Using Video Production in the Classroom - Tri

Using Video Production
In the Classroom
The Production Cart
Tri-Valley
Created By
SoundCom Systems
4388 Tuller Rd.
Dublin, OH 43017
(614) 799 – 1920
Service (800) 628 - 8739
School Wide Video
Distribution
9 DVD/VCR Combos: There are three DVD/VCR Players located in the
rack that can be used to show videos to the entire school or to
multiple classrooms at one time. Simply place the video into the
player and press play. Any classroom that tunes their TV to the
channel dedicated to the DVD/VCR player will be able to view the
video.
9 Important channels:
•
12, 13, 14 & 15
These channels are set for your video
distribution. These channels are reserved for VCR/DVD players so
you can view videos in your classroom.
12
13
14
15
•
•
2
16
17 & 18
Rack Mounted Computer
Production Cart – Use this channel to view live
video broadcasts that are taking place in the school.
Your Production Cart
The production cart contains equipment that allows teachers to
create a live video broadcast with the ability to record. The mobile cart
gives you the ability to broadcast video from any video connection plate
to the entire building. By following these easy steps, you are ready to
broadcast from any classroom!
Another great feature of this equipment is that any classroom
that is equipped with a network television is able to tune in to these
productions live. To view these broadcasts, tune to the channel that is
posted on the cart. This allows two classrooms, three classrooms, or the
entire school to have access to guest speakers, student presentations,
school events, etc. The possibilities are endless! Ideas on how to include
video production into the curriculum are a part of this packet. Many
more ideas are available on the Internet.
SETTING UP THE PRODUCTION CART
1. Locate the production cart and plug it into a power source.
equipment mounted in the cart should power on.
2. Connect the RF out cable to the RF jack in the wall.
All
3. Tune the preview monitor to the channel that is posted on the
cart.
4. Set the camera power switch to “Camera” by pushing the
“Mode” button located by the power switch. Please be aware that
if the preview monitor is displaying the image through the
camera, then it is broadcasting through the entire building.
3
Camera Mode
5. If other classes wish to view the production, they must tune
their televisions to the channel posted on the cart.
Using the microphones:
9 It is best to use either the wireless microphone or the wired
microphone during broadcasting to assure that the sound is clear
and understandable.
1. Decide if you are going to use the wired microphone, the
wireless microphone, or both. You may want to give a guest
speaker the wired microphone and use the wireless
microphone when students are asking questions.
2. If you choose to use the wireless microphones, turn the
power on the microphone and you are ready to go. To adjust
the volume of the wireless, use the controls labeled either
Green or Brown depending on the mic(s) you use. Start the
dial at 12:00 and adjust accordingly.
Wireless
Mics
4
3. If you are going to use the wired microphone, you must first
plug one end of a microphone cable into the microphone and
the other end into the cart in to either MIC 2 or MIC 3. The
volume can then be adjusted using the controls labeled MIC
3 or MIC 4. If you have the microphone plugged into MIC 3
then you will need to adjust the volume for MIC 3. Start the
Dial at 12:00 and adjust accordingly.
4. If you are going to rely solely on the camera microphone, use
the knob labeled “Camera” to adjust the volume. This is not
recommended because it may be difficult for other
classrooms to hear clearly when the camera microphone is
used.
Now that you know how to use your production cart, it is time to
put this device to work. The following ideas are provided to aid you in
the implementation of using video production in your classroom.
WHAT IS BEING SAID ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF USING VIDEO
PRODUCTION IN THE CLASSROOM?
9 Children find the use of video production in the
classroom to be motivating because they love working in
creative ways with technology. ¹
9 Children’s self-esteem increases because they are given
the opportunity to broadcast their views and ideas. ¹
9 As children become involved in the video production
process, they begin to take ownership of what is being
produced and find the process to be exciting. ²
9 When students are involved in the video production
process, the opportunity arises for peer review,
leadership, and critical and divergent thinking. ²
9 Using video and video production in the classroom allows
children to become active critical viewers and develop
deep insights into a range of literacy skills. ²
¹ No author (n.d.). Video Virtues. (Online), August 11, 2004.
http://www.kqed.org/topics/education/educators/videoclassroom/production.jsp
²No author (n.d.). The Positive Influence of Television and Video. (Online), August 11, 2004.
http://staff.ace.ac.nz/Centres/Technology/BruceWeb/Video%20in%20the%20classroom/usvidclasroom.htm
5
IDEAS FOR USING THE VIDEO PRODUCTION CART
IN THE CLASSROOM
By using the video production cart, several classrooms or the whole school
can tune in and view live video broadcasts that are taking place in the
school.
9 Produce a newscast combining national, state, local and
school items. The live newscast can replace the typical
morning announcements that are played over the PA
system.
9 Invite a guest speaker, related to an area in your
curriculum, to come into the classroom and tape his or
her presentation.
9 Write, produce and direct a "how-to" videotape on some
helpful skill such as using a computer or checking out a
book. Set these up as "check outs" in the library or have
the whole school tune in live.
9 Produce a series of student/teacher-made video lessons to
guide small group or individual learning activities in both
classroom and take-home situations.
9 Research a topic and create a video report.
9 Record events in the day of a teacher, administrator,
coach, media specialist, secretary, janitor, athlete or other
school member. Obtain the subject's permission before
beginning your plan.
9 Gather family photographs, maps, vacation brochures and
other family documents to record an oral history.
9 Videotape the daily progress on a long-term school
project, and then include the tape as part of the finished
product.
9 Produce public service messages for the whole school to
tune in to. Include helpful hints and reminders about
items such as paper recycling, saving electricity,
important sports, performance and social dates, etc.
9 Make a commercial for the school media center,
counseling office or clinic to advertise some material or
service available to students and teachers.
9 Establish a video-pal club with a school in another state or
country. Start the tape exchange with video introductions
of club members (what they are studying, what they like
to do, what they like to eat, etc.). Additional exchange
tapes might highlight the schools, the communities, the
geographic areas or a classroom topic.
9 Prepare a video yearbook using both still and moving
pictures to highlight the year's events
6
*Adapted from http://www.casablanca.tv
9
9
9
9
9
7
HELPFUL WEBSITES FOR USING VIDEO PRODUCTION
IN THE CLASSROOM
“Instant Video Revisiting”: http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v1n2/forman.html
“Kid’s Vid”: http://kidsvid.hprtec.org/
“Evaluating Student Videos”: http://cybercollege.com/gdvid.htm
“Getting Started with Digital Video”:
http://mediaed.org.uk/posted_documents/diggate.html
iMovie In Teacher Education”: http://edweb.sdsu.edu/sciencetg/ie/
Download PDF