The GMS Administrator`s Guide Gordano Ltd

The GMS
Administrator’s Guide
Fourth Edition
Gordano Ltd
The GMS Administrator’s Guide
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016. All rights reserved. Printed in the United
Kingdom.
Published by Gordano Ltd, Unit 1, Yeo Bank Business Park, Kenn Road, Kenn, Clevedon,
Somerset, UK, BS21 6UW
Printing History:
Oct 2002 First Edition
May 2003 Second Edition
May 2015 Third Edition
June 2016 Fourth Edition
ISBN
GMS, Gordano, Gordano Ltd and their logos are trademarks of Gordano Ltd.
Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distribute their products
are claimed as trademarks. Where those designations appear in this book, and Gordano
Ltd was aware of a trademark claim, the designations have been printed in capitals or
initial capitals
Written by Brian Dorricott, John Stanners, Dean Fenton, Jason Hall and Dean Packer.
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
GMS
WARNING: YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY READ THE LICENCE AGREEMENT PROVIDED WITH THIS MANUAL
BEFORE USING THIS SOFTWARE PACKAGE. INSTALLING THE SOFTWARE ONTO YOUR COMPUTER INDICATES YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS. IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO ACCEPT ALL
OF THESE TERMS, YOU SHOULD STOP INSTALLING THIS SOFTWARE NOW AND DESTROY ALL COPIES OF
THE SOFTWARE AND ALL MANUALS AND OTHER DOCUMENTS SUPPLIED WITH IT.
NTMail is a registered trademark of Gordano Ltd.
The Gordano Logo is a registered trademark of Gordano Ltd.
Juce is a registered trademark of Gordano Ltd.
NT is a registered trademark of Northern Telecom Ltd.
Windows NT is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the USA and other countries.
All other trademarks are acknowledged.
Patents
Gordano owns a number of patents on its software as listed below:
Autoport
Gordano's “Autoport” technology is patented in the United Kingdom under patent
number GB2391649.
A patent application has been filed in the United States and is pending approval.
Maintaining software and data (Automatic Updates)
Gordano's “Maintaining software and data” technology is patented in the United
Kingdom under patent number GB2374163.
A patent application has been filed in the United States and is pending approval.
Anti-spam filter (Sender Verification)
Gordano's “Anti-spam Filter” technology is patented in the United Kingdom under
patent number GB2385965 and in the United States under patent number 7574476.
Transitory E-Mail Addresses
Gordano's “Transitory E-mail Address” technology is patented in the United Kingdom
under patent number GB2398399.
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Contents
Table of Contents
1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1 About GMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 Who Should Read this Guide? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4 Other GMS Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.5 Additional Gordano Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.6 Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
2 Internet Mail Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2.1 How Does the Internet Work? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
2.2 What is a Post Office? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.3 What Does a Message Look Like?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.4 How is the Mail Server Found? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.5 How is the Message Transferred? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.6 Collecting E-mail and Replying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.7 SMTP Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.8 Methods of Collecting E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.9 Sending Files by E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.10 System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
GMS Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
GMS WebMail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Other GMS Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.11 Connecting to the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.12 Why is a Web Proxy Useful? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3 Setting Up a Mail Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1 Installing TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Naming Your Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Setting up MX Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Installing Internet Mail Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
17
17
17
18
4 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1 Sizing Your Server and Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processor and RAM requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Other Software Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3 Before Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 Installing GMS on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.5 Installing GMS on Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.6 What Installation Does . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Linux. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7 Changing the time zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.8 Removing Gordano products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Linux. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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20
22
22
22
24
26
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31
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33
33
5 Upgrades & Upgrading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
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5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Upgrade Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Determining Which Version You Have . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Adding products to an existing version . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Obtaining an Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Applying an Upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
User Interface Changes from Version 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Obtaining Notification of Upgrades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
6 The User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
6.1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
6.2 Logging on to Administer GMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
6.3 Standard Page Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
The Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
The Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Dialog Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Status dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Status bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
6.4 The Effect on the Interface of User Privileges . . . . . . . . . .44
6.5 What a Standard User Sees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
User logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
7 Day-to-day Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
7.1 Accounts Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
7.2 Managing Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Adding one or more accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Adding Accounts using mail.exe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Changing an accounts password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Emulating a user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Removing an account or obsolete accounts . . . . . . . .50
7.3 Account Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Robot accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
DLL accounts (Windows only). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Mail Manager (Windows only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
List Manager (Windows only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
MML Scripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Forwarding accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
“Moved” messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Autoresponders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
7.4 Expiring Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
7.5 Account Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
7.6 Maintaining Users Quarantine Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
7.7 Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Domain and System Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Adding new groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Adding users to a group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Calendar Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Address Book Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Folder Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
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Journal Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notes Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tasks Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tasks Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing a group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8 Manage Calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.9 Mailing All Users in a Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.10 Managing Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying log levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring log handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling Domain and Relay logs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting, compressing or e-mailing a log. . . . . . . . . .
Searching logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.11 Regular Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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66
67
68
68
69
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70
71
8 Authentication Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Linux, Solaris and AIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1 Authentication methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.2 LDAP authentication configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.3 SQL authentication parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.4 Using Windows ADSI for Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.5 Using Windows NT SAM database accounts . . . . . . . . . .
8.6 Using UNIX database accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7 Authenticating against GMS from external sources. . . . .
73
73
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75
79
81
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84
9 Domain Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1 Types of Domain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Full domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Virtual domains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
POP domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Robot domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alias domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2 Adding a Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up MX records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up domain parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up domain aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up an Unknown User Action . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3 Maintaining Domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Listing domains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring account size limits and archiving . . . . . .
Purging domain e-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advertising/customising the user interface . . . . . . . .
Domain welcome message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Usage Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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89
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Contents
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Email . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
10 Profile Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
10.1 Domain and System Profiles Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
10.2 Making a new profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
10.3 Editing Profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Account Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Access Rights - setting user access rights . . . . . . . . .101
Configuration Rights - Setting configuration access .102
Privileges - setting user privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Preferences - setting configuration appearance . . . .108
Preferences - configuring Anti-Spam settings . . . . . .108
AV Preferences - configuring Anti-Virus settings. . . .108
10.4 Changing a User’s Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
10.5 Profile Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
11 Advanced Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
11.1 Tuning System Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Using the Watch utility to monitor performance . . . .114
Incoming e-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Outgoing e-mail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
E-mail collection (POP3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Configuring Smart Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Configuring outbound delivery rules (Smart Delivery)124
SMTP DLLs (Windows only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
SMTP Shared Libraries (Unix) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
11.2 Other Advanced Areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Reducing use of IP resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Changing the ports used by services. . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Using ESMTP features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
Generating server messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Changing RFC compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
Controlling Services (Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Controlling Services (Unix) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Setting up an SMTP logon message . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Changing POST and POP timing settings . . . . . . . . .138
Listing and starting outgoing mail queues . . . . . . . .139
Setting up DNS servers and the DNS cache. . . . . . . .140
Editing Global, Domain and User variables . . . . . . . .141
Changing use of threads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Using ETRN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
11.3 Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Account Report (domain) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Undeliverable Mail (domain and system). . . . . . . . . .144
Quarantine (domain and system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Virus Scan Report (domain and system) . . . . . . . . . .146
Virus List Report (domain and system) . . . . . . . . . . .147
Search Email (domain and system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147
Licensing (system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Zero Hour (system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
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Current Activity Report (system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Domains Report (system). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mail Queue Size (system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reported Junk Mail (system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alerts (system) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring via SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allowed IPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allowing Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared and Public Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Access Control Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access control modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access Control Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Porting Accounts from other Mail servers . . . . . . . . . . .
AutoPort for Messaging Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allow LDAP directory services access to Address Books .
148
150
150
151
151
151
152
152
152
154
154
155
155
155
155
157
12 Customisation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.1 WebMail Customisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2 Cascading Style Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.3 Product Logo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4 Embedding WebMail Express into a website. . . . . . . . .
12.5 Custom logon and logoff pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
159
159
159
160
161
161
161
13 IP address and Port Flexibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.1 Use only IP address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.2 Use specified IP addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.3 Use IP Connection file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.4 Sockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.5 Adding and deleting a service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.6 Adding a comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.7 Default Ports used by GMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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164
165
166
166
166
14 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.2 E-mail and Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Everything on the Internet is plain text . . . . . . . . . .
GMS storage files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logging all throughput . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.3 Legal Implications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viruses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using footers as disclaimers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acceptable use policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14.4 Standard Security Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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11.4
11.5
11.6
11.7
11.8
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Password Expiry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173
Restricting access to the Web server. . . . . . . . . . . . .173
Checking who is logged on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Enabling or enforcing APOP logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Disabling the Finger server and Password server . . . .174
Authenticated SMTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
Adding addresses to the Local IP list . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
Authenticated POP3/IMAP users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
Post Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Imposing limits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Imposing a WWW session timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Limiting sessions from a single host . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Using service timeouts to stop denial of service attacks .
178
Disabling other functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
Protecting the SMTP STAT command . . . . . . . . . . . .179
Setting up Configuration Server session control . . . .179
14.5 MX Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
14.6 Firewalls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
14.7 Network Address Translation (NAT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
15 Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
15.1 Entering the SSL activation key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
15.2 Assigning a certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
SSL Key Certificate Generator (keycert.exe) . . . . . . .183
15.3 Configuring GMS to use SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185
ESMTP settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185
Setting the secure ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185
Setting the POST SSL mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
Configuring clients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
Restricting Weak Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
16 GMS on Complex Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189
16.1 Multiple SMTP Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189
Potential problems and their solution . . . . . . . . . . . .190
Multiple site setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
16.2 Configuring GMS as an MX Backup Server . . . . . . . . . .191
16.3 Installing GMS on a Bastion Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
16.4 Configuring GMS as a Firewall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
16.5 Multiple Servers Sharing a Domain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Normal forwarding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Resource utilisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
The round-robin setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
16.6 Using Multiple MX Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
16.7 Load Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Enable Load Sharing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Primary Server Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Redirect WWW Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Logon Redirected WWW Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
Maximum number of WWW redirects . . . . . . . . . . .197
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Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
17 Providing Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.1 Facilities Available. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.2 Configuring the Forward WWW Proxy Server . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MIME types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dial-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.3 Configuring the Forward FTP Proxy Parameters . . . . . . .
Enable Proxy Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use FTP Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.4 Configuring Forward SSL Proxy Parameters . . . . . . . . . .
17.5 Configuring Forward Proxy Content Scanning. . . . . . . .
Bypass sites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Banned Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Banned Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Banned Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Virus Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.6 Configuring the Reverse WWW Proxy Server . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17.7 Configuring Proxy Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Responses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bypass Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bypass Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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203
203
204
204
204
205
205
206
206
207
207
207
208
209
210
210
212
212
213
213
214
18 E-mail Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.1 POP3, IMAP4 or Web Browser? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.2 Thunderbird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.3 Microsoft Office Outlook Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.4 MS Outlook Express Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.5 Mobile Device Mail Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.6 Virtual domain users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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219
220
220
221
224
19 SMS and Pager Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.1 GMS Mail configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling the DLL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sending Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.2 GMS WebMail configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling the Outbound SMS Gateway . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling the Inbound SMS Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sending messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.3 Allowing users access to SMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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20 GMS Instant Messaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
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20.1 Installing GMS Instant Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
Installing the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
Activating Instant Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
20.2 Profile options - Access to Instant Messaging . . . . . . . . .231
20.3 Setting the Instant Messaging port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
20.4 Logging Instant Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
20.5 Location Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
21 GMS Anti-Spam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
21.1 Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
What is UCE?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
Spamming Techniques and Countermeasures . . . . .234
Forging a message’s source. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235
What GMS Anti-Spam Can Do for You . . . . . . . . . .236
Message Content. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
Identity checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
Artificial Intelligence — the AI module . . . . . . . . . . .240
Bypasses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
Anti-Spam filters (GMS WebMail). . . . . . . . . . . . . . .241
21.2 Setting Up GMS Anti Spam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .241
21.3 Messages and reply codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .241
SMTP reply codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
21.4 Checking Message Content. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243
Word based checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243
Restricted Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243
Restricted Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
Scored Restricted Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
Regular Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
Restricted Word Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248
Restricted Word Bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Bayesian filter (System Level) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Zero Hour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
Reading Zero Hour information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252
Setting up filters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253
Message Quality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254
Configuring Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
Domain Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262
Configuring Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262
Domain Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262
21.5 Attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262
Ban attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262
Content Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .264
Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .264
21.6 Connect Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .265
Checking servers against a DNSBL . . . . . . . . . . . . . .265
Local clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .266
Allowed IPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .267
Maximum recipients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .268
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Outbound message sizes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Relay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maximum messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authenticate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authenticated IPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.7 Checking Identity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sender of message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Receiver of message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Machine name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SPF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.8 AI Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quick configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining “unusual traffic”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuning the setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.9 Anti Spam Log entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.10 Anti-Spam Filters (User Level) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Junk Mail Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Anti Spam filter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bayesian filter (User Level) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Blocklist filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Confirmation filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
White List filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.11 Spam Reporting Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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273
273
274
277
277
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277
278
279
280
280
280
281
281
282
282
282
22 Anti Virus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.1 Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What is a Virus? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Cost of Virus Attacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viruses and E-mail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How the Anti Virus Operates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.2 Setting Up Anti Virus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Domain Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Domain Alerts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Level Actions and Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Virus Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading Zero Hour information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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285
285
285
286
286
287
288
290
291
291
291
291
291
292
23 Automatic updates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.1 What are automatic updates?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.2 How updates work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.3 General Update information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.4 Anti Spam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.5 Anti Virus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.6 Zero Hour Proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Use Proxy server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295
Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .296
Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .296
Authentication Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .296
23.7 Freebusy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .296
24 GMS Collaboration Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .299
24.1 What is GMS Collaboration Server? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .299
24.2 Collaboration free/busy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300
24.3 Email only mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300
24.4 Automatic client updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300
Client Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .301
How do I obtain updated client files . . . . . . . . . . . . .302
24.5 GMS & Microsoft® Exchange ActiveSync . . . . . . . . . . . .302
What is EAS? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302
How do I use EAS?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302
EAS Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303
24.6 CalDav and CardDav Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304
What is CalDav and CardDav? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304
How can I use CalDav and CardDav? . . . . . . . . . . . .304
24.7 GMS Drive & WebDav . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304
What is GMS Drive & WebDav? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304
How Can I use GMS Drive/WebDav . . . . . . . . . . . . .305
25 GMS Archiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .307
25.1 Setting up GMS Archiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .307
Adding a GMS Archiver profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .307
Adding a mail account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .309
Disabling the mailbox. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .309
Configuring the GMS Archiver robot . . . . . . . . . . . .310
Sending the message logs to the GMS Archiver robot311
25.2 Retrieving messages from the archives . . . . . . . . . . . . . .312
Interface method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .312
Email method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .314
26 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .317
26.1 Preparing to Find Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .317
26.2 Testing the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .318
26.3 Checking the Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .318
Using ping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .318
Checking connectivity between mail and DNS servers319
26.4 Checking your DNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .320
Checking that DNS works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .320
Does DNS have the correct mail domain information?321
26.5 Checking How Mail is Sent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .322
26.6 Checking Collection of Mail via POP3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .323
Available telnet commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .324
26.7 Checking Domain and Server Automatically. . . . . . . . . .324
Check MX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .324
Check Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .325
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Contents
Check SPF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
27 Contacting Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27.1 Reporting Problems to Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27.2 Support Details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
e-mail support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8x5 telephone support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13x5 telephone support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24x7 telephone support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tailored solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27.3 Support Contract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27.4 Third Party Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27.5 Contacting Support from the interface . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to email support from the interface . . . . . . . .
What information to include . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to change your support email addresses . . . . .
Reading responses to support questions . . . . . . . . .
27.6 Passing Suggestions to Gordano Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
327
327
328
328
329
329
329
329
329
329
329
330
330
331
331
331
28 Frequently-asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
29 Disaster Recovery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.1 The Backup File Setup.txt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.2 Standard Backup Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.3 Setting up the Recovery File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.4 Saving a Domain’s Mailboxes and Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.5 Saving other configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.6 Recovering your Mail System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.7 Moving GMS to Another Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
343
344
344
345
345
346
346
346
30 Jargon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Licence Agreements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361
Installation and Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
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Contents
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GMS Administrator’s Guide
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
GMS Administrator’s Guide
1
Introduction
Introduction
This guide introduces administrators to the Gordano Messaging
Suite (GMS), the multi-platform messaging server of choice. GMS
gives the maximum power and flexibility for messaging on the
Internet. This guide:
• Introduces Internet mail concepts for those who are new to this
area.
• Describes how to install GMS, or upgrade from an earlier
release.
• Shows how to manage your mail server, first for simple
networks then for more complex configurations.
• Describes the security benefits GMS offers.
• Shows how to set up GMS as a proxy Web server.
• Gives tips on setting up some of the main mail clients.
• Gives comprehensive troubleshooting and FAQ information.
• Explains GMS’ disaster recovery procedures.
This guide covers the needs of both the following:
• Administrators in companies who use GMS themselves.
• Administrators working for Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and
Internet Access Providers (IAPs), who provide e-mail as a service
to their own customers.
1.1
About GMS
GMS takes only a couple of minutes to install. It has low
management overheads because you can:
• Add large numbers of users at once.
• Manage it remotely using a Web browser.
• Allocate different levels of administrator privileges to senior
users.
GMS delivers large quantities of e-mail messages quickly and
efficiently. It does this by using sophisticated queuing algorithms to
re-use connections, and by using Enhanced SMTP and other
features. This means you do not need a top range server to run
GMS.
GMS reduces the bandwidth needed to deliver and accept
messages to and from the Internet. You can limit the bandwidth
used for outgoing mail to avoid saturating a low bandwidth link.
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Introduction
1.2
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Who Should Read this Guide?
This guide will be of interest to anyone interested in mail servers
and how they work, but particularly to the following GMS
administrators (a small system may only have the first):
• System administrator — has overall control of the system,
installs GMS and adds domains.
• Domain administrator — in a multiple domain system, looks
after one domain.
• Logs administrator — has access to transaction and message
logs.
• GMS Anti-Spam and GMS Anti-Virus administrator - has access
to the GMS Anti-Spam and GMS Anti-Virus product areas so
can manage all the features of those products.
1.3
This Guide
This guide covers the administration of the following products:
• GMS Mail
• GMS WebMail
• GMS WebOrganiser
• GMS Collaboration
• GMS Instant Messenger
• GMS Anti-Spam
• GMS Anti-Virus
• GMS Archive
1.4
Other GMS Guides
The following guides provide additional information:
• GMS User Guide - provides detailed information on all user
facing aspects of GMS. This guide describes mail client settings,
GMS WebMail and GMS WebOrganizer users interfaces. It also
describes the use of GMS Collaboration and GMS Instant
Messenger and the integration of these two products into
Microsoft Outlook.
• GMS Communication Server Guide - provides detailed
information on all aspects of GMS Communication Server,
Gordano’s leading list management program. GMS
Communication Server is a set of Customer Relationship
Management (CRM) Tools including advanced features such as
Personalised Message Targeting, Automated Voting Support,
ODBC connectivity, and Job Concentration Technology. GMS
Communication Server enables you to efficiently manage your
lists of email addresses.
• GMS Reference Guide - provides detailed technical information
for those wishing to use any of the available simple or
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•
1.5
Introduction
advanced programmer interfaces. This guide describes Mail.exe
and other useful tools, describes all GMS database parameters,
and gives example code for robots and DLLs. It provides full
details of the files generated and their formats.
GMS MML Programmers Guide - MML or Mail Meta Language
is the language that Gordano has used to write much of its
software. This language is now shared so that users of Gordano
product's can customize their installations to meet their
requirements. Some of the possibilities include customizing the
GUI, targeting list postings to specific list members and the
automatic adding of users.
Additional Gordano Products
More information about additional products can be found on our
Web site. They are all integrated and work well together as a suite
or as separate installations, making management seamless and
easy, and each has its own guide. The products are:
• GMS Communication Server — GMS’ feature rich companion
software which manages lists of e-mail addresses. See the GMS
Communication Server Guide.
• Mail Meta Language (MML) — the language you can use to
write scripts for GMS, for example to produce filters. This is
described in the MML Programmer’s Guide.
• Gordano Accessory Pack — a set of utilities including NTMetrn
and NTMail Inspector among others.
• Vanguard Server — provides enterprise class anti virus and anti
spam protection to multiple internal mail servers, including the
Gordano Messaging Suite, Microsoft Exchange and IBM Lotus
Notes/Domino.
1.6
Conventions
The following conventions are used in this guide:
Convention
Used for
Courier
NT Registry keys, lines of code and DNS records.
Italic
Other products / services.
<value>
Reference to information you must provide.
Node > page
The “>” abbreviates a sequence of actions. For example, “Choose
Users > Processing” means click the Users node in the menu tree,
then choose the Processing page.
CTRL + click
Hold down the CTRL key on the keyboard while selecting multiple
items by clicking on them with the left mouse button
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Introduction
GMS Administrator’s Guide
SHIFT + click
Hold down the SHIFT key on the keyboard while clicking on the
first item in a list you wish to select and dragging the pointer to
the last item you want selected. This will select all items between
the start and end items
<$path>\
Denotes the base directory for the installation. On UNIX
installations the default is /opt/gordano/mail/ and on Windows
installations C:\Gordano\. Wherever a file location is described in
the guide back slashes “\” will be used. If your GMS installation is
on UNIX substitute these back slashes with forward slashes “/”.
The following symbols are used in this guide:
Tip - gives you optional extra information you may want to act on.
You can ignore these if you wish.
Information - gives additional explanation of points. You should
read these.
Warning - warns of areas where you could damage some element
of your system. You must read these.
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2
Internet Mail Concepts
Internet Mail Concepts
This section introduces Internet Mail Systems — how they work,
what the jargon means and what additional information you may
require. We examine how a message is delivered. This information
is not GMS-specific - it applies to all Internet Mail.
If you have only used Internet Mail and have never installed or
maintained an Internet Mail Server, this section will help you to
understand the essential background concepts. If you cannot
describe what DNS, SMTP, POP3, an MX record or a proxy is, then
read on!
This section covers these elements:
• How the Internet works.
• What a post office does.
• What a message looks like.
• How the mail server is found.
• How the message is transferred.
• How to collect e-mail and reply to it.
• Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) issues.
• Methods of collecting e-mail.
• Sending files by e-mail.
• GMS system components.
• Connecting to the Internet.
• Why a Web proxy is useful.
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Internet Mail Concepts
2.1
GMS Administrator’s Guide
How Does the Internet Work?
The Internet is a collection of interconnected computers, each
identified by a unique number or Internet Protocol address (IP
address). For convenience, these addresses are given as four
numbers in the range 0 to 255, separated by dots, for example
“194.205.1.39”. The number ranges from 0.0.0.0 to
255.255.255.255. The Internet lets each computer exchange
information with any other computer, provided that each has a
unique number and knows the other’s number. Different
computers communicate in their own languages, called protocols,
in much the same way as humans from different countries. There
are many different communication protocols in common use today.
When the Internet was first designed there was a single computer
which handled the mapping of computer names to their numbers.
This quickly became unmanageable and a special program, Domain
Name Service (DNS), was written to perform this task. Today DNS
successfully manages millions of computers, all with different
numbers (addresses). DNS converts computer names to addresses,
and vice versa.
You may be familiar with the World Wide Web (WWW) address (or
Uniform Resource Locator - URL) which looks something like:
http://www.gordano.com
This contains:
• The protocol name, which in this case has the code HTTP for
HyperText Transmission Protocol, the means by which Web
browsers get pages from other computers.
• The name of the computer — “www.gordano.com”.
The first job your Web browser has to do is convert the name of the
computer into its IP address or unique number. To do this, it uses
the DNS protocol - it asks for the unique number for the absolute
name (or A record) “www.gordano.com”. The DNS will have some
configuration information so it knows how to respond to this
request. In this case, the record might look like:
www.gordano.com. IN A 216.13.182.19
This tells DNS that when a request is made for the A record for
www.gordano.com, it must reply with the IP address
“216.13.182.19”.
DNS may use a Canonical Name (C Name) instead. This is an alias for an A
record — a C Name should always point to an A record.
Once the browser has the IP address, it knows it must send a
request using the HTTP protocol. It tries to establish a connection to
the remote computer and (using HTTP) asks for the page to be
sent.
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Internet Mail Concepts
The above is termed a “client-server” transaction. The Web
browser (or client) requests information and the Web site (or server)
provides the information (or service) requested. Many different
services can be provided, including e-mail.
2.2
What is a Post Office?
A post office (in Internet Terminology) is a computer that has been
assigned to handle Internet Mail. Its basic task is to accept
messages and decide whether they are for a local user or for
someone whose post office is on another computer. If the e-mail is
local, it is retained at the post office until the local user is ready to
collect it.
To distinguish between people at a post office and the post office
itself, the “@” sign is used. The general form of an e-mail address
is:
user@post-office
The user and post office names can include any alphanumeric
character and a few special characters. They are case-insensitive, so
e-mail sees “sales@gordano.com” and “sales@GORDANO.com” as
equivalent.
In practice, the Internet Mail protocol supports a larger range of characters
than is normally used.. The characters used are restricted so that “mail gateways” that transfer mail to other systems can work correctly.
The user name is defined by the person running the post office. The
name of the post office is allocated by an external authority such as
the Internic. This ensures that all people use a unique post office
name, so that all e-mail can be routed correctly. GMS is an example
of a very powerful but easily managed post office.
2.3
What Does a Message Look Like?
Now we know what an e-mail address looks like, it’s time to study a
standard e-mail message. E-mail messages have two parts, body
and header, separated by a blank line, as shown below:
From: Customer <customer@company.dom>
To: Sales <sales@gordano.com>
Subject: System recovery in GMS
Date: Sat, 12 Sep 1998 17:59:00 +0000
The first four lines are
headers.
Hi,
How do I update my licence?
Customer
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
The message body
starts after the first
blank line.
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Internet Mail Concepts
GMS Administrator’s Guide
There are two parts to this Internet Mail message:
• The message header, the part above the first blank line. This
contains information about message delivery. The header
shown contains the minimum required for an Internet Mail
message — the specification is contained in Standards (STDs)
and Requests For Comments (RFCs):
There are two e-mail addresses, telling you where the mail is
from and where it is going to (these are termed the From clause
and To clause). In addition, there is a Subject line and a Date.
The subject is entered by the person sending the message and
the message is automatically date stamped.
• The body of the message, containing the message itself. This
follows the first blank line:
2.4
How is the Mail Server Found?
This section describes the basic principles of delivering an e-mail
message. The message in the previous section had this destination:
To: Sales <sales@gordano.com>
This message must be delivered to the post office which runs e-mail
for “gordano.com”. When the message is delivered to this post
office, it is stored for the sales staff to read at some time in the
future. So how does the message get delivered?
The mail server that is sending the message must find out the IP
address of the post office so that it can deliver the message to it. It
asks DNS to provide the IP address for mail delivery to the domain
“gordano.com”.
Besides A records (mentioned earlier), DNS provides Mail Exchange
(MX) records. These have an additional option, a priority for e-mail
delivery. The DNS entry for this mail server might be:
gordano.com.
IN MX 10 mail.gordano.com.
IN MX 20 gate05.gordano.com.
gate05.gordano.com. IN A 216.13.182.18
mail.gordano.com. IN A 62.172.232.100
For this mail server there are two MX records.
The two MX entries tell the sending mail server that there are two
possible places to which it can deliver e-mail for this domain. They
are “mail.gordano.com” and “gate05.gordano.com”. Both of
these places are actually absolute names and there are two more
entries which define how these A records are translated into the IP
addresses which the sending server needs. So the sending server
knows that it can deliver this message to either the machine at IP
address 62.172.232.100 or to 216.13.182.18.
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Internet Mail Concepts
As mentioned earlier, the MX records have a priority assigned. This
tells the sending server which machine to connect to first. So, since
the machine at 62.172.232.100 has a higher priority (10) than the
second machine (20), the sending server delivers the message to it.
If the first machine is not available (for example, because the
network is broken), the sending server delivers the message to the
second machine (at 216.13.182.18) instead.
Your Internet Service Provider (ISP) will probably provide your DNS for you,
though if you have a permanent connection you may decide to run your
own DNS. Many people install a copy of bind, a free port of the DNS software used on many Unix systems. If you decide to run DNS yourself, check its
documentation for more information about how to configure your particular
system. Bind is maintained by The Internet Software Consortium.

When changing DNS records, do not forget to update the serial number and
do not omit the “.” from fully qualified domain names.

For details of more complex use of MX records, see “Using Multiple MX
Records” on page 195.
2.5
How is the Message Transferred?
We now know which machine we must send the message to. Next
we need to transfer the message itself.
Messages are transferred using the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
(SMTP). When the sending server (or client) connects to the
destination server, it receives this response (actually on a single
line):
220 mail.gordano.com GMS (v4.00.0021/AB0000.00.719cfeeb) ready for
ESMTP transfer
To make the communication clearer in the following text, we put the letter
“S:” in front of this line, indicating that it is from the destination server. In a
similar way, we use “C:” to denote the client (or sending server).
The client “signs on” to the server using the HELO command:
C: HELO mail.company.dom
The server responds:
S: 250 mail.gordano.com mail.company.dom
The client must now tell the server who the mail is coming from
and who it is going to. It does this using the MAIL and RCPT
clauses. This transaction will look something like:
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C: MAIL From:<customer@company.dom>
S: 250 OK.
C: RCPT To:<sales@gordano.com>
S: 250 OK.
Now the message (both header and body) must be sent. The client
uses the DATA command to tell the server the message is about to
be sent:
C: DATA
S: 354 Start mail input, end with <CRLF>.<CRLF>.
C: From: Customer <customer@company.dom>
C: To: Sales <sales@gordano.com>
C: Subject: System recovery in GMS
C: Date: Sat, 12 Sep 1998 17:59:00 +0000
C:
C: Hi,
C:
C: How do I update my licence?
C:
C: Customer
C: .
S: 250 OK
The blank line between the header and message body must be present. The
message must end with <CRLF>.<CRLF>.
In this case, the server has replied “250 OK”, indicating that the
message has been accepted and delivered successfully.
2.6
Collecting E-mail and Replying
Messages arriving at the post office are stored until someone
collects them. Usually a mail reading application, a mail client, is
used to collect the e-mail. This is a program that lets you read
messages, compose new messages, reply to messages, etc.
For example, one of Gordano’s sales staff will use a mail client to
read the message that has been sent and send a reply, for example:
From: Sales <sales@gordano.com>
To: Customer <customer@company.dom>
Subject: Re: System recovery in GMS
Date: Sat, 12 Sep 1998 19:23:04 +0000
>Hi,
>
>How do I update my licence?
Here is your licence key. Update from GMS’ licence page.
Simon
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Internet Mail Concepts
This message will be sent to the local post office using SMTP. The
local post office will realise that e-mail to “company.dom” is not
local and queue the message for sending to the customer.
Exactly the same sequence of events takes place to deliver the reply
to the customer as when the message was sent.
In the response, each line of the original message has a “>” inserted. Most
mail clients use this to show the original message so that the reply is easy to
find. This mechanism is one of the reasons that Internet Mail is so much
faster to respond to than traditional paper mail.
2.7
SMTP Issues
The Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, as its name suggests, is very
simple. Its simplicity means that there are several issues you should
be aware of. These affect all Internet Mail:
• All e-mail is transferred in human readable format called “plain
text”, so anyone can read the message that you send (unless
you encrypt it in some way).
• Anyone can “fake” a message. Any Internet Mail message
might have been created by someone other than the person
who appears to have sent it. The GMS Anti-Spam product has
features to help prevent people faking your e-mail.
• Messages can be lost or duplicated. In practice, the vast
majority of messages sent are delivered. GMS employs an
internal system so that mail is never lost during transfer (it will
retry later if required). Most lost messages are those that need
to go through a “mail gateway”. A mail gateway translates
Internet Mail into another e-mail form, such as MSMail, ccMail,
X-400, etc. This conversion process is usually complex and
prone to error.
• Content can be changed. Anyone can tamper with the content
of an e-mail message without your knowledge.
SMTP has a series of extensions which address some of these
issues. These are denoted by Extended SMTP (ESMTP). GMS
complies with a range of ESMTP options and has additional
packages to help resolve the other issues mentioned above.
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Internet Mail Concepts
2.8
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Methods of Collecting E-mail
There are three methods of collecting and reading e-mail, listed
below. Decide which method(s) best suit your organisation. Here is
a short description of each method; for a list of advantages and
disadvantages, see “POP3, IMAP4 or Web Browser?” on page 216.
Different solutions may be applicable to different people — for example,
most users might use Web Mail, but the system administrator might use Web
Mail and IMAP4.
•
•
•
2.9
Using a POP3 mail client
POP3 dictates how a mail client obtains e-mail from the post
office (or mail server). It lets all the e-mail be collected from the
server and removed from the server’s storage space. Once the
e-mail has been downloaded, the user can read it on their local
machine.
Using IMAP4
IMAP4 dictates how e-mail can be manipulated on the server
by a mail application. As for POP3, the mail client lets messages
be read and replied to, but here all the e-mail is maintained on
the mail server rather than the local machine. The advantages
of this are that you can access your e-mail from anywhere in
the world, and can implement hot-desking in your office.
Using your Web browser/Web mail
GMS lets you access your e-mail directly from your Web
browser, so you can access your e-mail from anywhere in the
world. The browser lets you read messages, reply to e-mail, etc.
GMS WebMail. provides an advanced WebMail client. This
allows multiple mail boxes, address books, etc.
Sending Files by E-mail
Users can attach files to e-mail messages. Their mail client encodes
the file into the required format, MIME-encoded or Unencoded.
The file becomes part of the message body (see the client’s
documentation).
GMS complies with the MIME (Multimedia Internet Message
Exchange) standards.
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GMS Administrator’s Guide
Internet Mail Concepts
2.10 System Components
GMS Mail
This diagram gives an overview of the system components of GMS
Mail:
The components are:
• SMTP server — accepts incoming mail from the Internet and
from local mail clients.
• POST server — also called outgoing SMTP, this uses SMTP to
post mail to non-local domains.
• POP server — lets a Post Office Protocol version 3 (POP3) client
collect mail from GMS.
• IMAP server — lets an Internet Message Application Protocol
version 4 (IMAP) client collect mail from GMS.
GMS WebMail
This diagram gives an overview of the system components:
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The components are:
• SMTP server — accepts incoming mail from the Internet and
from local mail clients.
• POST server — also called outgoing SMTP, this uses SMTP to
post mail to non-local domains.
• GMS WebMail server — Allows the collection of mail using the
GMS WebMail browser client.
Note: POP and IMAP are not available if GMS WebMail is installed as a
stand alone product without GMS Mail or another mail server that provides
these services.
Other GMS Components
In addition to GMS Mail and GMS WebMail other components
such as GMS WebOrganizer and GMS Collaboration can be used
by mail clients such as Microsoft Outlook, Apple iCal etc. These are
described in a later section of this guide.
2.11 Connecting to the Internet
Your company will be connected to the Internet in one of two
ways:
• Dial-up — this is also known as intermittent connection. The
equipment at your end will be a modem, an ISDN terminal
adapter or a dial-on-demand router. This dials into your ISP at
times which you specify (using a “schedule”), and stays up long
enough to send and receive all waiting e-mail. It then
disconnects. (A dial-on-demand router does not have to be
scheduled, but this is the best way to cut your connection costs
if you use one.)
Dial-up installation is described separately as it’s more complex
and you also need to set up Windows NT’s Remote Access
Service (RAS).
• Permanent Connection — there are several types of
connection, the commonest being leased line. The connection
should always be up, so incoming or outgoing e-mail is
processed immediately it arrives.
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Internet Mail Concepts
2.12 Why is a Web Proxy Useful?
GMS provides a Web Proxy server. This:
• Fulfils the two most important requirements for users —
delivery of Web pages and e-mail.
• Reduces bandwidth requirements by caching. Pages which
have been read are stored (cached) by the server. If they are
requested again within a set time, they are retrieved from the
cache rather than obtained from the external Web site.
• Protects your Web Server. The reverse proxy will allow the web
server to remain behind a firewall. When a client makes a
request to your site, the request goes to the proxy server. The
proxy server then sends the client's request through a specific
passage in the firewall to the content server. The content server
passes the result through the passage back to the proxy. The
proxy sends the retrieved information to the client, as if the
proxy were the actual content server.
The proxy server is used as a go-between in Internet connections.
That is, the user connects to the proxy and the proxy connects to
the Internet and carries out their request. A proxy has the
advantage that it lets all users browse the Web through a single
line, which is especially useful if you use a dial-up connection to an
ISP.
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3
Setting Up a Mail Server
Setting Up a Mail Server
For those who have never set up an Internet mail system, this
section provides an overview of this process.
There are four stages to setting up an Internet mail server:
1. Installing the Internet (TCP/IP).
2. Naming your server.
3. Setting up Mail Exchange (MX) records.
4. Installing Internet mail software, such as GMS.
These are covered in turn below.
3.1
Installing TCP/IP
We assume at this stage that you have installed your TCP/IP and
have it running correctly.
3.2
Naming Your Server
You can choose any name for your mail server, for example “mail”.
It is important that you set up both a hostname and a domain
name for your mail server under its TCP/IP configuration to
prevent problems with outbound mail delivery. It is also helpful
to make the hostname of the server match the hostname that
you use in DNS for SMTP.
On a large system, try to plan for future expansion now. The DNS
gives you another option that may “future proof” your installation.
It lets a single machine have many names. You can use this to give
each part of the mail service a unique name, for example:
• mail.company.dom — where to send e-mail to.
• pop.company.dom — where users collect e-mail from.
• imap.company.dom — the name used by power users with
IMAP clients.
• mx.company.dom — a backup MX mail server.
All of these could point to the same physical machine, but by giving
them separate names you can separate the functions and help your
users.
3.3
Setting up MX Records
The most complicated part of setting up a mail server is establishing
correct (MX) records, yet this has nothing to do with GMS. As
described in “How is the Mail Server Found?” on page 8, MX
records dictate where mail is delivered. They also provide
information on backup mail systems in case your mail server is
down.
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Mail Exchange information is held by the DNS as MX records in this
form:
company1.dom. IN MX 10 smtp.company1.dom.
IN MX 20 mx.isp.dom.
Providing setup information for all of the different varieties of DNS
software is beyond the scope of this guide, but for more
information see the book DNS and Bind by Paul Albitz & Cricket Li.
This is published by O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. (for purchase
information see www.ora.com).
Your ISP should be able to help you set up your MX records
correctly. If they do set up your DNS, once you have installed GMS
you may wish to check that they have done this correctly. See
“Troubleshooting” on page 317 for details of how to do this.
3.4
Installing Internet Mail Software
Installing GMS normally only takes a few minutes (see
“Installation” on page 19). Once it’s installed you should have a
fully functioning Internet mail system with just the default account,
postmaster.
The next step is adding users (or configuring GMS to authenticate
to the correct location of your user database). You can do all this
using your Web browser.
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Installation
Installation
This section is for administrators installing GMS for the first time
(not upgrading from a previous version). It describes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
How to size your server and connection.
Other software you require.
What to do before starting to install GMS.
Installing GMS at sites with permanent connections.
Installing GMS at sites with dial-up connections (Windows
only).
Testing the installation.
Changing time zone.
A summary of what installation does.
Things you will need to have set up before installing GMS:
•
TCP/IP
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4.1
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Sizing Your Server and Connection
The size of server and network link you need depends on how your
users will use e-mail. This affects your system in several ways, but
this section gives guidelines based on average use of a mail system.
Two formulae are important:
Disk space (MB) =
Number of users
* Average number of messages daily per user
* Average message size
* Time mail is stored on server
/ 1024
* 1.01 (1% allowance for transaction logs)
Network 
bandwidth (bps) =

Number of users
* Average no. messages per day per user
* Average message size
* Ratio of messages sent outside
* 1024 * 8 /86400
Note that if your installation is also using other GMS
components such as GMS Collaboration you will need to make
an additional disk space allowance on the server. This is a more
finite amount than that required for mail storage and should
require no more than 1Mb allowance per user.
This table shows the meaning of the parameters in the above
formulae:
20
Parameter
Description
Average number of messages
daily per user
The average of all e-mail users. A typical figure
might be 10 messages per day.
Average message size
Although most messages will be short,
attachments such as spreadsheets and documents
increase the average size. Users sending graphics
increase it dramatically. A typical value might be
24KB.
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Parameter
Description
Time mail is stored on server
This depends on how your users read their e-mail. If
they use POP clients, mail may only be present for
half a day. If they use Web and IMAP, they tend to
leave mail on the server for longer periods. We’ll
assume an average of 30 days for Web and IMAP.
For a comparison of POP and IMAP, see “POP3,
IMAP4 or Web Browser?” on page 216.
Ratio of messages sent
outside
Number of messages sent to/ received from outside
this server, divided by the total number of
messages. A value of 0.25 (one message in four
goes outside) is reasonable, though this will fall as
the number of users increases.
The following table shows the network bandwidth needed for the
connection to the Internet. This is based on the assumption that
once the connection is made 100% bandwidth is used (this
requires that local mail is delivered to an ISPs mail server for
delivery).
It assumes that:
• Average number of messages sent daily per user = 10.
• Average message size is 32KB.
• Mail for POP3 accounts is left on the server for half a day.
• Mail for IMAP accounts is left on the server for 20 days.
• Ratio of messages sent outside = 0.25.
Disk Space Required
(MB)
Bandwidth
required
for
continuous
connection
(baud)
Time required (hh:mm:ss)
at
28.8
baud
64
baud
256
baud
85
00:04:1
6
00:01:5
5
00:00:2
9
158
213
00:10:4
0
00:04:4
8
00:01:1
2
8
316
427
00:21:2
0
00:09:3
6
00:02:2
4
100
16
631
853
00:42:4
0
00:19:1
2
00:04:4
8
250
39
1578
2133
01:46:4
0
00:48:0
0
00:12:0
0
500
79
3156
4267
03:23:2
0
01:36:0
0
00:24:0
0
1000
158
6313
8533
impracti
cal
03:12:0
0
00:48:0
0
Users
POP3
IMAP4
10
2
63
25
4
50
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Disk Space Required
(MB)
Users
POP3
IMAP4
2500
395
15781
10000
1578
63125
Bandwidth
required
for
continuous
connection
(baud)
Time required (hh:mm:ss)
at
28.8
baud
64
baud
256
baud
21333
impracti
cal
impracti
cal
02:00:0
0
85333
impossib
le
impossi
ble
08:00:0
0
IMAP requires more space than shown in the last column, because messages
are stored on the server.
For POP3, the disk space figure does not include the space needed by users
storing e-mail messages on their PCs.
Processor and RAM requirements
For entry level systems up to 1000 users, Gordano recommends a
minimum server specification of at least 2 physical CPU and 8GBs
or RAM. Performance will also be affected by Hard disk
specification depending on any given scenario.
4.2
Other Software Requirements
GMS may need the following software on your system:
• A Web browser. GMS can be configured using Internet Explorer
6 or later along with any other browser of your choice. We
recommend that you use the latest version of Internet Explorer,
Firefox and Google Chrome.
• PDF reader — Adobe provides a free PDF (Portable Document
Format) reader. All GMS documentation uses this format.
4.3
Before Installation
Start GMS installation by downloading the file containing GMS
from the Gordano Ltd. Web site.
Before you install GMS, you must install a network card and TCP/IP
on the server. You will need to know the following information:
• Your domain name and your server’s IP address. This must be a
static IP address — you cannot install a mail server on a
machine with a dynamic IP address, for example using DHCP.
• Your company name.
•
Use the table on the back page of this manual to record this information in
case you require it later.
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Dial up internet connections are not supported for Linux, Solaris or AIX
platforms.
The dialog in the installation procedure have an 'Explain' button giving help
on what you need to enter. Use this if you are unsure how to proceed.
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4.4
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Installing GMS on Windows
To install GMS for a permanent connection, do the following:
1. Use Windows Explorer or the Start > Run menu to run the
downloaded GMS installation program. This guides you
through installing the full GMS product suite. Read the online
licence agreement before continuing.
2. A 28 day licence (by default for 43 users and unlimited
domains) is automatically generated.
If you require a larger licence Trial keys are available from our Web site at
www.gordano.com, from your channel or by contacting sales. See the
contact details at the back of this guide.
3. The installation will ask you to choose which products from the
Gordano Messaging Suite you would like to install. You can
choose to install them all to trial then only purchase those that
you want or select only the desired product at this stage.
4. The next page will list the products you have elected to install
and ask you to confirm your choice by ticking the check box
before clicking “Next >”.
5. You will then be asked where you want to install your Gordano
products, if you do not want to use the default location,
C:\Gordano, specify another using the “Browse” button.
6. When Gordano products are installed, a mail account called
“postmaster” is created, with full administration privileges. You
will use this account to configure your system using a Web
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browser. The next page will ask you to enter a password for this
account. Make sure you make a note of this password.
The security of your system can be compromised if you choose a poor
password; see “Password policy” on page 172 for hints on choosing
passwords.
7. You will then be asked to select how your users will be
authenticated. i.e. where user information will be held so that
the software can check users exist and validate their passwords
and access rights. The default is to use just Gordano’s
proprietary database. You can however de-select this and use
another option or combine it with an NT database and an
optional external database such as the Active Directory. Once
you’ve made your selection click on “Next”.
8. If you selected one of the authentication options other than
Gordano’s proprietary database the next screen gives you
instructions on how to configure that method of
authentication.
9. You will then be asked for your domain name, IP address and
company name:
10. For the domain name, if you are using an ISP then type the
name they gave you. Otherwise, type the domain name
registered for your company, for example “mycompany.dom”.
11. Type your IP address (from your network card) and company
name.
12. You are then asked if you would like to provide up to three
email addresses that you would like to use for contacting
support. Entering an address or addresses here will help you get
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the fastest possible response from the Gordano support team
simply tick the text box and enter between 1 and 3 addresses.
13. On the next screen press next to start the install.
14. The installation is complete. You can now test it, as described in
“Testing the Installation” on page 318.
4.5
Installing GMS on Linux
The install process is similar for Solaris ,AIX and Linux. To install
GMS, do the following:
You must be logged on to your machine as root when installing GMS.
1. Download the installation file and copy it to a suitable directory
on your machine. For example"/install".
2. The install file comes packaged as a .tar file which has been
compressed into a gzip file (.gz). From a terminal window, the
files can be unpacked by typing:
tar -zxovf filename
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This unpacks the files required for installation into your install
directory. The console will display the filenames as the files are
unpacked as shown in the picture above.
It is advisable to read the file releasenotes.txt which contains
details of updates in the version being installed.
3. You are now ready to initiate the install by typing ./install from
within your install directory.
4. It is a necessary part of the install process to disable Sendmail if
it is installed on your machine. The install script will ask you to
confirm that Sendmail can be permanently disabled on your
system. If you agree to this, type YES in capital letters and the
install will continue, otherwise the install will be aborted.
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5. Next you will be asked to read the licence agreement contained
in the licence.txt file. If you agree to the terms of the licence
agreement type “yes” when prompted.
6. Next you will be asked which products from the Gordano suite
you would like to install. To install the whole suite (default) just
hit the Enter key. To install just one or two of the products type
a comma separated list of products. For example M,J will install
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GMS with JUCE. You will be prompted to confirm your
selection.
7. The install will then ask you to provide the following
information:
• Install directory. To install to the default /opt/gordano
directory just press the Enter key.
• The password to be used for the postmaster account. You
will need to type this twice to confirm you have entered it
correctly.
The security of your system can be compromised if you choose a poor
password; see “Password policy” on page 172 for hints on choosing
passwords.
•
•
The domain name that your machine is to host mail for. For
example yourcompany.dom. The domain entered here
should have an MX record set up in DNS.
The IP address of the machine GMS is being installed on. To
accept the suggested address press the Enter key.
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•
Enter a space separated list of IP addresses for the DNS
servers that GMS should use for domain name resolution.
To accept the suggested address press the Enter key.
•
The port to be used by the SMTP service. To use the default
port 25 press the Enter key.
The port to be used for configuring GMS using a WWW
browser. To use the default port 8000 press the Enter key.
Select the Authentication method to be used. There is a
choice of GMS’ proprietary database (G), the UNIX user
database (U) and an External database (E). If you select E for
an external database you can choose from L for an LDAP
database and S for an SQL database. See “Changing an
accounts password” on page 50 for more information.
•
•
If you choose an external database you will need to configure the parameters
GMS needs to access the data. This is done from the administration interface
by selecting the system level Authentication branch. Additionally on multiple
domain systems each domain may have its own individual authentication
settings.
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The name of a user on your system that will own all mail
files. To accept the default of “mail” press the Enter key.
• The name of a group that is to have access to the mail
system. To accept the default of “other” press the Enter
key.
8. You are also asked to optionally provide up to 3 email addresses
which will be registered with Gordano support. The addresses
entered here will be the ones that Gordano support will
respond to should you contact them.
9. You will then be asked for final confirmation that you wish to
complete the install. Typing “yes” installs the products you
selected and starts the GMS services. Your server is now ready
to receive and send mail and can be configured straight away
using a web browser by typing http://<server_IP_address>:8000
in the address bar on any machine and http://127.0.0.1:8000
on the server itself..
•
10. You can now test your installation as detailed in “Testing the
Installation” on page 318.
11. The install comprises a fully functional 28 day demonstration of
GMS Office (50 users). If you require a larger version contact
sales@gordano.com for a separate trial activation key.
Trial keys are also available from our Web site at www.gordano.com, or from
your channel.
12. If you have purchased an activation key for GMS follow the
instructions sent with the key to enable the full licence.
4.6
What Installation Does
Windows
This section summarises the elements installation adds to your
Windows NT or Windows 2000 machine.
The main additions are:
• GMS program and data files, stored under the directory
specified during the installation.
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•
•
GMS Administrator’s Guide
MySQL database required for vCard, Addressbook and
Calendaring functionality.
Registry entries for GMS stored under this key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/Software/InternetShopper/Mail
Installation installs and starts the following Gordano services:
• Configuration Server — allows configuration of GMS using a
Web browser.
• POP, POST, IMAP, SMTP, GMSSQL and LIST servers.
Installation also:
• Configures GMS with the default settings for domain and IP
address which you specified during the install.
• For dial-up sites, specifies how mail is to be sent to and from
the ISP. (Many of these details can be changed later, if required.)
• Adds a single account called postmaster@<yourDomain>. To
comply with RFCs, all mail servers must have a postmaster
account available at all times.
By default, this account can send and receive mail, and can be
used to configure GMS and other Gordano products using a
Web browser by pointing to http://<your IP>:8000. This
account has system, domain and logs administrator permissions
(see “The Effect on the Interface of User Privileges” on
page 44). You should not delete this account.
Linux
This section summarises the elements installation adds to your
machine.
The main additions are:
• GMS program and data files, stored under the directory
specified during the installation.
• The GMS install scripts are copied to the install directory
specified during the installation.
• Startup scripts in /etc:
• /etc/rc0.d/K30GMS
• /etc/rc1.d/K30GMS
• /etc/rc6.d/K30GMS
• Configuration Database entries for GMS stored in hidden .reg
files under this directory:
<BaseDir>/Mail
Installation installs and starts the following GMS services:
• Configuration Server — allows configuration of GMS using a
Web browser.
• POP, POST, IMAP, SMTP and LIST servers.
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Installation also:
• Configures GMS with the default settings for domain and IP
address which you specified during the install.
• Adds a single account called postmaster@<yourDomain>. To
comply with RFCs, all mail servers must have a postmaster
account available at all times.
By default, this account can send and receive mail, and can be used
to configure GMS using a Web browser by pointing to http://<your
IP>:8000. This account has system, domain and logs administrator
permissions (see “The Effect on the Interface of User Privileges” on
page 44). You should not delete this account.
4.7
Changing the time zone
Once you have installed GMS one of the first things you might
want to do is adjust the time zone for your local area. This is done
from the System Administration > Settings > General page of the
GMS interface.
4.8
Removing Gordano products
Windows
To remove GMS you can use the Add/Remove programs option
under the control panel or run the uninstallation program from
Run>Programs>Gordano Messaging Suite>Remove products.A
popup dialog box will ask you to confirm. select OK to confirm or
Cancel to abort the removal.
Linux
To remove GMS navigate to the /basedir directory (default is /opt/
gordano/mail) and type ./uninstall now. This will issue a warning
asking if you are sure you want to remove all Gordano products.
Entering YES in upper case will continue to remove all Gordano
products from the machine. Entering anything other than YES in
upper case will abort the removal.
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5
Upgrades & Upgrading
Upgrades & Upgrading
This section is for administrators who are upgrading from a
previous version of Gordano software. If you are installing GMS for
the first time, read the Installation section instead.
This section describes:
• The different types of upgrade and their numbering.
• Determining which version you already have.
• How to obtain an upgrade.
• How to apply an upgrade.
• User interface changes since Version 3.0.
• How you’re told upgrades are available.
5.1
Upgrade Policy
To upgrade GMS you will require a valid upgrade key. To determine
if your current upgrade key is valid go to the Licensing page of the
interface where the expiry date of the upgrade key is displayed.
Since the release of GMS 3028 there is an exception to this rule
whereby releases denoted as Hotfixes can be installed without an
upgrade key.
5.2
Determining Which Version You Have
There are two ways to display the GMS version number:
• Look at the top of the home page In the user interface
• Open a command prompt, go to the directory Gordano\bin and
type any service name (SMTP, POP, etc.) followed by’-s’.
5.3
Adding products to an existing version
If you want to add for example GMS WebMail to an existing GMS
installation this is very straightforward. Just contact
sales@gordano.com for a GMS WebMail key or purchase one from
the Gordano website. The key will arrive via an email which will tell
you how to enter the key on the Licensing page of the interface.
That’s all there is to it.
5.4
Obtaining an Upgrade
To obtain an upgrade install file, go to the web site
http:\\www.gordano.com or use ftp from ftp.gordano.com. In
addition to downloading the software you will have to have a valid
upgrade key that has not expired. This can be obtained from
sales@gordano.com or by phoning the number at the back of this
guide.
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5.5
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Applying an Upgrade
The upgrade you receive will be a single file and in fact is the same
file used for first time installs.
You cannot install an earlier version over a later version.
You must have obtained an upgrade key before you can install the upgrade
Prior to upgrading it is advisable to create a system recovery file, see
page 345, and take a backup copy of the entire Gordano File
structure
To upgrade, do the following:
1. Copy the new executable into a temp directory.
2. Run the new executable, either by double-clicking on the
downloaded file or by selecting Start, Run and typing in the
program name, then clicking OK.
3. You will then be asked to confirm that you agree to the licence
agreement before you can continue.
4. A dialog box will be displayed showing the enhancements and
improvements for this version of GMS.
5. Then you will be prompted to confirm that you wish to upgrade
your Gordano products.
Upgrading is a one way process.
6. Your current keys will then be listed along with any expiry dates
that may be applicable. Check that an upgrade key is listed and
that it hasn’t expired.
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7. If a valid upgrade key is listed then you can click on “Next”
without entering any keys.
8. If there is no upgrade key or it has expired you will need to
enter a new upgrade key which can be obtained from
sales@gordano.com or via Gordano’s website, http://
www.gordano.com.
9. If you need to enter a key you first have to enter the “Customer
Reference” this will be in the format “XX1234.00” (The two
digits after the dot refer to the machine number, if you are
unsure what this is check the System>Key page on your server
or the email that the key came in). Once you have typed in the
number press Enter. Then you will have to type in the key itself.
Be very careful not to make a mistake. Press Enter when you
have finished typing.
10. When you have finished entering keys or if you already have an
upgrade key that is in date, click on the “Next” button. The
install will then check to make sure there are no potential
upgrade problems.
11. Next you will be asked if you want to go ahead and complete
the upgrade. Click on “Next” and the upgrade will take place.
12. Should you encounter any problems upgrading contact
sales@gordano.com with details of what has gone wrong.
5.6
User Interface Changes from Version 3
If you have upgraded from Version 3, note that there are no CPLs
now. All configuration is done using a Web browser, whether you
are located locally or remotely.
5.7
Obtaining Notification of Upgrades
Gordano runs mail lists to notify you of new information available
on its server. These use a GMS Communication Server list to deliver
the information to customers.
To join or leave a mailing list:
• To subscribe, send a message to the list with a to address of
<listname>-join@listdomain.dom. For example to join
discuss@gordano.com you would send a message to
discuss-join@gordano.com.
•
To unsubscribe, send a message to the list with a to address of
<listname>-unsubscribe@listdomain.dom. for example to leave
the discuss@gordano.com list send a blank email to
discuss-unsubscribe@gordano.co.uk.
•
Alternatively you can visit the Support page of the Gordano
website and join or leave a list from there.
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You will receive a mail message confirming that you have been
added or removed from the appropriate list.
You can also subscribe/unsubscribe other people to/from a list; see the
GLCommunicator Administrator’s Guide.
The following mail lists are maintained:
• Discuss@gordano.com — used to discuss the addition of new
features and other GMS related topics. It is also a useful source
of technical help from other GMS users.
• MML@Gordano.com — used to discuss issues associated with
the Mail Meta language (MML). It is a useful source of
information for MML programmers
These lists are monitored by the Gordano Support team, but the do
not respond to support requests made via the lists.
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6
The User Interface
The User Interface
This section introduces Gordano’s user interface. All administrators
should read this section, including those who are upgrading from
earlier versions, since the new interface is very different.
• Logging on for administration.
• The screen and page layout.
• The effect on the interface of different administrator privileges.
• The effect on the interface of different user privileges.
• User plans.
Gordano’s user interface can only be accessed using a Web
browser, preferably Firefox or Internet Explorer, although other
browsers such as Chrome should also work. Gordano products can
be configured remotely over the Web, subject to security measures;
see “Restricting access to the Web server” on page 173.
6.1
Introduction
The Gordano browser based GUI:
• Lets all your users read their e-mail using their Web browser.
They can read, forward, reply and delete their mail from
anywhere they have access to the Internet. This also lets you
hot-desk within an office.
• Allows configuration of Gordano products from anywhere
using a standard web browser.
• Configuration pages have online context-sensitive help.
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6.2
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Logging on to Administer GMS
To start up the Administration GUI, do the following:
1. Open your Web browser, either Netscape or Windows Explorer.
2. In the Location or Address field, type http://127.0.0.1:8000
127.0.0.1 is the server’s loopback address and 8000 is the port
used by the Configuration server, if you are running your
browser on a separate machine replace 127.0.0.1 with the
actual IP address of the GMS server.
3. Press ENTER. The GMS logon screen should appear:
4. Type postmaster@<domain> in the User Name box and the
postmaster’s password you set up during installation in the
Password box.
5. Select the required option from the Interface drop down menu.
Depending on the products installed some of these options
may not be displayed.
Administration - Logs the user into the Administration
interface. The options displayed and available to the user will
depend upon their access rights. Logging in as Postmaster will
provide full access to all products
GMS WebMail Professional - Logs the user into the GMS
WebMail Professional interface. GMS WebMail is an advanced
web based mail client that brings the power of a traditional
workstation based mail client to your web browser. It will
empower you to receive, reply and manage your e-mail securely
from anywhere in the world. Like all Gordano products is easy
and familiar to use, combining reliability with high
performance. It includes an extensive range of features
including unlimited address books, Aliases, Filters and Folders
for filing messages.
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The User Interface
GMS WebMail Express - Logs the user into the GMS WebMail
Express interface. The WebMail Express Client provides a low
bandwidth solution ideal for users accessing their email from
locations with limited resources.
GMS WebMail Mobile - Logs the user into the GMS WebMail
Mobile Interface. If you wish to access your mail via a Personal
Digital Assistant (PDA) or your Internet connection is
particularly slow you can log on to the mobile interface which is
especially designed to meet those needs.
Instant Messaging - Logs the user into Instant Messaging and
opens an Instant Messaging window. Instant messaging allows
you to have realtime text conversations with other users on
your email system. It allows you to talk to single or multiple
contacts at once.
Anonymous List - Use this option to log on with a list account
name and password. Anonymous List access provides the user
full access to configure the specific list but no further access to
other areas of the server.
6. Press the Login button.
6.3
Standard Page Layout
The screenshot below shows a typical GMS administration screen.
In this case a user with administrator privileges has pressed the
Account button on the toolbar, then selected the Forward page:
Control Panel
Toolbar buttons
Status dialog
Status bar
You can customise the user interface. For details, see “Customising
the User Interface”GMS Reference Guide.
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The Control Panel
The left hand pane of the screen contains the Control Panel. The
topmost part is common to all users and allows access to the items
for the specific logged on account. The remainder of the panel will
vary depending on the rights held by the logged on user. The
remainder of the panel consists of a number of selectors which
allow you to navigate through the available options. If an item in
the panel is expandable it has a “^” next to it. Simply click on the
item to open it and reveal further options. The “^” will then rotate
through 180 degrees and items can be hidden again by clicking on
the item. Additional products can be found under the Services
item. If a particular product is not licensed, it will not appear in the
list.
The Licensing node in the panel is for ordering Gordano products if
you’re using a trial version or adding additional products.
The Toolbar
Across the top of the screen is the tool bar. The tool bar contains a
number of useful buttons. The first button allows you to check that
you are running the most up to date version of the software. The
“GMS WebMail” button will take you to the WebMail client if
installed. The third button links to the online help. There is a help
file for each dialog explaining what the features do. Next to this is
the manuals icon. Clicking on this gives you access to pdf versions
the Gordano manuals. The final button logs off your current
session.
Some items within the Panel will also have secondary toolbar
containing options specific to the functionality of the page.
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Dialog Components
Within the dialog itself, you can use the following components to
perform an action or to enter information:
• Radio button — where several options are alternatives, each
has an adjacent radio button. Select the button next to the
option you want.
• Check box — an option which simply has two states, selected
and deselected, has a check box. If it’s selected, there is a tick in
the box. To select or deselect it, click on the box.
• Text box — this is a standard clear box for entering text. It may
be a single line or a larger box, depending on the parameter
concerned.
• Update button — selecting radio buttons, check boxes or
entering text has no effect until you press the Update button at
the end of the page, if there is one of these. Some complex
entries have multiple pages, in which case the button at the
bottom each page except the last page is named Next.
Status dialog
The status dialog allows you to see an overview of the status of
GMS each time you log on. Once an option in the panel on the left
is selected the Status dialog will be replaced with a screen pertinent
to the option selected.
Status bar
Status messages and warnings are displayed in this area.
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6.4
GMS Administrator’s Guide
The Effect on the Interface of User Privileges
Depending on a user’s level of privilege, the following actions are
allowed:
• System administrator — has access to all the system areas and
the option to contact Support.
• Domain administrator — in a multiple domain system, looks
after one domain, adding users, creating domain profiles, etc.
Has access to his user’s area only.
• Log administrator — has access to the Logs area so can
manage transaction and message logs.
• GMS Anti-Spam and GMS Anti-Virus administrator — has
access to the GMS Anti-Spam and GMS Anti-Virus product
areas so can manage all the features of those products.
• User — cannot perform any management tasks, so just has
access to user areas (for details, refer to “What a Standard User
Sees” on page 45).
The postmaster account has system, domain and logs
administrative permissions.
Access to actions is controlled in three ways:
• If a product (for example, GMS Anti-Spam) is not licensed, its
node in the panel is not visible.
• If a user is not permitted to perform a complete set of actions,
the panel is not visible.
• If a user has access to just a subset of pages under a button,
the tabs for the remaining pages are greyed out.
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6.5
The User Interface
What a Standard User Sees
This section describes the user interface seen by users rather than
administrators, and how this is changed by changing user options.
Each of the features of the User Level administration interface are
covered in the GMS User Guide.
User logon
A user sees the same logon screen as shown for an administrator at
the start of the chapter.
To log on the user must:
1. Type their name in the User name box. Unless specifically
connecting to the IP address that the users domain runs on,
they must use a fully qualified user name, so it is always best to
get in the habit of using this format, for example
“user@domain.dom”.
2. Type their password in the Password box.
3. Select the required option from the Interface drop down menu.
In this instance they have selected the Administration option.
4. Press the Login button.
Options
A user who has been given standard permissions will see far fewer
options available than for an administrator, as shown here:
The main differences from the administrator screen shown earlier
are:
• This user only has the Find, My Account, Quarantine, Sharing
and Support options and GMS WebMail available via the Email
icon in the product bar. (Note if the user required access to a
GMS Communication Server list they could select the
Anonymous List option when logging on in page 41).
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•
•
•
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They have far fewer options in the panel. Of those which are
shown above, the Find option may also be disabled by an
administrator.
On individual pages they may see more options unavailable
(greyed out).
They have no access to the Administration options in the panel,
as shown in “The Effect on the Interface of User Privileges” on
page 44
The individual user settings are fully described in the User Interface
section of the GMS Users Guide.
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7
Day-to-day Management
Day-to-day Management
This section is for all administrators. It describes the main tasks
you’ll carry out on a regular basis. Operations like customising the
user interface are described in the Domain Management chapter.
The following areas are covered here:
• Accounts overview.
• Managing accounts - includes adding multiple accounts and
those from the NT SAM and LDAP/ADSI databases. It also
covers alternative authentication methods.
• Account attributes - user robot accounts, DLL accounts, aliases,
forwarding accounts and “moved” messages.
• Setting up Autoresponders.
• Groups overview - how to create groups, add members and
post to a group.
• Managing Calendars
• Mailing all users in a domain.
• Maintaining logs - specifying log levels, configuring log
handling, deleting/compressing and e-mailing a log, searching
logs.
• Regular expressions
After making changes, we recommend that you make a setup.txt
file for use in disaster recovery; see “Setting up the Recovery File”
on page 345.
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7.1
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Accounts Overview
GMS delivers e-mail to accounts. Accounts have a set of attributes
including a password and a creation date, and possibly an
autoresponder, forwarding information, aliases, profiles etc. A user
is a human who has access to an account.
Account information can be stored in several places such as an
ADSI/UNIX or SQL database. Other options include LDAP and NT
SAM. See “Authentication Options” on page 73 for more
information.
7.2
Managing Accounts
This section describes the basic account operations.
Adding one or more accounts
As well as adding single users, you can add multiple users at one
time.
If you are adding lots of employees to your mail system, try to use a
systematic naming convention. For example, Brian Jones could be
represented in any of these ways:
b.jones jonesb brian.jones jones-b brian brianj
Set up an autoresponder for common names (for example, John), so people
who e-mail the account in error have a list of correct e-mail addresses
returned to them.
When choosing an account name, we recommend that you use
numerals, letters, “.” and “-” only. Although GMS can use other
symbols correctly, other mail systems may not.
To add one or more new accounts:
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1. Choose Domains & Users, select the domain you would like to
add the user to, then press New User in the secondary toolbar
to display this page:
2. To add a single account, select Add Single Account and enter
the user name and password. For hints on creating passwords,
see “Password policy” on page 172.
3. To add multiple accounts, select Add many accounts and enter
the details for each user on a separate line in this format:
user-name,password[,real name[,account size in KB]]
For example, you might enter:
brianj,brian,Brian Jones,100
You can import from a database by cutting and pasting using
the clipboard. When you have added all the accounts, press the
Add button.
If you allocate simple passwords here, ask users to change these as soon as
possible.
4. Select which profile you want the new user(s) to adopt from
the drop down list. See “Profile Management” on page 99 for
more information on Profiles.
If you are logged on as a domain administrator you will not be able to add a
user with any of the system level profiles. i.e. You can only specify a profile
that has been set up for the domain you are an administrator for.
5. If you want new users to receive a welcome message when
they first log on, select this check box and type in your own
message or use the pre-selected default message.
6. If you do not want a mailbox to be created for this account,
deselect the Create Mailbox check box.
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Press the Add button to create the new account(s).
Adding Accounts using mail.exe
Multiple accounts can also be added using the mail.exe program
included with the Gordano install. For more information on this
refer to the GMS Reference Guide.
Changing an accounts password
From time to time you may need to change the password of one of
your users accounts. You can do this from the Domains & Users,
Domain, Users page by pressing Change Password in the secondary
toolbar, it is not necessary to know the current users password
unless you are using the NT SAM database. Simply enter the new
password for the user twice.
Emulating a user
From time to time you may need to edit a users personal settings.
Perhaps they have set up sharing and need to change the settings
but are unable to do so themselves for whatever reason.
You have the option to temporarily become that user even though
you have logged on as an administrator. While acting as a user you
will be able to see exactly what that user sees, including all of their
GMS WebMail information, settings, email etc.
To switch into the user mode go to the Domains & Users, Domain,
User page and select the user you wish to emulate then click on the
Switch with user button in the secondary toolbar. You can then
proceed to carry out any operation on that account you wish
exactly as if you were the user themselves.
While emulating another user you will see a Revert button in the
toolbar at the top of the screen in the administration interface.
Clicking this at any time will revert you to the user you originally
logged on as. If you are in the WebMail interface you will need to
switch back to the admin interface in order to Revert.
Removing an account or obsolete accounts
You can remove all accounts which are of a certain age, or which
have not been accessed for a specified time. You can specify
whether their mailbox is left on the disk or is also deleted.
To delete one or more accounts:
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1. Choose Domains & Users, select the domain you wish to
remove users from and press Delete User in the secondary
toolbar to display this dialog:
2. If you want to delete one account, select Delete Account and
type the name of the account into the box. Press the Next
button then press the Delete button.
3. If you want to delete obsolete accounts, select Delete Accounts
and specify the account age or the time since the last access.
Press the Next button and, when the accounts found are
shown, remove any that you actually want to keep from the
list. Press the Delete button to confirm deletion of those which
remain in the list.
• If you would like to delete multiple accounts at once, select
the Delete Accounts option, then Accounts and enter a list
of addresses, one per line, once they are all entered press
the Next button to remove them.
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7.3
GMS Administrator’s Guide
Account Attributes
There are many account attributes, for example:
• An account can have a mailbox and a robot, allowing all e-mail
sent to the robot to be saved in a mailbox.
• An account can have a mailbox and an autoresponder.
• An account may be an alias of another account, in which case
any e-mail is delivered to both locations. GMS iterates e-mail
addresses to a depth of five, so one forwarding account can
forward to a second forwarding account.
This section looks at the different account attributes: user robots,
DLLS, aliases, forwarding accounts, etc.
Robot accounts
A robot is a program which is started when e-mail arrives at the
account. The robot may process the message and can generate a
message for delivery to up to 100 e-mail addresses in return.
Robots may be written by Gordano Ltd. or provided by other users.
Check our Web site for information on robots currently available.
Users cannot set up robots on their own accounts.
Another type of robot is the “domain robot” which accepts mail for an entire
domain; see “Robot domains” on page 89.
See “Robots” in the GMS Reference Guide for example C code for
a robot.
Some robots are provided free in the Gordano Accessory Pack.
To set up a robot account:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain and select the user (which
you must already have added). Then select the Mail Processing
tab, the Robots drop down list shows available robots.
2. If you want to run one of the listed robots, select it and press
Configure. (Refer to each robot’s documentation for details of
what you need to do.)
3. If you want to set up a custom robot, select Custom and press
Configure. Type in the command line to run and specify
whether to send/accept messages to/from the robot, as follows:
• Pass message to robot — only select this if the robot is
going to use the header in some way.
• Accept message from robot — the robot passes the
message back after processing it. For example, it might post
a response.
• Sometimes — the server expects a message back from the
robot, but does not post an error if it does not receive one.
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4. Press the Update button to complete the account.
DLL accounts (Windows only)
A DLL is started by an e-mail message arriving at this type of
account. Move any DLLs you want to use into the Gordano\bin
directory. Users cannot set up DLLs on their own accounts.
The e-mail to fax DLL is provided free and, when used in conjunction with
LGFax, allows e-mail messages to be faxed.
To set up a DLL account:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain, User then select the Mail
Processing tab (you must already have added the user). The
Select DLL list shows available DLLs.
2. If you want to run one of the listed DLLs, select it and press
Configure.
3. If you want to set up a new DLL, select Custom and press
Configure. Type in the full path of the DLL to run then press the
Update button.
Mail Manager (Windows only)
GMS provides a Mail Manager DLL ntmmgr.dll that allows an email
interface to some of the basic user functions, such as setting a
users plan or holiday message.
To change his plan a user would send an email to the account
containing their username and password followed by a blank line
and then the text they want displayed in their plan, i.e.
plan <username>
password <userpassword>
<blank line>
This the plan for username
To remove an existing plan send
noplan <username>
password <userpassword>
Similarly to set an autoresponse message the user would send a
message similar to
holiday <username> [responserate 1]
password <userpassword>
<blank line>
I will be on holiday until the 25th and will respond on my return.
The optional responserate variable dictates how often, in days, a
response should be sent to a message arriving from a single sender.
A value of 0 means that a response will be sent to every message
arriving at the account.
To remove an existing autoresponder send
noholiday <username>
password <userpassword>
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The mail manager can also be used to add entries for a user to the
redirect file, i.e. it allows them to set their own filters as to who
they want to receive mail messages from.
To block mail from an unwanted sender, send a message to the
mail manager account
block user@domain.dom sender@other.dom
password <userpassword>
This will set up an entry in the system redirect file similar to this
sender@other.dom * user@domain * T F “500 You are not allowed to mail
this user”
To remove the block simply send
noblock user@domain.dom sender@other.dom
password <userpassword>
List Manager (Windows only)
GMS provides a List manager DLL ntlmgr.dll that provides an email
interface for list creation. You will need to have GLCommunicator
or GLList installed to create lists. Send a message with the following
syntax to the account that you have set up to use the list manager
DLL:
password <password>
addlist
domain <domain>
listname <listname>
joinaccess <joinaccess>
listaccess <listaccess>
postaccess <postaccess>
listmanager <listmanager>
[listowner <listowner>] (optional - sender used by default)
members
<user1@domain1>
<user2@domain2>
<user3@domain3>
..
<usern@domainn>
If you have entered the information correctly the list will be created
and you will be sent a confirmation message. Refer to the GMS
reference guide for information on the values that are valid for
parameters such as joinaccess.
MML Scripts
There are two different methods in which MML scripts can be used
under user accounts, Delivery and Post Delivery. Delivery Scripts act
on mail as it is delivered to the account, they can interact with any
stage of the SMTP process. Post Delivery Scripts can act on the
message after it has been determined where it will be delivered to
and just prior to it being written to the users mailbox. These
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options can be configured from Domains & Users, Domain, User
Mail Processing. For further information on the use of MML Scripts
please see the MML Programmers Guide which is included in the
GMS Accessory Pack.
Aliases
A user can have up to 20 aliases and multiple users can have the
same alias. For example, if joe@test.dom and bill@test.dom both
have the alias sales, they will both receive messages sent to
sales@test.dom. Users can be denied the privilege to set their own
aliases.
To set up an alias:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain, User, Account Information.
The Aliases box shows their existing aliases.
2. Press the Add New button and type the new alias into the text
area that appears and then press Enter to add it to the Alias list.
Remember to press Save once you have entered all of the
Aliases.
3. To remove an alias, select it and press the red cross next to the
alias to remove it from the list. To remove all the user’s aliases,
press the Remove All button.
4. If you want to give other users the same alias, repeat steps 1
and 2 for each user.
Forwarding accounts
Mail messages can be forwarded automatically to a maximum of
20 alternative destinations, if required. This is useful when people
leave the organisation or are temporarily located at another site, or
if you want mail forwarded to a group of people, for example the
Sales department. You can choose whether to let users set up their
own forwards.
Note the following:
• Users can set up forwarding for their own account.
• E-mail can be forwarded to any valid e-mail address — it
doesn’t have to be in the local domain.
• One maildrop can be forwarded to many addresses — simply
by repeating the steps below. (You could produce a small
distribution list for your e-mails in this way.)
To set up a forwarding address:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain, User then select the
Preferences tab and scroll down to the Forwarding section.
2. To add a new Forward press Add New and type the destination
address into the text box (make sure you type the fully qualified
user name). Then press Enter. Repeat for each entry.
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3. Press the Save button to confirm all the entries made in Step 2.
4. To remove an address, select it and press the Red cross to
remove it from the list. To remove all the addresses press the
Remove All button.
Take care not to create a “forward loop” by forwarding to yourself.
If you let users set up their own forwards, warn them not to forward to
themselves.
“Moved” messages
When a user’s e-mail address becomes obsolete, for example when
they leave the company, you can tell GMS to report an error
response which is sent to anyone who mails the old address. This
response can contain the user’s new username and address.
No messages are accepted for the old account, whatever other
attributes are set. Users cannot set moved messages on their own
accounts.
This disables all other features of the account and displays the message at
the protocol stage. No messages are accepted for the old account.
To set up a moved message:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain and select the user account
in the list.
2. Select the “Move User” option from the secondary toolbar.
3. Type the message you want those who mail the user account to
receive, then press the Move button.
If a user account is being moved within your organisation:
1. Choose Domain, Add User and add the user account with their
new username.
2. If you want to forward messages sent to the old user account
to the new user account, choose Domain, User, Preferences,
Forward and enter the new user account and click Save. Then
click on Update.
3. If you don’t want both accounts to keep copies of messages
select the old user account. Then choose the “Save nothing
locally” option under Preferences, Mail Backup. Once you click
on Update only the new user account will keep copies of
messages sent to the old user account.
Autoresponders
An autoresponder sends a reply message to anyone who sends email to its account. It can be used to reply automatically to mail
messages sent to a user who is on holiday or to tell the sender that
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their message is in a queue and will receive a full reply as soon as
possible. Users can set up Autoresponders on their own accounts.
To make the autoresponder keep the original message, enable the
mailbox. To discard messages, disable it. If the period value is nonzero, the autoresponder only replies once (per sender) during this
period of time. If this value is 0, the autoresponder responds to all
messages.
You can:
• Change the header of a message and use fields (Subject:,
Date:, etc.) from the original message in the reply. For a
complete list of header options, see “Template File Format” in
the GMS Reference Guide.
• Set standard header fields for the message by selecting
appropriate entries from the drop down lists.
• Send binary files that will be automatically encoded, MIMEcompliant, e-mail messages. This is done by specifying the
filename in the user variable called “Autoresponder”. For
details see the GMS Reference Guide.
To set up an autoresponder:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain, User, Autoreply.
2. Select the “Send an automatic reply to incoming mail”
checkbox.
3. Use the Header clauses window to amend a message header
(probably the Subject), or to add new ones (probably the
Sender).
4. Type the message you want to be sent.
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5. Specify how often the message is to be sent (in days), or set the
value as 0 to reply to all messages. If you are on a mailing list,
set this to a high number.
6. Press the Update button.
7.4
Expiring Users
The Expiry option can be used to expire accounts in various ways.
Logon Expiry means that the user will no longer be able to access
the account, however it will still continue to accept incoming mail.
This is a useful feature in particular for ISPs whereby a customer can
be denied access to an account while they have not paid their bill
but the account can be re enabled at a later time without any loss
of email at all. In addition to expiring access the mailbox the
functionality of Autoresponders (holiday messages), quarantine and
forwards can also be expired.
The account expiry option will totally disable the account
altogether, any incoming messages destined for the account will be
rejected with a “550 No such maildrop defined” permanent error
message.
To disable either Logon or Account access simply enter the date you
wish this to take effect from, or use the date selector, and click on
the Update button.
If you wish to re enable the account at a later time simply remove
the date from the relevant text box and click on the Update
button.
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To expire an account with immediate effect click on the Expire
User button in the secondary toolbar then on Expire.
7.5
Account Reports
The Report option allows you to collect information on an
individual account including Email Addresses, Personalities, Servers
and Mailboxes configured under the selected account. Each of the
individual reports will show further information on the selected
option.
Simply select the report you wish to run and click on the Show
button to display the report details.
7.6
Maintaining Users Quarantine Folders
System and Domain administrators can access the Quarantine
folder for each user on the system they have the permission level to
see. Accessed from the Domain & Users, Domain, User, Quarantine
page this provides a list of all messages in the folder and allows any
of them to be Accepted or Deleted. Additionally the folder can be
emptied completely of messages by clicking on the Delete All
button.
If a message is accepted it is moved from the users quarantine
folder to the users inbox.
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Groups
GMS allows you to set up groups to which you can join users.
When you send a message to a group every user that is a member
of that group gets a copy of the message. For example every
domain has a group called “Everyone” and all the users in the
domain must belong to that group. So if a message is sent to
everyone@company.dom then every user in the domain
company.dom gets a copy. Groups can be very useful in company
environments where different departments can have their own
groups for example Sales@company.dom,
Managers@company.dom.
Groups can be password protected so that only users who know the password can post messages to them.
Domain and System Groups
You can have two levels of groups namely system groups and
domain groups. It is not possible to create new system groups.
Domain groups can only have members who are users in the same
domain as the group. For example user@EnterpriseB.dom cannot
be a member of the domain group support@company.dom
Each domain has a default group called “everyone” . This group cannot be
deleted and every user in the domain is a member of it. There is also a
default system group called “allusers”. This also cannot be deleted and every
user on your system is a member of the “allusers” group.
Adding new groups
To add a new domain group select the domain you wish to work
with from the Select Domain drop down and then select Groups.
This will expand to list the groups and the right hand pane will also
display a dialogue listing all the current groups in the selected
domain. Clicking on the Add New button enables the area at the
bottom of the screen where you can name the group and define
who is allowed to send messages to it.
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There are a number of options for limiting who can post to the
group.
• No-one - means the group is disabled and cannot be emailed
by anyone.
• Any group member - means only members of the group can
post to it.
• Anyone in this domain - means any user who has an account
in the domain that the group is in can post to the group
members.
• Anyone in the domain using the password - If this is
selected you can enter a password which must be provided on
the first line of the message to the group. If this password is not
present or the message is sent by a user outside the domain the
message to the group will be rejected and a failure notification
sent to the sender.
• Any internal or external account - If this is selected anyone
from any domain is allowed to send a message to the group.
• Any internal or external account using the password This option allows you to enter a password which must be
provided on the first line of the message to the group. Anyone
who provides the correct password will be able to post to the
group whether they belong to the local domain or not.
If you limit post access to “Anyone with the password” anyone who wishes
to post to the group must have
Password=group_password
on its own on the first line of the message they want to post. If the password
is wrong or not present, group members won’t receive anything and the
sender will get a failure notification.
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Include forwarding in email to this group
By default any forward account joined to a group will not receive a
copy of any messages sent to the group. By forward account we
mean any account that has at least one forward configured and
which does not keep a copy of messages sent to it i.e. forward
accounts which don't have a mailbox of their own. Checking this
option will mean that forward accounts will receive copies of
messages posted to the group.
Adding users to a group
To add users to the group select the group name from the list of
groups in the menu on the left. This will display the settings for
who can post to the group and allow you to move users into the
group.
Highlight a user in the list of Users in Domain and click on > to add
them to the group. Clicking on >> will add all of the users. To
remove them highlight in the list of Users in Group and click on <
or <<.
Click on the “Update” button when you have finished making
changes. All new users in the group will be sent a welcome
message informing them they have been added to the group and
explaining to them how to post messages to the group.
Calendar Access
If your system has GMS WebOrganizer, each group has a calendar
assigned to it. This calendar can be accessed by any accounts that
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have been provided with access. This screen will allow you to
enable specific users to access this groups calendar.
• Add - Clicking the Add New button will enable the options
allowing you to specify the user or users who can access the
calendar belonging to this group The default access rights you
can assign are:.
•
•
Read public - This right gives others the ability to see any events
that you create with public access. They will not be able to see
any private events or make any changes to your calendar.
Read private - This right gives others the ability to see any
events that you create with public or private access. They will
not be able to make any changes to your calendar.
Manage - This right gives others full control over your calendar.
They will be able to see all your public and private events and
are also able to edit the events to change times, details, alarms
etc.
Custom - Once more familiar with access rights you may wish
to use the Custom options to specify them more granularly.
Remove - To remove a user from accessing this calendar you
should highlight the specific account or accounts and click the
Remove button.
Details - To amend the access rights for a user or users,
highlight the specific accounts and click the Details button.
This will open a new screen enabling the current access rights
to be amended.
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Address Book Access
The steps undertaken here are identical to that of Calendar Access
above.
Folder Access
The steps undertaken here are identical to that of Calendar Access
above. The folder Inbox will be created automatically under the
group account, and members of the group will be able to copy
messages in to the folder. The Inbox will however be unable to
accept incoming messages via SMTP.
Journal Access
The steps undertaken here are identical to that of Calendar Access
above.
Notes Access
The steps undertaken here are identical to that of Calendar Access
above.
Tasks Access
The steps undertaken here are identical to that of Calendar Access
above.
Tasks Access
The steps undertaken here are identical to that of Calendar Access
above.
Editing a group
Editing a group is very similar to adding the group. Just click on the
name of the group under “Groups” in the menu. A dialog similar
to the one for adding groups will appear. You can then configure
access and members in the same way as when you first added the
group (see above). New members added in this way will receive a
welcome message to let them know they have been added and
explaining how to post to the group.
Deleting a group
Display the list of current groups by clicking on Groups in the menu
then click on the group to be deleted in the list on the right. Next
click on the “Delete” button and the group will be removed.
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Manage Calendars
You may want to amend the frequency calendar events are
checked for alarms. To do so go to System Administration, Settings,
Alarms. This feature is available if GMS WebOrganizer has been
installed. (See the GMS User Guide for more information on this
feature)
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GMS Administrator’s Guide
Mailing All Users in a Domain
You may want to send a message to everyone in a domain.
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain and select the Email tab to
display this page:
2. Select a priority, type in the message and subject then press
Send.
If you wish to send a message to the bulk account from a
traditional mail client simply send a message to
everyone@<domain>. If access to the everyone group is restricted
with a password you will need to type the password in the first line
of the message. For example:
password=<grouppassword>
This is a message to everyone in a domain.
•
There is a similar option under the System>Email tab that
emails all users system wide.
If the right permissions are not set for the “everyone” group this tab will no
be displayed.
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7.10 Managing Logs
At a general level, GMS has two types of log:
• Message log — holds the contents of messages as a text file.
These can automate recording of all communications, which
you may need to comply with government and/or legal
requirements.
• Transaction log — can be used to prove that e-mail has been
received or delivered. Use transaction logs to fault find and to
trace e-mail which is reported as lost.
At configurable intervals, logs can be compressed (zipped) and emailed offsite for backup archiving, then deleted. This prevents
them filling the disk. GMS Archiver can automatically do this for
you. GMS Archiver also allows you to search the offsite logs and
retrieve any messages that match your search criteria. See “GMS
Archiver” on page 307.
A separate log file is created for each service each day. The files are
generally small (for example, a delivery log may take up only one
MB a day for 1000 users).
Logs cover three separate areas:
• Domain — logs messages from or to users in this domain.
These logs record email, instant messages and SMS messages.
By default these logs are stored in the
<$path>\<Domain_name>\meslog directory.
•
Transaction — SMTP, POST, POP3, IMAP, WWW, WebMail,
Dialup, LIST, Manager, Messenger, Collaboration, SNMP and
Dialup. By default these logs are stored in the <$path>\log
directory.
•
Relay — logs messages from other servers relayed by this GMS
server. By default these logs are stored in the <$path>\meslog
directory.
The transaction log for each service can log:
• Start/Stop — a time-stamped entry is made each time the
service is started or stopped.
• All Failures — for example, the time when a remote connection
dropped.
• Progress — general messages showing actions which happen.
• Statistics — details of all messages passing through the mail
server.
• Protocol Logs — displays each action sent and received. This is
useful for finding problems with mail clients.
Enabling full logging considerably increases the size of the log files but may
be necessary to track properly what is happening to e-mail passing through
the server.
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In addition:
• POST can maintain logs of DNS Requests, showing the
messages sent and received.
• SMTP can maintain logs of Redirection, showing when
messages have been redirected by the entries in the redirect
file.
• WWW and WebMail can produce parser logging. This is rarely
used due to the large logs that it creates. It is usually only
required if requested by Gordano Support personnel for
debugging specific problems.
Specifying log levels
For each service, you can set the level of logging that is used. We
recommend that for normal use you log Statistics and Failures only.
If you experience problems with any of the services, turn on all the
logging options for that service to get more information on what is
happening.
To configure any logging option:
1. Choose System Administration, Logging, Transaction Logging
to display this dialog:
2. Click on the appropriate check boxes then press the Update
button.
Configuring log handling
You can specify the frequency in days between zipping, e-mailing
and deletion of a log on the above page too.To set the frequency of
log deletion, compression and e-mailing:
1. If you want to keep logs on your system but zip the files to save
space, select the “Zip Logs After” check box and specify the
number of days after which they are to be zipped. Log files
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2.
3.
4.
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older than this are automatically placed in a zip file, but are not
removed from your system.
If you want to e-mail logs off-site for safety, select “Email Logs
to” and type the destination and the number of days after
which they are to be sent.
If you want to delete logs after a set time, select “Delete logs
after” and type the number of days after which they are to be
deleted. All logs older than this period will be deleted.
Press the Update button.
For a transaction log, choose the Transaction level page and for
each service type specify what you want to log (see above).
Relay logs are configured under Relay Logging and to configure domain
logs you need to go to Domain Administration, Logging after selecting the
domain to work with from the drop down.
Disabling Domain and Relay logs.
To disable the domain message logs select the Domain from the
drop down then Domain Administration, Logging. Select the
Message Logging tab and un-check the “Log all messages through
this domain” option for the required domain.
To disable the Relay Log navigate to the Support, System Variables
page in the interface. Select the “LogAllMessages” variable from
the “Select variable” box. Double click it to open it for editing then
enter 0 as the “Variable Value” box then click on “Save”. To enable
the log again change the value back to 1.
Deleting, compressing or e-mailing a log
To delete, compress or e-mail a log immediately:
1. Choose the Logs you wish to work with from either the System
or Domain Logs pages.
2. From the list of logs available, select the log you want to act on.
3. Choose Compress, Delete or E-mail to. If you’re e-mailing the
log, type the account to send it to.
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Searching logs
The options are different for each log type, as described below.
To search a message log for an item:
1. Choose System Administration, Logging then Search Relay Logs
from the secondary toolbar or to search the domain log
Domain Administration, Logging then Search Domain Logs
from the secondary toolbar. If there are no logs to search the
button will be disabled. The page looks like this:
2. Specify as many search criteria from the following list as you
need. You can use the wildcards “?” (one character) and “*”
(any number of characters).
• FROM clause — type the e-mail address of the message
sender you are looking for.
• RCPT clause — type the e-mail address of the message
recipient you are looking for.
• Originating domain — type the name of the domain
messages originate from.
• Recipient domain — type the name of the domain
messages are sent to.
• String — type a string which appears in a message.
3. Under “Logs on date”, select the log files you want to search.
Use CTRL+click if you want to select more than one log file to
search, or SHIFT+click to select a group of log files.
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4. If required, use the Number of Results value to restrict the
number of results that are displayed.
5. Press the Search button.
To search a transaction log for a string:
1. Choose System Administration, Logging then Transaction
Search from the secondary toolbar.
2. Specify whether to search incoming or outgoing messages for
the string.
3. In the “Search for” text box, type in the string you are looking
for. You can use the wildcards “?” (one character) and “*” (any
number of characters).
4. Under “Logs on date”, select the log files you want to search.
Use CTRL+click if you want to select more than one log file to
search, or SHIFT+click to select a group of log files.
5. If required, use the “Number of results” value to restrict the
number of results that are displayed.
6. Press the Search Button.
Searching and retrieving messages from a message archive can be greatly
simplified by using the GMS Archiver robot available from Gordano. Contact
sales@gordano.com for further details.
7.11 Regular Expressions
There are many areas of this software where you will need to use IP
addresses rather than domain names for entering information.
Here, is an explanation the various ways in which IP addresses may
be entered.
a.b.c.d
Specific IP address
a.b.c.*
All IP addresses beginning a.b.c
a.b.c.d-e
A range of IP addresses from d to e
a.b.c.d/n
Use first n bits
Note that a '!' may be placed at the beginning of the address to
indicate NOT.
Examples
!194.194.194.194
NOT IP Address 194.194.194.194
194.194.194.*
Addresses in the range 194.194.194.0 ->
194.194.194.255
194.194.194.194/
22
Addresses in the range 194.194.192.0 ->
194.194.195.255
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194.194.192-195
As above
194.194.194.194/
16
Addresses in the B Class range 194.194.0.0
-> 194.194.255.255
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8
Authentication Options
Authentication Options
GMS supports several authentication sources allowing you to store
user data in the way that best suits your organisation. The options
available are:
Windows:
•
GMS proprietary account database.
GMS stores account information in the system Registry under
the key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\InternetShopper.
There is also an option to store the information in dat files
under the <$Path>Data directory.
•
Windows NT SAM (Systems Access Management) database.
If an account is not in GMS’ own user database, it can query
Windows NT SAM database. GMS can read account
information including user, password and home directory from
the database. When you add an account to the NT SAM
database, the user is automatically given an e-mail account and
can use their NT password to collect e-mail.
You do not need to create these users within GMS itself. They
can be placed in any mail domain, with the same account
options as all other users. An NT SAM database user’s mailbox
is placed in their home directory (if user profiles are enabled).
NT SAM database users cannot use APOP logon.
Other sources (SQL, LDAP, ADSI)
GMS includes options to use SQL databases, LDAP and Microsoft
Active Directory (ADSI). Full details are included in this chapter.
A custom database
• If an account is not in GMS’ database, it queries the custom
DLL, if this is configured. If the DLL reports that the account is
valid, GMS uses the account. Custom DLLs are not supported
by Gordano Ltd. — for information on writing these DLLs, see
the GMS Reference Guide.
• Examples of custom DLLs include the Emerald authentication
DLL that is developed by a third party for use with the Emerald
ISP Management Suite.
If an account is not found, GMS delivers e-mail according to the “unknown user
action” which is described in “Setting up an Unknown User Action” on page 93.
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Linux, Solaris and AIX
•
•
•
GMS’ account database.
GMS stores account information in its own Configuration
Database. This consists of a set of hidden files with the .reg file
extension and which are stored in the same directory structure
as the software and user’s files (by default the /opt/gordano/
mail directory and its sub-directories).
The Unix Database.
This uses the UNIX database on the GMS machine for
authenticating users.
A custom database.
If an account is not in GMS’ database, it queries the custom
shared library, if this is present. If the shared library reports that
the account is valid, GMS uses the account. Custom shared
libraries are not supported by Gordano Ltd.
Other sources (SQL, LDAP)
• GMS includes options to use SQL databases and query LDAP
servers including Active Directory.
If an account is not found, GMS delivers e-mail according to the “unknown user
action” which is described in “Setting up an Unknown User Action” on page 93.
8.1
Authentication methods
As explained above GMS can authenticate users against a number
of sources. These can be configured as follows:
1. Log on to GMS and select System Administration, Settings then
select the Authentication tab on the right to display the
following dialog.
On Linux, Solaris and AIX platforms “Use NT Sam database” is replaced with
“Use UNIX account database”.
2. If you want to enable the use of the NT SAM check the box
next to that option and click on “Update”. You will then need
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to configure each domain’s settings separately. See “Using
Windows ADSI for Authentication” on page 81 and “Using
UNIX database accounts” on page 83.
3. If you want to use an external authentication database check
that option and click on “Update” which will update the dialog
to request some extra details
4. You will be asked to choose an authentication method from the
drop down. The options are:
• MS ADSI authentication (Windows only) - Select this option
and click on “Update”. You will then need to configure
each domain’s settings separately. See “Using Windows
ADSI for Authentication” on page 81.
• LDAP authentication (also preferred for Active Directory) Select this option and click on “Update”. This displays the
configuration options for LDAP. Enter any required details
then click on “Update” again. See below for more
information on the configuration parameters for LDAPAuth.
• SQL authentication. - Select this option and click on
“Update. This displays the configuration options for SQL.
Enter any required changes then click on “Update” again.
See below for more information on the configuration
parameters for SQLAuth.
• User defined authentication - If you select this option you
also need to specify the location of the custom dll for
windows or the custom authentication library for Unix that
you intend to use. Use the full path name or if the dll or
library is in the <$path>bin directory you can just type the
file name.
Once you have configured an authentication method you will
need to stop and start all the Gordano services before the
changes will take effect.
8.2
LDAP authentication configuration
Before LDAP can be used to authenticate usernames and
passwords it must be set up on the GMS server. The first step in
doing this is to enable the use of LDAP itself, once this is done the
individual LDAP servers can be configured.
We recommend that LDAP authentication is also used when authenticating against
an Active Directory server.
To enable the use of LDAP log onto the Administration interface
and select System Administration, Settings then the Authentication
tab on the right. On the right hand pane select the option “Use
external authentication database” and click on Update. Next from
the “Authentication method” drop down menu select the “LDAP
Authentication” option then click on Update. Click OK to the
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Popup warning you will need to restart the services, but do not
restart them for now.
Note that on multi domain installations you can set up LDAP authentication
details independently for each domain. If set at the system level the same authentication options will be used for all domains.
You will see a new dialogue appear on the same page that allows
you to set up any number of LDAP servers against which to
authenticate users. the process of adding LDAP servers at both the
system and domain levels is identical so will only be explained once.
The option “Enable full user list mode” is selected by default. This
allows caching of the user list on the GMS server and cuts down
traffic between it and the LDAP server.
To add in a new LDAP server click on the Add New button. This
will present you with a new dialogue allowing you to select the
type of LDAP server you will use for authentication. There are a
number of standard LDAP server types available by default,
including GMS, Microsoft Exchange, Active Directory and Other.
The latter of these provides the option to configure against any
LDAP server including Lotus Notes/Domino and Novell Groupwise.
For the supported LDAP server types the only configuration
required is the address of the LDAP server and the administrative
password required for access to that server. Simply select the LDAP
Serve type you wish to configure and click on the Next button.
Selecting the option “Show advanced settings” allows LDAP
authentication to be configured for more complex networks, this is
explained immediately after the known server types.
Standard Parameters:
• LDAP server - Enter the address of the LDAP Server against
which you want to authenticate.
• Account name - This is preconfigured to the default name of
the administrator for your selected server type. If you are using
a non default administrator replace the name with the
appropriate one for your setup.
• Account password - The password for the Account name
given above.
Advanced Parameters:
• LDAP server - Enter the address of the LDAP Server against
which you want to authenticate.
• LDAP port. Default 389. - This is the port where LDAP
responds on the LDAP server.
• Use SSL - If the LDAP server supports SSL and you wish to use
it enable this option.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Account name - This is preconfigured to the default name of
the administrator for your selected server type. If you are using
a non default administrator replace the name with the
appropriate one for your setup.
Account password - The password for the Account name
given above.
LDAP Domain - This is normally the same as the domain you
use for email but may be different on complex networks.
LDAP timeout. Default 20. - The max time the Gordano server
will wait for a response (secs).
Reset connection count. Default 100. The number of
statements to be executed before resetting the connection to
the LDAP server
SearchBase - The searchbase specifies the base object for the
search operation. The base object is the point in the LDAP tree
at which you want to start searching. Its value is a Distinguished
Name (DN). For example “ou=people, o=company.dom”.
Filter. Default is "(mail=%user@%domain)” - The filter is the
criteria to be used during the search to determine which entries
to return. This tells the LDAP server to check all records that
occur in or below the searchbase that contain a parameter
called “mail”. The %user and %domain are dynamically
substituted by the LDAPAuth.dll. So for example if
user1@company.dom attempts to log on to a POP session then
a search will be run to find a record that has a “mail” attribute
that equals “user1@company.dom”. Using the default requires
your users to have an attribute called “mail” in their record in
the format of user@domain. An alternative would be for your
users to have two attributes, one called user and another called
domain then have a filter of:
(&(user=%user) (domain=%domain))
•
Alias Filter - Similar to the Filter setting above this is intended
to allow access to users aliases or secondary email addresses.
These will be displayed in the Aliases tab for the user within
GMS but will not be editable from there. The configuration of
this option is often more complicated than the Filter option
above, as an example for Active Directory users you would use
(|(mail=%user@%domain)(proxyAddresses=SMTP:%user@%domain))
•
•
•
Email Attribute Name Default “mail” - Each record that is to
be authenticated against needs to have an attribute containing
an email address.
Alias Attribute Name No default as it depends on the LDAP
server. Each record that is to be authenticated may have an
attribute containing a list of additional email addresses
associated with a primary email address. The name of the LDAP
containing these should be provided here.
Password attribute name. Default “password”. - Each record
that is to be authenticated against needs to have an attribute
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containing a password. You could specify the “userpassword”
attribute from the “person” object class. If you use the default
“password” you may need to create a new object class and add
an attribute called password to that object class. You will then
need to add the new object class to all the records that you
want to authenticate against and then add the “password”
attribute to the records also.
Mailbox attribute name. Default “mailbox”. - As with the
password attribute name each record needs to have an
attribute containing the name of the user’s mailbox (this is
usually “inbox.mbx”). Gordano’s default name for this attribute
is “mailbox”. Since none of Netscape’s default object classes
have an attribute called “mailbox” you will have to use another
attribute such as “mailMessageStore” from the
“mailRecipient” object class or create a new attribute called
“mailbox”. You will need to make sure each of the users that
you want to authenticate has the attribute included in their
record and that it has a value defined (default = “inbox.mbx”).
Whenever you make any changes to these settings you will need to stop and start
all of the Gordano services before they are applied.
Examples:
• AuthUser=""
• AuthPassword=""
• SearchBase="ou=people, o=company.dom"
• Filter="(mail=%user@%domain)"
Directory structure: company.dom\people. (Where the
organisation(o) is company.dom, people is an organisational unit
(ou) and your users have the organisational unit “people” in their
record).
Values:
The values for each LDAP server you set up are held in a file called
LDAP servers.txt within the root of the Gordano directory structure.
Implementation
The LDAP Authentication DLL implements:
• VerifyUser
• VerifyPassword
• GetMailboxName
• ChangePassword
• GetErrorMessage
• ListUser
• ListUserFree
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Please see the Gordano Reference Guide for more information on
the structure of authentication DLLs.
Note that if the user already exists in the Gordano’s proprietary database then
authentication will be made against the entry in the Gordano database and not
the LDAP directory.
8.3
SQL authentication parameters
The configuration dialog shows a number of fields - the fields all
have defaults except for "DSN name" which must be correctly set.
This specifies the Data Source Name (DSN) that will link to the
database containing the Gordano user account information.
Parameters:
• DSN name. - This is the Data Source Name to be connected to
and must be specified. For Windows, DSNs are set up via the
ODBC32 application in the Windows control panel.
• User Name. - This is the username associated with the DSN
that may be required for authenticated access to the DSN.
• Password. - This is the password associated with the DSN that
may be required for authenticated access to the DSN.
• Verify an account exists. - This is the SQL statement for
verifying that a user exists. The default is:
SELECT Address FROM Users WHERE Address = '%s@%s’'
•
The %s parts of the query signify items that are dynamically
substituted. In this case the substitution of the first %s is the
username and the second %s is the domain name of the user
to be verified.
Authentication. - This is the SQL statement for checking
passwords. The default is:
SELECT Password FROM Users WHERE Address = '%s@%s’'
•
As before the %s substitutions are for username and domain
name respectively.
Obtaining mailbox name. - This SQL statement retrieves the
value of the Mailbox field from the database so the Gordano
server knows what the user’s mailbox is called. The default is:
SELECT Mailbox FROM Users WHERE Address = '%s@%s’'
•
Once again the %s substitutions are for username and domain
name respectively.
Change a user’s password. - This is the SQL statement to be
used when changing a user’s password. The default is:
UPDATE Users SET Password = %s WHERE Address = %s@%s
On this occasion the first %s is the dynamic substitution of the
new password the table is to be updated with. The other two
%s are for the username and domain name as before.
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Listing users in a domain. - This is the SQL statement that is
used to display the users on the “Users” page in the Gordano
interface. The default is:
SELECT Address FROM Users WHERE Address LIKE '%%@%s'
The %% in this query makes use of the % syntax in Structured
Query Language. So if you were listing the users for the domain
“company.dom” in the “Users” page of the interface, the
query after substitution would actually be:
SELECT Address FROM Users WHERE Address LIKE '%@Com panyA.dom'
This would return a list of all users with an address that ends
with “@company.dom”
Note: The Address field in the default statements above should contain full
email addresses in the format user@domain.dom. The mailbox field should contain the name of the mailbox file for each user the default is “inbox.mbx”
Registry Values - Windows only:
Under /InternetShopper/Mail/SQLAuth
• AuthDSN
• AuthUser
• AuthPassword
• SQLVerifyUser
• SQLVerifyPassword
• SQLGetMailboxName
• SQLSetPassword
• SQLUserDomain
Implementation
The SQL Authentication DLL implements:
• VerifyUser
• VerifyPassword
• GetMailboxName
• ChangePassword
• GetErrorMessage
Note that if the user already exists in the Gordano’s proprietary database then
authentication will be made against the entry in the Gordano database and not
the SQL database.
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8.4
Authentication Options
Using Windows ADSI for Authentication
With the release of Version 14 (Build 3509) of the Gordano Messaging Suite we
now recommend that you use LDAP authentication in preference to ADSI
Authentication.
To authenticate your users against Microsoft’s Active Directory you
first have to enable it at the system level by clicking on System
Administration, Settings, Authentication in the GMS administration
interface and selecting “MS ADSI Authentication” as the
authentication method. You will then need to restart the GMS
services for the change to take effect.
ADSI authentication can then be configured separately for each
GMS domain. To set up ADSI for a domain select the domain from
drop down then select Domain Administration, Settings and then
click on the Authentication tab on the right.
This displays a dialog on the right of the screen allowing you to set
up ADSI authentication.
Authorized user name
A user with access to the AD.
Authorized user password
Password for the above user.
Domains
A comma separated list of AD domains to authenticate against.
Security
There are four optional security options.
• Secure authentication - Requests secure authentication.
When this option is checked Active Directory will use Kerberos,
and possibly NTLM, to authenticate. When the user name and
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password are NULL, ADSI binds to the object using the security
context of the calling thread, which is either the security
context of the user account under which GMS is running or of
the client user account that the calling thread represents.
Use SSL - The connection is encrypted using Secure Sockets
Layer (SSL). Active Directory requires that the Certificate Server
be installed on the machine that is being authenticated against
to support SSL.
Use signing - Verifies data integrity. The secure authentication
option must also be checked to use signing.
Use sealing - Encrypts data using Kerberos. The secure
authentication option must also be checked to use sealing.
Once you have finished adding your settings click on Update to
apply them. If you have entered valid details you will then be able
to view a list of the AD users from the Domains & Users, Domain,
Users branch of the administration menu. AD users can be
recognised by the modified icon displayed next to their account
name. In the following example the Administrator account is a user
in the AD and the postmaster account is stored in the GMS
proprietary database. If a user already has an entry in the GMS
proprietary database this will take precedence over any AD entry
for that user and authentication will be against the information in
the GMS database.
Although the AD user is listed under the domain, an address book entry is not
added to the webmail local addresses address book until the user has logged on
for the first time.
8.5
Using Windows NT SAM database accounts
To use Windows NT SAM database accounts:
1. Create a User Group in the NT SAM database with the same
name as the domain.
2. Add to the group all the users you want to have access to email.
Do not add a user to more than one e-mail group.
3. In GMS go to System Administration, Settings then choose the
Authentication tab on the right and select the option "Use NT
Sam database”. Click “Update”. Now select your domain from
the drop down and go to Domain Administration, Settings
again choosing the Authentication tab.
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4. The NT SAM authentication dialog will be displayed.
If a message is displayed saying that NT SAM authentication hasn’t been set up
you will need to select the system level authentication branch of the tree and check
the “Use NT SAM database” option and click on update. Returning to the domain
level Authentication will allow you to configure NT SAM usage for that domain.
5. Check the box “Use Windows NT SAM Database” and specify
which of these three to use:
• Default domain on local machine in local or global group.
• Default domain on machine — type the machine name.
• Lookup in NT domains — enter a list of the domains. For
example, if you were running GMS on a member server and
authentication on several Primary Domain Controllers
(PDCs), you would type here the list of domains handled by
the PDCs.
If one machine runs GMS and another handles domains, the GMS machine must
have read/write access to the disk on the other. To set this up you must enable null
shares; see your Windows documentation for details or the Knowledge Base
article on the Gordano website (http://www.gordano.com/kb.htm?q=61).
Alternatively disable the “Allow NT Database Account Info" under System
Administration, Security, Control in the interface
8.6
Using UNIX database accounts
To use UNIX database accounts:
1. Create a Group in the UNIX database with the same name as
the domain.
2. Add to the group all the users you want to have access to email.
Do not add a user to more than one e-mail group.
3. In GMS choose System Administration, Settings, Authentication
and select the option “Use UNIX database”. Click “Update”.
Select your domain from the drop down then Domain
Administration, Domain Settings.
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4. Select the Authentication tab on the right and the UNIX
Database authentication dialog will appear.
If a message is displayed saying that no domain level authentication has been set
up you will need to select the system level authentication again and check the
“Use UNIX account database” option and click on update. Returning to the
domain level Authentication to configure UNIX usage for that domain.
5. Check the box “Use UNIX User/Group Database” and specify
which of these two to use:
• Use default domain as group name.
• Use specific group name — type the group name.
8.7
Authenticating against GMS from external sources
It is possible to configure external sources such as third party antivirus and anti-spam software and devices to authenticate accounts
against a GMS server. GMS provides an LDAP interface for this
purpose. Please see the specific instructions for your software
solution to configure this. The information you are likely to require
from a GMS perspective is as follows.
• GMS Server - The address of the GMS server.
• Account name - An address with administrative rights within
the GMS server. This is normally the postmaster account
running on your primary domain. It is also necessary to specify
the address book to query for the list of addresses. An example
is
mail=postmaster@gordano.com,ou=gmsaddressbook
•
Account password - the password for the account given
above.
Search Base - the Search Base to use as the basis of your LDAP
query. This would normally be as follows
mail=everyone@%domain,ou=gmsaddressbook
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•
Filter - The filter to apply to the results of the LDAP query to
ensure only valid accounts are returned. This is normally as
follows
(mail=%user@%domain)
Alias Filter - You may also wish your query to return Alias
accounts set up on the GMS server. For example the postmaster
account also has aliases of hostmaster and root. In order to do
this you need to also provide an alias filter which takes a
different format to the standard Filter as follows
(|(mail=%user@%domain)(&(mail=*@%domain)(gmsAlias=%user)))
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Domain Management
Domain Management
This section is for administrators who want to use the full
capabilities of GMS domains. It describes:
• Types of domain — full, virtual, POP, robot and alias domains.
The advantages and disadvantages of using each type are
given.
• Adding domains — setting up MX records, domain parameters,
aliases and the Unknown User action.
• Domain maintenance — listing, checking and deleting
domains, limiting message sizes, archiving and customising the
user interface for a domain.
You can give responsibility for managing a domain to a domain
administrator; see “Delegating Domain administration” on
page 110.
If you use more than one domain, you must set up MX records in your DNS
individually for each.
9.1
Types of Domain
Full domains
A full domain has an IP address. It is a complete domain with
accounts, list servers, auto responders etc. that are self-contained
and independent of any other supported domain.
As far as the mail users in the domain are concerned, they are using
their own mail server — they will not be able to find out the name
of any other domains on the mail server. Where two companies
share the same machine for all their e-mail, as far as the rest of the
world is aware they use different machines.
Multiple domains affect the SMTP server and POP3 server
differently:
• POP3 was not designed to support multiple domains on one
mail server so GMS provides multiple domains by using a
separate IP address for each. To support four domains you need
four IP addresses. GMS can then work out which domain a POP
user belongs to.
• SMTP divides out the e-mail based upon the domain name in
the e-mail message - not the IP address the e-mail arrived on.
Setting up a full domain involves these steps:
1. Adding a new IP address to your machine.
2. Updating your DNS for the new domain.
3. Creating the domain in GMS.
4. Adding users to the domain.
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The advantages of full domains are:
• Each is a completely separate domain (on disk, in the Registry
or Unix Configuration file, etc.). The outside world need never
know there is actually one machine supporting more than one
e-mail domain.
• Each domain name can have lists and list servers.
• Message logs are separate and separately controllable.
• Individual members of a domain can collect mail independently.
• All user accounts in the NT User Database or Unix Database
may be split across multiple domains.
• Administration of the domain — adding users, lists, forwarding
etc. — can be delegated.
Full domains have one disadvantage — IP Addresses must be
statically allocated to domains, so one IP address is required for
each domain.
Virtual domains
A virtual domain piggy backs on a full domain. GMS creates users
under the full domain but appends a postfix to the username so
that identical user accounts in two different domains will not exist.
This postfix is defined when you create the virtual domain.
The postfix can also be used when connecting to the POP3 server
to download messages. For example, if you have an account joe in
a virtual domain called “company.dom”, with a postfix of
“company”, created under the full domain “isp.dom”:
• email can be sent to joe@company.dom.
• but email must be collected from joe.company@isp.dom or
joe@company.dom. This means that when you set up your
account details in your POP3 or IMAP client you should specify
the username as one of the following
• joe.company
• joe@company.dom
• joe.company@isp.dom
The advantages of using virtual domains are:
• It reduces the number of IP addresses used.
• You can delegate domain administration.
• You can distinguish between addresses like the following,
whereas with domain aliases these two appear to be the same:
user@company1.dom
user@company2.dom
The disadvantages are:
• Messages are logged in the host domain’s message log.
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A virtual domain is only one domain with aliases so there is only
one “Unknown User” account option. This could mean that
one company's postmaster sees e-mail intended for the other
company.
Users must remember to log into the POP account using the
extended account name (sales.company1), even though their
user name is sales.
POP domains
A POP domain is an account where all the mail for all users in that
domain is placed into a single POP3 mailbox. All the mail is mixed
together for later separation using a utility such as Autodial or
GMS. Each message placed in the POP domain account will have
two additional clauses added to the header:
• X-Originally-To: — this contains the destination e-mail address
and should be used to deliver the e-mail to the correct
destination. Note that the e-mail address specified may not
necessarily be in the “To:” or “Cc:” clauses (e.g. List mail,
Bcc'ed e-mail).
• X-Originally-From: — this contains the e-mail address that the
message is from. Again, this may not be the same as the
“From:” clause (for example, List mail).
You must use the “X-Originally-To” clause to separate your e-mail. If you use
the “To:” clause, you will see several effects: 
- mail delivered to the wrong person 
- people getting two copies of messages
- messages posted back into mailing lists.
GMS on a remote site can log into an ISPs GMS and collect mail
from a POP domain account. This gives that site complete e-mail
access, as if they were permanently connected to the Internet they can use executables, lists, autoresponders, POP accounts, etc.
The advantages of POP domains are:
• An extra IP address is not required for each domain.
• Administration of mail is easier since new accounts only need
to be added at the server downloading the POP domain’s email.
• GMS on a remote system allows the provider to use DHCP for
all customers so fixed IP addresses can be avoided.
• All the mail for a given domain can be downloaded in one
transaction from any of the server’s IP addresses.
• Mail logging can be carried out by the destination rather than
the source machine.
• The NT user or Unix databases are not used.
The disadvantages of POP domains are:
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Individual users cannot download their mail, leaving other mail
for download later.
You have no control over the number of users in the domain.
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Robot domains
A robot domain is a domain where an application program is
started by an e-mail message arriving for any address in the
domain. A program which operates in this way is called a domain
robot (as opposed to a user robot). This is extremely useful if you
want to trigger a program remotely by sending e-mail to the
appropriate domain. When the message is received the specified
program starts.
This can be used for a “fake domain” where an executable needs
the account name for further processing of the incoming e-mail
(for example an e-mail to news gateway). A typical use of a domain
robot is to take all mail arriving for users in the domain and forward
it to the same users in a different domain.
You can give the executable access to the e-mail contents via the
standard input and output streams if the ‘Send message to Robot’
and/or ‘Accept message from Robot’ check boxes are selected (see
below).
For example code for an executable program, see “Robots” in the
GMS Reference Guide.
Alias domains
GMS lets you have many aliases for any other domain already on
the system.
For example, if you are using the full domain abcd.myisp.net and
then purchase the domain abcd.dom, you can simply tell GMS that
abcd.dom is an alias of abcd.myisp.net. This means that
sales@abcd.myisp.net and sales@abcd.dom are the same account.
You can set up any number of aliases in this way.
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Adding a Domain
There are four steps to setting up a domain, as follows.
Setting up MX records
Mail Exchange information is held by the DNS as MX records in this
form:
company1.dom. IN MX 10 smtp.company1.dom.
IN MX 20 mx.isp.dom.
Providing setup information for all the varieties of DNS software is
beyond the scope of this guide, but for more information, see the
book DNS and Bind by Paul Albitz & Cricket Li, published by O’Reilly
& Associates, Inc. (For purchase information see www.ora.com.)
Setting up domain parameters
Follow the instructions below for the type of domain you want to
set up.
Full Domain
To add a full domain:
1. Choose Domains & Users then click on New Domain in the
secondary toolbar to display this page:
2. Type in the domain name and select the type Full domain. Press
the Next button.
3. Specify the postmaster’s password for the new domain.
4. Select the domain’s IP address in the list.
5. Enter the company details and press the Save button.
To create sub domains of your primary domain. For example
Primary domain - CompanyA.dom
Sub domain - Sales.CompanyA.dom
You must first remove the domain alias *.CompanyA.dom created by default
when the primary domain was created.
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Virtual Domain
To set up a virtual domain:
1. Choose Domains & Users then New Domain in the secondary
toolbar (this displays the page shown above).
2. Type in the domain name and select the type Virtual domain.
Press the Next button to display this page:
3. Specify the postmaster’s password for the new domain.
4. Select the base domain name in the list, then the postfix to use
(see above).
5. Enter the company details and press the Save button.
For details of how to set up POP clients for users, see “E-mail
Clients” on page 215.
POP Domain
To set up a POP domain:
1. Choose Domains & Users then New Domain in the secondary
toolbar.
2. Type in the domain name and select the type POP3 account
domain. Press the Next button.
3. Specify the postmaster’s password for the new domain.
4. Enter the company details and press the Save button.
To collect mail, the system collecting mail can log on to any IP address of your
mail server, with a username the same as the domain name. The password
will be that which you defined when you set up the domain.
Robot Domain
To set up a robot domain:
1. Choose Domains & Users then New Domain in the secondary
toolbar.
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2. Type in the domain name and select Robot, then press the Next
button. From the following page either select an existing robot
from the drop down list or select Custom and press the
Configure button to display this page:
3. Type in the command line to run and specify whether to send/
accept messages to/from the robot. You have three choices:
• Send message to robot — only select Yes here if the robot is
going to use the message header in some way.
• Accept message from robot — the robot passes the
message back after processing it. For example, it might post
a response.
• Sometimes — the server expects a message back from the
robot, but does not post an error if it does not receive one.
4. Click the Save button.
Setting up domain aliases
Use domain aliases when you want a domain to accept mail for
more than one domain. When you set up a domain, domain aliases
are added to the list of local domain names.
Domains can have unlimited aliases and wild cards are supported.
To set up an alias:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain then select the Domain
Information tab and scroll down until you see Domain Aliases.
Any existing aliases will be displayed in the box.
2. To add a new Alias click on Add New and type the new alias
into the text area then press Enter. Press the Save button once
you have completed adding new aliases.
3. To remove an alias, select it and press the Remove button to
remove it from the list. To remove all the aliases, press the
Remove All button.
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Setting up an Unknown User Action
The Unknown User Action is a very powerful feature of GMS. You
can use it to:
• Chain mail servers together (perhaps across sites).
• Catch mail delivered to an incorrect address.
• Inform users of the correct address to e-mail.
• Let mail servers share management of the same domain. That
is, run poweruser accounts on GMS and others on MS
Exchange.
See “GMS on Complex Networks” on page 189 for examples of
how this feature can be used.
To set up the Unknown User Action:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain then the Preferences tab on
the right. The relevant part of the page looks like this:
2. Under Unknown User Action, select one of the following:
• Fail to Account — The message is accepted by the server, a
fault report is generated and the e-mail message is added
as a MIME attachment. This is then sent to the named
account.
• Redirect to server — Send the message on to the specified
server. You may use this if you use GMS as a firewall
passing all mail on to an internal server.
• Reject the mail — The mail message is rejected and the
sending server must return it to the originator of the
message.
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Transfer to user account — The message is accepted by the
server and transferred to the specified account without
making any changes to it.
Accept and return failure message — The message is
accepted and the sender receives a message indicating
delivery has failed.
Accept and quarantine message — The message is
accepted but placed in the domain level quarantine folder.
No error is returned.
Accept and discard message — The message is accepted
and silently thrown away. No error is returned.
Maintaining Domains
The tasks in this section apply to all domain types. For guidance on
adding a domain of each type, see the relevant section above.
Listing domains
All of the domains are listed under Domains & Users in the menu
for you.
Checking domains
You can check a domain’s MX records and IP address.
To check a domain:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain then Check Domain in the
secondary toolbar.
2. Select the check box(es) for the type of check you want to run.
3. Press the Check button
Deleting domains
If you remove a domain from GMS, any users in it will no longer
receive any mail. To remove a domain, choose Domains & Users
then click on the Delete Domain button next to the domain you
wish to delete, press the Next button, then confirm the deletion by
pressing the Delete button.
Configuring account size limits and archiving
The account size limits control the size of incoming messages,
account size, number of folders and inbox size. By default these are
set to 0, which means there are no limits. If you have limited disk
space or bandwidth, you may want to impose limits for the
domain.
To impose an account size limit:
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1. Select the domain from the drop down and select the Profiles
option.
2. Select the “Domain Base Profile” and click on the Account
Settings tab on the right.
3. Type the values you want for each limit.
4. Press the Update button.
System Administrators can set these limits to any figure. Domain administrators cannot set any limits that exceed the limits set in the system base
profile.
Purging domain e-mail
You can automatically clear out old e-mail, making the best use of
your disk space. This is useful if many users either never read their
e-mail or leave it on the server.
To purge old messages for the domain:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain then select the Purge
Settings tab on the right.
2. If you would like the purge to run automatically at regular
intervals enter the period in days at which the purge should be
run. If you don’t want it to run automatically enter 0 (zero).
3. In the “Delete messages older than” box, specify the age of
messages to be deleted.
4. Select the folders that you would like the purge to operate on.
5. If you only want to delete messages which users have actually
read, select the “Only read messages” check box.
6. Press the Update button to remove messages matching the
above criteria according to the defined schedule.
7. If you would like to purge the messages immediately use the
Purge Now option in the secondary toolbar.
Advertising/customising the user interface
You can change the user interface in several ways:
• Adding a footer to all messages in a domain. You can use this
to advertise services, as a disclaimer, etc.
• Replacing with new HTML text the default support page which
appears when a user chooses Support. You can do this for a
single domain or for the whole system. See “Customising the
User Interface” in the GMS Reference Guide.
To add your own messages to footers:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain and then select the
Templates tab on the right.
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2. Select the “Add footer to bottom of each message” check box,
type the message in the Footer area in plain text. You may also
add an HTML Footer for use with HTML formatted messages.
3. Select whether the footer should be applied to external mail,
internal mail or all mail and press the Update button.
Domain welcome message
When new user accounts are added using the Domains & Users,
Domain, New User option you are given the option to send a
welcome message to each of the accounts.You can either type a
unique message for each user when adding them or you can define
a message for all users added to a particular domain. The welcome
message used for each domain is set from the Domains & Users,
Domain, Templates page. Simply type your message in the space
provided. Once you have completed your changes click on the
Update button to apply them.
Access
Access to both the administration and WebMail interfaces can be
restricted by IP address, if you prefer you can simply use whatever is
set at the system level under System Administration, Security,
Access Control, or you can enter specific settings for each
individual domain on the system under Domains & Users, Domain,
Access. By default, all IP addresses are allowed to access the
interfaces.
If you do decide to restrict access to either of the interfaces please
ensure that you add your own IP address to the list prior to clicking
on the Update button, otherwise you will be immediately thrown
out of the system.
Usage Policy
Each domain on the system may have its own Acceptable Usage
Policy set under Domains & Users, Domain, Usage Policy. This will
be displayed to users when they first connect to the mail server and
should outline the companies policy on email usage.
It is good practice for every company to develop an acceptable use
policy for email in the event that abuse of the email system takes
place. Any legal argument ensuing from this abuse is much easier
to defend if such a policy exists.
Interfaces
This option allows you to specify the default interface that is
presented to your users, as well as which interface options are
available to them for selection from the drop down menu on the
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logon page. The interfaces are configured under Domains & Users,
Domain, Preferences.
Email
An Email can be sent to all of the users within your domain from
the Domains & Users, Domain, Email page. This makes use of the
underlying “allusers” group which is created during a standard
installation, or when each new domain is created.
If this tab is unavailable (or greyed out) it will be due to the fact that
you have not yet enabled this group to accept posts. See “Groups”
on page 60 for further information.
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10 Profile Management
This section is for all administrators. It describes the main tasks
you’ll carry out when configuring Profiles.
GMS allows you to create different user profiles. For example you
may want a group of your users to have special privileges such as a
larger mailbox size and access to their account via GMS WebMail.
To do this you would set up a new profile with those attributes
enabled and assign that profile to your privileged users. In a similar
way you can reduce limits and access rights for other groups of
users.
Each Domain has a default profile called the “Domain Base Profile”. This can
be edited to suit your requirements or you can clone new profiles
10.1 Domain and System Profiles Overview
You can have both system and domain profiles. System profiles can
be applied to any user in any domain by a system administrator.
Domain profiles however are unique to users in the domain for
which that profile has been created. This allows administrators of
individual domains to choose their own profile policies. Domain
administrators who do not have system rights can only create users
with a domain profile belonging to the domain they are an
administrator for.
You can view the profiles that are currently set up by selecting
Profiles from the menu on the left. You will see a display similar to
the one below.
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This is the view as seen by a system administrator. If you log on with
only Domain administration rights you would not have the option
for “Allow all domain Access” and of course the profile names
themselves would be different.
10.2 Making a new profile
The above picture shows the list of Profiles available by default at
the system level. At present there just two profiles, note that one
has been selected as the default profile. There can only ever be one
default at each of the System and Domain levels.
It is not possible to create a new profile from nothing so you need
to select which profile you want to “Clone” (Copy). Click on the
profile name in the list then click on the Clone icon on the far left
of the grid. This will open up a new dialogue where you should
type a name for the new profile in the box and then click on OK.
You will now have a new profile that is an exact copy of the one
you originally selected. The next thing you will want to do is to edit
your new profile. This is explained below.
10.3 Editing Profiles
To edit a profile first select Profiles in the menu and then the new
profile you just created. This will display the following, each of the
options are described fully below.
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Account Settings
Clicking on the Account Settings tab for a profile allows you to set
one or more of the following account parameters:
• Maximum Message size — the size of a single message arriving
at the account.
• Maximum Folder size — the maximum size that any one user
folder is allowed to grow to.
• Maximum size of account — the maximum disk space for all
the user’s mailboxes/folders (IMAP and GMS WebMail lets users
create multiple mailboxes/folders)
• Maximum number of folders — the maximum number of
IMAP/Webmail folders the user is allowed to have in their
account.
• Minimum mail refresh interval "x" minutes - This setting
controls the minimum frequency a GMS WebMail mailbox can
be refreshed, hence reduces the resources used by users who
check their mail too frequently.
• Starting Language — this is the language a new user will start
with when they access their GMS WebMail account for the first
time.
• Groups — you can select the groups that new users with this
profile will be a member of. This option is not available in
system profiles since you can not add groups at the system
level.
If the folder size exceeds 90% of the allowed size the user will
receive a warning email suggesting that they free up some space
within the folder.
A domain administrator cannot apply any maximums that exceed the system
settings in the System Base Profile.
Access Rights - setting user access rights
Clicking on the Access Rights tab for a profile allows you to define
what access rights are given to users that have that profile. The
options are as follows:
• Allow this account to access Email — having this option
checked allows the user to access their mailbox.
• Allow this account to access Email using POP3 — having this
option checked allows the user to download their messages
using a POP3 client.
• Allow this account to access Email using IMAP4 — having this
option checked allows the user to download their messages
using an IMAP4 client.
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Allow this account to access Email using WWW — having this
option checked allows the user to view their messages in
WebMail.
May configure software from anywhere — having this option
checked allows the user to access the configuration server from
any IP address.
GMS WebMail access from anywhere — having this option
checked allows the user to access the GMS WebMail client
from any IP address.
Password Control — the password control options allow you to
define how often passwords should expire.
GMS WebMail as a stand alone server does not contain POP3 or IMAP services. To enable POP3 and IMAP mail collection GMS Mail must also be
installed.
Configuration Rights - Setting configuration access
Clicking on the Configuration Rights tab for a profile allows you to
define how much access users with this profile will have to the
GMS configuration pages.
• Domain Access — by checking the “User may administer his
own domain” option you can allow users with the selected
profile to administer their own domain. Domain administrators
can add users to the domain, and can set up domain profiles.
Any profiles set up by a domain administrator cannot exceed
any limits set up in the profile that the domain administrator
belongs to. If you don’t want the domain administrators to
have full domain access you can un-check any of the individual
privileges such as “manage GMS Anti-Spam and GMS AntiVirus”. If you wish to allow the user or users assigned to this
profile to manage other domains you can select the option
“User may administer domains” and enter a space separated
list of the domains this is applied to.
• System Access — by checking the “Manage complete system”
option you will allow the users with the selected profile to
access any part of the Configuration interface.
• Logs Access — by checking the “Manage system logs” option
you will allow the users access to the transaction, relay and
message logs for all domains on the system.
• GMS Anti-Spam and GMS Anti-Virus access — by checking the
“Manage GMS Anti-Spam and GMS Anti-Virus for all domains”
option you will allow the users to access and configure the
GMS Anti-Spam and Virus modules that can be installed with
GMS.
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Privileges - setting user privileges
Clicking on the Privileges tab for a profile allows you to define what
privileges users with that profile should have. There are six sections:
General
• Change password — if this option is checked users with this
profile will be able to change their own password whenever
they wish. If you have set an expiry period under the “Access”
menu (see above) this will still apply.
• Alter their forwards — checking this option allows users to add
and change their forwards.
• Set a vacation or automatic response — setting this allows the
users to set up an autoresponder which is often useful for
letting people know that a user will not be viewing his mail for
a time.
• Set their plan — a user’s plan is a section of text which is
returned in response to the finger command or a search with
the “Find” option. By checking this option you allow the users
to edit their plans. A default plan is blank.
• Change their personal details — Each account can store a
number of details about the user such as full name position etc.
If you enable this option users will be allowed to edit or add to
their personal details.
• Add aliases — aliases are very useful if you want to have two
personas but only want to check one mailbox for mail.
Checking this option allows users to add their own aliases.
• Rebuild their mailbox — occasionally it may be necessary to
rebuild a mailbox, perhaps if it has become corrupted
somehow. Checking this option allows the users to do this
themselves. Note that rebuilding a mailbox sets all your
messages to the un-read state.
• Search users - if enabled this allows all users belonging to this
profile to search for other users using the Find option.
• Send email externally - enabled by default allows users to send
external email through the server, if disabled users will only be
able to send email to local users.
• Send email externally if in personal address books - only allow
the users to send external email if the recipient of the email
exists in the users personal address books.
• Send external email if in shared address books - only allow the
users to send external email if the recipient of the email exists in
any address book the sender has access to.
• Receive external email - allows the user to receive email from an
external sender, if unchecked users will only be able to receive
email from local senders.
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Receive external email if in personal address books - only allow
the users to receive external email if the sender of the email
exists in the users personal address books.
Receive external email if in shared address books - only allow
the users to receive external email if the sender of the email
exists in any address book the recipient has access to.
Sharing
• May use sharing — If this is unchecked the user will not have
access to any of the GMS Collaboration sharing features
including the ability to share Contacts, Calendars, Journals
Notes and Tasks. If it is checked the user will have access to
these facilities which are fully described in the GMS User Guide.
• Show domain address book — if this is checked users in this
profile will see domain address books. Checking this option
does not allow them to add entries to domain address books or
to add new domain address books. Domain address books can
only be viewed by users in the domain that the address book
was created in.
• Show system address book — if this is checked users in this
profile will be able to see system address books. Checking this
option does not allow them to add entries to system address
books or to add new system address books. System address
books can be viewed by any user on the system that has the
show system address book privilege.
• Show local address book — this option displays a special
address book that contains a list of all the accounts set up
under the user’s domain. The user can only edit their own
account details and not that of any other accounts.
• May share with everyone — this option relates to the Access
Rights for entries in System and Domain level address books.
This particular option allows the user creating an entry in one of
those address books to share that entry with the everyone
group. The everyone group contains all users that exist under
the user’s particular domain.
• May share with allusers — this option relates to the Access
Rights for entries in System and Domain level address books.
This particular option allows the user creating an entry in one of
those address books to share that entry with the allusers group.
The allusers group contains all users that exist on that particular
server.
• May change freebusy settings - enabling this option controls
whether the user is able to change their own freebusy settings
under the My Account area.
WebMail
• May use GMS WebMail — this gives the user the right to access
GMS WebMail.
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May use the address book — enabled by default, this option
gives users the right to use the GMS Address Books including
their personal address book. The options below can be used to
increase the granularity of the users access rights.
• Manage Domain Address Books — this gives the user the
right to Add, Remove and Rename address books at the
Domain level. It does not give the user the right to edit
entries within these address books.
• Manage Domain Address Book Entries — this option gives
the user the right to Add, Edit or Remove entries from the
Domain level address books. It does not give the user the
right to manage the address books themselves.
• Manage System Address Books — this gives the user the
right to Add, Remove and Rename address books at the
System level. It does not give the user the right to edit
entries within these address books.
• Manage System Address Book Entries — this option gives
the user the right to Add, Edit or Remove entries from the
System level address books. It does not give the user the
right to manage the address books themselves.
• Attach vCards to messages - this option determines if a user
has the right to attach vCards to their outgoing messages.
Add disposable addresses — disposable addresses are
temporary addresses created with a specific life span or time to
live. These are ideal if users wish to correspond with discussion
lists for a short period of time but do not want to receive spam
that this correspondence may generate.
Filter incoming email — enabling this allows users of GMS
WebMail to set up active filters. Filters can be used to carry out
actions on messages that meet certain defined criteria. For
example you could have a filter to copy all messages arriving at
a mailbox from Boss@test.dom to a folder called Important.
Add their own personalities — GMS WebMail allows the
addition of different personalities, for example you can send
some emails from a business personality and others from
personal personality. Checking this option allows users to add
their own personalties. See the GMS User Guide for more
information on personalities.
Allow local personalities only — this option limits users to
personalities for their own domain only.
Collect email from POP3/IMAP4 servers — this is another
feature related to GMS WebMail. Using the WebMail client you
can set it to download mail from external POP or IMAP
mailboxes. This is ideal if you have accounts with more than
one ISP and only want to check one mailbox. Checking this
option allows users to set up this facility. The GMS User Guide
explains more about this option.
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Send HTML email from GMS WebMail — enabling this allows
users to create and send messages in HTML format.
May CC email - allows the user to CC (Carbon Copy) other
users on email that is sent.
May BCC email - allows the user to BCC (Blind Carbon Copy)
other users on email that is sent.
Use calendars, tasks and notes - If this is checked the user will
have access to the personal and shared calendaring available in
GMS WebOrganizer which is fully integrated into GMS
WebMail.
May use Gizmos - If this option is enabled then WebMail users
will have access to all Gizmos made available to them by the
system administrator. Gizmos are a JavaScript based mashup
technology.
Mobile Gateway (requires GMS SMS/Pager Gateway)
• May use SMS Gateway - This option enables the user to send
SMS messages via the mobile gateway to mobile phones.
• May use Pager Gateway - This option enables the user to send
messages to a pager.
Instant Messaging (requires GMS Instant Messenger)
These settings define what instant messaging privileges users with
this profile should have.
• May use GMS Instant Messenger
Selected by default, this option allows the user to use Instant
Messaging if a valid license key is installed.
• Launch GMS Instant Messenger on logon
If instant messaging is enabled for your account when you log
in to GMS WebMail by default an instant messaging window
will be launched and you will automatically be logged in to
instant messaging. If users with this profile prefer not to
automatically log in to instant messaging you should un-check
this option. You can log on to instant messaging at any time by
clicking on the Compose instant message button in the top
menu bar of GMS WebMail or logging in to GMS Messenger
through the default login page.
• Include the following image
If selected, you can enter a default image which can be
included in outbound emails. This image will be placed in the
top right corner of messages sent from GMS WebMail
Professional. This could be your company logo or other
promotional image and can be combined with the users
presence images, detailed later in this section.
• Image URL - enter the URL to the image you wish to be
included in your users email.
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Alt Text - enter the alternative text you wish to be shown
when the mouse cursor is placed over the image, once it
has been displayed in a message.
• Link to URL - enter the URL you wish the message recipient
to be redirected to, should they click upon the image
displayed in their message.
Note: For a user to include this image in their email, they must
select “Include user image” from the Options section, available
in the GMS WebMail Professional message compose window.
See “Composing an Email Message” on page 20 of the GMS
User Guide.
Allow user selected image
If selected, this option will allow the user to specify the URL to
an image that will be used instead of the system configuration.
This image will be included in their email when sent from the
GMS WebMail Professional interface.
Allow user presence indication
If selected you can enter the URL to specific images showing an
online and offline statement. When a user sends a message
from GMS WebMail Professional they can include their GMS
Instant Messenger presence information, this will include either
the online or offline specified image depending upon whether
the user is logged on to GMS Instant Messenger.
• Offline Image URL - enter the URL to the image you have
chosen to use to indicates a users offline presence.
• Online Image URL - enter the URL to the image you have
chosen to use to indicates a users online presence.
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Collaboration (Requires GMS Collaboration key)
These settings define users rights to access and set information
regarding GMS Collaboration usage.
• May use GMS Collaboration
Enabled by default, this option allows users access to the GMS
Collaboration server from MS Outlook (providing they have first
installed the GMS Collaboration client on their desktop
machine). Roaming profiles are supported, so the client can be
used in a hotdesking situation.
Documents (Requires a GMS WebMail key)
The documents section of a profile allows you to control whether
or not a user may use the Documents facility within WebMail.
• May use Documents
Enabled by default, this option allows users to maintain a
variety of documents within the WebMail interface and to share
those documents with other users of the system.
• Document Store Capacity
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Allows the administrator to set a maximum size for the users
document store. Note that as users can maintain a number of
revisions of each document that stores may grow quite quickly.
• Maximum Revisions
Dictates the maximum number of revisions to be supported for
each document. Once this number has been reached any further
revisions to the document will cause the oldest revision to be
deleted.
Preferences - setting configuration appearance
You can either use the default GUI settings or you can configure
each of the following to your preference.
• Background colour
• Title colour
• Tab font face
• Tab font size
Preferences - configuring Anti-Spam settings
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Report mail as junk mail - allows users to report mail as Junk
mail. If using GMS WebMail the users will see an icon in their
status bar allowing them to report spam to the system
administrator. Normal mail users can forward the message to
spam@theirdomain.
• Automatically add Junk Mail to Bayesian Filter - If you have
users on your system whom you trust not to report good
mail as spam or junk then enabling this option will allow
them to add messages directly to the Bayesian filter without
any administrator input.
• Automatically report Zero Hour false negatives - Again for
trusted users this option allows them to report Zero Hour
false negatives, i.e. mail that has not been caught by the
Zero Hour filter but should have been.
May use the junk mail filter - allows users access to the Junk
Mail filter in the administration interface under Administration
> Mail > Account > Settings.
• Enable the junk mail filter - will enable the junk mail filter
for all accounts under this profile using the default settings.
AV Preferences - configuring Anti-Virus settings
This configuration requires GMS Anti-Virus. Prior to configuring the
Anti Virus settings for the profile you must set the GMS Anti Virus
configuration to “Allow user settings via profiles”. This is
configured by selecting the domain from the drop down then Anti
Virus in the menu and the Actions tab on the right. The Virus
scanner must also be enabled under System, Anti Virus, Actions.
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You are now able to apply specific Anti Virus settings to the profiles
in the domain you have set these options for.
Actions
There are three options that control the operation of the Virus
Scanner.
• Use Domain Virus Scanner Actions
The settings in place for the domain will be applied to all users
in this profile.
• Enable Specific Virus Scanner Actions
The settings in place further down this page will apply to all
users in this profile.
• Disable Virus Scanner
If this option is selected none of the users in this profile will be
protected from viruses.
The rest of the options on this page affect what happens when the
Virus Scanner detects an infected mail message.
• Reject Message
If a virus is found any mail can be rejected with a “550 This
message contained a virus” SMTP reply code.
• Redirect To
Any files found to contain a virus will be redirected to the given
account.
• Deliver Message as Usual
This is the default action. The message is delivered to the
intended recipient in the normal manner.
• Deliver to User Quarantine folder
The message is copied to the quarantine folder. The message
can be accepted, forwarded or deleted from the quarantine
folder.
• When a Scan fails for any other reason
You have the option to select Reject mail and notify postmaster
as a safeguard against errors on your system. This option would
protect the server from viruses should the messages not be
scanned if, for example, the definition files have been deleted
from the disk. Note: This setting will reject all inbound mail until
the issue is resolved.
Alerts
It is possible to alert a number of people to the fact that there was
an attempt to send a virus through the system. Exactly which alert
options are available will depend on the action you have configured
to occur when a virus is discovered. Either the default domain level
alerts may be used, or specific alerts set that will affect only users in
this profile.
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Alert Postmaster
To send an alert to the administrator of the system select this
check box. If you would like the alert to go to someone other
than the postmaster please enter their email address in the box
provided, otherwise the default of postmaster@domain.name is
used.
Alert User
Check this box if you would like the intended recipient of a
virus to be informed that someone has attempted to send him
an infected file.
Alert Sender
Selecting this option will send a message to sender of the file
alerting them to the fact that they attempted to send an
infected file through the system.
10.4 Changing a User’s Profile
Once you have created a new profile you may want to change
some of your existing users to use that profile. This can either be
done under the Users tab within the profile by clicking on Add
Members, or from the individual user configuration page. For the
latter go to Domains & Users, Domain, User and on the Account
Information tab select the new profile from the Account Profile
drop down and click on the “Update” button to apply the change.
10.5 Profile Examples
Delegating Domain administration
As a system administrator you may want to grant a user the
privilege to administer a domain. To do this you need to have a
profile that grants domain administration rights for the domain.
You should clone the system base profile to a new profile, perhaps
called “test.dom Admin”. Next you would select that profile and
display the “Configuration” tab for the new profile. This allows you
to select the "User may administer his own domain" option. Now
any user who is assigned to this profile will have the right to
administer their own domain. If the user is in the "test.dom"
domain then they will be able to administer that domain.
Service Levels
Some service providers like to provide different levels of service for
instance platinum, gold and silver levels. Profiles makes this
extremely easy as you can set up a profile for each level of service.
For example the platinum level might allow the users to have full
rights to set their own aliases and autoresponders etc. and give
them access to GMS WebMail from anywhere. A gold level might
allow users to access GMS WebMail but with no options to set
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filters, personalities etc. and a silver level might deny the user
access to GMS WebMail but still allow them to download their mail
using POP.
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11 Advanced Management
This section is for administrators who want to use the full
capabilities of GMS. If you are running a system with more than
one mail server, please also refer to “GMS on Complex Networks”
on page 189.
This section starts by describing how you can tune system
performance, as follows:
• Using Watch to monitor GMS.
• Incoming e-mail — tuning threads, extensions and connections.
• Outgoing e-mail — tuning bandwidth, extensions and threads.
• E-mail collection (POP3) — tuning the number of connections,
extensions, bandwidth and threads, also the immediate
deletion of messages.
• Inbound delivery rules (smart routing).
• Outbound delivery rules (smart delivery).
• SMTP DLLs.
It then describes a number of other areas:
• Reducing use of IP resources.
• Changing the ports used by services.
• Using ESMTP extensions.
• RFC compliance.
• Generating server messages.
• Configuring an SMTP logon message.
• Changing POST and POP timing settings.
• Listing and starting outgoing mail queues.
• Setting up DNS servers and the DNS cache.
• Editing global, domain and user variables.
• Threads.
• Porting accounts from other servers using AutoPort.
• Allow LDAP directory services access to addressbooks
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11.1 Tuning System Performance
GMS’ default values will suit all but the most demanding
establishments, but if you wish to tune your system’s performance,
you can change the settings described in this section.
Using the Watch utility to monitor performance
The GMS Watch application lets you monitor the threads being
used by the server and the transaction logs in live mode as
messages are processed by the server. GMS sends the required
information to the machine specified. This machine should be
running the GMS Watch program.
To run Watch:
1. Choose System Administration, Logging then the Watch tab on
the right to display this page:
2. Select the Enable Watch Utility check box.
3. In the Hostname box, type the hostname of the machine
running the GMS Watch program in the form
“machine.domain.dom”.
4. In the Post box, specify the port that the information should be
sent on. The default setting is port 22200 — do not change this
unless it has also been changed in the GMS Watch program.
5. Press the Update button.
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Incoming e-mail
There are three areas where you can tune incoming e-mail
performance, extensions, threads and connection times, as
described below.
Extensions
Use the relevant ESMTP extensions from the set described in “Using
ESMTP features” on page 130.
To enable/disable ESMTP features:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance and then the
ESMTP tab on the right to display this page:
2. Select or deselect the relevant check boxes and radio buttons.
3. Press the Update button.
Threads
You can set the number of threads used by SMTP for incoming mail
(the range is 1 to 255). This controls how many simultaneous
transactions SMTP can handle. Each thread requires memory, so
increasing the number of connections increases the memory
requirements of your mail server.
The main reason for increasing the number of threads is that your
server is especially busy, for example if you are an ISP with a large
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number of dial-up customers. You might reduce the value if you
have limited memory available.
If you have limited memory you may also want to restrict the
amount of memory by limiting the maximum number of threads
available to the services. This setting can only be made directly to
the system variables, see the MaxThreads setting in the GMS
Reference Guide for more information.
To change the number of threads used by SMTP for incoming mail:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance then the General
tab on the right to display this page:
2. In the SMTP Threads text box, type the number of threads you
want to use and press the Update button.
The Set to Default button returns all the values to their defaults.
Service Connection times
You can change the timeout for each service. You might increase
this for the POP service, for example, if users downloading large
messages using POP experience problems and the POP log shows
that the connections are timing out.
To change the connection times:
1. Choose System Administration, Security and then the
Connections tab on the right.
2. Type in the number of seconds before timeout for the service
and press the Update button.
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Outgoing e-mail
There are three areas where you can tune outgoing e-mail
performance.
POST outbound bandwidth
Limiting bandwidth helps to stop GMS saturating the link to the
Internet. This is especially useful if you need to preserve a
percentage of bandwidth for other services, such as browsing the
Web.
To limit the outbound bandwidth that POST uses:
1. Choose System Administration, Perfomance then the General
tab on the right to display this page:
2. Under Maximum POST Bandwidth, select the "Limit to" check
box and type in a figure in KBytes/sec. This is the maximum
bandwidth that POST can use.
3. Press the Update button.
Extensions
Use the relevant ESMTP extensions described in “Using ESMTP
features” on page 130. To enable/disable ESMTP features, choose
System Administration, Performance then the ESMTP tab on the
right and (de)select the relevant check boxes. Press the Update
button.
Threads
You can set the number of threads available for use by POST (from
1 to 255). This controls how many simultaneous transactions POST
can handle. The memory overhead for POST threads is much lower
than for SMTP threads. Each thread delivers a mail queue in the Out
directory.
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You might increase the POST threads if you have a lot of mail in the
Out directory waiting to be posted.
To change the number of POST threads:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance then the General
tab on the right.
2. In the Post Threads field, type the number of threads and press
the Update button.
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E-mail collection (POP3)
You can change parameters in any of the areas described below to
alter the performance of POP3 collection.
Number of connections
This specifies the number of simultaneous connections from a
single machine to your mail server. Typically, a value of one prevents
people using a large number of POP accounts from the same
machine.
Extensions
The following are all POP server commands, which can be issued in
a POP session to carry out the described actions. APOP is the only
one which you need to configure from within GMS:
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APOP — authenticated POP login. This encrypts passwords,
making it more difficult to hack into the system by "sniffing"
passwords from TCP packets transferred to/from your server.
APOP passwords cannot be used with NT User Database
accounts.
You have three choices:
• Disable APOP login.
• Let the POP3 server announce that it can accept APOP
encrypted passwords.
• Make APOP login mandatory. If you set this, ensure that all
your subscribing POP clients support APOP.
To set APOP up, choose System Administration, Security,
Connections and select the check boxes you want, then press
the Update button.
• LAST — lets users display the id of the last message in their
mailbox.
• UIDL (Unique ID Listing) — lets users display a unique id for
each message.
• TOP — a mail client can request the first n lines of a message.
• XTND — this supports two elements, XMIT and XLIST.
XMIT is used to send mail via POP servers rather than SMTP.
XLIST is used to list message headers. It can operate in several
modes: Get all headers, Get headers matching the given clause
(Received, To, etc.) or Get the header for a specific message ID.
For full details, see the GMS Reference Guide.
• VERS — lets users display the POP version number.
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POP download bandwidth
Limiting bandwidth helps to stop GMS saturating the link to the
Internet. This is especially useful if you need to preserve a
percentage of bandwidth for other services, such as browsing the
Web.
To limit POP download bandwidth:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance and then the
General tab on the right.
2. Under Limit POP Bandwidth, enter a figure in KBytes/sec. Press
the Update button.
Immediate deletion (POP3 DELE)
Normally POP3 does not remove deleted messages from a user’s
mailbox until they quit their session. This ensures users do not lose
mail on a poor connection. You can configure it to delete
messages immediately the user has requested they be deleted,
although this contradicts RFC1939.
The advantages of this are:
• Users only download messages once on a dial-up.
• It reduces the chance of messages being left on the server
accidentally (the user may not realise that messages are not
being deleted).
To delete messages immediately they have been read by users:
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1. Choose System Administration, Settings then the Compliance
tab to display this page:
2. Select the “POP3 DELE works immediately” check box and
press the Update button.
Threads
You can set the number of threads available for use by POP (from 1
to 256). This controls how many simultaneous transactions it can
handle, so changes the performance of the mail server.
You might increase the POP threads if you have many users and
little bandwidth between the clients and the server. You might
reduce the value if you do not have a lot of memory available.
To change the number of POP3 threads:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance, General.
2. In the POP3 Threads field, type the number of threads. Press the
Update button.
Configuring Smart Routing
Smart routing is the redirection of messages to/from specified
locations before they are delivered. You could use this, for example,
to send mail from all known Spammers to a null account (the
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equivalent of deleting it), or to redirect all mail for Sales to another
account.
The accounts to be redirected are listed in a Redirect file using a
notation that allows entire domains to be included using wildcards.
For details, see “The Redirect File” in the GMS Reference Guide.
To set up smart routing:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance then the Redirect
tab on the right. Any existing redirect commands are displayed
in the table.
2. Press the Add New button to enter a new redirect rule:
3. If you want to just add a comment to the file, select the
Comment radio button and type the text. Press Update and
skip the other steps. The comment could give details about a
rule, for example.
4. To create a rule, select Rule. For any of the following two steps,
you can use a “*” wildcard.
5. Specify the mail source, either as a name (in the MAIL Clause
text box), or an IP address (in the Remote IP Address text box).
6. Specify the mail destination, either as a name (in the RCPT
Clause text box), or an IP address (in the Local IP Address text
box).
7. In the Action drop-down list, specify what to do when a
matching message is found.
• Protocol refuse with — returns the specified message (type
it in the Parameter text box) to the sender. The message
must take the form 5xx, for example "503 Bad sequence of
commands".
• Protocol retry later — returns the specified message to the
sender. The message must begin with a number 4xx; see
“Error Messages” in the GMS Reference Guide.
• Redirect to — sends the message to the address you
specify in the Parameter text box.
• Run following script — allows a mml script to be specified
to act upon connections matching this redirect rule. Enter
the name of the script in the dialog box below. Note the
script must be placed in the <$path> directory.
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Don’t take action on match — ignores the rule.
8. When you finish, press the Update button. The rule will be
displayed like this:
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9. If you want to change the position of the command in the file
(commands at the bottom of the list override entries which are
above them), use the appropriate buttons to move the entry up
or down as required.
10. To edit an entry simply highlight it in the list and edit the entries
in the Redirect Rule box below as for creating a rule above.
11. To remove an entry highlight it and click on Delete.
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Configuring outbound delivery rules (Smart Delivery)
When POST sends outgoing mail, it works through the list of
servers defined in the postservers.txt file (known as the Sending
rules). For details of the file, see “Postservers.txt” in the GMS
Reference Guide.
Rules lower in the list override those at the top. For example, with
the two rules shown below, mail to all domains is resolved by MX
records through DNS, except for mail to domain.dom, which is
always sent to server.domain.dom:
* * 25 12
domain.dom server.domain.dom 25 12
Set up rules depending on the type of connection, as described
below.
Permanent or dial-up connections
To set up a rule for either of these connection types, do the
following:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance and then the
Delivery Rules tab on the right to display the page:
2. In the Target Address box, type "*", meaning mail for all
domains.
3. In the Post Server box, type the name of your ISPs server.
4. In the Port box, type “25”.
5. In the Retry box, type 12 for a permanent connection or 0 for
dial-up. This is the delay in minutes between consecutive
attempts at sending e-mail messages to a server that cannot be
reached first time. The retry value of 0 for dial-up means do not
retry.
With a permanent connection, if all your mail is urgent you can reduce this
value to ensure that any mail that fails to be delivered is retried again fairly
quickly. We do not recommend setting a value lower than five minutes. Be
careful if you have a busy server as this can increase server activity dramatically.
6. Press the Add New button to add a new rule. The added rules
are shown like this. To remove a rule highlight it and Delete it,
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or to edit highlight and edit the Delivery Rule Details. The order
of rules can be changed by highlighting the rule you would like
to move and using the appropriate buttons.
If you find that mail is not being posted out from your server
correctly and you see lots of “gethostbyname” failures in the post
log check that the entry in DNS for the mail server and the
hostname and domain given in your tcp/ip configuration match up.
The reason for this is that the local post server must do a lookup to
determine who it is first before attempting to lookup MX records
for the recipient domain in order that it can remove itself from the
MX records returned (if it appears there, i.e. in the case where it is
acting as a lower priority MX record).
Local domains
For a local domain you need an entry, like the following:
domain 127.0.0.1 25 12
*.domain 127.0.0.1 25 12
The second rule covers any subdomains
To set up the first of these sending rules (This entry is only required
if you are using a dialup):
1. Choose System Administration, Performance, Delivery Rules to
display this page:
2. In the Target Address field, type the domain name.
3. In the Post Server field, type 127.0.0.1. This is the server’s
loopback address.
4. In the Port field, type “25”.
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5. In the Retry field, type 12. This is the delay in minutes between
consecutive attempts at sending e-mail messages if there’s a
problem the first time.
6. Press the Update button.
To set up the second rule
1. Choose System Administration, Performance, Delivery Rules
2. In the Target Address field, type *.domain
3. In the Post Server field, type 127.0.0.1
4. In the Post Server field, type 25
5. In the Retry field, type 10
6. Press the Update button.
SMTP DLLs (Windows only)
DLLs let you extend the functionality of GMS to suit your own
requirements. SMTP DLLs act on all e-mail entering the system
during the course of a normal mail transaction. The DLLs can act on
any stage of the SMTP protocol.
For more details, see “SMTP DLLs” in the GMS Reference Guide.
SMTP Shared Libraries (Unix)
Shared Libraries let you extend the functionality of GMS Mail to suit
your own requirements. SMTP Shared Libraries act on all e-mail
entering the system during the course of a normal mail transaction.
The Shared Libraries can act on any stage of the SMTP protocol.
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11.2 Other Advanced Areas
This section describes those areas which do not directly affect the
performance of the system.
Reducing use of IP resources
There is currently a shortage of IP addresses on the Internet in
general, so GMS provides two methods of reducing your IP address
requirements:
• Using multiple domains on one IP address. This is called
multihoming and involves using virtual domains. Full domains
require an IP address for each domain, but virtual domains
“piggy back” on one full domain, sharing the same IP Address.
For details, see “Virtual domains” on page 86.
• Using domain aliases - for details, see “Setting up domain
aliases” on page 92.
Using virtual domains is better because you can distinguish
between addresses like the following, whereas with domain aliases
these two appear to be the same:
user@company1.dom
user@company2.dom
Changing the ports used by services
If you change any service’s port from its default value:
• This prevents other services accessing the port.
• You may not be able to post mail to any other mail server.
Because of this, you must take care when changing a value. Only
make changes if you are connecting to a machine internally, for
example to a proxy.
You can specify which port to use for each of the following
services:
• SMTP incoming — the port the SMTP server uses to accept email. The Internet Standard is to use port 25, but you may wish
to run another mail server on the same machine and make it
direct mail to GMS at a different port.
• SMTP outgoing — the port GMS uses to send all mail to
destination servers. In general, you would only change this
definition if you knew all mail was going to a specific port on a
machine defined by the parameter PostServers.
• POP3 — the port the POP server listens on for the POP3
Protocol.
• IMAP4 — the port the IMAP server listens on for the IMAP
protocol.
• Finger — the port allocated for the finger server.
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Password server — the port the password server listens on for
password request changes.
DNS — the port GMS uses for DNS when resolving MX records.
Note that changing this entry causes all MX lookups to fail
unless you have a DNS server which supports the new port
number.
Web Proxy — the port used by Proxy server.
Web Configuration (MML) — the port used by the Web
Configuration server.
MML Port.
To change the port used by a service:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance then the Ports tab
on the right to display this page:
2. Type the new number of the port you want to change. This can
be any available port on the server.
3. Press the Update button.
4. Stop and restart the relevant service to bring the change into
effect. The easiest way to do this if you have the interface open
is to choose System Administration, move your cursor over the
particular service and press the Stop button for the service, then
restart it.
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GMS Messenger Port
The messenger port must be configured directly via the Support,
System Variables section. See “Editing Global, Domain and User
variables” on page 141.
To return all the values to their defaults, press the Set to Default button.
There are some advanced port and IP address configuration options available see“IP address and Port Flexibility” on page 163.
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Using ESMTP features
The Enhanced SMTP (ESMTP) features are defined in a series of
RFCs extending the SMTP protocol. These enhancements have
emerged over time and each adds extra features to SMTP.
The ESMTP features supported by GMS are 8BitMIME, AUTH,
Delivery Status Notification, Enhanced Status Codes, ETRN,
Pipelining and Restart, Size, VRFY and XTND.
This section describes these briefly; for full details, see “Services” in
the GMS Reference Guide.
Disabling/enabling ESMTP features
To enable/disable ESMTP features, choose System Administration,
Performance then the ESMTP tab on the right and (de)select the
relevant check boxes. Press the Update button.
ESMTP features
The features available are as follows:
• 8BitMIME — the sender uses this command to announce that it
supports higher bit ASCII transmission.
• Auth — use Auth to set up authenticated SMTP transactions.
GMS supports three types of authenticated SMTP — LOGON,
MD5 and CRAM-MD5. MD5 uses encrypted passwords and is
the equivalent of APOP, LOGON does not and is the equivalent
of normal POP. For full details, see the GMS Reference Guide.
• Delivery Status Notification (DSN) — this option requests that
the GMS server confirms that a transaction was completed as
desired.
• Enhanced Status Codes — these give precise error codes
relating to the delivery of mail. They are only delivered to
servers issuing the EHLO command to indicate that they
understand ESMTP; all other servers receive the standard
response codes.
• ETRN — also known as QSND, this is specifically designed to
allow integration with dial-up mail servers. A dial-up mail server
can connect to the GMS server and issue the ETRN command to
force all the e-mail for it server to be posted out. The keyword
associated with this ESMTP extension is ETRN.
• Pipelining — reduces the time it takes to send multiple
messages. A sending server uses Pipelining to send all the
messages it has to a receiver in one burst, without sending a
Reset command after each message. It fires all the commands
down the pipe without waiting for a response from the remote
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server — once all the commands have been issued, the remote
server issues all its responses at once.
Pipelining and Restart are alternatives.
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With Pipelining, if a user on a remote server sends a message to
multiple users on your server, this uses only a single SMTP
connection with one MAIL FROM clause and multiple RCPT
clauses. This means the message body is only transmitted once.
Restart — after a connection is lost while a message is being
sent, on reconnection the Restart command from the sender
gives the receiver the option of continuing from the point it had
reached, rather than starting again at the beginning.
Size —this is used by the sending server to state that it has a
message of the specified size for the receiving server. The
receiver replies, either accepting or rejecting the message. The
main difference between this approach and the message size
limits described in “Account Settings” on page 101 is that it
acts at the protocol level so the message is never actually
transmitted — this preserves bandwidth.
To specify the ESMTP Size, choose System Administration,
Performance, ESMTP, select the Size check box and type in the
value in KB.
VRFY — this command verifies a user name. It lets external
servers check that an e-mail account actually exists on your
server. The response may include the full name of the user and
must include their mailbox.
XTND — this supports two elements, XMIT and XLIST.
XMIT is used to send mail via POP servers rather than SMTP.
XLIST is used to list message headers. It operates in three
modes: Get all headers, Get headers matching the given clause
(Received, To, etc.) or Get the header for a specific message ID.
For full details, see the GMS Reference Guide.
Generating server messages
You can choose from a number of useful server-generated
messages from the list below. The first four options in this list are
enabled by default:
• Delivery Receipts when requested — determines whether GMS
should respond when a remote host requests a confirmation of
the delivery of an e-mail to the recipients inbox. This is not an
indication that e-mail has been read — the receiving mail client
handles this — only confirmation that the e-mail has reached its
destination mail server.
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Read Receipts when requested from local users — determines
whether GMS should respond automatically when a remote
host requests a confirmation that a received e-mail has been
read.
Read Receipts when requested from external users —
determines whether GMS should respond automatically when a
remote host requests a confirmation that a received e-mail has
been read.
Return undelivered messages — specifies that any e-mail
rejected by a mail server because the recipient is unknown must
be returned as an attachment to an error message giving the
reason for the non-delivery. If you prefer to return the e-mail in
the error message body, instead of as an attachment, disable
this option.
Statistics Message to Postmaster — if this is checked, at
midnight GMS sends the Postmaster an e-mail summarising the
number of e-mail messages received and sent by the mail server
during the preceding 24 hour period.
Statistics Message (to Gordano Ltd.) — if this is checked, at
midnight GMS sends Gordano Ltd. an e-mail summarising the
number of e-mail messages received and sent by the mail server
during the preceding 24 hour period.
TRAP to Support (at Gordano Ltd.) — automatically e-mails any
occurrences of traps to Gordano Support. A trap occurs when
the server automatically catches a problem that could cause it
to stop responding — the thread the trap occurs on is
recovered and the server continues to function normally.
Enabling this option assists the Support department to see any
problems that may be affecting use of the server.
MML errors to Support (at Gordano Ltd) — Automatically
emails any occurrences of MML errors to support. This allows
our engineers to see problems as soon as they occur and
frequently a problem can be fixed before it has even been
reported to support.
Service start Message to Postmaster — Automatically emails a
message to the postmaster when a service is started.
To change settings from the default:
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1. Choose System Administration, Settings and the Messages tab
on the right to display this page:
2. Select/deselect check boxes as required.
3. Choose the Update button to effect your changes.
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Changing RFC compliance
GMS follows the RFC standards for e-mail closely, but you may
need it to deviate from the strict interpretation of the RFC
standards so it can work with other non-standard mail clients and
servers. The options available are listed below:
• Enforce RFC822 Header — If this box is checked, an e-mail
message header must include a minimum of a To and From
clause. These are normally inserted by the mail client, a process
which is entirely transparent to the user. However, during a
Telnet session these clauses must be input manually after the
DATA statement and before the message body in order to
comply with RFC822.
• Enforce CRLF end of line — according to RFC standards, all lines
must end with a Carriage Return, Line Feed pair <CRLF>.
Unfortunately, some mail servers (especially old versions of
Sendmail) only terminate with a carriage return. If you cannot
persuade the administrator of the non-standard mail server to
update it, you can modify GMS to accept this shortcoming.
• Enforce RFC2822 Line length — According to RFC standards
there are two limits placed on characters in a line. Each line of
characters must be no more than 998 characters, and should
be no more than 78 characters, excluding the CRLF. Select this
option to enforce character line length.
• Enforce RFC1894 DSN — enforces the use of Delivery Status
Notification (DSN) messages during the delivery of mail
messages.
• Allow RFC1123 return — specifies that any e-mail rejected by a
mail server because the recipient is unknown should be
returned as an attachment to an error message giving the
reason for the non-delivery. If you prefer to have the e-mail in
the error message body, instead of an attachment, disable this
option.
• Correct SMTP “From:” Clauses — if this option is checked,
GMS will try to correct badly formed e-mail From clauses. Errors
such as unbalanced angle brackets, quotes and illegal spaces
can be handled. Note that some From addresses are so badly
formed that it is impossible to guess the intended address.
• Correct SMTP “To:” Clauses — if this option is checked, GMS
will try to correct badly formed e-mail To clauses. Errors such as
unbalanced angle brackets, quotes and illegal spaces can be
handled. Note that some To addresses are so badly formed that
it is impossible to guess the intended address.
• MS Mail Address Fix — the Microsoft mail client, MS Mail, does
not always enter the correct From or To clauses in an e-mail
message envelope. This option forces GMS to check for the
account “NULL” or an empty e-mail address in the protocol and
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replace it with the “From” or “To” clause from the message
itself.
While the above option gives MS Mail users the warm feeling that they know
where the message was sent to, it is potentially dangerous because the To
clause may not contain the real destination address of the e-mail.
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POP3 DELE works immediately — enabling this option allows
the removal of mail from a user’s mailbox immediately the DELE
command is issued, instead of the recommended method of
updating the mailbox contents when the client issues a QUIT
command. This option contradicts RFC1939.
Show real host in SMTP “Received:” clause — enforces the
entry of the real host name in the Received header rather the
host name passed to GMS in the HELO clause
Show real host in POST EHLO/HELO clause — Enforces the entry
of the real host name as configured in TCP/IP settings in the
EHLO/HELO clause
SMTP resolve host name — forces GMS to perform a DNS
lookup on the host name given in the HELO clause and rejects
connections from any hosts that are not resolved correctly.
Maximum Hop Count — GMS keeps a record of how many
times an e-mail message passes through the mail server so that
it can detect when e-mail is caught in a loop. Loops are usually
caused by an incorrect mail server and/or DNS setting.
When the value entered here is reached, GMS breaks the loop
and warns the postmaster of the problem. The default value is
17.
Maximum length of “Received” line — Very long Received lines
can cause problems for some mail servers. You can restrict the
length of the Received line to a set number of characters.
To change a compliance parameter:
1. Choose System Administration, Settings then the Compliance
tab on the right.
2. Select or deselect check boxes for any of the on/off parameters
you want to change.
3. If required, type in the values for the last two parameters. Press
the Update button.
Controlling Services (Windows)
To stop or start the GMS services from the user interface:
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1. Choose System Administration to display this page:
2. The status column shows the state of each service. In the above
example the GMSSNMP service is stopped. To start it you would
highlight it with the cursor and click on Start.
3. Highlight the service then Press the button for the service you
want to start or stop. This effects the change immediately.
4. The Restart button has the same effect as stopping and then
starting a service.
Controlling Services (Unix)
All the GMS services can be stopped by typing the following from a
command line:
<$basedir>/mail/bin/glmail stop
GMS services can be started by typing the following from a
command line:
<$basedir>/mail/bin/glmail start
Services can also be shut down on an individual basis using the kill
command
To start just one service type:
<$basedir>/mail/bin/<servicename>
For Example:
opt/gordano/mail/bin/pop
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Setting up an SMTP logon message
You can include a message as part of the SMTP logon banner. Each
line of the message will automatically be preceded by "220-" for
you so please do not enter this, simly enter the text you wish
displayed. An example might be:
Unsolicited commercial e-mail will be rejected
Contact postmaster@domain.dom if rejected in error
When displayed by SMTP this would become
220-Unsolicited commercial e-mail will be rejected
220-Contact postmaster@domain.dom if rejected in error
Microsoft Outlook is known to experience problems when SMTP logon banners are defined.
To add a message to the logon banner:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance and then the
Miscellaneous tab on the right to display this page:
2. Type the message you want into the text box, following the
rules described above.
3. Press the Update button.
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Changing POST and POP timing settings
You can configure a number of parameters which control the way
messages are handled after an initial failure in delivery. These are:
• Send immediately — if this is enabled, GMS’ POST service sends
e-mail messages as soon as they are received from a mail client
or mail server.
Do not select the Send Immediately check box if you use a dial-up connection.
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Default retry time — The delay in minutes between attempts to
send e-mail messages to servers that could not be reached on a
previous attempt. The previous failure might be because of a
DNS or mail server failure, for example.
If this value is set to zero, POST never checks to see if there is
mail waiting to be sent and you must either use SMTP to tell
POST about new mail or use ‘MAIL -k’. The upper limit, 10080
minutes, is seven days.
Do not set this if you use a dial-up connection.
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If all your mail is urgent you can reduce this value to make sure
that any mail that fails to be delivered is retried again fairly
quickly. We do not recommend setting a value lower than five
minutes. Be careful if you have a busy server as this can increase
server activity dramatically.
You can set different values for different domains by using
Smart Delivery rules; see “Configuring outbound delivery rules
(Smart Delivery)” on page 124.
Sending warning if mail not sent — The time in hours after
which a warning is generated and sent to the original sender of
an e-mail if it has not been delivered during this period.
Reduce this if you want to be warned quickly if mail is not sent
out. We do not recommend a setting of less than four hours as
it is not unusual for mail to take at least this long to be
delivered.
Return mail if not deliverable — The time in hours after which
mail is returned to a user if it cannot be delivered.
Reduce this from 72 if all your mail is urgent and you would like
to know as soon as possible if it fails. Do not make this interval
too short or e-mail will be returned to a sender before a
temporary DNS or mail server fault can be rectified. We do not
recommend values under 24 hours as it can take at least this
time for mail to be delivered over the Internet — if the message
is very urgent e-mail is not the best way to send it!
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POP Logon Delay — Sets a delay in seconds before GMS sends
an OK response to POP clients which might be too slow to
accept it without a pause in the protocol. The default value, 0,
disables the delay.
To change a timing parameter:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance and then the
General tab on the right to display this page:
2. If you want mail to be sent immediately, select the Send
Message Immediately check box.
3. If you want to change any of the numeric parameter values,
type in the new value. (Read the description of the parameter
above carefully before you change anything.)
4. Press the Update button.
Listing and starting outgoing mail queues
You can list all the POST queues to show for each queue the
domains that outgoing mail is destined for, the number of
messages and their size in KB.
To view the queues:
1. Choose Reports, Mail Queue Size.
2. The queues are listed in this format:
To start queues:
1. Press Display to show all current mail queues
• Refresh - Clicking Refresh will refresh the queue data
displayed.
• Reschedule - Highlighting a queue and clicking on the
Reschedule button will force the post service to attempt to
send that queue immediately.
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Reschedule All - Highlighting a queue and clicking on the
Reschedule All button will force the post service to attempt
to send all queues immediately.
Details - Highlighting a queue and clicking on the Details
button will display additional details of the message queue
including the next scheduled retry time and details of any
potential problems associated with the specific mail queue.
Delete - Highlighting a queue and clicking on the Delete
button will immediately remove that queue from the server.
Mail in the queue will simply be deleted.
Setting up DNS servers and the DNS cache
You can specify which DNS servers GMS uses to resolve e-mail
addresses. You can also set up a DNS Cache that will greatly speed
up DNS requests for frequently requested domains.
To set these up:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance and the MX tab
on the right to display this page:
2. In the Expire Cache field, specify the time in hours after which
the cached MX record information is considered to be out of
date and will not be used. By default this cache is set to update
after 24 hours.
3. In the Flush Cache field, specify how often in hours the cache
should refresh its MX record data. If the DNS server needed for
the MX lookup is not available, the previous MX record
information can be stored until the cache expiry time is
reached.
You can set the expiry and flush times to any value but be aware that DNS
records are constantly changing. If the times are set too high, it is likely that
the DNS records for a domain may have changed before the cache is
refreshed and GMS will try to deliver e-mail to the wrong host.
4. In the Cache Size field, specify the size of the DNS Cache. This
is set at 1MB by default and you should not normally have to
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change this. If GMS cannot service a DNS request from the
cache, it will automatically contact the specified DNS Servers to
do so.
5. In the DNS Servers text box, type a space-separated list of DNS
Servers. If this box is empty, GMS will use those entered in the
system TCP/IP configuration. If more than one server is defined,
GMS sends queries to each server in turn to spread the load.
6. Select the Use HOSTS file check box if you want GMS to try to
use the local Hosts file to resolve names before trying to resolve
them via DNS.
7. Press the Update button to effect your changes.
Editing Global, Domain and User variables
Under certain circumstances you may need to edit directly the three
sets of variables which control GMS:
• Global variables — elements which affect the overall operation
of GMS, for example, the number of threads allocated a
service, whether or not APOP login is enforced on the system,
and the list of DNS servers to be used.
• Domain-specific variables — the values which can change on a
per-domain basis, for example domain name, domain id and
domain user count.
• User variables — elements like passwords, user-specific mailbox
sizes and access rights.
These variables are changed transparently when you change configuration
through the standard user interface, and that is the only way we recommend
changing the setup in normal circumstances. Only change the variables if you
are directed to do so by GMS Support staff.
If you are asked by Support to change a system value:
1. Choose Support, Variables.
2. Scroll down the list to find the variable they ask you to change.
3. Double click on the variable to open it for editing and type the
new value into the Variable Value field and press Enter. Make
sure you click on the Save button to apply and changes you
have made.
The procedure is the same for the other two types of variables,
Domain Variables are found under Domains & Users, Domain,
Variables and User Variables under Domains & Users, Domain,
Username, Variables.
Changing use of threads
You can set the number of threads available for use by each service
(the range is from one to 256). The number of threads allocated
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controls how many simultaneous transactions the service can
handle, so affects the performance of the mail server. On the other
hand more threads use more memory, so there’s a trade-off
between this and the benefits of allowing more connections.
The main reasons for changing from the defaults are:
• Your server is especially busy, for example if you are an ISP with
a large number of dial-up customers.
• If you have many users and plenty of bandwidth between the
clients and the server, you might increase the values for POP,
POST or SMTP.
• If you have a large number of users accessing your server
through the WWW interface, you might increase the WWW
value.
• If you do not have a lot of memory available, you might reduce
the values for POP, POST, SMTP or WWW.
To change the number of threads used by a service:
1. Choose System Administration, Performance and the General
tab on the right.
2. Type the number of threads for the service and press the
Update button.
To return all the values to their defaults, press the Set to Default button.
Using ETRN
Using ETRN with GMS as the server
Do not set up the domain within GMS
Ensure that GMS will accept mail for this domain by adding the
domain to the “Allow Relay for...” section
Add an entry to your Sending Rules as follows
“domain.com server.domain.com 25 0"
This means send all mail for domain.com to server.domain.com on
port 25 but only send when requested.
server.domain.com should have a valid A record in DNS
ETRN by itself is not a completely secure command so the supplied
ETRN utility additionally provides the capability of password
protecting mail queues. The password can be transmitted either in
plain text or in encrypted form, this is controlled by the AllowEtrn
registry entry.
To allow password protection of the queue an extra parameter
should be added to the entry in your postservers.txt file for the
domain in question, so the entry outlined in step 3 above would
become
“domain.com server.domain.com 25 0 password”.
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There is also a third option which allows mail to be dequeued to
the IP address of the server issuing the ETRN command. For this to
work the postserver entry must contain a password parameter as
above. The machine issuing the ETRN command must indicate a
destination machine of * in the ntmetrn.exe utility
The three options form a bit map for the AllowEtrn registry entry so
all three options can be allowed if required. Refer to the GMS
reference Guide for more details on AllowEtrn.
Using ETRN as a client
When retrieving mail via SMTP in a dialup situation you can use the
utility NTMEtrn.exe provided as part of the GMS Option Pack
available from ftp://ftp.gordano.com.
If you are using a static IP which requires that an A record is set up
in DNS, the command line might look something like:
NTMEtrn -mserver.isp.dom -qclient.dom -sKeepOut 
-dserver.client.dom
If you are using a dynamically assigned IP address then an example
of he command line required would be
NTMEtrn -mserver.isp.dom -qclient.dom -sKeepOut -d*
Run “ntmetrn -h” for help on usage.
11.3 Reports
GMS provides administrators with a number of useful reports that
allow you to monitor the performance of your system. There are
two levels of report, Domain reports and System reports. To access
system reports log on to GMS then select Reports in the menu. To
access the reports for a particular domain you need to first select
the Domain in the drop down then select Reports in the menu.
Domain Reports
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Account Report (domain)
The account report shows the last access date and time, profile and
disk space usage for every mail user in the domain. You can sort the
listing by selecting the title of the column you want to sort by. Click
the title again to sort in reverse order.
Undeliverable Mail (domain and system)
This report shows any mail that is found to be undeliverable. Simply
select the required entry from the list then click on the “View”
button.
If there were any undeliverable messages the subsequent report
displays the following information.
• Date and time of the messages.
• The QueueID (the name of the queue that contained the
undeliverable message(s).
• The destination the message was meant for.
• The From address.
• The To address.
• The size of the message.
You can sort the listing by selecting the title of the column you
want to sort by. Click the title again to sort in reverse order.
If no undeliverable messages exist on the system then the report
will be empty.
Quarantine (domain and system)
All messages found to contain banned content, for example
restricted words or a virus, from or to a local user, can be redirected
to the Domain Quarantine folder, others will go to the System
Quarantine folder.
This report shows the date of each individual quarantine folder and
the number of messages within that folder are displayed.
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The following options are available:
• Manage - Highlighting an entry and clicking on Manage
opens a management screen to allow you to accept, forward,
delete, virus scan or report falsely quarantined messages.
• Delete - Deletes the highlighted entry including all the
messages it contains.
• Refresh - Refreshes the display.
• False Positive - Reports the highlighted entry and all of the
messages within it as a False Positive result. That is messages
that should have been delivered to the user rather than placed
in Quarantine.
Access to this folder is controlled via user profiles.
In addition to copying messages to the Domain or System Quarantine folder
they may also be delivered to the each users Quarantine folder. Users are able
to perform their own management of this folder including reporting false
positives, allowing through to their inbox, or blacklisting senders. See the
User Guide for more information.
Quarantine Messages
This screen allows complete management of all of the individual
messages within a particular days quarantine folder.
The Quarantine Messages list shows all off the messages
quarantined on a particular day. It shows the sender, the recipient,
the reason the message was placed in the quarantine folder, the
subject of the message and the date and time it was sent. The
following options are available:
• View - Highlighting a message and clicking on View will
display that message in the lower panel on the screen.
• Accept - Accepts the highlighted message and delivers it to the
intended recipient.
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Forward - Accepts the highlighted message and delivers it to
the named recipient.
Delete - Deletes the highlighted message.
Refresh - Refreshes the screen to show the most up to date
status.
Virus Scan - If a message is placed in quarantine due to having
failed a virus check it can be rescanned from here. If the
message no longer fails the virus check you can elect to use one
of the above options.
False Positive - This option is used to report messages that
have ended up in the quarantine folder due to failing the Zero
Hour checks that should not have, i.e. genuine messages.
Cancel -.Closes the dialog and returns to the previous screen.
The same options as above are available on the View screen for
individual messages.
Virus Scan Report (domain and system)
This report shows messages that have passed through the virus
scanner and whether or not they were found to contain a virus. The
first step asks you what you would like included in the report. You
can choose to display results for all messages that have been
scanned and/or messages that were found to contain a virus.
Simply check the options you require, select the days you would
like the report to cover from the list of dates then click on the
“Report” button. You can select multiple days from the list by
holding down the “Control” key on your keyboard while selecting
the dates with the mouse pointer.
If there were any matching messages on the selected day the report
displays the following information.
• Date and time of the message.
• Who the message was from.
• Who the message was to.
• Whether a virus was found or not. If the name of the virus is
known that will also be shown.
• Any action that has been taken as a result of a virus being
detected.
• Whether or not any virus has been disinfected.
You can sort the listing by selecting the title of the column you
want to sort by. Click the title again to sort in reverse order.
If you have no virus logs available on your system this report is not
available and instead of the report an explanatory message is
displayed.
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Virus List Report (domain and system)
A list of Viruses the system is protected from, can be displayed
when selecting this report.
Enter the name of the virus you wish to check the system is
protected from and click Report
The wildcard “*” can be used in searches.
Search Email (domain and system)
The email search report is available to both system and domain
administrators.
The email address is entered in the “Email Address” field. Wildcards
can be used e.g “*@test.dom”.
Search for - enter the search criteria from the following options:
• All activity
• Custom
Received email
Sent email
Email collection
Web access
List server
Virus scans
Search - enter the period you wish to search
Number of results - specify the number of results to be returned.
The Search button will begin the search process along with a
warning that it may take some time.
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Note: Domain administrators are only able to search for emails sent
to or received from the domain(s) which they have rights to
manage.
Licensing (system)
The Licensing Report shows details of usage on each of the licensed
GMS services including the total number of licensed seats, the
number of those seats that have been used and also displays the
percentage of the particular license that has been used.
Zero Hour (system)
The Zero Hour report will firstly show you the version of the Zero
Hour detection engine you are running, and the status of that Zero
Hour detection engine.
It also allows you to open a number of flash images directly on the
Gordano Website showing real time views of live spam on the
Internet. The options available here are:
Daily Outbreak Report
Daily Outbreak Monitor Report
Top Outbreak Countries Report
Top Outbreak Domains Report
Current Activity Report (system)
You can monitor service activity (IMAP4, LIST, POP3, POST or SMTP)
in real time and, if necessary, start or stop a service. You would
need to restart a service, for example, after changing its timeout
value.
To monitor services from the user interface:
1. Choose Reports then select the “Current Activity” report from
the reports branch of the tree
2. The information for each service is displayed, with these fields:
• Action — the service name.
• Id — the session number.
• IP Address — the address of the remote connection, if any.
• Mode — the status, as given in the tables which follow.
• Time — the time this thread has been processing the
transaction, in seconds.
The following tables list the possible values for each service type:
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POST
Status
Meaning
IDLE
No action currently taking place.
CONN
Connecting to remote host.
HELO
Sent HELO, waiting for response.
EHLO
Sent EHLO, waiting for response.
MAIL
Sent MAIL from, waiting for response.
RCPT
Sent RCPT to, waiting for response.
DATA
Sent DATA, waiting for response.
RSET
Resetting connection for another transfer of e-mail.
QUIT
Closing down the connection.
POP
Status
Meaning
IDLE
No action currently taking place.
LOGN
User logging in.
USER
Sent response to USER command.
PASS
Sent response to PASS command. Logon successful.
QUIT
Closing down the connection.
IMAP
Status
Meaning
IDLE
No action currently taking place.
CONN
Just got a connection, now expecting authentication command.
AUTH
Authentication OK.
SELE
Successful select or examine — a folder has been selected for
work.
LOGO
Connection closing down.
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SMTP
Status
Meaning
IDLE
No action currently taking place.
CONN
Connected to remote host.
HELO
HELO clause received, waiting for MAIL clause.
MAIL
MAIL clause received, waiting for RCPT clause.
RCPT
RCPT clause received, waiting for DATA or RCPT clause
DATA
Receiving e-mail message from remote host.
QUIT
Closing down the connection.
Domains Report (system)
This report lists the domains on the system. The information given
includes:
• IP address
• type of domain
• date created
• number of users
• disk space usage
You can sort the listing by selecting the title of the column you
want to sort by. Click the title again to sort in reverse order.
If you select a domain from the report and then click on the
“Display” button.
a further report is displayed providing more detailed information on
that domain.
Mail Queue Size (system)
This report provides information on the mail queues existing on the
system. The first step asks you to decide whether you want to
display the queue length as Kbytes or number of messages in the
queue. You are also asked to specify how often you want the
information updated. Once you have made your selection click on
the “Display” button to show the results.
The results screen lists the queues and their size. You can select a
queue in the list and click on the “Details” button for more
information on an individual queue.
You can sort the listing by selecting the title of the column you
want to sort by. Click the title again to sort in reverse order.
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Reported Junk Mail (system)
This report shows any mail that has been reported as spam by users
on the system. The report will initially show the date and the
number of messages reported on that date. At this stage you can
highlight one of the rows in the report and Delete it. Alternatively
you can click on the Mark as Spam button to add all of the
messages reported that day to the system Bayesian filter, or click on
Manage to obtain a full report for that day displaying the
individual messages.
The secondary report displays the following information:
• The From address
• The To address
• The reason for the message being in the report
• The Subject of the message
• The Date
You can sort the listing by selecting the title of the column you
want to sort by. Click the title again to sort in reverse order.
There are a range of options open to you in this secondary report to
deal with the reported messages. If you wish to inspect the
message further to ensure that it is actually spam then click on the
View button which will display the source of the message in the
bottom pane of the report. The Delete and Mark as Spam
buttons allow the message to be deleted or added to the system
Bayesian filter respectively.
Alerts (system)
This page provides a powerful diagnostic tool to assist you in
diagnosing problems that may be occurring on your server. This
page shows alerts from the server in realtime. When the page is
first displayed, approximately 500 alerts (or the number of alerts
saved since system restart) will populate it. Alerts will be updated
each second and appended to the listing.
If you select one of the lines in the table and click Details, a new
browser window will be displayed and a page containing a full
explanation of the log entry will be displayed from Gordano's
website. The log entry displayed may also contain real values from
your server.
Click Manage Alerts to specify which type of alerts should be
displayed.
11.4 Monitoring via SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) provides a means to
monitor network devices and to manage statistics collection,
performance and security. GMS provides its own SNMP agent on
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the server, while an SNMP client will be required in order to read
the information provided.
SNMP monitoring is off by default, all configuration for it can be
accessed from the System Administration, Monitoring option in the
menu on the left hand side of the administration interface.
To enable publishing of SNMP information select the “Enable SNMP
Monitoring” check box then select which of the services you wish
to monitor. You can monitor either an individual service, some the
services or all of the services.
Each of the GMS services publishes a row in the “applTable” table
defined in RFC2788. Additionally SMTP and POST also publish a
row in the “mtaTable” and “mtaGroupTable” tables defined in
RFC2789.
To retrieve this information with your SNMP client you will need to
load certain Management Information Base (MIB) files. The
RFC2788 and RFC2789 information is published via the standard
“Network Services” and “MTA” MIB files respectively. All of the
additional information is published under Gordano's own MIB file
which can be found in the root of the Gordano installation
directory and will need to be installed on your SNMP client.
The Gordano MIB has been registered with IANA and a full list of
registered enterprise numbers can be found on their web site.
Password
The default SNMP community/password is “public”. For security
reasons we would strongly recommended that this is changed
before enabling SNMP, if you do not change it then anyone able to
connect to your SNMP service will be able to monitor the status of
your server.
Allowed IPs
The Allowed IPs option provides a further security measure to
protect your SNMP information by allowing you to specify IP
addresses that can connect to the SNMP service. You can use
wildcards when specifying IP address ranges using the formats
previously described.
11.5 Allowing Relay
Relay is the practice of using a mail server to send mail to users who
are not local to that server. Servers that allow relay in this way are
often used by Spammers (Bulk emailers) to distribute unsolicited
commercial email (UCE). Servers that allow open relay in this way
are often blacklisted by the internet community and may find they
are denied connections to other mail servers because of this. By
default GMS is configured not to allow relay at all.
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However while it is generally scorned upon to allow your server to
relay messages it is sometimes necessary to allow relay in special
circumstances. For instance you might have roaming users or home
workers who are not connecting from your local network. By
default these sorts of users will be able to send mail to other users
on your network but not to any external domains (i.e. they cannot
relay).
To get around this GMS lets you permit relaying for these types of
user whilst still denying relay to the rest of the internet. The options
are:
• Allow Relay
• Adding addresses to the LocalIP range.
• Allow Relay for specified domains.
• Authenticated SMTP.
• POP/IMAP before SMTP (Requires GMS Anti-Spam).
Allow Relay
You can enable relay from the System Administration, Security,
Relay page of the interface by clicking on the "Allow relay" option.
This will make your server an open relay allowing anyone on the
internet, particularly spammers to relay through your server. This
option is not recommended under any circumstances.
Adding to LocalIP range
If the remote user is always connecting to your server using the
same IP address you can tell GMS to treat that IP address as though
it were local and allow relay for any connection from that IP
address. You can add LocalIPs from the System Administration,
Security, LocalIP page of the interface. This method is no good if
the user’s IP address is constantly changing.
Allow Relay for specified domains
If you want to allow all the users in a particular domain to relay
through your server you can add the domain on the System
Administration, Security, Relay page of the interface. This is useful if
your mail server is acting as a backup or relay server for any nonlocal domains.
Authenticated SMTP
If you Enable “Allow AUTH” from the System Administration,
Performance, ESMTP page your remote users will then have to
authenticate to SMTP prior to sending external messages through
your server. That means they have to provide a username and
password before they can relay. The drawback is that this is only
supported by some mail clients.
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POP/IMAP before SMTP
Gordano’s add on product GMS Anti-Spam enhances your options
with POP/IMAP before SMTP. This requires the user to log on to POP
or IMAP with their password and username before they can then
relay. With some mail clients which try to send mail before they
check POP and IMAP the user may need to try twice before
messages can be sent. This is probably the best of the three
solutions for roaming users. You can configure this option from the
Anti Spam, Bypasses, Authenticated Clients page of the interface
where GMS Anti-Spam is installed.
11.6 Shared and Public Folders
GMS supports Shared and Public folders within the IMAP server
using the IMAP ACL extension covered by RFC 2086. Access Rights
can be set by any ACL enabled mail client, such as Mulberry. Other
clients such as MS Outlook can use ACLs but are not able to set
them.
Shared and Public folders can be set up from the System
Administration, Performance, Access Control page.
Enabling Access Control Lists
Selecting this option enables IMAP Access Control Lists (ACLs). If
enabled then IMAP will advertise the fact by returning the keyword
ACL to the IMAP Capability command. Any clients supporting ACLs
will then query the server for further folders that they are allowed
to access.
Shared Folder Prefix
All user level shared folders are shared under the prefix specified
here. For instance if you use a prefix of “share” then users shared
folders could be accessed using “share.username.mailbox”.
Public Folder Prefix
Public folders are accessible both to the users logged in to the
system and to anonymous users. Public level shared folders are
shared under the prefix specified here. A specific account must be
set up to hold public shared folders (see below). If you use a prefix
of “pub” then public shared folders could be accessed using
“pub.mailbox”.
Public Folder Account Name
This is an account that would be specifically set up to hold public
mailboxes. It is not advisable to use one of your standard mail
accounts for this, rather you should set up a specific account. The
account must already exist prior to being entered here.
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Access control modes
Enforce full access for folder owner
This mode enforces the use of the default ACL rights of
“lrswipcda” for a user's own folders. This is the default mode
giving fast performance and minimising configuration issues.
Enforce admin access for folder owner
This mode enforces the use of administer access for a user's own
folders. This minimises configuration issues.
Allow full access control
This mode allows full control for all folders. This can lead to
problems should users delete all admin access for their folders.
At least one account should always have administration access
to a folder. If this access right is not available then the rights
for a mailbox can never be changed. We therefore recommend
that you do not use option 3 above.
Access Control Rights
The following is a full list of the Access Rights that can be enabled/
disabled for a mailbox.
l
lookup (mailbox is visible to LIST/LSUB commands)
r
read (SELECT the mailbox, perform CHECK, FETCH, PARTIAL, SEARCH,
COPY from mailbox)
s
keep seen/unseen information across sessions (STORE SEEN flag)
w
write (STORE flags other than SEEN and DELETED)
i
insert (perform APPEND, COPY into mailbox)
p
post (send mail to submission address for mailbox, not enforced by
IMAP4 itself)
c
create (CREATE new sub-mailboxes in any implementation-defined hierarchy)
d
delete (STORE DELETED flag, perform EXPUNGE)
a
administer (perform SETACL)
11.7 Porting Accounts from other Mail servers
AutoPort for Messaging Servers
GMS includes a utility to provide seamless porting from other mail
servers.
This utility allows email accounts to be ported from one proprietary
system to another without the need to make any changes to the
existing server. The administrator does not need to contact users in
order to change their passwords and the transfer of mail files takes
place automatically. Furthermore, the email service is not disrupted
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and users do not have to disclose or change their passwords or
change the configuration of mail clients. The transfer process
between the GMS server and the existing server will work with any
Internet Standards-Compliant messaging server as the source server
including those supporting POP3, IMAP4 or SMTP protocols.
The porting is completed in three stages:
1. Preparation - The GMS System is prepared (off the network)
by installing the GMS software, setting it up for porting and
giving it the same IP address as the existing server you will be
replacing. To prepare the server to retrieve the accounts select
the System Administration, Porting option in the menu on the
left of the screen.
Set the details of the Host to be ported from, this is normally an
IP address. Follow this by selecting the protocol to use, the Port
on the remote host, whether or not you wish to use SSL, and
the type of access that you wish to initiate the porting process
for each user.
The SSL option requires that you have installed an SSL
certificate on both the old and new servers.
You should now set the Unknown user action for the GMS
server to send mail, received for accounts that have not yet
been created, to the source server. Go to Domains & Users,
Domain and select the Preferences tab on the right. Select
“Redirect to server” entering the IP address of the source server
then click on Update.
2. Account Transfer - To begin the porting process, the existing
server should be taken off line and given a new IP address (as
defined above). The GMS server is connected to the network
(preferably on the same LAN segment) and the existing server
and the GMS server restarted. Users can continue to collect
and send email in the usual way as illustrated in the diagram.
3.
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Retiring the existing server - After a period of time you may
determine that it is time to retire the existing server. Some
special mail routing rules (e.g. forwards, auto-responders etc.)
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Advanced Management
and accounts that have not been accessed will not be
transferred automatically. By reviewing the message logs, See
“Managing Logs” on page 67. you can identify these special
rules or accounts and take the required action.
Porting Options
The porting process can be controlled with these options,
dependant on which options you select the delay in a user logging
on to the system and actually gaining access to their mailbox may
be slightly delayed.
• Include domain in logon - will pass the domain name as well
as the username to the system being ported from.
• Port every logon - provides a persistent porting mechanism,
i.e. every time the user logs on an attempt will be made to
fetch any fresh messages from the remote system. This is a
useful option while testing porting behaviour
• Archive ported messages - enabling this option will place all
ported messages into the days message log.
• Content scan messages - this option provides the option of
checking the incoming messages for spam and viruses. Useful if
the incumbent system did not provide protection, and as a
double check on the validity of messages.
Autoport technology is patented in the United Kingdom under patent
number GB2391649. A patent application has been filed in the United
States and is pending approval.
11.8 Allow LDAP directory services access to Address
Books
GMS provides a facility allowing user to access address books
stored on the GMS server from their email client. This means your
organization can have a shared address book containing the
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addresses of everyone in the organization that they can access
using their usual email client.
GMS allows two types of access - non-authenticated or
authenticated which can be controlled by configuring a system
variable.
By default GMS is configured to only allow authenticated access,
however certain email clients do not provide the ability to
authenticate, hence you may need to change this setting.
If you need to reconfigure the authentication settings go to
Support, Variables and select the variable LDAPAuth. Double click
on it to open it for editing, enter a value of 0 and press Enter. Click
the Save button to apply the change. If you wish to reconfigure
authenticated access the variable should be reset to the default
value of 1.
Allowing unauthenticated access will allow anyone with a valid email
address access to your address books therefore this option should be used
with caution.
Please see the GMS Users Guide for full instructions on setting up
LDAP directory access from the client perspective.
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12 Customisation
GMS provides options allowing you to change the look of the
various GMS interfaces. This section will explain the options
available.
12.1 WebMail Customisation
WebMail Professional and Express can be customized by enabling
the variable WebMailAllowCustomisation. The variable can be
enabled at system, domain and user levels in the following way. To
enable customisation for a single user select Domains & Users,
Domain, Username and then the Variables tab on the right of the
screen. To enable customisation for a domain select the Domains &
Users, Domain and then the Variables tab on the right of the
screen. To enable customisation for the entire system select the
Support, Variables tab. On the selected tab click on Add New and
enter WebMailAllowCustomisation in the Variable Name entry box,
then enter the required value in the Variable Value entry box based
on the bit map below and click on the Add button.
A user level variable overrides the domain setting and a domain setting will
override the system setting. This way you can give separate users and
domains different customization rights
Bit
Valu
e
Meaning
0
1
Allow WebMail Professional users to set colors and backgrounds.
1
2
Allow WebMail Express users to set custom colors.
2
4
Allow WebMail Express to use Cascading Style Sheets to alter the
look of the Express client.
3
8
Allow WebMail Express users to select a Cascading Style Sheet on a
per user basis. (Implies that Bit 2 is also set.)
Example: To allow WebMail Professional users to set colours and
backgrounds and WebMail Express users to set custom colours you
would set WebMailAllowCustomisation to a value of 3 (i.e. 1 + 2).
The GMS User Guide contains full instructions for users who have been
granted the permission to set colors and backgrounds.
12.2 Cascading Style Sheets
If you set WebMailAllowCustomisation so that cascading style
sheets can be used, a default style sheet is loaded when the user
logs in to WebMail Express. To change the colours and look of the
client you can create your own style sheet which will be used in
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place of the default one. Some example style sheets are included in
the Gordano Accessory Pack which can be downloaded from the
Gordano website http://www.gordano.com. If you extract the
contents of the Accessory Pack you will have a wxp.css file and
mozwxp.css file in the Gordano\MML directory. These are the
default style sheets that will be used by Internet Explorer and
Mozilla respectively. If you open these files in a text editor you will
see that they contain a lot of items for which you can change
styles, colours, sizes etc.
If you want to use more than one style sheet or a non-default style
sheet you will need to set a user, domain or system variable called
WXPCSSLinks. This variable defines a colon separated list of base
stylesheet names for example:
wxp.css:domain_level.css
This means the styles in wxp.css will be used unless they are
overridden by the contents of domain_level.css
Netscape 4 and earlier do not support Cascading Style Sheets. The default
look will be seen when accessing WebMail Express using a browser that
does not support style sheets.
Allowing User Selection of Style sheets
If you have enabled user selection of Style Sheets the user will be
presented with a list of styles to select from, assuming that you
have copied the style sheets from the Accessory Pack to the MML
directory on the GMS Server.
You can add your own Style Sheets to provide even greater choice
to the user. The name of the Style Sheet as displayed to the user
within WebMail Express is determined by the name of the CSS file.
For example if you name the CSS file to wxpGordano.css then
“Gordano” will be displayed in the drop down selector.
12.3 Product Logo
WebMail Express
You can define whether or not a logo is displayed in the top left of
the WebMail Express page by setting the user, domain or system
variable WXPShowProductLogo. By default this is set to 1 and the
logo is displayed. To hide the logo set this variable to 0 using the
User/Domain/System variables pages under the relevant pages of
the Administration GUI. You can also define custom logos in the
same way as for WebMail Professional (as explained below).
WebMail Professional
You can change the logo that is displayed in the top left of
WebMail Professional pages for example to use your corporate
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logo. This can be done from the domain and/or system levels
allowing you to specify different logos for each domain on your
system. The Domain level logo is defined on the Domains & Users,
Domain, Domain Information page of the administration interface.
The system level logo is defined on the System Administration,
General page of the administration interface. You can also specify a
URL that is launched in a new browser window when a user clicks
on the logo.
If you log on to the administration interface the default GMS logos are
used even if a custom logo has been defined.
12.4 Embedding WebMail Express into a website.
The WebMail Express client has been designed to allow you to
embed it into your existing website using HTML frames.
12.5 Custom logon and logoff pages
The Gordano Accessory pack contains a number of custom pages
which unpack into the gordano/mml/usr directory. These pages are
accessed via port 8888 by default. For example:
http://mail.companya.dom:8888
This will display a custom log on page. You can change the look of
this page by editing the following file:
gordano\mml\usr\logonscreen.mml
Or you can write your own page from scratch using MML. See the
MML Programmer’s Guide.
Additional variables
WebMailLogOffURL - This can be set at a user, domain or system
level and specifies the URL the user will be taken to when they click
on the Sign Off button in WebMail Express or Professional.
WebMailLogOnURL - This can be set at a user, domain or system
level and specifies the URL the user will be taken to when they have
been automatically logged off due to a session timeout.
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IP address and Port Flexibility
13 IP address and Port Flexibility
IP address and Port Flexibility offers a great deal of control over the
ports and IP addresses that the different services use. There are 3
types of connection handling methods available to you as described
below. They are configured from the System Administration,
Performance, Connections page of the interface. This section will
explain:
• Using all IP addresses
• Using specified IP addresses
• Using the IP connection file
13.1 Use only IP address
This is the simplest option to use, each full domain that you set up
will need to have an IP address available to it. All the GMS Services
will respond using the default ports and the IP addresses defined on
your network interface card and associated with the domain. There
is no configuration option available for this selection.
13.2 Use specified IP addresses
This is somewhat of a halfway house allowing a degree of flexibility
in the configuration of IP addresses and ports for services to
respond on. Each full domain that you set up will require a free IP
address on your system in order that the default options may be set
up for it, however once set up you may amend these options on a
per IP basis. Domains will only bind to the IP addresses that are
configured against them. This option also allows you to define on
an IP/Port basis what remote IP addresses are allowed to connect to
each of the services.
Configuration options
Having selected the Update button for this option you will see a
number of options displayed in a list box immediately below. If you
select an item from the list and double click on it you will be able to
alter Protocol, Port, IP address settings etc. for each service. The
options are described below:
Protocol
Each service can have a number of protocols associated with it, for
instance the POP service supports the protocols for POP3,
PASSWORD and FINGER. If you select the ANY option from the
dropdown you will not be able to run the protocols on nonstandard ports.
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IP Address
Enter the IP address or range that this service should respond on, if
you want the service to respond on a non standard port you can
indicate this by appending :port-number to the IP address, for
example if you wanted the SMTP service running on IP
123.123.123.123 to respond on port 75 rather than the standard
port 25 you would enter
123.123.123.123:75
Allow Local IP Addresses
Enabled by default, this option forces the use of the LocalIP setting
under System Administration, Security, Local IP to determine a
default set of IP addresses that are allowed to connect to the
service. This setting is cumulative with External IP.
External IP
The default setting for this entry is ANY, i.e. any remote IP address
may connect to the service. You can allow only certain IP addresses
to connect to the service or allow everyone and ban certain
addresses using the standard IP notations. If you want only a subset
of your IP addresses to be able to connect to the service then this
option should be changed and the IP range added using the usual
wildcard options.
13.3 Use IP Connection file
This third and final option provides full flexibility over how your
server is set up. You have complete control over which services
responds on which IP address and what port it listens on. It is not
necessary to have a free IP address on your system to add a second
or subsequent domain as each could share the same IP but listen on
different ports. Each time you set up a domain or enable an
additional service you will need to visit here to enable the
connections options for the domain. Services will only bind to the IP
addresses that are configured against them. This option also allows
you to define on an IP/Port basis what remote IP addresses are
allowed to connect to each of the services.
This option is a one way process once it has been selected it is not possible
to revert to the other options. If you add new domains you will need to visit
the System Administration, Performance, Connections page to configure
the connection options for that domain before the domain can be used.
Configuration options
Having selected the Update button for this option you will see a
number of options displayed in a list box immediately below. If you
select an item from the list and double click on it you will be able to
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alter Protocol, Port, IP address settings etc. for each service. The
options are described below:
Protocol
Each service can have a number of protocols associated with it, for
instance the POP service supports the protocols for POP3,
PASSWORD and FINGER. If you select the ANY option from the
dropdown you will not be able to run the protocols on nonstandard ports.
Domain
This option allows you to select the domain that you would like to
be associated with the service option you are currently editing. You
may select any domain from the drop down menu.
IP Address
Enter the IP address or range that this service should respond on, if
you want the service to respond on a non standard port you can
indicate this by appending :port-number to the IP address, for
example if you wanted the SMTP service running on IP
123.123.123.123 to respond on port 75 rather than the standard
port 25 you would enter
123.123.123.123:75
Allow Local IP Addresses
Enabled by default, this option forces the use of the LocalIP setting
under System Administration, Security, Local IP to determine a
default set of IP addresses that are allowed to connect to the
service. This setting is cumulative with External IP.
External IP
The default setting for this entry is ANY, i.e. any remote IP address
may connect to the service. You can allow only certain IP addresses
to connect to the service or allow everyone and ban certain
addresses using the standard IP notations. If you want only a subset
of your IP addresses to be able to connect to the service then this
option should be unchecked and the IP range added here using the
usual wildcard options.
13.4 Sockets
Be aware that there are a finite number of sockets available for
each service. The maximum number available for each service is
1000.
If you use the wildcard in the IP address field for a protocol this
means that the service will bind to all IP addresses on your network
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interface card on the standard port for that protocol, but the
advantage is that only one socket will be used to do so.
If you specify IP addresses individually for each protocol a socket
will be used for each. for example, if you have 10 IP addresses on
your network interface card and enable the 3 protocols under the
POP service for each of the IP addresses this will use a total of 30
sockets. if you enable only POP3 and FINGER protocols under the
POP service for each of the 10 IP addresses then this will use 20
sockets.
13.5 Adding and deleting a service
This option is not available with the Use only IP address option.
From the page which lists the current IP/Port settings there are a
number of buttons, including Add New and Delete.
The Add New button will allow you to select a service to be added
and go on to configure IP and Port options for that service. You
would typically need to do this if you had just added a new domain
or wanted to enable a new service under an existing domain.
The Delete button will permanently remove the selected service
from your machine. You can also click on Remove All to remove all
the entries, please use with great caution, or use Add Comment to
enter text reminding you what various settings are for.
Finally when you have completed working with the options on this
page you must click Save to commit you changes.
13.6 Adding a comment
This option allows you to insert comments into the list of current
settings to remind you what the settings are for. The comments are
marked with a # symbol. To add a comment in the middle of a list
select the line you would like the comment added above and then
click on the Add Comment button.
13.7 Default Ports used by GMS
The following ports are used by GMS.
Service
Port
WatchPort
22200
WWWPort
80
WWWProxyPort
8080
WWWAdminMMLPort
9000
WWWWebMailMMLPort
8888
WWWScriptMMLPort
8025
WWWSSLProxyPorts
443
PasswordPort
106
FingerPort
79
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Service
Port
IMAPPort
143
POPPort
110
SMTPPort
25
DNSPort
53
SSLPOPPort
995
SSLIMAPPort
993
IMPort
8367
MySQLPort
8306
CollaborationPort
8376
LDAPPort
389
SNMPPort
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Security
14 Security
This section is for all administrators. It describes:
• Some background information explaining why security is
important.
• The legal implications of poor security practices.
• Standard security precautions you can take. These include
setting passwords, using APOP logon, disabling relay and using
a Local IP list, imposing limits on RCPT clauses, bad commands
etc., and
• Iimposing various timeouts.
• The GMS Firewall product.
• Details of the GMS Anti-Spam and GMS Anti-Virus options.
14.1 Introduction
GMS is secure against attack by hackers, viruses, etc. It has full
logging (transaction and message logs) and configuration-saving
options to ensure against system failures.
GMS can use lookup to verify that the sending server is genuine. It
can also perform lookups on the To and From clauses to verify that
the sending server has valid MX records.
You can:
• Set the maximum number of sessions from one remote host to
prevent denial of service attacks.
• Set the maximum number of RCPT clauses an incoming
message can have.
• Make APOP logon mandatory.
• Disable mail relay (and specify the IP addresses of machines
allowed to claim they are from local domains).
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14.2 E-mail and Security
This section explains why security is important in e-mail systems.
Everything on the Internet is plain text
The very nature of the Internet, where large volumes of electronic
mail messages are routed through any number of SMTP servers en
route to their destinations, means that mail messages may be:
• Read
• Modified (including their source/destination information).
• Destroyed
• Duplicated
If you use encryption software, for which only you and the recipient
have keys, you can do something about the first two security risks.
However, there is little you can do about the last two except
request that the destination mail server sends a message to
acknowledge receipt of your message.
Also, it is possible to fake completely the From, To, Date and
Subject clauses. In fact the existence of e-mail is no proof that the
named person sent it. For example, e-mail from god@universe
could easily be sent by anyone with a fair knowledge of e-mail
systems. It has yet to be seen whether the existence of an e-mail
message can be considered acceptable evidence of an agreement
in a court of law.
The Troubleshooting section shows just how easy it is to fake a
message; see “Troubleshooting” on page 317.
GMS storage files
GMS stores all information in unencrypted files on the mail server
computer. This means that anyone with access to the server can
read (and perhaps modify) mail messages on it. This approach has
been taken because of the overheads associated with encryption
and decryption.
User mailboxes
Individual user mailboxes are ASCII text files that contain currently
undeleted mail messages.
Logging all throughput
When GMS has been requested to log all messages passing
through the server, all these messages are stored in plain text files.
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14.3 Legal Implications
This section explains why it is important to take security
precautions.
Spam
If another company receives large amounts of Unsolicited
Commercial E-mail (UCE) which is relayed from your server, this will
at the very least reflect badly on your reputation. It will probably
cause you to be added to various DNSBL (DNS based Black Lists)
lists etc. — for details, see “GMS Anti-Spam” on page 233.
Spam will also use a lot of your resources — network costs, disk
space, administration time, etc.
Viruses
An employee may receive a virus in an e-mail attachment and
unwittingly release it onto your network. It takes time and costs
money to eradicate this and, if it’s a Trojan Horse virus, it may
transmit company data to an external third party.
If another company receives e-mail relayed from your server which
contains a virus, this could put you in danger of legal action to
recover the costs of removing the virus from their systems.
Using footers as disclaimers
You can customise footers on all messages on a per-domain basis.
Such a footer could be a disclaimer, something like this: “The
contents of this e-mail do not reflect the opinions of Company X”.
Whether this would protect your company in court is debatable.
Acceptable use policies
The contents of employees’ e-mail messages can cause your
company legal problems. We recommend that you give all
employees a statement similar to the following to make their
obligations clear.
Gordano Ltd. accepts no responsibility for problems resulting from use of this
policy. Allow for your company’s specific circumstances and take legal advice.
•
•
All messages composed, sent or received on the internal or
external electronic mail system are and remain the property of
Company. They are not the private or confidential property of
any employee, contractor or agent.
Company retains the right to review, audit, intercept, access
and disclose any information created, received or sent via its email systems at any time without prior notice for any business
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•
•
•
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purpose. E-mails, like other hard copy or computer files, may be
exposed to disclosure and can be used as evidence in legal
proceedings.
Notwithstanding the company's right to retrieve and read any
e-mail messages, such messages must be treated as
confidential and accessed only by the intended recipient. No
one is authorized to retrieve or read any e-mail messages that
are not sent to them. Any exception to this policy must receive
prior approval from company management.
The e-mail system is not to be used to create or transmit any
offensive or disruptive messages. Among those that are
considered offensive are any messages which contain sexual
implications, racial slurs, or any other comment that offensively
addresses someone's age, race, gender, sexual orientation,
physical attributes, religious or political beliefs, national origin
or disability.
The e-mail system must not be used to solicit or proselytize for
commercial ventures, religious or political causes, outside
organizations, or other non-job-related solicitations.
The e-mail system shall not be used in violation of any or
another person's rights. Disparaging or libellous comments
must not be made nor may any copyrighted material be used
without proper authorization. Violations could result in liability
for the individual as well as the company.
14.4 Standard Security Precautions
This section describes ways to improve the security of your system.
Password policy
Passwords are encrypted in GMS’s database, but to improve
general security, try to force your users to follow these rules:
• Passwords must include a mix of letters and numbers. (GMS
passwords must be at least five characters long.)
• Passwords must not be common words, names, places etc.
A good technique for choosing passwords is to use two three letter
words separated by a number or symbol. For example, "cat8dog"
or "the4ton".
It’s up to you to decide whether you let users change their
passwords. If not, you can obviously implement the above rules
more easily.
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If you add many users at once and allocate them simple passwords
initially, ask them to change these as soon as possible.
GMS stores passwords in the Registry in an encrypted form (by default), or in
plain text (if you enter them manually). To comply with certain countries’
export controls, GMS uses a weak password encryption algorithm to store
passwords, so passwords can be encrypted and decrypted easily. Ensure that
your Registry and any copies of the passwords are not accessible by third parties.
To prevent dictionary attacks against user passwords, GMS
increases the time delay after each failed logon attempt in a
sequence. Initially this is for one second, but the period doubles
after each failed logon attempt. Users should not try to log on
during this denial period. If a user tries to log on during it they will
fail, even if they supply the correct password. This protection
applies to POP and IMAP and WWW logins.
Passwords cannot contain *
Password Expiry
GMS allows you to specify an expiry interval so that passwords have
to be changed on a regular basis. This is configured under Profiles
on the Access Rights page by entering a number in the “Passwords
expire every [x] days” area. You also have to specify and confirm a
password that the user’s password will default to when it expires.
This password should not be widely known and is designed to
allow an administrator to change the password for a user who can
no longer access their account because their password has expired.
Two advisory messages are sent to users as the password expiry date
approaches giving them the opportunity to change their password.
Restricting access to the Web server
GMS can be configured using a supported Web browser from
anywhere in the world. You will only want to give permission to do
this to selected administrators.
To give a user permission to do this:
1. Select the user’s profile in the new administration pages. See
“Profile Management” on page 99.
If you only want to grant one or two users this privilege you might want to
create a new profile just for them.
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2. Select the Access Rights tab for the Profile.
3. Select the “May configure software from anywhere” check
box.
4. Press the Update button.
By default the Web Configuration Server can be accessed by one of
the above users from any IP address. You can restrict access to it
further by specifying a single IP address, or a range of addresses, as
the only addresses from which it can be accessed.
To control access to Web Configuration Server:
1. Choose System Administration, Security, Access Control.
2. Click on Add New and type the IP address you want to add to
the permitted access list in the text area that appears and press
Enter then click on Save. Press the Update button to confirm
your changes.
Checking who is logged on
If you want to know who is logged on to GMS at any time, choose
System Administration, Security, Who. Press the Refresh button to
update the list. Highlight an entry and click Logoff to end that user
session.
Enabling or enforcing APOP logon
APOP encrypts passwords, making it more difficult for a hacker to
gain access to the system. You can enforce APOP logon but, if you
do, you must ensure that your users’ mail clients support this
protocol and that the users understand that they must use APOP.
Because of this, you may want to let your users choose whether or
not to use APOP.
Some mail clients do not support APOP.
APOP passwords cannot be used with NT SAM User Database accounts.
To configure use of APOP:
1. Choose System Administration, Security, Connections.
2. To enforce APOP, select the “Require all POP clients to use
APOP” check box.
3. To enable APOP but not enforce it, select the "Enable APOP
authentication" check box.
Disabling the Finger server and Password server
For security, you might want to disable the finger and/or password
servers.
To configure use of either server:
1. Choose System Administration, Security, Protocols.
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2. To disable the finger server, deselect the Allow Finger Server
check box. To enable it, select the box.
3. To disable the password server, deselect the Allow Password
Server check box. To enable it, select the box.
4. Press the Update button. Your changes will only take effect
after a system reboot.
Authenticated SMTP
If your server is secured from relay but you have roaming users who
must, for whatever reason, use your server to send mail via SMTP
you can enable authenticated SMTP by checking the "Allow
AUTH" option on the System Administration, Performance, ESMTP
page.
This will allow any user who successfuly authenticates against
SMTP using their pop username and password to relay mail
through your server.
This option is only supported by a limited number of mail clients.
Adding addresses to the Local IP list
The LocalIP setting is used in conjunction with the Anti Relay
options (see above) to determine which IP addresses are able to
send non-local mail through the mail server.
On installation GMS automatically attempts to recognise a Class C
IP address block based on the IP addresses attached to the network
card of the machine acting as the mail server. You may want to
amend this if, for example, you only have a partial Class C address
block or have more than one Class C address block.
For more information on address blocks, see "How do I enter IP
addresses?" in “Frequently-asked Questions” on page 333.
To add a local IP address:
1. Choose System Administration, Security, Local IP.
2. Click on Add New and type the IP address in the text area that
appears then press Enter. Once you have finished entering IP
addresses click on Save to commit your changes.
To remove an IP address, select it in the list and click on the Delete button. To
remove all IP addresses at once, click on the Remove All button.
Authenticated POP3/IMAP users
You can set up GMS Anti-Spam (if installed) so that successful POP/
IMAP logon from a non-local client adds that client to the list of IP
addresses who are allowed to relay mail through your server. This is
particularly useful if you have a number of roaming users but still
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want to maintain a strict anti-relay policy on your server. See
“Authenticate” on page 271.
Post Authentication
It is possible to have the post service authenticate to a remote
SMTP service (assuming that service supports the AUTH command).
To allow this to happen there are two things that you must do.
1. Enable the “Allow AUTH” option under System Administration,
Performance, ESMTP, Outgoing
2. Add an account and password that exists on the remote SMTP
server to the relevant entry on the System Administration,
Performance, Delivery Rules page.
This is really useful where mail is being sent through a remote
server that is on a different network.
Imposing limits
Setting limits on three parameters improves security:
• The number of RCPT clauses that will be accepted for any
message arriving at the SMTP server. If you have GMS AntiSpam installed this setting can be overridden on a per-domain
basis. The default setting is 100.
• The number of responses to a single command POST will
accept. When the POST service issues a command to a remote
host, this setting controls the maximum number of responses
to the command that the remote host can send. The default
setting is 100.
• The number of bad commands the server accepts over a
connection before it disconnects. This option affects all the
services except POST. It defines the maximum number of
unacceptable commands that can be sent from a remote host
before the service is automatically disconnected. The default
setting is 100.
To change any of these, choose System Administration, Security,
Commands, select the Limit option for the parameter and type the
new maximum. Press the Update button.
Imposing a WWW session timeout
WWW sessions are set to time out after a specific delay. The default
is 10 minutes and you should not extend this. If you do, this
increases the chance of an unauthorised user gaining access to an
administrator’s computer and accessing restricted areas while the
administrator is absent.
To reduce the timeout, choose System Administration, Security,
Connections and specify the WWW Session Timeout value in
minutes up to a maximum of 240. Press the Update button.
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Limiting sessions from a single host
You can limit the number of simultaneous SMTP, POP3, IMAP4 and
WWW sessions from one remote host (IP address) to prevent a
Denial of Service attack. To view the current settings, choose
System Administration, Security, Sessions to display this page:
The reasons for changing any of the parameters are as follows:
• Maximum SMTP Sessions from one remote host — specifies the
maximum number of simultaneous SMTP connections from a
remote host. Its default setting is to allow an unlimited number
of connections.
If you have problems with a single host taking up all the
available SMTP threads for a period of time, reduce the value.
Many servers will open a new thread for each message they are
sending, so if a remote host is sending 200 messages to your
server this could conceivably use up 200 threads for the period
that the messages are being transferred.
If you have many SMTP connections to your server from the
same IP address, increase the value. This happens if the
connections come through a proxy or firewall.
• Maximum POP3 Sessions from one remote host — specifies the
maximum number of simultaneous POP connections from a
remote host. The default setting is one, which helps prevent
denial of service attacks on POP, as normally you would only
expect a single connection from any one IP address.
If you have many users accessing your server from the same IP
address, increase the number. This happens if users connect
through a proxy or firewall.
• Maximum IMAP4 Sessions from one remote host — specifies
the maximum number of simultaneous IMAP connections from
a remote host. The default setting for this is 20.
Increase the figure if you have heavy users of IMAP and need
more than 20 simultaneous connections. Reduce the value
from 20 if you suspect that denial of service attacks are eating
up the available IMAP threads.
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Maximum WWW Sessions — Specifies the number of
simultaneous sessions available. This limit is implemented to
stop systems using too much memory. The value can be set
from 1 to 9999. Default is 1000. Each session requires that
memory is allocated for it, therefore the greater number of
sessions the greater amount of memory is required.
Make any required changes to the parameters, then press the
Update button.
Using service timeouts to stop denial of service attacks
Three types of service have a timeout period in seconds, after which
the connection is dropped if there is no activity. These are the
following:
• IMAP clients — the IMAP client inactivity timer value in
seconds. Reduce this if you experience problems with IMAP
threads being used.
• POP clients — the time in seconds the POP server gives POP
clients before automatically logging them off the system due to
inactivity.
Increase this if your users experience timeouts downloading
their mail (these are more likely if they get a lot of large mail
messages). If this is the case, your users should also increase the
timeouts in their client software.
Reducing the value helps prevent POP threads being used up
for long periods of time, so prevents denial of service attacks.
• SMTP — the time in seconds the SMTP server waits before
dropping a connection due to inactivity. You can increase this if
you get a lot of connections from really slow servers or clients,
but note that this does leave you open to denial of service
attacks.
To change a timeout from the default:
1. Choose System Administration, Security, Connections.
2. Type in the number of seconds for the parameter(s) you want
and press the Update button.
Changes will not take effect until the services have been stopped and then
restarted.
Disabling other functions
There are several other options you might want to disable for
security reasons. To change these:
1. Choose System Administration, Security, Control and disable
any of the following:
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Stop executing scripts — this stops users executing MML
scripts. By default this is selected — only change it if you
have a good reason to do so.
• Show Support menus — you can stop users from using the
Support options if you have a reason to do this.
• Allow direct editing of system variables — this enables the
System, Domains and User Variables pages. By default
these are unavailable and only enable them if you have a
good reason to do so.
• Allow Find — the Find button which lets users lookup other
users by name.
2. Press the Update button.
•
Protecting the SMTP STAT command
The SMTP STAT command shows statistics on the SMTP server
usage. To use it, log on to port 25 using telnet then type STAT. Data
shown includes the number of accounts on the system, server up
time, etc.
For security you should set a password to stop unauthorised use of
the command. A user then has to type STAT <password> to
obtain the statistics.
To set a password on STAT:
1. Choose System Information, Performance, Miscellaneous.
2. Under Stats password, select Password and type the password
into the text box.
3. Press the Update button.
Setting up Configuration Server session control
You can specify how sessions are to be recognised and maintained
in the Configuration Server, that is, whether to use cookies and/or
IP addresses.
To set up session control:
1. Choose System Administration, Security, Session Control.
2. Specify which of the following to use
• Use both Cookies and IP addresses — this is the default
setting. It looks at the IP address connecting to the server to
maintain session information, but also maintains a cookie
for the duration of the session so a second connection from
the same IP address will have no effect on the first user’s
session.
• Only use Cookies — this should also work well to maintain
session information provided of course that the user has
not disabled the use of cookies in their browser. If they
have, the logon will be refused.
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Only use IP addresses — take care when selecting this
option as a second connection from the same IP address
will override the settings of the first connection. This could
occur for example if your users connect through a proxy
server.
3. Press the Update button.
•
14.5 MX Backup
GMS Firewall server is a single user version of GMS. It can be
configured to act as an MX Backup server to ensure that you can
still accept mail if your main mail server is unavailable for any
reason. The mail is queued on the backup server until the main
server becomes available again, at which point it is automatically
forwarded to it. It delivers messages only to a server with a higher
priority MX record; the backup server itself must have a lower
priority MX record. For details, see “How is the Mail Server Found?”
on page 8.
14.6 Firewalls
GMS Firewall is a standalone product that can be used in
conjunction with another mail server to protect your network from
unauthorised access. It sits on a gateway machine and its main
function is to pass mail arriving from the Internet onto your internal
mail server and pass outbound mail out to the Internet. It also
provides a WWW proxy service so that your users can browse the
Web safely.
For details of how to set up a firewall, see “Configuring GMS as a
Firewall” on page 193.
14.7 Network Address Translation (NAT)
You may wish to use GMS with a firewall that employs Network
Address Translation (NAT). This allows you to hide internal IP
addresses from the outside world and means a larger number of IP
addresses are available to the internal network. There are a couple
of things to bear in mind when using NAT with a mail server
however. If an external ip address is translated to an internal IP
address or the IP of the firewall that is doing the translation, GMS
will see the connection as local and therefore allow relay for that
connection. To prevent this you will need to either
• Configure your NAT software not to translate incoming
addresses.
• Configure GMS to disallow relay for the address(es) that the
external addresses are translated to. This can be done from the
System Administration, Security, Local IP page by adding the
address to exclude in the format !123.123.123.123 where !
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means “not” and 123.123.123.123 is the address to be
excluded from the local IP range.
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Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
15 Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
GMS supports the use of Secure Sockets Layer for the transmission
of messages. SSL is a system which uses a private key on the server
to encrypt any data transmitted over the connection. To set up
GMS to use SSL requires you to have two things.
• an SSL key (available from sales@gordano.com)
• a separate encryption certificate for each domain that is to use
SSL. This can be a self generated certificate or a certificate
obtained from an external certificate authority such as VeriSign.
15.1 Entering the SSL activation key
Once you have received your SSL activation key from
sales@gordano.com enter it on the Licensing page following the
instructions sent with the key.
15.2 Assigning a certificate
There is a utility in the Gordano\bin directory called Keycert.exe
which should be run. This gives you three key options.
• Use existing certificate
• Generate CSR for submission to CA
• Generate Self-Signed Certificate for testing
CSR = Certificate Signing Request
CA = Certificate Authority
The following section explains how to use keycert.exe to set up a
certificate.
SSL Key Certificate Generator (keycert.exe)
This utility will allow you to apply existing SSL Certificates that you
may have obtained from external certificate authorities. You will
need to know the names of the key and certificate files and the
password associated with these files.
You may also generate a CSR for submission to an external
Certification Authority. If you are generating a certificate request
please take careful note of the filenames and password used as you
may need these at a later date.
If generating a Self Signed Certificate please set an encryption
strength by selecting the required number of bits to be used for the
key from the drop down menu. The higher the number of bits, the
more secure the key is. Also set a period in days that this certificate
should be valid for. This can range from 1 day through to a
maximum of 365 days.
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While there is nothing wrong with self signed certificates users will
receive a warning the first time they visit your server, they can then
add this certificate to the list of trusted certificates in their browser.
Certificate File Location
By default all certificate/key pairs are stored in the gordano\bin
directory, however you may if you wish specify a separate location
either by using the Browse buttons or simply typing in the path to
the files. By convention a key file has the extension .pem signifying
the type of encryption used in the file and a certificate request file
has the extension .csr
The names chosen for the key and certificate do not matter but
both should be given the same name, only the extension being
different, so that they are easily matched up if necessary in the
future.
Common Name
Every certificate has a common name associated with it. This is
normally the fully qualified name of the machine that the certificate
will be used on. i.e. host.domain.com
If you wish to use a single certificate to cover a number of sub
domains select the Use Default Certificate option. You may replace
the hostname portion with a wildcard of *, i.e. *.domain.com
Company Information
Your Company Information is a required part of any certificate as
they are required to accurately reflect the holder of the certificate.
Anyone connecting to your server will be able to see these details
so please make sure they are accurate.
Company Details
Again please fill out these details as accurately as possible, users
connecting to your server will use these details to contact you
regarding any queries they may have. For example, they want to
email or call you to verify the authenticity of the certificate prior to
accepting it. It is preferable that you also provide a contact name
and telephone number although these details may be omitted if
you so wish.
This information will be combined with the Common Name and
Company Information provided earlier to give your server a unique
identity. This unique identity is often referred to as the
Distinguished Name of a certificate.
Pass Phrase
If you are using an existing certificate the pass phrase entered must
match that already associated with the certificate.
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If you are creating a request to send to a Certifying Authority please
keep a careful note of the Pass Phrase entered, as once you receive
your certificate you will need to refer to it when applying the
certificate.
If you are creating a self signed certificate you may use whatever
Pass Phrase you wish.
Enter the Pass Phrase a second time into the Confirm box to ensure
that you have entered it correctly.
Press the Finish button to complete.
Make sure that you have entered your SSL key into GMS, stop and
restart the services and you should now have an SSL enabled server.
15.3 Configuring GMS to use SSL
Once the certificate has been set up correctly and the GMS services
restarted the next step is to tell GMS to start using SSL. The
following is required.
ESMTP settings
Go to System Administration, Performance, ESMTP and check the
“allow STARTTLS” option under both the Incoming and Outgoing
sections.
Setting the secure ports
Next you will need to go to the System Administration,
Performance, Ports page and check the ports that are used for
secure connections. The IMAP and POP ports are set to the
recognised ports for these services and should not be changed. The
other ports on this page can be set to any available port that you
wish. for instance you might set the WWW administration GUI SSL
port to 8001. This means you can then access the GMS
administration pages over a secure HTTPS connection for example
https://127.0.0.1:8001.
The WWW WebMail GUI SSL Port refers to the GMS WebMail
client. If set to 9001 connecting to https://127.0.0.1:9001 from the
server would display the WebMail login screen over a secure
connection.
The WWW User GUI SSL port refers to the custom GUI that can be
created in the Gordano\MML\usr directory.
All the port numbers you assign must be different and must not already be
in use by another application or service. For example you can’t set the
WWW User GUI SSL port to the same value as the WWW WebMail GUI SSL
port.
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You will need to stop and start the GMS services before any port changes
will come into effect.
Setting the POST SSL mode
If you want SSL to be used when messages are posted to the local
or remote servers you will need to configure the SSL mode on the
System Administration, Performance Delivery Rules page of the
interface. There are three settings:
• 0 - Don’t use SSL for this connection.
• 1 - SSL may be used for this connection if the remote server
supports it.
• 2 - SSL must be used for this connection.
You can specify different rules for different receiving servers. For
example if you only want SSL to be used for non- local mail you can
add a rule that sets an SSL mode of 0 for all local mail and set all
other rules to have an SSL mode of 2. This way all local mail would
be delivered over an SSL connection and any mail to other servers
would not be posted unless a secure connection to the remote
server is available.
Configuring clients
Once you have finished configuring the above all you need to do is
to configure your email clients to use SSL (if they support it). You
will need to consult your client documentation to determine how
this is done.
If you use GMS WebMail as your client no client configuration is necessary.
Just make sure the SSL mode is enabled on the Ports page above.
Restricting Weak Connections
GMS provides two methods of restricting connections that do not
support a sufficiently high enough cipher strength. Generally
speaking there will be no need to amend these settings at all but
certain industries have compliance requirements that must be met.
Standard Method
The standard RFC compliant method of restricting weak
connections is to initially accept all connections and then politely
decline to process any further requests if the negotiated connection
is not of a high enough strength. This can be set but selecting the
appropriate cipher strength from the drop down menu on the
System Administration, Security, Connections page. Any
connection not meeting the required strength will receive an error
in response to any requests made after SSL negotiation.
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Strict Method
For especially strict compliance regimes we also provide a method
of simply not accepting any SSL connections which do not match
your criteria at all. This requires the setting of a variable in the
registry containing a list of the particular ciphers you wish to
support. You will need to paste the appropriate string from those
provided below into the variable and then stop and restart the GMS
services.
Open regedt32 on the GMS server and navigate to
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\InternetShopper\Mail\SSL\ and
create a new string value called Ciphers. Paste the appropriate
string from below into it depending on the minimum strength you
wish to use. We would recommend the string supporting 128 bit
and above as there are a lot of servers that still use 128 bit
connections.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\InternetShopper\SSL
Type: Reg_SZ
Key name: Ciphers
String for medium and high support (128bit or above):
ADH-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:AES256SHA:ADH-AES128-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:DHE-DSS-AES128SHA:AES128-SHA:ADH-DES-CBC3-SHA:EDH-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:EDHDSS-DES-CBC3-SHA:DES-CBC3-SHA:DES-CBC3-MD5:ADH-RC4-MD5:IDEACBC-SHA:RC4-SHA:IDEA-CBC-MD5:RC2-CBC-MD5:RC4-MD5
For high only (256bit or above):
ADH-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:AES256SHA:ADH-AES128-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:DHE-DSS-AES128SHA:AES128-SHA:ADH-DES-CBC3-SHA:EDH-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:EDHDSS-DES-CBC3-SHA:DES-CBC3-SHA:DES-CBC3-MD5
Finally, you can produce your own list of SSL ciphers to use if you
wish by running the OpenSSL client on the GMS server. You can get
a list of high security cipher algorithms using the “OpenSSL ciphers
HIGH” command, medium ciphers using the “OpenSSL ciphers
MEDIUM” command etc. The strings provided above should work
on all GMS installations, but if you have any issues with
unsupported ciphers then the first step is to generate your own list
and replace the above string with your own list. If you want to use
both HIGH and MEDIUM you will need to concatenate the two lists
provided by the OpenSSL client.
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16 GMS on Complex Networks
There are many situations in which you may have to set up GMS
within a complex network of other mail servers. This section gives
an overview of setting up GMS on such a network. It describes:
• Configuring multiple SMTP hosts.
• Configuring GMS as an MX backup server.
• Installing GMS on a bastion host.
• Configuring GMS as a firewall.
• Configuring multiple servers sharing a domain — normal
forwarding and “round-robin”.
• Using multiple MX records.
16.1 Multiple SMTP Hosts
Where you have several mail servers networked together, GMS can
be set up to act as a distributor for all SMTP mail.
Imagine a company with three departments, Accounts, Sales and
Research, each with its own mail server. Although each department
wants its own mail server, all users in the company must have an
address of the form user@company.dom. Here is the setup:
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The three departmental servers are connected to a main server
which, in turn, is connected to the Internet.
This system can be configured in several ways but the best of these:
1. Stores all the user information on the main server, so there is
only one user database to maintain.
2. Sets up the Accounts, Sales and Research servers to forward all
mail to the main server. This is done by entering
main.company.dom in the Unknown User action box under
Domains & Users, Domain, Preferences.
3. Sets up a list of forwarding accounts on the main server so that
it knows which server to forward mail messages to.
Potential problems and their solution
This setup has two potential problems:
• If a user called Joe in Accounts sends mail to Harry in Sales, the
Accounts server has no user records and so forwards it to the
main server. The main server accepts the mail and finds that
Harry has a forward account to harry@sales.company.dom, so
sends it to him there.
• A user may give their extended e-mail address (for example,
harry@sales.company.dom), which could be incorrect for three
reasons:
• There is no MX record for sales.company.dom.
• The company does not want external organisations to
know their internal machine names.
• There is a firewall in place which only allows incoming
SMTP connections to the mail machine (that is, the main
server).
To resolve these problems, MX records should be set for
accounts.company.dom, sales.company.dom and
research.company.dom as mail.company.dom. If this is done:
1. Any incoming mail for harry@sales.company.dom is delivered to
mail.company.dom.
2. The main server forwards it to harry@sales.company.dom.
However, there is a problem since the MX record now points back
to the machine it just came from. To overcome this, you would have
to add entries for each to the Sending Rules. The rule for
sales.company.dom would look like this, for example:
SALES.COMPANY.DOM SALES.COMPANY.DOM 25 12
For more details, see “Configuring outbound delivery rules (Smart
Delivery)” on page 124.
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Multiple site setup
It is possible to set up a system where the research department is
actually at another site and its IP address is on the Internet. In this
case the forward account would send the mail back out of the
company, onto the Internet and to its final destination.
To do this:
1. Set up the research mail server to accept mail for
company.dom even though the IP address (and/or real domain
name) is not in the same domain as company.dom.
2. In the Sending Rules, enter the real domain name (for example,
research_co.dom), this being the domain to which mail will
actually be forwarded.
When users in the Research department send mail, it will be sent
out directly or, if it is internal mail to mail.company.dom, using the
Sending Rules. Here it will be forwarded to Sales or Accounts, as
before. All mail for the Research department would be delivered via
the main mail server, mail.company.dom.
16.2 Configuring GMS as an MX Backup Server
Configuring GMS as an MX Backup server is very straightforward.
Do the following:
1. Install GMS on the backup server.
2. During installation, enter the fully qualified name of the
machine as the domain that GMS should use. That is, enter
backup.domain.dom.
3. Make sure that backup.domain.dom is listed as a lower priority
MX record in your DNS configuration, which it would look
something like this:
domain.dom. MX 10 mail.domain.dom.
domain.dom. MX 20 backup.domain.dom.
Note the following:
• If mail.domain.dom is unreachable for whatever reason, all your
mail is sent to backup.domain.dom where it is held until
mail.domain.dom becomes available again. When this happens
all mail held on the backup server is automatically forwarded to
the main mail server.
• The GMS Firewall key only allows a single user to be added.
This is the postmaster account created at installation time,
which is necessary for configuration purposes.
• You can get a Firewall licence from sales@gordano.com. Simply
install the same version as you are running on your main server
on the backup server, obtain the key from sales and install it.
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16.3 Installing GMS on a Bastion Host
Installing GMS on a bastion host is very simple. A typical setup is
shown below:
In this example:
1. Configure the router only to allow SMTP connection from the
bastion host to the Internal mail server, and vice versa. No other
SMTP connections are allowed.
2. Give GMS your domain name (for example, company.dom) and
set it to send all mail for unknown users to the Internal mail
server.
3. Configure the internal mail server to send all outbound mail to
GMS on the bastion host, which will, in turn, deliver it through
the Internet.
The advantage of this configuration is that, if the Bastion host is
compromised, only mail that is external to the company can be
read. Also, as this mail was to be broadcast on the Internet in any
case, it should be already regarded as potentially insecure. Internal
company mail remains safe from access over the Internet behind
the firewall.
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16.4 Configuring GMS as a Firewall
The GMS Firewall package combines several mail servers by acting
as a company’s central e-mail distribution point.
Many companies will want to have a firewall between the Internet
and their internal network. The simplest way to do this is to use a
machine to stop traffic flowing from one network to the other, like
this:
To configure GMS as a firewall:
1. Install GMS on the server that is to act as a Firewall. This
machine should have two Network Cards installed on it, one
for the public side having a public IP address and one for the
private or internal side having a non-public IP address. Make
sure that IP forwarding is deselected on both cards.
2. During installation enter the name of the domain that GMS
should use, for example, domain.dom.
3. Make sure that domain.dom is listed as an MX record in your
DNS configuration. It should look something like this:
domain.dom. MX 10 firewall.domain.dom.
4. Point your Web browser at http://firewall.domain.dom:8000
and log in using the account postmaster@domain.dom and the
password you supplied during installation.
5. Change the Unknown User Action for domain.dom to send all
mail for unknown users to your internal mail server. The
internal mail server in turn must be configured to post all
external mail to firewall.domain.dom, which will in turn post it
all out to the Internet.
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You can get a Firewall licence from sales@gordano.com. Simply
install GMS as normal, obtain the key from sales and install it. You
are ready to start.
When installed in a Firewall configuration the GMS Server is able to protect
any internal messaging server. If that server supports LDAP lookup of user
accounts (as does GMS, MS Exchange, Lotus Notes/Domino etc. GMS Firewall
can authenticate the internal accounts and reject mail for unknown users.
Please see “LDAP authentication configuration” on page 75.
16.5 Multiple Servers Sharing a Domain
This section describes the different ways in which multiple servers
can be set up. You can check that any setup is OK by tracing e-mail
through the system, then work out whether a reply would be
returned correctly. If you have a requirement for multiple servers
across a single domain then you should also take a look at the load
sharing options available in GMS.
Normal forwarding
This is a simple setup when a company has just two mail servers. It
works as follows:
1. All mail for the domain is handled by one server, the main mail
server.
2. If a message arrives for a user for which the main server does
not have an account, it looks at the Unknown User Action
parameter.
3. The Unknown User Action on the main server is set to pass the
message to the second server.
4. The second server is in turn set to forward all mail to the main
server for onward posting. Its unknown user action should be
set to forward all mail for unknown users to a specific account.
Resource utilisation
You can specify Sending Rules which control how outgoing mail is
sent to particular domains. This information is held in the Post
Servers file, postservers.txt.
To change the sending rules, follow the procedure in “Configuring
outbound delivery rules (Smart Delivery)” on page 124.
The round-robin setup
The purpose of round-robin is to allow use of multiple SMTP servers
(with identical contents) in order to distribute the connection loads.
Round-robin is not random, though it appears to give a random
effect. It operates in a round-robin fashion (as the name implies), in
that it rotates the return record sequence by one for each response.
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One address is handed out, put at the end of the list, and then the
next one is handed out for the next translation request. This
procedure is similar to the behaviour of a translation list.
In round-robin DNS, a random IP address is returned with each
request if multiple entries exist in the DNS using A records. Roundrobin can only be achieved using A records, like this:
domain.dom. MX 10 server1.domain.dom.
server1.domain.dom. A 123.123.123.1
server1.domain.dom. A 123.123.123.2
The advantages of a round-robin setup are:
• Any Bind server that supports DNS round-robin can serve the A
records for any host. Your nameserver doesn't need to be
running on the host(s) where you want to run round-robin.
• You can take one of the server systems out of the loop for
maintenance. A simple removal at the nameserver level from
the round-robin list allows almost no apparent loss to the client
systems (except for those that cache).
The disadvantages of round-robin are:
• Possible confusion at the user level. When one system fails, it
appears to the user as intermittent failure because the service
seems intermittent. As a result, once connected, a user is less
likely to report a failure.
• It does not provide true load balancing.
• It does not automatically handle hosts that go down (manual
modification of DNS zone files and reloading of DNS is
required).
16.6 Using Multiple MX Records
All domain names set up to receive mail should have at least one
MX record in DNS. We recommend that your ISPs mail server is also
added in with a lower MX priority, so that if your server is
unavailable for some reason mail will be held on your ISPs server
until your own becomes available. A typical MX record might look
like this:
domain.dom. MX 10 server.domain.dom.
domain.dom. MX 20 server.isp.net.
This means that if anyone is sending you mail they should try
server.domain.dom first and, if they cannot connect to that, they
should send mail to server.isp.net to be held until the highest
priority server is available. The lower the number, the higher the
priority.
Each machine or server must also have an A record set in DNS
If you have more than one mail server and do not mind which one
mail is delivered to, you can set both to have the same priority but
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there is then no way of specifying which of the two you would
rather receive mail at. An example would be the following:
domain.dom. MX 10 server1.domain.dom.
domain.dom. MX 10 server2.domain.dom.
This is sometimes used erroneously in an attempt to set up a roundrobin system using MX records (see above).
The correct way to do this would be to set up MX as in the first
example above, but give server.domain.dom two A records set in
DNS. If you had sufficient mail servers available, you could also act
as your own backup MX as in the following example:
domain.dom. MX 10 server1.domain.dom.
domain.dom. MX 20 server2.domain.dom.
16.7 Load Sharing
If you run a single domain with a large number of users running
under it then you may want to consider using GMS’ load sharing
feature.
Load sharing allows you to split the load of your users across a
number of machines so that none of them are over worked. You
would normally only set it up through the GUI if you do not have
an existing installation of GMS, if you do have an existing
installation please take a look at the file loadshare.txt in the GMS
base directory.
If all machines in the load sharing array are fresh installations of
GMS then please read on.
Enable Load Sharing
Check the box to enable Load sharing or uncheck it to disable.
Primary Server Location
All servers in a load sharing array need to know the location of the
Primary Server in the array. There can only be one primary server in
each array, if it is to be the machine you are currently working on
simply select Local Server, if it is to be one of the other machines in
the array select Remote Server and enter the fully qualified name of
the remote server, i.e. server1.domain.dom.
Redirect WWW Requests
Select this option if you would like WWW requests initiated by
users to the wrong server to be automatically redirected to the
server that actually holds their user account.
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Logon Redirected WWW Requests
Used in conjunction with the Redirect option above this will, if
checked, allow them to be automatically logged on to the correct
server.
Maximum number of WWW redirects
This option is useful in the case where a user does not match any of
the load sharing rules of any of the servers in the array. if this is the
case it is possible for the redirect requests to loop round and round
all the servers continuously. If this option is enabled these loops will
be terminated once the number of loops specified here is reached.
Once you have set all of the options above you also need to go and
set the rules that will be applied to user redirection amongst the
servers in the Load Sharing array.
Rules
To set up the required rules for the Load Sharing array click on the
Edit Rules button. The rules can get fairly complex but once set up
there should be no need to change them. The rules set up here
determine how the server treats requests for users that are part of
the domain but are not local to this server. You need to enter a set
of rules for each of the other machines in the load sharing array.
For instance if the machine you are currently working on is called
main.domain.dom and the array consists of 3 servers then you
must enter rules here for the other 2 servers only.
The rules you set can use the expressions given in the table below
along with wildcards to determine which server deals with which
user. If each of the three servers were to deal with one third of the
users each depending on the first character of the user names,
main.domain.dom deals with users whose names begin with “a”
through to “h”, server1.domain.dom deals with those beginning
with “i” through “p”, and server2.domain.dom the remainder you
would end up with two rules on each server as follows
main.domain.dom
[i-p]*@domain.dom
[q-]*@domain.dom
server1.domain.dom
[-h]*@domain.dom
[q-]*@domain.dom
server2.domain.dom
[-h]*@domain.dom
[i-p]*@domain.dom
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server1.domain.dom
server2.domain.dom
main.domain.dom
server2.domain.dom
main.domain.dom
server1.domain.dom
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[abc]
[-m]
[m-]
[a-m]
[expression,
expression,...]
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matches exactly one of the characters "a", "b" or "c"
Matches exactly one character that is less than
or equal to "m"
Matches exactly one character that is greater than
or equal to "m"
matches exactly one character in the range
"a" to "m" inclusive
matches exactly one character in one of the expressions
listed where each expression is in one of the forms listed
above
No support will be available for matching multiple characters with
these range options. Note that no spaces are allowed in the range
specifications.
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Providing Web Access
17 Providing Web Access
This section describes how to use the Web proxy facilities of GMS
This section describes:
• The facilities GMS provides.
• How to set up the proxy Web server — its cache, the MIME
types it supports and its dial-up.
• How to configure Anti-Virus and Anti-Spam scanning on proxy
content.
17.1 Facilities Available
GMS Proxy provides the following features:
• Forward Proxy — allows GMS to sit on an office Internet
gateway and provide users’ two most important requirements
— delivery of Web pages and e-mail. This is ideal for use in a
dial-up system.
• Anti Virus and Anti Spam Content Scanning — used in
conjunction GMS Anti-Virus and GMS Anti-Spam the forward
proxy can be configured to provide complete protection from
malicious or undesirable web content.
• Reverse Proxy — allows GMS to provide boundary protection to
your existing web server. Allows your web server to sit behind a
firewall with the reverse proxy collecting the requested pages
and serving them to the requester.
• Web Page Caching — helps reduce your bandwidth
requirements by storing copies of frequently accessed files
locally.
• Compression — allows the proxy server to compress data to
enhance download times and reduce network bandwidth.
These features will be covered in detail in the subsequent sections
of this chapter.
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17.2 Configuring the Forward WWW Proxy Server
You configure the Web proxy server by selecting Services, Proxy
Server, Forward WWW from the menu. There are three main
elements to configure, the cache, authentication and MIME types.
Access to the WWW Proxy is limited to the IP addresses you have configured under System Administration, Security, Local IP. See “Adding addresses
to the Local IP list” on page 175.
Parameters
To display the parameters which control how the cache stores and
expires files, choose the Settings tab to display this page:
You can specify the following parameters:
• WWW Proxy port — this the port your users browser should be
configured to connect to, by default this is set to 8080 however
any available port can be used.
• Maximum page age — the time after which data is removed
from the cache.
• Page purge method — the means by which old pages are
expired from the cache, either by the date they were last
accessed (this is recommended) or by the date they were
cached.
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Cache size — the maximum size of cache held on your local
disk, in MB. If you have plenty of disk space, you may want to
increase this from the default.
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Cache
To view the cache contents, choose View Cache from the
secondary toolbar.
To purge the cache:
1. Choose Purge Cache from the secondary toolbar.
2. In the “Keep last.... hours” box, type the number of hours’
cache that you want to retain when you purge.
3. Select the Page purge method you want to use (see above for
details).
4. Press the Purge Now button.
Authentication
By default GMS Proxy limits access to users within the local IP
range, see “Allowing Relay” on page 152. GMS Proxy
Authentication allows you to provide additional control over who
can access the proxy by using the authentication options shown in
the screen shot above.
Authentication Method
• No authentication
• Authenticate from user database — this option will require the
user to enter their user account name and password when they
first access the Internet via the proxy. The password will only be
required on the first access, subsequent requests from the same
browser window will not require the password to be entered
again.
• Use fixed logon details — Enter a Username and password you
wish to be used by all of your users. As mentioned above these
will only be required on the first access, subsequent requests
from the same browser window will not require the password
to be entered again.
Authentication Type
• Basic — this option passes a base64 (Plain Text) encoded string
to the proxy server, that contains the user name and password.
Passing passwords in plain text is not a particularly secure
method therefore this option should be used with caution.
• Digest — Digest authentication is a challenge-response scheme
that challenges using a nonce (a server-specified data string)
value. A valid response contains a checksum of the user name,
the password, the given nonce value, the HTTP method, and
the requested Uniform Resource Identifier (URI). This method
provides greater security.
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Note: Digest authentication cannot be used if you have
configured your user authentication to use an external data
source, for instance NT Sam or SQL.
MIME types
The Web proxy server automatically recognises a number of MIME
(Multimedia Internet Message Exchange) file types. To list these,
choose the MIME Types tab.
To add a new type:
1. Choose the MIME Types tab to display this page:
2. To enter a new Mime Type click on Add New then type the
extension the type is known by (without the dot) and a
description (separate by a comma) in the text area that opens
then press Enter. For example, the extension might be “gif”
and the description “image/gif”.
3. Click the Save button to confirm the changes.
To remove a MIME type:
1. Choose the MIME Types tab.
2. Select the type in the list and click on the Delete button.
3. Click the Save button to confirm the changes.
To remove all MIME types click on the Remove All button.
1. Click the Save button to confirm the changes
The process of adding and removing entries can also be applied to other sections of this chapter.
Dial-up
You can configure the proxy dial-up parameters.
To configure dial-up:
1. Choose the Settings tab to display the page shown above:
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2. In the “Connect using” drop-down list, choose one of these:
• If psapi.dll is available and installed in the GMS directory,
select MyDialUpServer.
• If psapi.dll is not available and you need to initiate a RAS
dial-up to collect mail, select “Proxy custom dialup” then
press the Custom button. In the Schedule window which
appears, type the phone number and your ISP account
details.
• If you use a dial-on-demand router, select “Do not dialup”.
3. Press the Custom button if you need to set up account
parameters. Type in values and press Update to return to the
Dialup page.
4. In the “Retry using” drop-down list, choose one of the three
methods listed above as the method to use if the first attempt
fails. If you do not want to retry, select “Do not dialup”.
5. The “Disconnect delay” box shows how long the connection is
kept open for after sending and receiving of e-mail finishes. Do
not reduce this to zero.
6. Press the Update button to effect your changes.
17.3 Configuring the Forward FTP Proxy Parameters
There are only two configuration options for the FTP Proxy.
Enable Proxy Server
Check or uncheck the box to enable/disable access to proxying of
FTP connections.
Use FTP Shortcuts
Only used if proxying of ftp connections is enabled this option
allows much quicker access to FTP sites, but it may also lead to
more errors as there is no checking done for correct responses from
the remote FTP server.
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17.4 Configuring Forward SSL Proxy Parameters
Selecting this option allows SSL connections through the GMS
Proxy. This option is required if your users require access to SSL
sites.
By default SSL uses port 443, however you can configure any port
you wish to use. To edit the existing port double click on it, enter a
new port number and press Enter.
To add a new port click on Add New and enter a new port number
in the text area that opens then press Enter.
Click on Save to confirm your changes.
17.5 Configuring Forward Proxy Content Scanning
In conjunction with GMS Anti-Virus and GMS Anti-Spam the proxy
server can be configured to protect the network from malicious and
undesirable content. This is ideal if you allow users to browse the
Internet or access their own private WebMail accounts with
insecure providers, as it will protect your network from the risk of
these users downloading viruses to their workstations.
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Bypass sites.
This section allows you to specify sites you do not wish to be
scanned for viruses. This will reduce server workload if you have a
busy server and you are confident the sites are known to contain
safe content.
To add a site click on the Add New button then enter the full URL
(http://domain.com) and press Enter, repeat for each site. Click Save
to confirm your changes.
To ensure virus scanning is enabled please see “Virus Scanning” on
page 207.
Banned Sites
This section allows you to specify sites you wish to prevent users
from accessing via the proxy.
To add a site click on the Add New button then enter the full URL
(http://domain.com) and press Enter, repeat for each site. Click Save
to confirm your changes.
Note: Wilcards “*” can be used to specify all variants of a domain
name, for example http://*.yahoo.* will prevent access to any
Yahoo site
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Banned Requests
Banned requests allow you to specify attachment types you wish to
prevent your users from downloading via the proxy server.
• Use banned attachments list — Select this option if you wish to
use the existing banned attachments list you may have
configured within GMS Anti-Spam, see “Ban attachments” on
page 262.
Alternatively you can click on Add New and specify a file extension
then press Enter. Repeat for each extension you wish to add. Click
Save to confirm your changes.
Note: File extensions should be entered without the “*.” therefore
to ban “.exe” extensions you should enter “exe” only.
Banned Responses
Banned responses allows you to specify response or MIME types
that you do not want your users to access.
It is possible for a web server to provide a modified HTTP header,
thereby letting virus-infected content pass through the proxy by
disguising the true content type of the file being downloaded.
An example of a response type is:
application/msword
If a URL request returns a MIME-type that is in this list it will be
blocked. This is a good way of blocking inappropriate content such
as content streaming, movies or internet radio for example. It
would not be advisable to ban the MIME-type text/html or image/*.
• Use banned content type list — Select this option if you wish to
use the existing banned content type list you may have
configured within GMS Anti-Spam, see “Content Types” on
page 264.
Alternatively you can click on Add New and specify a content type
then press Enter. Repeat for each content type you wish to add.
Click Save to confirm your changes.
Note: The list must be in lower case.
Virus Scanning
GMS Proxy allows you to configure virus scanning upon the
content retrieved via the proxy.
This can provide you with security from viruses which may be
contained in web pages or from email content accessed via third
party WebMail servers.
• Enable Virus Scanning — This option is available if you have
installed and configured GMS Anti-Virus as your virus scanning
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product. Enabling will virus scan all inbound and outbound
traffic through the proxy server.
Allow partial content download — A potential exploit used by
the creators of viruses is to split files into segments to bypass
virus scanning. Once the files are downloaded and the file is
recompiled the virus is present, therefore it is advised this
option should remain de-selected to secure against this exploit.
Virus scanning of proxy content is configured under Services, Proxy
Server, Forward Proxy Content, Settings.
17.6 Configuring the Reverse WWW Proxy Server
GMS includes a Reverse Proxy server. Reverse proxy provides both
boundary protection to protect your web server and load sharing
when used in conjunction with other forward proxy servers.
The diagram shows how the process takes place when used as
boundary protection.
1. The user requests the required web page
2. The reverse proxy receives the request from the browser and
checks its Hosts table to ensure it is acting as a reverse proxy for
this site.
3. The reverse proxy requests the web page from the web server.
4. The reverse proxy returns the required page to the users
browser.
This process allows you to place the GMS server in a DMZ hence
protecting the web server from potential attacks.
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Parameters
To display the parameters which control how to activate the
reverse proxy and how the cache stores and expires files, choose
Services, Proxy Server, Reverse WWW, Settings to display this page:
The following options can be configured
• Enable reverse proxy server — Select this option to enable the
reverse proxy.
• WWW Reverse Proxy port — Enter the port you wish to accept
connections on for standard HTTP connections. This value is set
by default to port 81 to prevent port conflicts. You should
change this port to 80 if you are intending to receive HTTP
connections.
• WWW Reverse Proxy SSL port — Enter the port you wish to
accept connections on for SSL (HTTPS) connections. This value
is set by default to port 444 to prevent port conflicts. You
should change this port to 443 if you are intending to receive
SSL connections.
• Maximum page age — Specify the maximum proxy cache data
age in days
• Page Purge Method — Page purge allows you to specify if the
maximum page age is applied to:
• Date cached - The maximum page age will be calculated
from the date the file was originally cached.
• Date last used - The maximum page age will be calculated
from the date the file was last used.
• Maximum cache size — Enter the maximum proxy cache size in
MB, the default is 32 MB but if you have plenty of disk space
available you may want to increase this.
After changing any of these settings, click on the Update button to
enter the new values for immediate use. Or you can use the Set to
Default button to quickly return to the initial values.
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Cache
To view the cache contents, select the View Cache button in the
secondary toolbar.
To purge the cache:
1. Select the Purge Cache button in the secondary toolbar.
2. In the “Keep last.... hours” box, type the number of hours’
cache that you want to retain when you purge.
3. Select the Page purge method you want to use (see above for
details).
Press the Purge Now button.
Hosts
This section enables you to add, edit and remove sites you wish to
act as a reverse proxy for.
You must ensure the DNS records for the hostname are reconfigured to direct
requests to the Reverse Proxy server
To add a new host click on the Add New button which will open a
new dialogue displaying the page shown below.
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To add a host
• Hostname - Enter the fully qualified domain name for the
website you wish to act as a reverse proxy for. For example
www.gordano.com.
• IP address - Enter the IP address of the Web Server for this host.
• Port - Enter the port that connections should be made upon on
the destination web server.
• Security Type - This option specifies the type of connections
used between the reverse proxy and the host. There are three
connection options available:
• NONE - Uses standard HTTP connections providing no
security.
• ANY - Uses either TLS (SSL) or standard connections as
required.
• TLS - Uses TLS (SSL) only.
• Authentication Method - GMS Proxy provides three
authentication options, they are:
• NONE - This option allows any connection from a local IP
address to use the proxy.
• USER DATABASE - Selecting this option forces the user to
enter their user name and password to gain access to the
proxy server.
• FIXED LOGON - This option allows you to set a specific user
name and password that all users who wish to access the
proxy must use. Enter the user name and password you
wish your users to use in the text boxes and click Update to
confirm.
• URL - The URL authentication option is unique to the
reverse proxy and allows the password for a user to be
obtained from the response header clause from a specified
URL.
• Authentication Type - GMS Proxy provides two types of
authentication, they are:
• Basic - Basic authentication uses a base64 (Plain Text)
encoded string that contains the user name and password.
This is not a particularly secure method of passing a
Username and password.
• Digest - Digest authentication is a challenge-response
scheme that challenges using a nonce (a server-specified
data string) value. A valid response contains a checksum of
the user name, the password, the given nonce value, the
HTTP method, and the requested Uniform Resource
Identifier (URI). This method provides greater security.
Note: If you are using an external user authentication method
such as NT Sam or SQL authentication you must select Basic.
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•
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Username - Enter the Username if you have specified the Fixed
logon authentication method above.
Password - Enter the password if you have specified the Fixed
logon authentication method above.
URL - Enter the URL for the page the authentication request
should be sent to.
Click the Save button to confirm your settings or click the Cancel
button return to the host listing.
To edit a host double click on the entry you wish to edit where the
entries explained above can be edited.
To delete an entry, highlight the required record and click on the
Delete button to permanently remove the entry or the Remove All
button to delete them all.
17.7 Configuring Proxy Compression
Both the GMS forward and reverse proxy servers will support
compression of pages into cache to accelerate download times
upon a cache hit. These pages are decompressed and displayed by
the browser in their original form once requested.
Requests
The Request section provides a list of file extensions for which a
compressed version of the page should be created and served from
the cache where possible.
If you wish to add specific files for the proxy server, click on Add
New and enter the attachment type, ensuring that you enter the
letters only, for example PDF, in the text area. To remove an entry
highlight it in the list and click the Delete button. All entries can be
removed at once by clicking the Remove All button. Click the Save
button to save any changes.
Some file types are already compressed such as jpg and gif,
therefore there will be no benefit in adding those to the list.
Wildcards are supported.
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By default this list is empty. To return to the default setting click the
Set to Default button..
Certain file types such as “js” (JavaScript) and “css” (Cascading Style Sheets)
can cause problems with specific browsers therefore it is not advisable to
add these to the list.
Responses
The Responses tab provides a list of MIME types for which a
compressed version of the page should be created and served from
the cache where possible.
If you wish to add specific MIME types for the proxy server, click on
the Add New button then enter the MIME type in the text area
provided and press Enter, an example response type is:
application/msword
Click the Save button to save any changes.
Wildcards are supported.
This list will contain text/* by default.
Bypass Requests
The Bypass Requests tab provides a list of file extensions for which
page compression should be bypassed.
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If you wish to add specific files for the proxy server, click on Add
New and enter the attachment type in the text area, ensuring that
you enter the letters only, for example pdf, and press Enter. To
remove an entry highlight it in the list and click the Delete button.
All entries can be removed at once by clicking the Remove All
button. Click the Save button to save any changes.
Wildcards are supported.
This list is empty by default and takes precedence over the
Compressible Request File Extensions list, see “Requests” on
page 212.
Bypass Responses
The Bypass Responses tab provides a list of MIME types for which
page compression should be bypassed.
If you wish to add specific MIME types for the proxy server, click on
Add New and enter the MIME type, for example application/
msword , in the text area and press Enter. To remove an entry
highlight it in the list and click the Delete button. All entries can be
removed at once by clicking the Remove All button. Click the Save
button to save any changes.
Wildcards are supported.
This list will contain text/* by default as some browsers do not
correctly handle this when compressed. This list takes precedence
over the Compressible Response MIME Types list.
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E-mail Clients
18 E-mail Clients
This section aims to help system or domain administrators who may
set up mail clients for their users. It is not a substitute for the mail
clients’ own documentation.
This section:
• Describes the password server.
• Describes advantages and disadvantages of POP3, IMAP4 and
Web browser clients.
• Gives some hints on how to set up some common POP3 and
IMAP4 mail clients. For more detailed information, refer to the
documentation that comes with the mail client.
• Explains the valid formats for account names in virtual and full
domains.
Examples in this section use the following information:
• Mail Server Name — mail.company1.dom.
• Mail Domain — company1.dom.
• Account Name — user.
• Account Holder’s name — Joe Bright.
Please see the GMS Users Guide for instructions on setting up
Microsoft Outlook to work with the GMS Collaboration Server.
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18.1 POP3, IMAP4 or Web Browser?
GMS Mail lets you access your e-mail using any one or all of these
options (for an introduction, see “Methods of Collecting E-mail” on
page 12). To help you choose the best solution, the following table
lists the main advantages and disadvantages of each method of
reading e-mail:
Metho
d
Advantages
Disadvantages
POP3
•
•
Many mail clients to
choose from.
•
•
•
•
•
•
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All mail stored on PCs, making
backup difficult.
Software maintenance cost high
(installed on every PC).
More than one vendor required for
mail solution (separate server and
client).
Mail can only be read from one location.
Availability of additional clients may
cause user to install their own software, increasing help desk costs.
Hot-desking not possible.
May need to increase disk size on
many machines to cope with mail.
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Metho
d
Advantages
Disadvantages
IMAP4
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Web
Browser
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Some mail clients to
choose from.
All mail stored on central
server, making backup
easy.
Mail can be read from
many locations although software needs
configuring at each location independently.
Users can share mailbox.
•
•
•
•
Hot-desking possible.
Software maintenance cost high
(installed on every PC).
IMAP4 standard is still undergoing
rapid changes.
More than one vendor required for
mail solution (separate server and
client).
Server requires enough disk space
for all e-mail to be stored.
Availability of additional clients may
cause user to install their own software, increasing help desk costs.
Only one machine
upgrade required to
increase mail storage
capacity.
No software on PCs
other than Web browser
— reduces maintenance
costs.
All mail stored on central
server making backup
easy.
Solution from one vendor reduces risk.
Mail can be read from
any location.
Consistent interface
reduces user help desk
costs.
Hot-desking possible.
•
•
One interface available.
Server requires enough disk space
for all e-mail to be stored.
Only one machine
upgrade required to
increase mail storage
capacity.
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18.2 Thunderbird
This section gives tips on setting up the Mozilla Thunderbird Mail
client to work with your server.
If you are installing Thunderbird for the first time you will be asked
for your account information during the installation process. You
should use the same information as provided here although you
will still need to complete the following steps to finalise the setting
up of your account.
Open Thunderbird and choose Tools, Account Settings from the
main menu. Under Account Action at the bottom left of the screen
choose Add Mail Account. This will open a new dialogue allowing
you to enter the details of the account you wish to add as follows:
• Your Name — enter the name you wish to be known as.
• Email Address — enter the email address of the account on
the GMS server.
• Password — enter the password for the new above
account, and check the Remember Password option.
Once you have completed the above details click on the Continue
button.
Thunderbird will now try and auto detect your server settings using
it’s own database or via DNS lookups. If it fails to find them you can
use the Manual Config option to enter them yourself or you to
change the default settings but this should not be necessary. If you
have multiple accounts on the same server it is best to just use a
single outgoing SMTP server.
You should be given the option of using IMAP or POP for mail
collection, we recommend the use of IMAP as this will maintain
your mailbox on the server and allow access via WebMail if you do
not have your mail client to hand. It also allows access to the
account from multiple devices such as smart phones. If you opt for
POP messages will be removed from the server and not accessible
from other clients or devices.
Once the account is created you should select it and see your inbox
being populated. You may need to right click on your account in
the tree on the left and select Subscribe to access any additional
folders that exist on your account in addition to the standard IMAP
folders.
There are a number of additional settings you can change for your
account to ensure Thunderbird operates in the way you would like.
To access these select Tools, Account Settings again.
• Account — allows you to change your account name, your
own name, set signatures, Outgoing Mail Server and so on.
• Server Settings — contains most of the important information
relating to the operation of your account, security levels, how
messages are handled etc..
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•
•
•
•
•
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Copies & Folders — Covers options for saving sent mail,
automated copying of replied to another account, Archiving of
messages etc.
Composition & Addressing — options relating to writing and
addressing messages including use of additional address books.
Junk Settings — determines how messages that Thunderbird
thinks are spam are handled.
Synchronisation & Storage — determines whether messages
are also stored locally, this is useful if you have to work offline
at any time. Also provides various options for minimising disk
space usage.
Return Receipts — various options for handling return receipts.
From a security perspective it is not a good idea to enable
automated responses to incoming messages as this can be used
to confirm your address thereby making you more valuable to
spammers.
Security — allows for digital signing and encryption of
messages.
Additional Features
Thunderbird has a number of advantages over other third party
mail clients especially if you have the GMS Collaboration option
enabled on your server.
• It can integrate with GMS address books via LDAP
• It can integrate with GMS calendars by using the Lightning
calendar plug-in
Usage of both of these are described more fully in the GMS User
Guide.
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18.3 Microsoft Office Outlook Setup
Microsoft Outlook is part of MS Office. Be sure to install the latest
patches from Microsoft.
To set Outlook up:
1. Go to Start > Control Panel and select the Mail Applet (You
may need to alter the view to small/large icons)
2. A small window with some options will appear, click on Show
Profiles
3. Click Add... in the profile window
4. Name your profile and click OK.
5. Click on Manual Setup or additional server types and click next
6. Select POP or IMAP and click next
7. Do the following:
• Type your name as you wish it to appear in the Full name
field, in our example this is “Joe Bright”.
• Type your e-mail address, “usera@company1.dom”, in the
field e-mail address.
• Type your account name — your POP/IMAP Username
(usera).
• Type your password in the Password field.
• Press Advanced Options, enter the SMTP server
“mail.company1.dom” and press OK.
• Check that the Internet Mail server is your assigned IMAP/
POP server.
8. Press OK twice.
9. All other settings are preferences. If you were missing any
components like Internet mail, see the startup and component
section.
18.4 MS Outlook Express Setup
MS Outlook Express is part of the Internet Explorer installation. Be
sure to install the latest patches from Microsoft.
To set Outlook Express up:
1. Start the MS Outlook Express program.
2. Press Tools on the menu bar and then the Accounts option.
3. Click the tab labelled Mail.
4. If you do not have any Mail Accounts listed press the Add
button and choose Mail. (If your account is already listed go to
step 5). The Add wizard settings are as follows:
• Enter your name as you would like it to appear in the Name
field, that is “Joe Bright”, and press the Next button.
• Enter your e-mail address, “usera@company1.dom”, and
press the Next button.
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Choose POP3 for the option 'My incoming mail server is.' In
the “Incoming Mail (POP3 or IMAP) Server” field, enter
your POP server “mail.company1.dom” 

In the “Outgoing Mail (SMTP) Server” field, enter your
SMTP server, again “mail.company1.dom”. Press the Next
button.
• Choose the option Log on using: and enter your POP
Username in the POP account field and your login
Password. Press the Next button.
• Type the name you want for the account name, “Joe
Bright”, and press the Next button.
• Choose the Connect option you want to connect to the
Internet using and press the Next button.
• Press the Next button, then press Finish.
5. To access your mail settings without using the Setup wizard:
• Highlight your existing account name and choose
Properties.
• Under the General tab enter your Name (“Joe Bright”) and
Organization. For both E-mail address and Reply address,
type “usera@company1.dom”.
• Click the Servers tab and verify the following:
• Enter your SMTP server, “mail.company1.dom”, in the
Outgoing Mail (SMTP) field.
• Enter your POP server, “mail.company1.dom”, in the
Incoming Mail (POP3) field.
• Choose the option Log on using.
• Enter your POP Username, “usera”, in the Account field.
• Enter your password in the Password field.
• Click the Connection tab and specify you preferred means
of connecting to the Internet.
• Do not modify the Security tab settings.
• Click Advanced Options and leave the port numbers at their
default (110 for POP and 25 for SMTP). Do not check
“Leave copy of messages on server” or your mailbox may
fill up.
• The rest of the Advanced options are preferences so press
OK for these.
•
18.5 Mobile Device Mail Clients
There are many different types of mobile clients and most of them
will contain a mail client, and will also allow you to install third
party mail clients via the relevant app store. For the purposes of this
user guide we will outline how to set up the default mail client that
ships with Android 4.0 otherwise known as Ice Cream Sandwich.
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To begin configuring the mail client open Apps and then select the
Email app. The first time you open the App you will be presented
with a screen allowing you to configure the account it should work
with.
Enter the fully qualified account name and the password associated
with that account. This will normally be the same information you
enter in your normal desktop client. Once entered click on Next at
the bottom of the screen and then select “IMAP account” from the
following screen.
If you will also access this account from another device or client be sure to
not select “POP3 account” as the POP protocol will remove the messages
from the server and thus they will be unavailable to the other client.
This will open a further screen allowing you to continue configuring
the IMAP settings as follows:
• Username - the domain portion of the account you entered
previously will have been removed. Please re-instate it so the
entry looks like username@domain.name
• Password - there should be no need to change this
• IMAP Server - this will have defaulted to imap.domain.name.
If this is not correct you will need to change it, your System
Administrator will be able to advise you, or simply copy the
settings in your desktop client.
• Security type - If your email provider supports it we would
recommend using SSL security, and as you know where you are
connecting to that you do not worry unduly about the type of
certificate. Select the option “SSL (Accept all certificates)”.
• Port - this will depend on your choice for the security type
above. The standard IMAP port of 143 should be used for all of
the options other than SSL, for which you should use a port of
993
• IMAP path prefix - please leave this blank unless you are
advised otherwise by your system administrator
When complete click on Next to continue setting up the account
by configuring the SMTP settings as follows:
• SMTP server - this will have defaulted to mail.domain.name. If
this is not correct you will need to change it, your System
Administrator will be able to advise you, or simply copy the
settings in your desktop client.
• Security type - If your email provider supports it we would
recommend using SSL security, and as you know where you are
connecting to that you do not worry unduly about the type of
certificate. Select the option “SSL (Accept all certificates)”.
• Port - this will depend on your choice for the security type
above. The standard IMAP port of 143 should be used for all of
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the options other than SSL, for which you should use a port of
993
Require sign-in - as you are using a mobile device it is highly
unlikely you will be connecting from a known IP address,
therefore you will likely fail a lot of the security checks on the
mail server. Selecting this option allows authentication to the
server allowing you to be treated as if you were on a local client
• Username - the fully qualified username to authenticate
with. Normally your email address
• Password - the password for the above account
When complete click Next to continue setting up the account
options as follows
• Email check frequency - select the desired frequency from the
drop down. The more frequent the check the greater the
impact on your battery life
• Sync Email - selecting this option will ensure that your mobile
device and the account on the server are kept synchronised
with each other
• Notify me when email arrives - if selected your mobile
device will notify you when a new email is available, so there is
no need to keep checking your device
• Automatically download attachments when connected to
WiFi - some attachments can be very large, and some WiFi
connections very slow. Unless you are confident in the speed of
your WiFi connection we would recommend that you leave this
option unchecked. Attachments will then only be downloaded
when you request them.
When complete click Next to open the final screen where you can
name the account and provide your personal details.
• Give this account a name (Optional) - if you are setting up
multiple accounts on the mobile device it is important to give
them names allowing you to distinguish between them. This
can be anything you like as it is not used anywhere else
• Your name (displayed on outgoing messages) - This is the
name that will appear in the From field of any messages you
send from the device. If you also use a desktop mail client then
it would normally be the same name as you have set there
Finally click on Done. The email account is now set up and ready
for use. It will automatically connect to your server and obtain an
up to date copy of all email in your inbox. Further connections will
depend on the Email check frequency you set above.
If you use a third party mail client the process for setting it up will be very
similar to the above. If this client supports the IMAP IDLE command we
would recommend using this over setting a frequency to check for new
email, it is much lighter on resources and you will get immediate
notification on the arrival of new email.
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18.6 Virtual domain users
If you are setting up a client for a user who is in a virtual domain
you can specify their account name in three ways as below:
1. username@virtual.dom
2. username.postfix
3. username.postfix@full.dom
This is different to normal domains where the account name takes
one of the following forms:
1. username@full.dom
2. username
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SMS and Pager Gateway
19 SMS and Pager Gateway
The SMS (Short Message Service) gateway is a service for sending
short text messages to mobile phones. The pager gateway provides
the ability to send messages to specified pagers and also to receive
messages from SMS devices directly into an email account, this is
often referred to as 2-Way SMS.
The SMS Gateway provides a gateway from your server to a SMS
broker, who will forward these messages to their specified
destination.
GMS allows you to configure this option in two different ways
depending upon the software licenses you have.
This section provides information on:
• Enabling the DLL (GMS Mail)
• Choosing the gateway to use (GMS WebMail)
• Allowing users access to SMS
Before you can configure the SMS Gateway you will require an active account
with an SMS broker.
The process to configure the pager gateway is identical to the
configuration of the SMS gateway, therefore the latter is described
here only.
19.1 GMS Mail configuration
Enabling the DLL
Before the SMS Gateway can be configured it must be assigned to
a mail account. The following stages provide details on how the
SMS Gateway is enabled.
• Create the user account
Go to Domains & Users, Domain and select New User from the
secondary toolbar, enter a username and password for the
account you are creating. Click Add
• Select the DLL
Select the user you just created under the domain and then the
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Mail Processing tab and from the “Select DLL” drop down list
select SMS Gateway. Click Configure
•
Configuring the DLL
To configure the SMS Gateway you must have a valid account
with an SMS broker. A list of suggested brokers is available in
the “Gateway” select box.
• Via Phone Number - Select this option to restrict all SMS
messages to a single specified phone.
• Via Access File - Select this option and click “Edit Access File
to configure rules on which phones receive messages from
specified users. “Editing the access file” on page 227
• Gateway - Select the gateway for the broker you are using.
• Username - Enter the username for the account with the
selected broker
• Password - Enter the password for the account with the
selected broker
By default the access file will allow messages to be sent by any user to any
phone. You can control access to use the gateway via profiles to restrict
usage.
•
Click Update to confirm the settings.
The SMS DLL is now configured.
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Editing the access file
Rules can be configured to specify which users can use the SMS dll
and which mobile phones their messages are sent to.
Access - Select this option to activate a rule
Email address - enter the message originators email address here.
You may use the * wildcard if required.
Telephone - Enter the specific number the SMS messages should be
sent to for the specified email address. You may use the * wildcard
if required.
Cost Group - If you wish to track SMS usage you can enter a cost
group value here, searching the log files will show cost groups and
enable usage to be calculated.
The rule shown in the example would allow any user to send a message to
any mobile phone.
Sending Messages
If the broker you have selected is situated in a different country to the
server, you may need to specify an International dialling code in any
telephone numbers you specify in messages. Your broker will be able to
provide you with additional details of International dialling codes you may
require.
To send an SMS message using the account above a user would
send an email message to:
<accountname>.<mobile number>@<domainname>
For example:
sms.07777111111@company.dom
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19.2 GMS WebMail configuration
Enabling the Outbound SMS Gateway
Please select Services, SMS from the menu then the Outbound tab
on the right of the page.
Gateway - Select the broker from the drop down box that you
have configured an account with.
Username - Enter the username of your account with the SMS
broker.
Password - Enter the password provided by the SMS broker.
International dialling code - In many instances the broker may
be situated in a different country to the location of the server, if an
international access code is required enter it here.
National trunk prefix - Enter a number here if your messages
need to be sent to a specific range of numbers specific to a single
phone network.
Your broker will be able to provide you with additional details of International
dialling codes and national trunk prefixes to use.
Enabling the Inbound SMS Gateway
The setup for this is identical to the Outbound Gateway. You will
normally also need to have a SIM card hosted with your SMS
provider as well.
Allowed IPs
The Allowed IPs option is designed to contain a list of IP addresses
that are allowed to send you inbound SMS messages. If no
addresses are added then anyone will be able to send you SMS
messages. As SMS messages arrive on the server via the HTTP
protocol you may wish to restrict this to only the IP range used by
your SMS service provider to prevent unwanted SMS messages.
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Edit Numbers
It is necessary to associate each SMS number you have with a
particular email address on your server so that the server knows
where to send inbound SMS messages. Clicking the Edit Numbers
button will allow you to configure this. Click Update to confirm the
settings.
Sending messages
Users can send messages to mobile phones in the same way in
which they send an email. Clicking the compose icon in GMS
WebMail will open a compose window. If they select the “SMS”
icon the window will change to a SMS format and the user can
enter a mobile number and compose their message. See
“Composing a SMS Message” on page 26 of the GMS User Guide
for further details.
19.3 Allowing users access to SMS
Access to use the SMS Gateway is controlled by profiles assigned to
the user or users. Amending these profiles can permit or deny the
user the ability to send SMS messages. See “Mobile Gateway
(requires GMS SMS/Pager Gateway)” on page 106 for further
details.
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GMS Instant Messaging
20 GMS Instant Messaging
GMS offers an Instant Messaging (IM) component that allows your
users to have real time text conversations with other users on your
email system. Depending on user and profile settings IM also allows
users to see and offer presence information including whether they
are busy, in a meeting, in the office, at home etc. They can also
configure their preferred contact method when not online, for
example by email or cell phone.
This chapter explains the configuration options that are available
for administrators of IM. For user level options please see the GMS
Users Guide.
20.1 Installing GMS Instant Messaging
If you installed all products when GMS was first installed on your
server you will not need to install any additional software to
activate GMS Instant Messaging. You can determine if the product
is installed by clicking on Licensing in the left hand menu tree.
This will display the products installed and the date upon which the
license keys will expire.
Installing the software
GMS Instant Messaging can be installed by running the
downloaded GMS installation program. See “Installation” on
page 19 for further details.
If you already have some GMS components installed you will need a valid
maintenance (upgrade) key before you can install GMS Instant Messaging.
Activating Instant Messaging
Once you have confirmed the software is installed upon your
system you can enter the product license key, restart the GMS
services and the product will become active.
20.2 Profile options - Access to Instant Messaging
There are a number of IM privileges that administrators can grant
to users via profiles. For example users will not be able to use IM
unless they are assigned to a profile that permits them to use it. For
detailed information on profile options see “Privileges - setting user
privileges” on page 103.
20.3 Setting the Instant Messaging port
By default Instant Messaging uses port 8367. If this causes a
conflict on the server or you would like to change this
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configuration to a different port you can amend this value by going
to System Administration, Performance, Ports and changing the
value for IM Port to the port number desired.
You will need to stop and restart the service for the new port to be recognised.
20.4 Logging Instant Messages
GMS provides the facility to record all conversations conducted
through the IM interface.You can configure instant message
logging by selecting the domain from the drop down then going to
Domain Administration, Logging in the menu. See “Managing
Logs” on page 67.
20.5 Location Map
When logging in to IM a user’s IP address can be mapped to a
specified location and displayed when the mouse cursor is placed
over the user’s name in the IM window. This location map is
configured from within the GMS Administration GUI. Once you
have logged on as an administrator open Services, Instant
Messaging in the left hand menu. This will display a dialog listing
the current mappings
From the above example if the user Jack logs on to IM from the
machine with IP 10.10.10.1 and he has allowed his presence
information to be displayed, other IM users will be able to see that
Jack is currently in the sales office by hovering their mouse over
Jack’s name in their list of contacts.
To add new mappings click on the Add New button. To edit an
existing entry double click on an entry in the list and make your
changes then press Enter. In a similar way to delete an entry select
it in the list and click on Delete. Click on Save to confirm your
changes.
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GMS Anti-Spam
21 GMS Anti-Spam
21.1 Concepts
This section:
• Defines Unsolicited Commercial E-mail (UCE).
• Explains why UCE is a problem.
• Explains how GMS Anti-Spam and the GMS Anti Spam Update
Service allows spam to be kept to a minimum.
What is UCE?
UCE is e-mail delivered over the Internet to someone who has not
asked for it and does not want it. This unsolicited mail is usually
commercial, hence the term Unsolicited Commercial E-mail. It is
sometimes referred to as Unsolicited Bulk E-mail (UBE) and more
commonly referred to as Spam. The person who sends UCE is often
termed a Spammer.
UCE imposes three types of cost on its recipient:
• Each message sent over the network consumes bandwidth.
• Each message is either stored locally or “bounced” back to
the sender, taking up storage space and even more
bandwidth.
• Each recipient is forced to spend time dealing with the
message. If system administrators are then consulted by the
affected users, this multiplies the time wasted.
The main non-commercial UCE area is use of e-mail in denial-ofservice attacks. These use various methods to flood a mailbox with
so many messages that its user’s e-mail system becomes unusable.
Types of denial-of-service attack include mailbombing, ping
flooding, and SYN flooding.
To understand how some UCE works, you also need to know what
a mail relay is. A mail relay is a server which forwards mail from one
server to another. Spammers try to use a third party mail server for
two reasons:
• To disguise the original source of their e-mails.
• To steal additional resources for sending e-mail, increasing the
number of messages they can send. If they can obtain use of a
powerful mail server with a fast net connection, a Spammer
can send out much more junk mail. They may even be able to
relay through several mail servers in parallel.
A responsible administrator should ensure that their servers cannot
be used for mail relay in this way.
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Spamming Techniques and Countermeasures
To understand UCE, it’s useful to think of its development as a
sequence of events. The following sequence makes it easy to
understand the problem, though it’s not historically accurate:
1. As e-mail becomes popular, list server software is developed,
making it easy to send e-mails to many users in one go. It is also
cheap; sending one message costs little more than sending 100
messages. Not all UCE uses list servers, but they do make
multiple messages easier to send.
The e-mails are usually advertisements, but there are also
financial scams, chain letters and pleas for financial assistance.
Unless the sender offers to sell illegal items, sending UCE is
currently not illegal.
The main non-commercial area is use of e-mail in denial-ofservice attacks, as described above.
2. Spammers collect lists of potential recipients by automatically
searching the Internet for e-mail addresses, generally either by
scanning Usenet postings or searching the World Wide Web.
3. After a time, software is developed to counter the flood of junk
e-mail. Two easy countermeasures are introduced into mail
servers, which start to:
• Search incoming e-mail for particular phrases (for example,
“amazing deals!”) and discard messages which contain
these.
• Limit the number of RCPT clauses a message can have. This
can stop a message addressed to a thousand users, for
example, from being delivered.
4. Servers which send out UCE become familiar and as a public
service some users compile lists of these, called DNS based
Black Lists (DNSBL). These list mail servers that are known
sources of UCE or let UCE be relayed through them.
5. Spammers try to avoid the address checks by using mail relay.
That is, they pass their e-mail to another mail server to deliver it
on their behalf, disguising its original source. Neither the sender
nor the recipient is a local user. The relay’s owner may not know
that this is happening, or they may collaborate with a
Spammer.
6. As a countermeasure to (5), mail servers are given the capability
to define the local users whose mail can be sent externally. This
is often done by defining the IP addresses allocated to them.
7. Spammers forge the names in the MAIL and RCPT clauses of a
message sent after the opening HELO command. For details of
this, see “Forging a message source” at the end of this section.
8. Mail servers start using MX lookup to check that the message’s
MAIL and RCPT clauses are genuine. This tests whether a
message really does come from where it claims to be from.
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9. Spammers become more and more sophisticated using genuine
MAIL and RCPT clauses, setting up their own MX records in
DNS, including so much good text in messages that standard
phrase type checks become useless, and finally they introduce
spam with no text at all only an image. Image based spam
makes content filtering all but useless.
10. The concept of Zero Hour (or Recurrent Pattern Detection
[RPD]) is introduced to combat the above. Instead of analysing
the content of a message billions of emails are analysed and
patterns developed for each of them, if multiple copies of a
similar pattern are detected the email must be either a genuine
bulk email or spam. The decision between these is easy to
make. RPD or Zero Hour has a very high success rate in
eliminating spam.
11. GMS Anti-Spam supports all the countermeasures outlined
above. If a spammer manages to get around all these checks,
GMS Anti-Spam has one last defence — it uses Artificial
Intelligence (AI) to monitor e-mail coming in and recognises any
unusual patterns. For example, if a user who normally only gets
about ten e-mails a day suddenly receives 40, these can be
rejected or otherwise dealt with. These unusual patterns
normally result from an attempt to relay through your server.
Forging a message’s source
This section briefly explains how a Spammer can forge a message
source. This elaborates on step 7 in the above sequence.
When a remote sending server at companyA.dom (referred to as
the “client” here) connects to your server (companyZ.dom), your
server sends a response like this (actually on a single line):
220 mail.companyZ.dom Gordano Messaging Suite (v8.00.3073/
AB0000.00.719cfeeb) ready for ESMTP transfer
The client “signs on” to your server using the HELO command and
announcing its name:
HELO mail.companyA.dom
Your server responds, giving its own name then repeating the
client’s (all messages from your server are preceded by “250”):
250 mail.companyZ.dom mail.companyA.dom
The client must now tell your server who the mail is coming from
and who it’s going to. It does this using the MAIL and RCPT clauses.
This transaction will look something like this:
MAIL From:<customer@companyA.dom>
250 OK.
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RCPT To:<sales@companyZ.dom>
250 OK.
The two “250 OK” lines are issued by your server. After this
exchange, the client would use the DATA command to tell your
server that the message (header and body) is about to be sent. This
is not shown here, as the parts which can be forged are the two
addresses shown in the From and To clauses above.
At each stage your server, if GMS Anti-Spam is configured properly,
can check for forgery:
• The MAIL clause — GMS Mail and GMS WebMail can perform
a DNS Lookup on the IP address of the connecting host and
ensure that it matches the address of the domain given in the
MAIL clause (CompanyA.dom).
• The RCPT clause — GMS Mail and GMS WebMail can perform
a DNS Lookup on the IP address of the given host and ensure
that it matches the address given in the RCPT clause.
If either does not match, the message will be refused.
What GMS Anti-Spam Can Do for You
GMS Anti-Spam supports all the countermeasures described in the
previous section. Using GMS Anti-Spam should let you eradicate
almost all the junk mail from your system. Current users see a
reduction of over 97% in junk e-mail entering their system and a
complete eradication of mail relay through their server. This means
you can reserve all your resources and bandwidth for your own use.
This section summarises GMS Anti-Spam capabilities under five
headings:
• Message content — checks for restricted words in the message
body and/or header. More complex filters can be set up, giving
weighting to particular words or phrases.
• Connections — checking servers against DNSBLs, defining local
clients and only allowing connections from these, stopping
relay from all servers except those you allow, limiting message
sizes and the number of recipients.
• Identity checks — checking a server’s IP address is genuine and
testing that the Mail and RCPT clauses are genuine.
• AI — recognising unusual traffic and preventing it from
entering your system.
• Anti-Spam filters (GMS WebMail) — user level filtering can
check for known spam message characteristics, messages from
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blocked addresses and can request message confirmations
before allowing quarantined messages into the users inbox.
At the end of each explanation below there is some informations which
explains where in the GMS Anti Spam interface the feature can be found.
For example Anti Spam, Connection, DNSBL means you can configure
the feature by clicking on the Connection menu item under Anti Spam
then selecting the DNSBL tab on the right.
Message Content
There are six distinct types of check:
• Restricted words — e-mail containing prohibited words is
stopped from entering your system. Every message passing
though the server, inbound or outbound, is checked.
Restricted words or phrases can be set in 4 distinct areas. In
addition a word scoring algorithm can also be enabled
operating on a separate list of words or phrases that will only
act when a given threshold is exceeded.
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Relay Words
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Global Words
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Dynamic Words
• Domain, Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Words.
• Filters — a filter gives a weighting to particular words. For
example, you could set up a filter which only operates if one
word occurs five times and another word three times. If a filter
finds what it’s looking for in a mail message, various actions can
be taken, such as rejecting the message or copying it to
another account for checking later. Filters can be global or
domain-specific.
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Filters
• Domain, Anti Spam, Message Content, Filters
• Quality — up to 52 distinct message quality checks can be
enabled. These are applied to all messages passing through a
system.
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Quality
• Domain, Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Quality
• Zero Hour — Based on Recurrent Pattern Detection (RPD)
technology this option is proving highly effective in the fight
against UCE. Requires no manual intervention.
• Domain, Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Words
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Relay Words
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Global Words
• Bayesian — uses a mathematical algorithm to detect UCE
based on sampling levels of both UCE and non UCE email
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already handled by the system. Requires to be regularly
updated with new samples to maintain performance.
• Domain, Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Words
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Relay Words
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Global Words
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Content, Dynamic Words
Attachments — Allows you to specify file extensions that
should not be allowed such as .exe or .vbs files.
• Anti Spam, Message Content, Attachments
All of the checks under Dynamic Words along with the Zero Hour checks
require a subscription to the GMS Anti-Spam Update Service.
Connections
These tests control which servers can send mail to yours:
• You can ban the IP addresses of servers listed on a DNSBL from
connecting to your server.
• Anti Spam, Connection, DNSBL
• You can list “local clients”, IP addresses that are allowed to
send mail using the domain’s address. If a message is received
from an IP address other than those listed and the domain is
used in the MAIL clause, the message is refused.
• Domain, Anti Spam, Connection, Local Clients
• Allowed IPs — you can ban specific IP addresses from
connecting to your server, perhaps because they are known
Spammers.
• Anti Spam, Connection, Allowed IPs
• Relay — you can define the non-local domains whose mail can
be relayed out to the external world through your server.
Attempts to relay from a server which is not on the list are
rejected. If you are acting as a backup or relay for another
server, you must allow relay for it.
• Anti Spam, Connection, Relay
• Message limits — you can limit the maximum number of
messages passed from a specific domain or to a specific user.
You can also limit the maximum outgoing message sizes passed
through your Gordano mail server.
• Anti Spam, Limits, Messages
• Anti Spam, Limits, Outbound size
• Max RCPT clauses — you can specify how mail with multiple
recipients is handled. This prevents simple attempts to send
UCE by sending one message to a large number of people.
• Anti Spam, Limits, Recipients
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Authentication — you can allow relay for roaming users as long
as they authenticate using a username and password before
they send a message. It works by requiring the user’s client to
check for mail first using POP or IMAP thereby providing the
authentication details. That connection is then allowed to relay
for a defined period of time.
• Anti Spam, Connection, Authenticated IPs
Connections — you can over-ride the system settings for
connections to the SMTP, POP and IMAP services on a per IP
address basis. If a particular sending domain is clogging up your
server with too much mail you can limit the connections they
are allowed to make.
• Anti Spam, Limits, Connections
Scripts
You can write your own scripts in GMS Anti Spam to carry out any
check and subsequent action on messages at any stage of the
delivery process:
• Connect
• HELO\EHLO
• MAIL
• RCPT
• DATA
• End of Message
Identity checks
These check that the sending server really is what it claims to be:
• Machine name — you can force the use of the machine's IP
address in the logs, or perform a reverse lookup on the
connecting IP address and record the results in the logs. You
can perform a reverse lookup on the machine and terminate
the connection if it’s not the same as that given at the HELO
stage.
• Anti Spam, Identity, Machine name
• Sender of message — you can run a DNS Lookup on the IP
address of the connecting host and ensure that it matches the
address given in the MAIL clause.
• Anti-spam, Identity, Sender
• Receiver of message — you can run a DNS Lookup on the IP
address of the given host and ensure that it matches the
address given in the RCPT clause.
• Anti Spam, Identity, Receiver
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Artificial Intelligence — the AI module
The AI feature keeps watch on the traffic passing through your
system, spots any unusual traffic and takes steps to prevent this
traffic from entering your system. Normally such traffic results from
an unauthorised person using your system as a relay server.
AI is a fail-safe feature that acts on the RCPT clause, the MAIL
clause and on the IP address of the sending server before a
message is accepted for delivery. It requires little or no
configuration and only acts in extreme circumstances.
GMS monitors the messages passing through the server and counts
the number from a given e-mail address, to a given e-mail address
and from an IP address. Over a period of time it builds up a profile
of the messages that pass through the server under normal
conditions. Once the profile has been created, the server checks to
see that the number of messages for that mail address in any
particular day does not exceed the average number of messages
per day multiplied by a specified factor. You can specify what action
is taken when unusual traffic occurs.
• Anti Spam, AI, Machine name
• Anti Spam, AI, Sender
• Anti Spam, AI, Receiver
Bypasses
There are a large number of bypasses that can be set allowing the
anti-spam checks to be over-ridden. These should be used with care
as if you are to liberal with the settings the amount of spam
blocked by the filters can be reduced considerably.
• Trusted Sessions - allow you to trust particular remote IP
addresses, remote hosts, Senders or Recipients.
• Anti Spam, ByPasses, Trusted Sessions
• Authenticated IPs - allow you treat particular IPs as if they had
authenticated to the system. All bypasses for authenticated
users will apply to them such as the ability to relay through the
system.
• Anti Spam, ByPasses, Authenticated IPs
• Authenticated Clients - provides various options as to how
connections from authenticated clients should be treated.
• Anti Spam, ByPasses, Authenticated Clients
• Relay Words - allows you to specify IP addresses that should be
allowed to relay through the system without being subject to
content checks.
• Anti Spam, ByPasses, Relay Words
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Anti-Spam filters (GMS WebMail)
The anti-spam filters are only available to users with GMS WebMail
installed. They are configured on a user basis. Users can configure
these to:
• Reject messages exhibiting known spam characteristics, for
example, many spam messages have no reply address specified
or no subject. These will be rejected.
• Reject messages from users listed in the blocklist address book
• Quarantine messages from unknown users and issue a
confirmation request. Upon receipt of a reply to the
confirmation the message is delivered to the inbox and the
users address is added to the list of accepted addresses.
21.2 Setting Up GMS Anti Spam
This section describes how to set up GMS Anti Spam. This is quick
and easy, especially since you should not initially need to change
any of the messages returned to senders from their defaults.
If you need full information on any parameter when you configure
GMS Anti Spam, use the context sensitive online help.
The Anti Spam functions are grouped into five categories, as
introduced in the previous chapter:
• Checking the content of messages — checking for restricted
words and setting up global or domain-specific filters.
• Connection options — using DNSBL lists to check for
Spammers, listing banned hosts, stopping mail relay, limiting
message sizes or the number of RCPT clauses and banning
attachment types.
• Checking the identity of machines sending e-mail, and of the
message sender and receiver.
• AI (Artificial Intelligence) — looking for unusual patterns of email activity.
• Anti-Spam filters (GMS WebMail) — filtering inbound email for
listed addresses and blocking or quarantining mail.
21.3 Messages and reply codes
Many of the GMS Anti Spam functions return a message to the
sender of an e-mail which is rejected. You will see a default
message on the page for any function which does this, usually in a
text box labelled “Reject with” or Retry later with”. Where these
two alternatives occur, the first rejects the e-mail permanently while
the second tells the sender they can try again later if they wish.
If you want to change the message on any page, just type in the
new message you want in place of the default which is shown. For
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example on the Anti Spam, Connection, DNSBL page the message
is “Mail not accepted from server in DNSBL”.
SMTP reply codes
A message returned to a sender will be preceded by an SMTP reply
code. For example, if a page shows “Phrase in e-mail not
acceptable” as the message, the sender will receive a message
“500 Phrase in e-mail not acceptable”. All responses have three
digits followed by a space and a free format text response.
For full details of SMTP error codes, see the Gordano Reference
Guide, but here is a quick summary:
• Responses starting “2” indicate success.
• Responses starting “4” indicate a transient failure. Retrying
later may succeed.
• Responses starting “5” indicate a permanent failure. The
message will never be accepted and should be returned to the
sender.
Here are some examples of reply codes used by GMS Anti Spam at
the various stages of the SMTP protocol:
Clause
Code
Default message
HELO
453
Exceeded IP count - please try later.
550
Your server has been banned from this server.
450
Too many messages from you today.
453
Exceeded MAIL count - please try later.
550
Domain has no MX or A record.
550
Too many RCPT clauses.
450
Too many messages to this user today.
453
Exceeded RCPT count - please try later.
550
This mail is not local.
550
You are not allowed to post to this address.
452
Insufficient system storage.
552
Exceeded maximum message size.
MAIL
RCPT
DATA
End of Message
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21.4 Checking Message Content
You can check for restricted words within messages. You can also
set up global or domain-specific filters, which let you return
messages to the sender with some explanation, or redirect them to
another account.
Word based checks
There are 2 distinct types of word based files within GMS,
Restricted Word lists and Scored Restricted Word lists. Both of these
run content checks in three areas using separate word lists
although the checks they perform are all similar. Prior to running
any checks the individual lists for each type are all amalgamated
into one large list, depending on which options are enabled, and
this large list is used to run the checks.
Each of the separate options are described further below.
Restricted Words
Dynamic Words
The Dynamic Word file can be automatically updated using the
update service provided by Gordano Limited. Other than obtaining
automatic updates this can only be enabled or disabled. The
contents of the file can also be viewed to aid with troubleshooting.
With junk mailers being more and more innovative with the
content of mail messages in attempts to bypass filtering tools, it is
essential that filters are kept as up to date as possible. It is very easy
for a busy administrator to forget or delay updates to the files so
Gordano have added an automatic update facility to Anti Spam.
The automatic updates feature allows up to the minute awareness
of current junk mail threats. see “Anti Spam” on page 294.
The dynamic word file can not be edited. This file is automatically updated
at predefined intervals from information supplied by Gordano Limited .
Note that there are certain words or phrases that are specifically not
included in the Dynamic Word list, these are:
• No domain names
• No URLs
• No trademark names
• No product or brand names
If you wish to restrict message containing any of the above items
you will need to specifically add these items to either the Global or
Domain Word lists.
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Global Words
The Global Words file is a universal file that can be used by any
domain on the system in addition to the domain specific word file.
It is an idea to keep all common words in this file and reserve the
domain level file for checks particular to that domain. The domains
can only use the Global Word file if it has been enabled. Editing the
file is similar to the process for the Domain Words file described
below.
Domain Words
Various checks can be performed against the content of incoming
mail. The headers and message body can both be checked.
To configure content checking:
1. Choose Domain, Anti Spam, Message Content, Words, and
then select the options you would like enabled.
2. If you wish to use the same Global checks for each domain on
your system select “Use global checks”, otherwise leave this
option unchecked. All options enabled under Global Words will
be used.
3. If you wish to use the same Dynamic checks for each domain
on your system select “Use Dynamic Checks”, otherwise leave
this option unchecked. All options enabled under Dynamic
Words will be used.
4. The Restricted Word File can be edited directly by entering
your restricted words and phrases, each entry on its own line.
5. The Scored Restricted Word File can be edited directly by
entering your score level and restricted words and phrases,
each entry on its own line.
6. Set any bypasses you would like enabled (sending IP addresses
that should not be checked).
7. Set the various check modes, the most sensible are already
selected by default.
Restricted Words
The Restricted Word check is an “all or nothing” check, i.e. any
incoming message containing one of the words or phrases in this
list will immediately apply whichever action you have configured.
When entering words and phrases there are a couple of things to
be aware of. If you enter the word “and” as a restricted word this
will also block messages that contain any derivative of the word
“and”. So words like “band” and “sandy” would also be caught by
the filter. One solution to this is to enter “ and “. Note the space
before and after the word. However if the message contains a dot
after the word "and" to denote the end of the sentence it won’t be
caught by the filter. In this case you may need two rules: “ and ", "
and.".
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In reality the Restricted Word filter is more suitable for use with
phrases rather than single words, as the use of single words will
increase the possibilities of false positives.
A false positive is when an incoming message is inadvertently
marked as being a spam message when in fact it is a legitimate
message.
Each phrase that you would like to check for should be included in
the file on a line of its own. Wild card matching is supported and
there is a good range of regular expressions that can be used to
provide ranges and location matching.
Scored Restricted Words
The Scored Restricted Word lists are basically similar to the
restricted word lists described above and the same regular
expressions can be used within them. However there are also major
differences which will become obvious as the functionality is
described.
Scored restricted word lists are more suited to containing single
words rather than phrases as may be preferred for the standard
restricted word lists. Each word entered into the file is given a
particular score, which may be either positive or negative. Each
occurrence of a word in an incoming message will result in the
score for that word being added to a running total for the
message. If the total for the message exceeds the given threshold
then the action set will be applied.
If the user level Anti Spam filter is being used then the messages
can be allowed through to this filter to allow end users direct
control over the threshold.
The following provides an example of the scored restricted word
filter in action. Imagine that the scored restricted word file
contained the following entries:
10: email
10: message
30: sales
-50: gordano
The following message was then sent into the mail server destined
for the postmaster:
From: “Sales” <sales@gordano.com>
To: “Postmaster” <postmaster@test.dom>
Subject: Scored Restricted Word filter
This is a sample email message to prove the workings of the new scored
restricted word filter available in GMS Anti-Spam.
Regards
Gordano Limited.
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Looking at the message we can see that the word “sales” occurs
twice giving a score of 60, the word “email” occurs once and adds
a further 10 to the score giving 70. The word “message” adds yet
another 10 giving a total so far of 80, and finally the word
“gordano” occurs once and has a score of -50 which is subtracted
from 80 to give an overall total for the message of 30.
As can be clearly seen, once a decent word list is built up, this is a
very powerful method of assessing the potential of any incoming
message. Particularly when used in conjunction with the standard
restricted word list above, which is more designed to catch very
specific messages without doing any analysis.
As for the standard restricted word lists this facility is available on a
Global, Domain and Relay basis.
If you are a subscriber to the Anti Spam Update Service a scored
restricted word file is also available that is maintained by Gordano
Limited and dynamically uploaded to your server at pre defined
intervals. see “Anti Spam” on page 294.
Regular Expressions
Filter rules also support the use of regular expressions or wildcards.
For example a rule of " and?" would catch both of the following "
and ", " and.". Supported regular expressions are:
[abc]
matches exactly one of the characters "a", "b" or "c"
[-m]
Matches exactly one character that is less than or
equal to "m"
[m-]
Matches exactly one character that is greater than or
equal to "m"
[a-m]
matches exactly one character in the range "a" to
"m" inclusive
[expression,expression,...]
matches exactly one character in one of the expressions listed where the each expression is in one of the
forms listed above
(abc)
Round brackets may be used in place of square brackets to provide an optional character. For example,
using the rules above to check for "pill[s]" would only
match exactly if the word "pills" existed in the message but using "pill(s)" would match against either
"pill" or "pills".
*
matches anything in a line of text. For example "some
text *" will match "some text goes here"
?
matches any single character. For example "some
?ext" will match both "some text" and "some next"
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[abc]
matches exactly one of the characters "a", "b" or "c"
\
Escape character. For example, the character ? is a
wildcard as described above, if you want to specifically
look for ? rather than matching any character you
would need to escape it thus \?, i.e. "word\?" would
only match "word?" and not "words"
^
Indicates the start of a line. For example, "^word"
would only match if "word" was at the very start of
the line.
$
Indicates the end of a line. For example, “word$”
would only match if “word” was at the very end of the
line.
+
+ is an over ride indicator, used either to balance out
another entry in the combined word files or to specifically allow messages containing the word or phrase.
For example, if the word “spam” exists in the dynamic
word file you could create an entry of “+spam” in the
domain word file to cancel out the previous entry.
If the word “spam” did not appear in any of the word
files then “+spam” means to explicitly allow messages
contain the word. If “spam” did appear in one of the
word files and you wanted to specifically allow messages containing it then you would need to enter
“+spam” twice, each on its own line in the domain
word file.
No support will be available for matching multiple characters with
these range options. Note also that no spaces are allowed in the
range specifications.
Example:
Restricted Word Entry: tr*i[l-o]
Matches: train, trail
Non-Matches: triangle, trill, trial
The regular expression characters * and ? can be escaped by placing them
in square brackets. For example a restricted word entry of "why[?]" will
catch "why?" but will allow "why." A restricted word entry of "why?" will
treat the question mark as a wild card and will catch "why?", "why.",
"whys" etc.
The \ character is a generic escape character that can be used to escape any
character, for example if you wanted to check for the string "[ADV]" you
would need to escape the [ and ] characters thus "\[ADV\]".
Over-rides
You may find that you want to use the automatically updated
dynamic word file or the Global Word file for all of your
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domains but there may be one domain on your system that
requires to accept mail containing a particular phrase. This is
easily configured by simply adding the phrase to the Domain
Word file preceding it with a + sign.
Say for example that there is a phrase in the Dynamic Word list
that reads "I don’t want this message”, if you wanted to allow
this you would add an entry to the Domain Word list that looks
like:
+I don’t want this message
The + character must be the very first character on the line, otherwise it will
be treated as a new phrase.
If you wanted to ensure that any message containing the phrase “I
don’t want this message” can enter your system no matter what
other banned words or phrases it contains then you would need to
enter the phrase twice on two separate lines so that the word list
looks like:
+I don’t want this message
+I don’t want this message
The word lists are amalgamated in the specific order Dynamic
followed by Global followed by Domain. So if you wished to over
ride a phrase in the Dynamic list for all domains on your system you
could put the over-ride in the Global Word list as opposed to having
an individual entry in each of the Domain Word lists.
Restricted Word Mode
This option, which applies to both the Restricted Word and Scored
Restricted Word filters, is only available under the System level
Relay Words filter or the Domain Words filter but will affect all
messages to or from the domain it is set for. Open the relevant area
of the page to specify a range of options to be used when checking
messages. The options are:
Search Mode
This determines which parts of a message are checked, the default
is to check both the headers and the body.
• Headers and body — This option will check the entire
message content including headers message body and
encoded attachment sections.
• Headers only — This option will only check the message
headers for matching words or phrases.
• Body only — This option will check the whole message
except for the headers. Encoded attachment sections will
also be checked.
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First [n] lines — This option will check the specified number
of lines in the entire message including the message
headers.
The "First [n] lines" option is advisable for busy systems that have a lot of
messages with attachments passing through them. Messages with attachments can be made up of 100’s of lines of encoded text. Because attachments sections are encoded there is no point in checking those sections.
Typically the first 100 lines of a message are sufficient to check against. If
you find messages have matching words later in the message you can
increase this figure as required.
1. Scan binary files
Selecting this option enables scanning of binary files. This may
slow down processing especially for large files.
2. Case-sensitive checks
Selecting this option enables the use of case-sensitive checks
rather than the default case-insensitive checks.
3. Check raw HTML
Selecting this option enables the content of HTML tags to be
checked.
4. Check filtered HTML
Selecting this option enables the removal of HTML tags before
checking content.
5. Remove punctuation
Selecting this option enables the filter which removes
punctuation prior to restricted word checks. For example
"t+e+s+t" will be reduced to “test” before checking.
6. Compress multiple spaces
Selecting this option enables the filter which reduces multiple
adjacent whitespace (space, tab) characters to a single space
character. For example "test this" (with 5 spaces) will be
reduced to “test this” (with just 1 space).
7. Character substitution
Selecting this option enables the filter which allows limited
character substitution. For example, it allows 1 (digit one) to be
substituted for i (letter i) allowing “test th1s” to be detected by
the restricted word pattern “test this”. Other substitutions are
0 (digit zero) for o (letter o), 5 (digit five) for s (letter ess), @ for
letter a and so on.
8. Multibyte Character substitution
Selecting this option allows substitution of Multibyte characters
with the single character equivalent. Examples of this would be
the multiple characters () (two round brackets) substituted with
the letter 0, |\/| (pipe, back slash, forward slash, pip) substituted
with the letter M, and so on.
9. Accent Character substitution
Selecting this option allows substitution of accented characters
with their non accented equivalents. For example, the letters À
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or à would be substituted with A and a respectively, and the
letter Î or î substituted with I and i respectively.
10. Ignore CR/LF characters
Selecting this option enables the filter which combines adjacent
lines of text into one line prior to checking.
11. Translate HTML entities
Selecting this option enables the filter which translates HTML
entities such as '&nbsp;' to ' ' (single space) and '&#65;' to 'A'
prior to checking.
Press Update to save your settings
Restricted Word Bypass
Again this option is only available for the System Relay Words and
the Domain, Words filters and will affect all messages to or from
that domain. If there are certain IP addresses whose mail you do
not want to be checked, select the Edit Bypass button. Now type an
IP address that you do not want mail from to be checked and click
on the Add button. Repeat for each IP address you wish checks to
be bypassed for. IP address ranges may be specified using the
normal notation.
Press Update to save your settings
Bayesian filter (System Level)
Bayesian based filters calculate the probability of a message being
junk based on the contents of that message. Unlike simple contentbased filters, Bayesian filtering learns from both good and bad
messages, resulting in a very efficient, self learning, anti-spam
system that will return very few false positives. Ideally, you should
start with a large number of messages that you have already
classified as bad, and another which you have classified as good.
These should then be fed into the Bayesian filter to prime it with
content. The filter will look at both good and bad messages,
analyzing both to calculate the probability of various characteristics
appearing in both good and bad messages.
For the Bayesian filter to be available the files required to run the
filter must be installed in the gordano\bin directory on your server.
Once the files are in place the Bayesian filter option will
automatically become enabled. The required files can be
downloaded from the Gordano website http://www.gordano.com,
please select the appropriate files for your operating system.
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Operating System
File name
Windows
af-win-intel.zip
Linux
af-linux-intel.tar.gz
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Operating System
File name
Solaris
af-solaris-sparc.tar.gz
AIX
af-aix-rs6000.tar.gz
The Bayesian filter is available at two different levels, Dynamic and
Global. The Dynamic option will only be available if you have
subscribed to the GMS Anti-Spam Update Service. Use of the
Dynamic and Global checks can also be enabled/disabled on a per
domain basis.
The first step in setting up the Bayesian filter should always be to
prime the Global Bayesian filter. To do this go to Domains & Users,
Domain and select a user account whose mail folders will be used
to prime the filter. Having selected the user, click on Bayesian
Dictionary in the secondary toolbar, select from the first drop down
menu which of their folders to use and from the second how mail
from that folder should be seen. The options are as Mail for good
mail that you want entering your system, and as Junk for bad mail
that you do not want to see.
Enabling the Check dictionary before adding option allows the
import filter to check for the presence of the message in the
existing filter. If the dictionary already knows about the message
and thinks it is classified the same as you are importing it as, it will
ignore it. If it is classified differently then the filter will automatically
try and change the classification to match that which you are
currently importing the message as.
If you have subscribed to the GMS Anti Spam Update Service
you must prime the Bayesian filter prior to enabling use of the
Dynamic Bayesian filter.
Thresholds for the Bayesian filter are set on either the Domain
Words or Relay Words pages and are expressed as a percentage.
The default setting is to act on any message that has a 90%
probability of being spam. You can change this but you should be
aware that the higher you set the probability the more likely you
are to suffer from false positives while the lower you set it the
greater the likelihood of spam passing through the filter.
If the user level Anti Spam filter is being used then the messages
can be allowed through to this filter to allow end users direct
control over the threshold.
Zero Hour
GMS Zero Hour technology is highly effective in stopping UCE. We
regularly see over 97% success rate with virtually zero false
positives. Setup is extremely straightforward and there is no
ongoing maintenance to perform whatsoever, a truly “set it and
forget it” solution to the UCE problem. Should you choose to move
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messages to quarantine, you can use the Quarantine Report (see
“Quarantine (domain and system)” on page 144.) to mark
messages as junk, or to report false positives.
Zero-hour classification is unlike conventional Anti Spam
techniques, because it does not work by examining the content of
your message, or by looking for particular key words or
combinations of words. Instead, a mathematical calculation is
performed on the incoming message to create a unique signature,
which is then sent to online servers which monitor the delivery of
millions of email messages daily and contain signatures for upwards
of 10 million known unique junk email messages at any one time.
A local cache of signatures is stored on the GMS server, to prevent
continued requests to the online stores - these local caches should
detect upwards of 70% of your junk email reducing the already
small bandwidth requirements even further.
Use Zero Hour Classification checks
Enables or disables the Zero Hour protection. Zero Hour
classification checks are run prior to the other content based antispam checks. This will help reduce load on the server as the checks
are run as early in the process as possible. If a message fails the
checks then the standard Anti-spam actions will be applied.
Use Strict Zero Hour Classification Checks
There are two levels of activity reported, Confirmed Spam and Bulk.
If this option is enabled both Confirmed and Bulk are treated as
spam. If it is not enabled only the Confirmed option is treated as
spam.
Fail On Zero Hour Classification Error
If this option is enabled messages that the Zero Hour protection
module has been unable to classify will be treated as if they have
failed the checks.
Reading Zero Hour information
The Zero Hour spam protection will write information into the
headers of messages it has processed. This information can be used
to determine how the Zero Hour check has processed the message
and to determine the results of that processing.
X-Zero-Hour-AS-Classification: 1 [62.172.232.191]
X-Zero-Hour-AS-Classification-RefId:
str=0001.0A0B0204.444DCF65.004C,ss=1,fgs=0
Classifications are:
0 - None
1 - Unknown
2 - Suspect
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3 - Bulk
4 - Confirmed Spam
Only messages classified as 4 will be blocked by the Zero-Hour
classification, if you enable strict mode messages with a
classification of 3 will also be blocked.
The RefId is an internal reference used when reporting false
positives via the Quarantine reports. If you ever need to query the
status of a false positive report you will need to quote the RefId.
Setting up filters
You can pass incoming mail through two types of filter:
• Global filters — apply to all incoming mail.
• Domain filters — apply to mail for one domain.
If a filter finds what it’s looking for in a mail message, various
actions can be carried out on the message, such as rejecting it or
copying it to another account for checking later.
You can add multiple words but not phrases and give each of these
a weighting. For example, you can configure a filter which operates
only if one word occurs five times and another word occurs three
times.
To add a new filter:
1. Choose Anti Spam, Message Content, Filters or for a domain
select it in the drop down then select Anti Spam, Message
Content, Filters.
2. Click Add New and name the rule.
3. Click Add New again in the list box immediately below the Rule
Name, type a word in the text area and then specify a count
that should be applied to that word to specify how many times
it must occur to trigger the filter then press Enter. Add further
words as necessary then click on Save.
4. Specify the action to take when a mail message matches the
rule:
• Reject it with a permanent or temporary failure reply code.
• Forward it to a given e-mail address instead of to the
intended recipient. This could be somebody who is
investigating UCE for you.
• Accept the message and copy it to another recipient as well
as the addressee.
• “Ignore this rule for now” — lets you set up the rule now
for activation later.
5. Press the Update button to save your settings and bring the rule
into effect.
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Deleting and Editing Rules
To delete a rule, choose Anti Spam, Message Content, Filters at
either the System or Domain level, highlight it in the list and click
on the Delete button.
To edit a rule, simply highlight it in the list and amend the details
shown below.
Message Quality
Malformed MIME content is often used to try and bypass the ability
of anti virus software to correctly identify viruses and anti spam
software to detect unsolicited email. Messages that contain
malformed MIME can also cause problems with certain email clients
when reading or downloading these messages.
This section provides the ability to look for and reject messages that
contain malformed mime content. The checks can be set either
globally or on a per domain basis, global checks taking priority over
domain checks.
Message lines not terminated by CRLF
According to RFC standards all lines must be terminated with a
carriage return, line feed pair. Unfortunately, some mail servers
(especially old versions of Sendmail) only terminate with a carriage
return. Selecting this option will reject messages that do not
conform to this standard.
Message line exceeds RFC2822 limits
According to RFC standards there are two limits placed characters
in a line. Each line of characters must be no more than 998
characters, and should be no more than 78 characters, excluding
the CRLF. Select this option to enforce character line length.
Message line not folding according to RFC2822
RFC 2822 specifies a method of folding long header lines in order
to conform to the 78 character line limit. Enabling this option will
detect messages where either there is no folding of long header
lines, or the folding is not done in accordance with the RFC.
Message has no body
There is no RFC requirement for a message to contain a body and it
may quite correctly terminate immediately after the headers.
However a number of email clients such as MS Outlook have
difficulty coping with such messages. Enabling this option will
ensure that they never get into a users mailbox.
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Message text contains binary data
Binary data should never be transmitted in email messages without
being encoded in one of the available mime formats. If any raw
binary data is detected in a message this option will cause it to be
rejected.
Headers contain required RFC822 Headers
RFC822 requires emails to have a certain set of header lines. Some
mail clients do not insert the required headers, with typically the
From: field missing. Select this option to enforce RFC822 header
compliance.
Headers contain suspicious header field name
Each header field should end with a : (colon) character, for example
Received:. If a field does not end with this character this option will
reject the message.
Attachment name is too long
If the attachment name exceeds 256 characters the message will be
rejected if this option is selected.
Suspicious attachment name
If the attachment name contains:
• multiple adjacent spaces
• multiple dots in file names, for example file.doc.bat
• mismatched quotes in mime boundary
The message will be rejected if this option is selected.
Empty attachment
If the message references an attachment that contains no content it
will be rejected.
CLSID in attachment name
The default operation performed to open a file type is determined
by referencing the file type's CLSID. It is possible to specify a
different default action for a given file than would normally be
used. As a result, seemingly harmless files (.txt, .jpg etc.) may be
opened in a non-standard, attacker specified manner. For example,
a program (“trojan.exe”) could be renamed
"trojan.jpg.{CLSID_of_executables}" and when opened by the
target user, this file will be executed instead of opened by their
default .jpg viewer. Selecting this option rejects messages with
attachments containing CLSID.
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UUEncode begin in subject
The UUEncode begin statement should never appear in the subject
line of the message. It is placed in the subject line as a method to
bypass virus scanners, therefore selecting this option will protect
against this exploit.
UUEncode begin incomplete
A typical UUEncode begin string would be
begin 666 image.jpg
Selecting this option will reject messages where this is not correctly
specified.
UUEncode data with blank lines
UUEncoded files should not have any blank lines within the
encoded section. Spaces will prevent the attachment from being
decoded correctly. Selecting this option will reject these messages.
UUEncode data with spaces
UUEncoded files should not have any spaces within the encoded
section. Spaces will prevent the attachment from being decoded
correctly. Selecting this option will reject these messages.
UUEncode data line too long
A UUEncoded line should be no longer than 45 characters.
Messages with longer lines will be rejected if this option is selected.
UUEncode data invalid
UUEncoded data should only contain ASCII text. Selecting this
option will reject messages with invalid characters within the
UUEncoded data.
UUEncode data invalid decode
When a message is received with UUEncoding GMS will decode the
attachment, to allow it to be checked. Selecting this option will
reject the message if invalid data is found during this decoding
process.
Base64 encoding of inline text
Base64 encoding of inline text can be used to bypass filters that
scan messages for specific words. Selecting this option will reject
messages with Base64 encoded inline text. Note: Some email
clients Base64 encode inline text by default, therefore this option
should be used with caution.
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Base64 data invalid
If the Base64 MIME section contains invalid data the message will
be rejected if this option is selected.
Base64 data invalid length
Base64 encoding has a line limit of 76 characters. All lines, with the
exception of the final line, must be 76 characters. If a message
contains data with lines of the incorrect length this option will
reject the message.
Base64 data has leading '=' signs
The '=' character is used in Base64 encoding as padding, to ensure
the last line of encoding contains the correct number of bytes.
Therefore this character will only appear at the end of the encoded
data. This option will reject messages when the '=' is found at the
beginning of the data.
Base64 data has too many '=' signs
The '=' character is used in Base64 encoding as padding, to ensure
the last line of encoding contains the correct number of bytes. This
character should not appear more than twice at the end of the
encoding if the message is correctly formatted. This option will
reject messages with more than two occurrences of the '=' if
selected.
Base64 data after end of decode
The encoded section is always ended with a string similar to
------=_NextPart_000_012D_01C2D8FD.FF311F10--
The -- section at the end of the line indicates this is the end of
decode. No data should be included after this string, unless it is
contained within further MIME boundaries. Select this option to
reject messages with this characteristic.
Base64 data line too long
Base64 encoding has a line limit of 76 characters. If a message has
a line or lines in excess of this length this option will reject the
message.
Binhex data in text section
BinHex is an especially common format for Macintosh files.
Selecting this option will reject messages that have BinHex data in
the message text section.
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BinHex data invalid
Binhex data must contain lines of 64 characters, a statement at the
beginning of the data stating the data is BinHex encoded and other
specific attributes. This option will reject the message if the data is
not correct in regards to these mandatory factors.
MIME no start boundary
MIME encoded data must contain a starting boundary, similar to
------=_NextPart_000_012D_01C2D8FD.FF311F10--
Selecting this option will reject messages where this boundary has
not been included.
MIME no final boundary
MIME encoded data must contain a final boundary, similar to
------=_NextPart_000_012D_01C2D8FD.FF311F10--
Selecting this option will reject messages where this boundary has
not been included.
MIME empty boundary
While an empty MIME boundary is in theory valid, we are not
aware of any legitimate application that creates such a boundary. It
is more likely to be used in an attempt to bypass content checking.
MIME 8 bit characters in header field
8 bit MIME characters are not permitted in message headers fields.
Select this option to delete messages with these characters in the
header field.
MIME partial message fragment
A common exploit to attempt to bypass virus scanners is to split a
message into several smaller messages with partial MIME content.
When these messages are received the client may reconstruct the
message into its original format. Select this option to reject these
messages.
MIME invalid fieldname format
MIME encoded data headers contain fieldnames such as
Content-Transfer-Encoding:
Content-Disposition:
These fieldnames end with a “:” which must follow immediately
after the fieldname. Selecting this option will reject messages that
do not adhere to this rule.
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MIME invalid message/rfc822 content type
If a message includes the "rfc 822 content type" it can be used to
include a message within a message as an attempt to bypass virus
or anti spam scanning. Select this option to prevent these messages
being accepted.
MIME invalid content transfer encoding
Each MIME message must include a section defining the content
transfer encoding used. There are a finite number of encoding
types and this option will reject any messages containing a non
standard type.
MIME invalid RFC2047 encoding
RFC 2047 defines a method of encoding non-US-ASCII data within
the headers if a message. This option will reject any messages
containing such data unless it is encoded according to the RFC.
MIME comment detected
It is possible to add comments to the MIME content type in the
MIME boundaries. To reject messages with these comments select
this option.
MIME section in prolog or epilog
MIME sections start with a prolog, such as:
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
There should be no data between this and the initial MIME
boundary. The epilog is the section after the final MIME Boundary
and the end of the message. No content should be included in this
section. Select this option to reject these messages.
MIME contains duplicate headers
Valid MIME encoded messages should never contain duplicate
headers. This is indicative of a message specifically enabled for bulk
transmission. Such messages can be rejected via this option.
MIME contains RFC2231 encodings
RFC 2231 defines methods of defining the language to be used in
association with MIME sections. Enabling this option allows
rejection of messages containing such language definitions.
HTML component has IFrame entities
If a message contains an IFrame it could be used to link the browser
or email client to remote content such .exe files, which could
contain a virus. Selecting this option rejects messages containing
IFrames.
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HTML component uses CID to load file.
CID can be used to instruct an email to call and load external
content and is used as an exploit to bypass virus scanning. Select
this option to reject these messages.
HTML component has Object entities
Object entities can be used to load external content on the server
or workstation and is used as an exploit to bypass virus scanning.
Select this option to reject these messages.
HTML component has unnecessary encodings
There in no need for standard emails to encode alpha-numeric
characters as numeric entities in HTML. This option will catch any
that are. For example the letter "A" may be written as &#065; etc.
HTML Component contains Javascript
There should be no requirement for an email to contain JavaScript
as it has the ability to run on the client and potentially cause
problems. Enabling this option will reject all emails containing
JavaScript.
HTML Component contains JScript
There should be no requirement for an email to contain JScript as it
has the ability to run on the client and potentially cause problems.
Enabling this option will reject all emails containing JScript.
HTML Component contains VBScript
There should be no requirement for an email to contain VBScript as
it has the ability to run on the client and potentially cause
problems. Enabling this option will reject all emails containing
VBScript.
HTML Component contains encoded scripts
There should be no requirement for an email to contain any
encoded scripts whatsoever. The only possible reason to encode
scripts in this way is to hide their purpose. Usually a good sign of
malicious intent. Enabling this option will reject all emails
containing encoded scripts.
URL has IP rather than hostname
Every HTTP URL should have a hostname rather than an IP in the
address part of the URL. The code detects normal dotted IP
addresses and obfuscated IP addresses, for example those
presented in binary, octal, decimal and hexadecimal formats with
and without numeric overflow.
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URL is obfuscated
Obfuscated URLs are often used by spammers in an attempt to hide
the true URL that they are trying to entice you to or to foil
legitimate traffic analysis, there is no reason for such a URL in
legitimate mail.
URL parameters are suspicious
This check looks for entries within URLs that are likely to run
computer code that you are unaware of. Specifically it looks for the
presence of “script”, “object”, “applet”, “embed” or “form”. If
any are found the message will be rejected.
Configuring Actions
There are a choice of actions available to you which will be carried
out when any of the Content based checks are breached, including
the thresholds for Scored Words and Bayesian filters.
Reject message with
Allows you to immediately reject any message that fails the content
checks at the SMTP Protocol level, returning the message entered in
the text area to the right of the field.
Redirect to
Provides the option of redirecting the message to another address
to allow for manual checking at a later time.
Accept and discard message
This option allows the message to be accepted on to your server so
that the sender is not aware that it has failed. The message is then
simply thrown away.
Deliver message as usual
If you wish the message to be passed on to the users for them to
apply their own filters then this is the option you should select. The
message can optionally be delivered to the recipients quarantine
folder rather than their inbox.
If you would like your users to manage their own quarantine folders then it is
necessary to choose to have messages delivered to the recipients quarantine
folder above.
Bypass checks for reporting accounts
All of the word based checks can be bypassed for two special
accounts on your system, that is postmaster@yourdomain and
abuse@yourdomain. The messaging RFCs require that all mail
systems have a postmaster account and that this account should
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always accept mail in order that remote people may report issues to
you.
Copy message to Quarantine folder
Enable this option if you would like a copy of the message saved to
the appropriate Quarantine folder in addition to the above actions.
see “Quarantine (domain and system)” on page 144.
Add Reason to Message Header
This option will add the reason that the message failed Content
checks into the headers of the email itself. This can then be used by
filters at the user level to determine the action to take on the
message.
Domain Actions
Actions can be configured separately for each domain or you can
simply elect to use the global values that are set under Actions.
Configuring Alerts
You can alert a number of people of any attempt to send a spam or
UCE through the system. Choose Anti Spam, Message Content,
Content, Alerts at either System or Domain level and select one or
more of the following:
• Alert Postmaster — to send an alert to the administrator of the
system select this check box. If you would like the alert to go to
someone other than the postmaster please enter their email
address in the box provided, otherwise the default of
postmaster@domain.name is used.
• Alert User — to inform the intended recipient of a virus that
someone has attempted to send them an infected file.
• Alert Sender — send a message to the sender of the file
alerting them to the fact that they attempted to send an
infected file through the system. (They may not know that the
message contained a virus.)
Domain Alerts
Alerts can be configured separately for each domain or you can
simply elect to use the System settings.
21.5 Attachments
Ban attachments
The Anti Spam, Message Content, Attachments page in the
interface provides a means to ban certain attachment types from
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entering your system altogether dependant on the file extension of
the attachment.
Simply click on Add New and enter the extension that you would
like to ban in the Extensions text area. Repeat for each attachment
type that you would like to ban, and once complete click on the
Save button, followed by the Update button.
To remove an attachment type from the list, highlight and click on
the Delete button followed by Update.
Note - only the attachment extension itself should be included, do not
include the “.” for example to ban “virus.exe” and all other files ending
“.exe” you would enter “exe” not “.exe”.
There are additional options on this page that you may also wish to
consider enabling due to the increasing usage of password
protected zip files to propagate viruses.
Check TNEF files for banned extensions
Enabling this option will allow the attachment blocking to be
applied to the contents of TNEF files (to non Microsoft mail clients
these appear normally as winmail.dat files). For example, if you had
banned attachment with an exe extension above then checking this
option will also check within TNEF for files with the an exe
extension and reject any matching messages.
Check zip files for banned extensions
Enabling this will allow the attachment blocking to also be applied
to the contents of zip files. For example, if you had banned
attachment with an exe extension above then checking this option
will also check within zip archives for files with the an exe extension
and reject any matching messages.
Reject password protected zip files
Use of this option will completely ban all password protected zip
files from your server.
Reject zip files within zip files
If a zip file contains another zip file and you have enabled this
option the message will be rejected. This option does not require
that an extension of zip is applied in the blocking list above.
Reject corrupt or unreadable zip files
If for any reason GMS is unable to inspect the contents of zip file
due to it being corrupt or unreadable in any way it will be rejected
by enabling this option.
Reject office packages
If this is option is enabled then all emails containing attachments in
the new Office 2007 document format will be rejected.
Reject protected office packages
If an email contains protected Office 2007 documents it will be
rejected if this option is enabled.
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Reject macro enabled office packages
Enabling this option will reject emails with Office 2007 documents
which contain macros.
Reject OpenDoc packages
Similar to the above option for Office 2007 documents enabling
this option will reject all emails containing OpenDoc format
documents.
Content Types
The standard encoding for email messages today is MIME
encoding. The MIME RFCs specify that each attachment be
specified in its own MIME section and that a Content Type for that
MIME section should also be specified which determines how the
receiving client handles the specific attachment. Thus Microsoft
Word documents would have one Content Type, executable files
would have another and so on.
The Content Types page allows you to specify MIME types that you
do not want to enter your system. It is possible however for
message to contain a modified MIME type, thereby potentially
letting content you thought you had banned pass through the
server by disguising the true content type of the encapsulated file.
An example of a Content Type is:
application/msword
This example would prevent any Microsoft Word documents being
received via email.
Click on Add New and enter the content type in the text area
provided and press Enter to add it to the list below. To remove an
entry highlight it in the list and click the Delete button. All entries
can be removed at once by clicking the Remove All button. Click
Save when you have finished adding entries, then the Update
button to save any changes.
Actions
There are a choice of actions available to you which will be carried
out when any of the attachment and content type checks are
breached.
Reject message with
Allows you to immediately reject any message that fails the checks
at the SMTP Protocol level, returning the message entered in the
text area to the right of the field.
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Redirect to
Provides the option of redirecting the message to another address
to allow for manual checking at a later time.
Accept and discard message
This option allows the message to be accepted on to your server so
that the sender is not aware that it has failed. The message is then
simply thrown away.
Deliver message as usual
If you wish the message to be passed on to the users for them to
apply their own filters then this is the option you should select. The
message can optionally be delivered to the recipients quarantine
folder rather than their inbox.
If you would like your users to manage their own quarantine folders then it is
necessary to choose to have messages delivered to the recipients quarantine
folder above.
Bypass checks for reporting accounts
All of the checks can be bypassed for two special accounts on your
system, that is postmaster@yourdomain and abuse@yourdomain.
The messaging RFCs require that all mail systems have a postmaster
account and that this account should always accept mail in order
that remote people may report issues to you.
Copy message to Quarantine folder
Enable this option if you would like a copy of the message saved to
the appropriate Quarantine folder in addition to the above actions.
see “Quarantine (domain and system)” on page 144.
Add Reason to Message Header
This option will add the reason that the message failed checks into
the headers of the email itself. This can then be used by filters at
the user level to determine the action to take on the message.
21.6 Connect Options
The Connect options control which servers can send mail to yours.
Checking servers against a DNSBL
DNS based Black Lists (DNSBLs) are used to maintain a list of mail
servers that are known to allow the transmission of UCE.
When DNSBL checking is set up the IP address of each server
connecting via SMTP is checked against the DNSBL and, if a match
is found, the connection is rejected with the message you specify.
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By default, DNSBL checking is set to “Check on Connect”.
However no checking will be carried out until you define at least
one DNSBL server.
In addition to “Check on Connect” you can also set GMS to wait
until the MAIL From: clause has been issued before the connecting
IP address is checked against the DNSBL. This is only necessary if
you would like your banned hosts settings or an HELO/EHLO script
to be acted on prior to the DNSBL check being made. You may also
choose this option if you want to log the MAIL From: prior to the
connection being rejected.
To set up an DNSBL server:
1. Choose Anti Spam, Connection, DNSBL.
2. Click on Add New and enter the name of the DNSBL Server you
would like to use in the text area provided.
3. Select the action to be taken when an entry is found in the
DNSBL Server from the drop down menu provided. The options
are:
• Accept
• Try Next
• Fail
4. Edit the IP response field, most DNSBL servers respond with
127.0.0.2 but some respond with other additional IP addresses.
You will need to check with the provider of your particular
DNSBL.
5. Enter the response message returned when a match is found.
Then press Enter to enter these settings into your configuration
followed by clicking on Save.
Once an entry has been made to the configuration it can be edited
by double clicking on the entry or removed altogether by clicking
on Delete. The order in which DNSBL servers are checked can be
changed by highlighting an entry and using the Move Up and
Move Down buttons.
If you choose to accept mail from sites listed in the DNSBL, GMS Anti Spam
will add a header called X-DNSBL to indicate which DNSBL it was listed on.
This allows for filtering later on.
Local clients
The Local clients page maintains a list of IP addresses that you allow
to send mail using the address of the specified domain. If a
message is received from an IP address other than those listed
which uses the domain in its MAIL clause, the message is refused.
There are no local clients by default.
To add local clients:
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1. Select the domain from the drop down then Anti Spam,
Connection, Local Clients.
2. Click on Add New and type the IP address of the first host in
the text area and press the Enter button to add it to the list.
Add any further IP addresses then click on Save.
3. Specify the action to take when mail arrives from an IP address
which is not in the list, customising the rejection message as
required then click on the Update button.
Check on connection
Enable this option if you would like the check to take place
immediately on connection. If unchecked the check will be delayed
to give the sender the opportunity to authenticate to the server.
Check Allowed IP first
If this option is selected SMTP will first check to see if the sender is
either in the LocalIP range or has authenticated to the server. If they
are found to be connecting from a trusted IP address then the Local
Client check is not applied.
Allowed IPs
You can ban specific IP addresses from connecting to your server,
perhaps because they are known Spammers. By default no hosts
are banned. Unlike most of the others, setting this function up is
quite complex, so it’s described here in detail.
To ban hosts:
1. Choose Anti Spam, Connection, Allowed IPs to display this
page:
2. The list of IP addresses will initially be empty.
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3. The list must begin with an asterisk (*) on its own. This means
allow all IP addresses initially. To add this, click on Add New
then type an asterisk in the text area and press Enter.
4. Now specify the banned IP addresses using exclamation marks.
In the text area, click Add New again then type an exclamation
mark (!) followed immediately by the IP address of the first host
you would like to ban the press Enter to add this to the list. In
the above example, the entry “!22.22.44.44” shows how
entries appear in the list. Now if the IP address 22.22.44.44
ever attempts to connect to your server they will not be able to
send any mail and will receive the message indicated below.
5. To ban more hosts, repeat step 2. In the above example, the
entry “!33.33.33.55” shows how further entries appear in the
list. Click on Save when you have finished adding entries.
6. To remove a host, select it in the list on the right and press the
Delete button. You can remove all the entries in one go by
clicking on the Remove All button.
7. Specify the action to be taken when mail from a banned host
arrives (this applies to all hosts in the list), customising the
rejection message if necessary.
8. Click on the Update button.
Maximum recipients
You can specify how e-mail with multiple recipients is handled. This
is an ideal method of dealing with UCE that is generated by
sending a single e-mail message to a mail server, making it expand
a large number of “To” or “cc” header clauses. The mail server
does this by issuing multiple RCPT commands, so limiting the
number of RCPT clauses on your mail server restricts the expansion.
This should be enough to make the Spammer use another,
unprotected, mail server.
Having said this, there are reasons for setting a high RCPT value:
• Many legitimate mail servers use multiple RCPT clauses to
reduce network traffic for a common message. List servers do
this.
• Mail clients often use multiple RCPT clauses to send “cc” and
“bcc” copies of messages.
• Some messaging systems are incapable of recovery if a failure
occurs part way through a list of RCPT clauses.
We recommend a value between five and 10 for the maximum
number of RCPT clauses.
To configure the maximum number of recipients:
1. Choose Anti Spam, Limits, Recipients.
2. In the “Default maximum RCPT clauses” box, specify the
default maximum allowed. RFC 821 specifies that this should
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be no greater than 100 but you can set it higher — see the
above advice on choosing a value.
3. If you want a particular domain to use a limit other than the
default, specify its IP Address and default, and add it to the list.
See the help for details on this.
4. Specify the action to be taken when mail fails the test,
customising the rejection message if necessary.
Outbound message sizes
You can specify the maximum size of outbound messages that will
be accepted for onward transmission from a domain through the
server.
To limit outbound message sizes:
1. Choose Anti Spam, Limits, Outbound Sizes at either the System
or Domain levels.
2. In the "Maximum Outbound Message Size" box, type the
maximum size in KB that messages leaving this domain will be
restricted to then click on the Update button.
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Relay
By default, no mail relay is allowed — all RCPT clauses must be
local. If your server acts as a backup or relay for another server in a
non-local domain, you must allow relay for it as described here.
The mail relay check takes effect:
• After a remote mail server has connected to yours and
informed it who the mail is from and who it’s addressed to.
• Before the message itself is transferred.
If you select "Allow relay" this lets anyone anywhere send mail through your
mail server. You’ll probably end up relaying UCE and could be added to DNSBLs with the result your legitimate mail will not be sent either.
To configure relay:
1. Choose Anti Spam, Connection, Relay and select one of the
following:
• “Disallow relay but allow mail where MAIL clause or more
than one RCPT clause is local" — to deny access to your
mail server to all e-mail except that addressed to or being
sent from one of your local domains. This automatically
recognises local domains including POP domains.
• “Disallow relay, all RCPT clauses must be local” — to only
relay mail with local RCPT clauses. A remote mail server can
avoid the previous restriction by “spoofing”, pretending
that e-mail was sent from your domain. To stop this, use
the Local IP option because IP addresses are much more
difficult to forge; see “Local clients” on page 266.
2. If your mail server is acting as a backup or relay server for any
non-local domains, add these to the “Allow relay for the
following.” list. You can combine this with either of the above
options.
3. Specify the action to be taken when mail fails the test,
customising the rejection message if necessary.
Maximum messages
You can specify the maximum number of messages that will be
accepted in any 24 hour period, defined in two ways:
• From a particular domain, determined by the sending server’s IP
address. For example, you might specify that server
196.198.12.12 can send a maximum of five messages in any 24
hour period. This would produce an entry like this:
196.198.12.12:5
•
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To a particular user on the local server. For instance, you could
specify that user1@domain.dom can only receive 15 messages
in any 24 hour period. This would produce an entry like this:
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user1@domain.dom:15
To configure message limits:
1. Choose Anti Spam, Limits, Messages.
2. To add a server click on Add New, type its IP address in the text
box on the left and the number of messages in the right-hand
box then press Enter.
3. To add a user click on Add New, type their fully-qualified name
in the text box (e.g., user@CompanyA.dom) on the left and the
number of messages in the right-hand box and press Enter to
add them to the list.
4. When you are finished adding entries click on the Save button.
5. Keep the default failure messages and press the Update button.
Authenticate
You can set up GMS Anti Spam so that successful POP/IMAP logon
from a non-local client adds that client to the list of IP addresses
who are allowed to relay mail through your server. This is
particularly useful if you have a number of roaming users but still
want to maintain a strict anti-relay policy on your server. Similar
settings are also available to those authenticating directly to the
SMTP service. To do this:
1. Select Anti Spam, Bypasses, Authenticated Clients.
2. Choose one of the following for POP and IMAP
• Normal Anti Spam checks - This option disables POP/IMAP
before SMTP in that the normal GMS Anti-Spam anti-relay
checks will be enforced in addition to other Anti Spam
checks such as against DNSBL lists and filters.
• Allow relay but allow other checks - This option allows relay
for users who have previously authenticated over POP/IMAP
with their username and password. Once they are
authenticated they will be allowed to relay for the period
you specify as the expiry period. Other Anti Spam checks
such as filters and DNSBL lists will still be performed.
• Bypass all Anti Spam checks - This option allows relay for
users who have previously authenticated over POP with
their username and password. Any other Anti Spam checks
will be ignored for authenticated users.
Additionally you may specify whether or not any of the
authentication options above will also enable access to the
included Free/Busy information service.
An option to allow Free/Busy access for those authenticating to the
GMS Collaboration Service is also included, as the ability to specify
the longevity of these rights for both Relay and Free/Busy access.
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An authentication expiry time can also be specified for POP, IMAP
and Collaboration logons. This setting does not apply to SMTP
Authentication.
Authenticated IPs
This option allows you to enter a list of IP Addresses or IP Address
ranges that you would like to treat as if they had authenticated to
the server, whether they have actually authenticated or not.
Scripts
This option allows you to define an MML script which is able to act
on incoming mail at the stage of the protocol as defined by
selecting from the drop down menu. Multiple scripts may be run at
any point in the SMTP protocol.
To add a script go to the Anti Spam, Scripts page and click on the
Add New button. You will now be presented with a drop down
menu from which you can select the part of the protocol you would
like the script to act on, give the script a unique name, enter the
MML code into the large text area and click on the Update button.
If scripts already exist when you go to the Anti Spam, Scripts page
you will be presented with a list of these scripts. To remove a script
highlight it in the list and click on the Delete button. To edit the
script simply highlight it in the list and edit the details below.
For further information on MML scripts and how they work please
see the MML Programmers Guide available as part of the Gordano
Accessory Pack.
Connections
The number of connections to each of the SMTP, POP and IMAP
services can be restricted from the Anti Spam, Limits, Connections
page.
You can either allow unlimited connections to the service or
globally limit them by entering a figure in the “Limit to” box and
then pressing the Update button.
In addition, certain IP addresses can also be given different limits to
those set above by clicking on Add New and entering the IP address
and allowed number of connections in the appropriate boxes and
then pressing Enter to add them to the list. Again once you have
completed adding to the list press the Save button followed by the
Update button to confirm the changes.
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21.7 Checking Identity
You can set up checks that the sending server really is what it
claims to be. There are four types of check:
Sender of message
This will run a DNS Lookup on the IP address of the connecting host
to check that it matches the address given in the MAIL clause. For
details of how Spammers can change MAIL clauses, see “Forging a
message’s source” on page 235.
To turn on sender checking, press Identity on the toolbar and
simply select the “Do Reverse MX Lookup on FROM email address”
check box on the page Anti Spam, Identity, Sender. Specify the
action that should be applied to messages failing the check then
click on the Update button.
You can also specify if the checks should be applied to mail sent
FROM a local domain or not.
Receiver of message
This will run a DNS Lookup on the IP address of the given host to
check that it matches the address given in the RCPT clause. For
details of how Spammers can change RCPT clauses, see “Forging a
message’s source” on page 235.
To turn on receiver checking, press Identity on the toolbar and
simply select the “Do Reverse MX Lookup on RCPT email address”
check box on the page Anti Spam, Identity, Receiver. Specify the
action that should be applied to messages failing the check then
click on the Update button.
Machine name
This option forces use of the machine's IP address in the logs, or
performs a reverse lookup on the connecting IP address and records
the results in the logs. The machine name check ensures that the
connecting machine is what it claims to be. It performs a reverse
lookup on the IP address of a connecting machine. If this does not
match the name in the HELO command, the connection is rejected.
For example, if the remote machine sends the SMTP message
“HELO mail.companyA.dom” and its IP address does resolve to
mail.companyA.dom, the connection is accepted. If the result of
the lookup does not match, the connection is refused.
Some servers may have a non-existent or incorrect reverse lookup entry in
their name servers. If this is the case, the real source of the message will be
lost.
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To enable this option choose Anti Spam, Identity, Machine Name
and select one of the following options:
• “Use raw IP address in logs” — if you want the raw IP address
of the machine used in the Gordano logs rather than the
machine name.
• “Reverse lookup on IP and reject if no reverse lookup” — if you
want Anti Spam to perform a reverse DNS Lookup on the IP
address of the connecting machine and terminate the
connection if one does not exist.
• “Reverse lookup on IP and reject if not the same” — if you
want Anti Spam to perform a reverse DNS Lookup on the IP
address of the connecting machine and terminate the
connection if the results do not match. You can also elect to
drop the connection immediately after sending a response.
• “Accept and discard the message” — if you want Anti Spam to
perform a reverse DNS Lookup on the IP address of the
connecting machine and throw the message away if the results
do not match.
• “Deliver message as usual” — if this option is selected the
message will have any Reasons for failure added to the headers
for later filtering but will otherwise be delivered to the user as
normal. You can optionally elect to have the message delivered
to the users Quarantine folder rather than their Inbox.
• “Use result of reverse lookup in logs” — if you want Anti Spam
to use the result gathered from the reverse lookup in the logs
rather than the information given out by the connecting
machine.
• Finally you can elect to have the message copied to the system
Quarantine folder, but bear in mind this is only possible where
the message has actually been accepted by the server.
SPF
Sender Policy Framework (SPF) allows Domain owners to identify
approved sending mail servers for their domain in DNS. GMS can
verify the envelope sender address against this information, and
can distinguish authentic messages from forgeries before any
message data is transmitted.
Use TXT record
Traditionally SPF information is contained in TXT records in DNS and
this is the default setting. An example SPF record would look like
v=spf1 a mx ptr a:office.ntmail.co.uk mx:mail.gordano.com
mx:gate05.gordano.com ip4:62.172.232.231 ~all
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Use SPF record
TXT record types are not ideally suited to holding SPF records so a
new DNS Record type of SPF is being proposed. This uses the same
format as TXT records.
Check HELO clause identity
Enabling this option will cause the SPF check to be applied against
the identifier passed in the SMTP protocol HELO/EHLO clause.
Check MAIL clause identity
Enabling this option will cause the SPF check to be applied against
the domain passed in the SMTP protocol MAIL clause.
Use local policy
A local policy can be determined which can be applied to all SPF
checks. The default is to also included spf.trusted-forwarder.org in
checks. This is a white list for SPF checks and provides early
adopters of SPF a way of allowing legitimate email that is sent
through known, trusted email forwarders from being blocked by
SPF checks simply because the forwarders do not use some sort of
envelope-from rewriting system.
Use default SPF record
Specifies a default SPF record that should be used where the
sending domain does not have any SPF records at all. By default this
includes any A or MX records specified for the sending domain.
Reject if no SPF record
If no SPF record exists for the sending domain then simply reject the
connection.
Reject neutral results
The domain owner has explicitly stated that they cannot or do not
want to assert whether the IP address is authorized or not. A
neutral result MUST be treated exactly like the None result; the
distinction exists only for informational purposes.
Reject soft fail results
A soft fail should be treated as somewhere between a hard fail and
neutral. The domain believes the host isn't authorized but isn't
willing to make that strong a statement.
Reject hard fail results
A hard fail is an explicit statement that the client is not authorized
to use the domain in the given identity. The checking software can
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choose to mark the mail based on this, or to reject the mail
outright.
Reject permanent errors
A permanent error means that the domain's published records
couldn't be correctly interpreted. This signals an error condition
that requires manual intervention to be resolved, as opposed to the
temporary error.
Reject temporary errors
A temporary error means that the SPF client encountered a
transient error while performing the check. Checking software can
choose to accept or temporarily reject the message.
Add SPF header
If this option is enabled an SPF header will be added to each
incoming email indicating the result of the SPF lookup.
Permanent Reject with
The textual error to be returned when a permanent failure is
encountered, this is always preceded by a 550 SMTP reply code.
Temporary Reject with
The textual error to be returned when a temporary failure is
encountered, this is always preceded by a 451 SMTP reply code.
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21.8 AI Checks
The AI feature keeps watch on the traffic passing through your
system, spots any unusual traffic and prevents it from entering your
system. Unusual traffic may result from an unauthorised person
trying to use your system as a relay server. AI needs little or no
configuration and only acts in extreme circumstances.
Quick configuration
To turn AI checking on, select the “Allow xxxx clause checking”
check box on each page. The default AI values are adequate for
most circumstances. You only need to change anything if you want
to fine tune the system, or to replace temporary rejection of
messages with permanent rejection.
Details
AI acts on the MAIL clause, the RCPT clause or the IP address of the
sending server before a message is accepted for delivery. GMS
monitors messages passing through the server and counts how
many:
• Come from a given e-mail address, shown in the MAIL clause.
• Come from a given IP address.
• Go to a given e-mail address, shown in the RCPT clause.
Over a period of time the AI software builds up a profile of the
messages that pass through the Gordano mail server under normal
conditions. Once this profile has been created, the server checks to
see that the number of messages for that mail address in any
particular day does not exceed the average number of messages
multiplied by a factor you specify.
You can either reject the excess messages permanently or send a
“Retry later” message to show that the rejection is only temporary.
Note the following before making your choice:
• Temporary rejection lets the rejected e-mail be resent at a later
date. This may cause problems if the sending server is set up to
resend rejected messages after just a few seconds. If this does
happen, switch to permanent rejection.
• Permanent rejection may reject legitimate e-mail. For example,
a user may receive unusual amounts of e-mail for a genuine
reason.
Rejection messages must always be preceded by a three digit code
indicating the reason for refusal.
Defining “unusual traffic”
Anti Spam can run three types of check, all of which use these
parameters:
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Average Multiplier — the multiplier applied to the running
average. Only when the number of e-mails exceeds the product
of the two does Anti Spam start rejecting e-mails. This allows
for some natural fluctuation around the average on particular
days.
For example, if you set an Average Multiplier of two and the
Running Average for a particular user is three, the maximum
number of e-mail messages allowed per day will be six. The
seventh message will be rejected with the failure message you
specify.
Required Samples — the number of days for which GMS AntiSpam AI must sample your mail server traffic to build up a
profile of its e-mail throughput.
Over time the average is adjusted automatically at a maximum
rate of (Average Multiplier divided by Required Samples)
messages, giving a changing upper band.
Running Average Minimum — this is needed because no typical
statistics are available for a new account before it sends or
receives e-mail. When a new account is set up, Anti Spam, AI
allows a maximum throughput of messages to the account
before rejecting e-mail. This is calculated as:
Running Average Minimum * Average Multiplier
Any remote mail server exceeding this threshold will not be able
to deliver the excess e-mail until the following day.
Tuning the setup
The three pages which control AI are almost identical, so this
section uses the Sender page as an example. This controls how Anti
Spam monitors the MAIL clause to check how much e-mail is
coming from a particular user. For most purposes, the defaults
should be acceptable.
To configure MAIL clause AI checking:
1. Choose Anti Spam, AI, Sender to display this page:
2. Select the "Allow MAIL Clause AI checking" check box.
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3. In the Average Multiplier box, type the multiplier to apply to the
running average before Anti Spam AI starts rejecting mail.
4. In the Required Samples (days) box, specify the number of days
for which Anti Spam AI should sample your mail server traffic to
build up a profile of your e-mail throughput.
5. In the Running Average Minimum box, specify the threshold for
e-mail checking.
6. Specify the action to be taken when mail fails the test,
customising the rejection message if necessary.
7. Press the Update button.
21.9 Anti Spam Log entries
Anti Spam log names start with SL, followed by the date, then the
extension “.LOG”. For example SL990328.LOG. A typical GMS
Anti-Spam log entry might look like this:
SPAM 25 Sep 2002 15:26:12.234 H 08039 2 62.172.232.181 rates@mortgages.dom
sandy@company.dom Reject with "550 Phrase in email not acceptable" - Matched "*best rates
available*"
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21.10Anti-Spam Filters (User Level)
Defeating UCE is an ongoing battle not only against the
“spammers” but also in regards to the configuration you set for
your network. Using the options detailed above can lead to
compromises which may prevent some users from receiving
legitimate email or you may allow some content through that some
users may be offended by. The Anti Spam filters allows your users
to determine the level of protection they wish to set.
Anti Spam provides 1 user filter in the administration interface
which provides user level control over the Scored Words, Bayesian
and Message Quality filters for non GMS WebMail users. GMS
WebMail provides users with 5 further anti spam filters to enable
control of the messages they wish to receive in their inbox. GMS
WebMail users have a greater level of control over filters so if
available we would recommend that these are used in preference.
Below you will find details on how the user configures these files.
Further information can be found in the GMS Users Guide.
Junk Mail Filter
The Junk Mail Filter provides 3 settings to control how messages
failing the Scored Words, Bayesian and Message Quality filters are
treated. High is the most rigorous, through Medium to Low which
will give the lowest false positive chances but consequently the
highest probability of letting spam through to the users mailbox.
The options enforced with each setting are shown in the table
below.
High
Scored Rwords: 75
Bayesian Probability: 75
Maximum Allowed Message Defects: 0
Medium
Scored Rwords: 100
Bayesian Probability: 90
Maximum Allowed Message Defects: 1
Low
Scored Rwords: 200
Bayesian Probability: 95
Maximum Allowed Message Defects: 3
The user has the option of either immediately deleting or moving to
their quarantine folder any messages that fail the filter.
Anti Spam filter
The Anti Spam filter is designed in such a way that when it is
enabled it should greatly reduce the amount of spam the user sees
in their mailbox. This filter is configured by clicking on Quarantine
in the user area in the top left of the screen then clicking on Filter
Settings on the right hand side.
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This filter checks for messages with the following characteristics
and if found allows the user to carry out a number of filtering
actions. The characteristics are:
• Not addressed to me
• No reply address specified
• Reply address does not match from address
• Subject is all capitals
• No subject
Further information regarding this filter can be found in the GMS User Guide.
“The dedicated anti-spam filter” on page 83
Bayesian filter (User Level)
Bayesian based filters calculate the probability of a message being
junk based on the contents of that message. Unlike simple contentbased filters, Bayesian filtering learns from both good and bad
messages, resulting in a very efficient, self learning, anti-spam
system that will return very few false positives. Ideally, you should
start with a large number of messages that you have already
classified as bad, and another which you have classified as good.
These should then be fed into the Bayesian filter to prime it with
content. The filter will look at both good and bad messages,
analyzing both to calculate the probability of various characteristics
appearing in both good and bad messages.
For the Bayesian filter to be available to your users the files required
to run the filter must be installed in the gordano\bin directory on
your server. Once the files are in place the Bayesian filter option will
automatically become enabled. The required files can be
downloaded from the Gordano website http://www.gordano.com,
please select the appropriate files for your operating system.
Operating System
File name
Windows
af-win-intel.zip
Linux
af-linux-intel.tar.gz
Solaris
af-solaris-sparc.tar.gz
AIX
af-aix-rs6000.tar.gz
Further information regarding this filter can be found in the GMS User Guide.
“The Bayesian Filter” on page 88
Blocklist filter
The blocklist filter checks incoming email against entries in the
users blocklist address book. If a match is found the actions
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configured for this filter are applied. This filter can either quarantine
messages or delete them.
Further information regarding this filter can be found in the GMS User Guide.
“The Block List filter” on page 94
Confirmation filter
The confirmation filter is most likely the most powerful filter the
user has access to. Once configured inbound messages are checked
to determine if the senders address matches the search criteria the
user has set. For example the user may set the filter to detect
messages where the senders address does not appear in any of
their address books. Once a message is detected the server will
generate a confirmation request which is sent to the original sender
asking them to reply, to confirm their identity. During this period
the original message is stored in the users quarantine folder. When
the confirmation request is returned, the original message is moved
from the quarantine folder to the inbox.
If the confirmation request is not returned the message remains in
the quarantine folder until such time as this folder is purged. Once
purged GMS WebMail can be configured to add this address to the
Blocklist address book, as described above, and hence any further
mail from this address will be rejected.
Further information regarding this filter can be found in the GMS User Guide.
“Setting up Confirmation” on page 79
White List filter
The white list filter checks incoming email against entries in the
users address books, other than the Quarantine and Blocklist
address books. If a match is found the actions configured for this
filter are applied.
As the intention of this filter is to allow mail through that otherwise
may be caught by the other filters it is advisable to configure this
filter to be the first one run, that is the topmost filter in the list.
Further information regarding this filter can be found in the GMS User Guide.
“The White List Filter” on page 94
21.11Spam Reporting Account
Each installation of GMS includes an account to which users can
report any spam they receive to allow the administrator to fine tune
the servers anti-spam settings. The account is by default called
spam@yourdomain although you may change this if you wish via
the system variables.
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Messages can be sent directly to this account from local users only,
i.e. mail from external users will be refused unless they have first
authenticated to the server. GMS WebMail users will have an
additional button available in the message status bar which they
can click on to automatically forward the mail to the spam
reporting account.
A Reported Junk Mail report is available to Anti Spam
administrators to allow them to decide how to treat this reported
spam, including the ability to add it to the system Bayesian filter.
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Anti Virus
22 Anti Virus
22.1 Concepts
This section:
• Explains what viruses are.
• Explains why viruses are a problem.
• Explains how viruses can be sent within e-mail messages.
• Explains how Anti Virus stops viruses reaching your system.
What is a Virus?
A virus is a program designed to replicate itself without permission.
In addition, some make great efforts to avoid detection, damage
programs and/or data and transfer information and/or funds out of
the company to third parties. Viruses must be executed before they
can do anything to your computer system. To aid this, viruses
usually try to avoid detection by disguising themselves as a
legitimate program or attaching themselves to a trusted program.
Viruses are not only executable programs, but may also be
contained in the macros used by programs such as word
processors, spreadsheets etc.
Viruses, once introduced, can quickly propagate round a network
causing anything from service loss to destroyed document archives.
There are four types of Virus: hoax, non-malicious, malicious and
security breaching. For more details on these and their effects, see
the Virus primer on the Gordano Web site.
It is essential that you stop viruses reaching your system. For
example, a malicious virus may attack a system and cause data loss.
There are two major types of malicious virus that affect PCs:
• Boot-sector viruses affect the boot sector of system disks and
are run at startup, ensuring they are always placed in memory
before anything else on the system. They may also prevent the
system loading.
• File-infecting viruses infect executable files and are triggered
when these files are run.
The Cost of Virus Attacks
It can take many days of work to remove a virus from even a small
network of computers - for example, to remove a Word macro virus
that has successfully propagated round the network, the same
software must be run on each networked computer. While this is
being done, no employees can use Word. As well as scanning all
these machines for the virus, floppy disks and other removable
media must also be checked so that they cannot re-introduce the
virus to the network.
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The total cost of the virus attack can be significant, given the loss of
time by all employees plus time spent scanning the machines and
disks to remove the virus.
Viruses and E-mail
Many viruses are introduced to networks by e-mail messages. Any
serious virus needs to introduce an executable file onto your system
and e-mail, with its capacity to attach files, is an ideal way to do
this.
To protect your system from these viruses you must run a Virus
Checker at the point of entry, that is, on the mail server itself so
that messages and their attachments can be checked as they enter
your system and before they get the opportunity to propagate
through the network.
Hoax viruses cannot be stopped by virus checking software as they do not
contain any files to pass through the virus checker. You may want to try other
means of stopping them such as applying the restricted word filter in Anti
Spam. See “GMS Anti-Spam” on page 233.
How the Anti Virus Operates
Anti Virus can be configured to work with any Internet mail server
to provide automatic scanning and disinfection of email messages
and attachments. This bi-directional process can remove potentially
damaging viruses before they enter (or leave) the user's system.
This capability is now essential given the emergence of viruses such
as Nimda and Klez, which can infect Outlook users and their
correspondents when they open, or simply preview, an infected
email.
Anti Virus is integrated into the GMS server using a set of custom
DLLs or shared libraries. Due to the close integration of these
products performance is significantly increased. Coupled with the
fact that Anti Virus is multi-threaded this results in significantly
faster virus checking with minimal resource use. Multi-threading
means many messages can be scanned at the same time. Anti Virus
also removes the hassle of installing and configuring a separate
third party virus checker, not to mention the mailbox corruption
that can be caused by third party software editing mailboxes
unbeknown to GMS.
Gordano’s Anti Virus comes with two distinct Anti Virus engines,
providing both normal virus protection and protection from so
called Zero Hour threats.
The first of these, supplied by Authentium, provides an interface
between MIME and TNEF encoded messages and the virus
checking engine. It takes the encoded files, decodes them and
passes them to the virus checking software. If it finds a virus in the
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decoded file, it acts as you specify. Otherwise, the attachment is reattached and it is passed to the recipient in the normal way.
To maintain protection from viruses, keep your Anti Virus active, operational
and update it regularly.
The second engine, provided by CommTouch, protects from Zero
Hour threats. This engine is only called for messages that have
successfully passed through the Authentium engine. This provides a
second ring of defences against virus attack, specifically targeting
those viruses that are actively being transmitted across the Internet
at the time of checking.
If a message fails the check, it can be returned to the sender,
rejected, quarantined, re-directed to another mailbox for dealing
with later or allowed to pass through the system in the normal way.
In addition, you can generate an alert message for sending to the
Postmaster, the recipient and/or the sender of the message. If you
return the message to the sender you can append a message
warning them that there may be a virus in the message
attachment. Anti Virus will also allow you to dis-infect a virus
before it is sent on.
This dual approach to Virus protection is essential to provide full
protection from both new and existing virus threats. Zero Hour
cover provides protection from the time a new virus is released into
the wild until such time as the traditional Anti Virus companies
have time to implement and distribute a definition file specifically
designed to capture the virus. After a period of time, dependant on
how prolific the virus is, it will drop out of the scope of Zero Hour
protection.
Automatic Updates
With up to 300 new viruses being written each month regular
updates to your anti virus solution are essential in protecting your
system and your organisation’s reputation. It is very easy for a busy
administrator to forget or delay updates to virus signature files so
Gordano have added an automatic update facility to Anti Virus. The
automatic virus updates feature allows up to the minute awareness
of current viral threats. Being directly integrated with Gordano’s
products, the Anti Virus interface allows the Administrator to
determine when and how often the updates are to be received and
implemented. If preferred, updates may still be received
automatically but manually deployed. (see “Automatic updates” on
page 293).
22.2 Setting Up Anti Virus
This section describes how to set up Anti Virus. When you first
install Gordano products on your machine if you have chosen to
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install the anti virus options GMS Anti Virus will be automatically
enabled. GMS Anti Virus will operate for 28 days as a fully
functioning demonstration. Licence keys to extend operation
beyond that point can be obtained from sales@gordano.com
Although GMS Anti Virus is enabled on install the latest definition files may
not be present. See “Automatic updates” on page 293
Configuration
This screen allows you to configure all of the options pertaining to
the operation of both the traditional definition (or signature) based
Anti Virus engine and the Zero Hour protection based engine.
Zero Hour is a term given to the period between a virus being released in
the wild and Anti Virus vendors making updated virus definition files available.
Scanning Options
The options set here control the operation of the virus scanner,
which protocols it operates on and which activities cause the
message to be checked for viruses.
• Scan SMTP inbound\outbound messages — scans all internal
and external SMTP traffic. Enabled by default, this is the only
virus checking action normally carried out by other less security
conscious vendors.
• Scan POP messages on read — scans messages as they are read
from the POP service. Disabled by default as it has the effect of
slowing the performance of the POP service. Enabling this
option will provide further coverage for the zero hour period
due to the normal delay between a message being received on
the server and it being retrieved by a POP client.
• Scan WebMail attachments on attach — the scanning of
attachments as they are being attached to a message within
GMS WebMail not only provides protection against the
transmission of viruses but also stops viruses being stored on
the server prior to being delivered onwards where they can also
pose a risk.
• Scan WebMail messages on read — unlike POP and IMAP
scanning on read this option does not have a detrimental affect
on WebMail performance so is enabled by default.
• Scan IMAP messages on append — enabled by default this
option prevents messages infected with a virus entering the
server, or users mailbox, by the back door. To illustrate this
imagine a user has two accounts, one corporate on the
company mail server, and the other personal hosted by a third
party. The user sets both accounts up in Outlook and copies a
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message from the unprotected third party server to his account
on the corporate server.
Scan IMAP messages on read — scans messages as they are
read from the IMAP service. Disabled by default as it has the
effect of slowing the performance of the IMAP service.
Enabling this option will provide further coverage for the zero
hour period due to the normal delay between a message being
received on the server and it being retrieved by a IMAP client.
Scan Collaboration attachments on attach — enabled by
default this option will scan any files associated with calendar
entries prior to uploading those to the server. This also applies
to notes, tasks, etc.
Scan Collaboration attachments on read — likewise enabled by
default this option will scan any files associated with calendar
entries prior to delivery to the client. This also applies to notes,
tasks, etc.
Signature Scanning
To set up the way in which each message is treated with regards to
passing encapsulated files to the virus scanner select one of the
following:
• Decode email messages — this is the default action for
messages. Each message is broken into its constituent parts and
each of these passed to the scanner separately.
• Scan whole email messages — this option may be enabled in
addition to the above option to provide a secondary check of
the message. While this requires additional processing time for
a message you may want to enable it.
• Decode TNEF files — this is the default action for TNEF files.
Each file is broken into its constituent parts and passed
separately to the scanner.
• Scan whole TNEF files — this option may be enabled in addition
to the above option to provide a secondary check of the TNEF
file. While this requires additional processing time for a
message you may want to enable it.
• Scan inline text — enabling this option provides scanning of all
text that should be displayed in line within a mail client. This
check is useful if you suspect that a message may, for example,
contain malicious JavaScript.
Zero Hour Classification
The behaviour of the Zero Hour scanner is controlled with the
following settings:
• Enable Zero Hour classification checks — enabled by default.
The Zero Hour option is run after a standard virus check so is
only applied to messages that have already passed the
signature based check.
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Use strict checks — there are two levels of activity reported,
Medium and High. If this option is enabled both Medium and
High are treated as a potential virus. If it is not enabled only the
High option is treated as a virus. This option is disabled by
default as it can lead to a number of false positive results due to
being very cautious. If you enable this option we would
recommend that messages failing the check are placed in
quarantine and rescanned 24 hours later.
Fail on error — if this option is enabled messages that the Zero
Hour protection has been unable to classify, for whatever
reason, will fail the checks.
Re-scan messages on read if less than n days old — disabled by
default this option was added in to provide an even higher level
of protection. No matter how quickly any solution updates,
there is always the possibility of the odd message slipping
through the system. If this is enabled the checks will be re-run
against messages when they are read from the server.
Actions
By default the Anti Virus scanning engine is enabled. To disable it
choose Anti Virus, Actions and ensure the “Virus scanner enabled”
check box is not selected.
To set up the way an infected message is handled, select one of the
following:
• Return with — this is the default action. The message is
rejected and returned to the sender along with any message
you supply.
• Reject Message — the mail is rejected with a “500 This
message contained a virus” SMTP reply code.
• Redirect To — the message is redirected to the given account.
• Deliver Message as Usual — the message is delivered to the
intended recipient in the normal manner.
• Copy message to Quarantine folder — the message will be
copied to the quarantine folder. This folder can be accessed to
manage the quarantined messages allowing you to accept,
delete or forward these messages. See “Quarantine (domain
and system)” on page 144.
• Disinfect Message — this option can be set to disinfect viruses
before the message is returned, redirected or delivered as usual.
Note that proprietary media subtypes such as ms-tnef or x-msdownload
cannot be disinfected if they contain a virus. This is due to the proprietary
format of these files. GMS Anti-Virus will however still recognise a virus
contained in files of this type.
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Configuring Alerts
You can alert a number of people of any attempt to send a virus
through the system. Choose Anti Virus, Alerts and select one or
more of the following:
• Alert Postmaster — to send an alert to the administrator of the
system select this check box. If you would like the alert to go to
someone other than the postmaster please enter their email
address in the box provided, otherwise the default of
postmaster@domain.name is used.
• Alert User — to inform the intended recipient of a virus that
someone has attempted to send them an infected file.
• Alert Sender — send a message to the sender of the file
alerting them to the fact that they attempted to send an
infected file through the system. (They may not know that the
message contained a virus.)
Domain Actions
Anti Virus actions can be configured separately for each domain or
you can simply elect to use the global values that are set under
Actions and Alerts. You can also disable GMS Anti-Virus altogether
for a selected domain or domains. This allows you to provide a
value added service to selected customers.
Domain Alerts
As for Domain Actions you can over-ride the global settings on a
domain by domain basis by entering details here for the currently
selected domain.
User Level Actions and Alerts
User Profiles provide a method of setting Anti Virus Actions and
Alerts down to the user level. The user level settings may differ
from the System and Domain level settings outlined above. This is
useful where you may want to provide a more relaxed set of actions
for some users on the system while maintaining a strict Anti Virus
policy for others.
For more information on this and other profile options See “Profile
Management” on page 99.
Virus Reports
The Reports option in the menu provides 2 reports relating to GMS
Anti-Virus. They are:
• Virus Scan report - this report shows messages that have passed
through the virus scanner and whether or not they were found
to contain a virus. The first step asks you what you would like
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included in the report. You can choose to display results for all
messages that have been scanned and/or messages that were
found to contain a virus. Simply check the options you require,
select the days you would like the report to cover from the list
of dates then click on the Report button. You can select
multiple days from the list by holding down the “Control” key
on your keyboard while selecting the dates with the mouse
pointer. See “Virus Scan Report (domain and system)” on
page 146.
Virus List report - A list of Viruses the system is protected from
can be displayed when selecting this report. Enter the name of
the virus you wish to check the system is protected from and
click Report. If you are unsure of the complete name of the
virus you can use the wildcard “*”. For example searching for
nim* would return results including the following:
Nimda.A@mm
Nimda.B@mm
Nimda.E@mm
See “Virus List Report (domain and system)” on page 147.
Reading Zero Hour information
The Zero Hour virus protection will write information into the
headers of messages it has processed. This information can be used
to determine how the Zero Hour check has processed the message
and to determine the results of that processing.
X-Zero-Hour-AV-Classification: 0 [62.172.232.100]
X-Zero-Hour-AV-Classification-RefId:
str=0001.0A0B0203.444C8E3E.0011,ss=1,fgs=0
Classifications are:
0 - Unknown\Undetermined
1 - Medium
2 - High
4 - Non Virus
We treat 2 as a virus and 1 if strict mode is enabled.
The RefId is an internal reference used when reporting false
positives via the Quarantine reports. If you ever need to query the
status of a false positive report you will need to quote the RefId.
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23 Automatic updates
23.1 What are automatic updates?
Both GMS Anti-Virus and GMS Anti-Spam provide the facility of
obtaining automatic updates to virus signatures and dynamic word
lists respectively. These are controlled from the automatic updates
pages with each of the options being individually described below.
The technology used to perform automatic updates is patented in the
United Kingdom under patent number GB2374163. A patent application
has been filed in the United States and is pending approval.
23.2 How updates work
GMS contacts Gordano via email at the intervals you have defined
to check if there are any updates that should be applied. If there
are, the Gordano server will send a reply with the new files
attached. The files are then placed in the “update” directory.
They stay in this directory until the Gordano Manager service moves
them to their normal working directory. This is done upon there
arrival in the folder specified above.
The reason for writing the files to this location is to allow GMS to
dynamically unload the SMTP and Configuration Server services.
GMS does not need to stop and restart any services ensuring a
smooth definition file update process.
Request Update Now option
There is a Request Update Now option on each of the individual
product update pages of the interface. This sends the request email
to Gordano immediately and the update files are returned within a
few minutes.
The files in the installation may not be the latest files available. For the latest files use the Request Update Now option.
If you have just installed GMS you should use the Request Update Now
option to retrieve the updates as soon as possible.
23.3 General Update information
Some of the information required for updates to progress correctly
is common to all updatable products. This information includes:
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Send update warnings
If you would like to be notified if an update event occurs then
select this option, you will receive warnings of successful updates
as well as any update failures.
Send warnings to
Enter the address that you would like warnings of any problems
arising out of the update procedure mailed to, this is pre filled with
the email address of the system administrator but may be changed
to any valid email address you wish.
Passphrase
This will be supplied to you at the time you purchase your license
for the relevant products from Gordano Ltd. Once your purchase
has been completed and a passphrase issued to you please enter it
here. The passphrase is essential to allow you access to the updated
files. Please take care to enter the passphrase correctly, an incorrect
passphrase will stop you receiving your updates.
When you purchase a key for GMS Anti-Virus sales will ask you for a
passphrase. You should enter the same phrase here that you gave to the
Gordano sales person. Note that these passphrase are case sensitive. If you
are just running a demo of the software you can just elect to use the
default pass phrase by leaving the box blank.
23.4 Anti Spam
This feature allows you to automatically obtain the latest dynamic
word files and Bayesian filter from Gordano Limited. With Anti
Spam installed there is no need to go and retrieve updates
manually, the software does it for you.
The topmost line on this page will show you the date of the most
recently applied dynamic word list.
To configure this option select System Administration, Automatic
Updates, Anti Spam and select one or more of the following:
• Send Updates To — The email address that updates should be
sent to. By default this is set to gmsas@<domainname>. If this
account exists on your system as a valid user you should change
this address to an account that does not exist on your server.
• Automatic updates — Enables/disables the automatic update of
dynamic word files and Bayesian filter.
• Update Every — The interval in days, hours or minutes between
each check for new updates.
Once you have completed your configuration click on the Update
button to confirm the changes.
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The Request Update Now button allows you to immediately send
off a request for the most recent updates without having to
reconfigure your schedule.
23.5 Anti Virus
This feature allows you to automatically obtain the latest virus
signature files. With GMS Anti-Virus installed there is no need to go
and retrieve updates manually, GMS Anti-Virus does it for you.
The topmost line on this page will show you the current state of
your GMS Anti-Virus installation. It contains three sets of numbers,
the first of these shows the version of the AV engine you are
running, the second the date of the virus signature files currently
installed and the third the date of the macro signature files
installed.
The virus signature files contain all the information required to
enable Anti Virus to recognise any standard viruses while the macro
signature files are specifically for macro viruses, e.g. viruses written
in Microsoft Word or Excel macro languages.
To configure this option select System Administration, Automatic
Updates, Anti Virus and select one or more of the following:
• Send Updates To — The email address that updates should be
sent to. By default this is set to gmsav@<domainname>. If this
account exists on your system as a valid user you should change
this address to an account that does not exist on your server.
• Automatic Virus definition updates — Enables/disables the
automatic update of virus definitions.
• Update Every — The interval in days, hours or minutes between
each check for new updates.
Once you have completed your configuration click on the Update
button to confirm the changes.
The Request Update Now button allows you to immediately send
off a request for the most recent updates without having to
reconfigure your schedule.
23.6 Zero Hour Proxy
The Zero Hour Proxy settings only need to be set if you do not have
direct outbound access to the Internet on Port 80 from your GMS
server.
Use Proxy server
Enable this option if you need to use a Proxy server to access
external web sites from your GMS server.
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Address
The fully qualified address of your Proxy server, i.e.
proxy.domain.com
Port
The port that your Proxy server answers requests on, this is normally
8080.
Authentication Method
Most Proxy servers do not require authentication so you should not
need to change this from the default. In the event that your Proxy
server does require authentication there are two options available
to you.
1. Basic — A plain text username and password combination are
required to access the Proxy server
2. NTLM — The Proxy server uses a challenge/response
mechanism to authenticate users. Commonly used by Microsoft
based servers such as IIS.
Username
Specify the username required to authenticate to the Proxy server.
Password
Specify the password associated with the username entered above.
23.7 Freebusy
This page allows you to enable the automatic pushing out of
updates to the GMS Outlook connector. Once the Connector has
been installed on a client PC all future updates to the connector
can be pushed out to the client automatically.
In order to be pushed out to the client the updates must be placed
in the following directory on the server where basedir is the root of
the Gordano installation.
\<basedir>\collaboration\update
The following files can be updated:
• gmsmapi32.dll (compulsory)
• gmsdb.dll (optional)
• gmszlib.dll (optional)
• gmsssleay32.dll (optional)
• gmslibeay32.dll (optional)
To enable automatic updates for all clients connecting to the server
first place the files in the correct directory then select the option
Enable Automatic Updates and click on the Update button. Each
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client that connects to the server will then check it is running the
latest versions of the above files and if required will have the
updates pushed out to them automatically.
We strongly recommend copying all of the files each time to avoid any
consistency issues.
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GMS Collaboration Server
24 GMS Collaboration Server
24.1 What is GMS Collaboration Server?
GMS Collaboration Server allows you to integrate Microsoft
Outlook tightly with your email system and allow your users to
work collaboratively by sharing information between users. Users
can use and share with others advanced Outlook features such as
tasks, journals, notes, address books, contacts, calendars and
shared/public folders, without the need for Microsoft Exchange.
Support for these facilities is also available in the GMS WebMail
client allowing remote web based access to email, calendar events,
alarms and contact lists.
Outlook Contacts are automatically mapped to the users personal
address book in GMS WebMail and vice versa, while access to
global address books is via the Outlook Address Book interface.
Access rights are obeyed at all times, setting up those rights was
described earlier. See “Shared and Public Folders” on page 154..
The GMS Collaboration client fully supports standard Outlook
features such as voting, scheduling, task assignment, read receipts,
automatic archiving and so on. External e-mail editors such as MS
Word are also completely compatible.
Both the Collaboration Server and Client are fully UTF-8 aware to
provide full support for multiple languages including multi-byte
languages such as Japanese and Chinese.
In order to use the GMS Collaboration Server the GMS server must
have a valid GMS Collaboration key installed, and the machine
running Microsoft Outlook must have the GMS Collaboration client
installed. The Collaboration client is a Microsoft Outlook plug-in
that integrates tightly into the Outlook user interface providing
seamless integration with the GMS server software. No license is
required for the client installation, however only the licensed
number of clients may connect to the server.
Full installation instructions for the GMS Collaboration client are
included in the GMS User Guide.
Like other products developed by Gordano Ltd, the GMS
Collaboration Server has been developed with open standards in
mind at all times. As a consequence of this a number of other
clients are able to access shared Calendars and Tasks such as Apple
iCal, Mozilla Calendar, Bloomba, EventSherpa, KDE Kontact, and so
on. In fact any client that supports the iCal standard should be
compatible with GMS Collaboration server. Full details of how to
configure these additional clients can also be found in the GMS
Users Guide.
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24.2 Collaboration free/busy
GMS Collaboration Server has the ability to act as an Internet free/
busy publisher for all users on a GMS Server. Scheduling is also
supported using this feature. The provision of a free/busy server
negates any security worries associated with the use of public free/
busy servers.
Enabling publishing of free/busy information allows all users of MS
Outlook on the same server to automatically see whether other MS
Outlook users are free or busy at certain times of the day
dependant on the entries in their Outlook Calendars. Free/busy
information is also published for GMS WebMail users allowing their
information to be available to Outlook Scheduling.
Invitations to meetings or events can be sent to users to invite them
to attend meetings and their responses can be used to finalise
meeting plans in the normal way.
Private entries may either be returned to free/busy queries or not,
depending on your preferences. All private entries will be shown as
busy.
You may also set the length of time that information should be
published for, the default is 61 days, approximately two months,
but you may set this to whatever period you prefer in days.
Individual users may over ride these settings if they wish by editing
their private information under My Account, Freebusy.
24.3 Email only mode
The GMS Collaboration client may also be used without the GMS
Collaboration Server being enabled, this is known as email only
mode. Using the client in email only mode provides full access to
sharing of mail folders only. Personal calendars, tasks and notes are
still available within Outlook but these can not be shared with other
users on the system unless the GMS Collaboration Server is
enabled.
Gordano believes that at this time Outlook with the GMS
Collaboration client installed in email only mode, is the only
standard mail client that allows both the setting of and accessing of
Access Control Lists in order to allow full sharing of mail folders
amongst groups of users.
Full instructions on using the GMS Collaboration client for MS
Outlook are available in the GMS User Guide.
24.4 Automatic client updates
Once the GMS Outlook Connector has been installed on a client PC
all future updates to the connector can be pushed out to the client
automatically. In order to be pushed out to the client the updates
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must be placed in the following directory on the server
\<basedir>\collaboration\update where basedir is the root of the
gordano installation.
The following files can be updated:
gmsmapi32.dll (compulsory)
gmsdb.dll (optional)
gmszlib.dll (optional)
gmsssleay32.dll (optional)
gmslibeay32.dll (optional)
We strongly recommend copying all of the files each time to avoid
any consistency issues.
To enable automatic updates for all clients connecting to the server
first place the files in the correct directory then go to System
Administration, Automatic Updates, Freebusy and enable the
option "Enable automatic updates". Each client that connects to
the server will then have the updates automatically pushed out to
them.
It is also possible to enable/disable automatic updates at the
domain and individual user levels but you will need to edit the
domain or user variables directly as there is no configuration page.
The relevant variable is “CollaborationEnableUpdates”, set this to
“0” to disable updates and “1” to enable updates. The standard
user/domain/system hierarchy is followed so that you can enable
updates globally but switch them off for specific users.
Client Updates
There is no interface on the client side to handle automatic
updates. However some new directories and files will be present as
follows.
<base>/GMS/MAPI/Updates - This is where downloaded updates
are stored until they can be installed.
<base>/GMS/MAPI - This is where installed updates are stored.
Updates are downloaded on startup and are only installed once
Outlook has been re-started. The user is sent an email to remind
them that they will need to re-start Outlook in order for the
updates to be applied.
For the update mechanism to work the version number of the
updates must be greater than, or equal to the installed version
number AND the MD5 of the DLLs must be different.
To remove a set up updates, stop Outlook and delete all DLLs in the
GMS/MAPI directory. You will probably want to disable updates for
the user before doing this to prevent the update being downloaded
from the server again.
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How do I obtain updated client files
There are two methods of obtaining new client files to use with the
automatic update service.
1. Install the new Outlook connector on a client PC and take a
copy of the files from the windows\system32 directory on that
PC; or
2. Run “msiexec /a GMS-Collab-MSIv1.0-3625.msi” and specify a
local directory for the network location drive. The files will be
automatically extracted into the specified directory for you.
We would recommend option 2 above as the most suitable option
for the majority of situations.
24.5 GMS & Microsoft® Exchange ActiveSync
What is EAS?
Microsoft® Exchange ActiveSync is an XML-based protocol that
communicates over HTTP (or HTTPS). It is used to synchronise email,
contacts, calendar, tasks and notes between a messaging server
and a mobile device without the need to install a client application
on the mobile device. The protocol also provides mobile device
management and policy controls.
Initially a client will use the Autodiscover command to get a user’s
account configuration. The client can then view and modify server
data related to that account, this data can include email messages
and attachments, folders, contacts, and calendar requests. The
client then uses the Provision command to send device information
to the server and to get and subsequently acknowledge security
policy settings from the server. Next, the client uses the FolderSync
command to retrieve the folder hierarchy of the user.
How do I use EAS?
The use of EAS requires you to have an active GMS Collaboration
license in place and is controlled via your GMS profiles for users. A
user must be in a profile that has EAS active under the privileges
section.
To activate EAS under profiles, you will need to select a domain
from the administration interface dropdown, located in the top left
hand corner. From there, go to Profiles > (Name of profile you wish
to enable EAS under) > Privileges. Here you will see a tick box for
“May use Microsoft® Exchange ActiveSync”, which you will need
to tick and then click on Update Settings to activate the feature.
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EAS Troubleshooting
EAS in GMS has been designed to use the GMS Collaboration port,
which is set in the administration interface under System
Administration > Performance > Ports. By default, this is usually
either 8376 for non-secure access or 8377 for secure/SSL
connections. For some users attempting to set up their Android
devices for use with EAS, this can be a potential issue as some
devices do not allow you to specify the port to connect on and uses
the default port 80 dictated by the device. In these instances, a
workaround is possible by using the IP Connection feature in GMS,
to redirect traffic from Collaboration attempting to connect on port
80 to the correct port specified for the service.
You can find further information on the IP Connection feature and
how to set it up, on section 13.3, page 164 of this Administrators
guide.
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24.6 CalDav and CardDav Functionality
What is CalDav and CardDav?
CalDAV is an Internet standard allowing a client to access
scheduling information on a remote server. It extends WebDAV
(HTTP-based protocol for data manipulation) specification and uses
iCalendar format for the data. The access protocol is defined by
RFC 4791.
CardDAV is an address book client/server protocol designed to
allow users to access and share contact data on a server. The
CardDAV protocol was developed by the IETF and has been
published as RFC 6352, and uses vCard format for the data.
CalDav/CardDav are an XML-based protocol that communicates
over HTTP (or HTTPS) and which is an extension of WebDav
protocol. It is used to synchronise contacts, calendar, tasks between
a messaging server and a mobile device without the need to install
a client application on iOS devices, but is needed for Android
mobile devices.
In Short, CalDav allows users to set up a connection to their
messaging server, in order to sync their calendar data from GMS to
mobile devices, Mac OSX computers and Outlook (with an
additional plugin). CardDav allows users to sync their contacts with
their own clients from GMS.
How can I use CalDav and CardDav?
The only requirement for using CalDav and CardDav in GMS is to
have a GMS Collaboration license in place. Details on how to set up
a device or Outlook to use these features can be found in the GMS
User guide and on our Knowledge base located on the GMS
website.
24.7 GMS Drive & WebDav
What is GMS Drive & WebDav?
Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV) is an
extension of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) that allows
clients to perform remote Web content authoring operations. A
working group of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) defined
WebDAV in RFC 4918.
The WebDAV protocol provides a framework for users to create,
change and move documents on a server, typically a web server or
web share.
GMS Drive, like WebDAV, is a feature that allows you to view your
stored Webmail documents on your desktop, via a network drive,
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set up by the user on their PCs. Documents placed on the network
drive will also be uploaded to your documents in Webmail. This also
introduces WebDav features which allows you to sync your
documents to mobile devices (with a 3rd party application) and
Mac OSX computers
How Can I use GMS Drive/WebDav
A GMS Collaboration license is required for Drive/WebDAV usage
on your devices. Assuming you have the license in place, you can
download the GMS Drive application from your top level
Documents folder in Webmail. The setup process and information
on how to setup WebDAV usage with GMS, can be found in the
GMS User Guide.
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25 GMS Archiver
25.1 Setting up GMS Archiver
The following steps are necessary to get your GMS Archiver
account up and running:
• Add a user profile for GMS Archiver.
• Add a GMS mail account.
• Disable the account’s mailbox.
• Configure the account to use the GMS Archiver robot.
• Configure your server to send message logs to the GMS Archive
account.
Adding a GMS Archiver profile
Since the GMS Archiver account will be storing archives of all the
messages that pass through your mail server the account size can
grow quite large. If you impose account size limits on some of your
users it is important that the GMS Archiver account is not assigned
to a user profile with a small account limit. For this reason it is good
practice to create a separate profile just for the GMS Archiver
account. This is done in the following way:
1. Logon to the Gordano interface as a system administrator.
2. Select System Administration, Profiles.
3. Select the System Base Profile in the list of profiles.
4. Click on the “Clone To” icon and give the new profile a name,
for example “GMS Archiver”.
5. Click on the OK button.
You can then edit this profile at any time to increase or decrease
the account size limits. The limit you set will be governed by the
amount of mail that passes through a domain. For example if your
domain processes 100 messages per day with an average size of
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1MB you should allow a mailbox and account size of about 50MB.
The message logs are zipped before being sent to the GMS
Archiver account so in the above example the zipped logs would be
approximately 40MB. Setting a limit of 50MB will allow for days
where email traffic is greater than usual. Note that if the message
containing the zipped messages exceeds the size you set here the
message will be rejected as too large and that day’s email will not
be archived.
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Adding a mail account
Log on to the Gordano interface on the machine that has the GMS
Archive executable installed. Then select the Domains & Users,
Domain page in the interface and click on the New User button in
the secondary toolbar. Enter the name of the account to be added,
for example “GMSArchiver”. Then enter and confirm a password
for the account.
Make sure the option “Create mailbox for each new account” is
unchecked then select the profile you have just created for GMS
Archiver and click on the Add button to complete the addition.
You can add as many accounts as your mail server license permits and configure all of them to use the GMS Archive robot. For example you might
want to have a separate GMS Archive account for each domain on your
main mail server in order to simplify message retrieval on a domain by
domain basis.
Disabling the mailbox
GMS Archiver stores the archives it receives in a directory that you
specify. This is a separate area from where the account’s mailbox is
kept. In order to avoid ending up with two copies of the messages
that GMS Archiver receives it is a good idea to ensure the mailbox
for the GMSArchiver account is disabled. This also prevents all the
search requests sent to GMS Archiver being kept needlessly.
To disable the mailbox, assuming you mistakenly enabled it above,
log on to the Gordano administration interface and select the
Domains & Users, Domain, Username, Preferences page. Then
ensure that the “Save nothing locally” option is selected then click
on the Update button.
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Configuring the GMS Archiver robot
Once the mail account has been added select the Domains & Users,
Domain, Username and then the Mail Processing tab for the user
account you have just added. Now select “GMS Archiver” from the
drop down marked “Select Robot” and click on the Configure
button. This will display the configuration options for GMS Archiver
as described below:
•
•
•
•
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Message Logs Directory
Specify the directory where the message logs for this GMS
Archiver account should be stored. This directory should exist
on your server.
Send Alert Emails To
Enter an email account that will receive alerts of any problems
with the account, i.e. disk space exceeded.
Delete Oldest Logs
If the maximum disk space entered is reached and this box is
checked the logs will be deleted strictly in order of oldest first.
This option is enabled by default.
Max Disk Space
The maximum amount of disk space allocated to the archive
store measured in MB. This will depend on the amount of mail
you receive and how long you want to keep messages for. For
example if you have 100 messages pass through your domain
each day, averaging 1MB in size, you can expect your zipped
daily archive files to have an average size of 40MB. If you want
to keep messages for a year you will need to specify a disk
space of at least 365 x 40 = 14,600MB. It is a good idea to add
10% to this to cover any busy mail days. It is also
recommended that you review this setting periodically as the
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amount of daily email traffic in most organisations is steadily
increasing. Once this limit is reached the oldest messages will
be deleted until there is enough space for the new messages.
Require Password
Check this option if you wish to enforce a password
requirement for all archive searches. The password used is the
password entered for the account created earlier in this section.
Accept Search Requests from
A list of email addresses that the GMS Archiver robot will
accept requests from. To add an email address click on the Add
button then enter the address in the text area and press Enter.
Repeat for any further addresses then click on the Save button.
To remove an address simply highlight it in the list and click on
Delete. Clicking on the Remove All button will remove all
addresses at once.
Search requests from any address not listed will be refused. If no addresses
are entered searches will be accepted from any address.
When you have finished setting up all the details for the GMS
Archiver account click on the Update button. To disable the
robot click on the Disable button, the robot will no longer be
associated with the account.
Sending the message logs to the GMS Archiver robot
Now that the GMS Archiver account is configured and ready to
compile an archive you need to tell GMS to send daily updates of
messages passing through the server to the GMS Archiver account.
This is done in the following way.
1. Log on to the GMS interface on the machine that the messages
will pass through.
2. Select the domain from the drop down and then go to the
Domain Administration, Logging, Message Logging page.
3. Select the “Configuration for GMS Archiver account” option
and enter the fully qualified address of the GMS Archiver
account, i.e. GMSArchiver@domain.dom in the space provided.
Early versions of GMS Archiver may refer to this setting as “Configuration
for eSarah account”
4. Click on the Update button.
5. The “Manual configuration” option will now be selected and
the other log options will have been automatically configured
to their optimum settings for GMS Archiver.
6. Repeat this process for each domain that you wish to archive.
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7. If you wish to archive your relay logs as well as your message
logs select the System Administration, Logging, Relay Logging
page.
25.2 Retrieving messages from the archives
There are two methods of searching and retrieving messages from
the GMS Archiver archives
• Using the Gordano Interface
• Via an email request to the GMS Archiver account.
Interface method
The GMS Archiver archives can be queried by going to System
Administration, Logging and clicking on the Off Site Search button
in the secondary toolbar. On this page enter the name of the GMS
Archive account and the password you gave the GMSArchiver
account when you created it. Then enter your search criteria.
Wildcards may be used when making searches, for example
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entering “user*” in the From field would find both
user@somedomain.dom and user@otherdomain.dom.
Select the dates that the search should be run on from the drop
down boxes provided, and enter the email address that the results
of the search should be sent to.
The information returned by the search can be limited by setting
the number of matching results to return. While the Return option
allows you to select how the results of the search are returned to
you. There are three options available for this, as follows:
• Index - Returns an index of the results, you can then select
which messages you would like to see from this index file and
request them back from GMS Archiver. For example an index
might contain the following message details:
[] id = company.dom,2012-09-25,00000014
# From: "GMS Communicator" <List@Company.dom>
# To: "Jacks@Company.dom" <Jacks@Company.dom>
# Subject: Welcome to new list
If you want to see the full message click on reply and enter a X
between the square brackets [] For example:
>[X] id = company.dom,2012-09-25,00000014
># From: "GMS Communicator" <List@Company.dom>
># To: "Jacks@Company.dom" <Jacks@Company.dom>
># Subject: Welcome to new list
Click on send and in a short time GMS Archiver will send you
the full contents of any messages you have marked with an X.
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Messages in a single email - All messages matching the
search will be returned to you in a single email.
Messages in a separate email - All messages matching the
search results will be returned to you, each in an individual
email message.
Email method
You can send an email message to the GMS Archiver account from
an email address that is authorised to query the GMS Archiver
archives. The email message must be in the following format:
To save time, if you have a GMS WebMail account you could set up a template that has these details pre filled.
Password = GMSArchivepassword
SearchToDate = 2012-09-24 00:00:00
SearchFromDate = 2012-09-20 00:00:00
From = *
To = *
BodyContains = *
Subject = *
ResultsLimit = 50
ResultsFormat = Index
ResultsTo = postmaster@company.dom
Lets look at the lines of the message in more detail
Password
This is the password you gave the GMS Archiver account when you
first set it up. If this line is not present then the search will be
rejected.
SearchToDate
This date must be specified in the format “yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss”.
GMS Archiver will return messages logged prior to this date that
match your other search criteria. This line is optional and can be
removed if you don’t want to specify a date.
SearchFromDate
This date must be specified in the format “yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss”.
GMS Archiver will return messages logged after this date that
match your other search criteria. This line is optional and can be
removed if you don’t want to specify a date.
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From, To, BodyContains, Subject
These define the search terms that GMS Archive will use to find the
messages you want to retrieve. For example if you want to retrieve
all messages to and from userA@company.dom you would have:
From = userA@Company.dom
To = userA@Company.dom
At least one of these lines should be included in the message. The
others can be removed if required. You can use standard wildcards
in your search terms such as * and ?.
ResultsLimit
Specify the number of results that you want the search to return. If
you don’t want a specific number you should enter “All”.
ResultsFormat
This is the format the results will be returned in. There are three
options available for this, as follows:
• Index - Returns an index of the results, you can then select
which messages you would like to see from this index file and
request them back from GMS Archiver. Type “Index” to get the
results in this format.
• Messages in a single email - All messages matching the
search will be returned to you in a single email. Type
“SingleMessage” to get the results in this format.
Messages in a separate email - All messages matching the
search results will be returned to you, each in an individual
email message. Type “Manymessages” to get the results in this
format.
ResultsTo
This is the email address you want the results to be sent to. This
allows you to direct search results straight to the person that
requested the search.
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Troubleshooting
26 Troubleshooting
Start with this section if you have problems with GMS. It indicates
where to look to fault find problems and gives examples of typical
problems.
This section covers:
• What you need to know to find faults on your network.
• Testing the GMS installation.
• Checking the network.
• Checking your DNS.
• Checking sending of mail.
• Checking collection of mail by POP3.
All administrators who have GMS problems or solve problems for
others should read this section.
For answers to frequently-asked questions which do not relate to problems,
see “Frequently-asked Questions” on page 333.
26.1 Preparing to Find Faults
This section explains what you need to know to find faults on your
network.
In order to diagnose Internet connectivity and mail problems, you
need the following information. In this section we use the examples
given here for illustration:
Description
Example value
IP address of your mail server
123.123.123.123
IP address of your DNS server
123.123.100.100
A Name of your mail server
mail.company.dom
MX name of your mail server
company.dom
A well known Web site.
www.gordano.com
Unless stated, we assume you are working on your mail server.
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26.2 Testing the Installation
Once GMS is installed, carry out the following tests to ensure that it
is working correctly.
Mail the postmaster, as follows:
1. Open your mail client and set it to use the name of the mail
server for both SMTP and IMAP/POP servers.
2. Set your mail client to use the username “postmaster”.
3. Send mail to “postmaster@domain.dom” (<domain.dom>
being the domain you specified during installation).
4. Retrieve mail from the postmaster account — you should see
the message you just sent.
Mail a new user, as follows:
1. Point your web browser at http://server.domain.dom:8000.
2. Log on using the account postmaster@domain.dom and the
password that you supplied during installation.
3. Add a new user to the server, then send mail to them and make
sure it arrives safely in their mailbox.
Mail a remote user, as follows:
1. Send a mail message to someone on a remote mail server and
ask them to respond to you. Check that the mail has been sent
out correctly and that a response is indeed received. This may
take some time.
If you have problems with any of these, the most likely cause is that DNS is
not set up correctly. There are some useful tips on checking this in “Troubleshooting” on page 317.
2. There is a special account test@gordano.com that you can use
for this test. It automatically sends a response back to you.
3. If you are on a dial-up connection, you must set up a dial-up
schedule first.
26.3 Checking the Network
Using ping
To check that the network is working, use the program called ping.
This is an MS-DOS program so can only be run from a command
prompt. It sends a packet to a remote machine and displays the
time it takes to get a reply from it.
To ping a machine, type ping followed by the mail server’s IP
address:
ping 123.123.123.123
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There are several likely responses:
• A set of replies like those shown below confirms that the
Internet Protocol is successfully installed on the machine.
C:\>ping 194.205.1.2
Pinging 194.205.1.2 with 32 bytes of data
Reply from 194.205.1.2: bytes=32 time-15ms TTL=125
Reply from 194.205.1.2: bytes=32 time-15ms TTL=125
Reply from 194.205.1.2: bytes=32 time-15ms TTL=125
Reply from 194.205.1.2: bytes=32 time-15ms TTL=125
C:\>
•
•
Command not found — this occurs if IP (Internet Protocol) has
not been installed on your mail server. Choose Control Panel,
Network and install “Microsoft TCP/IP” from the appropriate
installation disk.
Request timed out — you have probably either typed the
wrong IP address or the mail server has a different IP address to
that you typed. Check the IP address in Microsoft’s network
setup.
Checking connectivity between mail and DNS servers
The next task is to test connectivity out from your mail server to the
DNS server. If you are using a dial-up connection, dial-up now. This
time type ping 123.123.100.100.
Again there are several likely responses:
• Timed out — if your line is busy, the response from the remote
machine may be lost. If this happens, type:
ping -w 5000 123.123.100.100
•
•
If you still receive no response, check that the DNS server is up
and working correctly. Contact the ISP and check that the IP
address you typed is correct.
“Reply from 125.88.25.1:destination host unreachable”.
This is a response from a router informing you that the DNS
server cannot be reached. Check your DNS IP address.
“Reply from 123.123.100.100:bytes 32 time=521 ms
TTL=123”.
A reply like this confirms that there is an IP connection to your
DNS server. Note that if the time reported exceeds 1000 ms
(one second), you will probably have difficulty resolving
addresses, since the network between your server and the DNS
server is saturated somewhere in between the two ends.
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26.4 Checking your DNS
There are two parts to checking your DNS:
• Checking that DNS works.
• Checking that DNS has the right information for your mail
domain.
Checking that DNS works
To check that DNS is working (correctly converting domain names
into IP addresses), do the following:
1. From an MS-DOS window use ping to test whether DNS is
working by using a well known Web site. If you are on a dial-up
connection, dial up and log on manually. For example:
ping www.gordano.com
2. After a short time you should see a response like this in the MSDOS window (the IP address may differ):
C:\>ping www.gordano.com
Pinging w3.net-shopper.co.uk [194.205.1.3] with 32 bytes of data
Reply from 194.205.1.3: bytes=32 time-15ms TTL=125
Reply from 194.205.1.3: bytes=32 time-15ms TTL=125
Reply from 194.205.1.3: bytes=32 time-15ms TTL=125
Reply from 194.205.1.3: bytes=32 time-15ms TTL=125
C:\>
3. This confirms that the name has been converted to a number
by DNS. If you see the response, this confirms that the network
between you and the Gordano Ltd. Web site is complete.
4. If you do ping a site which you cannot reach, you’ll see a
response like this:
C:\>ping www.testsite.dom
Bad IP address www.testsite.dom
C:\>
then you need to:
• Firstly, check that you’ve used the correct Web site address.
• Secondly, check the IP address you entered for the DNS
server.
• Thirdly, check the IP address with your ISP.
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Troubleshooting
Does DNS have the correct mail domain information?
If you are on a dial-up connection, do not close the connection. Do
the following:
1. Start your Web browser and log into GMS. For our example,
you would point it to: http//123.123.123.123:8000.
2. Go to Domains & Users, Domain and select Check Domain in
the secondary toolbar then click on the Check button. GMS will
perform two checks:
• Using your domain name, it will find the MX records.
• It will find the reverse address for your mail machine.
3. For example, you may get this response:
MX Lookup Results
Company.dom IN MX 10 mail.company.dom
IN MX 20 mail.isp.dom
mail.company.dom IN A 123.123.123.123
mail.isp.dom
IN A 123.123.200.200
Reverse Lookup Results
123.123.123.123 is mail.company.dom
Check all the names and IP addresses. If they are correct, your MX
records are set up correctly.
If there are any errors or you find any of the following, you must
change your DNS information:
• If you have one line containing the text “IN MX”, obtain
permission to use a backup mail server then add this to your
MX records. Failure to do this may result in e-mail being
returned. This is especially important if you use an intermittent
connection.
• If the reverse lookup does not return the name of your mail
server, you must change your DNS server. To reduce Spam,
some system administrators set up their systems to prevent email from those domains where the reverse lookup does not
match the claimed name.GMS Anti Spam supports this option.
• If there’s no response after 30 seconds, check that your DNS
server is configured correctly. Depending on your operating
system version, you may need to explicitly tell GMS the DNS
server’s IP address — choose System Administration,
Performance, MX and type this into the DNS Servers text box.
Click on the Update button to effect the change.
You should now have DNS and your network working correctly.
You can now go on to look at GMS configuration issues.
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26.5 Checking How Mail is Sent
The first question to resolve is “where does e-mail sent to GMS
go?". To do this:
1. Stop the POST and POP services by typing net stop post and
net stop pop in the command prompt, using Control Panel,
Services or from the System Administration page in the GUI.
2. Send mail to the machine running GMS.
If the mail gets rejected:
1. Check that you are really sending mail to the machine running
GMS.
2. Check that you have defined the user correctly.
3. Does the rejection message give any clues about the problem?
4. Turn on full logging — choose System Administration,
Logging, Transaction Logging and select all the check boxes.
Stop and restart the SMTP service, then send the message
again.
5. Check the log in /Gordano/logs/sm.<today’s date>.log. Open
this file with Notepad or Word. It may give an explanation of
the problem.
6. Make sure you don’t have a DNS timeout problem — choose
System Administration, Settings, Compliance and ensure that
the “Resolve hostname on connection” check box is
deselected.
7. Check that the ESMTP Size setting is not being exceeded.
8. Is mail relay disabled? If so, check that the domain is defined as
local and the IP range is acceptable.
9. Does the directory/Gordano/temp exist and is it valid?
10. If you have GMS Anti-Spam, check the GMS Anti-Spam
options.
Check the user’s directory using Explorer. You should see two files,
inbox.mbx and index.idx. If the mail goes to the user’s directory:
1. Which user’s directory does it go to? If it’s incorrect, check user
aliases.
2. If the mail goes to the defined Unknown user action, use
Notepad to examine the message and check for a reported
error. Check the header to see who the message was originally
addressed to.
3. Turn on full logging — Go to System Administration, Logging,
Transaction Logging and select all of the check boxes for SMTP.
Stop and restart the SMTP service, then send the message
again.
4. Check the log in \Gordano\logs\sm.<today’s date>.log. Open
this file with Notepad or Word. It may give an explanation of
the problem.
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If the mail goes to the Out directory:
1. This suggests that the local domain name has not been set up
correctly.
2. Check that the number of users does not exceed the licence.
3. Check that the part after the ‘@’ appears in the Local Domains
list.
4. Turn on full logging — Go to System Administration, Logging,
Transaction Logging and select all of the check boxes for SMTP.
Stop and restart the SMTP service, then send the message
again.
5. Check the log in \Gordano\logs\sm.<today’s date>.log. Open
this file with Notepad or Word. It may give an explanation of
the problem.
26.6 Checking Collection of Mail via POP3
If you have problems receiving mail, try using telnet to gain access
to your mailbox. This will ensure the POP server is functioning
properly. You will need to use a Telnet application to access the POP
server. Windows offers an inbuilt Telnet application.
You must specify port 110, otherwise you will see a message from the POP
server reading “login:” and the procedures below will fail.
To use telnet, open an MS-DOS Prompt and issue this command,
replacing <your.pop.server> with your POP server name:
C:\>telnet <your.pop.server> 110
For example, you might type telnet 123.123.123.123 110.
This is sample text from a mailbox telnet session:
S: + ok POP server ready
C: user userid
S: +OK Password required for account.userid.
C: pass password
S: +OK userid has 3 message(s) (7683 octets)
Here we typed user userid, then after the OK we typed Pass
password. In this example this mailbox is working properly and has
three messages. If mail cannot be downloaded, the cause is one of
the following:
• The e-mail client software is not configured properly.
• There is a problem with the mail client software itself.
• One of the messages may be causing a failure in your mail
client while the mail is being downloaded. This may be a nonstandard or large e-mail message that is causing the e-mail
client software to abort the download.
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Do the following:
1. Try reading your mail with the GMS WebMail interface.
2. Delete all mailbox messages using the GMS WebMail account.
This process is irreversible and the mail cannot be recovered.
3. Use Telnet to delete the message selectively, causing your email application to terminate (see the Telnet commands below).
Available telnet commands
Once you have accessed your mailbox with telnet, you can use:
• LIST - displays each message with its number (#) and file size.
• DELE # - deletes the specified message number. Be sure to type
quit after finishing the delete command(s).
• RETR # - displays the message across the screen without
stopping.
• QUIT - closes the Telnet session.
• TOP # RETR - displays the message header (showing who the
message is from).
For example, once you have logged on, you can type RETR 1 to see
the first message in the mailbox.
26.7 Checking Domain and Server Automatically
GMS automates checking of domain and server information. Go to
Support in the menu and in the secondary toolbar on the right you
will see 3 distinct options allowing you to check various settings.
Check MX
If you want to check a domain, type its name into the “Domain to
check” text box. Specify whether to check MX records and/or the IP
address, then click on the OK button to start the check.
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Check Server
If you want to check a server, type its name into the “Server to
check” text box. Specify the service(s) to be checked, POP, SMTP
and/or IMAP. If you want to check a port on the server, select the
last check box and specify the port number. Click on the OK button
to start the check.
Check SPF
This option allows you to check the SPF records for a particular
Sender address and also the SPF records for a particular IP address.
Enter the information you would like checked and then click on the
OK button.
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Contacting Support
27 Contacting Support
Start with this section if you have problems with GMS. It indicates
where to look to fault find problems and gives examples of typical
problems.
This section covers:
• How to report problems to support
• Details of support levels, contacts, etc.
• How to suggest improvements to GMS.
All administrators who have GMS problems or solve problems for
others should read this section.
For answers to frequently-asked questions which do not relate to problems,
see “Frequently-asked Questions” on page 333.
27.1 Reporting Problems to Support
If you have a problem:
1. Before reporting it, please check this manual, then look at our
web site www.gordano.com, the knowledge base, primers etc.
You may find the information you need there. We also
recommend that you join the list GMS-discuss, where there’s
peer support. This list is also monitored by the Gordano support
team.
2. If you purchased GMS from one of our resellers, contact them
first.
3. If you do not use our wizard on the Support, Email Gordano
page of the interface, send an e-mail to
support@gordano.com. Include the following information in
your message so we can process it more quickly and efficiently:
You will need a current Gordano support contract before any questions sent
by email can be answered. If you don’t have a support contract, contact
sales@gordano.com to obtain one.
•
•
•
•
Your name and our reference number (NTnnnn).
Your Internet Service Provider.
A detailed description of the problem.
A dump of the current GMS configuration. You can
produce this in two ways. The first is to choose System
Administration, Settings and click on Export System
Configuration in the secondary toolbar and request that
setup.txt is created immediately.

The second way is to use the MAIL -y command to create a
file setup.txt. See “Dump Current Configuration” in the
GMS Reference Guide.
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Any relevant GMS log files.
If your mail server does not work properly, please include an alternative email address and/or a Fax number so we can contact you!
4. If you have telephone support, you can contact +44 (0)1275
340151. Please have your support contract number plus the
relevant information — listed above — ready before you call.
You will need it as soon as the call is answered. Customers in
the USA can call our freephone support number 800 890 8406.
27.2 Support Details
Gordano Ltd. has an extensive support team and bases in several
different countries to provide support for GMS. In addition, some
of our resellers have taken training and examinations in order to
ensure that they have staff with the right knowledge to be able to
support GMS. If you purchased GMS from one of our resellers,
contact them first.
Gordano Ltd. provides different levels of support directly to our
customers. You will receive priority support for 28 days from your
first contact with the Gordano Sales department. Beyond those 28
days the support levels are 8x5 telephone support, 13x5 telephone
support, 24x7 telephone support and custom support contracts.
To purchase Support from Gordano Ltd., send an e-mail to
sales@gordano.com or complete an order form on our Web site at
http://www.gordano.com. Alternatively you can order over the
phone on +44 (0)1275 345100 or from the UK 0844 809 4822 or
from the USA 877 292 1142.
The options are as follows:
e-mail support
If you have a telephone support contract with Gordano you can
also send questions using email to support@gordano.com. If you
do not have a support contract you will need to obtain one before
any questions sent via email can be answered.
Your e-mails are answered strictly in order of arrival. You can select
up to three e-mail addresses for those people who will be able to
obtain e-mail support from Gordano Ltd. When you send a
message to support from one of these accounts, an automatic
response will be generated confirming that your message has
arrived and you should receive a response from a support engineer
within one working day, this response will go to all three registered
addresses.
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8x5 telephone support
We allow you to select a time zone for your telephone support.
During this time, you may call a given telephone number for
Support. When you call, you will be asked to enter your contract
number before being put through to a member of the Support
staff.
13x5 telephone support
Provides flexibility for those who cross time zones, and support
outside of normal working hours for essential maintenance tasks.
When you call, give your contract number and you will be put
through to a member of staff directly.
24x7 telephone support
You can call our Support line at any time. When you call, give your
contract number and you will be put through to a member of staff
directly.
Tailored solutions
These are available by prior agreement: contact Gordano Ltd.
27.3 Support Contract
Your support contract gives full details of your rights.
27.4 Third Party Support
The Gordano Web pages lists people who have recently passed the
GMS Support Engineer's examination. This means we believe they
have the knowledge to set up mail servers (and in particular GMS)
competently.
They may also offer their own support contracts, independent of
Gordano Ltd. and in your local language rather than English.
27.5 Contacting Support from the interface
Within the GMS interface there is an option for emailing support
should you encounter problems with your setup. This does not rely
on your server being able to post the message itself and in fact uses
a remote server that is known to be working. The default is
Gordano’s own mail server. This section describes:
• How to email support from the interface.
• What information to include
• How to change your recognised support email addresses
• Reading responses to support questions
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How to email support from the interface
Select Support then Email Gordano from the secondary toolbar.
Here you will be able to enter a subject for the message and text to
describe the difficulties you are encountering. You will also be able
to select which of your 3 nominated email addresses you want the
message to be sent from. The reply will be sent to the address you
select.
When you have finished composing your message to support with
as much relevant information as possible concerning your setup
select the Next button. This will take you to another page where
you need to enter the fully qualified domain name of the mail
server that you want to use for sending the message. By default
this is set to mail.gordano.com and should only need to be
changed in one or two circumstances, for instance if there is a
firewall preventing direct access to the selected server. Other
information is also provided on this page. Estimates of how long
the message should take to deliver based on the speed of
connection are given.
What information to include
When you compose the message there is a check box (already
checked) called “Include setup.txt”. When selected this will dump a
copy of your current configuration into a setup.txt file which is very
often essential for a swift diagnosis and resolution of problems. It is
strongly recommended that the setup.txt is included. The log files
for that day are pre-selected in the select box on the compose
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page. If the problem did not start on the day that you are sending
the message or you feel logs from previous days may be useful they
can be selected also. Remember that to select more than one log
file at a time you need to hold down the CTRL key on your
keyboard.
How to change your support email addresses
Gordano maintain a list of up to three recognised email addresses
for each customer. To get a fast response you should always use
one of these addresses when contacting support. These email
addresses can be changed by logging on to the Gordano website
www.gordano.com with your customer reference number and
email address or you can change them from the GMS interface. Go
to the Support, Addresses page in the interface where you can
enter your 3 chosen addresses then click on the Update button.
Gordano will receive notification that you wish to change your
addresses and make the change for you.
Reading responses to support questions
If you are experiencing difficulties with your mail server you may
not be able to receive the response that Gordano Support send
you. To get around this problem you can view the response by
logging on to the Gordano website. Go to www.gordano.com/
support/index.htm where you can enter your email address,
Customer reference number in the format AB1234 and a password
if you have set one. Once you have entered this information you
will be able to view your messages to and from support. You will
also be able to change your nominated support addresses.
27.6 Passing Suggestions to Gordano Ltd.
GMS is unique in being a mail server that has effectively been
designed by its customers since its debut in January 1995. Since
that date, customers have made suggestions about new features
that would make their lives easier. As a result, GMS has become the
most flexible mail server on the market.
We always listen to any suggestions that you may have for
improving the product — please e-mail us on
suggest@gordano.com.
This e-mail address reaches managers in the company, who
consider all suggestions for future inclusion in GMS.
Do not send support questions to this address, as they may not be read for
some days.
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Frequently-asked Questions
28 Frequently-asked Questions
This section answers the questions which our customers ask most
often. If you have a query regarding GMS it’s worth checking here
and in the knowledge base on our Web site to see if it’s been
answered previously.
These questions do not directly relate to problems — for those
which do, see “Troubleshooting” on page 317.
If, after reading this section and trying out the suggestions given,
you still have the problem, refer to the GMS Knowledge Base on
our Web server.
How do I enter IP Addresses in GMS?
This section explains the various ways in which IP addresses can be
input to GMS. In all the following, the letters a to e represent
numbers in the range 0 to 255:
• a.b.c.d — a specific IP address, for example 194.194.194.194.
• a.b.c.* — all IP addresses beginning a.b.c. For example,
194.194.194.* gives addresses in the range 194.194.194.0 to
194.194.194.255.
• a.b.c.d-e — a range of IP addresses from d to e. 
For example, 194.194.192-194.* gives addresses in the range
194.194.192.0 to 194.194.194.255
• a.b.c.d/n — means use the first n bits. 
For example, 194.194.194.194/22 gives addresses in the range
194.194.192.0 to 194.194.195.255.
Similarly, 194.194.194.194/16 gives IP addresses in the B Class
range 194.194.0.0 to 194.194.255.255.
• !a.b.c.d — the “!” at the beginning of the address means
NOT.
For example, !194.194.194.194 means not 194.194.194.194.
Can I use APOP with the Windows User Database?
Unfortunately, no. This is due to restrictions in the Win32 API
supplied by Microsoft.
Can I run GMS under an Windows user account?
Yes, as follows:
You must be logged into a privileged account as administrator to do this and
the services must be stopped first.
1. Set up an account and give it the privilege to “Log on as a
service” and to read the GMS base directory.
2. Select Start, Settings, Control Panel, Services.
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3. Select the SMTP service and click on Startup. Repeat this for the
services POST, POP, IMAP, LIST and WWW.
4. Select the account you have just created and type in the
password.
How do I change the Time Zone code?
If you are not in the GMT time zone, change the time zone code.
This defines the time zone message that is written in time stamps. If
it is not defined, GMT is used. Any number of letters can be used,
but there should always be a plus or minus followed by four digits
and a daylight saving string.
For example, the default, GMT+0000BST, causes GMT to be used
during the winter months and BST for Daylight Saving Time.
The changeover date is as defined by the operating system.
To change the time zone information:
1. Choose System Administration, Settings, General to display this
page:
2. In the Time Zone Name field, type the code for your time zone.
3. In the Offset drop-down list, select the offset from GMT.
4. In the Summer Time field, type the code used for summer time
(daylight saving time) in your time zone.
What is the maximum message size?
Maximum message size is set by the available disk space. The
maximum size of any message is limited to half the available disk
space, unless overridden by another option.
What is the maximum number of accounts?
There is no limit except that set by your GMS licence agreement.
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How does GMS find a DNS Server?
Unless it’s explicitly specified using the DNS Servers text box on the
System Administration, Performance, MX page, GMS searches the
following Registry key values to find the dotted-decimal address of
a DNS server:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\InternetShopper\Mail\Users\<No Name>\DNS
Servers=X.X.X.X Y.Y.Y.Y
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\N
ameServer
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\Tr
ansient\NameServer
There might be other DNS key values and any of those listed above might not
be set on your system.
How does POST decide where to send mail?
To send e-mail, GMS does the following:
1. Checks the Sending Rules. If a specific rule has been set up for
the domain, GMS uses this; for details, see “Configuring
outbound delivery rules (Smart Delivery)” on page 124.
2. Uses MX Records. If the domain name can be resolved, each
machine listed in the MX records is contacted.
3. If no machine can be reached, or there is no MX record, GMS
tries using the absolute name. It tries to discover any absolute
name for the domain and to deliver the mail there.
4. If a permanent error is recorded, or the message has exceeded
the expiry limit (see “Changing POST and POP timing settings”
on page 138), the message is returned to its sender.
I can retrieve mail via the Web but not from a POP client.
(Further details of the problem — the user can log onto the Web
interface and read mail, but with exactly the same account their
POP client gives a password error.)
You have probably set two domains to point to the same IP
address. This has created a conflict within POP, which cannot
identify the users in those conflicting domains. Try establishing the
second domain as a virtual domain, as opposed to a full domain.
I’m receiving bad commands from a remote host
There are two reasons why bad commands may be received from a
host:
• The remote server has a configuration problem.
• Someone is trying to gain unauthorised access to your system.
In either case, the solution is to limit the number of bad commands
accepted from a remote host before disconnection is forced.
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Choose System Administration, Security, Commands and reduce
this parameter.
How do I limit the responses accepted by POST to one
command?
Remote hosts can cause problems for the POST server, for two
reasons:
• The remote server has a configuration problem.
• Someone wants to slow down the responsiveness of your POST
server. This is known as tar pitting and involves a remote server
sending a multi-line responses very slowly just to keep a
connection open.
The solution is to limit the number of responses accepted by POST
before disconnection is forced. Choose System Administration,
Security, Commands and reduce this parameter (the default is 100).
Mail is not sent to host
This is only a problem if your server is on the banned list. You can
verify the domain’s existence by using Mail.exe as follows to look
up its MX records:
mail -m<domain name>
This verifies that the domain has valid MX records set and that they
have an accompanying A record pointing to the correct IP address.
You can check that the IP address is correct by using telnet to
connect on port 25.
As discussed in “How is the Mail Server Found?” on page 8, the
MX records specify the list of remote machines that will accept mail
messages for the specified host. Mail.exe lists the servers together
with their IP addresses.
If Mail.exe returns an error code, this may be because a DNS server
has not been set up, or has been incorrectly specified. Servers are
used as follows:
1. If a server is set up in GMS itself, it uses this.
2. If it cannot connect to this DNS server, it tries those in the TCP/
IP settings.
3. GMS uses the DNS server specified in your Network
Configuration.
Once the list of MX records has been obtained, you can ping each
server in turn to see if it’s reachable. At a command prompt type
the command:
ping <IP_address>
If ping returns “Destination host unreachable”, the server is either
down or no longer available.
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If a response from the host is received, check whether it is receiving
mail. Type this command and see if it responds:
telnet <IP_address> 25
POP clients on dial-up setup time out retrieving large
messages
Increase the POP client timeout period on the System
Administration, Security, Connections page of the interface to 600.
If the problem persists at this level, increase it in increments of 100
until the problem disappears.
How do I configure ETRN?
For information on setting up an ETRN queue for a domain within
GMS, see “Services” in the GMS Reference Guide.
Windows user database users cannot logon
Start by checking that you have not added more users than your
licence allows. Also, check that the users have the correct
passwords.
If some of these users are denied access to retrieve their mail, the
problem is probably caused by the users not having Logon locally
privilege or not being on the local machine.
Logon Locally privilege is the privilege you must give a user or
group of users so that they can use a POP account with their
Windows Username and Password. To give Logon locally privilege
to a group:
1. Using the User Manager, select Policy, Rights. In later versions
of Windows you will need to use the Policy Manager.
2. In the dialog which appears, allowing you to select the
privileges you give to certain groups of users, select Log on
locally.
You can configure GMS to ask remote systems to validate user
names and passwords using the NTDomains and NTComputer
Registry parameters. The latter is the most appropriate setting if all
users are in a simple NT domain, otherwise use the NTDomains
parameter. Refer to “Configuration — The Registry” in the GMS
Reference Guide.
GMS does not recognise Windows NT SAM Database Users
Start by checking that you have not added more users than your
licence allows.
If problems are encountered recognising the SAM database
accounts, check which licence you have for GMS. Make sure that
the users are put in an group with the same name as the Internet
domain they are in.
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Can I add GMS Logon to my Web Site?
Yes. Add this code to your HTML:
<form ACTION="http://<servername>:8000/logon.mml" method="post">
<p>
Enter username <input type=text name=username value=>
<p>
Enter password <input type=password name=password value=>
<p>
<input type=hidden name=interfacetype value=admin>
<p>
<input type=hidden name=ismvm value=1>
<p>
Press <INPUT TYPE="submit" VALUE="Submit"> to login
</form>
SAM user database users cannot receive/check their mail
SAM Database users cannot receive or check their mail if they are
set up with a user profile that specifies a home directory using the
Network share option. This problem is because one machine does
not have the rights to access the disk on the other machine and
write files to it.
There are two solutions (we recommend using the second):
• Run Regedt32.exe on the machine that the users’ directories
are stored on and go to
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\L
anmanServer\Parameters.
Add a parameter called RestrictNullSessionAccess with value 0
(zero). This will let any null session access this machine.
• Share a directory on the machine that you would like your
users’ directories stored on, so that in the Home Directory entry
for the user of User Manager you have an entry like this:
\\machine\share\%username%
Run Regedt32.exe on the machine that stores the users’
directories and go to this key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\
Services\LanmanServer\Parameters.
Add a value called NullSessionShares (of type MULTI_SZ) if it
doesn't already exist, then add an entry on a line of its own
reading “share” without the quotes, where share is the share
name of the drive.
Use Windows Explorer on the GMS server to connect to the
shared drive on the remote machine and select the Reconnect
at logon check box.
Depending on whether you are running on a workstation or server, you may
need to add the above settings to the LanmanWorkstation\Parameters key as
well.
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Other users cannot reply to your e-mail messages
If you do not specify an e-mail address, your e-mail software may
default you to userid@pop.server, which is invalid.
• Verify that your e-mail address or “Reply to” setting contains
your valid e-mail address.
• Check that those who cannot reply to you are using the correct
address.
• If you get no responses at all, this may be because your MX
records are incorrect. See “Checking your DNS” on page 320
for details of how to check this.
You cannot send e-mail to a single (or a few) addresses
Do the following:
1. Verify that you typed the full e-mail address in the correct
location without using an address book. Contact the owner of
the e-mail address to verify that it’s valid (most problems relate
to invalid addresses).
2. Any time that e-mail fails to be delivered it should bounce (or
return) to the sender. The bounced e-mail message should
contain a complete mail header with server information (your email client should have an option to display all headers). The
message header and errors in the message body are needed to
troubleshoot these problems.
Once you have this information, check for the following:
• The recipient's e-mail address should be correctly listed in
the message header. If it’s not, the message is being sent
incorrectly. Check your software settings and/or the
message window.
• If you see messages regarding “Too many hops”, mail is
looping.
• If the header shows a failure in a certain system, send the
header to the owning network administration. If you
suspect a problem on your local server, submit the headers
to the system administrator.
Help with e-mail attachments, once downloaded
A file sent through e-mail cannot be transmitted as-is. Usually it
must be encoded in a particular way so the recipient's mail
software can understand it. Most e-mail applications automatically
encode and decode files. However, older e-mail applications may
not support some encoding types.
If you have problems decoding an attachment, contact the sender
to determine which e-mail program they use. Verify that you use
compatible encoding schemes. If you can decode the file but not
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view it, contact the sender to find which reader program must be
used to view the file.
You receive the same e-mail message many times
Occasionally you may download the same e-mail message several
times. Do the following:
• If you are using POP check that the option “Delete retrieved
mail” is enabled in your mail client. If your client software does
not delete the message, use the WebMail interface to delete it.
• Check that the problem is not due to an autoresponder, for
example one that causes a loop.
• You may be receiving Spam; check the JUCE setup.
You cannot send e-mail but you can download it
Do the following:
1. Verify that your e-mail settings are correct (the SMTP server and
e-mail address must be correctly listed in your e-mail software).
2. Send a message to your e-mail address as a test. Be sure to type
the full e-mail address in the correct location in the message
window.
3. If the Reply To or E-mail Address setting has an invalid domain
name, mail is not sent.
4. If using a dial-up connection, ensure that the IP address you are
connected on is in the LocalIP setting. If you dial in through
another service, try using that provider’s SMTP server.
You have a problem with your e-mail password
Your e-mail password is the same as your GMS login password.
Verify that your password is properly configured in your e-mail
software. Check your e-mail programs, especially Netscape, to
remove any stored password and disable the mail auto-check
feature.
When you log on you can see all the options but when you
try to select one of them, you are logged out of the GMS
Configuration Server and returned to the logon screen.
This is because GMS’ Session Control is set to use cookies but
cookies are not enabled in your Web browser. To fix this, either
allow use of cookies in your Web browser (see its documentation/
help) or amend GMS’ Session Control setting to only use IP
addresses, as described below.
If you have a number of users connecting to GMS through either a firewall or
Proxy Server do not set GMS to use only IP addresses.
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There are two ways to set up GMS to only use IP addresses:
• Enable cookies in your Web browser (see its documentation/
help). Log onto GMS, select System Administration, Security,
Session Control then select “Only use IP addresses” and press
the Update button. Now disable cookies in your Web browser
again.
• Open regedt32 (see the GMS Reference Guide) and navigate to
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\InternetShopper\Mail\Users.
Double-click on the <No Name> entry on the right of the
screen to open it for editing. Add an entry that reads
“wwwusesessioncookies=0” on a line of its own without the
quotes, then stop and restart the WWW service.
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Event log shows event 2213
The Event log shows the following but no insertion strings are
displayed:
“The description for Event ID (2213) in Source (GMS) could not be
found. It contains the following insertion string(s):
This GMS error indicates that “GMS was unable to start - the
Registry is not valid for this version”. The likely reasons for this error
are that the key for the machine is not valid, or the Registry has
become corrupted in some way.
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Disaster Recovery
29 Disaster Recovery
One of GMS’ advanced features is the ability to quickly restore an
installation to its previous state if any serious problems are
encountered. All configuration data can be compressed and emailed at regular intervals to a safe haven for later recovery.
Incoming messages are not lost if the machine running GMS fails,
because they are not deleted until they have been written to disk.
This section is for administrators who want to protect themselves
from system failure — server crash, lost database, etc. It discusses
the standard procedures you should have in place and how to
recover if the worst happens.
This section covers:
• The backup file setup.txt.
• The recommended backup procedure.
• Setting up the recovery file.
• Saving a domain’s mailboxes and logs.
• Recovery procedures.
• Moving GMS to a different machine.
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29.1 The Backup File Setup.txt
You can configure GMS to save a file called setup.txt containing all
of the server’s configuration, taken at predefined intervals. There’s
also an option to include other configuration files, such as
postservers.txt, list help files, etc. within the file setup.txt. As an
additional security feature, all configuration data can be
compressed into this file and e-mailed off-site at regular intervals to
a safe haven for later recovery.
This file is also used by Gordano Support staff, so they can help you
more quickly.
The contents of mailboxes are not written to the file — make a backup tape,
or see the “Saving a Domain’s Mailboxes and Logs”.
29.2 Standard Backup Procedure
All mission-critical mailboxes should be backed up regularly, usually
every day. Backups are usually made to tape and include all files on
the system.
We recommend using a modified grandfather - father - son
approach, with backups labelled as follows:
Tuesday
January
Wednesday
Week 2
February
Thursday
Week 3
March
Friday
Week 4
April
Week 5
May ... etc.
Proceed as follows:
1. On the first Monday of the month, use the monthly tape.
2. On subsequent Mondays during the month, use the weekly
tape.
3. For the remaining days of the month, use the daily tapes.
If any tape reports an error, destroy it and replace it.
For GMS back up these two sets of data:
• The setup — this is stored in the setup.txt file described above.
When this is produced daily, a copy is left in the Gordano
directory.
• The mailbox contents.
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29.3 Setting up the Recovery File
You can compress all your mail configuration data and e-mail it
off-site at regular intervals to a safe haven for later recovery if
required. You should set this up soon after installing GMS. The
information is written to a file called setup.txt. To set up the
recovery file:
1. Choose System Administration, Settings, System Recovery to
display this page:
2. If you are setting up a long term recovery file policy, select the
“Schedule saving every” check box and enter a period in days
for the schedule to be run.
3. If you want the file to include items like autoresponder files, fax
templates etc. and all user specific data, select the “Include all
files” check box.
4. In the “Send by email to” box, specify who you are mailing files
to.
5. Both options allow the recovery file to be saved to a local
directory rather being emailed to an address, this is useful to
ensure that your GMS configuration is included in your
standard backup policy.
6. If you also want to save a recovery file made straight away (to
cover for the time before the first regular save), select the
“Export System Configuration” button in the secondary toolbar
and also complete the details there.
7. Once you have completed either option click on the Update
button.
29.4 Saving a Domain’s Mailboxes and Logs
For details of how to save e-mail log files, see “Managing Logs”.
Apart from logs, you can save all the other files for a domain,
including its users’ mailboxes, and e-mail these to a safe location.
This is useful if you do not want to send the recipient, for example
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a domain administrator, a copy of setup.txt, but you do want to
send the configuration files for their domain.
If the users’ mailboxes are large, this process produces a large file. The alternative is to make a backup tape.
To save the domain files:
1. Choose Domains & Users, Domain and click on Save Domain in
the secondary toolbar.
2. Specify the e-mail address the files are to be sent to and press
the Send button to e-mail the files.
29.5 Saving other configuration files
SSL files
If your server is running with SSL enabled you should also backup
the two files that make up your key pair.
29.6 Recovering your Mail System
Recovering an GMS system is simple. Do the following:
1. Install a new, fresh version of GMS. This version must be the
same as the version the setup.txt was created on.
2. Copy the saved setup.txt file into the Gordano\bin directory,
stop all of the GMS services and then run the command mail yr from that directory to write the configuration back to the
Registry. If you decided to include any other configuration files
including user, profile or database files in setup.txt, run mail yrZ instead. See “Dump Current Configuration” in the
Gordano Reference Guide for details.
3. Restore users’ mailboxes from a backup tape. (The contents of
mailboxes are not held in setup.txt.) Mailboxes can also be
restored from a saved domain zip file if you have followed the
procedure outlined above in “Saving a Domain’s Mailboxes and
Logs”.
4. Your system is up and running.
29.7 Moving GMS to Another Machine
To move GMS, follow the recovery procedure described above.
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Jargon
30 Jargon
This section explains technical terms used in this manual.
Term
Definition
Account
The place an e-mail message is delivered to.
Alias
An alternative name for a user or domain.
APOP
Authenticated POP. An authentication system which does not require
the password to be sent over the Internet.
Autoresponder Type of account which responds automatically to any sender of e-mail,
replying with a pre-configured message.
Client
In a client-server relationship, the computer that uses the service which
another computer (the server) provides. A mail client is the software a
user uses to send and receive their mail, for example Eudora or Pegasus.
<CRLF>
The characters carriage return and line feed (in that order). A full stop
with one of these on each side is used to mark the end of a message.
CSR
Certificate Signing Request - A file containing a randomly generated key
for submission to a Certificate Authority to enable the use of SSL.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Control Protocol, a method of allocating IP addresses
dynamically. Mail servers cannot obtain their IP address using DHCP.
Dial-up connec- Intermittent connection provided by equipment like a modem dialing
tion
into the ISP at intervals. The alternative to this is a permanent connection.
DLL
Dynamic Linked Library, an executable program written in C, C++, Fortran, COBOL, etc.
DNS
Domain Name Service — software used to convert a computer name to
its number (IP address) and back again.
ESMTP
Enhanced SMTP — set of extensions to SMTP, components of which include the
VRFY, Size and AUTH commands. These extensions improve security, bandwidth
utilisation and performance.
Firewall
A router and/or computer set up as a barrier between the Internet and
an internal network.
FTP
File Transfer Protocol — the TCP/IP protocol used to list directories
remotely and transfer files.
IAP
Internet Access Provider, company providing Internet access.
IMAP
Internet Message Application Protocol — a protocol used by mail clients, where e-mail is stored on the server.
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Term
Definition
IP address
Address used by Internet Protocol to identify uniquely a computer. The
address is represented by four numbers between 0 and 255, separated
by dots, like this: 101.101.12.255.
ISDN
Integrated Services Digital Network — a form of connection.
ISP
Internet Service Provider, company providing web access.
Kbps
Kilobits per second, the standard measure of data transmission. 1 Kbps
equals 1000 bits per second. Note that a 1 Kbps link will actually deliver
about 100Kbytes per second, due to timing and other constraints.
LGFax
A third party package which provides a fax gateway for NTMail.
LIST
The service which manages mail lists.
Lookup
Means of verifying that a sending server, or a user, is genuine. For a
server lookup involves checking MX records for the sending server.
Mail clause
Clause in header showing sender of message.
Mail domain
The name of the post office which is running all the accounts for a particular group of people. This is denoted by the part after the “@” sign in
an e-mail address. For example the domain in “user@gordano.com” is
“gordano.com”. For each Mail Domain there will be Mail Exchange
(MX) records set up in the Domain Name Service (DNS). Note, the Mail
Domain is not the same as Windows NT Domains.
Mail server nameThe full name of the server that is running the e-mail services for a Mail
Domain. This name is used in the URL while configuring NTMail and is
also the name you would “ping” to check network connectivity. This
name will have an absolute name (A) record set up in the Domain Name
Service (DNS).
Mailbox
A character string (address) identifying a user to whom mail is sent.
MIME
Multimedia Internet Message Exchange — a specification of how e-mail
messages may carry other information, for example, Word documents,
audio etc.
MML
Mail Meta Language, the language used within NTMail.
MX records
Mail Exchange (MX) records.
NAT
Network Address Translation - Hides internal IP addresses and allows the
use of more IP addresses by translating addresses as information arrives
at or leaves a network.
PDC
Primary Domain Controller — the computer on an NT network which
performs name authentication.
PDF
Portable Document Format — a form of document that may be
exchanged.
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Term
Jargon
Definition
Permanent con- Connection between site and ISP which uses a fixed link, for example a
nection
leased line. The alternative to this is a dial-up connection.
Ping
Command used to test connectivity to another computer.
POP3
Post Office Protocol Version 3, a protocol used by mail clients.
Postfix
This is used to differentiate users in virtual domains.
Proxy
This is used as a go-between in Internet connections. That is, the user
connects to the proxy and the proxy connects to the Internet and carries
out the user’s request.
RAS
Remote Access Service — software providing remote access over dial-up
link, used by modem or ISDN adapter.
DNSBL
DNS based Black List, a list of servers known to send Spam e-mail.
RCPT clause
Clause in header showing recipient of message.
Registry
The structure used to store NT system setup information. For full details
of NTMail Registry settings, see the NTMail Reference Guide.
Relay
A server which forwards mail from one server to another.
RFC
Request For Comments — an Internet Standards specification.
Robot
An executable program which is started when a message arrives at a
specific account in NTMail .
SAM
System Access Management, also called NT User Database.
Server
In a client-server relationship, this is the computer that provides the service the client uses.
Session
The set of exchanges that occurs when a client and server communicate.
SMTP
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol — protocol which receives incoming mail and
sends outgoing mail.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol - a protocol used by network hosts to
exchange information used in the management of networks.
Spam
A commercial e-mail message posted indiscriminately to a large number of
addresses.
SQL
Structured Query Language, means used to interrogate a relational database.
STD
Internet Standards specification — some RFCs become these.
Tar pitting
Tar pitting occurs when you post to a remote SMTP server, and it
responds to the POST server commands very slowly, tying up your POST
threads. This normally takes the form of them sending multi-line SMTP
responses with one line being sent every minute or two — this could go
on for hours.
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Term
Definition
Telnet
TCP/IPs terminal emulation protocol.
URL
Uniform Resource Locator. This is the name of a standard means of representing
something on the internet. The URL has three parts:
Protocol://server-name/options or parameters
The protocol is often one of “http” for the Web, “ftp” etc. An example is:
http://www.ntmail.co.uk/index.htm
User
A person who uses a computer.
VPN
Virtual Private Network - There are a number of systems which allow you to create networks using the internet which are private. Encryption methods are used
so that although information is transmitted over public lines the information
remains private.
Web Proxy
A proxy that works only with HTTP requests.
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Index
Numerics
8BitMIME
ESMTP command 130
A
A Name
definition 6
function 8
required 195
round robin DNS 195
Accept Search Requests from 311
Acceptable use policies 171
Access
Address Books 64
Calendars 62
Documents 64
Email 101
email via WWW 102
Folders 64
IMAP4 101
Journals 64
Notes 64
POP3 101
profile access rights 101
Tasks 64
Access right 299
Access rights
Setting for users 101
Account
adding 48
DLL 53
Emulating 50
forwarding 55
maximum folders 101
maximum size 101
NT SAM user database 73
removing obsolete 50
setting size constraints 101
user robot 52
using NT database accounts 82
using UNIX database accounts 83
Account size
Limiting 307, 310
Actions 109
Configuring 261
Decode messages 289
Decode TNEF files 289
Deliver Message as Usual 290
Disinfect Message 290
Domain 262, 291
Redirect To 290
Reject Message 290
Return With 290
Return with 290
Scan Inline Text 290
scan inline text 289
Scan whole message 289
Scan whole TNEF Files 289
User 291
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Index
Virus 290
Active Directory 75
Add disosable addresses 105
Adding a comment 166
Adding a service 166
Address 296
Address Book 299
Address Book Access 64
Administration
Login 40
Administrator
102
access to interface 44
Anti-Spam and Anti-Virus 102
logs 102
system 102
AI
configuring 277
described 240, 277
reasons for use 235
tuning 278
Alert emails 310
Alerts 109
Configuring 262, 291
Domain 262, 291
Postmaster 262, 291
Sender 262, 291
User 262, 291
Alias
domain 89, 92
user 55
Allow Local IP Addresses 164, 165
Allow user presence indication 107
Allow user selected image 107
Allowed IP 152
Allowed IPs 238
Alt Text 107
Anonymous List
Login 41
Anti-Spam filters 241
AntiSpam Updates 294
Anti-Virus Updates 295
APOP
configuring login 119
not with NT User Database 333
security benefits 174
Appearance
custom 108
Apple iCal 299
Archiving messages 311
AS Preferences 108
Attach vCards to messages 105
attachment 255
Attachments 238
Auth
ESMTP command 130
Authenticate 271
Authenticated IP 272
Authenticated SMTP 153
Authentication 79, 296
Collaboration 271
IMAP 271
LDAP 75
351
Index
POP 271
SMTP 271
Authorised username 76, 77
Automatic Updates 294, 295
Automatic updates 293
Autoresponder
adding 57
definition 56
Autoresponse 53
AV Preferences 108
Average Multiplier 278
B
Background color 108
Backup
POP3 difficulties 216
procedure 344
recovery 346
Bad commands
from host 335
limiting 176
Bandwidth
caching web pages 199
limiting in POP 120
limiting in POST 117
required by NTMail 21
Banned hosts 238, 267
Banned list
incorrect entry 336
Base64 257
Bastion host
advantages 192
setup 192
Bayesian 237
Bayesian filter 250
BCC email 106
Bind server 195
Binhex 257
Blind Carbon Copy 106
Bloomba 299
BodyContains 315
Browsers
Firefox and Explorer 39
Bypass 250
Bypasses 240
C
CA 183
Cache
parameters 200, 209
purging 202, 210
Calendar Access 62
Calendars 65
calendars 299
Capacity 107
Carbon Copy 106
Cascading Style Sheet 159
Cascading Style Sheets 159
CC email 106
Change a user’s password 79
Clients. See mail clients
Collaboration 107, 299
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Collecting e-mail 12
Command
bad 176
bad commands from host 335
Community 152
Concepts 285
Configuration 102
remote 173
Configure remotely 102
Configuring Alerts 291
Connections 272
permanent 24
contacts 299
Content Types 264
Cookies 179, 340
Cost of Virus Attacks 285
CSR 183
Custom 63
Customisation
WebMail 159
Customising the interface 95, 159
Customization
background color 108
tab font face 108
tab font size 108
title color 108
D
DATA command 236
Default domain 83
Delete Oldest Logs 310
Deleting a service 166
Deliver Message as Usual 290
Delivery rule. See Smart delivery.
Delivery Status Notification 130
Denial-of-service attack 233, 234
Dial-up
introduction 14
Disaster recovery 343
Disclaimer
in footer 171
Disinfect Message 290
Disk space
required for NTMail 20
DLL
account 53
SMTP 126
DNS
changing records 9
Introduction 6
provision by ISP 9
round robin 195
setup problem 336
DNS based Black List (DNSBL) 234, 265
Documents 107
Documents Access 64
Domain 165
administrator privileges 44
alias 89
checking 94
checking MX and IP address 94, 324
default 83
deleting 94
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Editing Variables 141
full 85
listing and checking domains 94
POP 87
robot 89
shared by servers 194
virtual 86
Domain Actions 262, 291
Domain Alerts 291
Domain alias
setting up 92
to cut IP resource use 127
Domain filter 253
Domain robot
reason for use 89
Domain Words 244
DSN name 79
Dynamic Words 243
E
Email
mode 300
Email support 330
Emulating a user 50
Enabling the DLL
SMS 225
Enabling the SMS Gateway
SMS 228
Encoding types 339
Enhanced Status Codes 130
eSarah
Configuring 307, 310
Sending messages 311
eSarah account
Adding 309
ESMTP
8BitMIME 130
Auth 130
definition 11
Delivery Status Notification 130
enabling/disabling 130
Enhanced Status Codes 130
ETRN 130
features available 130
Pipelining 130
Restart 131
Size 131
Size too small 322
VRFY 131
XTND 131
ESMTP command 131
ETRN
command 130
configuring queue 337
Event log
event 2213 342
EventSherpa 299
External IP 164, 165
F
Fail on error 290
FAQ on Web 333
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Index
File
MIME encoded 12
postservers 124
recovery 345
redirect 122
security issues 170
setup.txt 345, 346
UUencoded 12
Filter 77
Filter types 237, 253
Finger server
port 127
Firewall
NTMail version 180
security 180
Folder
maximum size 101
Folder Access 64
Footer
using as disclaimer 171
Forwarding
account defined 55
adding address for account 55
avoiding loops 56
between servers 194
Groups 62
free/busy 300
From 315
Full domain
definition 85
setting up 85, 90
G
Global
Editing Variables 141
Global filter 253
Global Words 244
GLWebMail
access from anywhere 102
GMS Mail
System Components 13
Sytem Components 13
GMS Professional
Login 40
GMS WebMail
System Components 13
GMS WebMail Express 41
GMS WebMail Mobile
Login 41
Groups
Adding 60
Adding members 64
adding to profiles 101
Deleting 64
Editing 64
Everyone group 60
Password protection 61
Post rights 61
GUI Preferences 108
H
HELO command 235, 273
353
Index
Hoax viruses 286
Hosts
multiple SMTP 189
Hot-desking 12, 216
HTML 260
replacing support page 95
HTML email 106
I
iCal 299
Image URL 106
IMAP 239
Connections 272
IMAP before SMTP 153, 239
IMAP4
advantages/disadvantages 217
definition 12
IMAP-before-SMTP Authentication 271
Include the following image 106
Index 315
Instant Message
Profiles 106
Instant Messaging
Login 41
Internet
security problems 170
IP Address 164, 165
IP address 165
entering into NTMail 333
explained 6
IP address Flexibility 163
J
journals 299
Journals Access 64
JUCE 153
configuring 241
reply codes sent 241
summary of capabilities 236
K
KDE Kontact 299
keycert.exe 183
L
Language
defining in profiles 101
LAST extension 119
Launch GMS Instant Messenger on
logon 106
LDAP 75
Account name 76, 77
Account Password 76, 77
Alias Attribute 77
Alias Filter 77
Domain 77
Email Attribute 77
Filter 77
Mailbox attribute 78
Password attribute 77
Reset connection count 77
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SearchBase 77
SSL 76
timeout 77
Values 78
LDAP directory services access 157
LDAP servers 76
LDAPAuth
Authorised user password 76, 77
Implementation 78
LDAP server port 76
LDAP servers 76
LDAP timeout 77
Legal issues
disclaimers 171
Spam 171
user policies 171
viruses 171
Licensing 148
Limits
account size 101
bad commands 176
bandwidth 117, 120
mailbox size 101
message size 101
RCPT clauses 176
responses 176
Link to URL 107
List Manager 54
Listing users in a domain 80
Live spam reports 148
Load Sharing 196
Local clients 266
LocalIP 153
Log
JUCE log entries 279
using raw IP address 274
Logging all throughput 170
Logs
domain, transaction and relay 67
management 67
searching for item 70, 71
Logs administrator
privileges 44
Lookup
NT domains 83
on MAIL clause 236
on RCPT clause 236
M
Machine name 239, 273
Macro virus 285
MAIL clause
AI checking 278
example 235
local clients 266
lookup on 236
Mail client
encoding types 339
setting up MS Outlook 220
setting up MS Outlook Express 220
setting up Thunderbird 218
use of 10
Mail Clients
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Mobile 221
Mail domain
defined 348
Mail lists
for new information 37
joining 38
Mail Manager 53
Mail refresh interval 101
Mail relay
configuring check 270
defined 233
use by non-local domains 238
mail.exe 50
Mailbombing 233
Mailbox
definition 170
Mailbox attribute name 78
Mailing all users in domain 66
Manage 63, 105
Manage Domain Address Books 105
Manage System Address Book
Entries 105
Manage System Address Books 105
mashup 106
Max Disk Space 310
Maximum
folder size 101
folders 101
Inbox size 101
message size 101, 334
number of accounts 334
maximum folders 101
Maximum message size 269
Maximum messages in 24 hours 270
Maximum recipients 238, 268
Maximum Revisions 108
May change free/busy information 107
May change freebusy settings 104
May share with allusers 104
May share with everyone 104
May use calendars 106
May use Documents 107
May use GMS Collaboration 107
May use GMS Instant Messenger 106
May use GMS WebMail 104
May use Pager Gateway 106
May use sharing 104
May use SMS Gateway 106
May use the address book 105
Message
body 8
files in body 12
header 8
maximum size 101, 131, 334
moved 56
Message limits 238
Message Logs Directory 310
Message Quality 237, 254
Messages in a separate email 315
Messages in a single email 315
MIME 259
encoded files 12
Types page 203
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Index
Minimum mail refresh interval 101
Mobile Client 221
Mobile Gateway
Profiles 106
Monitoring 151
Monitoring threads usage 114
Moved message
adding 56
definition 56
Mozilla Calendar 299
MS Outlook
setting up 220
MS Outlook Express
setting up 220
Multiple servers sharing domain 194
Multiple SMTP Hosts 189
MX lookup 234
MX record
for multiple hosts setup 190
lookups failing 128
MX backup 180
need for multiple 195
priority in 8, 9
setting up 17, 90
N
NAT 180
notes 299
Notes Access 64
NT SAM User Database
mail problems 338
problems 337
users not recognised 337
using accounts 73
Number of accounts
maximum 334
O
Obtaining mailbox name 79
Off Site Search 312
Offline Image URL 107
Online Image URL 107
Options 45
Outbound message sizes 269
Outlook 299
P
Password 79, 152, 314
choosing 172
configure expiry 102
eSarah account 309
Password attribute name 77
Password Expiry 173
Password server
port 128
PDF reader 22
Performance
limiting bandwidth 120
tuning parameters 114
use of threads 115, 117, 121, 141
Permanent Connection 14
Personal address books 103
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Index
personal address books 104
Ping command
to reach hosts 336
Ping flooding 233
Pipelining
ESMTP command 130
Plan 53
POP 239
domain 87
download bandwidth 120
mail client 12
timeout errors from client 337
POP before SMTP 153, 239
POP domain
setting up 91
POP3
advantages/disadvantages 216
Connections 272
POP-before-SMTP Authentication 271
Port 296
Port Flexibility 163
Ports used 166
Post Authentication 176
POST outbound bandwidth 117
Postfix
client setup 224
defined 86
Postmaster
initial account 32, 33
Postservers file 124
Privilege
need for logon privilege 337
Privileges
Add aliases 103
add personalities 105
autoresponder 103
change details 103
change password 103
collect from POP/IMAP 105
Filter 105
forwards 103
Gizmos 106
local personalities only 105
rebuild mailbox 103
set plan 103
setting up 103
Product Logo 160
Profile
Adding 307
Profiles 101
access 101
adding groups 101
Changing 110
Collaboration 107
Documents 107
Example 110
language 101
maximum account size 101
maximum folder size 101
maximum message size 101
provileges 103
Protocol 163, 165
Proxy 295
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configuring server 200
Web 199
Zero Hour 295
public folders 299
Purging
cache 202, 210
domain’s e-mail 95
Q
Quarantine 59, 144
R
RCPT
limiting number of clauses 176
RCPT clause
and AI 240
example 235
limiting number 268
limiting numbers 234
lookup on 236
Read private 63
Read public 63
Receive external email 103, 104
Receiver of message 239, 273
Recovery
file setup 345
from disaster 343
procedure 346
Redirect file
smart routing 122
Redirect To 290
Redirection
setting up 122
Regular Expressions 246
Regular expressions 246
Reject Message 290
Relay
Allowing 152
Relay logs
Archiving 312
Relay server 270
Relay. See mail relay
Removing accounts 50
Reply code 242
Reports
Account Report 144
Current Activity Report 148
Domains Report 150
Mail Queue System 150
Virus Scan Report 146
Required Samples 278
Reset connection statement count 77
Responses
limiting number 176
problems with 336
Restart 131
Restricted Word 243
Restricted word checks 237
Restricted Words 244
Domain 244
Dynamic 243
Global 244
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ResultsFormat 315
ResultsLimit 315
ResultsTo 315
Retry later with - messages 241
Return with 290
Reverse lookup
on connecting IP address 273
Revert 50
Revisions 108
Robot account 52
Robot domain
defined 89
setting up 91
Round robin
advantages 195
disadvantages 195
server setup 194
Running Average Minimum 278
S
SAM. See NT SAM User Database
Saving Messages 311
Scan Inline Text 290
Scheduling 300
Scored Restricted Word 243
Scored Restricted Words 245
Scripts 239, 272
Search users 103
SearchBase 77
SearchFromDate 314
SearchToDate 314
Security issues 169
Send Alert emails to 310
Send external email 103
Send Updates To 294, 295
Sender of message 239, 273
Sending e-mail fails 340
Sending rules 124, 335
Server
checking services and ports 324
finger 127
password 128
size required 20
Servers sharing a domain 194
Service Levels 110
Services
Starting 136
timeouts 116
Setup.txt 330
Setup.txt recovery file 344, 345, 346
Shared address books 103
shared address books 104
shared folders 299
Shared Library
SMTP 126
Sharing 104
Show domain address book 104
Show local address book 104
Show system address book 104
Size
ESMTP command 131
Smart delivery
setting up 124, 335
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Index
Smart routing
definition 121
SMTP
Authenticated 153
Connections 272
DLLs 126
explained 9
issues 11
multiple hosts 189
Reply Codes 242
Shared Libraries 126
SMTP Authentication 271
SNMP 151
Allowed IP 152
Community 152
Password 152
Sockets 165
Spam
costs to users 233
defined 233
legal implications 171
SQL Database
account information in 73, 74
SQLAuth
Authentication 79
Change a user’s password 79
DSN name 79
Implementation 80
Listing users in a domain 80
Obtaining mailbox name 79
Parameters 79
Password 79
Registry Values 80
User Name 79
Verify an account exists 79
SSL
Certificate File Location 184
Common Name 184
Company Details 184
Company Information 184
Pass Phrase 184
STARTTLS 185
Status bar 43
Status dialog 43
Strict 290
Subject 315
Support
Contacting 329
five levels 328
replacing default page 95
reporting problems to 327
Responses 331
Support email addresses 331
Changing 331
Switch 50
SYN flooding 233
System administrator
privileges 44
System failure
how to recover 343
T
Tab font face 108
357
Index
Tab font size 108
tasks 299
Tasks Access 64
Telnet
commands 324
Threads
monitoring 114
number per service 115
Thunderbird 218
Timeout
of services 116
WWW sessions 176
Title color 108
To 315
Toolbar 42
TOP extension 119
Troubleshooting 317, 327
U
UCE 152
advertisements 234
UIDL extension 119
Unknown User Action
setting up 93
Unknown User action
using 190
Update Every 294, 295
Updates 287
Anti-Spam 294
Anti-Virus 295
Automatic 294
Automatic with GMS AV 295
Interval 294, 295
Send To 294, 295
Upgrade
applying 36
getting notified of 37
obtaining 35
URL
Definition 350
how it works 6
Use IP Connection file 164
Use only IP address 163
Use specified IP addresses 163
Usenet postings 234
User
alias 55
cannot reply to e-mail 339
checking who is logged on 174
Editing Variables 141
Emulating 50
User interface
changes from Version 3 37
customising 95
described 39
User Name 79
UUEncode 256
UUencoded files 12
V
Verify an account exists 79
VERS extension 119
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Virtual domain
client setup 224
defined 86
setting up 91
Virus
Actions 290
Boot-sector 285
Configuration 288
File-infecting 285
Scan Collaboration 289
Scan IMAP 288
Scan POP 288
Scan SMTP 288
Scan WebMail 288
Types 285
What is a Virus 285
Virus List Report 147
Viruses
Hoax 286
In Email 286
Legal implications 171
VPN 350
VPP
Setting up 287
Updates 287
VRFY
ESMTP command 131
VSM
Setting up 287
W
Watch application 114
Web browser
advantages/disadvantages 217
collecting mail with 12
providing Web access 199
Web Proxy
advantages 15
setting up 199
WebMail 104
WebMailAllowCustomisation 159
WebMailLogOffURL 161
WebMailLogOnURL 161
Welcome message
Defining for domain 96
Welcome message for users 49
Wildcards 246, 312, 315
Word Mode 248
Words
Restricted 244
Scored 245
WXPCSSLinks 160
WXPShowProductLogo 160
X
X-Originally-From 87
X-Originally-To 87
XTND
ESMTP command 119, 131
Z
Zero Hour 148, 237, 286, 295
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Index
Classification 252, 289, 292
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
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Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
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Licence Agreements
Licence Agreements
GORDANO LIMITED SOFTWARE LICENCE AGREEMENT
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
WARNING: YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY READ THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS
BEFORE USING THIS SOFTWARE PACKAGE. INSTALLING THE SOFTWARE ONTO YOUR
COMPUTER INDICATES YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS. IF
YOU DO NOT WISH TO ACCEPT ALL OF THESE TERMS, YOU SHOULD STOP INSTALLING
THIS SOFTWARE NOW AND DESTROY ALL COPIES OF THE SOFTWARE AND ALL
MANUALS AND OTHER DOCUMENTS SUPPLIED WITH IT.
1 DEFINITIONS
"Agreement" means this Gordano Limited Software Licence Agreement together with
all related invoices.
"Company" means the licensee of the Software, being the signatory to this Agreement.
"Gordano" means Gordano Limited.
"Documentation" means any documentation or manuals provided with the Software or
provided online or
on storage media containing this text.
"Key" means the activation key.
"Software" means the software computer program, Key and Documentation contained
in this package.
"Trial Period" means the period of 28 days from installation of the Software.
2 GRANT OF LICENCE
2.1 Subject to the Company's compliance with the terms of this Agreement, Gordano
grants to the Company a non-exclusive, non-transferable licence to use the Software
strictly for its own internal business operations only under the terms of this Agreement
for the Trial Period and thereafter if a key is purchased from Gordano or its authorised
representatives. For the avoidance of doubt, operating the Software outside the Trial
Period or without a Key from Gordano (or its representatives) constitutes unlicensed use
of the Software and will be a material breach of this Agreement, which would allow
Gordano to terminate under clause 8.2.
2.2 This Agreement becomes effective upon the Company signing this Agreement or
installing the Software.
2.3 On expiry of the Trial Period and on payment of the fee invoiced by Gordano, the
Company will be sent the Key which will activate the Software.
2.4 The Company may use the Software on the number of computers that it has
purchased a licence for; a separate license is required for any other computers. The
number of licenses purchased by the Company under this Agreement will be stated on
the invoice issued by Gordano.
2.5 The Company may make one copy of the Software, strictly for backup or archive
purposes only.
2.6 The Company shall be responsible for all use of the Software licenced under this
Agreement, including but not limited to any use by its agents, contractors, outsourcers,
customers and suppliers, and their compliance with this Agreement.
2.7 The Company agrees to maintain accurate and adequate records relating to its use of
the Software and compliance with this Agreement. The Company agrees to permit
Gordano to audit the Company in relation to its use of the Software and compliance with
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the terms of this Agreement. The Company shall provide Gordano with reasonable
assistance and access to information in the course of any such audit, and the Company
agrees that Gordano may report the audit results to its licensors. Each party shall be
responsible for its own costs in relation to any such audit.
2.8 In the event that the Software contains source code from a licensor of Gordano, that
source code shall also be governed by the terms of this Agreement.
3 OWNERSHIP OF THE SOFTWARE
3.1 Gordano and its licensors own all title and proprietary rights to the Software and all
copies thereof and all rights therein, including without limitation all copyright, patents,
know-how, trade secrets, trade marks or names and database rights. All such rights shall
remain vested in Gordano and its licensors. The provision of the Software to you does not
grant, and you do not receive, any rights under any Microsoft intellectual property with
respect to any device or software that you use to access the Software.
3.2 The Company undertakes and agrees as follows:
(a) it may NOT make or permit others to make any copies of the Software except for one
backup copy.
(b) it may NOT reverse engineer, disassemble, decompile the Software or attempt to
reconstruct, identify
or discover any source code except as expressly permissible by law.
(c) it may NOT modify, adapt or translate the Software or incorporate the Software, in
whole or in part in any other product or software or permit others to do so without
express, written consent of Gordano.
(d) it may NOT disclose, provide or otherwise make available in any form the Software, its
functionality or any portion thereof, to any third party other than its employees without
the prior written consent of Gordano.
(e) it may NOT remove any copyright, trademark, proprietary rights, disclaimer or warning
notice included on or embedded in any part of the Software and the Company agrees to
diligently reproduce all copyright notice(s) and other proprietary notices of Gordano on
any authorised copy of the Software.
(f) it may NOT assign, sell, transfer (except for temporary transfer in the event of
computer malfunction), licence, sub-licence, rent, timeshare, lease or otherwise
redistribute the Software or its functionality to any third party without the written
permission of Gordano.
(g) it may NOT use the Documentation for any purpose other than to support its use of
the Software.
(h) it accepts that from time to time, the Software will send a message containing details
of the Key or Keys installed to Gordano and it agrees not to interfere with the delivery of
this message.
(i) its accepts, that Gordano may receive error messages from the Software installed on
the Company's system in the event that the Software fails for some reason (and that the
Company has the option to turn this off).
(j) it agrees to stop using all previous version of the Software immediately following an
upgrade.
(k) it may NOT use the Software for any subscription service, hosting or outsourcing.
(l) it may NOT publish any results of benchmark tests run on the programs.
(m) if appropriate, it must comply with all relevant import and export laws to ensure that
the Software or anything directly produced using the Software are not exported directly
or indirectly contrary to applicable laws.
(n) it agrees that any third party technology that may be appropriate or necessary for use
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with some or all of the Software that is notified to the Company (whether via the
Documentation or otherwise) shall not be licensed to the Company under this
Agreement, but may be licensed as stated in the Documentation or as otherwise notified
to the Company.
(o) The Company shall ensure that its customers and/or employees (and any other
persons) that use the Software agree to and are bound by the following condition on
their right to access and use the Software: "The provision of the Software to you does
not grant, and you do not receive, any rights under any Microsoft intellectual property
with respect to any device or software that you use to access the Software."
3.3 No distribution licence or other rights are provided to the Company under this
agreement.
3.4 The Software may utilise Microsoft® Exchange ActiveSync, and the use of Microsoft®
Exchange ActiveSync is limited to internal use as part of hosting the Software for the sole
purpose of providing access by Microsoft® approved devices to email accounts of
employees or customers of the Company maintained by the Software.
The provisions of clauses 3, 4, 6, and 7 shall survive termination of this Agreement.
4 CONFIDENTIALITY
4.1 The Company undertakes to treat as confidential and keep secret all information
contained or embodied in the Software and Documentation supplied by Gordano.
5 ANTI-VIRUS
5.1 Gordano does not warrant that the Software is free from all known viruses and the
Company shall assume responsibility to take appropriate steps to ensure that the
Software is virus free and that the running of the Software will not damage or interfere
with the computer system on which the Software is used or any data or software which
may be used or stored on its computer system.
6 WARRANTY AND DISCLAIMER
6.1 The Company acknowledges that software in general is not error free and agrees that
the existence of such errors in the Software shall not constitute a breach of this
Agreement.
6.2 The Company further acknowledges that the Software has not been developed to
meet its specific individual requirements and that it is the Company's responsibility to
ensure that any use of the Software or the information contained on it is suitable for its
specific individual requirements.
6.3 THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED 'AS IS'. GORDANO WARRANTS THAT THE SOFTWARE
WILL SUBSTANTIALLY COMPLY WITH THE SPECIFICATIONS SET OUT IN THE
DOCUMENTATION. EXCEPT AS STATED HEREIN AND TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY
LAW THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, SATISFACTORY QUALITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE. GORDANO DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE FUNCTIONS
CONTAINED IN THE SOFTWARE WILL MEET THE COMPANY'S REQUIREMENTS OR THAT
THE OPERATION OF THE SOFTWARE WILL BE UNINTERRUPTED OR ERROR-FREE.
6.4 Gordano does not represent or warrant that the Software furnished hereunder is free
of infringement of any third party patents, copyrights, other intellectual property rights or
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trade secrets. The Company waives any right to indemnification or other relief from
Gordano should the Software be found to be defective or to infringe any right of any
third party.
6.5 Nothing in this Agreement shall exclude or limit the liability of Gordano for death or
personal injury caused by its negligence or for any other liability which cannot by law be
excluded.
GORDANO'S SOLE LIABILITY TO THE COMPANY FOR ANY CLAIM, DEMAND OR CAUSE
OR ACTION WHATSOEVER, AND REGARDLESS OF FORM OF ACTION, WHETHER IN
CONTRACT OR TORT, SHALL BE LIMITED TO REPLACEMENT OF THE PRODUCT OR
REFUND OF THE LICENCE FEE PAID FOR THE SOFTWARE. IN NO EVENT SHALL GORDANO
OR ITS LICENSORS BE LIABLE TO THE COMPANY FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL,
INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT
NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF ANTICIPATED SAVINGS, LOSS OF REVENUES, LOSS OF PROFIT,
LOSS OF BUSINESS, LOSS OF DATA OR DATA USE OR ECONOMIC LOSS OF ANY KIND.
7 LIMIT OF LIABILITY
7.1 In the event that any exclusion or limitation in clause 6 above is held to be invalid for
any reason and Gordano becomes liable for loss or damage that may lawfully be limited,
such liability shall be limited to the sum equivalent to a multiple of 3 (three) times the
total annual fee paid by the Company to Gordano for the licence of the Software.
8 TERMINATION OF LICENCE
8.1 Save in the event of any unlicensed use of the Software when the terms of this
Agreement shall remain in full force and effect, the Company may terminate this
Agreement, at any time, by destroying or returning all copies of the Software.
8.2 Gordano may terminate this Agreement by written notice to the Company if the
Company is in default of any terms or conditions of this Agreement or if the Company
enters into any form of insolvency including without limitation liquidation, receivership,
voluntary arrangement, administration or is unable to pay its debts as they fall due.
8.3 On termination of this Agreement the Company agrees to discontinue all use of the
Software and destroy all copies of the Software in any form in its possession or control,
and if requested by Gordano certify in writing that such action has been taken. The
Company shall not be entitled to any refund of any monies or other consideration paid by
it.
9 SUPPORT
9.1 Gordano shall provide support for the first 28 days from your first contact with
Gordano or its representatives. First contact means the Company's representative's first
telephone call to Gordano, registration on the Gordano website, or installation of the trial
software from our website, whichever is the earlier.
9.2 On expiry of this 28 days the Company shall have the option of purchasing support
services from Gordano under the terms of the Support Agreement.
10 MAINTENANCE (Software Updates)
10.1 Gordano shall provide maintenance services in the form of updates to the Software
for the duration of the Software's licence term, commencing on the expiry of the Trial
Period and on the Company's receipt of the Key. Thereafter, the Company shall have the
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option of renewing annual maintenance services (Software updates) from Gordano.
10.2 Maintenance services shall comprise of the provision of new versions of the
Software only as and when they become available, and no other maintenance services or
assistance is included.
11 GENERAL
11.1 If any provision of this Agreement is determined to be invalid or unenforceable, by
any court of competent jurisdiction it shall be deemed to be omitted and the remaining
provisions shall continue in full force and effect.
11.2 Gordano's waiver of any right shall not constitute a waiver of that right in the
future.
11.3 This Agreement shall be governed and construed in accordance with the laws of
England and both parties submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts, save in
respect of enforcement where the jurisdiction shall be non-exclusive.
11.4 This Agreement constitutes the entire understanding between the parties with
respect to the subject matter hereof. The Company agrees that any of Gordano's
licensors that are associated with the Software shall be a third party beneficiary of this
Agreement. All prior agreements, representations, statements and undertakings, oral or
written, between the Company and Gordano are hereby expressly superseded and
cancelled.
11.5 All notices under this Agreement shall be in writing and shall be given by registered
or certified mail to the following address: Gordano Ltd, 1 Yeo Bank Business Park, Kenn
Road, Kenn, Clevedon, North Somerset,
BS21 6UW, UK.
© 1995-2016. Gordano Limited. All rights reserved.
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
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GORDANO LIMITED SUPPORT AGREEMENT
WARNING: YOU SHOULD CAREFULLY READ THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS.
BY REGISTERING FOR SUPPORT SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED BY GORDANO YOU ARE
ACCEPTING THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS. IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO ACCEPT ALL OF
THESE TERMS YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY NOTIFY GORDANO AND ANY SUPPORT FEE
YOU MAY HAVE PAID WILL BE REFUNDED FOR THE OUTSTANDING CONTRACT TERM.
1 DEFINITIONS
"Business Days" means weekdays excluding weekends, and UK Bank and Public
Holidays and Gordano's training days (which will be notified to the Company in advance
and in any case will not be more than 3 (three) days in any one calendar year).
"Company" means the licensee of the Software.
"Gordano" means Gordano Limited.
"Key" means the activation key for the Software or Support Service.
"Software" means the software computer program and documentation licensed to the
Company from Gordano.
"Software Licence" means the software licence granting the Company a non-exclusive,
nontransferable licence of the Software.
"Support Fee" means the fees payable for the Support Service, which shall be in
accordance with Gordano's current price list as amended from time to time.
"Support Agreement" means this Gordano Limited Support Agreement.
"Support Service" means the support services provided by Gordano in relation to the
Software and as detailed in clause 3 of this Support Agreement.
2 GRANT
2.1 This Support Agreement is for the provision of Gordano's Support Service in respect
of the current version of the Software for the term of your subscription to the Support
Service commencing from the date of the commencement of your subscription for the
Support Service.
2.2 If further products are licensed from Gordano during the lifetime of this Agreement a
"top-up" fee may be added to extend this Support Agreement to cover the additional
products at the time of their purchase.
2.3 This Support Agreement becomes effective on the date you pay for the Support
Service.
2.4 Customers may register as users on the helpdesk at https://helpdesk.gordano.com
however this is not required in order to receive support.
3 SUPPORT SERVICES
3.1 Gordano shall provide the Company with the following Support Service:
(a) telephone support for the Software (currently on +44 (0)1275 340151):
(i) between the hours of 0900 to 17:00 or 14:00 to 2200 hours UK Time; or
(ii) between the hours of 0900 to 2200 UK Time; on all Business Days or
(iii) for 24x7 cover; telephone support shall be provided at all hours on all days
(b) email support for the Software at support@gordano.com or helpdesk@gordano.com.
3.2 Messages sent to and Support calls made to Gordano will be processed automatically
and assigned a ticket ID. Gordano will send confirmation of these details to the creator of
the ticket.
3.3 All Support Services for the Software will be provided in the English language only.
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4 EXCLUDED SERVICES
The Support Service supplied under this Agreement shall not include the provision of
Support Service in respect of:
(a) any version of the Software which is more than 24 months past its release date, except
at the discretion of a support engineer or the management of Gordano Ltd;
(b) any products or services which are not the Software or its components;
(c) training in the use of the Software;
(d) any development services;
(e) defects or errors resulting from any modifications or enhancements of the Software
made by any person other than Gordano;
(f) use of the Software other than in accordance with the documentation or operator
error;
(g) virus protection or bug fixes except in exceptional circumstances as advised by
Gordano, for example, when the system has been compromised by some external force
and there is no available workaround; or
(h) any circumstances beyond the reasonable control of Gordano, including (but not
limited to) any act of God, fire, flood, war, act of violence or any other similar occurrence
or failure or reduced performance of telecommunications networks or the internet.
5 COMPANY OBLIGATIONS
5.1 The Company agrees and undertakes:
(a) to ensure that the Software is used only in accordance with the documentation or
advice from Gordano, by competent trained employees only or by persons under their
supervision;
(b) not to alter or modify the Software in any way whatever nor permit the Software to
be combined with any other programs to form a combined work;
(c) not to request, permit or authorise anyone other than Gordano or its nominated third
parties to provide any support services in respect of the Software;
(d) to co-operate fully with Gordano's personnel in the diagnosis of any error or defect in
the Software;
(e) if necessary, to make available to Gordano free of charge all information facilities and
services reasonably required by Gordano to enable Gordano to provide the support
services;
(f) to provide such telecommunication facilities as are reasonably required by Gordano for
testing and diagnostic purposes.
6 SUPPORT FEES
In consideration of the Support Services the Company shall pay the Support Fee in
advance to Gordano
7 TERMINATION
Gordano may terminate this Support Agreement by written notice to the Company if the
Company is in default of any terms or conditions of this Support Agreement by written
notice to the Company or if the Company enters into any form of insolvency including
without limitation liquidation, receivership, voluntary arrangement, administration or are
unable to pay its debts as they fall due.
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8 LIABILITY
Gordano's sole liability to the Company for any claim, demand, cause or action
whatsoever, and regardless of form of action, whether in contract or tort, including
negligence, shall be limited, at Gordano's sole option, to refund of the purchase price, reperformance of the Support Service or an extension to the length of the Support Service
to be provided. In no event shall Gordano be liable for recovery of any special, indirect,
incidental, or consequential damages, even if Gordano has been advised of the possibility
of such damages, including but not limited to lost profits, lost savings, lost revenues, lost
business, lost data or economic loss of any kind, or for any claim by any third party.
9 LIMIT OF LIABILITY
In the event that any exclusion or limitation in clause 8 above is held to be invalid for any
reason and Gordano becomes liable for loss or damage that may lawfully be limited, such
liability shall be limited to the sum equivalent to a multiple of three times the Support
Fees paid by the Company to Gordano.
10 GENERAL
10.1 If any provision of this Support Agreement is determined to be invalid or
unenforceable, by any court of competent jurisdiction it shall be deemed to be omitted
and the remaining provisions shall continue in full force and effect.
10.2 Gordano's waiver of any right shall not constitute a waiver of that right in the
future.
10.3 This Support Agreement shall be governed and construed in accordance with the
laws of England and both parties submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts,
save in respect of enforcement where the jurisdiction shall be non-exclusive.
10.4 This Support Agreement constitutes the entire understanding between the parties
with respect to the subject matter hereof and all prior agreements, representations,
statements and undertakings, oral or written, are hereby expressly superseded and
cancelled.
10.5 All notices in connection with this Agreement shall be in writing and shall be given
by registeredor certified mail to the following address: Gordano Ltd, 1 Yeo Bank Business
Park, Kenn, Kenn Road,
Clevedon, North Somerset, BS21 6UW, UK.
© 1995-2016. Gordano Limited. All rights reserved.
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Licence Agreements
LICENCE AGREEMENT MySQL AB
MySQL AB, Bangårdsgatan 8, 753 20 Uppsala, SWEDEN
1. License Grant. Customer is granted a limited, non-exclusive, non-transferable license
to run one copy of the object code version of the Licensed Software on one machine or
instrument solely as integrated with, and for running and extracting data from, a Licensee
Application. Use shall be limited to internal business purposes in accordance with these
license terms. If the Integrated Product is licensed for concurrent or network use,
Customer may not allow more than the maximum number of authorized users to access
and use the Licensed Software concurrently.
2. License Restrictions. Customer may make copies of the Licensed Software only for
backup and archival purposes. Customer shall not:
(a) copy the Licensed Software onto any public or distributed networks
(b) use the Licensed Software as a general SQL server, as a stand alone application or with
applications other than Licensee Applications under this license;
(c) change any proprietary rights notices which appear in the Licensed Software; or
(d) modify the Licensed Software.
3. Ownership. MySQL AB and its third party suppliers retain all right, title and interest in
the Licensed Software and all copies thereof, including all copyright and other intellectual
property rights. MySQL AB may protect its rights in the Licensed Software in the event of
any violation of this EULA.
4. Transfer. Customer may transfer the license granted herein provided that it complies
with any transfer terms imposed by Licensee and delivers all copies of the Licensed
Software to the transferee along with this EULA. The transferee must accept the terms
and conditions of this EULA as a condition to any transfer. Customer's license to use the
Licensed Software will terminate upon transfer. Customer must comply with all applicable
export laws and regulations.
5. Termination. Upon termination of this license, Customer must immediately destroy all
copies of the Licensed Software.
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Licence Agreements
GMS Administrator’s Guide
The MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm
The MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm used in NTMail is copyright (c) 1992-2, RSA Data
Security, Inc. Created 1991. All rights reserved.
License to copy and use this software is granted provided that it is identified as the “RSA
Data Security, Inc. MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm” in all material mentioning or
referencing this software or this function.
License is also granted to make and use derivative works provided that such works are
identified as “derived from the RSA Data Security, Inc. MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm”
in all material mentioning or referencing the derived work.
RSA Data Security, Inc. makes no representations concerning either the merchantability of
this software or the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided
“as is” without express or implied warranty of any kind.
These notices must be retained in any copies of any part of this documentation and/or
software.
jQuery MIT License
Copyright (c) 2008 John Resig, http://jquery.com/
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this
software and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal in the Software
without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge,
publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons
to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or
substantial portions of the Software.
THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS”, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL
THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR
OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE,
ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR
OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.
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Installation and Contact Information
Installation and Contact Information
For installation you need the following information. Keep a note of
the values you used here in case you need to quote them to
support.
Your domain name
Your computer’s IP address (if
static).

Telephone number of ISPs
computer.

Your account user name at
the ISP and its password.
To contact Gordano Ltd.
Support
• Email: support@gordano.com
Sales
• Email: sales@gordano.com
• Tel: +44 1275 345100
• Fax: +44 1275 340056
•
Unit 1, Yeo Bank Business Park, Kenn Road, Clevedon, North Somerset,
BS21 6UW, UK.
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
371
Installation and Contact Information
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GMS Administrator’s Guide
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
Gordano Limited
Unit 1, Yeo Bank Business Park,
Kenn Road, Clevedon, North Somerset, BS21 6UW, UK
http://www.gordano.com
Copyright © Gordano Ltd, 1995-2016
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