FIBA Official Interpretations 2010

Official Basketball Rules 2014
Official Interpretations
Valid as of 1st February 2015
The interpretations presented in this document are the FIBA Official Interpretations of the FIBA Official Basketball Rules 2014 and are effective as of 1st February
2015. Where the interpretations in this document differ from previously published
FIBA Official Interpretations, this document shall take precedence.
The FIBA Official Basketball Rules are approved by the FIBA Central Board and are periodically
revised by the FIBA Technical Commission.
The rules are kept as clear and comprehensive as possible, but they express principles rather than
play situations. They cannot, however, cover the rich variety of specific cases that could happen
during a basketball game.
The aim of this document is to convert the principles and concepts of the rulebook into practical and
specific situations as they might arise during a normal basketball game.
The interpretations of the different situations can stimulate the officials’ minds and will complement
an initial detailed study of the rules themselves.
The FIBA Official Basketball Rules shall remain the principal document governing FIBA basketball.
However, the referee shall have the full power and authority to make decisions on any point not specifically covered in the FIBA Official Basketball Rules or in the following FIBA Official Interpretations.
For the sake of consistency of this interpretation, ‘team A’ is the (initial) offensive team, ‘team B’ is the
defensive team. A1 – A5, B1 – B5 are players; A6 – A12, B6 – B12 are substitutes.
ART. 5
PLAYERS - INJURY
5-1
Statement. If a player is injured or appears to be injured and, as a result, the coach,
assistant coach, substitute or any other team bench personnel of the same team enters the
playing court, that player is considered to have received treatment, whether or not actual
treatment is performed.
5-2
Example: A1 appears to have injured an ankle and the game is stopped.
(a) The team A doctor enters the playing court and treats A1's injured ankle.
(b) The team A doctor enters the playing court but A1 has already recovered.
(c) Coach A enters the playing court to assess A1's injury.
(d) Assistant coach A, substitute A or team follower A enters the playing court but does not
treat A1.
Interpretation: In all cases A1 is considered to have received treatment and shall be
substituted.
5-3
Statement. There is no time limit for the removal of a seriously injured player from the
playing court if according to a doctor the removal is dangerous for the player.
5-4
Example: A1 is seriously injured and the game is stopped for about 15 minutes because the
doctor estimates that removal from the playing court could be dangerous for the player.
Interpretation: The doctor’s opinion shall determine the appropriate time for the removal of
the injured player from the playing court. After the substitution, the game shall be restarted
without any sanction.
5-5
Statement. If a player is injured or is bleeding, or has an open wound, and cannot continue
to play immediately (within approximately 15 seconds), he must be substituted. If a time-out is
granted to either team in the same stopped clock period, and that player recovers during the
time-out, he may continue to play only if the scorer’s signal for the time-out has sounded
before an official beckoned a substitute to become a player.
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5-6
Example: A1 is injured and the game is stopped. As A1 is not able to continue to play
immediately, an official blows his whistle making the conventional sign for a substitution.
Coach A (or Coach B) requests a time-out:
(a) Before a substitute for A1 has entered the game.
(b) After a substitute for A1 has entered the game.
At the end of the time-out, A1 appears to have recovered and asks to remain in the game.
Interpretation:
(a) Time-out is granted and if A1 recovers during the time-out he may continue to play.
(b) Time-out is granted but a substitute for A1 has already entered the game. Therefore A1
cannot re-enter until after the clock-running phase of the game.
5-7
Statement. Players who have been designated by their coach to start the game or who receive treatment between free throws may be substituted in the event of an injury. In this case
the opponents are also entitled to substitute the same number of players, if they so wish.
5-8
Example. A1 is fouled by B1 and is awarded 2 free throws. After the first free throw the
officials discover that A1 is bleeding and he is replaced by A6 who will attempt the second
free throw. Team B now requests to substitute 2 players.
Interpretation: Team B is entitled to substitute only 1 player.
5-9
Example. A1 is fouled by B1 and is awarded 2 free throws. After the first free throw the
officials discover that B3 is bleeding. B3 is replaced by B6 and team A requests to substitute
1 player.
Interpretation: Team A is entitled to substitute 1 player.
ART. 7
7-1
COACHES: DUTIES AND POWERS
Statement. At least 20 minutes before the game is scheduled to begin, each coach or his
representative shall give the scorer a list with the names and corresponding numbers of the
team members who are eligible to play in the game as well as the name of the captain of the
team, the coach and the assistant coach.
The coach is personally responsible that the numbers in the list correspond to the numbers
on the shirts of the players. At least 10 minutes before the game is scheduled to begin the
coach shall confirm his agreement with the names and corresponding numbers of his team
members and the names of coach, assistant coach and captain by signing the scoresheet.
7-2
Example: Team A presents in due time the team list to the scorer. The numbers of 2 players
are not the same as the numbers displayed on their shirts or the name of a player is omitted
on the scoresheet. This is discovered:
(a) Before the start of the game.
(b) After the start of the game.
Interpretation:
(a) The wrong numbers are corrected or the name of the player is added on the scoresheet
without any sanction.
(b) The referee stops the game at a convenient moment so as not to disadvantage either
team. The wrong numbers are corrected without any sanction. However, the name of the
player cannot be added to the scoresheet.
7-3
Statement. At least 10 minutes before the game is scheduled to begin each coach shall
indicate the 5 players who are to start the game. Before the game starts the scorer shall
check if there is an error regarding these 5 players and, if so, he shall notify the nearest
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official as soon as possible. If this is discovered before the start of the game the starting 5
players shall be corrected. If this is discovered after the start of the game it shall be
disregarded.
7-4
Example: It is discovered that 1 of the players on the playing court is not 1 of the confirmed
starting 5 players. This occurs:
(a) Before the start of the game.
(b) After the start of the game.
Interpretation:
(a) The player shall be replaced without any sanction by 1 of the 5 players who were to start
the game.
(b) The error is disregarded and the game continues without any sanction.
ART. 8
PLAYING TIME, TIED SCORE AND EXTRA PERIODS
8-1
Statement. An interval of play begins:
• 20 minutes before the game is scheduled to begin.
• When the game clock signal sounds for the end of the period.
8-2
Example: A1 in the act of shooting is fouled by B1 simultaneously with the game clock signal
sounding to end the period and is awarded 2 free throws.
Interpretation: The interval of play shall start after the free throws have been completed.
ART. 9
BEGINNING AND END OF A PERIOD
9-1
Statement. A game shall not begin unless each team has a minimum of 5 entitled players on
the playing court and ready to play. If fewer than 5 players are on the playing court at the
time the game is to begin, the officials must be sensitive to any unforeseeable
circumstance(s) that could explain the delay. If a reasonable explanation is provided for the
delay, a technical foul shall not be charged. If, however, no such explanation is provided, a
technical foul and/or forfeiture of the game may result upon arrival of further entitled players.
9-2
Example: When the game is scheduled to begin, team B has fewer than 5 players on the
playing court and ready to play.
(a) The representative of team B is able to provide a reasonable and acceptable explanation
for the late arrival of the team B players.
(b) The representative of team B is unable to provide a reasonable and acceptable
explanation for the late arrival of the team B players.
Interpretation:
The beginning of the game shall be delayed for a maximum of 15 minutes. If the absent
players arrive on the playing court ready to play before 15 minutes have passed,
(a) the game shall begin and no penalty shall be charged.
(b) a technical foul may be charged against coach B, recorded as 'B'. Team A shall be
awarded 1 free throw and the game shall begin with a jump ball.
In both cases if the absent players have not arrived on the playing court ready to play before
15 minutes have passed, then the game may be forfeited to team A and the score recorded as
20:0. In all cases the referee shall report it on the reverse side of the scoresheet to the
organising body of the competition.
9-3
Example: At the beginning of the second half, team A cannot present 5 players entitled to
play on the playing court because of injuries, disqualifications etc.
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Interpretation: The obligation to present a minimum of 5 players is valid only for the
beginning of the game, Team A shall continue to play with fewer than 5 players.
9-4
Example: Close to the end of the game A1 commits his 5th foul and leaves the game. Team A
can continue the game with only 4 players as they have no more substitutes available. As
team B is leading with more than 15 points, coach B demonstrating fair play wants to remove
one of his players in order to continue to play also with 4 players.
Interpretation: The request of coach B to play with less than 5 players shall be denied. As
long as a team has sufficient players available, 5 players shall be on the playing court.
9-5
Statement. Art. 9 clarifies which basket a team is to defend and which basket it is to attack.
If by confusion any period begins with both teams attacking/defending the wrong baskets,
the situation shall be corrected as soon as it is discovered, without placing either team at a
disadvantage. Any points scored, time used, fouls charged, etc. before the stopping of the
game remain valid.
9-6
Example: After the start of the game, the officials discover that both teams are playing in the
wrong direction.
Interpretation: The game shall be stopped as soon as possible and without placing any team
at a disadvantage. Teams shall exchange baskets. The game shall be resumed from the
mirror-opposite place nearest to where the game was stopped.
9-7
Example: At the beginning of a period, team A is defending its own basket when B1
erroneously dribbles to his own basket and scores a field goal.
Interpretation: 2 points shall be awarded to the captain of team A on the playing court.
ART. 10
10-1
ART. 12
STATUS OF THE BALL
The ball does not become dead and the goal counts if made, when a player commits a foul on
any opponent while the ball is in control of the opponents, who are in the act of shooting for a
field goal and who finishes their shot with a continuous motion which started before the foul
occurred. This statement is equally valid if any player or team bench personal of a defensive
team commit a technical foul.
JUMP BALL AND ALTERNATING POSSESSION
12-1
Statement. The team that does not obtain control of a live ball on the playing court after the
jump ball at the beginning of the game will be awarded the ball for a throw-in at the place
nearest to where the next jump ball situation occurs.
12-2
Example: A referee tosses the ball for the opening jump ball. Immediately after the ball is
legally tapped by jumper A1:
(a) A held ball between A2 and B2 is called.
(b) A double foul between A2 and B2 is called.
Interpretation: Since the control of a live ball on the playing court has not yet been
established, the official cannot use the alternating possession arrow to award possession.
The referee shall administer another jump ball in the centre circle and A2 and B2 shall jump.
Whatever time has passed on the game clock, after the ball is legally tapped and before the
held ball/double foul situation shall remain consumed.
12-3
Example: The referee tosses the ball for the opening jump ball. Immediately after the ball is
legally tapped by jumper A1. The ball:
(a) Goes directly out-of-bounds.
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(b) Is caught by A1 before it has touched one of the non-jumpers or the floor.
Interpretation: In both cases team B is awarded a throw-in as the result of the A1 violation.
After the throw-in the team that does not gain control of the live ball on the playing court
will be entitled to the first alternating possession at the place nearest to where the next jump
ball situation occurs.
12-4
Example: Team B is entitled to a throw-in under the alternating possession procedure. An
official and/or a scorer makes an error and the ball is erroneously awarded to team A for the
throw-in.
Interpretation: Once the ball touches or is legally touched by a player on the playing court,
the error cannot be corrected. However, team B shall not lose its alternating possession
throw-in opportunity as a result of the error and will be entitled to the next alternating
possession throw-in.
12-5
Example: Simultaneously with the game clock signal for the end of the first period, B1 fouls
A1 and an unsportsmanlike foul is called.
Interpretation: A1 shall attempt 2 free throws with no line up of players and no playing time
remaining. After the 2 minutes interval of play, the game shall be resumed with a throw-in by
team A at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table. No team shall lose its right to
the next alternating possession throw-in at the next jump ball situation.
12-6
Example: А1 jumps with the ball and is legally blocked by B1. Both players then return to the
playing court with both of them having one or both hands firmly on the ball.
Interpretation: A held ball shall be called.
12-7
Example: А1 and В1 in the air have their hands firmly on the ball. After returning to the
playing court А1 lands with one foot on the boundary line.
Interpretation: A held ball shall be called.
12-8
Example: А1 jumps with the ball from his frontcourt and is legally blocked by B1. Both players
then return to the playing court with both of them having one or both hands firmly on the ball.
А1 lands with one foot in his backcourt.
Interpretation: A held ball shall be called.
12-9
Statement. Whenever a live ball lodges between the ring and the backboard, unless between free throws and unless a possession of the ball is part of the foul penalty, it is a jump
ball situation resulting in an alternating possession throw-in. As this does not result in a
rebound situation, it is not considered as having the same influence on the game as when the
ball simply touches and rebounds from the ring. Therefore if the team that was in control of
the ball before it lodges between the ring and the backboard is entitled to the throw-in it shall
have only the remaining time on the shot clock as in any other jump ball situation.
12-10
Example: On a shot for a field goal by A1 the ball lodges between the ring and the backboard.
Team A is entitled to a throw-in under the alternating possession procedure.
Interpretation: After the throw-in team A has only the remaining time on the shot clock.
12-11
Example: While the ball is in the air on A1’s shot for a field goal the shot clock expires,
followed by the ball lodging between the ring and the backboard. Team A is entitled to a
throw-in under the alternating possession procedure.
Interpretation: As team A has no remaining time on the shot clock a shot clock violation has
occurred. Team B is entitled to a throw-in. Team A shall not lose its right to the next
alternating possession throw-in at the next jump ball situation.
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12-12
Example: A1 shoots for a 2-point field goal and is fouled by B2. The officials call an
unsportsmanlike foul on B2. During the last free throw:
(a) The ball lodges between the ring and the backboard.
(b) A1 steps on the free-throw line while releasing the ball.
(c) The ball misses the ring.
Interpretation: The free throw shall be considered unsuccessful and the ball shall be
awarded to team A for a throw-in at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table.
12-13
Statement. A held ball occurs when one or more players from opposing teams have one or
both hands firmly on the ball so that neither player can gain control without undue roughness.
12-14
Example: A1 with the ball in his hands is in the continuous motion towards the basket in
order to score. At this moment B1 places his hands firmly on the ball and now A1 makes more
steps than allowed by the traveling rule.
Interpretation: A held ball shall be called.
ART. 14
CONTROL OF THE BALL
14-1
Statement. Team control starts when a player of that team is in control of a live ball by
holding or dribbling it.
14-2
Example: During a throw-in, regardless whether the game clock is stopped or not or during a
free throw, in the judgement of the officials, a player deliberately delays the process of taking
the ball.
Interpretation: The ball becomes live when the official places the ball on the floor next to the
throw-in place or free-throw line.
14-3
Example: Team A has been in control of the ball for 15 seconds. A1 tries to pass the ball to A2
and the ball moves across the boundary line. B1 tries to catch the ball and jumps from the
playing court over the boundary line. While B1 is still airborne the ball
(a) is tapped by one hand of B1
(b) is caught by B1 with both hands
and the ball returns to the playing court where it is caught by A2.
Interpretation:
(a) Team A remains in control of the ball. The shot clock continues.
(b) Team B has gained team control. The shot clock for team A shall be reset.
ART. 16
GOAL: WHEN MADE AND ITS VALUE
16-1
Statement. The value of a field goal is defined by the place on the floor from where the shot
was released. A goal released from the 2-point field goal area counts 2 points, a goal
released from the 3-point field goal area counts 3 points. A goal is credited to the team
attacking the opponents’ basket into which the ball has entered.
16-2
Example: A1 released the ball on a shot from the 3-point field goal area. The ball on its
upward flight is legally touched by
(a) an offensive player
(b) a defensive player
who is within the team A's 2-point field goal area. The ball then continues its flight and enters
the basket.
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Interpretation:
In both cases team A shall be awarded 3 points as A1’s shot was released from the 3-point
field goal area.
16-3
Example: A1 released the ball on a shot from the 2-point field goal area. The ball on its
upward flight is legally touched by B1 who has jumped from A’s 3-point field goal area. The
ball then continues its flight and enters the basket.
Interpretation: Team A shall be awarded 2 points as A1’s shot was released from the 2-point
field goal area.
16-4
Statement. If the ball enters the basket, the value of the field goal is defined by whether the
ball
(a) has entered the basket directly or
(b) on the pass is touched by any player or touches the floor before entering the basket.
16-5
Example: A1 passes the ball from the 3-point field goal area and the ball directly enters the
basket.
Interpretation: Team A shall be awarded 3 points as A1‘s pass was released from the 3-point
field goal area.
16-6
Example: A1 passes the ball from the 3-point field goal area and the ball is touched by any
player or the ball touches the floor
(a) in team A’s 2-point field goal area
(b) in team A’s 3-point field goal area
before it enters the basket.
Interpretation: In both cases team A shall be awarded 2 points as the ball did not enter the
basket directly.
16-7
Statement. In a throw-in situation or on a rebound after the last or only free throw, a period
of time will always pass from the moment the inbounds player touches the ball until that
player releases the ball on a shot. This is particularly important to take into consideration
near the end of a period. There must be a minimum amount of time available for such a shot
before time expires. If 0:00.3 second is displayed on the game clock, it is the duty of the
official(s) to determine if the shooter released the ball before the game clock signal sounds
for the end of the period. If, however, 0:00.2 or 0:00.1 second is displayed on the game clock,
the only type of a valid field goal made by an airborne player is by tapping or directly dunking
the ball.
16-8
Example: Team A is awarded a throw in with
(a) 0:00.3
(b) 0:00.2 or 0:00.1
displayed on the game clock.
Interpretation:
In (a), if a shot for a field goal is attempted and the game clock signal sounds for the end of
the period during the attempt, it is the responsibility of the officials to determine if the ball
was released before the game clock signal has sounded for the end of the period.
In (b), the basket can be awarded only if the ball while in the air on the throw-in pass is
tapped to the basket or directly dunked.
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ART. 17
THROW-IN
17-1
Statement. Before the player taking the throw-in has released the ball on a throw-in, it is
possible that the throwing-in motion could cause that player’s hand(s) with the ball to break
the plane of the boundary line separating the inbounds area from the out-of-bounds area. In
such situations, it continues to be the responsibility of the defensive player to avoid
interfering with the throw-in by contacting the ball while it is still in the hands of the player
taking the throw-in.
17-2
Example: A1 is awarded a throw-in. While holding the ball, A1’s hand(s) crosses the plane of
the boundary line so that the ball is above the inbounds area. B1 grabs the ball that is in A1’s
hand(s) or taps the ball out of A1’s hand(s) without causing any physical contact against A1
Interpretation: B1 has interfered with the throw-in, thereby delaying the resuming of the
game. A warning shall be given to B1 and communicated to coach B and this warning shall
apply to all team B players for the remainder of the game. Any repetition of a similar action by
any team B player may result in a technical foul.
17-3
Statement. On a throw-in, the player taking the throw-in must pass the ball (not hand the
ball) to a team-mate on the playing court.
17-4
Example: On a throw-in A1 hands the ball to A2 who is on the playing court.
Interpretation: A1 has committed a throw-in violation. The ball must leave the player’s
hand(s) in order for the throw-in to be considered legal. The ball is awarded to team B for a
throw-in at the place of the original throw-in.
17-5
Statement. During the throw-in other player(s) shall not have any part of their bodies over
the boundary line before the ball is passed across the boundary line.
17-6
Example: After an out-of-bounds violation A1 has received the ball from the official for the
throw-in. A1
(a) places the ball on the floor after which the ball is taken by A2.
(b) hands the ball to A2 in the out-of-bounds area.
Interpretation: This is a violation of A2 in both cases as he moves his body over the
boundary line before A1 has passed the ball across the boundary line.
17-7
Example: After a team A successful field goal or a successful last or only free throw a timeout is granted to team B. Following the time-out B1 receives the ball from the official for a
throw-in at the endline. B1
(a) places the ball on the floor after which the ball is taken by B2.
(b) hands the ball to B2, who is also standing behind the endline.
Interpretation: Legal play. The only restriction for team B to handle the ball on the throw-in is
they must pass the ball into the playing court within 5 seconds.
17-8
Statement. If a time-out is granted to a team that has been awarded possession of the ball in
its backcourt when the game clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period and in each
extra period, the throw-in shall be administered at the throw-in line opposite the scorer’s
table in the team’s frontcourt. The player taking the throw-in must pass the ball to a teammate in the frontcourt.
17-9
Example: In the last minute of the game, A1 has dribbled in his backcourt when a team B
player taps the ball out-of-bounds at the free-throw line extended.
(a) A time-out is granted to team B.
(b) A time-out is granted to team A.
(c) A time-out is granted first to team B and immediately after to team A (or vice-versa).
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Interpretation:
In (a),
team A shall resume the game with a throw-in at the free-throw line extended
at its backcourt.
In (b) and (c), team A shall resume the game with a throw-in at the throw-in line opposite the
scorer’s table in the team’s frontcourt.
In all cases team A shall have only whatever time was remaining on the shot clock.
17-10
Example: In the last minute of the game, A1 attempts 2 free throws. During the 2nd free throw
A1 steps on the free-throw line while shooting and a violation is called. Team B requests a
time-out.
Interpretation: Team B shall resume the game with a throw-in at the throw-in line opposite
the scorer’s table in the team’s frontcourt, and shall have 24 seconds on the shot clock.
17-11
Example: When the game clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period and in each extra
period, A1 has dribbled for 6 seconds in team A’s backcourt, when
(a) B1 taps the ball out-of-bounds
(b) B1 commits the 3rd foul for team B in this period
and team A is granted a time-out.
Interpretation: After the time-out, team A resumes the game with a throw-in at the throw-in
line opposite the scorer’s table in the team’s frontcourt. In both cases team A shall have 18
seconds remaining on the shot clock.
17-12
Example: When the game clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period and in each extra
period, A1 has dribbled the ball in his frontcourt when B1 taps the ball to team A’s backcourt
where any player of team A starts to dribble the ball again. B2 now taps the ball out-ofbounds in the team A backcourt with
(a) 6 seconds
(b) 17 seconds
remaining on the shot clock. Team A is granted a time-out.
Interpretation: After the time-out, team A resumes the game with a throw-in at the throw-in
line opposite the scorer’s table in the team’s frontcourt. In both cases, team A shall only have
whatever time was remaining on the shot clock.
17-13
Example: When the game clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period and in each extra
period, A1 has dribbled the ball in his frontcourt when B1 taps the ball to team A’s backcourt
where any player of team A starts to dribble the ball again. B2 now commits the 3rd foul for
team B in this period in the team A backcourt with
(a) 6 seconds
(b) 17 seconds
remaining on the shot clock. Team A is granted a time-out. After the time-out, team A
resumes the game with a throw-in at the throw-in line opposite the scorer’s table in the
team’s frontcourt.
Interpretation: When the game resumes team A shall have
(a) 14 seconds
(b) 17 seconds
remaining on the shot clock.
17-14
Example: Team A has been in control of the ball in its backcourt for 5 seconds when A6 and
B6 are disqualified for entering the playing court in a fighting situation. The foul penalties
cancel each other and a throw-in is awarded to team A at the centre line extended, opposite
the scorer's table. Before the throw-in is administered, coach A is granted a time-out. Where
shall the throw-in be administered to resume the game?
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Interpretation: The throw-in shall be administered at the centre line extended, opposite the
scorer’s table with the time remaining on the shot clock, in this case with 19 seconds.
17-15
Statement. There are additional situations to those listed in Art. 17.2.3 in which the
subsequent throw-in shall be administered at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s
table.
17-16
Example:
(a) The player taking the throw-in at the centre line extended opposite the scorer’s table
commits a violation and the ball is awarded to the opponents for a throw-in at the place
of the original throw-in.
(b) If during a fighting situation members of both teams are disqualified, there are no other
foul penalties remaining for administration, and at the time the game was stopped a team
had control of the ball or was entitled to the ball. In this case the throw-in team shall
have only whatever time was remaining on the shot clock.
Interpretation: In all the above situations the player taking the throw-in can pass the ball to
either the frontcourt or the backcourt.
17-17
Statement. On a throw-in the following situations may occur:
(a) The ball is passed over the basket and a player of either team touches it by reaching
through the basket from below.
(b) The ball lodges between the ring and the backboard.
(c) The ball is intentionally thrown at the ring in order to reset the shot clock.
17-18
Example: On a throw-in A1 passes the ball over the basket when a player of either team
touches it by reaching through the basket from below.
Interpretation: This is a violation. The game shall be resumed with a throw-in for the
opponents at the free-throw line extended. In case the defensive team commits the violation,
an offensive team cannot score any points, as the ball did not come from the inbounds area
of the playing court.
17-19
Example: On a throw-in A1 passes the ball towards the basket and it lodges between the ring
and the backboard.
Interpretation: This is a jump ball situation. The game shall be resumed by applying the
alternating possession procedure. If team A is entitled to the throw-in the shot clock shall not
be reset.
17-20
Example: With 5 seconds remaining on the shot clock during the throw-in A1 passes the ball
towards the basket where it touches the ring.
Interpretation: The shot clock operator shall not reset his clock, as the game clock has not
started yet. The shot clock shall be started simultaneously with the game clock when the first
player on the playing court touches the ball.
17-21
Statement. After the ball has been placed at the disposal of the player taking the throw-in,
he may not bounce the ball so as to have it touch the inbounds area and then touch the ball
again before it has touched or been touched by another player on the playing court.
17-22
Example: A1 is awarded a throw-in. A1 then bounces the ball so as to have the ball touch
(a) the inbounds area
(b) the out-of-bounds area
and then catches it again.
Interpretation:
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(a) A1 has committed a throw-in violation. Once the ball leaves the hand(s) of the player
taking the throw-in and touches the inbounds area, he shall not touch the ball before it
touches (or has been touched) by another player on the playing court.
(b) The action is legal and the 5-second count shall continue.
17-23
Statement. The player taking the throw-in shall not cause the ball to touch out-of-bounds,
after it had been released on the throw-in.
17-24
Example: A1 on the throw-in passes the ball to A2 but the ball goes out-of-bounds without
touching any player on the playing court.
Interpretation: This is a violation of A1. The game shall be resumed with a team B throw-in at
the place of the original throw-in.
17-25
Example: A1 on the throw-in passes the ball to A2. A2 receives the ball but with one foot
touching the boundary line.
Interpretation: This is a violation of A2. The game shall be resumed with a team B throw-in at
the place nearest to the infraction.
17-26
Example: A1 is awarded a throw-in at the sideline close to the centre line
(a) in his backcourt, entitled to pass the ball at any place into the playing court
(b) in his frontcourt, entitled to pass the ball only into his frontcourt
(c) at the beginning of the 2nd period, from the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s
table, entitled to pass the ball at any place into the playing court.
After having the ball at his disposal, A1 makes one normal lateral step, therefore changing his
position regarding the frontcourt or backcourt.
Interpretation: In all cases A1 keeps the right being entitled to pass the ball either into the
frontcourt or into the backcourt as he had at his initial position.
17-27
Statement. Following a free throw(s) resulting from a technical, unsportsmanlike or
disqualifying foul, the subsequent throw-in shall be administered at the centre line extended,
opposite the scorer's table.
17-28
Example: With 1:03 remaining in the 4th period a technical foul is called on B1. Any team A
player shoots 1 free throw after which a time-out is granted to team A.
Interpretation: The game resumes with a team A throw-in at the centre line extended,
opposite the scorer's table.
ART. 18/19
TIME-OUT / SUBSTITUTION
18/19-1
Statement. A time-out cannot be granted before the playing time for a period has started or
after the playing time for a period has ended.
A substitution cannot be granted before the playing time for the first period has started or
after the playing time for the game has ended. Any substitution can be granted during
intervals of play.
18/19-2
Example: After the ball has left the hands of the referee on the jump ball but before the ball
is legally tapped, jumper A2 commits a violation and the ball is awarded to team B for a
throw-in. At this moment either coach requests a time-out or a substitution.
Interpretation: Despite the fact that the game has already started the time-out or
substitution shall not be granted because the game clock has not yet started.
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18/19-3
Example: At approximately the same time when the game clock signal sounds for the end of
a period or extra period a foul is called and A1 is awarded 2 free throws. Either team
requests:
(a) A time-out.
(b) A substitution.
Interpretation:
(a) A time-out cannot be granted because the playing time for a period or extra period has
ended.
(b) A substitution can be granted only after the free-throw attempts have been completed
and the interval of play for the next period or extra period has begun.
18/19-4
Statement. If the shot clock signal sounds while the ball is in the air during a shot for a field
goal, it is not a violation and the game clock does not stop. If the shot for a field goal is
successful it is, under certain conditions, a time-out and substitution opportunity for both
teams.
18/19-5
Example: On a shot for a field goal, the ball is in the air when the shot clock signal sounds.
The ball then enters the basket. At this time either or both teams request:
(a) Time-outs.
(b) Substitutions.
Interpretation:
(a) This is a time-out opportunity only for the non-scoring team.
If the non-scoring team is granted a time-out, the opponents may also be granted a
time-out and both teams are also granted a substitution, if they request it.
(b) This is a substitution opportunity only for the non-scoring team and only when the game
clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period and in each extra period.
If the non-scoring team is granted a substitution, the opponents may also be granted a
substitution and both teams are also granted a time-out, if they request it.
18/19-6
Statement. If the request for time-out or substitution (for any player, including the freethrow shooter) is made after the ball is at the disposal of the free-throw shooter for the first
or only free throw, the time-out or substitution shall be granted for both teams if:
(a) The last or only free throw is successful or
(b) The last or only free throw is followed by a throw-in at the centre line extended,
opposite the scorer’s table, or for any valid reason the ball will remain dead after the
last or only free throw.
18/19-7
Example: A1 is awarded 2 free throws. Team A or team B requests a time-out or
substitution:
(a) Before the ball is at the disposal of the free-throw shooter A1.
(b) After the first free-throw attempt.
(c) After the successful second free throw but before the ball is at the disposal of the
player taking the throw-in.
(d) After the successful second free throw but after the ball is at the disposal of the player
taking the throw-in.
Interpretation:
(a) The time-out or substitution is granted immediately, before the first free-throw attempt.
(b) The time-out or substitution is granted after the last free throw, if successful.
(c) The time-out or substitution is granted immediately before the throw-in.
(d) The time-out or substitution is not granted.
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18/19-8
Example: A1 is awarded 2 free throws. After the first free-throw attempt, team A or team B
requests a time-out or substitution. During the last free-throw attempt:
(a) The ball rebounds from the ring and the game continues.
(b) The free throw is successful.
(c) The ball does not touch the ring or does not enter the basket.
(d) A1 steps on the free-throw line while shooting and the violation is called.
(e) B1 steps into the restricted area before the ball has left the hands of A1. B1’s violation
is called and the A1’s free throw is missed.
Interpretation:
(a)
Time-out or substitution is not granted.
(b), (c) and (d)
The time-out or substitution is granted immediately.
(e)
A substitute free throw is attempted by A1 and, if successful, the time-out
or substitution is granted immediately.
18/19-9
Statement. If, following a request for a time-out, a foul is committed by either team, the
time-out shall not begin until the official has completed all communication related to that
foul with the scorer’s table. In the case of a 5th foul by a player, this communication includes
the necessary substitution procedure. Once completed, the time-out period shall begin
when an official blows his whistle and gives the time-out signal.
18/19-10 Example: Coach A requests a time-out after which B1 commits his 5th foul.
Interpretation: The time-out opportunity shall not begin until all communication with the
scorer’s table relative to that foul has been completed and a substitute for B1 has become a
player.
18/19-11 Example: Coach A requests a time-out after which any player commits a foul.
Interpretation: Teams shall be permitted to go to their benches if they are aware that a
time-out has been requested, even though that time-out period has not formally begun.
18/19-12 Statement. Art. 18 and 19 clarify when a substitution or time-out opportunity begins and
ends. Coaches requesting a time-out or substitution must be aware of these limitations,
otherwise the time-out or substitution shall not be granted immediately.
18/19-13 Example: A substitution or time-out opportunity has just ended when coach A runs to the
scorer’s table, loudly requesting a substitution or a time-out. The scorer reacts and
erroneously sounds the signal. The official blows his whistle and interrupts the game.
Interpretation: Because of the official’s interruption of the game the ball is dead and the
game clock remains stopped, resulting in what would normally be a substitution or time-out
opportunity. However, because the request was made too late, the substitution or time-out
shall not be granted. The game shall resume immediately.
18/19-14 Example: A goaltending violation or an interference violation occurs at any time during the
game. Substitutes from either team or both teams are waiting at the scorer’s table to enter
the game or a time-out has been requested by either team.
Interpretation: The violation causes the game clock to be stopped and the ball to become
dead. The substitutions or time-out shall be permitted.
18/19-15 Statement. Each time-out shall last 1 minute. Teams must promptly return to the playing
court after the official blows his whistle and beckons the teams on the playing court.
Sometimes a team extends the time-out beyond the allotted 1 minute, gaining an advantage
by extending the time-out and causing also a delay of the game. A warning to that team
shall be given by an official. If that team does not respond to the warning, an additional
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time-out shall be charged against the offending team. If the team has no time-outs
remaining, a technical foul for delaying the game may be charged against the coach,
recorded as 'B'.
18/19-16 Example: The time-out period ends and the official beckons team A back on the playing
court. The coach A continues to instruct his team which still remains in the team bench
area. The official re-beckons team A on the playing court and
(a) Team A finally enters the playing court
(b) Team A continues to remain in the team bench area.
Interpretation:
(a) After the team starts to return to the playing court, the official gives a warning the
coach that if the same behaviour is repeated an additional time-out will be charged
against team A.
(b) A time-out, without warning, will be charged against team A. If team A has no time-out
remaining, a technical foul for delaying the game will be charged against coach A,
recorded as 'B'.
18/19-17 Statement. If a team has not been granted a time-out in the 2nd half until the game clock
shows 2:00 in the 4th period, the scorer shall mark 2 horizontal lines on the scoresheet in the
first box for the team’s second half. The scoreboard shall show the first time-out as having
been taken.
18/19-18 Example: With 2:00 on the game clock in the 4th period both teams have not taken a time-out
in the second half.
Interpretation: The scorer shall mark 2 horizontal lines on the scoresheet in the first box of
both teams for the second half. The scoreboard shall show the first time-out as having been
taken.
18/19-19 Example: With 2:09 on the game clock in the 4th period coach A requests his 1st time-out in
the second half while the game is played. With 1:58 on the game clock the ball goes out-ofbounds and the game clock is stopped. The time-out for team A is now granted.
Interpretation: The scorer shall mark 2 horizontal lines on the scoresheet in the first box of
team A as the time-out was granted at 1:58 in the 4th period. The time-out shall be entered in
the second box and team A has only one more time-out left. The scoreboard shall show the
two time-outs as having been taken.
ART. 24
DRIBBLING
24-1
Statement. If a player deliberately throws the ball against a backboard (not attempting a
legitimate shot for a field goal) this is considered as if the player has bounced the ball on the
floor. If the player then touches the ball again before it has touched (or been touched by)
another player, this is considered as a dribble.
24-2
Example: A1 has not yet dribbled when A1 throws the ball against the backboard and
catches it again before another player has touched the ball.
Interpretation: After catching the ball A1 may shoot or pass but may not begin a new dribble.
24-3
Example: After ending a dribble either in the continuous motion or standing still, A1 throws
the ball against the backboard and catches or touches it again before it has touched another
player.
Interpretation: A1 has committed a double dribble violation.
24-4
Example: A1 dribbles the ball and then comes to a stop.
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(a) A1 loses his balance and without moving his pivot foot touches the floor with the ball
once or twice while holding the ball with two hands.
(b) A1 tosses the ball from one hand to another without moving his pivot foot.
Interpretation: Legal action in both cases as A1 does not move his pivot foot.
24-5
Example: A1 starts his dribble by
(a) throwing the ball over his opponent.
(b) throwing the ball a few meters away from him.
The ball touches the playing court after which A1 continues his dribble.
Interpretation: Legal action in both cases as the ball has touched the playing court before
A1 has touched the ball again on his dribble.
ART. 25
TRAVELLING
25-1
Statement. It is legal if a player who is lying on the floor gains control of the ball. It is legal if
a player who is holding the ball falls on the floor. It is also legal if the player after falling on
the floor slides briefly. If, however, the player then rolls or attempts to stand up while holding
the ball, it is a violation.
25-2
Example: A1, while holding the ball, loses balance and falls on the floor.
Interpretation: A1’s action of unintentionally falling on the floor is legal.
25-3
Example: A1, while lying on the floor, gains control of the ball. A1 then
(a) passes the ball to A2.
(b) begins a dribble while still lying on the floor.
(c) attempts to stand up while still holding the ball.
Interpretation:
In (a) and (b), the action of A1 is legal.
In (c), a travelling violation has occurred.
25-4
Example: A1, while holding the ball, falls to the floor and his momentum causes him to slide.
Interpretation: The unintentional sliding action of A1 does not constitute a violation.
However, if A1 now rolls or attempts to stand up while still holding the ball a travelling
violation occurs.
25-5
Statement. If a player is fouled in the act of shooting after which he scores while committing
a travel violation the basket does not count and free throws shall be awarded.
25-6
Example: A1 has started his act of shooting by penetrating towards the basket, having the
ball in both hands. In his continuing motion he is fouled by B1 after which A1 commits a travel
violation and the ball enters the basket.
Interpretation: The basket shall not count. A1 is awarded 2 or 3 free throws.
ART. 28
8 SECONDS
28-1
Statement. The application of this rule is based solely on the individual counting of the 8
seconds by an official. In case of any discrepancy between the number of seconds counted
by the official and those displayed on the shot clock, the decision of the official shall take
precedence.
28-2
Example: A1 is dribbling the ball in his backcourt when the official calls an 8-second
violation. The display on the shot clock shows that only 7 seconds have passed.
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Interpretation: The decision of the official is correct. The official is solely responsible to
decide when the 8 second period is terminated.
28-3
Statement. The 8-second count in the backcourt is stopped because of a jump ball situation.
If the resulting alternating possession throw-in is awarded to the team that was in control of
the ball, that team shall have only whatever time is remaining in the 8-second period.
28-4
Example: Team A has been in control of the ball for 5 seconds in its backcourt when a held
ball occurs. Team A is entitled to the next alternating possession throw-in.
Interpretation: Team A shall have only 3 seconds to cause the ball to go into its frontcourt.
28-5
Statement. During a dribble from the backcourt to the frontcourt, the ball goes into a team's
frontcourt when both feet of the dribbler and the ball are completely in contact with the
frontcourt.
28-6
Example: A1 is straddling the centre line. He receives the ball from A2 who is in the
backcourt. A1 then passes the ball back to A2 who is still in team A’s backcourt.
Interpretation: Legal play. A1 does not have both feet completely in contact with the
frontcourt and therefore is entitled to pass the ball into the backcourt. The 8 second count
shall continue.
28-7
Example: A1 is dribbling the ball from his backcourt and ends his dribble holding the ball
while straddling the centre line. A1 then passes the ball to A2 who is also straddling the
centre line.
Interpretation: Legal play. A1 does not have both feet completely in contact with the
frontcourt and therefore is entitled to pass the ball to A2 who is also not in the frontcourt. The
8 second count shall continue.
28-8
Example: A1 is dribbling the ball from his backcourt and has one foot (but not both feet)
already in the frontcourt. After that A1 passes the ball to A2, who is straddling the centre line.
A2 then starts to dribble the ball in his backcourt.
Interpretation: Legal play. A1 does not have both feet completely in contact with his
frontcourt and therefore is entitled to pass the ball to A2 who is also not in his frontcourt. A2
is therefore entitled to dribble the ball in the backcourt. The 8-second count shall continue.
28-9
Example: A1 is dribbling the ball from his backcourt and stops his forward motion still
dribbling while:
(a) Straddling the centre line.
(b) Both feet are in the frontcourt but the ball is being dribbled in the backcourt.
(c) Both feet are in the backcourt but the ball is being dribbled in the frontcourt.
(d) Both feet are in the frontcourt while the ball is being dribbled in the backcourt, after
which A1 returns both feet to his backcourt.
Interpretation: In all cases dribbler A1 continues to be in the backcourt until both feet as
well as the ball are completely in contact with the frontcourt. The 8-second count shall
continue in each situation.
28-10
Statement. Each time the 8-second period continues with any time remaining and the same
team that previously had control of the ball is awarded a throw-in, either at the centre line
extended, opposite the scorer’s table or in the backcourt, the official handing the ball to the
player taking the throw-in shall inform him how much time remains from the 8-second period.
28-11
Example: A1 is dribbling the ball for 4 seconds in his backcourt when a fight starts. The
substitutes A7 and B9 are disqualified for entering the playing court. The equal penalties will
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be cancelled and the game shall be resumed with an A2 throw-in at the centre line extended,
opposite the scorer’s table. A2 passes the ball to A3 in his backcourt.
Interpretation: Team A has 4 seconds to cause the ball to go into his frontcourt.
28-12
Example: Team A has control of the ball in its backcourt. With 6 seconds consumed from the
8-second period a double foul is called that occurs
(a) in the backcourt
(b) in the frontcourt.
Interpretation:
(a) The game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in in the backcourt at the place nearest
to the infraction with 2 seconds to cause the ball to go into team A’s frontcourt.
(b) The game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in in the frontcourt at the place nearest
to the infraction.
28-13
Example: A1 dribbles for 4 seconds in his backcourt when B1 taps the ball out-of-bounds.
Interpretation: The game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in in the backcourt with 4
seconds to cause the ball to go into team A’s frontcourt.
28-14
Statement. If the game is stopped by an official for any valid reason not connected with
either team and if in the judgement of the officials the opponents would be placed at a
disadvantage, the 8 second count shall continue from the time it was stopped.
28-15
Example: With 0:25 to play in the last minute of the game and with the score A 72 – B 72, team
A gains control of the ball. A1 has dribbled the ball for 4 seconds in his backcourt when the
game is stopped by the officials due to
(a) The game clock or the shot clock failing to run or to start
(b) A bottle being thrown on the playing court
(c) The shot clock being erroneously reset.
Interpretation: In all cases the game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in in their
backcourt with 4 seconds remaining on the 8 second count. Team B would be placed at a
disadvantage if the game were resumed with a new 8 second count.
ART. 29/50 24 SECONDS
29/50-1
Statement. A shot for a field goal is attempted near the end of the shot clock period and the
signal sounds while the ball is in the air. If the ball does not touch the ring, a violation has
occurred unless the opponents have gained immediate and clear control of the ball. The
ball shall be awarded to the opponent for the throw-in at the place nearest to where the
game was stopped by the official, except directly behind the backboard.
29/50-2
Example: A1’s shot for a field goal is in the air when the shot clock signal sounds. The ball
touches the backboard and then rolls on the floor, where it is touched by B1 followed by A2
and is finally controlled by B2.
Interpretation: This is a shot clock violation because the ball did not touch the ring and
then there was no immediate and clear control of the ball by the opponents.
29/50-3
Example: During A1’s shot for a field goal the ball touches the backboard but does not
touch the ring. The ball then is touched on the rebound, but not controlled by B1, after
which A2 gains control of the ball. At this time the shot clock signal sounds.
Interpretation: A shot clock violation has occurred. The shot clock continues to run when
the ball fails to touch the ring and the ball is again controlled by a team A player.
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29/50-4
Example: A1 shoots for a field goal at the end of a shot clock period. The ball is legally
blocked by B1 and then the shot clock signal sounds. After the signal B1 fouls A1.
Interpretation: A shot clock violation has occurred. B1’s foul shall be disregarded unless it
is a technical, an unsportsmanlike or a disqualifying foul.
29/50-5
Example: A1’s shot for a field goal is in the air when the shot clock signal sounds. The ball
does not touch the ring, after which a held ball between A2 and B2 is immediately called.
Interpretation: A shot clock violation has occurred. Team B did not gain immediate and
clear control of the ball.
29/50-6
Example: A1 releases a shot for a field goal. While the ball is in the air the shot clock
expires. The ball misses the ring, after which it touches B1 who is inbounds and then goes
out-of-bounds.
Interpretation: A shot clock violation has occurred because team B has not gained clear
control of the ball.
29/50-7
Statement. If the shot clock signal sounds in a situation where, in the judgement of the
officials, the opponents will gain immediate and clear control of the ball, the signal shall be
disregarded and the game shall continue.
29/50-8
Example: Near the end of the shot clock period A1’s pass is missed by A2 (both players are
in their frontcourt) and the ball rolls into team A’s backcourt. Before B1 gains control of the
ball with a free path to the basket the shot clock signal sounds.
Interpretation: If B1 gains immediate and clear control of the ball the signal shall be
disregarded and the game shall continue.
29/50-9
Statement. If a team that was in control of the ball is awarded an alternating possession
throw-in, that team shall have only whatever time was remaining on the shot clock at the
time the jump ball situation occurred.
29/50-10 Example: Team A is in control of the ball with 10 seconds remaining on the shot clock when
a held ball occurs. An alternating possession throw-in is awarded to:
(a) Team A.
(b) Team B.
Interpretation:
(a) Team A shall have only 10 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
(b) Team B shall have a new shot clock period.
29/50-11 Example: Team A is in control of the ball with 10 seconds remaining on the shot clock when
the ball goes out-of-bounds. The officials cannot agree on whether it was A1 or B1 who was
the last to touch the ball before it went out-of-bounds. A jump ball situation is called and the
alternating possession throw-in is awarded to:
(a) Team A.
(b) Team B.
Interpretation:
(a) Team A shall have only 10 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
(b) Team B shall have a new shot clock period.
29/50-12 Statement. If the game is stopped by an official for a foul or violation (not for the ball having
gone out-of-bounds) committed by the team not in control of the ball and the possession of
the ball is awarded to the same team that previously had control of the ball in the frontcourt,
the shot clock is reset as follows:
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•
•
If 14 seconds or more are displayed on the shot clock at the time the game was
stopped, the shot clock shall not be reset, but shall continue from the time it was
stopped.
If 13 seconds or less are displayed on the shot clock at the time the game was stopped,
the shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds.
29/50-13 Example: B1 causes an out-of-bounds violation in the frontcourt of team A. The shot clock
shows 8 seconds.
Interpretation: Team A shall have only 8 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-14 Example: A1 dribbles the ball in his frontcourt and is fouled by B1. This is the second foul
against team B in this period. The shot clock shows 3 seconds
Interpretation: Team A shall have 14 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-15 Example: With 4 seconds remaining on the shot clock team A is in control of the ball in the
frontcourt when
(a) A1
(b) B1
is injured and the officials interrupt the game.
Interpretation: Team A shall have
(a) 4 seconds
(b) 14 seconds
remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-16 Example: A1 releases a shot for a field goal. While the ball is in the air a double foul against
A2 and B2 is called with 6 seconds remaining on the shot clock. The ball does not enter the
basket. The alternating possession arrow indicates the next possession to team A.
Interpretation: Team A shall have 6 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-17 Example: With 5 seconds remaining on the shot clock A1 is dribbling the ball when a
technical foul is called against B1 followed by a technical foul against coach A.
Interpretation: After the cancellation of equal penalties, the game shall resume with a
throw-in for team A with 5 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-18 Example: With
(a) 16 seconds
(b) 12 seconds
remaining on the shot clock B1 in his backcourt deliberately kicks the ball with his foot or
strikes the ball with his fist.
Interpretation: Team B’s violation. After the throw-in in the frontcourt team A shall have
(a) 16 seconds,
(b) 14 seconds
remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-19 Example: During A1’s throw-in, B1 in his backcourt places his arms over the boundary line
and he blocks A1’s pass with
(a) 19 seconds
(b) 11 seconds
remaining on the shot clock.
Interpretation: B1’s violation. After the throw-in in the frontcourt team A shall have
(a) 19 seconds
(b) 14 seconds
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remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-20 Example: A1 dribbles the ball in his frontcourt when B2 commits an unsportsmanlike foul on
A2 with 6 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
Interpretation: Regardless of whether the free throws are made or missed team A shall be
awarded a throw-in at the centre line extended, opposite to the scorer's table. Team A shall
have a new shot clock period.
The same interpretation is valid for a technical and disqualifying foul.
29/50-21 Statement. If the game is stopped by an official for any valid reason not connected with
either team and if in the judgement of the officials the opponents would be placed at a
disadvantage, the shot clock shall continue from the time it was stopped.
29/50-22 Example: With 0:25 to play in the last minute of the game and with the score A 72 – B 72,
team A gains control of the ball. A1 has dribbled the ball for 20 seconds when the game is
stopped by the officials due to
(a) The game clock or the shot clock failing to run or to start
(b) A bottle being thrown on the playing court
(c) The shot clock being erroneously reset.
Interpretation: In all cases the game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in with 4
seconds remaining on the shot clock. Team B would be placed at a disadvantage if the
game were resumed with a new shot clock period.
29/50-23 Example: After A1’s shot for a field goal the ball rebounds from the ring and is then controlled by A2. 9 seconds later the shot clock sounds in error. The officials interrupt the game.
Interpretation: Team A in control of the ball would be placed at a disadvantage if this were
a shot clock violation. After consulting with the commissioner, if present, and shot clock
operator the officials resume the game with a throw-in for team A with 5 seconds remaining
on the shot clock.
29/50-24 Example: With 4 seconds left on the shot clock A1 attempts a shot for a field goal. The ball
misses the ring but the shot clock operator erroneously resets the clock. A2 secures the
rebound and after a certain time, A3 scores a field goal. At this time the officials are made
aware of the situation.
Interpretation: The officials (after consulting with the commissioner, if present) shall
confirm that the ball did not touch the ring on the shot for a goal by A1. They shall then
decide if the ball left the hand(s) of A3 before the shot clock would have sounded if the
reset had not taken place. If so, the basket shall count; if not, a shot clock violation has
occurred and the goal by A3 shall not count.
29/50-25 Statement. A throw-in resulting from a technical foul, an unsportsmanlike foul or a
disqualifying foul penalty is awarded to the offensive team when the game clock shows 2:00
minutes or less in the 4th period and in each extra period. The throw-in shall always be
administered at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table. The shot clock shall
be reset to 24 seconds, regardless of whether or not a time-out is also awarded to the
offensive team during the last 2 minutes of the game.
29/50-26 Example: When the game clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period A1 is dribbling
the ball in the frontcourt with 6 seconds remaining on the shot clock when
(a) B1 commits an unsportsmanlike foul
(b) Coach B commits a technical foul
A time-out is now granted to either coach A or coach B.
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Interpretation: Whether the free throws are made or missed and regardless of which
coach requested the time-out, team A shall be awarded a throw-in at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table. Team A shall also have new 24 seconds on the shot clock.
29/50-27 Statement. When a shot for a field goal has been released and then a defensive foul is
called, the shot clock shall be reset as follows:
• If 14 seconds or more are displayed on the shot clock at the time when the game was
stopped, the shot clock shall not be reset, but shall continue from the time it was
stopped.
• If 13 seconds or less is displayed on the shot clock at the time when the game was
stopped, the shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds.
29/50-28 Example: A1 releases a shot for a field goal. While the ball is in the air with 10 seconds
remaining on the shot clock, a defensive foul is called against B2 who fouls A2. It is team
B's 2nd foul in the period. The ball:
(a) Enters the basket.
(b) Hits the ring but does not enter the basket.
Interpretation:
(a) Basket of A1 is valid and the ball shall be awarded to team A for a throw-in at the place
nearest to the infraction, with 14 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
(b) The ball shall be awarded to team A for a throw-in at the place nearest to the
infraction, with 14 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-29 Example: A1 releases a shot for a field goal. While the ball is in the air the shot clock
expires and then a defensive foul is called against B2 who fouls A2. It is team B's 2nd foul in
the period. The ball:
(a) Enters the basket.
(b) Hits the ring but does not enter the basket.
Interpretation:
(a) Basket of A1 is valid and the ball shall be awarded to team A for a throw-in at the place
nearest to the infraction, with 14 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
(b) The ball shall be awarded to team A for a throw-in at the place nearest to the
infraction, with 14 seconds remaining on the shot clock.
29/50-30 Example: A1 releases a shot for a field goal. While the ball is in the air with 10 seconds
remaining on the shot clock, a defensive foul is called against B2 who fouls A2. It is team
B’s 5th foul in the period. The ball:
(a) Enters the basket.
(b) Hits the ring but does not enter the basket.
Interpretation:
(a) Basket of A1 is valid and A2 is awarded 2 free throws.
(b) A2 is awarded 2 free throws.
29/50-31 Example: A1 releases a shot for a field goal. While the ball is in the air the shot clock
expires and then a defensive foul is called against B2 who fouls A2. It is team B’s 5th foul in
the period. The ball:
(a) Enters the basket.
(b) Hits the ring but does not enter the basket.
Interpretation:
(a) Basket of A1 is valid and A2 is awarded 2 free throws.
(b) A2 is awarded 2 free throws.
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29/50-32 Statement. After the ball has touched the ring of the opponents’ basket for any reason, the
shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds, if the team which regains control of the ball is the
same team that was in control of the ball before the ball touched the ring.
29/50-33 Example: On a pass by A1 to A2 the ball touches B2 after which the ball touches the ring.
A3 gains control of the ball.
Interpretation: The shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds as soon as A3 gains control of
the ball.
29/50-34 Example: A1 shoots for a field goal with
(a) 4 seconds
(b) 20 seconds
remaining on the shot clock. The ball touches the ring, rebounds and A2 gains control of the
ball.
Interpretation: In both cases the shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds regardless of
whether A2 gains control of the ball in the frontcourt or in the backcourt.
29/50-35 Example: A1 shoots for a field goal. The ball touches the ring. B1 touches the ball and then
A2 gains control of the ball.
Interpretation: The shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds as soon as A2 gains control of
the ball.
29/50-36 Example: A1 shoots for a field goal. The ball touches the ring. B1 touches the ball which
then goes out-of-bounds.
Interpretation: Throw-in for team A at the place nearest to the violation. The shot clock
shall be reset to 14 seconds regardless of whether the throw-in shall be in the frontcourt or
in the backcourt.
29/50-37 Example: Near the end of the shot clock period, A1 throws the ball toward the ring in order
to reset the shot clock. The ball touches the ring. B1 touches the ball which then goes outof-bounds in team A's backcourt.
Interpretation: Throw-in for team A in its backcourt. The shot clock shall be reset to 14
seconds.
29/50-38 Example: A1 shoots for a field goal. The ball touches the ring. A2 taps the ball and then A3
gains control of the ball.
Interpretation: The shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds as soon as A3 gains control of
the ball anywhere on the playing court.
29/50-39 Example: A1 shoots for a field goal. The ball touches the ring and on the rebound B2 fouls
A2. This is team B’s 3rd team foul in the period.
Interpretation: Throw-in for team A at the place nearest to the infraction. The shot clock
shall be reset to 14 seconds.
29/50-40 Example: A1 shoots for a field goal. The ball enters the basket and now B2 fouls A2. This is
team B’s 3rd team foul in the period.
Interpretation: Throw-in for team A at the place nearest to the infraction. The shot clock
shall be reset to 14 seconds.
29/50-41 Example: A1 shoots for a field goal. The ball touches the ring and on the rebound a held ball
between A2 and B2 is called. The possession arrow shows for team A.
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Interpretation: Throw-in for team A at the place nearest to where the held ball situation
occurred. The shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds.
29/50-42 Example: A1 shoots for a field goal. The ball lodges between the ring and the backboard.
The possession arrow shows for team A. The shot clock shows 8 seconds.
Interpretation: Throw-in for team A from the endline next to the backboard. The shot clock
shall continue with 8 seconds.
29/50-43 Example: A1 passes the ball for an alley-hoop to A2. The ball is missed by A2 and touches
the ring after which A3 gains control of the ball.
Interpretation: The shot clock shall be reset to 14 seconds as soon as A3 gains control of
the ball. If A3 touches the ball in his backcourt, this is a backcourt violation.
29/50-44 Example: After a defensive rebound A1 wants to pass the ball to A2. B1 taps the ball out of
A1’s hands. The ball then hits the ring and is caught by B2.
Interpretation: As the ball was not in control of the same team that was in control of the
ball before the ball touched the ring, the shot clock shall be restarted with 24 seconds for
team B.
29/50-45 Statement. Whenever a team gains possession of a live ball in either the frontcourt or the
backcourt and 14 seconds or less remains on the game clock, the shot clock shall be
switched off.
29/50-46 Example: Team A is awarded a new possession of the ball with 12 seconds remaining on
the game clock.
Interpretation: The shot clock shall be switched off.
29/50-47 Example: With 18 seconds on the game clock and 3 seconds on the shot clock player B1 in
his backcourt deliberately kicks the ball.
Interpretation: The game shall be resumed with a throw-in for team A in his frontcourt with
18 seconds on the game clock and 14 seconds on the shot clock.
29/50-48 Example: With 7 seconds on the game clock and 3 seconds on the shot clock, player B1 in
his backcourt deliberately kicks the ball.
Interpretation: The game shall be resumed with a throw-in for team A in its frontcourt with
7 seconds on the game clock and the shot clock shall be switched off.
29/50-49 Example: With 23 seconds on the game clock team A gains new control of the ball. With 19
seconds on the game clock A1 shoots for a field goal. The ball touches the ring and A2 gets
the rebound.
Interpretation: The shot clock shall not be started when team A originally gains control of
the ball. However, it shall be reset to 14 seconds as soon as A2 gains control of the ball as
there is still more than 14 seconds on the game clock.
29/50-50 Example: With 58 seconds remaining on the game clock in the 4th period A1 is fouled in his
backcourt by B1. Team A has 19 seconds remaining on the shot clock. This is team B’s 3rd
foul in the period. Team A is granted a time-out.
Interpretation: The game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in at the throw-in line,
opposite the scorer’s table in the team’s frontcourt with 19 seconds on the shot clock.
29/50-51 Example: With 58 seconds remaining on the game clock in the 4th period A1 is fouled in his
backcourt by B1. Team A has 19 seconds remaining on the shot clock. This is team B’s 3rd
team foul in the period. Team B is granted a time-out.
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Interpretation: The game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in from his backcourt with
new 24 seconds on the shot clock.
29/50-52 Example: With 30 seconds remaining on the game clock in the 4th period A1 dribbles the ball
in his frontcourt. B1 taps the ball to team A’s backcourt where A2 now controls the ball. B2
fouls A2 with 8 seconds remaining on the shot clock. This is team B’s 3rd team foul in the
period. Team A is granted a time-out.
Interpretation: The game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in at the throw-in line,
opposite the scorer’s table in the team’s frontcourt and with 14 seconds on the shot clock.
ART. 30
BALL RETURNED TO THE BACKCOURT
30-1
Statement. While airborne, a player retains the same status relative to the floor as where he
was last touching the floor before jumping into the air. However, when an airborne player
jumps from his frontcourt and gains control of the ball while still airborne, he is the first player
on his team to establish team control.
If his momentum then returns him to his backcourt, he is helpless to avoid not returning also
with the ball to the backcourt. Therefore if an airborne player establishes a new team control,
that player’s position relative to the frontcourt/backcourt will not be determined until the
player has returned with both feet to the floor.
30-2
Example: A1 in his backcourt attempts a fast break pass to A2 in the frontcourt. B1 jumps
from the team B frontcourt, catches the ball while airborne and lands
(a) with both feet in his backcourt.
(b) straddling the centre line.
(c) straddling the centre line and then dribbles or passes the ball to his backcourt.
Interpretation: No violation has occurred. B1 established the first team B control of the ball
while airborne and his position relative to frontcourt/backcourt was not determined until both
his feet returned to the floor. In all cases B1 is legally in his backcourt.
30-3
Example: On the jump ball between A1 and B1 that begins the first period, the ball has been
legally tapped when A2 jumps from his frontcourt, catches the ball while airborne and lands
(a) with both feet in his backcourt.
(b) straddling the centre line.
(c) straddling the centre line and then dribbles or passes the ball to his backcourt.
Interpretation: No violation has occurred. A2 establishes the first team A control of the ball
while airborne. In all cases A2 is legally in his backcourt.
30-4
Example: A1 taking the throw-in in his frontcourt attempts a pass to A2. A2 jumps from his
frontcourt, catches the ball while airborne and lands
(a) with both feet in his backcourt.
(b) straddling the centre line.
(c) straddling the centre line and then dribbles or passes the ball to his backcourt.
Interpretation: Team A violation. A1 has established the team A control of the ball in the
frontcourt before A2 caught the ball while airborne and landed in his backcourt. In all cases
A2 has illegally returned the ball to the backcourt.
30-5
Example: A1 straddles the centre line to start the 2nd period and passes the ball to A2. A2
jumps from his frontcourt, catches the ball while airborne and lands
(a) with both feet in his backcourt.
(b) straddling the centre line.
(c) straddling the centre line and then dribbles or passes the ball to his backcourt.
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Interpretation: Team A violation. A1 has established the team A control of the ball. A2
jumping from his frontcourt and catching the ball while airborne has established the team A
control of the ball in the frontcourt. In all cases by landing in his backcourt A2 has caused the
ball to return illegally to his backcourt.
30-6
Example: A1 taking the throw-in in his backcourt attempts a pass to A2 in his frontcourt. B1
jumps from his frontcourt, catches the ball while airborne and before he lands in his
backcourt he passes the ball to B2 in his backcourt.
Interpretation: Team B violation for illegally returning the ball to the backcourt.
30-7
Statement. A live ball has been illegally returned to the backcourt when a team A player who
is completely in the frontcourt, causes the ball to touch the backcourt, after which a team A
player is the first to touch the ball either in the frontcourt or backcourt. However, it is legal
when a team A player in the backcourt causes the ball to touch the frontcourt, after which a
team A player is the first to touch the ball, either in the frontcourt or the backcourt.
30-8
Example: A1 is standing completely with both feet in the frontcourt near the centre line when
A1 attempts a bounce pass to A2 who is also standing with both feet in the frontcourt near
the centre line. On the pass, the ball touches the backcourt before touching A2.
Interpretation: Violation for illegally returning the ball to the backcourt.
30-9
Example: A1 is standing with both feet in the backcourt near the centre line when A1
attempts a bounce pass to A2 who is also standing with both feet in the backcourt near the
centre line. On the pass, the ball touches the frontcourt before touching A2.
Interpretation: Legal play. No backcourt violation as no team A player with the ball was in
the frontcourt. However, as the ball was caused to go into the frontcourt the 8-second count
stopped at the moment the ball has touched the frontcourt. A new 8-second count shall be
started as soon as A2 touches the ball.
30-10
Example: A1 in his backcourt passes the ball towards his frontcourt. The ball is deflected
from an official standing on the playing court with both feet straddling the centre line and is
next touched by A2 who is still in his backcourt.
Interpretation: Legal play. No backcourt violation as no team A player with the ball was in
the frontcourt. However, as the ball was caused to go into the frontcourt the 8-second count
stopped at the moment the ball has touched the official. A new 8-second count shall be
started as soon as A2 touches the ball.
30-11
Example: Team A is in control of the ball in its frontcourt when the ball is simultaneously
touched by A1 and B1 and then goes into the team A’s backcourt, where the ball is first
touched by A2.
Interpretation: Team A has caused the ball to be illegally returned into its backcourt.
ART. 31
GOALTENDING AND INTERFERENCE
31-1
Statement. When the ball is above the ring during a shot for a field goal or a free-throw
attempt, it is interference if a player reaches through the basket from below and touches the
ball.
31-2
Example: On A1’s last or only free throw,
(a) before the ball has touched the ring,
(b) after the ball has touched the ring and still has the possibility to enter the basket,
B1 reaches through the basket from below and touches the ball.
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Interpretation: B1’s violation for touching the ball illegally.
(a) A1 shall be awarded 1 point and a technical foul shall be called on B1.
(b) A1 shall be awarded 1 point but no technical foul shall be called on B1.
31-3
Statement. When the ball is above the ring during a pass or after it has touched the ring, it is
interference if a player reaches through the basket from below and touches the ball.
31-4
Example: The ball is above the ring as a result of a pass from A1 when B1 reaches through
the basket from below and touches the ball.
Interpretation: B1’s interference violation. Team A shall be awarded 2 or 3 points.
31-5
Statement. Following the last or only free throw and after the ball has touched the ring, the
free-throw attempt changes its status and becomes a 2-point field goal if the ball is legally
touched by any player before it enters the basket.
31-6
Example: A1’s last or only free throw has touched the ring and is bouncing above it. B1 tries
to tap the ball away but the ball enters the basket.
Interpretation: The ball has been legally touched. The free-throw attempt has changed its
status and team A shall be awarded 2 points.
31-7
Statement. If, during a field goal attempt, a player touches the ball on its upward flight, all
restrictions related to goaltending and interference shall apply.
31-8
Example: A1 attempts a shot for a field goal and the ball on its upward flight, is touched by A2
or B2. On its downward flight to the basket the ball is touched by:
(a) A3.
(b) B3.
Interpretation: The contact of A2 or B2 with the ball on its upward flight is legal and does not
change the status of a shot for a field goal. However, the subsequent contact with the ball on
its downward flight by A3 or B3 is a violation.
(a) The ball is awarded to team B for a throw-in at the free-throw line extended.
(b) 2 or 3 points are awarded to team A.
31-9
Statement. It is an interference violation if a player causes the backboard or the ring to
vibrate in such a way that the ball, in the judgment of an official, has been prevented from
entering the basket or has been caused to enter the basket.
31-10
Example: A1 attempts a shot for a 3-point field goal near the end of the game. While the ball
is in the air the game clock signal sounds for the end of the game. After the signal, B1 causes
the backboard or the ring to vibrate and therefore, in the judgment of the official, the ball is
prevented from entering the basket.
Interpretation: Even after the game clock signal sounds for the end of the game, the ball
remains live and therefore an interference violation has occurred. 3 points are awarded to
team A.
31-11
Statement. Interference is committed by a defensive or offensive player during a shot for a
field goal when a player touches the basket or the backboard while the ball is in contact with
the ring and still has a possibility to enter the basket.
31-12
Example: After A1’s shot for a field goal, the ball has rebounded from the ring and then again
landed on the ring. B1 touches the basket or backboard while the ball is on the ring.
Interpretation: B1’s violation. The interference restrictions apply as long as the ball has the
possibility to enter the basket.
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31-13
Statement. Whenever there are contradictory decisions of the officials or the infractions of
the rules occur at approximately the same time and one of the sanctions is to cancel the
basket made, that sanction prevails and no points shall be awarded.
31-14
Example: A shot for a field goal by A1 on its downward flight and completely above the level
of the ring is simultaneously touched by A2 and B2. The ball then
(a) enters the basket.
(b) doesn’t enter the basket.
Interpretation: In both cases no points shall be awarded. This is a jump ball situation.
ART. 33
CONTACT: GENERAL PRINCIPLES
33.10
33-1
No-charge semi-circle areas
Statement. The purpose of the no-charge semi-circle rule is not to reward a defensive
player who has taken a position under his own basket in order to draw a charging foul
against an offensive player who is in control of the ball and is penetrating towards the basket.
For the no-charge semi-circle rule to be applied:
(a) The defensive player shall have one foot or both feet in contact with the semi-circle area
(see Diagram 1). The semi-circle line is part of the semi-circle area.
(b) The offensive player shall drive to the basket across the semi-circle line and attempt a
shot for a field goal or a pass while airborne.
The no-charge semi-circle rule is not to be applied and any contact shall be judged
according to normal regulations, e. g. cylinder principle, charge/block principle:
(a) For all play situations occurring outside the no-charge semi-circle area, also developing
from the area between the semi-circle area and the endline.
(b) For all rebounding play situations when, after a shot for a field goal, the ball rebounds
and a contact situation occurs.
(c) For any illegal use of the hands, arms, legs or body by either offensive or defensive
player.
33-2
Example: A1 attempts a jump shot that begins outside the semi-circle area and charges into
B1 who is in contact with the semi-circle area.
Interpretation: A1’s action is legal as the no-charge semi-circle rule is applied.
33-3
Example: A1 dribbles along the endline and, after reaching the area behind the backboard,
jumps diagonally or backwards and charges into B1 who is in a legal guarding position in
contact with the semi-circle area.
Interpretation: A1’s charging foul. The no-charge semi-circle rule is not applied as A1 has
entered the no-charge semi-circle area from the playing court directly behind the backboard
and its extended imaginary line.
33-4
Example: A1’s shot for a field goal touches the ring and a rebound situation occurs. A2 jumps
into the air, catches the ball and then charges into B1 who is in a legal guarding position in
contact with the semi-circle area.
Interpretation: A2’s charging foul. The no-charge semi-circle rule is not applied.
33-5
Example: A1 drives to the basket and is in the act of shooting. Instead of completing the shot
for a field goal A1 passes the ball to A2 who is directly following him. A1 then charges into B1
who is in contact with the no-charge semi-circle area. At approximately the same time A2,
with the ball in his hands is on a direct drive to the basket in an attempt to score.
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Interpretation: A1’s charging foul. The no-charge semi-circle rule is not applied as A1
illegally uses his body to clear the way to the basket for A2.
33-6
Example: A1 drives to the basket and is in the act of shooting. Instead of completing the shot
for a field goal A1 passes the ball to A2 who is standing in the corner of the playing court. A1
then charges into B1 who is in contact with the no-charge semi-circle area.
Interpretation: A1’s legal action. The no-charge semi-circle rule is applied.
Diagram 1
ART. 35
Position of a player inside/outside the no-charge semi-circle area
DOUBLE FOUL
35-1
Statement. Whenever there are contradictory decisions of the officials or the infractions of
the rules occur at approximately the same time and one of the sanctions is to cancel the
basket made, that sanction prevails and no points shall be awarded.
35-2
Example: While in the act of shooting, there is physical contact between shooter A1 and B1.
The ball enters the basket. The lead official calls an offensive foul against A1 and therefore
the basket shall not count. The trail official calls a defensive foul against B1 and therefore the
basket shall count.
Interpretation: As the officials agree to a double foul the basket shall not count. The game
shall be resumed with a team A throw-in at the free-throw line extended.
Team A shall have only whatever time was remaining on the shot clock at the time the double
foul occurred.
35-3
Statement. All the following conditions are necessary for 2 fouls to be considered as a
double foul:
(a) Both fouls are player’s fouls.
(b) Both fouls involve physical contact.
(c) Both fouls are between two opponents fouling each other.
(d) Both fouls are committed at approximately the same time.
35-4
Example:
(a) A1 and B1 are pushing each other.
(b) On the rebound A1 and B1 are pushing each other.
(c) On expecting a pass from his team mate A1 and B1 are pushing each other.
Interpretation: Personal fouls are called in all 3 situations. Therefore it is a double foul.
35-5
Example: After a rebound A1 insults B1 verbally and B1 reacts with punching A1 with his fist.
Interpretation: This is not a double foul. A1’s foul is a technical foul and B1’s foul is a
disqualifying foul. The game shall be resumed with 1 free throw for team B, followed by 2 free
throws for A1 and possession of the ball for team A.
35-6
Example: On getting a free position B1 pushes off A1, called as a personal foul. A1 at
approximately the same time hits B1 with his elbow, called as an unsportsmanlike foul.
Interpretation: This is a double foul. As team A had control of the ball at the time when the
double foul was called, the game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in at the place
nearest to the infraction.
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35-7
Example: A1 and B1 are pushing each other and personal fouls are called. This is team’s A
2nd and team’s B 5th foul in the period.
Interpretation: This is a double foul. No free throws shall be awarded.
ART. 36
TECHNICAL FOUL
36-1
Statement. An official warning is given to a player for an action or behaviour which if
repeated may lead to a technical foul. That warning shall also be communicated to the coach
of that team and shall apply to any member of that team for any similar actions for the
remainder of the game. An official warning shall be given only when the ball becomes dead
and the game clock is stopped.
36-2
Example: Team A member is given a warning for:
(a) Interfering with throw-in.
(b) His behaviour.
(c) Any other action which, if repeated, may lead to a technical foul.
Interpretation: The warning shall be communicated also to coach A and shall apply to all
team A members, for similar actions, for the remainder of the game.
36-3
Statement. During an interval of play a technical foul is committed by a team member who is
entitled to play and who is designated as player-coach. The technical foul shall count as a
player foul and shall count towards the team foul penalty situation in the following period.
36-4
Example: Player-coach A1 is charged with a technical foul for:
(a) Hanging on the ring during the pre-game or half-time warm up.
(b) His behaviour during an interval of play.
Interpretation: In both cases a technical foul shall be charged against A1 as a player. The
foul shall count as 1 of the fouls leading to the team foul penalty situation in the following
period as well as 1 of the 5 fouls leading to A1’s having to leave the game.
36-5
Statement. While a player is in the act of shooting, opponents shall not be permitted to
disconcert that player by actions such as waving a hand(s) to obstruct the shooter’s field of
vision, shouting loudly, stamping feet heavily or clapping hands near the shooter. To do so
may result in a technical foul if the shooter is disadvantaged by the action, or a warning is
given if the shooter is not disadvantaged.
36-6
Example: A1 is in the act of shooting for a field goal when B1 attempts to distract A1 by
shouting loudly or stamping feet heavily on the floor. The shot for a field goal is:
(a) Successful.
(b) Unsuccessful.
Interpretation:
(a) B1 shall be given a warning, which shall also be communicated to coach B. If team B has
already been given a warning for similar behaviour, B1 shall be charged with a technical
foul.
(b) B1 shall be charged with a technical foul.
36-7
Statement. If the officials discover that more than 5 players of the same team are
participating on the playing court simultaneously, the error must be corrected as soon as
possible without placing the opponents at a disadvantage.
Assuming that the officials and the table officials are doing their job correctly, one player
must have re-entered or remained on the playing court illegally. The officials must therefore
order one player to leave the playing court immediately and charge a technical foul against
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the coach of that team, recorded as 'B'. The coach is responsible for ensuring that a
substitution is applied correctly and that the substituted player leaves the playing court
immediately after the substitution.
36-8
Example: While the game is being played it is discovered that team A has more than 5
players on the playing court.
(a) At the time of the discovery, team B (with 5 players) is in control of the ball.
(b) At the time of the discovery, team A (with more than 5 players) is in control of the ball.
Interpretation:
(a) The game shall be stopped immediately unless team B is placed at a disadvantage.
(b) The game shall be stopped immediately.
In both cases the player who has re-entered (or remained in) the game illegally must be removed from the game and a technical foul shall be charged against coach A, recorded as 'B'.
36-9
Statement. After it is discovered that a team is participating with more than 5 players, it is
also discovered that points have been scored or a foul has been committed by a player of this
team while participating illegally. All such points shall remain valid and any foul(s) committed
by (or against) that player shall qualify as player fouls.
36-10
Example: The officials discover A2 is the team A 6th player on the playing court and interrupt
the game after:
(a) A2 commits an offensive foul.
(b) A2 scores a field goal.
(c) B2 has fouled A2 during his unsuccessful shot for a field goal.
Interpretation:
(a) A2’s foul is a player foul.
(b) A2’s field goal shall count.
(c) Any team A player on the playing court, as designated by his coach, at the time when the
foul has been called shall attempt free throws.
36-11
Statement. After having been notified of being no longer entitled to participate because of a
5th foul, a player re-enters the game. The illegal participation shall be penalised immediately
upon discovery, without placing the opponents at a disadvantage.
36-12
Example: After committing a 5th foul, B1 is notified of being no longer entitled to participate.
B1 later re-enters the game as a substitute. B1’s illegal participation is discovered before:
(a) The ball has become live for the resuming of the game.
Or after:
(b) The ball has again become live while the ball is in control of team A.
(c) The ball has again become live while the ball is in control of team B.
(d) The ball has again become dead following B1’s re-entering the game.
Interpretation:
(a)
B1 shall be removed from the game immediately.
(b)
The game shall be stopped immediately unless team A is placed at a disadvantage. B1
shall be removed from the game.
(c), (d) The game shall be stopped immediately. B1 shall be removed from the game.
In all cases a technical foul shall be charged against coach B, recorded as 'B'.
36-13
Statement. After having been notified of being no longer entitled to participate because of a
5th foul, a player re-enters the game and scores a field goal, commits a foul, or is fouled by an
opponent before the illegal participation is discovered. The field goal shall count and the foul
shall be considered as a player foul.
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36-14
Example: After committing a 5th foul, B1 is notified of being no longer entitled to participate.
B1 later re-enters the game as a substitute. B1’s illegal participation is discovered after:
(a) B1 scores a field goal.
(b) B1 commits a foul.
(c) B1 is fouled by A1 (5th team foul).
Interpretation:
(a) B1’s field goal shall count.
(b) B1’s foul is a player foul and shall be recorded on the scoresheet in the space behind his
5th foul.
(c) The 2 free throws awarded to B1 shall be attempted by his substitute.
In all cases a technical foul shall be charged against coach B, recorded as 'B'.
36-15
Statement. After not having been notified of being no longer entitled to participate because
of a 5th foul, a player remains in or re-enters the game. That player shall be removed from the
game as soon as the error is discovered without placing the opponents at a disadvantage. No
penalty shall be applied for the player’s illegal participation. If that player scores a field goal,
commits a foul or is fouled by an opponent, the field goal shall count and the foul shall be
considered as a player foul.
36-16
Example: A6 asks to substitute for A1. The ball next becomes dead as a result of a foul by A1
and A6 enters the game. The officials fail to notify A1 that the foul is his 5th foul. A1 later reenters the game as a substitute. A1’s illegal participation is discovered after:
(a) The game clock has started while A1 is participating as a player.
(b) A1 has scored a field goal.
(c) A1 fouls B1.
(d) B1 fouls A1 during an unsuccessful shot for a field goal.
Interpretation:
No penalty shall be charged because of A1’s illegal participation.
(a) The game shall be stopped, without placing team B at a disadvantage. A1 shall be
removed from the game immediately and replaced by a substitute.
(b) A1’s field goal shall count.
(c) A1’s foul is a player foul and penalised accordingly. It shall be recorded on the
scoresheet in the space behind his 5th foul.
(d) B1 foul. A1’s substitute shall be awarded 2 or 3 free throws.
36-17
Example: 10 minutes before the start of the game, a technical foul is called on A1. Before the
start of the game coach B designates B1 to attempt 1 free throw, however B1 is not one of
the team B starting 5 players.
Interpretation: One of the players designated as team B starting 5 players must attempt the
free throw. Substitution cannot be granted before the playing time has started.
36-18
Statement. When a player falls down to fake a foul in order to create an unfair advantage by
having a foul called unjustly on an opponent or to create an unsportsmanlike atmosphere
amongst spectators towards the officials, such behaviour shall be considered
unsportsmanlike.
36-19
Example: A1 is driving to the basket when B1 falls backwards to the floor without contact
having occurred between these players or after negligible contact followed by B1’s theatrical
display. A warning for such action has already been communicated to the team B players
through the team B coach.
Interpretation: Such behaviour is obviously unsportsmanlike and poisons the smooth
running of the game. A technical foul shall be called on B1.
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36-20
Statement. Serious injury may occur by excessive swinging of elbows, especially in
rebounding activity and closely guarded player situations. If such action results in contact,
then a personal foul may be called. If the action does not result in contact, a technical foul
may be called.
36-21
Example: A1 gains control of a ball on rebound and returns to the floor. A1 is immediately
closely guarded by B1. Without contacting B1, A1 excessively swings the elbows in an
attempt to intimidate B1 or to clear enough space to pivot, pass, or dribble.
Interpretation: A1’s action does not conform to the spirit and intent of the rules. A technical
foul may be charged against A1.
36-22
Statement. A player shall be disqualified when he is charged with 2 technical fouls.
36-23
Example: A1 has committed his 1st technical foul during the 1st half for hanging on the ring. A
2nd technical foul is called against him during the 2nd half for unsportsmanlike behaviour.
Interpretation: A1 shall be automatically disqualified and shall go to and remain in the team's
dressing room for the duration of the game or, if he so chooses, he shall leave the building.
This 2nd technical foul is only to be penalised and no additional penalty for the disqualification
shall be administered. It is the scorer who must notify an official immediately when a player
has committed 2 technical fouls and should be disqualified.
ART. 37
UNSPORTSMANLIKE FOUL
37-1
Statement. When the game clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period and in each
extra period, and the ball is out-of-bounds for a throw-in and still in the hands of the official or
already at the disposal of the player taking the throw-in. If at this moment a defensive player
on the playing court causes contact with a player of the offensive team on the playing court
and a foul is called, it is an unsportsmanlike foul.
37-2
Example: With 0:53 to play in the last minute of the game A1 has the ball in his hands or at his
disposal for a throw-in when B2 causes contact with A2 on the playing court and a foul is
called on B2.
Interpretation: B2 obviously has made no effort to play the ball and has gained an advantage
by not allowing the game clock to restart. An unsportsmanlike foul must be called without a
warning being given.
37-3
Example: With 0:53 to play in the last minute of the game on a throw-in A1 has the ball in his
hands or at his disposal when A2 causes contact with B2 on the playing court and a foul is
called on A2.
Interpretation: A2 did not gain an advantage by committing a foul. A personal foul is called
on A2 unless there is hard contact which shall be called as an unsportsmanlike foul. Team B
is awarded the ball for a throw-in at the place nearest to the infraction.
37-4
Statement. When the game clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period and in each
extra period, and after the ball has left the hands of the player taking the throw-in, a
defensive player, in order to stop or not to restart the game clock, causes contact with an
offensive player who is just about to receive or has received the ball on the playing court.
Such contact shall be called immediately as a personal foul unless there is hard contact
which shall be called as an unsportsmanlike or disqualifying foul. The principle of
advantage/disadvantage shall not be applied.
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37-5
Example: With 1:02 to play in the last minute of the game and with the score A 83 – B 80 on a
throw-in the ball has left the hands of A1, when B2 causes contact on the playing court with
A2 who is about to receive the ball. A foul is called on B2.
Interpretation: A personal foul shall be called on B2 immediately unless the officials judge
that the severity of the B2 contact requires an unsportsmanlike or disqualifying foul to be
called.
37-6
Example: With 1:02 to play in the last minute of the game and with the score A 83 – B 80 on a
throw-in the ball has left the hands of A1, when A2 causes contact on the playing court with
B2. A foul is called on A2.
Interpretation: A2 did not gain an advantage by committing a foul. A personal foul shall be
called on A2 immediately, unless there is hard contact. Team B is awarded the ball for a
throw-in at the place nearest to the infraction.
37-7
Example: With 1:02 to play in the last minute of the game and with the score A 83 – B 80 on a
throw-in the ball has left the hands of A1, when B2 causes contact with A2 in a different
area of the playing court to where the throw-in is administered. A foul is called on B2.
Interpretation: B2 is obviously not making any effort to play the ball and an advantage is
gained by not allowing the game clock to restart. An unsportsmanlike foul must be called
without a warning being given.
ART. 38
DISQUALIFYING FOUL
38-1
Statement. With a disqualification a person is no longer a team member or team bench personnel. Therefore he may no longer be penalised for additional unsportsmanlike behaviour.
38-2
Example: A1 is disqualified for flagrant unsportsmanlike behaviour. He leaves the playing
court and verbally insults an official.
Interpretation: A1 is already disqualified and may no longer be penalised. The referee or the
commissioner, if present, shall send a report describing the incident to the organising body of
the competition.
38-3
Statement. When a player is disqualified for a flagrant unsportsmanlike non-contact action
the penalty is the same as for a contact disqualifying foul.
38-4
Example: A travelling violation is called against A1. Frustrated, he verbally insults the official
and is disqualified.
Interpretation: The penalty is 2 free throws and possession of the ball for team B.
38-5
Statement. When a substitute, excluded player or team follower is disqualified and the
coach is charged with a technical foul, recorded as ‘B’, it shall be penalised the same as for
any other technical foul.
38-6
Example: A1 has been charged with his 5th personal foul. Frustrated, he verbally insults the
official and is disqualified.
Interpretation: The foul is charged to the coach A and recorded as ‘B’. The penalty is 1 free
throw and possession of the ball for team B.
ART. 39
39-1
FIGHTING
Statement. A team is awarded a throw-in because that team was in control of the ball at the
time a fight breaks out or threatens to break out. That team shall have only whatever time
was remaining on the shot clock when the game resumes.
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39-2
Example: Team A has possession of the ball for 20 seconds when a situation which may lead
to a fight occurs. The officials disqualify members of both teams for leaving their team bench
area.
Interpretation: Team A, who controlled the ball before the fighting situation started, shall be
awarded a throw-in at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table with only 4
seconds remaining on the shot clock.
ART. 42
SPECIAL SITUATIONS
42-1
Statement. In special situations with a number of penalties to be administered during the
same stopped clock period, officials must pay particular attention to the order in which the
violation or fouls occurred in determining which penalties are to be administered and which
penalties are to be cancelled.
42-2
Example: A1 attempts a jump shot for a field goal. While the ball is in the air, the shot clock
signal sounds. After the signal, with A1 still in the air, B1 commits an unsportsmanlike foul on
A1 and:
(a) The ball misses the ring.
(b) The ball only touches the ring but does not enter the basket.
(c) The ball enters the basket.
Interpretation: In all cases B1’s unsportsmanlike foul cannot be disregarded.
(a) A1 was fouled by B1 while A1 was in the act of shooting. The shot clock violation by team
A shall be disregarded as it would have occurred after the unsportsmanlike foul. 2 or 3
free throws shall be awarded to A1, followed by a team A’s throw-in at the centre line
extended, opposite the scorer’s table.
(b) No shot clock violation has occurred. 2 or 3 free throws shall be awarded to A1, followed
by a team A’s throw-in at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table.
(c) 2 or 3 points and 1 additional free throw are awarded to A1 followed by a team A throwin at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table.
42-3
Example: A1 in his act of shooting for a field goal is fouled by B2. Afterwards, while still in the
act of shooting, A1 is fouled by B1.
Interpretation: B1’s foul shall be disregarded unless it is an unsportsmanlike or disqualifying
foul.
42-4
Example: B1 commits an unsportsmanlike foul against A1. After the foul, technical fouls are
committed by coach A and coach B.
Interpretation: Only equal penalties shall be cancelled in the order in which they occur.
Therefore the penalties for the coaches’ technical fouls shall be cancelled. The game shall
be resumed with 2 free throws for A1 and possession of the ball for team A.
42-5
Example: B1 commits an unsportsmanlike foul against A1 on a successful field goal. A1 then
commits a technical foul.
Interpretation: A1’s field goal counts. The foul penalties for the unsportsmanlike and the
technical foul (1 free throw plus possession for both teams) cancel each other and the game
shall be resumed with a throw-in at any place from the endline as after any successful field
goal.
42-6
Example: On getting a free position B1 pushes off A1, called as a personal foul. This is team
B’s 3rd team foul. Later (not at approximately the same time) A1 hits B1 with his elbow, called
as an unsportsmanlike foul.
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Interpretation: This is not a double foul as the fouls of B1 and A1 did not occur at
approximately the same time. The game shall be resumed with 2 free throws for B1 and
possession of the ball for team B.
42-7
Statement. If double fouls or fouls with equal penalties are committed during free-throw
activity, the fouls shall be charged but no penalties are administered.
42-8
Example: A1 is awarded 2 free throws. After the first free throw:
(a) A2 and B2 commit a double foul.
(b) A2 and B2 commit technical fouls.
Interpretation: Fouls shall be charged against A2 and B2, after which A1 shall attempt the
second free throw. The game shall resume normally as after any last or only free throw.
42-9
Example: A1 is awarded 2 free throws. Both free throws are successful. Before the ball
becomes live after the last free throw:
(a) A2 and B2 commit a double foul.
(b) A2 and B2 commit technical fouls.
Interpretation: In both cases fouls shall be charged against the involved players, after which
the game shall resume with a throw-in at the endline as after any successful last or only free
throw.
42-10
Statement. In the case of double fouls and after cancellation of equal penalties against both
teams, if there are no other penalties remaining for administration, the game shall be
resumed with a throw-in by the team that had control of the ball or was entitled to the ball
before the first infraction.
In the case neither team had control of the ball or was entitled to the ball before the first
infraction, this is a jump ball situation. The game shall be resumed with an alternating
possession throw-in.
42-11
Example: During the interval of play between the first and second period players A1 and B1
commit disqualifying fouls or coach A and coach B commit technical fouls.
The alternating possession arrow points towards:
(a) Team A.
(b) Team B.
Interpretation:
(a) The game shall be resumed with a team A throw-in at the centre line extended, opposite
the scorer’s table. The moment the ball touches or is legally touched by a player on the
playing court, the direction of the alternating possession arrow shall be reversed
towards team B.
(b) The same procedure is followed, beginning with a throw-in awarded to team B.
ART. 44
44-1
CORRECTABLE ERRORS
Statement. To be correctable the error must be recognized by the officials, table officials or
commissioner, if present, before the ball becomes live following the first dead ball after the
game clock has started following the error. That is:
Error occurs during a dead ball
Error is correctable
Ball live
Error is correctable
Game clock starts or continues to run
Error is correctable
Dead ball
Error is correctable
Ball live
Error is no longer correctable
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After the correction of the error, the game shall be resumed and the ball shall be awarded to
the team entitled to the ball at the time the game was interrupted to correct the error.
44-2
Example: B1 fouls A1 and this is team B’s 4th team foul. The official commits an error by
awarding A1 2 free throws. Following the successful last free throw, the game continues and
the game clock starts. B2 receives the ball, dribbles and scores.
The error is discovered:
(a) Before
(b) After
the ball is at the team A’s player disposal for the throw-in at the end line.
Interpretation:
B2’s basket counts.
In (a), any free throw made shall be cancelled. The error is still correctable and team A shall
be awarded the ball for a throw-in at the end line where the game was interrupted to correct
the error.
In (b), the error is no longer correctable and the game continues.
44-3
Statement. If the error constitutes the wrong player shooting a free throw(s), the free
throw(s) shall be cancelled. The ball shall be awarded to the opponents for a throw-in at the
free-throw line extended unless the game has started, in which case it shall be awarded for a
throw-in at the place nearest to where the game was interrupted unless penalties for further
infractions are to be administered. If the officials discover, before the ball has left the hands
of the free-throw shooter for the first or only free throw, that a wrong player has the intention
to attempt a free throw(s), he shall be immediately replaced by the correct free-throw
shooter without any sanction.
44-4
Example: B1 fouls A1 and this is team B’s 6th team foul. A1 is awarded 2 free throws. Instead
of A1 it is A2 who attempts the 2 free throws. The error is discovered:
(a) Before the ball has left A2’s hands for the first free throw.
(b) After the ball has left A2’s hands for the first free throw.
(c) After the successful second free throw.
Interpretation:
In (a), the error is immediately corrected and A1 is required to attempt the 2 free throws
without any sanction for team A.
In (b) and (c) the 2 free throws are cancelled and the game shall be resumed with a team B
throw-in at the free-throw line extended.
The same procedure shall be applied if the foul of B1 is unsportsmanlike. In that case also the
right to the possession of the ball as part of the penalty is cancelled and the game shall be
resumed with a throw-in for team B at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table.
44-5
Example: B1 fouls A1 in the act of shooting, after which a technical foul is committed by
coach B. Instead of A1 attempting 2 free throws for the B1 foul, it is A2 who attempts all 3 free
throws. The error is discovered before the ball has left the hands of A3, taking the throw-in
resulting from the coach B technical foul.
Interpretation: The 2 free throws which were attempted by A2 instead of A1 are cancelled.
The free throw for the technical foul penalty was legally taken and therefore the game shall
resume with a throw-in for team A at the centre line extended, opposite the scorer’s table.
44-6
Statement. After the error is corrected, the game shall be resumed from the point of
interruption to correct the error, unless the correction involves awarding merited free
throw(s) and:
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(a) If there has been no change of team possession after the error was made, the game
shall resume as after any normal free throw(s).
(b) If there has been no change of team possession after the error was made and the same
team scores a basket, the error shall be disregarded and the game shall resume as after
any normal field goal.
44-7
Example: B1 fouls A1 and this is team B’s 5th team foul. Erroneously, A1 is awarded a throw-in
instead of 2 free throws. A2 dribbles the ball on the playing court when B2 taps the ball outof-bounds. Coach A requests a time-out. During the time-out, the officials recognize the error
or it is called to their attention that A1 should have been awarded 2 free throws.
Interpretation: A1 shall be awarded 2 free throws and the game shall resume as after any
normal free throw(s).
44-8
Example: B1 fouls A1 and this team B 5th team foul. Erroneously, A1 is awarded a throw-in
instead of 2 free throws. After the throw-in A2 is fouled by B1 on his unsuccessful field goal
attempt and is awarded 2 free throws. Coach A is granted a time-out. During the time-out, the
officials recognize the error or it is called to their attention that A1 should have been awarded
2 free throws.
Interpretation: A1 shall be awarded 2 free throws with no players occupying free-throw
rebound places. Then A2 shall attempt 2 free throws and the game shall resume as after any
normal free throw(s).
44-9
Example: B1 fouls A1 and this is team B’s 5th team foul. Erroneously, A1 is awarded a throw-in
instead of 2 free throws. After the throw-in A2 scores a field goal. Before the ball becomes
live, the officials recognize the error.
Interpretation: The error is disregarded and the game shall continue as after any normal
field goal.
ART. 46
46-1
REFEREE: DUTIES AND POWERS
Statement. Procedure for the application of the Instant Replay System (IRS) review.
1.
The IRS review will be conducted by the officials.
2.
If the call and the decision of the officials is subject to the IRS review, that initial decision
must be shown by the officials on the playing court.
3.
Prior to the IRS review, the officials may gather as much information as possible from the
table officials and from the commissioner, if present.
4.
The referee makes the decision whether the IRS review will be used or not. If not, the
initial official’s decision remains valid.
5.
Following the IRS review the initial decision of the official(s) can be corrected only if the
IRS review provides the officials with clear and conclusive visual evidence for the
correction.
6.
If the IRS review will be used, it must be used, at the latest before the start of the next
period or before the referee has signed the scoresheet, unless otherwise stated.
7.
The officials shall keep both teams on the playing court at the end of the 2nd period if an
IRS review is to be used to decide whether a foul was called before the end of the 2nd
period’s playing time, an out-of-bounds violation of the shooter, a shot clock violation or
an 8-seconds violation has occurred or whether playing time should be added on the
game clock.
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8.
The officials shall keep both teams on the playing court anytime the IRS review is used at
the end of the 4th period or any extra period.
9.
An IRS review shall be conducted as fast as possible. The officials may extend the
duration of the IRS review if technical problems arise with the IRS.
10. If the IRS fails to work and there is no approved spare equipment available, the IRS
cannot be used.
11. During the IRS review the officials shall ensure that no unauthorised persons have
access to the IRS monitor.
12. After the IRS review has ended, the final decision shall be clearly reported by the referee
in the front of the scorer's table and if necessary, communicated to the coaches of both
teams.
46-2
Example: A1 shoots successfully for a field goal when the game clock signal sounds for the
end of the period or game. The 2 or 3 points are awarded by the officials. The officials
become uncertain as to whether the shot of A1 was released after the end of the playing
time.
Interpretation:
If the IRS review provides clear and conclusive visual evidence that the ball was released
after the end of playing time for the period or game, the basket is cancelled. If the IRS review
ascertains that the ball was released before the end of playing time for the period or game,
the referee confirms the 2 or 3 points for team A.
46-3
Example: Team B is leading by 2 points. The game clock signal sounds for the end of the
period or game when A1 shoots for a field goal and 2 points are awarded by the officials. The
officials become uncertain as to whether the shot of A1 should be valid for 3 points.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used at any time to decide whether a shot for a
successful field goal counts for 2 or 3 points.
46-4
Example: A1 shoots for a successful 3-points field goal and at approximately the same time
the game clock signal sounds for the end of the period. The officials become uncertain as to
whether A1 has touched the boundary line on his shot.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used to decide at the end of the period whether a shot
for a successful field goal was released before the game clock signal has sounded for the
end of the period. If so the IRS review can be used furthermore to decide whether and if so
how much time shall be displayed on the game clock if an out-of-bounds violation of the
shooter has occurred.
46-5
Example: A1 shoots for a successful field goal and at approximately the same time the game
clock signal sounds for the end of the period. The officials become uncertain as to whether a
shot clock violation has occurred.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used to decide whether a shot for a successful field
goal was released before the game clock signal has sounded for the end of the period. The
IRS review can be used furthermore to decide whether and if so how much time shall be
displayed on the game clock if a shot clock violation has occurred.
46-6
Example: A1 shoots for a successful field goal and at approximately the same time the game
clock signal sounds for the end of the period. The officials become uncertain as to whether
team A has violated against the 8-second rule.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used to decide at the end of the period whether a shot
for a successful field goal was released before the game clock signal has sounded for the
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end of the period. If so the IRS review can be used furthermore to decide whether and how
much time shall be displayed on the game clock if an 8-second violation has occurred.
46-7
Example: Team B is leading by 2 points. The game clock signal sounds for the end of the
period or game when a personal foul is called on B1 against dribbler A1. It is team B’s 5th
player foul.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used to decide whether the foul was called before the
end of the playing time. If so, 2 free throws shall be awarded to A1 and the game clock shall
be reset to the remaining playing time.
46-8
Example: A1 shoots for a field goal and is fouled by B1. At approximately the same time the
game clock signal sounds for the end of the period. The shot for a field goal is unsuccessful.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used to decide whether B1's foul was called before
the game clock signal has sounded.
If the IRS review provides that the foul was called before the end of the period, the game
clock shall be reset to the remaining playing time and free throws shall be administered.
If the IRS review provides that the foul was called after the end of the period, B1’s foul shall
be ignored and no free throws shall be awarded to A1 unless B1's foul was called as
unsportsmanlike or disqualifying and there is a period to follow.
46-9
Example: With 5:53 to play in the 1st period the ball rolls on the playing court next to the
sideline when both A1 and B1 try to get the control of the ball. The ball goes out-of-bounds
and the ball is awarded to team A for the throw-in. The officials become uncertain of the
player who caused the ball to go out-of bounds.
Interpretation: The officials cannot use the IRS review at this time. To identify the player
who caused the ball to go out-of-bounds the IRS review can only be used when the game
clock shows 2:00 minutes or less in the 4th period and in each extra period.
46-10
Example: A1 shoots for a field goal, the ball enters the basket and the officials award 3
points. The officials become uncertain as to whether the shot was released from the 3-point
field goal area.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used to decide at any time during the game whether
the successful field goal shall count for 2 or 3 points. The IRS review of the given game
situation shall be conducted at the first opportunity when the game clock is stopped and the
ball is dead.
46-11
Example: A1 is fouled by B1 and is awarded 2 free throws. The officials are uncertain on the
correct free-throw shooter.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used at any time during the game to identify the
correct free-throw shooter before the ball is at the disposal of the free-throw shooter for his
1st free throw. However, the IRS review can still be used after the ball has been at the
disposal of the free-throw shooter but if the IRS review provides for a wrong free-throw
shooter, a correctable error for permitting a wrong player attempting a free throw has
occurred. The free throw(s) attempted, and the possession of the ball if part of the penalty
shall be cancelled and the ball shall be awarded to the opponents for a throw-in at the freethrow line extended.
46-12
Example: A1 and B1 start to throw punches to each other followed by more players getting
involved in a fight. After some minutes the officials have restored the order on the playing
court.
FIBA Official Interpretations 2014/LK
Page 40 of 41
Interpretation: Once the order is restored, the officials can use the IRS review to identify the
involved team members and team followers during a fight. After gathering the clear and
conclusive evidence of the fighting game situation, the final decision shall clearly be reported
by the referee in front of the scorer's table and communicated to both coaches.
46-13
Example: With 1:45 to play in the extra period A1 near the sideline passes the ball to A2. On
the pass B1 taps the ball to go out-of-bounds. The officials become uncertain as to whether
A1 on his pass was already out-of-bounds.
Interpretation: The IRS review cannot be used to decide whether a player or a ball was outof-bounds.
46-14
Example: With 1:37 to play in the 4th period ball goes out-of-bounds. The ball is awarded to
team A for a throw-in and team A is granted a time-out. The officials become uncertain of the
player who has caused the ball to go out-of-bounds.
Interpretation: The IRS review can be used to identify the player who caused the ball to go
out-of-bounds. The time-out period of 1 minute duration will start only once the IRS review
has ended.
46-15
Statement. Before the game the referee approves the IRS and informs the 2 coaches about
its availability. Only the IRS approved by the referee can be used for a replay review.
46-16
Example: A1 shoots for a field goal when the game clock signal sounds for the end of the
game. The shot is successful. There is no approved IRS on the playing court but the manager
of team B states that the game was filmed by the team video from an elevated position and
presents to the officials the video material for a review.
Interpretation: The review shall be denied.
FIBA Official Interpretations 2014/LK
Page 41 of 41
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