AirSpeed 5000 Server Media Drive Deiagnostics and

AirSpeed 5000 Server
Media Drive Diagnostics and
Recovery
This document contains information regarding how to determine if certain system behaviors are
the result of degrading or failed media drives on AirSpeed 5000 servers. It also describes how to
recover from a degrading or failed media drive scenario, and resume operation as quickly as
possible.
The following topics are included:
•
Impact of Degrading Media Drives
•
Identifying Degrading or Failed Media Drives
•
Detailed Scenarios of Degrading Media Drives
•
Running Disk Performance Testing
•
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
•
Contacting Customer Support
Impact of Degrading Media Drives
Impact of Degrading Media Drives
AirSpeed 5000 servers require proper operation of its media drive array.
When a media drive is in the process of degrading, it could affect your system in a variety of
ways, including reduced performance, failed recordings, and/ or failed playout behaviors.
Depending upon the severity of the disk performance, you can encounter different behaviors that
can range from minimal to quite severe.
When a media drive has failed, the RAID Controller indicates the “failed” drive, and the server
performance returns to specification.
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A degrading media drive can affect the media array until it is removed either by the RAID
Controller, or physically by the user.
Some common behaviors that might be the result of a degrading media drive are listed below:
•
Sluggish network and Operating System (OS) response.
•
Stalled playback or repeating frames during playout.
•
Cue times, check-in times, and general channel response takes substantially longer than
expected.
•
Gradual loss of audio video sync during clip playout.
•
Corrupted recordings, including short, missing, or corrupted data.
•
External control systems (such as iNEWS Command or Capture Manager) might respond
more slowly or fail recordings or playout.
•
In extreme cases, external controllers such as Capture Manager may not be able to handle
the disruption in communication to the system and will not respond properly. In these cases,
attempting to restart the Capture service, or the Capture Manager server, may be required to
recover.
2
Identifying Degrading or Failed Media Drives
Identifying Degrading or Failed Media Drives
A degrading or failed media drive can cause many different types of system behaviors. If your
system exhibits any suspect behavior, it is extremely important that you actively investigate to
see whether it is the result of a degrading or failed media drive.
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It is critical that you do not wait too long to determine whether a media drive is degrading
or failed. If a degrading media drive is involved, the longer you wait, the more likely it is
that your system will become unstable.
If a drive has been replaced, you can begin the media array rebuild process while the system is
online, if required. In most cases, performance of the system will not be adversely impacted
during the rebuild process, and you can expect the system to operate normally.
For more information, see “Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives” on page 8 for
information on how to manage the RAID rebuild process and what to expect during the process.
If you are not able to fully investigate system behaviors, or are operating in a time-sensitive
environment, you can try these relatively easy tests:

Verify local and network connectivity to the system and determine if the operating system is
performing properly by doing the following:
•
Connect to the AirSpeed 5000 server locally via KVM
•
Connect to the AirSpeed 5000 server remotely via Remote Desktop
Look for signs that the operating system does not respond to your keyboard and mouse
actions.

Check an instance of the Remote Console and verify that the user interface is accurately
responding to the activities expected, as well as updating in a timely fashion (system is
responding).

Check the system health by viewing the Drive Status on the Health Monitor to see if it
reports a Failed drive (indicated by a RED X or message saying “STATE DEGRADED”).

View the LEDs on the front of the AirSpeed 5000 server.
An LED that is flashing RED indicates the drive could be rebuilding the data. However, an
LED that is solid RED indicates that the media drive has failed. You need to replace that
media drive.
3
Identifying Degrading or Failed Media Drives

Reboot your system as follows:
•
Prepare your system to be rebooted by rerouting all Play and Record sources to backup
devices.
•
Shutdown and restart the AirSpeed 5000 server.
•
View the LEDs on the front of the AirSpeed 5000 server.
An LED that is flashing RED indicates the drive could be rebuilding the data. However,
an LED that is solid RED indicates that the media drive has failed. You need to replace
that media drive.
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You should replace the failed media drive as soon as possible to avoid the chance of data
loss that can occur upon a second drive failure.
If you have performed all of the steps in the preceding checklist, and still cannot determine if
you have a failing drive, contact your Customer Support Representative and perform the
Disk Performance Test in the System Diagnostics application.
For more information on running disk performance testing, see “Running Disk Performance
Testing” on page 6.
For more information on contacting Customer support, see “Contacting Customer Support”
on page 54.
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Detailed Scenarios of Degrading Media Drives
Detailed Scenarios of Degrading Media Drives
The table below describes some of the behaviors (symptoms) that different configurations might
exhibit when an AirSpeed 5000 server media drive is degrading.
Configuration
Behavior
Remote Console Capture
Critical error on server
Timecode updates erratically
AirSpeed 5000 Remote Console locks up for 30 seconds and inventory data is
missing
Media takes awhile (around 15 seconds) to stop and unload records, The
captures recording media is out of order
Transferred clips play out of order in the Editor
Clips take a long time to close out in Interplay
Transfer Manager message saying “Transfer Failed”
Remote Console Playout
Playout Stalls
Timecode flickers
Critical error on server
Timecode update issues
Channels stop during playback
Command - Playout
Output starts to stutter and eventually stalls
Command continues to count down the duration, even though the output is not
moving
Command - Capture
Playback stalls
Critical error on server
IsoSync - Capture
check-in falied
timecode updates sporadically
Failed cue for record
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Running Disk Performance Testing
Configuration
Behavior
Message “Impossible to stop one of the records!” appears when records are
stopped.
Captured media pauses and resumes when played
Interplay appears to have more clips than what was actually captured
IsoSync - Playout
Critical error on the server from LSI stating that VD is degraded
Playout stalls
Output of playback stalls
Capture Manager Capture
Times out waiting for Stop
Cue for record fails
checkin failed
Transferred media plays back out of order
Timecode updates sporadically
Disruptions in communication to the system/ poor system response
Critical error on server
Running Disk Performance Testing
To test your media drives, we have System Diagnostics application that you can use to test,
verify and diagnose all aspects of your system, including disk performance. This test can help
you determine if there are indications of a failing or poorly performing drive on your AirSpeed
5000 server.
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Make sure that you quit all AirSpeed 5000 applications before running the System
Diagnostic program. Failure to do so could cause the system to blue-screen and restart.
To run disk performance testing:
1. On the AirSpeed 5000 server, access the System Diagnostics tool by navigating to
C:\Program Files (x86)\Avid\AirSpeed\Utilities\DiagnosticUtilities, and select
Airspeed5000Test.exe.
The Avid AirSpeed 5000 Hardware Test dialog box opens.
6
Running Disk Performance Testing
2. Scroll down in the left pane, and select the Disk Performance icon.
The Disk Performance section opens.
3. In the Drive command time tests (msec) section, in the Seek method list box, select Seeker.
4. In the Test length list box, select Short.
5. Make sure all of the disks (Drive-0 to Drive-9) are selected, and click the Start button to run
the disk test on all of the disks. When the test is done, the Status column will show you
which drives have “Passed”, and which drive(s) have “Failed”.
6. Repeat the test 3-5 times. Each instance of the test takes about 4 minutes to run.
7. Based on the results of the Disk Performance test, determine what to do next:
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If all drives Pass, and you ran the test as a preventative maintenance task, then this
indicates your disk drives are all working fine. There is no further action.
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If all drives Pass, and you ran the test because you are having performance issues, this
might indicate another system problem. Contact Avid Customer Support for help in
resolving that issue. Depending on how long your system has been up, they might have
you restart your system, check the Health Monitor, or run other diagnostic tests.
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One or more drives fail the test:
-
Determine which physical media drive(s) failed, by deselecting all of the “Passed”
drives, and leaving the “Failed” drive(s) selected.
-
Click the Start button again to run the test for the “Failed” drive.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
-
As the test is being run, check the media drives on the front of the AirSpeed 5000 server
to see which drive has blue flashing LEDs. The drive that has blue flashing LEDs is the
one that has failed the Drive test.
-
You can now remove and replace the failed media drive. For more information, see
“Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives” on page 8.
Once a disk has been failed by the system and removed from the array by the RAID
controller, operation of the system should stabilize and performance of the system should be
comparable to normal operation before the drive failure. At this time, the degrading drive
can be physically removed from the system and a replacement drive inserted into the system.
At this point, you can begin a rebuild of the array. For more information, see “Identifying
and Replacing Failed Media Drives” on page 8.
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You should replace a degrading or failed media drive as soon as possible to avoid the
chance that a second drive fails causing a serious loss of data.
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
In the event that you have one or more bad media drives, you can replace them. First, you must
identify which drive has failed. Then, once you know which drive has failed, you need to figure
out when you can replace it.
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For four (4) channel model servers, if you are doing 4 channels of DNxHD 120/145 with proxy,
Edit While Capture performance will not be real time if a drive fails, or is offline.
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For two (2) channel model servers, if you are doing 2 channels of DNxHD 120/145 with proxy,
Edit While Capture performance will not be real time if a drive fails, or is offline.
Depending on your model (2-channel or 4-channel), see the following topics for more
information.
For information on identifying and replacing Media Drives for 4-channel model systems, see the
following topics:
•
“Identifying Failed Media Drives (4-Channel Models)” on page 9
•
“Removing and Replacing Media Drives (4-Channel Models)” on page 10
•
“Re-RAIDing Media Drives from Scratch (4-Channel Model Servers)” on page 15
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
For information on identifying and replacing Media Drives for 2-channel model systems, see the
following topics:
•
“Identifying Failed Media Drives (2-Channel Models)” on page 34
•
“Removing and Replacing Media Drives (2-Channel Models)” on page 35
•
“Re-RAIDing Media Drives from Scratch (2-Channel Model Servers)” on page 38
Identifying Failed Media Drives (4-Channel Models)
This topic contains information on how to identify that your AirSpeed 5000 four (4) channel
model server has one or more failed media drives.
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For a list of media drive LED meanings, see “AirSpeed 5000 Front Panel” in the AirSpeed 5000
Setup Guide.
To identify failed media drives:
1. Determine if you have a failed media drive by doing the following:
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a.
View the Drive status in the Health Monitor. On your AirSpeed 5000 server, select Start
> All Programs > Avid > Avid Framework > Avid Health Monitor. Then, select
Avid AirSpeed 5000 - Integration Service (for the AirSpeed 5000 server). In the Base
Board category, the Media Drive RAID Status field would have a RED X, and would
say “STATE_DEGRADED”.
b.
View the LEDs on the front of the AirSpeed 5000 server. A solid red LED on the front
of the drive indicates that the media drive has failed. If it’s flashing RED, the drive could
be rebuilding the data. However, if it is solid RED, you need to replace that media drive.
In the event of a failed media drive, it is very important that you replace the failed media
drive as soon as possible.
2. Note which drive(s) are failed. If two drives have failed, you must determine whether the
two failed drives are on the same span (Span: 0, or Span:1).
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If you have determined that there is only one failed media drive, you must remove and
replace the media drive(s) in the AirSpeed 5000 chassis.
For more information, see “Removing and Replacing Media Drives (4-Channel
Models)” on page 10.
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If you have determined that there is more than one failed media drive, and they are on
different spans (e.g., one failed drive on Span: 0, and one failed drive on Span: 1), you
must remove and replace the media drive(s) in the AirSpeed 5000 chassis.
For more information, see “Removing and Replacing Media Drives (4-Channel
Models)” on page 10.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
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If you have determined that there are two or more failed media drives, and they are on
the same span (two failed drives on Span: 0, or Span: 1), you will lose your media, and
need to re-RAID all of your media drives from scratch. For more information on how to
do that, see “Re-RAIDing Media Drives from Scratch (4-Channel Model Servers)” on
page 15.
Removing and Replacing Media Drives (4-Channel Models)
This procedure contains all of the necessary steps for successfully removing and replacing drives
from the AirSpeed 5000 four (4) channel model server chassis only.
All four (4) channel AirSpeed 5000 servers RAID allows for a single media drive failure during
operation. Once a media drive has been identified as failed and removed, it can be replaced with
a backup drive and the rebuild process begun.
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For single media drive failures, the rebuild process can occur during online use, if required.
Online rebuild is supported for all SD formats and HD formats with the following limitations:
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•
DNx185/220 formats are not supported for online rebuild.
•
FTP transfers might have an impact on system performance during rebuild and should not be
enabled during an online rebuild process
•
Do not perform an online rebuild for 2-channel model servers. Online rebuild is only
supported on 4-channel model servers.
•
Online rebuild is only supported when performing a single media drive replacement.
Before you begin this procedure, you should make sure you have one or more spare media
drives available. If not, you must obtain replacement drives before proceeding. For more
information on ordering spare drives, see “Spares List” on page 84.
To remove and replace media drives:
1. Obtain replacement media drives.
2. Locate the data drive(s) on the front of the AirSpeed 5000 that has both the blue and red
LEDs on solid.
3. Remove the drives from the chassis by pushing the button, then pull the handle to unlatch the
drive and slide the drive carrier out of the Avid AirSpeed 5000.
4. Unscrew the old drive from the carrier, noting the holes used for each screw on the carrier.
5. Fasten the new drive into the carrier making sure to line up the four (4) screws with the
correct holes in the carrier.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
6. Push the drive carrier latch in, to release the handle and pull the handle completely open
prior to inserting the drive carrier into the open slot.
7. Make sure the drive LEDs are on the bottom before you begin to slide the drive into the
server.
Drive carrier latch Drive lock
Fault LED (red)
Power/Activity LED (blue)
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Do not force a drive into a slot. If you are having problems installing a drive, check to make
sure it is level and flat as you insert it into the server, that the drive carrier latch is open and
at a 45 degree angle to the drive carrier, and that the LEDs are on the bottom of the drive
carrier.
8. Slide the drive into the open drive slot in the Avid AirSpeed 5000 server until it stops.
Approximately 1/2 inch of the drive carrier should be outside the server.
9. Push the handle into the drive carrier. This seats the drive in the Avid AirSpeed 5000. You’ll
hear a click when the drive is fully seated and the handle latches in place.
10. Select Start > All Programs > MegaRAID Storage Manager > StartupUI.
11. Click on the IP address URL link in the IP Address column for the AirSpeed 5000 server.
The User Name and Password dialog box opens.
12. Log in using the Administrator name amsuser, and password is-admin.
Make sure the Login Mode is set to Full Access.
13. Click OK.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
14. Click the Logical tab to confirm the location of the failed drive(s), and if more than one
drive is failed, confirm that two failed drives are not in the same span, and that the new
drives you inserted appear in the Unconfigured Drives tree.
In the following example, note the following:
-
In the Drives tree, Span 0: has one failed drive (Slot 03).
-
In the Unconfigured Drives tree, the drives in Slot 03 appear there. This means that it is
an un-configured media drive, and it is on Span: 0.
12
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
15. On your system, note which drive(s) are failed. If two drives have failed, you must determine
whether the two failed drives are on the same span (Span: 0, or Span:1), or on different
spans.
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If you have determined that there is only one failed media drive, you must get the media
drive(s) online in the LSI MegaRAID Storage Manager. Go to Step 16.
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If you have determined that there are two or more failed media drives, and they are on
different spans (e.g., one failed drive on Span: 0, and one failed drive on Span: 1), you
must get the media drives online in the LSI MegaRAID Storage Manager. Go to Step 16.
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If you have determined that there are two or more failed media drives, and they are on
the same span (two failed drives on Span: 0, or Span: 1), you will lose your media, and
need to re-RAID all of your media drives from scratch. For more information on how to
re-RAID your media drives, see “Re-RAIDing Media Drives from Scratch (4-Channel
Model Servers)” on page 15.
16. In the Drives folder, right-click a drive that has failed or is bad, and select Replace Physical
Drive.
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If the failed, bad, or missing drive has already been removed, it will not appear in the Span
within the Drives folder.
13
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
17. In the Unconfigured Drives folder, do the following:
a.
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Right-click on the unconfigured drive, and select Change to Unconfigured Good.
Depending on the failure scenario, the status for the drive might already be set to Unconfigured
Good.
b.
Right-click on the un-configured drive again, and select Replace Missing Drive.
The LED for the drive flashes and can be seen on the front of the Avid AirSpeed 5000. A
dialog box opens showing the drive location.
18. Note the drive location and number, and click OK.
19. Right-click on the failed drive in the Unconfigured Good tree, and select Start Rebuild.
The MegaRAID Storage Manager dialog box opens.
20. Click Confirm, and then click Yes.
The drive will now display as “Rebuild”.
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It takes approximately six hours to rebuild a drive on an idle system. Rebuild times vary based on
the amount of disk bandwidth in use during the rebuild.
21. If you want to view the Rebuild progress, select Manage > Show Progress.
The Group Show Progress dialog box opens. Click OK to close the box when you are done.
22. (Option) If you had two failed drives (on different spans), repeat Steps 8-13 for the other
failed media drive.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
Re-RAIDing Media Drives from Scratch (4-Channel Model Servers)
This topic contains information on how to re-RAID your media drives in the event that two or
more media drives from the same array have failed.
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Before you perform this procedure, you must take your system off air, as the media disk
replacement process can cause possible problems with video playout. Depending on the
amount of data, as well as the activity in the disk array, the task of replacing a drive can
take a considerable amount of time.
This procedure creates a new RAID50 drive group on the AirSpeed 5000 server.
Before you begin this procedure, you must have already removed the physical media drives from
the chassis and replaced them with new drives, as described in Steps 1-7 of the topic “Removing
and Replacing Media Drives (4-Channel Models)” on page 10.
To re-RAID Media Drives from scratch:
1. On the AirSpeed 5000 server, right click on Computer, and select Manage.
The Computer Management dialog box opens.
2. In the Storage folder, select Disk Management.
The Disk Management window opens.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
3. Right-click on the (E:) partition in Disk 1, and select Delete Volume from the menu.
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If Disk 2 also appears, right-click on the (F:) partition in Disk 2, and select Delete Volume from
the menu.
The Disk Management dialog box should appear as in the following example.
4. Once you have verified that you have deleted the existing volumes, you can close the Disk
Management window, and go to the next step.
5. Start the MegaRAID Storage Manager by selecting Start > All Programs > MegaRAID
Storage Manager > StartupUI, or select the MegaRAID Storage Manager desktop icon.
The MegaRAID Storage Manager - Host View dialog box opens.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
6. Select the IP address of the AirSpeed 5000 server in the IP Address field.
The Enter User Name & Password dialog box opens.
7. Type the local machine login credentials.
a.
In the User Name field, type amsuser.
b.
In the Password field, type is-admin.
c.
Click Login.
The LSI MegaRAID Storage Manager application opens.
8. Click the Logical tab to confirm that the failed drives are in the same Span, and that the new
drives you inserted appear in the Unconfigured Drives tree.
In the following example, note the following:
-
In the Drives tree, Span 0: has two failed drives (Slot 11, and Slot 12).
-
In the Unconfigured Drives tree, notice that the drives in Slot 11 and Slot 12 appear
there as “Unconfigured Good”. This indicates that they are new un-configured media
drives.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
9. Clear the existing configuration by doing the following:
a.
Right-click on the LSI MegaRAID SAS.
b.
Select the Clear Configuration option from the list
The Confirm Clear Configuration dialog box opens.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
10. Select the Confirm check box, and click Yes to clear the existing configuration.
After the existing configuration is cleared, all of the drives that were in the Span: 0, and
Span:1 trees should now appear in the Unconfigured Drives tree as “Unconfigured Good”.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
11. Right-click the LSI MegaRAID SAS again, and select Create Virtual Drive.
The Create Virtual Drive - Choose mode dialog box opens.
12. Select the Advanced radio button, and click Next.
The Create Drive Group - Drive Group Settings dialog box opens.
13. Select the Drive group settings by doing the following:
a.
In the RAID level field, select RAID 50 - Spanned Drive Group.
b.
Select five drives by pressing Ctrl and clicking on the five drives.
The Add > button becomes enabled.
c.
Click the Add > button to add the five drives to Span: 0 in the Drive Group0 tree.
d. Create a new Span by clicking the Create Span button.
It will generate Span: 1 at the bottom of the Drive groups field.
e.
Select the remaining five drives by pressing Ctrl and clicking on the remaining five
drives.
f.
Click the Add > button to add them to Span: 1.
g. Click the Create Drive Group button.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
h. Click the Next button.
The Create Virtual Drive - Virtual drive settings dialog opens.
14. You need to create two virtual drives. To create the first virtual drive, do the following:
a.
In the Virtual drive name field, make sure it says VD_0.
b.
In the Units field, select MB.
c.
In the Capacity field, type 100.
d. In the Initialization state field, select No Initialization.
e.
In the Strip(e) size field, select 512 KB.
f.
In the “Read policy” field, select No Read Ahead.
g. In the “Write policy” field, select Write Through.
h. In the I/O Policy field, select Direct I/O.
i.
In the Access policy field, select Read Write.
j.
In the Disk Cache Policy, select Disabled.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
15. Click the Create Virtual Drive button.
The Write Through Selected dialog box opens.
16. Click Yes to confirm the changes for Write Policy settings.
17. Click the Next button.
The Create Virtual Drive - Summary dialog box opens.
18. Review the summary for the settings to create the virtual drive VD_0.
19. Click Finish to finish creating the virtual drive VD_0 100.000 MB.
A message saying “The virtual drive(s) successfully created” opens.
20. Click OK.
The following is an example of what the Logical tab looks like. At the top of the screen is the
first virtual drive 0 (VD_0, 100.000 MB). At the bottom is the un-configured free drive
space.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
21. To create the second virtual drive, right-click the LSI MegaRAID SAS again, and select
Create Virtual Drive.
The Create Virtual Drive - Choose mode dialog box opens.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
22. Select the Advanced radio button, and click Next.
The Create Virtual Drive - Allocate Capacity dialog box opens, asking if you want to use the
remaining free capacity on the existing drive group.
23. Click Next to accept.
The Virtual Drives settings dialog box opens.
24. In the Virtual drive settings dialog box, do the following:
a.
In the Virtual drive name field, make sure it says VD_1.
b.
In the Capacity field, leave the default of 7.273.
c.
In the Initialization state field, select No Initialization.
d. In the Units field, leave the default of TB.
e.
In the Strip(e) size field, select 512 KB.
f.
In the “Read Policy, select Always Read Ahead.
g. In the “Write policy” field, select Always Write Back.
h. In the I/O Policy field, select Direct I/O.
i.
In the Access policy field, select Read Write.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
j.
In the Disk Cache Policy field, select Disabled.
k. Click the Create Virtual Drive button.
The Always Write Back Selected dialog box opens.
l.
Click Yes to confirm the changes for the write policy setting.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
m. Click the Next Button.
The Create Virtual Drive - Summary dialog box opens.
25. Review the summary for the settings you selected to create the virtual drives. Make sure the
settings are correct before you create the virtual drive.
26. Once you have confirmed your settings are correct, click the Finish button to create the
virtual drive.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
27. When you are done, the Logical Tab should appear as it does in the following example:
After the configuration, the system might go to “initializing mode”. This takes about 6 or 7
hours to initialize a single disk, and 12 to 14 hours for two disks.
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To view your progress, select Manage > Show Progress.
28. In Windows, do the following:
a.
Right-click on Computer, and select Manage.
The Computer Management dialog box opens.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
b.
In the Storage tree, select Disk Management.
The Initialize Disk dialog box opens.
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If the Initialize Disk dialog box does not appear, you need to go to the diskpart utility to clean the
previous configuration on Disk 1, by doing the following:
-
Select Start > Run.
-
Type diskpart, and press Enter. The Diskpart command window will open.
-
Type list disk, and press Enter.
-
At the DISKPART prompt, type select disk 1, and press Enter. The message “Disk 1 is
now the selected disk” appears.
-
When disk 1 is selected, type clean, and press Enter. The message “DiskPart succeeded
in cleaning the disk.” appears.
-
Select Computer Management > Disk Management, right click on Disk 1, and select
Initialize. The Initialize Disk dialog box will open.
29. In the Initialize Disk dialog box, do the following:
a.
Uncheck Disk 2 (but leave Disk 1 checked)
b.
Select the MBR (Master Boot Record) option.
c.
Click OK.
30. Select Computer Management > Storage > Disk Management, right click on Disk 1, and
select New Simple Volume.
31. Click Next on the volume wizard screen.
The Volume Size dialog box opens. It should show 97 MB for the volume size.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
32. Click Next.
33. Check the “Do not assign a drive letter or drive path” option and click Next.
The Format Partition dialog box opens.
34. In the Format Partition dialog box, select the “Do not format this volume” option.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
35. Click Next and then click Finish.
The partition should now show as RAW, Healthy, (Primary Partition).
36. Close the Computer management window and then reopen it.
37. In Windows, do the following:
a.
Right-click on Computer, and select Manage.
The Computer Management dialog box opens.
b.
In the Storage tree, select Disk Management.
The Initialize Disk dialog box opens.
38. In the Initialize Disk dialog box, do the following:
a.
Select Disk 2 (but leave Disk 1 unchecked)
b.
Select the GPT (GUID Partition Table) option.
c.
Click OK.
39. In Computer Management > Storage > Disk Management, right click on the new
Unallocated Drive space for Disk 2, and select New Simple Volume.
40. Click Next on the volume wizard screen.
The Volume Size dialog box opens. It should show 7626522 MB for the volume size.
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Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
41. Click Next.
The Assign Drive Letter or Path dialog box opens.
42. In the “Assign the following drive letter” field, make sure the drive letter is set to “E” and
click Next.
The Format Partition dialog box opens.
31
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
43. In the Format Partition dialog box, do the following:
a.
Select the “Format this volume with the following settings” option.
b.
Set the Allocation unit size to 64K.
c.
Change the Volume label to Media.
d. Make sure the “Perform a quick format” check box is selected.
e.
Click Next.
44. Click Finish.
After the format is complete, the drive should show Healthy (Primary Partition).
45. Right-click on the Disk 2 drive icon, and select Convert to Dynamic Disk from the list.
The Convert to Dynamic Disk dialog box opens.
46. Make sure only Disk 2 is selected (checked), and click OK.
32
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
A Confirmation dialog box opens.
47. Click Convert on the Confirmation dialog box.
A Warning message dialog box opens.
48. Click “Yes” on the Warning message dialog box.
The following is an example of how the window should appear when you are done.
49. Close the Disk Manager.
50. Reboot the system.
You are now done creating the new media drives.
33
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
Identifying Failed Media Drives (2-Channel Models)
This topic contains information on how to identify that your AirSpeed 5000 two (2) channel
model server has one or more failed media drives.
n
For a list of media drive LED meanings, see “AirSpeed 5000 Front Panel” in the AirSpeed 5000
Setup Guide.
To identify failed media drives:
1. Determine if you have a failed media drive by doing the following:
c
a.
View the Drive status in the Health Monitor. On your AirSpeed 5000 server, select Start
> All Programs > Avid > Avid Framework > Avid Health Monitor. Then, select
Avid AirSpeed 5000 - Integration Service (for the AirSpeed 5000 server). In the Base
Board category, the Media Drive RAID Status field would have a RED X, and would
say “STATE_DEGRADED”.
b.
View the LEDs on the front of the AirSpeed 5000 server. A solid red LED on the front
of the drive indicates that the media drive has failed. If it’s flashing RED, the drive could
be rebuilding the data. However, if it is solid RED, you need to replace that media drive.
In the event of a failed media drive, it is very important that you replace the failed media
drive as soon as possible.
2. Note which drive(s) are failed.
t
If you have determined that there is only one failed media drive, you must remove and
replace the media drive(s) in the AirSpeed 5000 chassis.
For more information, see “Removing and Replacing Media Drives (2-Channel
Models)” on page 35.
t
If you have determined that there are two or more failed media drives, you will lose your
media, and need to re-RAID all of your media drives from scratch. For more
information on how to do that, see “Re-RAIDing Media Drives from Scratch
(2-Channel Model Servers)” on page 38.
34
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
Removing and Replacing Media Drives (2-Channel Models)
When a single media drive fails, you must remove and replace the media drive in the AirSpeed
5000 chassis. To identify which drive has failed, locate the media drive on the front of the server
that has both the blue and red LEDs on solid. Once you have identified the failed media drive,
you can remove it, and replace it with a new media drive.
c
Before you perform this procedure, you must take your system off air, as the media disk
replacement process can cause possible problems with video playout. Depending on the
amount of data, as well as the activity in the disk array, the task of replacing a drive can
take a considerable amount of time.
This procedure contains all of the necessary steps for successfully removing and replacing drives
from the AirSpeed 5000 two (2) channel model server chassis only.
c
Before you begin this procedure, you should make sure you have one or more spare media
drive available. If not, you must obtain replacement drives before proceeding. For more
information on ordering spare drives, see “Spares List” on page 84.
To remove and replace media drives:
1. Obtain replacement media drives.
2. Locate the data drive on the front of the AirSpeed 5000 that has both the blue and red LEDs
on solid.
3. Remove the drive from the chassis by pushing the button, then pull the handle to unlatch the
drive and slide the drive carrier out of the Avid AirSpeed 5000.
4. Unscrew the old drive from the carrier, noting the holes used for each screw on the carrier.
5. Fasten the new drive into the carrier making sure to line up the four (4) screws with the
correct holes in the carrier.
6. Push the drive carrier latch in, to release the handle and pull the handle completely open
prior to inserting the drive carrier into the open slot.
7. Make sure the drive LEDs are on the bottom before you begin to slide the drive into the
server.
Drive carrier latch Drive lock
Fault LED (red)
Power/Activity LED (blue)
35
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
c
Do not force a drive into a slot. If you are having problems installing a drive, check to make
sure it is level and flat as you insert it into the server, that the drive carrier latch is open and
at a 45 degree angle to the drive carrier, and that the LEDs are on the bottom of the drive
carrier.
8. Slide the drive into the open drive slot in the Avid AirSpeed 5000 server until it stops.
Approximately 1/2 inch of the drive carrier should be outside the server.
9. Push the handle into the drive carrier. This seats the drive in the Avid AirSpeed 5000. You’ll
hear a click when the drive is fully seated and the handle latches in place.
10. Select Start > All Programs > MegaRAID Storage Manager > StartupUI.
11. Click on the IP address URL link in the IP Address column for the AirSpeed 5000 server.
The User Name and Password dialog box opens.
12. Log in using the Administrator name amsuser, and password of is-admin.
Make sure the Login Mode is set to Full Access.
13. Click OK.
14. Click the Logical tab to confirm the location of the failed drive.
In the following example, note the following:
-
In the Drives tree, note the failed drive (Slot 07) is missing.
-
In the Unconfigured Drives tree, the drive in Slot 07 appears there. This means that it is
an un-configured media drive.
36
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
15. In the Drives folder, right-click on the drive that has failed or is bad, and select Replace
Missing Drive.
n
If the failed, bad, or missing drive has already been removed, it will not appear in the Drives
folder.
16. In the Unconfigured Drives folder, do the following:
a.
n
Right-click on the un-configured drive, and select Change to Unconfigured Good.
Depending on the failure scenario, the status for the drive might already be set to Unconfigured
Good.
b.
Right-click on the un-configured drive again, and select Replace Missing Drive.
The LED for the drive flashes and can be seen on the front of the Avid AirSpeed 5000. A
dialog box opens showing the drive location.
17. Note the drive location and number, and click OK.
18. Right-click on the failed drive in the Unconfigured Good tree, and select Start Rebuild.
The MegaRAID Storage Manager dialog box opens.
19. Click Confirm, and then click Yes.
The drive will now display as “Rebuild”.
n
It takes approximately six hours to rebuild a drive.
20. If you want to view the Rebuild progress, select Manage > Show Progress.
37
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
The Group Show Progress dialog box opens. Click OK to close the box when you are done.
Re-RAIDing Media Drives from Scratch (2-Channel Model Servers)
This topic contains information on how to re-RAID media drives for two (2) channel model
servers in the event that two or more media drives have failed.
c
Before you perform this procedure, you must take your system off air, as the media disk
replacement process can cause possible problems with video playout. Depending on the
amount of data, as well as the activity in the disk array, the task of replacing a drive can
take a considerable amount of time.
This procedure creates a new RAID 5 drive group on the AirSpeed 5000 server.
Before you begin this procedure, you must have already removed the physical media drives from
the chassis and replaced them with new drives, as described in Steps 1-7 of the topic “Removing
and Replacing Media Drives (4-Channel Models)” on page 10.
To re-RAID Media Drives from scratch:
1. On the AirSpeed 5000 server, right click on Computer, and select Manage.
The Computer Management dialog box opens.
2. In the Storage folder, select Disk Management.
The Disk Management window opens.
38
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
3. Right-click on the (E:) partition in Disk 1, and select Delete Volume from the menu.
n
If Disk 2 also appears, right-click on the (F:) partition in Disk 2, and select Delete Volume from
the menu.
The Disk Management dialog box should appear as in the following example.
4. Once you have verified that you have deleted the existing volumes, you can close the Disk
Management window, and go to the next step.
5. Start the MegaRAID Storage Manager by selecting Start > All Programs > MegaRAID
Storage Manager > StartupUI, or select the MegaRAID Storage Manager desktop icon.
The MegaRAID Storage Manager - Host View dialog box opens.
6. Select the IP address of the AirSpeed 5000 server in the IP Address field.
39
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
The Enter User Name & Password dialog box opens.
7. Type the local machine login credentials.
a.
In the User Name field, type amsuser.
b.
In the Password field, type is-admin.
c.
Click Login.
The LSI MegaRAID Storage Manager application opens.
8. Click the Logical tab to confirm that the new drives you inserted appear in the Unconfigured
Drives tree.
In the following example, note the following:
-
In the Drives tree, the failed drives (Slot: 4, and Slot: 7) are missing.
-
In the Unconfigured Drives tree, notice that the drives in Slot 4: and Slot: 7 appear there
as “Unconfigured Good”. This indicates that they are new un-configured media drives.
40
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
9. Clear the existing configuration by doing the following:
a.
Right-click on the LSI MegaRAID SAS.
b.
Select the Clear Configuration option from the list.
The Confirm Clear Configuration dialog box opens.
10. Select the Confirm check box, and click Yes to clear the existing configuration.
After the existing configuration is cleared, all of the drives should now appear in the
Unconfigured Drives tree as “Unconfigured Good”.
41
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
11. Right-click the LSI MegaRAID SAS again, and select Create Virtual Drive.
The Create Virtual Drive - Choose mode dialog box opens.
12. Select the Advanced radio button, and click Next.
The Create Drive Group - Drive Group Settings dialog box opens.
13. Select the Drive group settings by doing the following:
a.
In the RAID level field, select RAID 5.
b.
Select five drives by pressing Ctrl and clicking on the five drives.
The Add > button becomes enabled.
c.
Click the Add > button to add the five drives to the Drive Group0 tree.
d. Click the Create Drive Group button.
42
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
e.
Click the Next button.
The Create Virtual Drive - Virtual drive settings dialog opens.
14. You need to create two virtual drives. To create the first virtual drive, do the following:
a.
In the Virtual drive name field, make sure it says VD_0.
b.
In the Units field, select MB.
c.
In the Capacity field, type 100.
d. In the Initialization state field, select No Initialization.
e.
In the Strip(e) size field, select 512 KB.
f.
In the “Read policy” field, select No Read Ahead.
g. In the “Write policy” field, select Write Through.
h. In the I/O Policy field, select Direct I/O.
i.
In the Access policy field, select Read Write.
j.
In the Disk Cache Policy, select Disabled.
15. Click the Create Virtual Drive button.
43
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
The Write Through Selected dialog box opens.
16. Click Yes to confirm the changes for Write Policy settings.
17. Click the Next button.
The Create Virtual Drive - Summary dialog box opens.
18. Review the summary for the settings to create the virtual drive VD_0.
19. Click Finish to finish creating the virtual drive VD_0 100.000 MB.
A message saying “The virtual drive(s) successfully created” opens.
20. Click OK.
The following is an example of what the Logical tab looks like. At the top of the screen is the
first virtual drive 0 (VD_0, 100.000 MB). At the bottom is the un-configured free drive
space.
21. To create the second virtual drive, right-click the LSI MegaRAID SAS again, and select
Create Virtual Drive.
The Create Virtual Drive - Choose mode dialog box opens.
44
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
22. Select the Advanced radio button, and click Next.
The Create Virtual Drive - Allocate Capacity dialog box opens, asking if you want to use the
remaining free capacity on the existing drive group.
23. Click Next to accept.
The Virtual Drives settings dialog box opens.
24. In the Virtual drives settings dialog box, do the following:
a.
In the Virtual drive name field, make sure it says VD_1.
b.
In the Capacity field, leave the default of 3.637.
c.
In the Initialization state field, select No Initialization.
d. In the Units field, leave the default of TB.
e.
In the Strip(e) size field, select 512 KB.
f.
In the “Read Policy, select Always Read Ahead.
g. In the “Write policy” field, select Always Write Back.
h. In the I/O Policy field, select Direct I/O.
i.
In the Access policy field, select Read Write.
45
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
j.
In the Disk Cache Policy field, select Disabled.
k. Click the Create Virtual Drive button.
The Always Write Back Selected dialog box opens.
l.
Click Yes to confirm the changes for the write policy setting.
46
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
m. Click the Next Button.
The Create Virtual Drive - Summary dialog box opens.
25. Review the summary for the settings you selected to create the virtual drives. Make sure the
settings are correct before you create the virtual drive.
26. Once you have confirmed your settings are correct, click the Finish button to create the
virtual drive.
27. When you are done, the Logical Tab should appear as it does in the following example:
47
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
After the configuration, the system might go to “initializing mode”. This takes about 6 or 7
hours.
n
To view your progress, select Manage > Show Progress.
28. In Windows, do the following:
a.
Right-click on Computer, and select Manage.
The Computer Management dialog box opens.
b.
In the Storage tree, select Disk Management.
The Initialize Disk dialog box opens.
n
If the Initialize Disk dialog box does not appear, you need to go to the diskpart.exe utility to
clean the previous configuration on Disk 1, by doing the following:
-
Select Start > Run.
-
Type diskpart, and press Enter. The Diskpart command window opens.
-
Type list disk, and press Enter.
-
At the DISKPART prompt, type select disk 1, and press Enter. The message “Disk 1 is
now the selected disk” appears.
-
When disk 1 is selected, type clean, and press Enter. The message “DiskPart succeeded
in cleaning the disk.” appears.
-
Select Computer Management > Disk Management, right click on Disk 1, and select
Initialize. The Initialize Disk dialog box will open.
48
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
29. In the Initialize Disk dialog box, do the following:
a.
Uncheck Disk 2 (but leave Disk 1 checked)
b.
Select the MBR (Master Boot Record) option.
c.
Click OK.
30. Select Computer Management > Storage > Disk Management, right click on Disk 1, and
select New Simple Volume.
31. Click Next on the volume wizard screen.
The Volume Size dialog box opens. It should show 97 MB for the volume size.
32. Click Next.
49
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
33. Check the “Do not assign a drive letter or drive path” option and click Next.
The Format Partition dialog box opens.
34. In the Format Partition dialog box, select the “Do not format this volume” option.
35. Click Next and then click Finish.
The partition should now show as RAW, Healthy, (Primary Partition).
36. Close the Computer management window and then reopen it.
50
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
37. In Windows, do the following:
a.
Right-click on Computer, and select Manage.
The Computer Management dialog box opens.
b.
In the Storage tree, select Disk Management.
The Initialize Disk dialog box opens.
38. In the Initialize Disk dialog box, do the following:
a.
Select Disk 2 (but leave Disk 1 unchecked)
b.
Select the GPT (GUID Partition Table) option.
c.
Click OK.
39. In Computer Management > Storage > Disk Management, right click on the new
Unallocated Drive space for Disk 2, and select New Simple Volume.
40. Click Next on the volume wizard screen.
The Volume Size dialog box opens. It should show 363711 MB for the volume size.
51
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
41. Click Next.
The Assign Drive Letter or Path dialog box opens.
42. In the “Assign the following drive letter” field, make sure the drive letter is set to “E” and
click Next.
The Format Partition dialog box opens.
52
Identifying and Replacing Failed Media Drives
43. In the Format Partition dialog box, do the following:
a.
Select the “Format this volume with the following settings” option.
b.
Set the Allocation unit size to 64K.
c.
Change the Volume label to Media.
d. Make sure the “Perform a quick format” check box is selected.
e.
Click Next.
44. Click Finish.
After the format is complete, the drive should show Healthy (Primary Partition).
45. Right-click on the Disk 2 drive icon, and select Convert to Dynamic Disk from the list.
The Convert to Dynamic Disk dialog box opens.
46. Make sure only Disk 2 is selected (checked), and click OK.
A Confirmation dialog box opens.
47. Click Convert on the Confirmation dialog box.
A Warning message dialog box opens.
53
Contacting Customer Support
48. Click “Yes” on the Warning message dialog box.
The following is an example of how the window should appear when you are done.
49. Close the Disk Manager.
50. Reboot the system.
You are now done creating the new media drives.
Contacting Customer Support
If you experience any of these behaviors, and cannot recover using the recommended steps
outlined in “Identifying Media Drive Failures” on page 4you should contact Customer Support at
www.avid.com/csportal.
Before you call Customer Support, you need to obtain as many of the following items as
available to you for the AirSpeed 5000 server that is exhibiting media drive problems:
•
System ID
•
any Activation IDs
•
Device ID
54
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This product is subject to the terms and conditions of a software license agreement provided with the software. The product may
only be used in accordance with the license agreement.
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No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including
photocopying and recording, for any purpose without the express written permission of Avid Technology, Inc.
Copyright © 2013 Avid Technology, Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved.
Portions of this product were created using LEADTOOLS © 1991-2002, LEAD Technologies, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Portions of this product are licensed under US patent 5,327,254 and foreign counterparts.
Portions Copyright 2003-2007 of MOG Solutions.
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License Agreement, pursuant to FAR §12.212(a) and/or DFARS §227.7202-1(a), as applicable.
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Avid AirSpeed 5000 Media Drive Failure Analysis and Recovery • 9390-65168-00 Rev A • May 2013 • 5/16/13
56
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