How to capture video

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5
Project 2 guide
How to capture video
Before you can edit a video, you need to capture the source videotape: transfer it from a camcorder or VCR to a hard
drive.
Capture is a somewhat misleading term used throughout the nonlinear editing world. In the case of digital video
(DV), all Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 does during DV capture is move the video from a DV camcorder or other
playback device into a computer and place the video data into a wrapper, a file format Adobe Premiere Pro can read:
AVI for Windows, MOV for Mac OS. The original DV data remain unchanged—meaning it is not compressed.
Capturing analog video takes a few more steps: transferring, digitizing, compressing, and wrapping. The analog
camcorder transfers the video and audio as analog waveform data via a cable to a video capture card. The card’s
hardware digitizes the analog signal—converts it to a digital form—and then compresses it, using a codec
(Compression/Decompression), and wraps it into a file format Adobe Premiere Pro can work with.
Preparing for digital video capture
Adobe Premiere Pro offers tools to take some of the manual labor out of the digital video capturing process. There are
three basic approaches. This guide covers all of them:
1. Manually capture an entire videotape or a tape segment.
2. Use the Adobe Premiere Pro Scene Detect feature. Scene Detect identifies places in the original tape where
the pause/record button on the camcorder was pressed. As Adobe Premiere Pro captures an entire tape or a
segment, it creates separate clips starting at each pause/record instance.
3. Log the in and out points of clips and use the batch capture feature to automatically play the DV tape,
capture all the logged clips, name them, store them on a hard drive, and load them into the Project panel.
This is the best way to limit the captured clips to only those keepers you want to work with in your project.
Note: When setting up Adobe Premiere Pro for any of the three DV capture methods, you follow the same basic
steps, so the first task covers the DV capture setup. When you finish the setup, go to any of the DV capture scenarios:
manual, Scene Detect, or batch capture.
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How to capture video
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Project 2 guide
Adobe Premiere Pro CS5
To prepare for digital video capture:
1. Connect your DV camcorder to your computer by using a
FireWire/iLink (IEEE 1394) cable (Figure 1).
2. Turn on your camcorder and set it to the playback mode:
VTR or VCR. Do not set it to the camera mode.
Note: When capturing video, use your camcorder’s AC
adapter, not its battery. With a battery, camcorders go into
sleep mode after a while, and the battery may run out
before you finish.
Figure 1 FireWire/iLink connection
3. Start Adobe Premiere Pro and either open a saved project
or start a new one.
Note: The project’s video and audio project settings
should match the video you are about to capture. For
example, if your project is set up for DV-NTSC, you
can’t capture HDV video.
Figure 2 Capture panel device status
4. Select File > Capture to open the Capture panel.
5. Look above the Capture panel preview pane to make sure
your camcorder is connected properly (Figure 2).
It should say Stopped.
Note: If the message says No Device Control or Capture
Device Offline, you need to do some troubleshooting.
The most obvious fix is to make sure the camcorder is
turned on and the cables are connected. For more
troubleshooting tips, refer to Adobe Premiere Pro Help.
6. Click the Settings tab (in the upper-right corner of the
Capture panel). In the Capture Locations area, specify
where you want to store the captured video and audio
(Figure 3).
7. Click the Logging tab (next to the Settings tab) and type a
name for your tape in the Clip Data area (Figure 4).
Note: Be sure not to give any two tapes the same name.
Adobe Premiere Pro remembers clip in/out data based on
tape names.
Figure 3 Capture panel Capture Locations area
Figure 4 Logging tab Clip Data area
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How to capture video
© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Adobe Premiere Pro CS5
Project 2 guide
Manually capturing an entire videotape or a tape segment
You can capture an entire video tape or portions of a tape and then edit the captured video in Adobe Premiere Pro
CS5.
To capture video from tape:
1. Prepare your video for capture (see “Preparing for digital
video capture”).
2. Use the VCR-style device controls in the Capture panel
to play, fast forward, rewind, step forward or backward a
single frame, pause, and stop your tape (Figure 5).
Figure 5 Capture panel device controls
3. Rewind the tape to its beginning or to wherever you want
to start recording.
4. In the Setup area of the Logging tab, note that Audio And
Video is the default setting (Figure 6).
If you want to capture only audio or only video, change
the setting.
5. Click the Record button in the Device Control area or the
Tape button in the Capture area to start recording
(Figure 7).
Note: The video is displayed in the Capture panel
preview pane and on your camcorder. If the audio is
turned up on your camcorder, you’ll hear what sounds
like an echo coming from the computer speakers, caused
by a slight delay during capture. Turn down either your
camcorder or your computer speakers.
6. When you want to stop recording, click the red Record
button or the black Stop button.
Figure 6 Logging tab Setup area
Record and Tape buttons
Figure 7 Record and Tape buttons
The Save Captured Clip dialog box appears (Figure 8).
7. Give your clip a name (add descriptive information if you
want) and click OK.
Your newly named clip appears in the Project panel.
8. Close the Capture panel.
© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Figure 8 Save Captured Clip dialog box
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Using Scene Detect when capturing all or part of a DV tape
You can use Scene Detect to capture portions of the tape between where record and pause were used during taping.
To capture clips by using Scene Detect:
1. Prepare your video for capture (see “Preparing for digital
video capture”).
2. Use the VCR-style device controls in the Capture panel
to play, fast forward, rewind, step forward or backward a
single frame, pause, and stop your tape (Figure 9).
3. Rewind the tape to its beginning or to wherever you want
to start recording.
Figure 9 Capture panel device controls
4. In the Setup area of the Logging tab, note that Audio And
Video is the default setting (Figure 10).
If you want to capture only audio or only video, change
the setting.
5. Select Scene Detect (Figure 11) in the Device Control
area or the Capture area of the Logging tab.
Figure 10 Logging tab Setup area
6. Name your clip in the Clip Data area of the Logging tab
(Figure 12).
Note: After Adobe Premiere Pro captures clips in the
Scene Detect mode, it places them in the Project panel
and names and numbers them, using the clip name, as in
Clip 01, Clip 02, and so on.
7. If you want to capture frames that extend beyond the in
and out points of each clip (head or tail frames), enter the
number of frames in the Handles field in the Capture area
of the Logging tab.
Scene Detect buttons
Tape button
Figure 11 Record, Tape, and Scene Detect buttons
8. Click the Tape button in the Capture area to start
recording (Figure 11).
Note: The video is displayed in the Capture panel
preview pane and on your camcorder. If the audio is
turned up on your camcorder, you’ll hear what sounds
like an echo coming from the computer speakers, caused
by a slight delay during capture. Turn down either your
camcorder or your computer speakers.
Figure 12 Logging tab Clip Data area
9. When you want to stop recording, click the red Record
button or the black Stop button.
10. A set of sequentially numbered clips appears in the
Project panel (Figure 13).
Figure 13 Clips captured by using Scene Detect
11. Close the Capture panel.
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How to capture video
© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Adobe Premiere Pro CS5
Project 2 guide
Using the Batch Capture feature
When you perform a batch capture, you log the in and out points of a number of clips and then have Adobe Premiere
Pro automatically transfer them to your PC. The setup for batch capture is the same as that in the previous two tasks.
To use Batch Capture:
1. Prepare your video for capture (see “Preparing for digital
video capture”).
2. In the Capture panel Setup area, click the Logging tab.
3. Insert a tape into your device.
Adobe Premiere Pro prompts you to name the tape.
Figure 14 Set In and Set Out buttons
4. Use the VCR-style controls in the Capture area to move
to the first frame in your first shot.
5. In the Logging tab Timecode area, click the Set In button
(Figure 14). Then move to the last frame in the shot and
click the Set Out button.
6. If you want to add head or tail frames, in the Logging tab
Capture area, change the Handles value from the default
zero to a number that suits you (Figure 15). For example,
try 30 frames.
Figure 15 Set capture handles
7. Click the Log Clip button in the Timecode area of the
Logging tab to log the clip you identified.
The Log Clip dialog box appears (Figure 16).
8. Name the clip in the Log Clip dialog box and click OK.
The clip’s name appears in the Project panel, with its in/
out times and tape name info and with “Offline: User
Requested” in its status column (Figure 17).
Note: To see the clip Status column in the Project panel,
you need to widen the panel and scroll horizontally to
the right. If you do this, be sure to return the Workspace
to its default view.
9. Repeat steps 4 through 8 to log each shot you want to
batch capture.
Note: You can also log clips on the fly. As you play, fast
forward, or rewind a tape, you can click Set In or Set Out
at any time. When you click Log Clip, the camcorder
stops. After you type in a clip name and click OK, the
tape returns to the play, fast forward, or rewind mode.
Figure 16 Log Clip dialog box
10. When you finish logging your clips, close the Capture
panel.
11. In the Project panel, select all the clips you want to
capture.
© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Figure 17 Project panel batch capture clip info
How to capture video
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12. Select File > Batch Capture.
The Batch Capture dialog box appears (Figure 18).
13. In the Batch Capture dialog box, do either of the
following and then click OK:
•
Choose Capture With Handles and enter the number
of frames for the handles if you want to capture
frames beyond the in and out points identified for
each clip in the batch.
•
Choose Override Capture Settings if you want to
replace the capture settings of individual clips in the
batch with the project’s default settings.
The Capture panel appears, as does a dialog box telling
you to insert the proper tape.
Figure 18 Batch Capture dialog box
14. Make sure you’ve inserted the proper tape and click OK.
Adobe Premiere Pro cues up the tape to the first clip, and
transfers that clip and all other clips to your hard drive.
When this finishes, take a look at the Project panel to see
the results. The clip status now says Online and the clip
icon changes (Figure 19). If there is an error capturing, a
batch capture log text file is added to the Project panel.
You can double-click that link to open the file and
troubleshoot the error.
Figure 19 Clip info in Project panel after batch
capture
Capturing analog video
If you need to capture analog video—consumer-level VHS, SVHS, Hi-8, or professional-grade video such as BetaSP—you need a video capture card with analog inputs. Most such cards have consumer-quality composite connectors
as well as S-video and sometimes top-of-the-line component plugs.
You need to check your card’s documentation for setup and compatibility issues. Some capture cards have specific
presets for Adobe Premiere Pro that are available when you start a new project. Unless your camcorder has device
control (an expensive option), you have only one capture choice: to do it manually.
To capture analog video:
1. In Adobe Premiere Pro, select File > Capture.
2. Set the camcorder to VCR and use its controls to move
the videotape to a point several seconds before the frame
you want to begin capturing.
3. Press the Play button on the camcorder, and then click the
red Record button in the Capture panel.
4. When your clip has been captured, click the Stop button
in the Capture panel and stop the camcorder. Your clip
shows up in the Project panel.
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How to capture video
© 2010 Adobe Systems Incorporated
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