indicating the
server version, not the X.org version as was done in earlier versions. The table below
shows the corresponding versions for the supported X.org packages.
Table 36.
X.org and X-version Conversion Reference
X.org Package Version
X-version Command Result
7.2
1.2 or 1.3
7.3
1.3
See also:
• “Prerequisites”
• “Supported Hardware”
• “Installation”
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7.2
Prerequisites
The following lists the prerequisites for installing and configuring the IEGD Linux driver.
• Platform with supported Intel chipset.
• Platform with a minimum of 128 Mbytes.
• Resolution and timing specifications for the display devices that will be configured.
• Driver package consisting of directories and files (see the following reduced
samples, which are located under the IEGD Linux directory).
Note:
In the following, “Xorg-X11R7.0” is an example X server version that should be
replaced with the version to be used.
— Documents/Relnotes
Documents/UsersGuide.pdf
Documents/Xorg-X11R7.0/iegd.4
Documents/Xorg-X11R7.0/IntelEscape.3x
— License/License.txt
— Driver/<xserver name>/iegd_drv.o (or iegd_drv.so for Xorg
7.0)
Driver/<xserver name>/libXlibXiegd_escape.a
Driver/<xserver name>/libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0
Driver/<xserver name>/iegd_escape.h
Driver/<xserver name>/lvds.so
Driver/<xserver name>/tv.so
• Linux kernel source tree for active running kernel.
— AGPGART must be enabled as a module.
— Direct Rendering support enabled.
• XFree86 version 4.2, XFree86 version 4.3, X.org version 6.7.0, X.org version 6.8.2,
or X.org version 7.0 X-Server installed and functional.
— Directory paths to XFree86 or X.org installation and
configuration files.
• Other system capabilities
— Ncurses (SUSE 10), etc.
— IEGD Kernel Module for GART and DRM patches
• System administration privileges.
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7.2.1
Supported Hardware
IEGD supports the following chipsets with integrated graphics:
• Intel® GM45 Express chipset
• Intel® System Controller Hub US15W chipset
• Intel® Q35 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® GME965 Express chipset
• Intel® Q965 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GSE Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GME Express chipset
• Intel® 945G Express chipset
• Intel® 915GV Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 915GME Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 910GMLE Express chipset
7.3
Installation
Refer to Section 1.7, “Downloading the IEGD and Video BIOS” on page 17 for
instructions on obtaining the software. You can then install the IEGD by performing the
instructions for your specific distribution in the following sections:
• “Installing Fedora Core 5 or Fedora 7” on page 149
• “Installing SUSE 10” on page 151
• “Installing Novell Linux POS 9 SP3” on page 153
• “Installing Other Kernels” on page 155
• “Enabling Damn Small Linux” on page 184
Note:
If you are using a Linux distribution different from those for which these instructions
are designed, you may need to adapt the steps for your specific situation.
7.3.1
Installing Fedora Core 5 or Fedora 7
1. Log into to a system administration account.
2. Untar the driver package to a convenient location.
tar -xvzf <driver package.tgz>
This creates a directory structure in the directory where you extracted the .tgz file
and contains the following directories:
— IEGD_X_x_Linux - Contains the Documents, Driver, License, and Utilities
subdirectories, where X is the major version and x is the minor version.
The Documents subdirectory contains the Xfree86 and Xorg-X11 subdirectory.
These directories contain man pages for the IEGD.
The Driver directory contains subdirectories the supported versions of XFree
and Xorg.
The Utilities directory contains IEGD utilities, including the iegdgui runtime
configuration utility.
— IEGD_Patches - Contains files for patching the Linux kernel agpgart module.
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3. Check the version of the X-Server your system is running. Type the following
command:
X -version
Note:
For Fedora Core 5, the result from this command is 7.0. For Fedora 7, the result from
this command is 1.3 which equates to 7.2 for IEGD. Refer to Table 36 on page 147 to
convert from the X -version command to IEGD's naming convention.
4. Copy the IEGD driver binary, iegd_drv.o (or iegd_drv.so), from the
IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/<xserver name> directory to the X-Server's
modules/drivers directory, where X is the major version and x is the minor
version.
— For FC5 (X.org-7.0 based distribution), the default location is /usr/lib/X11/
lib/modules/drivers. This location can vary by distribution so check your
system for the proper path and replace X and x with the correct version
numerals.
cd IEGD_9_0_Linux/Driver/Xorg-X11R7.0
cp iegd_drv.so /usr/lib/xorg/modules/drivers
— For FC7 (X.org-7.2 based distribution), the default location is /usr/lib/X11/
lib/modules/drivers. This location can vary by distribution so check your
system for the proper path and replace X and x with the correct version
numerals.
cd IEGD_9_0_Linux/Driver/Xorg-X11R7.2
cp iegd_drv.so /usr/lib/xorg/modules/drivers
5. Copy the necessary port driver files (*.so files in the IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/
<xserver name> directory) to the X-Server lib/modules directory, where X is
the major version and x is the minor version. The default installation location is /
usr/lib/xorg/modules. This location can vary, so check your system for the
proper path. After the required port drivers have been copied, you can specify them
in the PortDrivers option in the Device section of the config file. For more
information on specifying the PortDrivers option, refer to Table 37, “Supported
Driver Options” on page 167. For example, to copy all the port drivers use the
following command:
cp *.so /usr/lib/xorg/modules
6. Copy the escape control library libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 from the
IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/<xserver name> directory to the X-Server library
directory, where X is the major version and x is the minor version. The default
installation location is /usr/lib. For example,
cp libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 /usr/lib
7. In the X-Server library directory, create symbolic links for the escape library
aliases:
cd /usr/lib
ln -s libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 libXiegd_escape.so
ln -s libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 libXiegd_escape.so.2
ldconfig
8. From the IEGD_X_x_Linux/Documents directory, where X is the major version
and x is the minor version, copy the driver man page, iegd.4, to the man/man4
directory. The default installation location is /usr/share/man/man4. This
location can vary by distribution so check your system for the proper path and
replace X and x with the correct version numerals. For example:
cd IEGD_9_0_Linux/Documents/Xorg-X11
cp iegd.4 /usr/share/man/man4
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9. For Fedora Core 5, use the IKM Patch Instructions in Section 7.4 on page 156 which
is the preferred method, or use Section 7.6, “GART Patch Instructions (for Fedora
Core 5 Only)” on page 160.
For Fedora 7, proceed to step 10.
10. For Fedora 7 only, execute the following commands:
cd IEGD_Patches/IKM
./install.sh
(Note: if a permissions error is displayed, do a chmod +x install.sh)
depmod -a
modprobe iegd_mod
11. Modify your xorg.conf file to include a device section for this driver and a Monitor
section for your display. See Section 7.7.1, “Configuration Overview” on page 161
for details on the driver configuration and the list of supported options. The default
installation location for this file is /etc/X11.
12. Reboot
7.3.2
Installing SUSE 10
1. Log into to a system administration account.
2. Untar the driver package to a convenient location.
tar -xvzf <driver package.tgz>
This creates a directory structure in the directory where you extracted the .tgz file
and contains the following directories:
— IEGD_X_x_Linux - Contains the Documents, Driver, License, and Utilities
subdirectories, where X is the major version and x is the minor version.
The Documents subdirectory contains the Xfree86 and Xorg-X11 subdirectory.
These directories contain man pages for the IEGD.
The Driver directory contains subdirectories for the supported versions of XFree
and Xorg.
The Utilities directory contains IEGD utilities, including the iegdgui runtime
configuration utility.
— IEGD_Patches - Contains files for patching the Linux kernel agpgart module.
3. Check the version of the X-Server your system is running. Type the following
command:
X -version
Note:
For SUSE 10 the result from this command is normally Xorg 11 6.8.2. If the command
returns a different result, refer to Table 36 on page 147 to convert from the X -version
command to IEGD's naming convention.
4. Copy the IEGD driver binary, iegd_drv.o (or iegd_drv.so), from the
IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/<xserver name> directory, where X is the major
version and x is the minor version, to the X-Server's modules/drivers directory.
For SUSE 10 (X.org-6.8 based distribution), the default location is /usr/X11R6/
lib/modules/drivers.
This location can vary by distribution so check your system for the proper path and
replace X and x with the correct version numerals.
cd IEGD_9_0_Linux/Driver/Xorg-X11R6.8
cp iegd_drv.o /usr/X11R6/lib/modules/drivers
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Note:
Depending on your installation you may need to copy the IEGD driver to an alternate
location:
cp iegd_drv.o /usr/lib/xorg/modules/drivers
5. Copy the necessary port driver files (*.so files in the IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/
<xserver name> directory) to the X-Server lib/modules directory, where X is
the major version and x is the minor version. The default installation location is /
usr/X11R6/lib/modules. This location can vary, so check your system for the
proper path. Once the required port drivers have been copied, you can specify
them in the PortDrivers option in the Device section of the config file. For more
information on specifying the PortDrivers option, refer to Table 37, “Supported
Driver Options” on page 167. For example, to copy all the port drivers use the
following command:
cp *.so /usr/X11R6/lib/modules
6. Copy the escape control library libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 from the
IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/<xserver name> directory to the X-Server library
directory, where X is the major version and x is the minor version. The default
installation location is /usr/X11R6/lib. For example,
cp libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 /usr/X11R6/lib
7. In the X-Server library directory, create symbolic links for the escape library
aliases:
cd /usr/X11R6/lib
ln -s libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 libXiegd_escape.so
ln -s libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 libXiegd_escape.so.2
ldconfig
8. From the IEGD_X_x_Linux/Documents directory, copy the driver man page,
iegd.4, to the man/man4 directory, where X is the major version and x is the
minor version. The default installation location is /usr/X11R6/man/man4. This
location can vary by distribution so check your system for the proper path and
replace X and x with the correct version numerals. For example:
cd IEGD_9_0_Linux/Documents/Xorg-X11
cp iegd.4 /usr/X11R6/man/man4
9. Use the IKM Patch Instructions in Section 7.4.3, “Installing IKM with SUSE” on
page 158.
Note:
You must have your kernel source and GCC installed for this step. If you do not have
these installed, you can use the YAST and search for “kernel”, select it, then search for
“GCC” and select it. At this point you should also ensure that the kernel is set for
loadable modules.
At this point, when X Windows starts, it should be using the IEGD driver. To verify this,
you can check your Xorg log, or run the iegdgui utility (found in the Utilities
directory).
Note:
You may need to set the iegdgui file properties to be executable before it will run.
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7.3.3
Installing Novell Linux POS 9 SP3
1. Log into a system administration account.
2. Untar the driver package to a convenient location.
tar -xvzf <driver package.tgz>
This creates a directory structure in the directory where you extracted the .tgz file
and contains the following directories:
— IEGD_X_x_Linux - Contains the Documents, Driver, License, and Utilities
subdirectories, where X is the major version and x is the minor version.
The Documents subdirectory contains the Xfree86 and Xorg-X11
subdirectory. These directories contain man pages for the IEGD.
The Driver directory contains subdirectories for XFree86-4.3, Xorg-6.7,
Xorg-6.8, and Xorg-7.0.
The Utilities directory contains IEGD utilities, including the iegdgui runtime
configuration utility.
— IEGD_Patches - Contains files for patching the Linux kernel agpgart module.
Note:
You must have the following installed to successfully install the IEGD gcc, patch, and
make.
3. Check the version of the X-Server your system is running. Type the following
command:
X -version
Note:
For NLPOS 9 the result from this command is normally XFree86 4.4.0 RC 2. If the
command returns a different result, refer to Table 36 on page 147 to convert from the
X -version command to IEGD's naming convention.
4. Copy the IEGD driver binary, iegd_drv.o (or iegd_drv.so), from the
IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/<xserver name> directory, where X is the major
version and x is the minor version, to the X-Server's modules/drivers directory.
For NLPOS 9 (XFree86 based distribution), the default location is /usr/X11R6/
lib/modules/drivers/.
This location can vary by distribution so check your system for the proper path and
replace X and x with the correct version numerals.
cd IEGD_9_0_Linux/Driver/Xorg-X11R6.8
cp iegd_drv.o /usr/X11R6/lib/modules/drivers/
5. Copy the necessary port driver files (*.so files in the IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/
<xserver name> directory) to the X-Server lib/modules directory, where X is
the major version and x is the minor version. The default installation location is /
usr/X11R6/lib/modules. This location can vary, so check your system for the
proper path. After the required port drivers have been copied, you can specify them
in the PortDrivers option in the Device section of the config file. For more
information on specifying the PortDrivers option, refer to Table 37, “Supported
Driver Options” on page 167. For example, to copy all the port drivers use the
following command:
cp *.so /usr/X11R6/lib/modules
6. Copy the escape control library libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 from the
IEGD_X_x_Linux/Driver/<xserver name> directory to the X-Server library
directory, where X is the major version and x is the minor version. The default
installation location is /usr/X11R6/lib. For example,
cp libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 /usr/X11R6/lib
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7. In the X-Server library directory, create symbolic links for the escape library
aliases:
cd /usr/X11R6/lib
ln -s libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 libXiegd_escape.so
ln -s libXiegd_escape.so.2.0.0 libXiegd_escape.so.2
ldconfig
8. From the IEGD_X_x_Linux/Documents directory, copy the driver man page,
iegd.4, to the man/man4 directory, where X is the major version and x is the
minor version. The default installation location is /usr/X11R6/man/man4. This
location can vary by distribution so check your system for the proper path and
replace X and x with the correct version numerals. For example:
cd IEGD_9_0_Linux/Documents/Xorg-X11
cp iegd.4 /usr/X11R6/man/man4
9. Use the IKM Patch Instructions in Section 7.4 on page 156.
Note:
You must have your kernel source and GCC installed for this step. If you do not
have these installed, you can use the YAST and search for “kernel”, select it,
then search for “GCC” and select it. At this point you should also ensure that
the kernel is set for loadable modules.
You can use the IKM method described in Section 7.4, “IKM Patch Instructions”
on page 156 instead of using the instructions below. You need to use only one
of the patching methods, either the IKM or the GART patch.
To patch a Linux 2.6.xxxx kernel with the GART changes:
a.
cd into the kernel source directory (e.g., cd /usr/src/linux-2.x.xxxx).
For NLPOS it is:
cd /usr/src/linux-2.6.5-7.244
b.
Execute the patch command (e.g., patch -p1 < .../IEGD_Patches/
Driver/agpgart.patch-2.x.xxxx). For NLPOS use:
patch -p1 < .../IEGD_Patches/Driver/agpgart.patch-2.6.5-7.244
To update the kernel:
a.
cd to the kernel source directory (e.g., cd /usr/src/linux-2.x.xxxx)
cd /use/src/linux-2.6.5-7.244
b.
Since the agpgart is typically built-in by default, it needs to be configured to
install it as a module before updating the kernel.
make menuconfig
From the configuration menu, select Device Drivers, then Character
Devices. Scroll down to /dev/agpgart. Change the disposition to M (for
Module). Exit from the configuration menu and save your changes.
c.
Execute the make all modules command:
make all
d.
Install the modules and build the kernel:
make modules_install && make install
e.
Reboot.
f.
If you did not edit the grub.conf file, select the custom kernel.
Note:
Make sure that the newly updated kernel is the one being booted.
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g.
Run the following commands:
modprobe agpgart
modprobe intel-agp
h.
To ensure the agpgart modules are loaded after a reboot, add the following line
to the /etc/modprobe.conf file:
alias char-major-10-175 intel-agp
i.
Modify your xorg.conf file to include a device section for this driver and a Monitor
section for your display. See Section 7.7.1, “Configuration Overview” on
page 161 for details on the driver configuration and the list of supported options.
The default installation location for this file is /etc/X11.
Note:
The CED utility generates generic Linux X config samples using “Screen0” and
“Monitor0” entries but a standard install of NLPOS seems to require
“Screen[0]” and “Monitor[0]” in the Xorg.conf file.
j.
Reboot.
At this point, when X Windows starts, it should be using the IEGD driver. To verify this,
you can check your Xorg log, or run the iegdgui utility (found in the Utilities
directory).
Note:
You may need to set the iegdgui file properties to be executable before it will run.
7.3.4
Installing Other Kernels
The instructions for Fedora Core 5 and SUSE 10 describe how to patch and use IEGD
with a 2.6.x kernel. If you are using a 2.4.x kernel, the patch step is slightly different:
1. To patch the Linux 2.4.2x kernel with the GART changes:
a.
cd into the kernel source directory (e.g., cd /usr/src/linux-2.x.xxx)
b.
Execute the patch command. For example:
patch -p1 < .../IEGD_Patches/Driver/agpgart.patch-2.x.xxx
2. To update the kernel:
a.
cd to the kernel source directory (e.g., cd /usr/src/linux-2.x.xxx)
b.
Execute the make modules command.
make modules
c.
Install the modules.
make modules_install
3. Reboot and if you did not edit the grub.conf file, select the custom kernel.
4. Run the following commands:
modprobe agpgart
modprobe intel-agp
5. To ensure the agpgart modules are loaded after a reboot, add the following line to
the /etc/modprobe.conf file:
alias char-major-10-175 intel-agp
6. Modify your XF86Config or xorg.conf file to include a device section for this driver
and a Monitor section for your display. See Section 7.7.1, “Configuration Overview”
for details on the driver configuration and the list of supported options. The default
installation location for this file is /etc/X11.
7. Reboot.
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7.4
IKM Patch Instructions
The IKM process is designed to replace the need to patch your kernel GART and DRM. If
you plan to use the patch method of installing IEGD, do NOT use this IKM process.
Using the IKM process is the preferred method for installing IEGD.
See also the following topics:
• “Finding and Installing the Kernel Source (Headers)”
• “Installing IKM with Fedora”
• “Installing IKM with SUSE”
• “Using the IEGD Kernel Module”
7.4.1
Finding and Installing the Kernel Source (Headers)
• Building the IKM requires a kernel build tree.
This should be at least a partial kernel source tree and most importantly, the exact
kernel .config file used for the build as well as several files generated at kernel
build time.
• KERNEL_VERSION is the output of the command uname -r
• If you use a kernel from your distribution you will typically have a package with all
the files required to build kernel modules for your kernel image.
— On Fedora and compatibles (e.g., RedHat) this is the kernel-devel package.
Or if you run kernel-smp or kernel-xen, you need kernel-smp-devel or
kernel-xen-devel, respectively.
— On SUSE you need the package kernel-source.
— In some distributions (e.g., in RHEL or Fedora) the installation of the kerneldevel / kernel-headers package will be a newer version than the one you
currently run. In such a case, you may need to upgrade the kernel package
itself and reboot.
For details, see:
• “Installing IKM with Fedora”
• “Installing IKM with SUSE”
7.4.2
Installing IKM with Fedora
1. Install kernel-$ARCH-devel. The version of the package must be the same as
the running kernel. Replace $ARCH with architecture of the kernel (e.g., smp).
2. Install Kernel-devel from the CD/DVD or through the yum utility.
3. Install the kernel source for the version you are running by choosing one of the
following methods.
— If you are using a CD or DVD, search for the rpm package for kernel-$ARCHdevel and install using
rpm -ivh kernel-$ARCH-devel
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— For the yum utility, type the following command:
yum install kernel-devel
This will install kernel-devel and resolve dependencies. Note that, as stated
earlier, kernel-devel that is installed through this method might not be the
same version as a running kernel. In this case IKM compilation might be
successful, however, when trying to insert it to the running kernel, modprobe/
insmod will produce an error. The solution is to upgrade the kernel-package
itself and reboot to make the Linux OS run the updated kernel.
4. Hardlink is a utility that consolidates duplicates files in one or more directories by
traversing the directories and searching for duplicate files. When Hardlink finds
duplicate files, it uses one of them as the master, removes all other duplicates, and
places a hardlink for each one pointing to the master file.
Download Hardlink from the Fedora site:
http://fedora.secsup.org/linux/core/5/i386/os/Fedora/RPMS/hardlink-1.01.21.2.i386.rpm
5. Install Hardlink using one of the methods described below
— Run the following command:
rpm -ivh hardlink-1.0-1.21.2.i386.rpm
— Run the following command through yum utility, making sure the computer is
connected to the Internet:
yum install hardlink
Hardlink is now installed and will resolve any dependencies.
6. Compile the module using the following commands:
cd IEGD_Patches/IKM
./install.sh
depmod -a
modprobe iegd_mod
7. Modify your xorg.conf file to include a device section for this driver and a Monitor
section for your display. See Section 7.7.1, “Configuration Overview” on page 161
for details on the driver configuration and the list of supported options. The default
installation location for this file is /etc/X11.
Note:
The CED utility generates generic Linux X config samples using “Screen0” and
“Monitor0” entries but a standard install of NLPOS seems to require
“Screen[0]” and “Monitor[0]” in the Xorg.conf file.
8. Reboot.
At this point, when X Windows starts, it should be using the IEGD driver. To verify this,
you can check your Xorg log, or run the iegdgui utility (found in the Utilities
directory).
Note:
You may need to set the iegdgui file properties to be executable before it will run.
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7.4.3
Installing IKM with SUSE
1. Install kernel-source.$ARCH.rpm.
2. Change to the /usr/src/linux directory.
3. Configure the kernel using
make cloneconfig
4. Create files required for compiling external modules:
make scripts && make prepare
5. Change to directory /lib/modules/<runningkernelversion>
6. Delete 'build' links by running
rm -rf build
7. Create a build links file pointing to the kernel source:
ln -s /usr/src/linux-<kernel_version> build
8. Compile the module using the following commands:
cd IEGD_Patches/IKM
./install.sh
depmod -a
modprobe iegd_mod
9. Modify your xorg.conf file to include a device section for this driver and a Monitor
section for your display. See Section 7.7.1, “Configuration Overview” on page 161
for details on the driver configuration and the list of supported options. The default
installation location for this file is /etc/X11.
Note:
The CED utility generates generic Linux X config samples using “Screen0” and
“Monitor0” entries but a standard install of NLPOS seems to require
“Screen[0]” and “Monitor[0]” in the Xorg.conf file.
10. Reboot.
At this point, when X Windows starts, it should be using the IEGD driver. To verify this,
you can check your Xorg log, or run the iegdgui utility (found in the Utilities
directory).
Note:
You may need to set the iegdgui file properties to be executable before it will run.
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7.4.4
Using the IEGD Kernel Module
Note:
This needs to be run after adding the IEGD components and updating the symbolic
links in the Linux OS.
An installation script is provided to perform the installation. The script generates the
Makefile together with the compilation environment for that particular kernel or distro.
To install the IKM, run the shell script provided:
cd IEGD_Patches/IKM
./install.sh
The installation script detects the kernel version and points to the proper header files
location before creating the Makefile. The script then calls the Make program to start
the compilation process. After compilation is complete, the script tries to install the
IKM. If the script is run from a normal user, it prompts for the superuser password
before copying the generated file and then runs the following command to resolve
module dependencies:
depmod -a
To insert the module into the kernel, run
modprobe iegd_mod
This will load all the modules that iegd_mod depends on before loading iegd_mod itself.
IKM installation requires a matching kernel source tree and a working Linux build
system. Some of the programs require some additional libraries; for example, a hard
link is required by Fedora Core 5.
7.5
Uninstalling the IKM
To uninstall the IKM, run the install script described in Section 7.4.4 on page 159 with
following argument:
./install.sh uninstall
This deletes the IKM file from kernel module location and invokes
depmod -a
to resolve dependencies for other module. A reboot might be required because IKM
cannot be removed through the rmmod utility if a previous agpgart is part of the kernel
image.
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7.6
GART Patch Instructions (for Fedora Core 5 Only)
Note:
You must have your kernel source and GCC installed for this procedure. If you
do not have these installed, you will need to follow the kernel install
instructions on the Redhat Web site and use your software installer for
development tools. At this point you should also ensure that the kernel is set
for loadable modules.
You can use the IKM method described in Section 7.4, “IKM Patch Instructions”
on page 156 instead of using the instructions below. You need to use only one
of the patching methods, either the IKM or the GART patch.
To patch a Linux 2.6.xxxx kernel with the GART changes:
1. cd into the kernel source directory (e.g., cd /usr/src/linux-2.x.xxxx). For
FC5 it is:
cd /usr/src/redhat/BUILD/kernel-2.6.15/linux-2.6.15.i686
2. Execute the patch command (e.g., patch -p1 < .../IEGD_Patches/Driver/
agpgart.patch-2.x.xxxx). For FC5 use:
patch -p1 < .../IEGD_Patches/Driver/agpgart.patch-2.6.15-1.2054
To update the kernel:
1. cd to the kernel source directory (see above).
2. Since the agpgart is typically built-in by default, it needs to be configured to install
it as a module before updating the kernel.
make menuconfig
From the configuration menu, select Device Drivers, then Character
Devices. Scroll down to /dev/agpgart. Change the disposition to M (for
Module). Exit from the configuration menu and save your changes.
3. Execute the make all modules command:
make all
4. Install the modules and build the kernel:
make modules_install && make install
5. Reboot.
6. If you did not edit the grub.conf file, select the custom kernel.
Note:
Make sure that the newly updated kernel is the one being booted.
7. Run the following commands:
modprobe agpgart
modprobe intel-agp
8. To ensure the agpgart modules are loaded after a reboot, add the following line to
the /etc/modprobe.conf file:
alias char-major-10-175 intel-agp
9. Modify your xorg.conf file to include a device section for this driver and a Monitor
section for your display. See Section 7.7.1 for details on the driver configuration
and the list of supported options. The default installation location for this file is
/etc/X11.
Note:
You may need to disable SELinux security to allow the IEGD driver to load.
Alternatively, you will need to configure SELinux to allow IEGD to operate.
10. Reboot.
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At this point, when X Windows starts, it should be using the IEGD driver. To verify this,
you can check your Xorg log, or run the iegdgui utility (found in the Utilities
directory).
Note:
You may need to set the iegdgui file properties to be executable before it will run.
7.7
Editing the Linux OS Configuration File
This section describes how to edit the Linux configuration files (XF86Config or
xorg.conf) for use with the IEGD.
The Intel Linux driver is for use with the integrated graphics of Intel chipsets on the
Embedded Intel Architecture roadmap. The driver supports 8-, 16- and 24-bit pixel
depths, dual independent head setup on capable hardware, flat panel, hardware 2D
acceleration, hardware cursor, the XV extension, and the Xinerama extension.
7.7.1
Configuration Overview
IEGD auto-detects all device information necessary to initialize the integrated graphics
device in most configurations. However, you can customize the IEGD configuration for
any supported display by editing the X-server’s configuration file (XF86Config or
xorg.conf ). Please refer to the XF86Config(5x) or Xorg(5x) man page for
general configuration details. This section only covers configuration details specific to
the IEGD.
To configure the IEGD for the Linux OS, you must edit the X server’s configuration file
(XF86Config or xorg.conf ). You can either edit the configuration directly or you can
use CED to create configurations that must then be copied into the configuration file.
Even if you use CED to create a configuration, you must still edit the Linux
configuration file.
The following topics describe methods of configuring the IEGD for the Linux operating
system.
• “Linux OS Configuration Using CED”
• “Editing the Linux OS Configuration File Directly”
• “XFree86 and Xorg Configuration Options”
• “Sample Dual Independent Head (DIH) Configuration”
• “Video Memory Management”
• “Configuring Accelerated Video Decode for IEGD driver and US15W”
• “Graphics Port Initialization”
• “OpenGL Support”
See also The Linux OS Configuration File for details on the file structure.
7.7.2
Linux OS Configuration Using CED
You can configure the Linux driver settings using CED as described in Section 3.0,
“Platform Configuration Using CED” on page 25.
The output file (yourbuildnamehere.x) from CED contains the settings required to
configure the IEGD for Linux systems and can be pasted into the appropriate sections
of the XF86Config or xorg_conf file.
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7.7.3
Editing the Linux OS Configuration File Directly
Instead of using the CED, as described in Section 3.0, “Platform Configuration Using
CED” on page 25, you can edit the XF86Config or xorg.conf file directly. The
following procedure outlines the steps to follow when editing the Linux configuration
file. Section 7.7.4, “The Linux OS Configuration File” on page 162 provides details on
each section of the configuration file.
1. Log in as root and open the configuration file for editing. The configuration file is
typically located in the /etc/X11 directory but may be located elsewhere on your
system.
2. In the Device section of the configuration file, enter the appropriate information
for your driver. The configuration file must have at least one Device section. The
Device section lets you define information about IEGD. You can use a single
Device section for single, twin, or clone configurations. For Dual Independent
Head configurations, you must specify a second Device section.
3. In the Screen section, enter information for each display in your configuration.
The configuration file must have at least one Screen section. The Screen section
binds a Device with a Monitor and lets you define resolution modes for the
display. The Screen section is referenced in the ServerLayout section of the
configuration file.
4. In the Monitor section, define monitor specifications and timings that will be used
for the display. You must have a Monitor section defined for each display in your
configuration. The Monitor section is referenced by the Screen section.
5. Save your changes to the file. For systems booted to run level 3, startx to restart.
For systems booted to run level 5, kill X (Alt-backspace) to restart. Reboot if
necessary.
7.7.4
The Linux OS Configuration File
To configure the IEGD for use with the Linux OS, you must edit the Linux configuration
file (XF86Config or xorg.conf ). There are several sections within the configuration
that must be edited or created, including:
• “Device Section”
• “Screen Section”
• “Monitor Section”
• “ServerLayout Section” (when configuring DIH)
• “ServerFlags Section” (when configuring Xinerama)
The above Sections are described following the Sample XF86Config File. Please see the
XF86Config or xorg.conf man pages for complete details.
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Figure 37.
Sample XF86Config File
# XFree86 4 configuration created by redhat-config-xfree86
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier
Screen
0
InputDevice
InputDevice
InputDevice
"Default Layout"
"Screen0" 0 0
"Mouse0" "CorePointer"
"Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
"DevInputMice" "AlwaysCore"
EndSection
Section "Files"
# RgbPath is the location of the RGB database.
Note, this is the name of the
# file minus the extension (like ".txt" or ".db").
There is normally
# no need to change the default.
# Multiple FontPath entries are allowed (they are concatenated together)
# By default, Red Hat 6.0 and later now use a font server independent of
# the X server to render fonts.
RgbPath
"/usr/X11R6/lib/X11/rgb"
FontPath
"unix/:7100"
EndSection
Section "Module"
Load "dbe"
Load "extmod"
Load "fbdevhw"
Load "glx"
Load "record"
Load "freetype"
Load "type1"
EndSection
Section "InputDevice"
# Specify which keyboard LEDs can be user-controlled (eg, with xset(1))
#
Option"Xleds""1 2 3"
# To disable the XKEYBOARD extension, uncomment XkbDisable.
#
Option"XkbDisable"
# To customise the XKB settings to suit your keyboard, modify the
# lines below (which are the defaults).
For example, for a non-U.S.
# keyboard, you will probably want to use:
#
Option"XkbModel""pc102"
# If you have a US Microsoft Natural keyboard, you can use:
#
Option"XkbModel""microsoft"
#
# Then to change the language, change the Layout setting.
# For example, a German layout can be obtained with:
#
Option"XkbLayout""de"
# or:
#
Option"XkbLayout""de"
#
Option"XkbVariant""nodeadkeys"
#
# If you would like to switch the positions of your capslock and
# control keys, use:
#
Option"XkbOptions""ctrl:swapcaps"
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# Or if you just want both to be controled, use:
#
Option"XkbOptions""ctrl:nocaps"
#
Identifier "Keyboard0"
Driver
"keyboard"
Option
"XkbRules" "xfree86"
Option
"XkbModel" "pc105"
Option
"XkbLayout" "us"
EndSection
Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Mouse0"
Driver
"mouse"
Option
"Protocol" "IMPS/2"
Option
"Device" "/dev/psaux"
Option
"ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
Option
"Emulate3Buttons" "no"
EndSection
Section "InputDevice"
# If the normal CorePointer mouse is not a USB mouse then
# this input device can be used in AlwaysCore mode to let you
# also use USB mice at the same time.
Identifier "DevInputMice"
Driver
"mouse"
Option
"Protocol" "IMPS/2"
Option
"Device" "/dev/input/mice"
Option
"ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
Option
"Emulate3Buttons" "no"
EndSection
Section "Monitor"
Identifier
"Monitor0"
VendorName
"Monitor Vendor"
ModelName
"Eizo T550"
DisplaySize 290220
HorizSync
30.0 - 82.0
VertRefresh 50.0 - 160.0
Option
"dpms"
EndSection
Section "Monitor"
Identifier
VendorName
ModelName
"Monitor1"
"SamSung"
"SyncMaster 192MP"
EndSection
Section "Device"
Identifier
Driver
VendorName
BoardName
BusID
Screen
Option
Option
Option
Option
"Intel_IEGD-0"
"iegd"
"Intel(R) DEG"
"Embedded Graphics"
"0:2:0"
0
"PcfVersion"
"ConfigId"
"ALL/1/name"
"ALL/1/General/PortOrder"
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"1792"
"1"
"IEGD_Example"
"42000"
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Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
Option
"ALL/1/General/DisplayConfig" "1"
"ALL/1/General/DisplayDetect" "0"
"ALL/1/General/CloneRefresh"
"60"
"ALL/1/General/CloneWidth"
"1280"
"ALL/1/General/CloneHeight"
"1024"
"ALL/1/Port/4/name"
"ALL/1/Port/4/General/EdidAvail"
"ALL/1/Port/4/General/EdidNotAvail"
"ALL/1/Port/4/General/Rotation"
"ALL/1/Port/4/General/Edid"
"ALL/1/Port/2/name"
"ALL/1/Port/2/General/EdidAvail"
"ALL/1/Port/2/General/EdidNotAvail"
"ALL/1/Port/2/General/Rotation"
"ALL/1/Port/2/General/Edid"
"PortDrivers"
"Sample_LVDS"
"3"
"1"
"0"
"1"
"Sample_SDVO"
"3"
"1"
"0"
"1"
"lvds sdvo"
EndSection
Section "Screen"
Identifier
"Screen0"
Device
"IntelIEGD-1"
Monitor
"Monitor0"
DefaultDepth
16
SubSection "Display"
Depth
16
Modes
"800x600" "640x480"
EndSubSection
EndSection
Section "DRI"
Group
Mode
0
0666
EndSection
7.7.4.1
Device Section
The Device section provides a description of a graphics device. The Linux
configuration file (XF86Config or xorg.conf ) must have at least one Device
section for the graphics driver. If your chipset supports multiple graphics pipelines, you
may have multiple Device sections, but in most situations, only one is required. If you
are creating a Dual Independent Head (DIH) configuration, you must have at least two
Device sections.
The Device sections in the XF86Config and xorg.conf configuration files have the
following format:
Section “Device”
Identifier “devname”
Driver “iegd”
...
EndSection
The Identifier field defines the device. This name is used to associate the device
with a screen and is referenced in Screen sections.
The Driver field defines the driver to use and is a required field in the Device
section. The intel driver, intel_drv.o, must be installed in the /usr/X11R6/lib/
modules/drivers directory.
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The remainder of the Device section can contain IEGD-specific options. Please see
Table 37 on page 167 for a list and description of IEGD supported options.
7.7.4.2
Screen Section
The Screen section is used to bind a Screen with a Device and a Monitor. It is also
used to define resolution modes, color depths, and various other screen characteristics.
Please see the XF86Config or xorg man page for detailed information.
The Screen section has the following format:
Section “Screen”
Identifier
“screenname”
Device
“devname”
Monitor
“Monitor0”
DefaultDepth
24
Subsection “Display”
Depth
24
Modes
“1280x1024” “1024x768” “800x600” “640x480”
EndSubSection
EndSection
7.7.4.3
Monitor Section
Use the Monitor section to define monitor characteristics and timings for a display.
You should have one Monitor section for each display your system supports. The
Monitor section is referenced in a Screen section and has the following format.
Section “Monitor”
Identifier “Monitor0”
VendorName “NEC”
MonitorName “MEC MultiSync LCD”
HorizSync
30-60
VertRefresh
50-75
...
EndSection
7.7.4.4
ServerLayout Section
The ServerLayout section defines the overall layout of the system configuration.
Input devices are specified in the InputDevice fields and output devices usually consist
of multiple components (such as a graphics board and a monitor, which are bound
together in a Screen section). You typically need to edit this section only when you are
using a DIH configuration. You need to add a line to reference the second Screen
section and specify its relative location to the first screen. In the following sample, the
line beginning with Screen 1... is required for DIH configurations.
Section “ServerLayout”
Identifier “Default Layout”
Screen 0 “Screen0” 0 0
Screen 1 “Screen1” RightOf “Screen0”
InputDevice entries...
EndSection
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7.7.4.5
ServerFlags Section
If you are configuring the IEGD for Xinerama support, you must set the “Xinerama”
option to “True” in the ServerFlags section of the configuration file.
Section “ServerFlags”
Option “Xinerama” “True”
EndSection
7.7.5
XFree86 and Xorg Configuration Options
The IEGD provides a format syntax for Linux configuration options. The syntax is
similar to the Microsoft Windows* INF file and is as follows:
“All/<ConfigID>/<block name>/<option name>”
The IEGD parses the configuration options and looks for “new-style” 4.0 and later
options. If it does not find any, then it falls back to processing old-style options.
The device configuration must contain the “pcfversion” option with value “0x700”. This
indicates to the driver the options format to use. Earlier pcfversions (0 and 0x400) are
supported for backward compatibility.
The IEGD driver supports multiple sets of installed configuration options that may be
selected at runtime.
Configuration ID 0 is used unless otherwise specified in the configuration file or
supplied by the system BIOS.
The table below shows the supported driver options.
Table 37.
Supported Driver Options (Sheet 1 of 3)
Option
Option “PcfVersion” “integer”
Description
This option indicates that the new IEGD format is
being used for the Linux Configuration files
(XF86Config or xorg.conf). The new format is
hierarchical (similar to the Microsoft Windows* INF
file) and allows both global and per-configuration
information to be stored in the X-server’s configuration
file (XF86Config or xorg.conf) rather than having
per-configuration information stored separately in the
EDIDx.bin file.
This option is usually set to 0400 hex (1024 decimal)
and is required for the new format.
Option "SWCursor" "boolean"
Enable the use of the software cursor. The default is off
and the hardware cursor is used.
Option "ShadowFB" "boolean"
Enable or disable double buffering on the framebuffer.
The default is that double buffering is disabled.
Option "TearFB" "boolean"
Disable or enable wait for vblank when doing blits. The
default is to not wait for vblank when doing blits. This
is faster but may cause visible tearing of the display.
Set to “1” (default) to not wait for vblank
Set to “0” to wait for vblank to reduce tearing
Option "XVideo" "boolean"
Disable or enable XVideo support. In a dual
independent head configuration, either the first display
or the second display support XVideo. Both displays
cannot support XVideo simultaneously. The default is
XVideo support is enabled.
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Table 37.
Supported Driver Options (Sheet 2 of 3)
Option
Description
Option "XVideoBlend" "boolean"
Disable or enable XVideo support using the 3D blend
manager. This provides XVideo support in
configurations that cannot be supported with overlay.
For example, this is supported on both displays in a
dual independent head setup. It is also supported
when the display is rotated or flipped. Color key is only
supported if ShadowFB is enabled and the VideoKey is
defined. The default is XVideoBlend support is
enabled.
Option “ConfigID” “integer”
This option identifies the configuration.
Option “All/<ConfigID>/Name” “string”
A quoted string used to identify the configuration
name.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Comment" "string"
A quoted string used to identify the configuration file.
Comment is a required field for Linux configurations.
Option "PortDrivers" "string"
This option specifies which port driver(s) must be
loaded. The list is a space- or comma-separated list of
port driver names corresponding to the *.so port
driver files included with the Linux OS version of the
driver.
The port driver for the built-in analog output from the
GMCH is always included and does not need to be
specified in the PortDrivers option.
The port drivers for the built-in LVDS and TV
components (on chipsets with such features) are NOT
automatically included. The "lvds" and "inttv" port
drivers must be specified in order to use those output
ports.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/General/PortOrder" "string"
This option can be used to change the default port
allocation order. The default order can vary depending
on chipset. List the port type numbers in the priority
order starting from first to last. The port type numbers
are as follows:
1 - Integrated TV Encoder (mobile chipsets only)
2 - sDVO B port
3 - sDVO C port
4 - Integrated LVDS port (mobile chipsets only)
5 - Analog CRT port
To set the order as Integrated TV Encoder, ANALOG,
LVDS, sDVO C, sDVO B set the PortOrder string to
"15432". Zeros can be used to specify don’t care.
Setting this option incorrectly can result in port
allocation failures.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/General/Rotation"
"integer"
Rotate the display. Valid values are 0, 90, 180, 270.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/General/Flip" "boolean"
Invert the display horizontally.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/VideoKey" "integer"
This sets the color key for XVideo and XVideoBlend.
This value is either a 24-bit value or a 16-bit value,
depending on the pixel depth of the screen. The color
key is always enabled for XVideo, even when it is not
defined. The color key is always disabled for
XVideoBlend unless both this option is defined and the
ShadowFB option is enabled. The default color key for
XVideo is 0x0000ff00. For XVideoBlend, the color key
is disabled by default.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/CloneWidth" "integer"
This sets the display width for a clone port when
CloneDisplay is active. The default is 640.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/CloneHeight" "integer"
This sets the display height for a clone port when
CloneDisplay is active. The default is 480.
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Table 37.
Supported Driver Options (Sheet 2 of 3)
Option
Description
Option "XVideoBlend" "boolean"
Disable or enable XVideo support using the 3D blend
manager. This provides XVideo support in
configurations that cannot be supported with overlay.
For example, this is supported on both displays in a
dual independent head setup. It is also supported
when the display is rotated or flipped. Color key is only
supported if ShadowFB is enabled and the VideoKey is
defined. The default is XVideoBlend support is
enabled.
Option “ConfigID” “integer”
This option identifies the configuration.
Option “All/<ConfigID>/Name” “string”
A quoted string used to identify the configuration
name.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Comment" "string"
A quoted string used to identify the configuration file.
Comment is a required field for Linux configurations.
Option "PortDrivers" "string"
This option specifies which port driver(s) must be
loaded. The list is a space- or comma-separated list of
port driver names corresponding to the *.so port
driver files included with the Linux OS version of the
driver.
The port driver for the built-in analog output from the
GMCH is always included and does not need to be
specified in the PortDrivers option.
The port drivers for the built-in LVDS and TV
components (on chipsets with such features) are NOT
automatically included. The "lvds" and "inttv" port
drivers must be specified in order to use those output
ports.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/General/PortOrder" "string"
This option can be used to change the default port
allocation order. The default order can vary depending
on chipset. List the port type numbers in the priority
order starting from first to last. The port type numbers
are as follows:
1 - Integrated TV Encoder (mobile chipsets only)
2 - sDVO B port
3 - sDVO C port
4 - Integrated LVDS port (mobile chipsets only)
5 - Analog CRT port
To set the order as Integrated TV Encoder, ANALOG,
LVDS, sDVO C, sDVO B set the PortOrder string to
"15432". Zeros can be used to specify don’t care.
Setting this option incorrectly can result in port
allocation failures.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/General/Rotation"
"integer"
Rotate the display. Valid values are 0, 90, 180, 270.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/General/Flip" "boolean"
Invert the display horizontally.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/VideoKey" "integer"
This sets the color key for XVideo and XVideoBlend.
This value is either a 24-bit value or a 16-bit value,
depending on the pixel depth of the screen. The color
key is always enabled for XVideo, even when it is not
defined. The color key is always disabled for
XVideoBlend unless both this option is defined and the
ShadowFB option is enabled. The default color key for
XVideo is 0x0000ff00. For XVideoBlend, the color key
is disabled by default.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/CloneWidth" "integer"
This sets the display width for a clone port when
CloneDisplay is active. The default is 640.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/CloneHeight" "integer"
This sets the display height for a clone port when
CloneDisplay is active. The default is 480.
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Table 37.
Supported Driver Options (Sheet 2 of 3)
Option
Description
Option "XVideoBlend" "boolean"
Disable or enable XVideo support using the 3D blend
manager. This provides XVideo support in
configurations that cannot be supported with overlay.
For example, this is supported on both displays in a
dual independent head setup. It is also supported
when the display is rotated or flipped. Color key is only
supported if ShadowFB is enabled and the VideoKey is
defined. The default is XVideoBlend support is
enabled.
Option “ConfigID” “integer”
This option identifies the configuration.
Option “All/<ConfigID>/Name” “string”
A quoted string used to identify the configuration
name.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Comment" "string"
A quoted string used to identify the configuration file.
Comment is a required field for Linux configurations.
Option "PortDrivers" "string"
This option specifies which port driver(s) must be
loaded. The list is a space- or comma-separated list of
port driver names corresponding to the *.so port
driver files included with the Linux OS version of the
driver.
The port driver for the built-in analog output from the
GMCH is always included and does not need to be
specified in the PortDrivers option.
The port drivers for the built-in LVDS and TV
components (on chipsets with such features) are NOT
automatically included. The "lvds" and "inttv" port
drivers must be specified in order to use those output
ports.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/General/PortOrder" "string"
This option can be used to change the default port
allocation order. The default order can vary depending
on chipset. List the port type numbers in the priority
order starting from first to last. The port type numbers
are as follows:
1 - Integrated TV Encoder (mobile chipsets only)
2 - sDVO B port
3 - sDVO C port
4 - Integrated LVDS port (mobile chipsets only)
5 - Analog CRT port
To set the order as Integrated TV Encoder, ANALOG,
LVDS, sDVO C, sDVO B set the PortOrder string to
"15432". Zeros can be used to specify don’t care.
Setting this option incorrectly can result in port
allocation failures.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/General/Rotation"
"integer"
Rotate the display. Valid values are 0, 90, 180, 270.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/General/Flip" "boolean"
Invert the display horizontally.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/VideoKey" "integer"
This sets the color key for XVideo and XVideoBlend.
This value is either a 24-bit value or a 16-bit value,
depending on the pixel depth of the screen. The color
key is always enabled for XVideo, even when it is not
defined. The color key is always disabled for
XVideoBlend unless both this option is defined and the
ShadowFB option is enabled. The default color key for
XVideo is 0x0000ff00. For XVideoBlend, the color key
is disabled by default.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/CloneWidth" "integer"
This sets the display width for a clone port when
CloneDisplay is active. The default is 640.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/CloneHeight" "integer"
This sets the display height for a clone port when
CloneDisplay is active. The default is 480.
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Table 37.
Supported Driver Options (Sheet 3 of 3)
Option
Description
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/CloneRefresh" "integer"
This sets the display vertical refresh rate for a clone
port when CloneDisplay is active. The default is 60 Hz.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/Active" "boolean"
Make the device ports active and enabled on startup.
This is the default. When this option is set to FALSE,
the driver will allocate the output ports for this device
but will not set the mode or enable the output. To
enable the output, the port control extension must be
used.
Option "All/<ConfigID>/Port/<port number>/EDID" "boolean"
Enable or disable reading of EDID data from the output
port device. Note that if the EDID option is specified in
the config file (XF86Config or xorg.conf), all per-port
EDID options in the configuration are overwritten by
the EDID option specified in the config file.
7.7.6
Sample Dual Independent Head (DIH) Configuration
For dual independent head operation, several additional options must be set in the
Device sections for each head. Both Device sections must specify the BusID, and the
BusID must be the same for both devices. Each Device section must specify the
Screen section that will associate the device with the Screen option.
BusID - B:F:S (Bus, Function, Slot)
Screen - number
The example below shows a sample DIH configuration. Only the Device, Screen, and
Server Layout sections of the configuration file are shown. For a complete example
of a configuration file, see Figure 37 on page 163.
Figure 38.
Sample DIH Configuration
Section "Device"
Identifier "IntelEGD-1"
Driver
"iegd"
BusID
"0:2:0"
Screen
0
VideoRam
32768
EndSection
Section "Device"
Identifier "IntelEGD-2"
Driver
"iegd"
BusID
"0:2:0"
Screen
1
VideoRam
32768
EndSection
Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen 1"
Device
"IntelEGD-1"
Monitor
"Monitor1"
DefaultDepth 24
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Subsection "Display"
Depth
8
Modes
"1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
ViewPort
0 0
EndSubsection
Subsection "Display"
Depth
16
Modes
"1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
ViewPort
0 0
EndSubsection
Subsection "Display"
Depth
24
Modes
"1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
ViewPort
0 0
EndSubsection EndSection
Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen 2"
Device
"IntelEGD-2"
Monitor
"Monitor2"
DefaultDepth 24
Subsection "Display"
Depth
8
Modes
"1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480
ViewPort
0 0
EndSubsection
Subsection "Display"
Depth
16
Modes
"1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
ViewPort
0 0
EndSubsection
Subsection "Display"
Depth
24
Modes
"1280x1024" "1024x768" "800x600" "640x480"
ViewPort
0 0
EndSubsection
EndSection
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Dual Head Layout"
Screen "Screen 1"
Screen "Screen 2" Right Of "Screen 1"
InputDevice "Mouse1" "CorePointer"
InputDevice "Keyboard1" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection
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7.7.7
Video Memory Management
The Intel integrated graphics controllers have a unified memory architecture that uses
system memory for video RAM. The amount of memory used is not fixed and depends
on the configuration. Address space for framebuffers and back buffers is always
reserved, along with some scratch space for 2D and 3D acceleration. Use of some
features such as Video Overlay also affect video memory allocations. The amount of
video memory allocated for pixmap surfaces is configurable. By default, 16 Mbytes is
used for each screen. You can change this with the VideoRam option in the Device
section of the configuration file. It may be set to any reasonable value up to 32 Mbytes.
Increasing this value reduces the amount of system memory available for other
applications. This value is in units of 1024 Kbytes (32 Mbytes is represented by 32768).
7.7.8
Configuring Accelerated Video Decode for IEGD driver and
US15W
7.7.8.1
Hardware Video Acceleration
Hardware Video Acceleration is the use of a specialized video engine to decode video
streams (such as MPEG2, MPEG4, h.264 and VC-1) in order to free up the processor
from having to do all of the decoding. Only some chipsets (such as the US15W) support
a video engine. The flow of video through the various components generally is as
follows:
1. The video player (such as Splay) reads video file and determines the type.
2. Based on type, the proper codec shared library object is loaded.
3. The codec loads the VA library shared library object.
4. The VA library loads the iegd_drv_video.so shared library object.
5. The iegd_drv_video_so communicates, over the X wire protocol, with the IEGD
X driver to send encoded video to the hardware for decoding.
You can either use the provided binary of the libva library found in the appropriate
Xorg/Xserver directory in the IEGD release or build it from the source. To build it,
use the following steps:
1. Untar libva.tgz included in the IEGD driver package in the Extras folder.
2. Enter the following commands:
./autogen.sh --prefix=/usr
make
make install
7.7.8.2
IEGD Driver
First install the IEGD Graphics Driver for Linux per the appropriate installation
instructions in Section 7.3. IEGD should be fully configured and running X properly
before installing the VA Library.
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7.7.8.3
VA Library (version 0.29)
Install the VA shared library object on the library path using the steps below.
1. Untar libva-0.29.tgz included in the IEGD driver package.
2. Change to the directory where the library file is located (as built above or from the
IEGD release) and copy the libva.so.0.29.0 file to the /usr/lib folder using
the following command:
cp libva.so.0.29.0 /usr/lib
3. Create the library aliases:
ln -s /usr/lib/libva.so.0.29.0 /usr/lib/libva.so
ln -s /usr/lib/libva.so.0.29.0 /usr/lib/libva.so.0
4. Set the Libva environment variable to point to the correct folder:
Set LIBVA_DRIVERS_PATH to point to the location of the IEGD driver. The following
is an example (with the BASH command shell):
export LIBVA_DRIVERS_PATH=/usr/lib/xorg/modules/
Your driver location may vary, so please use the path to where you installed the IEGD
drivers. To make this “sticky” you may want to add this to your .profile, bashrc or
whatever your distribution uses to store these variables.
7.7.8.4
IEGD Video Acceleration Driver
To install the provided Video Acceleration Driver (iegd_drv_video.so):
1. Change to the appropriate Xorg/Xserver directory where you unpacked the IEGD
release.
2. Copy the driver to the directory where you installed the main IEGD driver from
Section 7.3. For example:
cp iegd_drv_video.so /usr/lib/xorg/modules/drivers
Note:
Your actual directory will vary depending on your particular Linux distribution.
7.7.8.5
Helix Framework Installation
Set up the Helix Framework environment to use accelerated video playback with the
IEGD driver using the steps below.
1. Download helix-dbu-server and splay plug-ins from:
https://helix-client.helixcommunity.org/releases
You will need to accept the Helix DNA Technology Binary Research Use License
agreement and register an account before downloading the software.
a.
Download the latest Splay Plug-ins files.
Example: splay-plugin-atlas-01.2.0.tgz
b.
Download the latest Helix DBUS Server files.
Example: helix-dbus-server-0.6.0.tar.bz2
2. Untar splay-plugins.tgz and copy the contents to the directory
/usr/lib/helix/splay
3. Untar helix-dbus-server-0.6.0.tar.bz2
4. Run make install from the helix-dbus-server-0.6.0 directory.
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7.7.8.6
Intel® Media Codec Installation
The latest EVALUATION ONLY versions of the VA API enabled hardware accelerated
codecs for Helix are available on:
• The Intel VIP site (https://platformsw.intel.com/) or
• The Intel Premier Support site in the IEGD product org (premier.intel.com)
After you have the codec package, follow these steps to install it:
1. Untar the codec package.
2. Copy libipp_hx_*.so to /usr/lib/helix/splay
3. Remove /usr/lib/helix/splay/mpgfformat.so
4. Remove /usr/lib/helix/splay/h264dec.so
5. Remove /usr/lib/helix/splay/mp4vrender.so
6. Remove /usr/lib/helix/splay/wmvrender.so
7. Remove /usr/lib/helix/splay/wmv9.so
7.7.8.7
Playing Video
The video player application used must support the Helix plug-in framework. A sample
player (splay) is included and known to work. The splay application is located in the
/usr/lib/helix/splay directory.
To play a video, enter the following command:
— /usr/lib/helix/splay/splay -l /usr/lib/helix/splay <Video file>
where <Video file> is replaced with an actual file name.
7.7.8.8
Troubleshooting
1. If the “splay” application quits silently, try removing the helix configuration files
~/.helix, ~/.hxplayerrc, and ~/.realplayerrc.
2. Check the codec version numbers using the script get_lib_version.sh
included with the codecs. The output should be:
libipp_hx_ac3ad.so
-> ipp_hx_version:20080401:1.8.4.1
libipp_hx_h264vd.so -> ipp_hx_version:20080401:1.8.4.1
libipp_hx_mp2sp.so
-> ipp_hx_version:20080401:1.8.4.1
libipp_hx_mp2vd.so
-> ipp_hx_version:20080401:1.8.4.1
libipp_hx_mp4vd.so
-> ipp_hx_version:20080401:1.8.4.1
libipp_hx_vc1vd.so
-> ipp_hx_version:20080401:1.8.4.1
3. If you receive the following message when you try to play video:
libva: Trying to open /usr/X11R6/lib/modules/dri/
iegd_drv_video.so
libva: va_openDriver() returns -1
make sure the LIBVA_DRIVERS_PATH environment variable is set to the location
where you installed the iegd_drv_video.so file. Typically this would be /usr/
lib/xorg/modules/drivers.
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7.7.9
Graphics Port Initialization
When used with a graphic chipset that supports multiple graphics pipelines, the driver
supports multiple screens and Xinerama. This support is enabled by creating additional
Device sections for each additional graphics device on the PCI bus. The driver locates
the first device on the bus and associates it with the device section that matches (or
one that does not specify a busID). This becomes the primary display. If the chipset
supports multiple display pipes, and the config file specifies two Device sections and
two Screen sections, the driver attempts to operate in a dual-independent head mode.
After all the graphics devices and device sections have been matched up, the driver
attempts to allocate any remaining output ports and attach them to the primary
graphics device. For example:
• Two pipes and two ports allows for dual independent displays.
• One pipe and two ports allows for a cloned display (915GV special case).
7.7.10
OpenGL Support
The IEGD supports OpenGL* for the following Intel chipsets:
• Mobile Intel® GME965 Express chipset
• Intel® Q965 Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GSE Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 945GME Express chipset
• Intel® 945G Express chipset
• Mobile Intel® 915GME Express chipsets
• Intel® 915GV Express chipsets
• Mobile Intel® 910GMLE Express chipset
The OpenGL implementation for IEGD consists of three components.
• libGL: This is the shared library that implements the OpenGL and GLX APIs. It is
linked by all OpenGL applications.
• iegd.ko: This is the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM). It is a kernel module that
provides the OpenGL application with the permissions necessary to directly access
the DMA buffers used by libGL.
• X Server: The existing IEGD X server driver has been enhanced to communicate
with libGL.
Installing the IEGD OpenGL driver provides a fully hardware accelerated
implementation of the OpenGL library to applications. This implementation makes use
of a Direct Rendering technology, which allows the client to directly write to DMA
buffers that are used by the graphics hardware.
Due to the use of direct rendering technology, system designers should take special
care to ensure that only trusted clients are allowed to use the OpenGL library. A
malicious application could otherwise use direct rendering to destabilized the graphics
hardware or, in theory, elevate their permissions on the system.
A system designer can control the access to the direct rendering functionality by
limiting the access to the DRI device file located at:
/dev/dri/card0
The permissions on this device are set by the X-Server using the information provided
in the “DRI” section of the configuration file.
See also “OpenGL Installation”.
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7.7.10.1
OpenGL Installation
To install the IEGD libGL onto a system, copy the libGL.so binary from the package
to the standard location. Then compile and install the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM)
kernel module from the sources provided. Lastly, enable the DRI option in the X
server's configuration file.
Note:
The system likely has a version of libGL already installed. You may want to make a
backup copy of the existing library before installing the IEGD library. There are two
libGL binaries included in the package that each support different hardware types. Only
the one supporting target hardware should be installed. Chipsets of generation 3 and
earlier (945 and earlier) should use libGLgn3.so and generation 4 chipsets (965 and
above) should use libGLgn4.so.
1. cd IEGD_x_Linux/Driver/Xorg-X11R6.8/
Note:
This example is specific to Fedora Core 5. The locations and commands may be
different for a specific LINUX distribution.
2. cp libGLgn#.so /usr/lib/libGL.so.1.2
— For 910GMLE, 915GME, 915GV, 945GME, 945G
Use libGLgn3.so
— For Q965, GME965
Use libGLgn4.so
— Q35 is not supported in 9.0 (no 3D)
3. cd /usr/lib
4. ln -sfv /usr/lib/libGL.so.1.2 libGL.so
5. ln -sfv /usr/lib/libGL.so.1.2 libGL.so.1
6. ldconfig
Note:
Skip steps 7 and 8 if you are using the IKM method detailed in Section 7.4.
7. cd IEGD_Patches/Drm
8. make
This will build and install the kernel module for the currently running kernel. If
another kernel is installed or used, this step must be performed again.
9. depmod -Ae
10. Restart the X-Server or restart the system.
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7.7.10.2
OpenGL Use Considerations
Allocation of Mipmaps and Memory Usage
Under normal circumstances the OpenGL driver will allocate all mip levels for a texture
at allocation time. This is due to the fact that the OpenGL API allows an application to
make use of the mips without first conveying an intention to do so. All mips are
therefore available all the time.
The IEGD OpenGL driver has a special-case scenario to prevent the allocation of mips
when the application can ensure that they will never be populated or used. On some
hardware configurations this can save 50% on texture memory usage. To enable this
feature, the application should do the following:
Using glTexParameter*(), set the GL_TEXTURE_MAX_LEVEL parameter to 0 before
populating the texture (before any call to glTexImage2D()). This will prevent mips 1-N
from being allocated but will not prevent them from being used. If the mips are
inadvertently used, the results are undefined.
7.7.11
Sample Advanced EDID Configurations for Linux OS
The edid_avail and edid_not_avail parameters control the available timings for
any display. The edid_avail parameter is used when EDID information is read from
the display. If the driver is unable to read EDID information from the display or if the
edid parameter in the config file is set to “0” (disable), then the settings of the
edid_not_avail parameter are used. Please see Section 3.0, “Platform Configuration
Using CED” on page 25.
There is an edid option that can be placed in the XF86Config or xorg.conf files that
controls the behavior of the overall driver, and there are also EDID settings within CED
that control the behavior on each port (edid, edid_avail, and edid_not_avail).
The combination of these settings determines how the driver behaves. The table below
shows various configurations and the expected behavior of the driver.
Table 38.
Sample Advanced EDID Configurations for Linux OS
Case
XF86Config “edid”
option
CED: Per port “edid” option
Expected driver behavior
1.
No “edid” option specified
No edid flag specified
For every port, driver uses
edid_avail.
2.
No “edid” option specified
edid=0 for some ports and
edid=1 for some ports
For edid=0 ports, driver uses
edid_not_avail flags.
For edid=1 ports driver uses
edid_avail flags.
3.
“edid”=no
Setting does not matter.
For all ports driver will not read
edid and interprets
edid_not_avail flags.
Driver overrides any per-port
edid flags, treats all displays as
EDID-less displays, and uses
edid_not_avail flags.
4.
“edid”=yes
edid=0 for some ports and
edid=1 for some ports
Same as case 2
Notes: For all cases:
If there is not an edid_not_avail flag specified for a port, and an EDID-less display is detected, the
driver defaults to using the standard built-in timings for that port.
2. If there is not an edid_avail flag specified for a port, and an EDID display is detected, the driver defaults
to using the EDID data from the display, plus any user specified DTDs.
3. If edid=1 and the display device is EDID-less, the driver uses edid_not_avail flags.
1.
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7.7.12
AGP GART Errors
The following are the most common AGP GART errors:
1. Symptom: No “agpgart: ” in the system log
Cause: The IEGD AGP GART patch has not been applied to the system.
2. Symptom: The Xorg.0.log has the following:
(EE) INTEL(0): gart.c: Acquire IOCTL failed
Cause: The IEGD AGP GART module has not been loaded.
3. Symptom: When starting the X server, the following message is listed in the X log
file.
“Graphics hardware initialization failed.
The most likely cause is a missing or incorrect agpgart kernel module.
module_init returned -1”
Cause: The agpgart kernel module is not loaded or does not support the chipset
being used. Check the kernel messages for the message:
“agpgart: Detected an Intel xxxx chipset”
If this message is there, the agpgart is not the problem.
7.8
Using the IEGD Runtime Configuration GUI on Linux
Systems
You can change the configuration and runtime attributes of the driver using the iegdgui
runtime configuration tool. The iegdgui resides in the /Utilities directory. The
Intel Embedded Graphics Drivers GUI (iegdgui) is a GUI application that is used to view
and control the Intel Embedded Graphics Drivers. This tool is used to retrieve status
information of the display and driver and also to configure the supported display
attributes. The iegdgui also demonstrates multi-monitor support.
7.8.0.1
iegdgui Setup
To run the iegdgui, you need to ensure that the XServer has been configured to use
the IEGD. See Section 7.7.1, “Configuration Overview” on page 161 for details on
configuring and installing the IEGD.
You need GTK+ and libglade, which are part of the Linux distribution and should
already be installed.
Ensure that the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable points to the X11R6 library. If
it does not, type the following command:
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/X11R6/lib
Ensure the iegdgui is executable by changing directories to .../IEGD_X_x_Linux/
Utilities (where X is the major version and x is the minor version) and running the
following command:
ls -l iegdgui
Executable permissions should be set for all three Linux groups (user, group, world)
and should look like this:
rwxr_xr_x iegdgui ...
If the permissions do not contain an “x” for each group, change the permissions using
the following command:
chmod +rwx iegdgui
After you have completed this step, the IEGD can be launched.
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7.8.0.2
Using the iegdgui Runtime Configuration Utility
The iegdgui application provides four tabs: Driver Info, Display Config, Display
Attributes, and Color Correction.
• Driver Info: Contains the driver information.
• Display Config: Contains current display information and allows configuration of
display configurations, display resolutions for primary and secondary displays and
enabling/disabling of a specified port.
• Display Attributes: Contains the supported Port Driver (PD) attributes and allows
configuration of PD attributes.
• Color Correction — Contains current color-correction information for the
framebuffer and overlay. Using this tab, you can change the framebuffer and
overlay color settings.
To view current display information and or to change the current configuration of
display configurations, display resolutions of the primary and secondary displays and
enabling/disabling of a specified port, click the Display Config tab.
Note:
If you make any changes to the configuration, click Apply for the changes to take
effect.
The figure below shows a sample configuration.
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Figure 39.
Example Linux Runtime Configuration GUI — Display Config Tab
The Display Status section of the above dialog shows the current configuration for the
Primary and Secondary displays.
In the Display Configuration section of the dialog, select the required display
configuration in the Display Config drop-down list. This allows the user to choose
between Single, Twin, Clone and Extended for all connected ports. A maximum of two
ports per display configuration is currently allowed.
In the Primary Mode and Secondary Mode sections of the dialog, you can change
display resolutions via the Resolution drop-down list.
In the Display Settings section of the dialog, you can view and change the settings
for a port and then rotate and flip the display via the appropriate drop-down lists:
• Port: Allows you to select the required port.
• Port Status: Allows you to enable or disable the selected port.
Note:
If you change any configuration settings in the Display Config dialog box, click Apply
for the changes to take effect.
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To view or change the attributes for a port, click the Display Attributes tab. The
figure below shows a sample configuration. Please see Appendix B for detailed
information on port driver attributes.
Note:
If you make any changes to the port driver attributes, click Apply for the changes to
take effect.
Figure 40.
Example Linux Runtime Configuration GUI — Display Attributes Tab
To view and change color corrections, click the Color Correction tab. The figures
above and below show sample Color Correction tab screens for Framebuffer and
Overlay, color correction values for which are shown in Table 31 and Table 32.
Note:
If you make any changes to the color-correction attributes, click Apply for the changes
to take effect.
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Figure 41.
Example Linux Runtime Configuration GUI — Color Correction Tab
(Framebuffer)
The following steps present an example color-correction procedure:
a.
Select Framebuffer in the Surface section and select the appropriate port for
the color correction to be applied to or select Overlay in the Surface section for
color correction to be applied to the overlay.
b.
Select the required color to be corrected in the Color section.
c.
Select the required color attribute to be corrected in the Gamma Correction
section.
d.
Click Restore Defaults to restore the default values.
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Figure 42.
Example Linux Runtime Configuration GUI — Color Correction Tab (Overlay)
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7.9
Enabling Damn Small Linux
This section describes IEGD enablement of Damn Small Linux* (DSL) operating
system. For further DSL-specific information and downloads, please see
http://www.damnsmalllinux.org.
See also the following IEGD/DSL-related topics:
• Damn Small Linux OS Introduction
• XFree86 Versus TinyX
• Running IEGD on Damn Small Linux OS
• RAM Size Constraint
• Shrinking and Modifying the Extension
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7.9.1
Damn Small Linux OS Introduction
DSL is intended for “liveCD” or “frugal” installs, i.e., installed on a USB flash drive for
booting, which should only require 50 Mbytes. You can also experiment with a harddisk installation. Note that a minimal, 50-Mbyte flash drive installation is compressed
and loaded at boot time. This “original” DSL filetree is permanent and always gets
restored after each reboot. In addition, the compressed filetree is always located in the
first partition of the flash drive.
7.9.1.1
Extending Damn Small Linux OS
A second USB-drive partition (sda2) can be used for additional programs or files for use
with DSL; see the figure below. An external partition or CD-ROM can also be used for
such additional items. Note that for users to write or create new files, DSL uses a
RAMdisk, which means that at boot time a certain portion of the RAM is reserved as
disk space.
There are two main methods of adding items to DSL:
• myDSL — an extension package that adds new programs to DSL at boot time.
Please see the myDSL page (http://distro.ibiblio.org/pub/linux/distributions/
damnsmall/mydsl/) for extensions and installation instructions.
• Backup restore script in the original DSL file system.
Figure 43.
Damn Small Linux Partition
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7.9.2
XFree86 Versus TinyX
DSL uses TinyX* by default. To use XFree86* instead, see “XFree86.dsl.info” in the
XFree86.dsl package (http://distro.ibiblio.org/pub/linux/distributions/damnsmall/
mydsl/system/XFree86.dsl). Two changes, which are outlined in XFree86.dsl.info, are
required to enable XFree86.
Note:
IEGD works only with the optional XFree86 X server, not the default TinyX X server.
7.9.3
Running IEGD on Damn Small Linux OS
After the XFree86 package has been installed, you can install and use the IEGD driver.
The first thing to do is to try to get the agpgart compiled before running XFree. The
current DSL version, 2.3, uses kernel 2.4.26. The agpgart patch 2.4.24 (agpgart.patch2.4.24) is also used. Kernel source for 2.4.26 can be found on http://www.kernel.org/.
Due to the limited space/resources that a DSL system may have, it is advisable to
compile the agpgart in another distro before transferring it into DSL. Remember also to
disable version information in make menuconfig when you attempt to compile in an
external distro. During enablement of DSL, a RH9 distro is used to patch and compile
the agpgart in kernel 2.4.26.
Using RH9 as an example, execute the following commands:
1. Copy linux-2.4.26.tar.gz to /usr/src/
2. cd /usr/src
3. tar xzvf linux-2.4.26.tar.gz
4. cp /usr/src/linux2.4.20-8/configs/kernel-2.4.20-i686.config ./.config
5. cd /usr/src/linux-2.4.26
6. Apply patch agpgart.patch.2.4.24
7. Make clean
8. make mrproper
9. cp ../.config ./.
10. Make menuconfig.
Note:
For this step, remember to turn off version information under the kernel
loadable module section. Also check that agpgart is being compiled as a module
here.
11. make dep make bzImage modules
12. Copy agpgart from /usr/src/linux-2.4.26/drivers/char/agp/agpgart.o
13. Transfer agpgart to DSL /lib/modules/2.4.26/kernel/drivers/char/agp/agpgart.o
After the agpgart has been modprobed, copy all the IEGD files to the proper directory.
Startx and IEGD should be running then.
Check that IEGD is running by looking through the XFree logfile. It should be under
/var/log/. Also, “Intel Embedded Graphics Driver” should display.
After all this is done, you can ensure that IEGD is running after it has been rebooted.
Add the appropriate files for IEGD into .filetool.lst, include the agpgart.o in
/lib/modules/2.4.26/kernel/drivers/char/agp, and run filetool.sh
backup to back up the files. Next, change /opt/bootlocal.sh to modprobe the
agpgart at startup.
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7.9.4
RAM Size Constraint
A 128M RAM can be used if a swap file is created in the second partition. To make a
swap file:
1. Make a blank file of fixed size using dd. Example: dd if=/dev/zero
of=knoppix.swp bs=1M count=70
2. Make the file into a swap file. mkswap knoppix.swp
3. Turn on the swap. swapon knoppix.swp
Note:
Remember to turn on the swap file every time you start DSL by changing the bootup
script in /opt/bootlocal.sh.
7.9.5
Shrinking and Modifying the Extension
There are several types of extensions being used for myDSL. For more information on
the different types, how to use them, and their creation, please refer to the myDSL
wiki. Basically, myDSL extensions are tarballs that get untarred during bootup. For the
purpose of enabling IEGD, the XFree86.dsl extension can be modified and shrunk to
help save hard disk space.
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Example INF File
Appendix A Example INF File
;*******************************************************************************
;*******************************************************************************
; Filename: iegd.inf
; $Revision: 1.135 $
; $Id: iegd.inf,v 1.135 2008/01/14 04:46:34 anthill Exp $
; $Source: /nfs/fm/proj/eia/cvsroot/ssigd/ial/dx/install/iegd.inf,v $
;
; Copyright (c) 2006 Intel Corporation. All rights reserved.
;
;*******************************************************************************
[Version]
Signature="$WINDOWS NT$"
Class=Display
ClassGUID={4D36E968-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}
Provider=%Intel%
DriverVer = 01/14/2008,9.0.0.1115
;===============================================================================
[SourceDisksNames]
1=%DiskDesc%,,,""
[SourceDisksFiles]
iegdmini.sys = 1
iegdmkey.vp = 1
iegdmsys.vp = 1
iegddis.dll = 1
iegd3dg3.dll = 1
iegd3dg4.dll = 1
analog.sys
= 1
ch7017.sys
= 1
fs454.sys
= 1
lvds.sys
= 1
ns2501.sys
= 1
ns387.sys
= 1
sii164.sys
= 1
ti410.sys
= 1
th164.sys
= 1
sdvo.sys
= 1
tv.sys
= 1
;===============================================================================
[DestinationDirs]
DefaultDestDir
= 11; System directory
iegd.Display_alm = 11
iegd.Display_nap = 11
iegd.Display_gn4 = 11
iegd.Display_plb = 11
iegd.Miniport_vp = 11
iegd.Miniport
= 12; Drivers directory
iegd.PortDrvs_alm = 12
iegd.PortDrvs_nap = 12
iegd.PortDrvs_gn4 = 12
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Example INF File
iegd.PortDrvs_plb = 12
;===============================================================================
[Manufacturer]
%Intel%=Intel.Mfg
;===============================================================================
[Intel.Mfg]
%Intel% %i830m%
= iegd_alm, PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_3577
%Intel% %i865%
= iegd_alm, PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2572
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%i915GD0%
%i915GD1%
%i915AL0%
%i915AL1%
%i945LP0%
%i945LP1%
%i945CT0%
%i945CT1%
%i945WB0%
%i35BL0%
%i35BL1%
%i35BL0A2%
%i35BL1A2%
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
iegd_nap,
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2582
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2782
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2592
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2792
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2772
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2776
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_27A2
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_27A6
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_27AE
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_29C2
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_29C3
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_29B2
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_29B3
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%Intel%
%i965BW0%
%i965BW1%
%iG9650%
%iG9651%
%iQ9650%
%iQ9651%
%i946GZ0%
%i946GZ1%
%i965GM0%
%i965GM1%
%i965GME0%
%i965GME1%
%ictg0%
%ictg1%
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
iegd_gn4,
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2982
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2983
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_29A2
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_29A3
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2992
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2993
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2972
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2973
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2A02
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2A03
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2A12
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2A13
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2A42
PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_2A43
%Intel% %i900G0%
= iegd_plb, PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_8108
;===============================================================================
[iegd_alm.GeneralConfigData]
MaximumNumberOfDevices = 2
MaximumDeviceMemoryConfiguration = 128
[iegd_nap.GeneralConfigData]
MaximumNumberOfDevices = 2
MaximumDeviceMemoryConfiguration = 256
[iegd_gn4.GeneralConfigData]
MaximumNumberOfDevices = 2
MaximumDeviceMemoryConfiguration = 512
[iegd_plb.GeneralConfigData]
MaximumNumberOfDevices = 2
MaximumDeviceMemoryConfiguration = 256
;===============================================================================
[iegd_alm]
CopyFiles = iegd.Miniport, iegd.Display_alm, iegd.PortDrvs_alm
[iegd_nap]
CopyFiles = iegd.Miniport, iegd.Display_nap, iegd.PortDrvs_nap, iegd.Miniport_vp
[iegd_gn4]
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Example INF File
CopyFiles = iegd.Miniport, iegd.Display_gn4, iegd.PortDrvs_gn4, iegd.Miniport_vp
[iegd_plb]
CopyFiles = iegd.Miniport, iegd.Display_plb, iegd.PortDrvs_plb, iegd.Miniport_vp
;===============================================================================
[iegd.Miniport]
iegdmini.sys
[iegd.Miniport_vp]
iegdmkey.vp
iegdmsys.vp
[iegd.Display_alm]
iegddis.dll
iegd3dg3.dll
[iegd.Display_nap]
iegddis.dll
iegd3dg3.dll
[iegd.Display_gn4]
iegddis.dll
iegd3dg4.dll
[iegd.Display_plb]
iegddis.dll
iegd3dg3.dll
[iegd.PortDrvs_alm]
analog.sys
ch7017.sys
fs454.sys
lvds.sys
ns2501.sys
ns387.sys
sii164.sys
ti410.sys
th164.sys
[iegd.PortDrvs_nap]
analog.sys
sdvo.sys
lvds.sys
tv.sys
[iegd.PortDrvs_gn4]
analog.sys
sdvo.sys
lvds.sys
[iegd.PortDrvs_plb]
sdvo.sys
lvds.sys
;===============================================================================
[iegd_alm.Services]
AddService = iegdmini, 0x00000002, iegd_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = analog, ,analog_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = ch7017, ,ch7017_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = fs454, ,fs454_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = lvds,
,lvds_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = ns2501, ,ns2501_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = ns387, ,ns387_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = sii164, ,sii164_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = ti410, ,ti410_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = th164, ,th164_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
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Example INF File
[iegd_nap.Services]
AddService = iegdmini, 0x00000002, iegd_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = analog, ,analog_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = lvds,
,lvds_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = sdvo,
,sdvo_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = tv,
,tv_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
[iegd_gn4.Services]
AddService = iegdmini, 0x00000002, iegd_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = analog, ,analog_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = lvds,
,lvds_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = sdvo,
,sdvo_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
[iegd_plb.Services]
AddService = iegdmini, 0x00000002, iegd_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = lvds,
,lvds_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
AddService = sdvo,
,sdvo_Service_Inst, iegd_EventLog_Inst
;===============================================================================
[iegd_Service_Inst]
ServiceType
= 1
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= 0
LoadOrderGroup = Video
ServiceBinary = %12%\iegdmini.sys
[analog_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "analog"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\analog.sys
[ch7017_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "ch7017"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\ch7017.sys
[fs454_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "fs454"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\fs454.sys
[lvds_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "lvds"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\lvds.sys
[ns2501_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "ns2501"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\ns2501.sys
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Example INF File
[ns387_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "ns387"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\ns387.sys
[sii164_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "sii164"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\sii164.sys
[ti410_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "ti410"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\ti410.sys
[th164_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "th164"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\th164.sys
[sdvo_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "sdvo"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\sdvo.sys
[tv_Service_Inst]
DisplayName
= "tv"
ServiceType
= %SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER%
StartType
= %SERVICE_DEMAND_START%
ErrorControl
= %SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE%
ServiceBinary = %12%\tv.sys
;===============================================================================
[iegd_EventLog_Inst]
AddReg = iegd_EventLog_AddReg
[iegd_EventLog_AddReg]
HKR,,EventMessageFile,0x00020000,"%SystemRoot%\System32\IoLogMsg.dll;%SystemRoot%\Syst
em32\drivers\iegdmini.sys"
HKR,,TypesSupported,0x00010001,7
;===============================================================================
[iegd_alm.SoftwareSettings]
AddReg = iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_alm
[iegd_nap.SoftwareSettings]
AddReg = iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_nap
[iegd_gn4.SoftwareSettings]
AddReg = iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_gn4
[iegd_plb.SoftwareSettings]
AddReg = iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_plb
;===============================================================================
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193
Example INF File
[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_alm]
HKR,, InstalledDisplayDrivers, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, iegddis
HKR,, MultiFunctionSupported, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, 1
HKR,, VgaCompatible, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PcfVersion,
%REG_DWORD%, 0x0700
HKR,, No_D3D, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, "analog ch7017 fs454 lvds ns2501 ns387 sii164 ti410 th164"
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_nap]
HKR,, InstalledDisplayDrivers, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, iegddis
HKR,, MultiFunctionSupported, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, 1
HKR,, VgaCompatible, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PcfVersion,
%REG_DWORD%, 0x0700
HKR,, No_D3D, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, "analog sdvo lvds tv"
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_gn4]
HKR,, InstalledDisplayDrivers, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, iegddis
HKR,, MultiFunctionSupported, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, 1
HKR,, VgaCompatible, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PcfVersion,
%REG_DWORD%, 0x0700
HKR,, No_D3D, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, "analog sdvo lvds"
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------[iegd_SoftwareDeviceSettings_plb]
HKR,, InstalledDisplayDrivers, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, iegddis
HKR,, MultiFunctionSupported, %REG_MULTI_SZ%, 1
HKR,, VgaCompatible, %REG_DWORD%, 0
HKR,, PcfVersion,
%REG_DWORD%, 0x0400
HKR,, No_D3D, %REG_DWORD%, 1
HKR,, PortDrivers, %REG_SZ%, "sdvo lvds"
;===============================================================================
[Strings]
;---------------------------------------------------------------------; Localizable Strings
;---------------------------------------------------------------------Intel="Intel Corporation"
DiskDesc="Embedded Installation"
i865="865 Embedded Graphics Controller"
i915GD0="915G/915GV/910GL Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i915GD1="915G/915GV/910GL Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i915AL0="915GM/915GMS/915GME/910GML/910GMLE Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i915AL1="915GM/915GMS/915GME/910GML/910GMLE Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i945LP0="945G Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i945LP1="945G Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i945CT0="945GM Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i945CT1="945GM Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i945WB0="945GME Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i35BL0="Q35 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i35BL1="Q35 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i35BL0A2="Q35 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i35BL1A2="Q35 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
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Example INF File
i965BW0="965G Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i965BW1="965G Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
iG9650="G965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
iG9651="G965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
iQ9650="Q963/Q965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
iQ9651="Q963/Q965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i946GZ0="946GZ Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i946GZ1="946GZ Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i965GM0="GM965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i965GM1="GM965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i965GME0="GME965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
i965GME1="GME965 Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
ictg0="Cantiga Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
ictg1="Cantiga Embedded Graphics Controller Function 1"
i900G0="Poulsbo Embedded Graphics Controller Function 0"
;---------------------------------------------------------------------; Non Localizable Strings
;---------------------------------------------------------------------SERVICE_BOOT_START
= 0x0
SERVICE_SYSTEM_START
= 0x1
SERVICE_AUTO_START
= 0x2
SERVICE_DEMAND_START
= 0x3
SERVICE_DISABLED
= 0x4
SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER
= 0x1
SERVICE_ERROR_IGNORE
SERVICE_ERROR_NORMAL
SERVICE_ERROR_SEVERE
SERVICE_ERROR_CRITICAL
=
=
=
=
REG_EXPAND_SZ
REG_MULTI_SZ
REG_DWORD
REG_SZ
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=
=
=
=
0x0;
0x1;
0x2;
0x3;
Continue on driver load fail
Display warn, but continue
Attempt LastKnownGood
Attempt LastKnownGood, BugCheck
0x00020000
0x00010000
0x00010001
0x00000000
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Example INF File
This page is intentionally left blank.
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Port Driver Attributes
Appendix B Port Driver Attributes
B.1
Standard Port Driver Attributes
Port drivers are modules within the IEGD driver suite that control GMCH-specific
modules such as GMCH LVDS, GMCH TV or add-on modules to GMCH. The table below
lists the attributes available to port drivers. Some of these standard attributes can be
customized for specific port drivers and are detailed in the following topics:
In the attribute tables, device-specific (non-standard) attributes are highlighted in
gray.
• “Internal LVDS Port Driver Attributes (Mobile chipsets only)” on page 199
• “CRT (Analog) Port Driver Attributes” on page 199
• “Chrontel CH7307 Port Driver Attributes” on page 201
• “Chrontel CH7308 Port Driver Attributes” on page 202
• “Chrontel CH7315/CH7317/CH7319/CH7320 Port Driver Attributes” on page 202
• “Silicon Image SiI 1362/SiI 1364 Port Driver DVI Attributes” on page 203
Note:
Not all standard attributes are supported by all port drivers. Please see the topics
mentioned above for details on the specific attributes supported by each port driver.
Flat panel settings are specified via the FPINFO options of the configuration; please see
Table 24.
Table 39.
Standard Port Driver Attributes
Attribute Name
BRIGHTNESS
Attribute
ID Number
0
Description
Brightness adjustment.
CONTRAST
1
Contrast adjustment.
HUE
2
Hue adjustment.
FLICKER
3
Setting to reduce flicker.
HPOSITION
4
Controls the horizontal position of the display.
VPOSITION
5
Controls the vertical position of the display.
HSCALE
6
Horizontal scaling ratio.
VSCALE
7
Vertical scaling ratio.
TVFORMAT
8
TV formats are device-specific.
DISPLAY TYPE
9
Allows selection of different displays for multidisplay devices. This attribute is device-specific.
LUMA FILTER
10
TV Luma Filter adjustment.
CHROMA FILTER
11
ChromaFilter adjustment.
TEXT FILTER
12
Text Filter adjustment.
TV OUTPUT TYPE
14
TV output types. This attribute is device-specific.
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Port Driver Attributes
Table 39.
Standard Port Driver Attributes (Continued)
Attribute Name
Attribute
ID Number
Description
SATURATION
15
Saturation adjustment.
PANEL FIT
18
Panel fitting. Yes or no.
SCALING RATIO
19
Output Scaling. Device-specific.
FP BACKLIGHT ENABLE
20
Enable flat panel backlight.
PANEL DEPTH
26
Can be either 18 or 24. 18 specifies 6-bit output
per color, 24 specifies 8-bit output per color.
DUAL CHANNEL PANEL
27
Is it a dual channel panel or not? Takes 0 or 1.
GANG MODE
28
For achieving a Gang mode output using two
digital ports.
GANG MODE EVEN ODD
29
Gang display even or odd. This attribute is to be
set along with Gang mode (28). This mode (Gang
Mode Even Odd) puts even pixels on one digital
port and odd pixels on the other, and needs to be
selected based on the display panel used.
SHARPNESS
31
Sharpness.
32
Hardware Configuration for sDVO encoders that
support multiple configurations.
HWCONFIG
HORZFILTER
33
Horizontal Filter.
VERTFILTER
34
Vertical Filter.
FRAME BUFFER GAMMA
35
Framebuffer gamma correction.
FRAME BUFFER BRIGHTNESS
36
Framebuffer brightness.
FRAME BUFFER CONTRAST
37
Framebuffer contrast.
2D FLICKER
39
Two-dimension flicker.
ADAPTIVE FLICKER
40
Adaptive flicker.
HORIZONTAL OVERSCAN
41
Horizontal overscan.
VERTICAL OVERSCAN
42
Vertical overscan.
SPREAD SPECTRUM CLOCKING
43
Spectrum Clocking
DOT_CRAWL
44
Dot crawl affects the edges of color and manifests
itself as moving dots of color along these edges.
DITHER
45
Dither setting
PANEL PROTECT HSYNC
46
Horizontal sync panel protection
PANEL PROTECT VSYNC
47
Vertical sync panel protection
PANEL PROTECT PIXCLK
48
Pixel clock protection
LVDS PANEL TYPE
49
This is used to select SPWG vs. OpenLDI panel
types. 0-SPWG 1-OpenLDI.
VGA 2X IMAGE
57
Controls VGA image in Gang mode.
TEXT ENHANCEMENT
58
Controls text tuning.
MAINTAIN ASPECT RATIO
59
This controls scaled image to match source image
aspect ratio or full screen image.
FIXED TIMING
60
This indicates whether the attached display is a
fixed timing display.
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Port Driver Attributes
B.1.1
Internal LVDS Port Driver Attributes (Mobile chipsets only)
Table 40.
Internal LVDS Port Driver Attributes
Attribute Name
Attribute
ID
Description
Possible Ranges
Default is 18, however, on some
GMCH chipsets 24-bit also is
supported. For example, GM965
supports both 18 and 24-bit
outputs.
PANELDEPTH
26
Specify Panel Depth based
on connected panel.
DUALCHANNEL
27
Single or Dual Channel Panel
0 = Single
1 = Dual
Default is 0.
On and off Dithering
0 = on
1 = off
Default:
• dither on for 18-bit panels
• dither off for 24-bit panels.
DITHER
45
LVDS Panel Type
49
LVDS panel connector.
0 = SPWG formatted LVDS
output (default)
1 = OpenLDI unbalanced color
mapping output
Default = 0
FIXED TIMING
60
This indicates whether
attached display is a fixed
timing display.
0 = on
1 = off
B.1.2
CRT (Analog) Port Driver Attributes
Note:
The analog port driver is included in the driver by default, unlike other port drivers
available for selection as part of the driver configuration.
Table 41.
CRT (Analog) Port Driver Attributes
Attribute Name
FIXED TIMING
DISPLAY DETECT METHOD
Attribute
ID
60
32769
Description
Possible Ranges
Set this attribute if the
attached display supports
only one timing.
0 = Not a fixed timing display.
1 = Fixed timing display. Default
is 0.
Controls display detection
for the CRT.
0 = Uses DDC method first then
Analog sense to detect the
display.
1 = DDC method only (Digital
Sense method) by reading EDID
2 = Analog Sense only
Default = 0
B.1.3
HDMI Port Driver Attributes
7.9.5.1
Audio
The IEGD package does not include an HDMI audio driver, so you must obtain and
install the driver. The HDMI audio driver needs to support Intel HD Audio to be
compatible with IEGD. You must also obtain Microsoft* patch KB888111 to enable
HDMI audio. IEGD supports only the Windows HDMI audio driver.
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Port Driver Attributes
B.1.3.1
SDVO-HDMI (CH7315)
IEGD supports only one type of SDVO-HDMI encoder, which is CH7315. SDVO-B cannot
coexist with HDMI-B; SDVO-C cannot coexist with HDMI-C.
SDVO takes precedence over the HDMI port driver. If no SDVO encoder is available
HDMI is automatically loaded by default (only in the GM45 Express chipset).
B.1.3.2
Internal HDMI
Internal HDMI is available only for the GM45 Express chipset. Only one HDMI port has
audio at any one time. The first port in the port order has audio while the second port
would have only display without audio.
Only one HDMI port has HDCP at any one time. The first port to receive a request for
HDCP has HDCP enabled only in that port.
B.1.3.3
HDCP
HDCP is supported through the Certified Output Protection Protocol (COPP) interface in
Windows.
Table 42.
HDMI Port Driver Attributes
Attribute Name
Attribute
ID
FIXED TIMING
60
Description
This indicates whether
attached display is a fixed
timing display.
Possible Ranges
0 = on
1 = off
B.1.4
Internal TV Out Port Driver Attributes (Mobile chipsets only)
Table 43.
Internal TV Out Port Driver Attributes
Attribute Name
Attribute
ID
Description
Possible Ranges
BRIGHTNESS
0
Screen brightness
0-100. Default is 50.
CONTRAST
1
Color contrast
0-7. Default is 3.
HUE
2
Hue adjustment
0-100. Default is 0.
TV FLICK FILTER
3
TV Flicker Filter. The higher
the value, the higher the
amount of flicker filtering
and text enhancement.
0-1000. Default is 999.
4
Horizontal Position.
Increasing the value moves
the image to the right and
decreasing the value moves
the image to the left.
0-511. Default is 64.
H POSITION
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Port Driver Attributes
Table 43.
Internal TV Out Port Driver Attributes (Continued)
Attribute
ID
Description
V POSITION
5
Vertical Position. The value
represents the TV line
number relative to the VGA
vertical sync. Increasing the
value moves the image
down and decreasing the
value moves the image up.
0-511. Default is 0.
TV FORMAT
8
TV formats are devicespecific.
Default is NTSC-M (1).
Attribute Name
Possible Ranges
TV output types. This
attribute is device-specific.
B.1.5
TV OUTPUT
14
Note:
OVERSCAN/SCALING RATIO
19
Output Scaling.
TV output types are
limited to S-Video
and Composite for
the VBIOS.
Default is S-VIDEO (2).
0-1000. Default is 350.
Chrontel CH7307 Port Driver Attributes
The table below shows the attributes for the Chrontel CH7307* port driver.
Note:
For flat panel backlight timing settings, please see Table 24.
Table 44.
Chrontel CH7307 Port Driver Attributes
Attribute Name
Attribute
ID
Description
Possible Ranges
Spread Spectrum Clocking
43
Spectrum clocking
0-15
Default = 0
Step = 1
FIXED TIMING
60
This indicates whether
attached display is a fixed
timing display.
0 = on
1 = off
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Port Driver Attributes
B.1.6
Chrontel CH7308 Port Driver Attributes
The table below shows the attributes for the Chrontel CH7308* port driver.
Note:
For FPINFO panel width, height, and backlight timing settings, please see Table 24.
Table 45.
Chrontel CH7308 Port Driver Attributes
Attribute Name
B.1.7
Attribute
ID
Description
Possible Ranges
LVDS Color Depth
26
Panel depth
18 = 18 bits
24 = 24 bits
Default = 18
DUAL_CHANNEL
27
Dual-channel pane
Default - 0
Spread Spectrum Clocking
43
Spectrum Clocking
0-15
Default = 0
Step = 1
Dither
45
Dither setting
Default = 0
HSync Panel Protection
46
Horizontal sync panel
protection
Default = 0
VSync Panel Protection
47
Vertical sync panel
protection
Default = 0
Pixel Clock Protection
48
Pixel clock protection
Default = 0
LVDS Panel Type
49
LVDS panel connector.
0 = SPWG formatted LVDS
output (default)
1 = OpenLDI unbalanced color
mapping output
Default = 0
Text Enhancement
58
Controls text tuning.
0-4.
Fixed Timing
60
This indicates whether
attached display is a fixed
timing display.
0 = on
1 = off
Chrontel CH7315/CH7317/CH7319/CH7320 Port Driver
Attributes
The table below shows the attributes for the Chrontel CH7315/CH7317/CH7319/
CH7320 port driver.
Table 46.
Chrontel CH7315/CH7317/CH7319/CH7320 Port Driver Attributes
Attribute Name
Attribute
ID
VGA Bypass
9
Fixed Timing
60
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
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Description
Possible Ranges
TBD
TBD
This indicates whether
attached display is a fixed
timing display.
0 = on
1 = off
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Port Driver Attributes
B.1.8
Silicon Image SiI 1362/SiI 1364 Port Driver DVI Attributes
Note:
For flat panel backlight timing settings, please see Table 24.
Table 47.
Silicon Image SiI 1362/SiI 1364 Port Driver DVI Attributes
Attribute
ID
Attribute Name
FIXED TIMING
60
B.2
Default Search Order
Table 48.
Default Search Order
Chipset
Intel
®
US15W
Intel
®
Q35
Intel® GME965
Description
This indicates whether
attached display is a fixed
timing display.
TBD
ANALOG, sDVOB, sDVOC
ANALOG, sDVOB, sDVOC, LVDS
ANALOG, sDVOB, sDVOC
Intel® 945GSE
TBD
Intel® 945GME
ANALOG, sDVOB, sDVOC, LVDS
Intel® 945G
ANALOG, sDVOB, sDVOC
Intel
915GV
ANALOG, sDVOB, sDVOC
Intel® 915GME
ANALOG, sDVOB, sDVOC, LVDS
Intel® 910GMLE
ANALOG, sDVOB, sDVOC, LVDS
June 2008
Document Number: 274041-014US
0 = on
1 = off
Default Search Order
Intel® Q965
®
Possible Ranges
Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS v9.0
User’s Guide
203
Port Driver Attributes
B.3
Default GPIO Pin Pair Assignments
Table 49.
Default GPIO Pin Pair Assignments
Default GPIO Pin Pair for EDID
Chipset
Intel
®
Q35
Intel® GME965
Intel
®
Q965
sDVO/A
sDVOB
sDVOC
LVDS
N/A
4
4
N/A
N/A
4
4
2
N/A
4
4
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
Intel® 945GME
N/A
4
4
2
Intel® 945G
N/A
4
4
N/A
Intel® 945GSE
Intel® 915GV
N/A
4
4
N/A
Intel® 915GM
N/A
4
4
2
N/A
4
4
2
Intel
®
910GMLE
B.4
Default I2C Device Address Byte Assignment
Table 50.
Default I2C Device Address Byte Assignment
Port Driver
Default Device Address Bytes (DAB)
CH7021, CH7315, CH7317,
CH7319, CH7320, CH7021
0x70 (for first sDVO device)
0x72 (for second sDVO device)
CH7307
0x70 (for first sDVO device)
0x72 (for second sDVO device)
CH7308
0x70 (for first sDVO device)
0x72 (for second sDVO device)
SiI 1362
0x70 (for first sDVO device)
0x72 (for second sDVO device)
SiI 1364
0x70 (for first sDVO device)
0x72 (for second sDVO device)
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Appendix C Intel® 5F Extended Interface Functions
The BIOS provides a set of proprietary function calls to control operation of the
extended features. These function calls all use AH = 5Fh in their designed interface for
easy identification as a proprietary function.
These functions are designed to maintain maximum compatibility with the Desktop and
Mobile Video BIOS. As such many of the definitions behave identically. When the
behavior of the Embedded Video BIOS is not identical to the Desktop and Mobile Video
BIOS it is noted.
In addition to these 5F functions, the Video BIOS also supports all 4F functions defined
by the VESA BIOS Extension (VBE) Core Functions Standard, Version 3.0 with the
exception of the 0A function (Return VBE Protected Mode Interface). All other
functions, from 00 through 09 and 0B are supported by the Video BIOS. Click on the
following link to view the VBE 3.0 Core Functions Standard document.
http://www.vesa.org/Public/VBE/vbe3.pdf
The table below provides a summary of the IEGD supported Intel 5F functions.
Table 51.
Summary of Intel 5F Extended Interface Functions
Function/Name
Description
BIOS Extended Interface Functions
“5F01h – Get Video BIOS Information”
Gets VBIOS Build Information.
“5F05h – Refresh Rate”
Sets a new vertical refresh rate for a given mode and
returns the current vertical refresh rate
“5F10h – Get Display Memory Information”
Returns information about the linear memory.
“5F1Ch – BIOS Pipe Access”
Sets the BIOS pipe access and returns the BIOS pipe
access status.
“5F29h – Get Mode Information”
Returns information on the requested mode.
“5F61h – Local Flat Panel Support Function”
Supports local flat panel features.
Allows SoftBIOS to do any system callbacks through INT
15h
“5F68h – System BIOS Callback”
Hooks for the System BIOS
“5F31h – POST Completion Notification Hook”
Signals the completion of video POST (Power On Self Test)
“5F33h – Hook After Mode Set”
Allows System BIOS to intercept Video BIOS at the end of
a mode set.
“5F35h – Boot Display Device Hook”
Allows System BIOS to override video display default
setting.
“5F36h – Boot TV Format Hook”
Allows System BIOS to boot TV in selected TV format
state.
“5F38h – Hook Before Set Mode”
Allows the system BIOS to intercept the video BIOS before
setting the mode.
“5F40h – Config ID Hook”
Allows System BIOS to supply a configuration ID that is
passed to the driver.
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C.1
BIOS Extended Interface Functions
The BIOS provides a set of proprietary function calls to control operation of the
extended features. These function calls all use AH = 5Fh in their designed interface for
easy identification as a proprietary function
These functions are designed to maintain maximum compatibility with the Desktop and
Mobile Video BIOS. As such many of the definitions behave identically. When the
behavior of the Embedded Video BIOS is not identical to the Desktop and Mobile Video
BIOS it is noted.
C.1.1
5F01h – Get Video BIOS Information
This function returns the Video BIOS Build information.
Note:
This function is an extension of the Desktop and Mobile Video BIOS. If register ECX
does not contain ASCII characters “IEGD” then the VBIOS is not described by this
specification.
Calling Register:
AX = 5F01h, Get Video Information function
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
EBX = 4 bytes Video BIOS Build Number ASCII string, e.g., ‘1000’
ECX = 4 bytes Embedded Identifier, ASCII string ‘IEGD’
C.1.2
5F05h – Refresh Rate
This function sets a new vertical refresh rate for a given mode and returns the current
vertical refresh rate and available refresh rate for a given non-VGA mode.
C.1.2.1
5F05h, 00h – Set Refresh Rate
This sub-function sets a new default refresh rate for the selected pipe. If the mode is
currently active, the CRT controller and other registers will be automatically
programmed setting the requested refresh rate.
Note:
This function is not entirely compatible with the Desktop and Mobile versions. It is not
possible to set the refresh rate for a given mode in advance. This function sets the
“desired” refresh rate which will be applied to all subsequent mode sets when possible.
If the mode provided in BL is the current mode, then a mode change will be
automatically performed.
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Calling Register:
AX = 5F05h, Refresh Rate function
BH = 00h, Set Refresh Rate sub-function
BL = Mode Number
ECX = Refresh rate (indicated by setting one bit):
Bits 31 - 9 = Reserved
Bit 8 = 120 Hz
Bit 7 = 100 Hz
Bit 6 = 85 Hz
Bit 5 = 75 Hz
Bit 4 = 72 Hz
Bit 3 = 70 Hz
Bit 2 = 60 Hz
Bit 1 = 56 Hz
Bit 0 = 43 Hz (Interlaced - Not supported)
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
C.1.2.2
5F05h, 01h – Get Refresh Rate
This sub-function returns current vertical refresh rate for the selected pipe and
available refresh rates information for a given Non-VGA mode.
Note:
This sub-function returns a status of supported but failed (AX = 015Fh) if executed with
a standard VGA mode.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F05h, Refresh Rate function
BH = 01h, Get Refresh Rate sub-function
BL = Mode number
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
EBX = Available refresh rates (indicated by one or more bits set):
Bits 31 - 9 = Reserved
Bit 8 = 120 Hz
Bit 7 = 100 Hz
Bit 6 = 85 Hz
Bit 5 = 75 Hz
Bit 4 = 72 Hz
Bit 3 = 70 Hz
Bit 2 = 60 Hz
Bit 1 = 56 Hz
Bit 0 = 43 Hz (Interlaced - Not supported)
ECX = Current refresh rate (see EBX for bit definitions)
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C.1.3
5F10h – Get Display Memory Information
This function returns information regarding the linear memory starting address, size
and memory mapped base address.
Calling Register:
AX = 5F10h, Get Linear Display Memory Information function
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
ESI = Display memory base address
ECX = Total physical display memory size (in bytes)
EDX = Available display memory size (in bytes)
EDI = Memory Mapped I/O Base Address
EBX = Stride (memory scan line width in bytes)
C.1.4
5F1Ch – BIOS Pipe Access
This function will set the BIOS pipe access or return the BIOS pipe access status.
C.1.4.1
5F1Ch, 00h – Set BIOS Pipe Access
This sub-function will set the currently selected pipe. All 5f functions operate on the
currently selected pipe.
When not in clone modes this value cannot be set.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F1Ch, BIOS Pipe Access function
BH = 00h, Set BIOS Pipe Access sub-function
CH = BIOS Pipe access:
= 00h, Pipe A
= 01h, Pipe B
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
C.1.4.2
5F1Ch, 01h – Get BIOS Pipe Access
This sub-function will return the currently selected pipe.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F1Ch, BIOS Pipe Access function
BH = 01h, Get BIOS Pipe Access sub-function
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
CH = BIOS Pipe access:
= 00h, Pipe A
= 01h, Pipe B
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C.1.5
5F29h – Get Mode Information
This function returns the requested mode’s resolution, color depth, and maximum
required bandwidth using its current refresh rate. This function is applied to extendedgraphics modes only. If the mode number is not an extended graphics mode, the
function will return failure.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F29h, Get Mode Information function
BH = Mode To Use:
= 80h, Current Mode
= 00h - 7Fh, Given Mode Number
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
EBX bits 31 - 16 = Mode horizontal (X) resolution in pixels
EBX bits 15 - 0 = Mode vertical (Y) resolution in pixels
ECX bits 31 - 16 = Maximum bandwidth in megabytes per second
ECX bits 15 - 0 = Color depth in bits per pixel
C.1.6
5F61h – Local Flat Panel Support Function
This function supports local flat panel only features.
Note:
Only Subfunction 5h of the 5f61h interface is supported for the Embedded vBIOS.
C.1.6.1
5F61h, 05h – Get Configuration ID
This function is used to return the Configuration ID.
Note:
This function is known as “Get Local Flat Panel Number” in the Desktop and Mobile
Video BIOS. This function performs a similar purpose however, the configuration IDs
have no pre-defined meaning. The Configuration ID is reported to the Embedded
Graphics Driver and will be used as described in the Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers
and Video BIOS User’s Guide.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F61h, Local Flat Panel Support function
BH = 05h, Get Config ID Subfunction
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
BL = Config ID
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C.1.7
5F68h – System BIOS Callback
This is a generic function that allows SoftBIOS to do any system callbacks through INT
15h. The Input/Output of this function is dependent on the definition of the desired INT
15h hook except for the EAX register.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F68h, System BIOS Callback Function
EAX bits 31:16 = System BIOS INT 15h Hook Function
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
C.2
Hooks for the System BIOS
The video BIOS performs several system BIOS interrupt function calls (interrupt 15h
hooks). Each function provides the system BIOS with the opportunity to gain control at
specific times to perform any custom processing that may be required. After each
interrupt hook, the system BIOS must return control to the video BIOS. INT 10h calls
could be made within the INT 15h hook calls provided that it is not recursive and thus
cause a deadlock.
See the following topics for details on these function calls:
• “5F31h – POST Completion Notification Hook”
• “5F33h – Hook After Mode Set”
• “5F35h – Boot Display Device Hook”
• “5F36h – Boot TV Format Hook”
• “5F38h – Hook Before Set Mode”
• “5F40h – Config ID Hook”
C.2.1
5F31h – POST Completion Notification Hook
This hook signals the completion of video POST (Power On Self Test). The hook
executes after the sign-on message is displayed and PCI BIOS resizing.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F31h, POST Completion Notification Hook
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
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C.2.2
5F33h – Hook After Mode Set
This hook allows the system BIOS to intercept the video BIOS at the end of a mode set.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F33h, Hook After Mode Set
BH = Number of character columns
BL = Current mode number
CH = Active display page
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
C.2.3
5F35h – Boot Display Device Hook
This hook allows the system BIOS to override the video display default setting. The
graphics BIOS will set the returned video display during POST (power up initialization).
Note:
This function is not entirely compatible with the Desktop and Mobile Video BIOS. The
bits in CL have a configurable mapping to the Port Numbers as defined in the Intel®
Embedded Graphics Drivers and Video BIOS User’s Guide. The assigned meanings used
in the Desktop specification can be duplicated with a correct configuration. The values
below are the default values if no “Common To Port” mapping is provided.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F35h, Boot Display Device Hook
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh);
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
CL = Display Device Combination to boot (1 = Enable display, 0 = Disable
display):= 00h, VBIOS Default
Bit 7 - 6 = Reserved
Bit 5 = Port 5 (or common_to_port[5])
Bit 4 = Port 4 (or common_to_port[4])
Bit 3 = Port 3 (or common_to_port[3])
Bit 2 = Port 2 (or common_to_port[2])
Bit 1 = Port 1 (or common_to_port[1])
Bit 0 = Port 0 (or common_to_port[0])
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C.2.4
5F36h – Boot TV Format Hook
This hook allows the system BIOS to boot TV in selected TV format state.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F36h, Boot TV Format Hook
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
BL = TV Format requested:
= 00h, No Preference
= 01h, NTSC_M
= 11h, NTSC_M_J
= 21h, NTSC_433
= 31h, NTSC_N
= 02h, PAL_B
= 12h, PAL_G
= 22h, PAL_D
= 32h, PAL_H
= 42h, PAL_I
= 52h, PAL_M
= 62h, PAL_N
= 72h, PAL_60
= 03h, SECAM_L
= 13h, SECAM_L1
= 23h, SECAM_B
= 33h, SECAM_D
= 43h, SECAM_G
= 53h, SECAM_H
= 63h, SECAM_K
= 73h, SECAM_K1
C.2.5
5F38h – Hook Before Set Mode
This hook allows the system BIOS to intercept the video BIOS before setting the mode.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F38h, Hook Before Set Mode
CL = New video mode to be set
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
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C.2.6
5F40h – Config ID Hook
This function is known as “Boot Panel Type Hook” in the Desktop and Mobile Video
BIOS. It allows the system BIOS to supply a configuration ID that will eventually be
passed to the driver. This configuration ID is unused by the Video BIOS; however, it
alters the behavior of the driver as described in the Intel® Embedded Graphics Drivers
and Video BIOS User’s Guide.
Calling Registers:
AX = 5F40h, Config ID Hook
Return Registers:
AX = Return Status (function not supported if AL != 5Fh):
= 005Fh, Function supported and successful
= 015Fh, Function supported but failed
CL = Configuration ID
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Intel® OpenGL APIs
Appendix D Intel® OpenGL APIs
The table below presents supported IEGD OpenGL* APIs, and presents nonsupported IEGD OpenGL APIs.
The following OpenGL versions are supported:
• Version 1.3 on all Embedded Intel® Architecture (eIA) chipsets
• Version 1.4 on 915GV, 915GM, 945G, 945GM, Q965, GME965
• Version 1.5 on Q965, GME965
• Version 2.0 on US15W
For general OpenGL information, visit http://www.opengl.org/about/overview/.
Table 52.
Supported Intel® OpenGL APIs (Sheet 1 of 2)
Supported API Name(s)
GL_3DFX_texture_compression_FXT
1
GL_ARB_depth_texture
GL_ARB_fragment_program (965 only)
GL_ARB_multitexture
GL_ARB_occlusion_query (956 only)
1
GL_ARB_shadow
GL_ARB_textture_env_dot3
GL_ARB_texture_border_clamp
GL_ARB_texture_compression
GL_ARB_texture_cube_map
GL_ARB_texture_env_add
GL_ARB_texture_env_combine
GL_ARB_texture_env_crossbar
GL_ARB_transpose_matrix
GL_ARB_vertex_buffer_object
GL_ARB_vertex_program (965 only)
GL_EXT_abgr
GL_EXT_bgra
GL_EXT_blend_color
GL_EXT_blend_func_separate
GL_EXT_blend_minmax
GL_EXT_blend_subtract
1
Only supported on Intel 915 series and
later chipsets.
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Table 52.
Supported Intel® OpenGL APIs (Sheet 2 of 2)
Supported API Name(s)
GL_EXT_clip_volume_hint
GL_EXT_compiled_vertex_array
GL_EXT_cull_vertex
GL_EXT_fog_coord
GL_EXT_mulit_draw_arrays
GL_EXT_packed_pixels
GL_EXT_rescale_normal
GL_EXT_secondary_color
GL_EXT_separate_specular_color
1
GL_EXT_shadow_funcs
1
GL_EXT_stencil_two_side
GL_EXT_texture_compression_s3tc
GL_EXT_texture_env_add
GL_EXT_texture_filter_anisotropic
GL_EXT_texture_lod_bias (965 only)
GL_IBM_texture_mirrored_repeat
GL_NV_blend_square
GLX_ARB_get_proc_address
1
Table 53.
Only supported on Intel 915 series and
later chipsets.
Non-Supported Intel® OpenGL APIs
Non-Supported API Name(s)
GL_ARB_color_buffer_float
GL_ARB_fragment_program_shadow
GL_ARB_point_sprite
GL_ARB_shader_objects
GL_ARB_shading_language_100
GL_ARB_texture_non_power_of_two
GL_EXT_paletted_texture
GL_WIN_swap_hint
WGL_ARB_buffer_region
WGL_ARB_extensions_string
WGL_ARB_make_current_read
WGL_ARB_pbuffer
WGL_ARB_pixel_format
WGL_EXT_swap_control
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