Documentation for CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded

Documentation for
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CX8050: CANopen-Master oder CAN-Master CX8051:
CANopen-Slave
Version:
Date:
1.3
2017-04-18
Table of contents
Table of contents
1 Notes on the documentation .................................................................................................................... 5
1.1
Explanation of symbols................................................................................................................... 6
1.2
Documentation issue status............................................................................................................ 7
2 For your safety........................................................................................................................................... 8
2.1
Intended use ................................................................................................................................... 8
2.2
Staff qualification ............................................................................................................................ 9
2.3
Safety instructions .......................................................................................................................... 9
3 Transport and storage ............................................................................................................................ 11
4 Product overview..................................................................................................................................... 12
4.1
CX80xx - System overview........................................................................................................... 12
4.2
CX8050, CX8051 - Introduction.................................................................................................... 14
4.3
Technical data .............................................................................................................................. 16
4.4
Technical data - CAN.................................................................................................................... 17
4.5
CX80xx - MicroSD cards .............................................................................................................. 18
5 Mounting and wiring ............................................................................................................................... 19
5.1
Mounting ....................................................................................................................................... 19
5.1.1 Dimensions ...................................................................................................................... 19
5.1.2 Installation on mounting rails ........................................................................................... 19
5.2
Wiring............................................................................................................................................ 22
5.2.1 Power supply.................................................................................................................... 22
5.2.2 Ethernet............................................................................................................................ 24
5.2.3 CANopen Cabling ............................................................................................................ 26
5.3
Changing the battery .................................................................................................................... 32
6 Parameterization and commissioning................................................................................................... 33
6.1
DIP switch..................................................................................................................................... 33
6.2
Setting the IP adress .................................................................................................................... 35
6.2.1 IP address ........................................................................................................................ 35
6.2.2 Setting the address via DHCP server .............................................................................. 35
6.2.3 Subnet mask .................................................................................................................... 35
6.3
Configuration ................................................................................................................................ 37
6.3.1 CX80xx - Operating system ............................................................................................. 37
6.3.2 Power supply terminal...................................................................................................... 39
6.3.3 CAN.................................................................................................................................. 41
6.3.4 Web Services ................................................................................................................... 45
6.3.5 Real Time Clock (RTC) .................................................................................................... 47
6.3.6 1-second UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) ................................................................ 48
6.3.7 CPU load.......................................................................................................................... 49
7 Programming ........................................................................................................................................... 50
7.1
Library for CX80xx ........................................................................................................................ 50
7.2
Seconds UPS ............................................................................................................................... 50
7.2.1 Function blocks ................................................................................................................ 50
7.2.2 Data types ........................................................................................................................ 53
7.3
Diagnostics ................................................................................................................................... 54
7.3.1 FUNCTION F_CX80xx_ADDRESS ................................................................................. 54
7.4
CAN .............................................................................................................................................. 54
7.4.1 Reading the CAN baud rate ............................................................................................. 54
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Table of contents
7.4.2
7.4.3
7.4.4
Sending any CAN message ............................................................................................. 55
CX8050 Master ................................................................................................................ 55
CX8051 Slave .................................................................................................................. 59
8 Ethernet X001 Interface........................................................................................................................... 61
8.1
System introduction ...................................................................................................................... 61
8.1.1 Ethernet............................................................................................................................ 61
8.1.2 Topology example............................................................................................................ 63
8.2
ADS-Communication .................................................................................................................... 64
9 CAN........................................................................................................................................................... 66
9.1
Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 66
9.2
Protocol description ...................................................................................................................... 67
9.2.1 Network Management ...................................................................................................... 67
9.2.2 Process Data Objects (PDO) ........................................................................................... 71
9.2.3 PDO Parameterization ..................................................................................................... 78
9.2.4 Service Data Objects (SDO) ............................................................................................ 80
9.3
Objekt dictionary ........................................................................................................................... 83
9.3.1 Object Directory - Structure.............................................................................................. 83
9.3.2 Object List ........................................................................................................................ 84
9.3.3 Objects and Data ............................................................................................................. 89
10 Error handling and siagosis ................................................................................................................. 130
10.1
LED displays............................................................................................................................... 130
11 Appendix ................................................................................................................................................ 134
4
11.1
First steps ................................................................................................................................... 134
11.2
Image Update ............................................................................................................................. 139
11.3
Certification................................................................................................................................. 141
11.3.1 ATEX.............................................................................................................................. 141
11.3.2 FCC................................................................................................................................ 142
11.3.3 UL................................................................................................................................... 142
11.4
CAN Identifier List....................................................................................................................... 143
11.5
Bibliography ................................................................................................................................ 167
11.6
List of Abbreviations ................................................................................................................... 168
11.7
Support and Service ................................................................................................................... 169
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CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Notes on the documentation
1
Notes on the documentation
This description is only intended for the use of trained specialists in control and automation engineering who
are familiar with the applicable national standards.
It is essential that the documentation and the following notes and explanations are followed when installing
and commissioning the components.
It is the duty of the technical personnel to use the documentation published at the respective time of each
installation and commissioning.
The responsible staff must ensure that the application or use of the products described satisfy all the
requirements for safety, including all the relevant laws, regulations, guidelines and standards.
Disclaimer
The documentation has been prepared with care. The products described are, however, constantly under
development.
We reserve the right to revise and change the documentation at any time and without prior announcement.
No claims for the modification of products that have already been supplied may be made on the basis of the
data, diagrams and descriptions in this documentation.
Trademarks
Beckhoff®, TwinCAT®, EtherCAT®, Safety over EtherCAT®, TwinSAFE®, XFC® and XTS® are registered
trademarks of and licensed by Beckhoff Automation GmbH.
Other designations used in this publication may be trademarks whose use by third parties for their own
purposes could violate the rights of the owners.
Patent Pending
The EtherCAT Technology is covered, including but not limited to the following patent applications and
patents:
EP1590927, EP1789857, DE102004044764, DE102007017835
with corresponding applications or registrations in various other countries.
The TwinCAT Technology is covered, including but not limited to the following patent applications and
patents:
EP0851348, US6167425 with corresponding applications or registrations in various other countries.
EtherCAT® is registered trademark and patented technology, licensed by Beckhoff Automation GmbH,
Germany
Copyright
© Beckhoff Automation GmbH & Co. KG, Germany.
The reproduction, distribution and utilization of this document as well as the communication of its contents to
others without express authorization are prohibited.
Offenders will be held liable for the payment of damages. All rights reserved in the event of the grant of a
patent, utility model or design.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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5
Notes on the documentation
1.1
Explanation of symbols
The following symbols with corresponding warnings or explanatory text are used in the documentation. Read
and follow the warnings.
Symbols that warn of personal injury:
Serious risk of injury
Note this warning. Hazard with high risk of death or serious injury.
DANGER
Risk of injury
Note this warning. Hazard with medium risk of death or serious injury.
WARNING
Personal injuries
Note this warning. Hazard with a low degree of risk, which could lead to minor or moderate
injury.
CAUTION
Symbols that warn of damage to property or equipment:
Damage to the devices or environment
Note this warning. Risk of damage to the environment and equipment.
Attention
Symbols indicating further information or tips:
Tip or pointer
This symbol indicates information that contributes to better understanding.
Note
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Notes on the documentation
1.2
Documentation issue status
Version
0.1
1.0
Comment
• Preliminary version
• Foreword updated
• Chapter 1-second UPS added
1.1
• Chapter Operating System added
• Foreword reworked
• Chapter „For your safety“ added
1.2
1.3
• ATEX warnings added
• Chapter “Transport and storage“ added
• Chapter “FCC” added
CX8050 image version
Firmware
Build 2241
Description
• First version
CX8051 image version
Firmware
Build 2241
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Description
• First version
Version: 1.3
7
For your safety
2
For your safety
Read the chapter on safety and follow the instructions in order to protect from personal injury and damage to
equipment.
Limitation of liability
All the components are supplied in particular hardware and software configurations appropriate for the
application. Unauthorized modifications and changes to the hardware or software configuration, which go
beyond the documented options, are prohibited and nullify the liability of Beckhoff Automation GmbH & Co.
KG.
In addition, the following actions are excluded from the liability of Beckhoff Automation GmbH & Co. KG:
• Failure to comply with this documentation.
• Improper use.
• Untrained personnel.
• Use of unauthorized replacement parts.
2.1
Intended use
The CX80xx Embedded PC is a programmable controller designed for installation on a DIN rail in a control
cabinet or terminal box.
The Embedded PC series is used in conjunction with Bus Terminals for recording digital or analog signals
from sensors and transferring them to actuators or higher-level controllers.
The Embedded PC is designed for a working environment that meets the requirements of protection class IP
20. This involves finger protection and protection against solid foreign objects up to 12.5 mm in size, but not
protection against water. Operation in wet and dusty environments is not permitted, unless specified
otherwise.
The specified limits for electrical and technical data must be adhered to.
Potentially explosive atmospheres
The CX80xx Embedded PC is only suitable for the following potentially explosive atmospheres:
1. For ATEX zone 2 areas in which gas occurs as a flammable substance. ATEX zone 2 means that an
explosive atmosphere does usually not occur during normal operation, or only for a short time.
2. For ATEX zone 22 areas in which dust occurs as a flammable substance. ATEX zone 22 means that
an explosive atmosphere in the form of a cloud does usually not occur during normal operation, or
only for a short time.
The Embedded PC must be installed in a housing, which ensures protection class IP 54 for gas according to
EN 60079-15. A housing with protection class IP 54 is required for non-conductive dust. IP 6X is required for
conductive dust according to EN 60079-31.
Improper use
The Embedded PC is not suitable for operation in the following areas:
• The Embedded PC must not be used in other ATEX zones or without a suitable housing.
• Areas with an aggressive environment, e.g. aggressive gases or chemicals.
• Living areas. In living areas, the relevant standards and guidelines for interference emissions must be
adhered to, and the devices must be installed in housings or control cabinets with suitable shielding.
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For your safety
2.2
Staff qualification
All operations involving Beckhoff software and hardware may only be carried out by qualified personnel with
knowledge of control and automation engineering. The qualified personnel must have knowledge of the
administration of the Embedded PC and the associated network.
All interventions must be carried out with knowledge of control programming, and the qualified personnel
must be familiar with the current standards and guidelines for the automation environment.
2.3
Safety instructions
The following safety instructions must be followed during installation and working with networks and the
software.
Explosion protection
The Embedded PC must be installed in a housing, which ensures protection class IP54 for gas according to
EN 60079-15. A housing with protection class IP54 is required for non-conductive dust. IP6X is required for
conductive dust according to EN 60079-31.
Observe the temperature at the cable entry points into the housing. If the temperature during nominal
operation is higher than 70 °C at the entry points or higher than 80 °C at the wire branching points, cables
that are designed for these higher temperatures and ATEX operation must be used.
Maintain the prescribed ambient temperature during operation. The permissible ambient temperature range
during operation is 0 °C to +55 °C.
Take measures to prevent the rated operating voltage exceeding 119 V through short-term interference
voltages.
Switch off the power supply and ensure that no explosive atmosphere occurs when:
• Bus Terminals are connected or removed,
• the Embedded PC is wired or cables are connected,
• DIP switches or ID switches are set,
• the front flap is opened,
• the MicroSD card or battery is replaced,
• the USB port behind the front flap is used.
Mounting
• Never work on live equipment. Always switch off the power supply for the device before installation,
troubleshooting or maintenance. Protect the device against unintentional switching on.
• Observe the relevant accident prevention regulations for your machine (e.g. the BGV A 3, electrical
systems and equipment).
• Ensure standard-compliant connection and avoid risks to personnel. Ensure that data and supply
cables are laid in a standard-compliant manner and ensure correct pin assignment.
• Observe the relevant EMC guidelines for your application.
• Avoid polarity reversal of the data and supply cables, as this may cause damage to the equipment.
• The devices contain electronic components, which may be destroyed by electrostatic discharge when
touched. Observe the safety precautions against electrostatic discharge according to DIN EN
61340-5-1/-3.
Working with networks
• Limit physical and electronic access to all devices to an authorized group of persons.
• Change the default passwords to reduce the risk of unauthorized access. Regularly change the
passwords.
• Install the devices behind a firewall.
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For your safety
• Apply the IT security precautions according to IEC 62443, in order to limit access to and control of
devices and networks.
Working with the software
• Use up-to-date security software. The safe function of the Embedded PC can be compromised by
malicious software such as viruses or Trojans.
• The sensitivity of an Embedded PC against malicious software increases with the number of installed
and active software.
• Uninstall or disable unnecessary software.
Further information about the safe handling of networks and software can be found in the Beckhoff
Information System:
http://infosys.beckhoff.com
Document name
Documentation about IPC Security
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Transport and storage
3
Transport and storage
Transport
Short circuit due to moisture
Moisture can form during transport in cold weather or in the event of large temperature fluctuations.
Attention
Avoid moisture formation (condensation) in the Embedded PC, and leave it to adjust to
room temperature slowly. If condensation has occurred, wait at least 12 hours before
switching on the Embedded PC.
Despite the robust design of the unit, the components are sensitive to strong vibrations and impacts. During
transport the Embedded PC must be protected from
• mechanical stress and
• use the original packaging.
Table 1: Weight and Dimensions.
Weight
Dimensions (W x H x D)
CX80xx
180 g
64 mm x 100 mm x 73 mm
Storage
• The battery should be removed if the Embedded PC is stored at temperatures above 60 °C. The
battery should be stored separate from the Embedded PC in a dry environment at a temperature
between 0 °C and 30 °C.
The preset date and time are lost if the battery is removed.
• Store the Embedded PC in the original packaging.
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Product overview
4
Product overview
4.1
CX80xx - System overview
CX80xx is a device family of programmable controllers with 32-bit ARM-based CPU, which can be used for
processing of PLC programs or as slave devices for higher-level fieldbus systems. Unlike with the nonprogrammable EtherCAT couplers of the EK series, which only act as gateway between the associated
fieldbus system and the connected EtherCAT terminals, the CX80xx is programmable and able to run its
own control program.
The devices from the CX80xx series represent a further development of the well-known and proven 16-bit
microcontroller-based Bus Terminal Controllers from the BC and BX series including more efficient 32-bit
processors. As with the BC/BX, it is also ensured in the case of the CX80xx that the control and the local
program continue to be executed in the case of interruption of the higher-level fieldbus system. The CX80xx
devices can therefore be used as local controllers. Alternatively, Bus Terminals (K-bus) or EtherCAT
Terminals (E-bus) can be connected; the CX80xx automatically recognizes which terminal system is
connected during the start-up phase. The use of EtherCAT gives rise to further options, such as the
realization of different topologies, the integration of further bus systems such as CANopen, PROFIBUS and
PROFINET and – with the EtherCAT Box Modules – connection to the IP67 world.
Like all CX products, the CX80xx devices are programmed and commissioned via the Ethernet interface,
which can, of course, also be used for connection of the control system with a regular network. Some of the
Embedded PCs have further Ethernet interfaces with switch functions, so that a linear "daisy chain" topology
can be constructed inexpensively, without additional hardware. The other connections on the lower plug level
are fieldbus-specific. Under the cover at the upper housing level there is an exchangeable button cell for
date and time, a set of DIP switches for setting function modes, a slot for Micro-SD Flash memory cards and
a type B USB connection. Thanks to their low power consumption, the devices are fanless.
Microsoft Windows CE is used as the operating system. In the absence of a monitor port, the operating
system and its "virtual" display can only be accessed via the network. As for all other Beckhoff devices, the
TwinCAT software is used for system configuration and the programming of the PLC functionality. The
CX80xx target device features a pre-installed TwinCAT PLC runtime environment. All software required for
operating the device, including the operating system, the TwinCAT files and user files and data, is stored on
the MicroSD Flash card. This simplifies exchange in the case of service. Commercial card readers can be
used to access the card data. The size of the MicroSD Flash card (e.g. 512 MB) can be chosen depending
on the application and the quantity of data to be stored.
The CX80xx device family features an integrated, capacitive 1-second UPS, which in the event of a failure of
the supply voltage provides sufficient energy for saving persistent data. Important data are thus preserved in
a non-volatile manner without battery backup.
With a high-performance but nevertheless energy-saving 32-bit ARM processor, EtherCAT as I/O bus and
TwinCAT PLC with extensive PLC libraries, the Embedded Controllers from the CX80xx series represent
high-performance and versatile controllers with slave fieldbus connection.
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Product overview
Fieldbus interface
The variants from the CX80xx series differ by their fieldbus interfaces. Various versions cover the most
important fieldbus systems:
• CX8010: EtherCATSlave
• CX8030: PROFIBUS DP Master
CX8031: PROFIBUS DP Slave
• CX8050: CAN Master
CX8051: CANopen Slave
• CX8080: RS232/485
• CX8090: Ethernet (RT-Ethernet, EAP, ModbusTCP, TCP/IP, UDP/IP, Web Services)
• CX8091: BACnet IP/OPC UA
• CX8093: PROFINET RT Device (Slave)
• CX8095: Ethernet/IP Slave
• CX8097: Sercos III Slave
Programming
The CX80xx controller is programmed according to the high-performance IEC 61131-3 standard. As with all
other Beckhoff controllers, the TwinCAT automation software is the basis for parameterization and
programming. Users therefore have the familiar TwinCAT tools available, e.g. PLC programming interface,
System Manager and TwinCAT Scope.
Configuration
The configuration is also carried out using TwinCAT. The fieldbus interface and the real-time clock can be
configured and parameterized via the System Manager. The System Manager can read all connected
devices and Bus Terminals. The configuration is stored on the CX after the parameterization. The
configuration thus created can be accessed again later.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
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Product overview
4.2
CX8050, CX8051 - Introduction
In the basic version the CX80xx contains a 512 MB MicroSD Card. A fieldbus interface, an Ethernet interface
and a K-bus or E-bus interface are included as standard.
The smallest task time to be used is 1 ms (a task time of 10 ms to 50 ms is recommended for the I/O data,
further tasks can also be set slower). When using short cycle times, the total system utilization rate is to be
observed. If too short a cycle time is selected, the Web visualization and remote desktop may operate very
slowly or cause timeouts. The user is responsible for projecting and configuring his system such that it is not
overloaded.
CX8050
The CX8050 is a controller with a CANopen master interface. Apart from functioning as a CANopen master,
CAN-Layer-2 communication is alternatively also possible. Alternatively K-bus or E-bus terminals can be
series-connected; the CX8050 automatically detects which system is connected during the start-up phase.
The controller is programmed via the Ethernet interface.
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Product overview
CX8051
The CX8051 is a control system with CANopen slave interface. The CANopen address is set via two rotary
selection switches. The CX8051 offers automatic baud rate detection. Alternatively K-bus or E-bus terminals
can be series-connected; the CX8051 automatically detects which system is connected during the start-up
phase. The controller is programmed via the Ethernet interface.
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Product overview
4.3
Technical data
Technical data
Processor
Internal main memory
Operating system
Web-based Management
Flash memory
Interfaces
Protocols
Interface for I/O terminals
Process data on the K-Bus
Diagnostics LED
Clock
Operating system
Control software
Programming
Programming languages
Online Change
Up/download code
Power supply
UPS
Power supply for I/O terminals (Kbus or E-bus)
Power contact current load
Max. power loss
Dielectric strength
Dimensions (W x H x D)
Weight
Permissible ambient temperature
during operation
Permissible ambient temperature
during storage
Installation position
Relative humidity
Vibration / shock resistance
EMC immunity/emission
Protection class
16
CX8050
CX8051
32 bit, 400 MHz, ARM9
64 MB RAM (internal, not extendable)
Microsoft Windows CE 6.0
yes
MicroSD card (ATP) 512 MB (optionally 1, 2, 4 GB)
1 x USB device (behind the front flap)
1 x RJ45 Ethernet, 10/100 MBit/s (ADS over TCP/IP)
1 x D-sub RS485 CAN
CANopen master or CAN master
CANopen slave
K-bus or E-bus, automatic recognition
max. 2 KB input data
max. 2 KB output data
1 x power, 1 x TC status, 2 x bus status
internal battery-backed clock (RTC) for time and date (battery
exchangeable)
Microsoft Windows CE
TwinCAT PLC runtime (from version 2.11 R3)
TwinCAT PLC
IEC 61131-3
Yes
Yes/Yes
24 VDC (-15 %/+20 %)
1-second UPS
max. 2 A
max. 10 A
3.0 W (including system interfaces)
500 V (supply / internal electronics)
64 mm x 100 mm x 73 mm
approx. 180 g
0° C ... +55° C
-25° C ... +85° C
see notes under: Transport and storage [} 11]
See chapter Installation positions
95 % no condensation
Conforms to EN 60068-2-6 / EN 60068-2-27
Conforms to EN 61000-6-2 / EN 61000-6-4
IP20
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Product overview
4.4
Technical data - CAN
CX8050
Technical data - CANopen
Fieldbus
Data transfer rate
Bus interface
Bus devices
max. process image
Autobaud
Galvanic isolation
Protokoll
CANopen Slave
CAN (virtual slave)
ADS Interface
Services
CAN Layer 2
CAN 2.0A
CAN 2.0B
Diagnosis/Status/Alarm
TC LED
BF LED
DIA LED
diagnostic notice
CX8050
CANopen
10, 20, 50, 100, 125, 250, 500, 800, 1.000 kBaud
1 x D-sub socket, 9-pin
max. 64
512 Tx PDOs / 512 Rx PDOs
Yes
Yes (only via Ethernet)
Yes
Yes
Yes, can only be used via the CAN interface
Yes, green/red
Yes, green/red
Yes, green/red
Yes
CX8051
Technical data - CANopen
Fieldbus
Data transfer rate
Bus interface
Extendable process image
max. process image
Autobaud
galvanic isolation
Protokoll
CANopen Slave
CAN (virtual slave)
ADS Interface
Services
CAN Layer 2
CAN 2.0A
CAN 2.0B
Diagnosis/Status/Alarm
TC LED
BF LED
DIA LED
diagnostic notice
CX8051
CANopen
10, 20, 50, 100, 125, 250, 500, 800, 1.000 kBaud
1 x D-sub socket, 9-pin
Up to 3 virtual slaves in addition
4 slaves x (16 Tx PDOs / 16 Rx PDOs (8 byte per PDO))
Yes
Yes
Yes
4 (3 virtual CANopen nodes)
Yes (only via Ethernet)
No
after CANopen
No
Yes, green/red
Yes, green/red
Yes, green/red
Yes
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Product overview
4.5
CX80xx - MicroSD cards
MicroSD card as ignition source in ATEX areas
Gases or dusts can be ignited by a spark discharge when the MicroSD card is inserted or
removed.
CAUTION
Switch off the power supply and wait until the 1-second UPS has discharged. Ensure that
there is no explosive atmosphere before you insert or remove the MicroSD card.
In the basic version the CX80xx contains a MicroSD card with 512 MB. You can order it as an option with
larger cards (up to 4 GB).
The cards employed are SLC memory with extended temperature range for industrial applications. Use
exclusively MicroSD cards approved by Beckhoff.
Example of a MicroSD card:
Order identifier
CX1900-0123
CX1900-0125
CX1900-0127
CX1900-0129
Capacity
1 GB
2 GB
4 GB
8 GB
Description
MicroSD card (SLC memory) with
extended temperature range for
industrial applications instead of
the 512 MB card (ordering option)
Order identifier
CX1900-0122
CX1900-0124
CX1900-0126
CX1900-0128
CX1900-0130
Capacity
512 MB
1 GB
2 GB
4 GB
8 GB
Description
MicroSD card (SLC memory) with
extended temperature range for
industrial applications as spare
part.
Further Information: http://www.beckhoff.de/CX8000
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Mounting and wiring
5
Mounting and wiring
5.1
Mounting
Application in ATEX areas
The Embedded PC must be fitted with a suitable housing and suitable cables for use in
ATEX areas.
CAUTION
In ATEX areas the Embedded PC must always be installed in a housing with the correct
protection class, and suitable cables must be used.
Install the Embedded PC in a housing or a control cabinet, if it is to be used in ATEX areas.
Table 2: Embedded PC installation, requirements for housing in ATEX areas.
ATEX area
Zone 2
Zone 22
Flammable substance
Gas
dust, non-conductive
dust, conductive
Protection class
IP 54, according to EN 60079-15
IP 54, according to EN 60079-31
IP 6x, according to EN 60079-31
Observe the temperature at the cable entry points into the housing. If the temperature during nominal
operation is higher than 70 °C at the entry points or higher than 80 °C at the wire branching points, cables
that are designed for these higher temperatures and ATEX operation must be used.
5.1.1
Dimensions
The following drawings show the dimensions of the CX80xx Embedded PCs.
Dimensions
Drawings in various CAD formats can be found at: http://www.beckhoff.de/german/download/cx1000.htm
5.1.2
Installation on mounting rails
Snapping onto the mounting rail
The CX80xx can simply be snapped onto the mounting rail. To this end simply position the block on the
mounting rail and push it slightly until it engages on the right-hand side. The is indicated by a distinct click.
Use a screwdriver to push up the lock on the left-hand side, thereby turning it and causing it to engage
audibly.
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Mounting and wiring
Avoid damage!
Do not force the module or apply excessive pressure!
Attention
Permissible installation positions and minimum distances
Installation positions
Installation position up to 55 °C
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Mounting and wiring
Comply with the permitted installation position and minimum distances!
Attention
The maximum ambient temperature for CPU modules mounted on a DIN rail is 55°C. The
orientation in which the device is fitted must be selected in such a way that cooling air can
flow vertically through the ventilation holes. The images show the permitted and restricted
installation positions. Mounting must provide a clearance of 30 mm both above and below a
CX80xx device combination to ensure adequate ventilation of the base CPU module and
the power supply unit.
The high performance and the compact design of the CX80xx systems may result in increased heat
generation. The heat is dissipated via a passive ventilation system. This system requires the unit to be
mounted correctly. Ventilation openings are located at the top and bottom of the housing. The system
therefore has to be installed horizontally. This ensures optimum air flow.
Installation positions with reduced temperature range up to 45 °C
Other installation positions are permitted with a temperature range up to 45 °C.
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Mounting and wiring
5.2
Wiring
5.2.1
Power supply
Risk of injury through electric shock and damage to the device!
Bring the CX80xx into a safe, de-energized state before starting assembly, disassembly or
wiring!
WARNING
Connections as ignition source in ATEX areas
Gases or dusts can be ignited by a spark discharge when the Embedded PC is wired.
CAUTION
Switch off the power supply and wait until the 1-second UPS has discharged. Ensure that
there is no explosive atmosphere before you wire the Embedded PC and connect or disconnect Bus Terminals.
This power supply unit is equipped with an I/O interface, which permits connection of the Beckhoff Bus
Terminals. The power is supplied via the upper spring-loaded terminals with the designation 24 V and 0 V.
The supply voltage supplies the CX system and, via the terminal bus, the Bus Terminals with a voltage of 24
VDC (15 %/+20 %). The dielectric strength of the power supply is 500 V. Since the Terminal Bus (K- and Ebus) only transfers data, a separate power supply is required for the Bus Terminals. This is provided by
means of the power contacts, which are not connected to the power supply. Only 24 V DC may be
connected to the power contacts; the maximum current load of the power contacts is 10 A.
Power contact PE
The PE power contact must not be used for other potentials.
CAUTION
Requirements for the power supply (24 V)
In order to guarantee the operation of the CPU (CX80xx module) and the terminal strand in all cases, the
power supply must supply 2.0 A at 24 V.
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LED
If the power supply unit is connected correctly and the power supply is switched on, the two upper LEDs in
the terminal prism are green. The left LED (Us) indicates the CPU supply. The right LED (Up) indicates the
terminal supply. The other LEDs indicate the Terminal Bus status. A detailed description of the LEDs can be
found in section "LED troubleshooting".
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Mounting and wiring
5.2.2
Ethernet
Ethernet connections
Assignment of the RJ45 interface, port 1
X001
PIN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal
TD +
TD RD +
connected
Description
Transmit +
Transmit Receive +
reserved
RD connected
Receive reserved
Assignment of the RJ45 interface, port 2 (switched)
CX8010, CX809x: X101/102
EK9xxx: X001 / X002
PIN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal
TD +
TD RD +
connected
Description
Transmit +
Transmit Receive +
reserved
RD connected
Receive reserved
Transmission standards
10Base5
The transmission medium for 10Base5 consists of a thick coaxial cable ("yellow cable") with a max.
transmission speed of 10 Mbaud arranged in a line topology with branches (drops) each of which is
connected to one network device. Because all the devices are in this case connected to a common
transmission medium, it is inevitable that collisions occur often in 10Base5.
10Base2
10Base2 (Cheaper net) is a further development of 10Base5, and has the advantage that the coaxial cable is
cheaper and, being more flexible, is easier to lay. It is possible for several devices to be connected to one
10Base2 cable. It is frequent for branches from a 10Base5 backbone to be implemented in 10Base2.
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10BaseT
Describes a twisted pair cable for 10 Mbaud. The network here is constructed as a star. It is no longer the
case that every device is attached to the same medium. This means that a broken cable no longer results in
failure of the entire network. The use of switches as star couplers enables collisions to be reduced. Using
full-duplex connections they can even be entirely avoided.
100BaseT
Twisted pair cable for 100 MBaud. It is necessary to use a higher cable quality and to employ appropriate
hubs or switches in order to achieve the higher data rate.
10BaseF
The 10BaseF standard describes several optical fiber versions.
Short description of the 10BaseT and 100BaseT cable types
Twisted pair copper cable for star topologies, where the distance between two devices may not exceed 100
meters.
UTP
Unshielded twisted pair
This type of cable belongs to category 3, and is not recommended for use in an industrial environment.
S/UTP
Screened/unshielded twisted pair (screened with copper braid)
Has a general screen of copper braid to reduce influence of external interference. This cable is
recommended for use with Bus Couplers.
FTP
Foiled shielded twisted pair (screened with aluminum foil)
This cable has an outer screen of laminated aluminum and plastic foil.
S/FTP
Screened/foiled-shielded twisted pair (screened with copper braid and aluminum foil)
Has a laminated aluminum screen with a copper braid on top. Such cables can provide up to 70 dB reduction
in interference power.
STP
Shielded twisted pair
Describes a cable with an outer screen, without defining the nature of the screen any more closely.
S/STP
Screened/shielded twisted pair (wires are individually screened)
This identification refers to a cable with a screen for each of the two wires as well as an outer shield.
ITP
Industrial Twisted-Pair
The structure is similar to that of S/STP, but, in contrast to S/STP, it has only one pair of conductors.
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Mounting and wiring
5.2.3
CANopen Cabling
CAN topology
CAN is a 2-wire bus system, to which all participating devices are connected in parallel (i.e. using short drop
lines). The bus must be terminated at each end with a 120 (or 121) Ohm terminating resistor to prevent
reflections. This is also necessary even if the cable lengths are very short!
Since the CAN signals are represented on the bus as the difference between the two levels, the CAN leads
are not very sensitive to incoming interference (EMI): Both leads are affected, so the interference has very
little effect on the difference.
Bus length
The maximum length of a CAN bus is primarily limited by the signal transit time. The multi-master bus access
procedure (arbitration) requires signals to reach all the nodes at effectively the same time (before the
sampling within a bit period). Since the signal transit times in the CAN connecting equipment (transceivers,
opto-couplers, CAN controllers) are almost constant, the line length must be chosen in accordance with the
baud rate:
Baud Rate
1 Mbit/s
500 kbit/s
250 kbit/s
125 kbit/s
50 kbit/s
20 kbit/s
10 kbit/s
Bus length
< 20 m*
< 100 m
< 250 m
< 500 m
< 1000 m
< 2500 m
< 5000 m
*) A figure of 40 m at 1 Mbit/s is often found in the CAN literature. This does not, however, apply to networks
with optically isolated CAN controllers. The worst case calculation for opto-couplers yields a figure 5 m at
1 Mbit/s - in practice, however, 20 m can be reached without difficulty.
It may be necessary to use repeaters for bus lengths greater than 1000 m.
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Drop lines
Drop lines must always be avoided as far as possible, since they inevitably cause reflections. The reflections
caused by drop lines are not however usually critical, provided they have decayed fully before the sampling
time. In the case of the bit timing settings selected in the Bus Couplers it can be assumed that this is the
case, provided the following drop line lengths are not exceeded:
Baud Rate
1 Mbit/s
500 kbit/s
250 kbit/s
125 kbit/s
50 kbit/s
Drop line length
< 1m
<5m
< 10m
< 20m
< 50m
Total length of all drop lines
<5m
< 25 m
< 50 m
< 100 m
< 250 m
Drop lines must not have terminating resistors.
Star Hub (Multiport Tap)
Shorter drop line lengths must be maintained when passive distributors ("multiport taps"), such as the
Beckhoff ZS5052-4500 Distributor Box. The following table indicates the maximum drop line lengths and the
maximum length of the trunk line (without the drop lines):
Baud Rate
1 Mbit/s
500 kbit/s
250 kbit/s
125 kbit/s
Drop line length with multiport
topology
< 0,3 m
< 1,2 m
< 2,4 m
< 4.8 m
Trunk line length (without drop
lines)
< 25 m
< 66 m
< 120 m
< 310 m
CAN cable
Screened twisted-pair cables (2x2) with a characteristic impedance of between 108 and 132 Ohm is
recommended for the CAN wiring. If the CAN transceiver’s reference potential (CAN ground) is not to be
connected, the second pair of conductors can be omitted. (This is only recommended for networks of small
physical size with a common power supply for all the participating devices).
ZB5100 CAN Cable
A high quality CAN cable with the following properties is included in Beckhoff's range:
• 2 x 2 x 0.25 mm² (AWG 24) twisted pairs, cable colors: red/black + white/black
• double screened
• braided screen with filler strand (can be attached directly to pin 3 of the 5-pin connection terminal),
• flexible (minimum bending radius 35 mm when bent once, 70 mm for repeated bending)
• characteristic impedance (60 kHz): 120 Ohm
• conductor resistance < 80 Ohm/km
• sheath: grey PVC, external diameter 7.3 +/- 0.4 mm
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Mounting and wiring
• Weight: 64 kg/km.
• printed with "BECKHOFF ZB5100 CAN-BUS 2x2x0.25" and meter marking (length data every 20 cm)
ZB5200 CAN/DeviceNet Cable
The ZB5200 cable material corresponds to the DeviceNet specification, and is also suitable for CANopen
systems. The ready-made ZK1052-xxxx-xxxx bus cables for the Fieldbus Box modules are made from this
cable material. It has the following specification:
• 2 x 2 x 0.34 mm² (AWG 22) twisted pairs
• double screened braided screen with filler strand
• characteristic impedance (1 MHz): 126 Ohm
• conductor resistance 54 Ohm/km
• sheath: grey PVC, external diameter 7.3 mm
• printed with "InterlinkBT DeviceNet Type 572" as well as UL and CSA ratings
• stranded wire colours correspond to the DeviceNet specification
• UL recognized AWM Type 2476 rating
• CSA AWM I/II A/B 80°C 300V FT1
• corresponds to the DeviceNet "Thin Cable" specification
Screening
The screen is to be connected over the entire length of the bus cable, and only galvanically grounded at one
point, in order to avoid ground loops.
The design of the screening, in which HF interference is diverted through R/C elements to the mounting rail
assumes that the rail is appropriately earthed and free from interference. If this is not the case, it is possible
that HF interference will be transmitted from the mounting rail to the screen of the bus cable. In that case the
screen should not be attached to the couplers - it should nevertheless still be fully connected through.
Notes related to checking the CAN wiring can be found in the Trouble Shooting section.
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Cable colors
Suggested method of using the Beckhoff CAN cable on Bus Terminal and Fieldbus Box:
BK51x0 pin
BC5150/
BX5100
1
2
3
4
5
BK5151,
CX805x, CXB510/M510
3
2
5
7
9
Fieldbus
Box pin
FC51xx pin/ Function
EL6751
ZB5100 cable color
ZB5200 cable color
3
5
1
4
2
3
2
5
7
9
black/ (red)
black
Filler strand
white
(red)
black
blue
Filler strand
white
(red)
CAN Ground
CAN Low
Screen
CAN high
not used
BK5151, EL6751, CX805x, CX-B/M510 and FC510x: D-sub, 9 pin
The CAN bus cable is connected to the FC51x1 and FC51x1/2 CANopen cards via 9-pin sub-D sockets, with
pins assigned as follows.
Pin
2
3
6
7
Assignment
CAN low (CAN-)
CAN ground (internally connected to pin 6)
CAN ground (internally connected to pin 3)
CAN high (CAN+)
The unlisted pins are not connected.
The top-hat contact clip and the connector shield are connected..
Note: An auxiliary voltage of up to 30 VDC may be connected to pin 9. Some CAN devices use this to supply
the transceiver.
BK5151
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Mounting and wiring
FC5102
BK51x0: 5- pin open style connector
The BK51x0 Bus Couplers have a recessed front surface on the left hand side with a five pin connector.
The supplied CANopen socket can be inserted here.
The left figure shows the socket in the BK51x0 Bus Coupler. Pin 5 is the connection strip's top most pin.
Pin 5 is not used. Pin 4 is the CAN high connection, pin 2 is the CAN low connection, and the screen is
connected to pin 3 (which is connected to the mounting rail via an R/C network). CAN GND can optionally be
connected to pin 1. If all the CAN ground pins are connected, this provides a common reference potential for
the CAN transceivers in the network. It is recommended that the CAN GND be connected to earth at one
location, so that the common CAN reference potential is close to the supply potential. Since the CANopen
BK51X0 Bus Couplers provide full electrical isolation of the bus connection, it may in appropriate cases be
possible to omit wiring up the CAN ground.
ZS1052-3000 Bus Interface Connector
The ZS1052-3000 CAN Interface Connector can be used as an alternative to the supplied connector. This
makes the wiring significantly easier. There are separate terminals for incoming and outgoing leads and a
large area of the screen is connected via the strain relief. The integrated terminating resistor can be switched
externally. When it is switched on, the outgoing bus lead is electrically isolated - this allows rapid wiring fault
location and guarantees that no more than two resistors are active in the network.
LC5100: Bus connection via spring-loaded terminals
In the low cost LC5100 Coupler, the CAN wires are connected directly to the contact points 1 (CAN-H,
marked with C+) and 5 (CAN-L, marked with C-). The screen can optionally be connected to contact points 4
or 8, which are connected to the mounting rail via an R/C network.
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Mounting and wiring
[Gefahrinformation hier einfügen!]
AchtungThe LC5100 has no galvanic isolation and an incorrect wiring can by destroyed or
damaged the CAN driver.
Attention
Fieldbus Box: M12 CAN socket
The IPxxxx-B510, IL230x-B510 and IL230x-C510 Fieldbus Boxes are connected to the bus using 5- pin M12
plug-in connectors.
Beckhoff offer plugs for field assembly, passive distributor's, terminating resistors and a wide range of preassembled cables for the Fieldbus Box system. Details be found in the catalog, or under www.beckhoff.com.
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Mounting and wiring
5.3
Changing the battery
Battery as ignition source in ATEX areas
Gases or dusts can be ignited by a spark discharge when the battery is inserted or removed.
CAUTION
Switch off the power supply and wait until the 1-second UPS has discharged. Ensure that
there is no explosive atmosphere before you insert or remove the battery.
An incorrectly inserted battery may explode!
Attention
Use exclusively the specified battery type. Make absolutely sure that positive and negative
terminals of the battery are inserted correctly. (Plus pole on the left). Never open the battery or throw it into a fire. The battery cannot be recharged.
The battery of the CX80xx is required for the real-time clock (RTC) of the CX80xx. It ensures that the RTC
continues to run in the power-off state so that the set time is available again on restarting.
• Step 1: Open the flap
• Step 2/3: Take a small flat-blade screwdriver, insert it above the battery and prise the battery carefully
out of the device
• Step 4: Insert the new battery. The plus pole must be on the left
• Step 5: Close the flap again
Battery type
Duracell 303/357 SR44
Technical data
1.5 V / 165 mAh
Battery maintenance
The battery must be replaced every 5 years. Spare batteries can be ordered from Beckhoff
Service.
Note
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Parameterization and commissioning
6
Parameterization and commissioning
6.1
DIP switch
DIP switches as ignition source in ATEX areas
Gases or dusts can be ignited by a spark discharge when DIP switches are used.
CAUTION
Switch off the power supply and wait until the 1-second UPS has discharged. Ensure that
there is no explosive atmosphere before you use DIP switches.
CX8050 DIP switch
The address selection switch of the CX8050 has no purpose, although it can be read by the PLC (see
programming).
CX8051 DIP switch
2x 10-pole address switch S101/S102
The address selection switch can be used for CAN address, although it can also be read by the PLC (see
programming).
S101 for the address x 1, S102 for the address x10, example S101=2, S102=3 CAN node address 32
So that the address is also used via the address selector, this must be activated in the System Manager.
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Parameterization and commissioning
The station address can now be set for each slave with a DIP switch + number. For the virtual slaves you
can use +1, +2, +3 for example.
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2-pole DIP switch (under the flap between the battery and the SD card slot)
Requirements
DIP switch (red)
1 off and 2 off
1 on and 2 off
Meaning
normal mode, TwinCAT is started
The CX mode starts in Config Mode; the flash
memory or, in the case of the CX80xx the SD card, is
reachable via the USB interface (for example for an
image update).
Restore the registry
No function so far
1 off and 2 on
1 on and 2 on
6.2
Setting the IP adress
6.2.1
IP address
The CX8010, CX803x, CX805x and CX8080 have an Ethernet interface, X001.
X001
IP addressing via the operating system; default is DHCP (represented in the operating system as FEC1)
EtherCAT interface
The EtherCAT interface is a further Ethernet interface that is not visible in the operating system for the IP
addressing.
6.2.2
Setting the address via DHCP server
Port 1 (X001) is set to DHCP by default.
If DHCP is switched on, the CX is automatically assigned an IP address by the DHCP server. The DHCP
server must know the MAC ID of the Bus Terminal Controller for this. The IP address should be assigned
statically by the DHCP server. A local IP address is used if no DHCP server is reachable.
The DNS name is formed from the type and the last 3 byte of the MAC ID. The MAC ID is given on the
production label of the Bus Terminal Controller.
Example: CX80xx
• MAC ID: 00-01-05-01-02-03
• DNS name: CX-010203
6.2.3
Subnet mask
The subnet mask is subject to the control of the network administrator, and specifies the structure of the
subnet.
Small networks without a router do not require a subnet mask. The same is true if you do not use registered
IP numbers. A subnet mask can be used to subdivide the network with the aid of the mask instead of using a
large number of network numbers.
The subnet mask is a 32-bit number:
• Ones in the mask indicate the subnet part of an address space.
• Zeros indicate that part of the address space which is available for the host IDs.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Parameterization and commissioning
Description
IP address
Subnet mask
Network ID
Host ID
Binary representation
10101100.00010000.00010001.11001000
11111111.11111111.00010100.00000000
10101100.00010000.00010000.00000000
00000000.00000000.00000001.11001000
Decimal representation
172.16.17.200
255.255.20.0
172.16.16.0
0.0.1.200
Standard subnet mask
Address class
A
B
C
Standard subnet mask (decimal)
255.0.0.0
255.255.0.0
255.255.255.0
Standard subnet mask (hex)
FF.00.00.00
FF.FF.00.00
FF.FF.FF.00
Assignment of subnets, host numbers and IP addresses
Note
36
Neither subnet 0 nor the subnet consisting only of ones may be used. Host number 0, and
the host number consisting only of ones, must not be used. Under BootP or DHCP the subnet mask is transmitted also by the server.
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Parameterization and commissioning
6.3
Configuration
6.3.1
CX80xx - Operating system
The CX80xx comes with a Microsoft CE operating system, version 6.0. This operating system is adapted and
optimized for the CX80xx. Not all CE6.0 components are available.
Safety
From image version 3.54b security was tightened. This applies to CERHOST and TELNET. Both services
are now switched off in delivery state. To reactivate these services, you need a Micro SD card reader.
CERHOST
CERHOST is deactivated by current images on first start-up via the registry file
CeRemoteDisplay_Disable.reg, which is located in the folder RegFiles.
To reactivate CERHOST, delete the file CeRemoteDisplay_Disable.reg from the folder RegFiles and also the
folder Documents and Settings.
Then reinsert the Micro SD card in the CX and reboot. The CX creates a new Document and Settings
directory and then reboots automatically.
The CX is then accessible again via CERHOST.
TELNET
TELNET is deactivated by current images on first start-up via the registry file Telnet_Disable.reg, which is
located in the folder RegFiles.
To reactivate TELNET, delete the file Telnet_Disable.reg from the folder RegFiles and also the folder
Documents and Settings.
Then reinsert the Micro SD card in the CX and reboot. The CX creates a new Document and Settings
directory and then reboots automatically.
The CX is then accessible again via TELNET.
IMAGE
If you do not know what image is loaded on the CX80xx, you can determine it quite easily.
• Via the web diagnostics page of the CX. Here you can find the build number under the TwinCAT
device.
Opening the web diagnostics page:
- IP address</config
or
- CX name/config
Example:
- 172.16.17.201/config
or
- CX-01551E/config
• Via a Micro SD card reader.
The Micro SD card contains a file with the name of the image.
Example CX8000_CE600_LF_v354b_TC211R3_B2248.
TC211R3_2248 indicates the TwinCAT build; in the example the build is 2248.
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Parameterization and commissioning
Prerequisites
Feature / platform
ATL
MFC
XML DOM
COM
COM Storage
Winsock
TCP/IP
TCP/IPv6
Firewall
Network Utilities (IpConfig, Ping, Route)
UPnP
Control Point
Device Host
SOAP
Client
Server
DCOM
Object Exchange Protocol OBEX
Message Queuing MSMQ
Server
File Server (SMB/CIFS)
File Server
Print-Server (SMB/CIFS)
RAS Server / PPTP Server
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
Telnet Server
HTTP / ASP / FTP / SNTP -Server
Web Server (HTTPD) / Active Server Pages (ASP)
Support / JScript 5.6 / VBScript 5.6
Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP)
CX80x0 LF version 3.xx
Xtd
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
HTML / DHTML, TLS, ISAPI extensions
Internet Explorer 6.0
Java Applets
NET Compact Framework
RDP Client (Remote Desktop protocol)
CAB File Installer/Uninstaller
TwinCAT (Level PLC)
X
v3.5
X
X
USB support
Printer, storage on Compact Flash, for example
HID (Human interface devices)
Touch
X
-
38
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
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CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Parameterization and commissioning
6.3.2
Power supply terminal
K-bus interface
It is possible to operate K-bus terminals on the CX80xx.
The CX80xx recognizes these terminals automatically on scanning, reads out the terminal types and
automatically places them in the System Manager.
2
1
Fig. 1: K-Bus Interface
K-bus state
The K-bus status is saved in the state byte (see fig. K-bus interface "1"). If the value is 0 the K-bus is
operating synchronously and without errors. If the value should be <>0 this can be an error, but it may also
be just a notice that, for example, the K-bus requires longer than the employed task and is thus no longer
synchronous to the task. The task time should be faster than 100 ms. We recommend a task time of less
than 50 ms. The K-bus update time typically lies between one and five ms.
Bit 0 = K-Bus Err
Bit 1 = Terminal State Err
Bit 2 = Process Data Length Err
Bit 8 = No valid Inputs
Bit 9 = K-Bus Input Update busy
Bit 10 = K-Bus Output Update busy
Bit 11 = Watchdog Err
Bit 15 = Acyc. Function atcive (e.g. K-Bus Reset)
If there is a K-bus error, this can be reset via the IOF_DeviceReset function block (in the TcIoFunctions.lib).
The NetID is that of the CX80xx and can thus be entered as an empty string, the Device ID (see fig. K-bus
Interface "2") is to be taken from the System Manager.
E-bus interface
The operation of E-bus terminals and EtherCAT devices is possible on the CX80xx.
The CX80xx recognizes these terminals automatically on scanning, reads out the terminal types and
automatically places them in the System Manager.
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Parameterization and commissioning
DC Distributed Clocks
The CX80xx series is not suitable for the use of EtherCAT slaves that use or need distributed clocks functionality.
Note
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CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Parameterization and commissioning
6.3.3
CAN
CX8051
CANopen-Interface
The CANopen communication takes place via D-Sub port X101.
Debug via the Ethernet interface only
The CX8051 does not support the ADS via CANopen. The program download and debugging can take place exclusively via the Ethernet interface.
Note
CANopen address
The CANopen address can be assigned via the rotary selector, or permanently in the System Manager. If the
address is assigned permanently, the address switch is ignored.
CANopen NodeState
The NodeState can be used to display the state of the CANopen communication to find out whether the
slave is engaged in data exchange (NodeState=0) or whether there is an error or problem.
0 = No error
128 = Node is Operational but not all RxPDOs were received
129 = Node is Pre-Operational
130 = Node is Stopped
CANopen process data
The CX8051 can exchange up to 16 PDOs (each with 8 bytes of process data) with the CANopen master in
input and output direction via CANopen.
By default 2 PDOs are created in Tx and Rx direction. The PDOs can be filled with user data. The limit of 8
bytes per PDO must not be exceeded. Data are sent automatically when there is a change, unless the
master is configured differently. At the planning stage please ensure that the data in a PDO "only" change at
a moderate rate (e.g. not with ms frequency). Failure to adhere to this can lead to CAN overload. Particularly
for low baud rates, the CAN can reach its limit quite quickly.
Creating data in the PDO
For each PDO you can create up 8 bytes of data. Variables of different type may be used, as long as the
limit of 8 bytes is adhered to. For TxPDOs there is an additional control word, which can be used in cases
where data are to be sent not only in the event of changes, but also when the data in the PDO have not
changed. To change the control word it can simply be incremented, for example. If incrementation and data
modification happen at the same time (i.e. in the same cycle), only one telegram is sent.
The RxPDOs had an additional status word, which is incremented on arrival of the PDO. This is useful in
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Version: 1.3
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Parameterization and commissioning
cases where data in the PDO are unchanged, since attention is drawn to the fact that new telegram with old
data has arrived. This can be used for monitoring or to check whether a device still sends data on a regular
basis.
Further PDOs can be added by clicking on the "CX8xxx CANopenSlave box". Please note that the COB ID is
always zero from the 5th PDO, in which case it has to be entered manually.
CAN load
The CAN load should be taken into account during network planning and configuration: 500 kbit at 8 bytes of
user data per frame results in a maximum number of 3707 frames per second. For reasons of network
stability it is never advisable to run a CAN at 100% load. An upper bus load limit of 60% is recommended,
which corresponds to 2221 frames per second. Example: A CX8051 with 8 Rx PDOs and 10 ms task time,
resulting in 100 cycles per second for 8 PDOs. If PDO sending is event-driven, they are sent when the
process data change. On the slave side this may be more frequent than every 10 ms. If the values only
change once per 10 ms cycle, this results in 800 frames per second on the slave side and perhaps another
800 frames per second on the master side, plus heartbeat, sync telegrams and SDO communication. The
example indicates that the upper limit of 2221 frames can be reached or indeed exceeded quite quickly in
cases where rapid changes in input data lead to sending of PDOs with high frequency. This may be the case
for analog inputs, for example, since their values usually change continuously. It is therefore advisable to
control the send behavior by setting suitable parameter (inhibit time, filters) or to switch to cyclic sending.
Baud rate
1 Mbaud
500 kbaud
100 kbaud
1 bytes data
15384
7692
1538
2 bytes data
13333
6666
1333
4 bytes data
10526
5263
1052
8 bytes data
7407
3703
740
Table showing the number of theoretical CAN frames at 100% load for different CAN data sizes.
Virtual CANopen device interface
The virtual slave interface enables the creation of up to three virtual slaves on the same hardware interface.
This enables the user to exchange more data with a CANopen master.
A maximum of 16 PDOs data can be configured for each slave, i.e. in total you can exchange 4 x 16 PDOs
data in each direction.
Append a maximum of four CX8051 devices to your CAN device (fig. 1.0). Each of these devices is given a
CAN address via the System Manager which can also be linked with the address selector (see Address
switch). Add the process data PDOs under the box. For the CANopen master configure each of the four
slaves like an independent device.
42
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Parameterization and commissioning
Fig. 2: Creation of the 4 CANopen slave devices
Fig. 3: Appending the CAN modules
CX8050
CANopen interface / CAN interface
The CANopen communication takes place via D-Sub port X101. The CX8050 enables a CANopen master or
"simple" CAN communication to be used.
CANopen address
The rotary selector (S101/102) of the CAN master has no purpose. The address selector can be read via the
PLC (see address) and then be used for the applications.
CANopen NodeState
The NodeState (red) can be used to display the state of the CANopen communication to find out whether the
slave is engaged in data exchange (NodeState=0) or whether there is an error or problem.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
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Parameterization and commissioning
0 = No error
1 = Node deactivated
2 = Node not found
4 = SDO syntax error at StartUp
5 = SDO data mismatch at StartUp
8 = Node StartUp in progress
11 = FC510x Bus-OFF
12 = Pre-Operational
13 = Severe bus fault
14 = Guarding: toggle error
20 = TxPDO too short
22 = Expected TxPDO is missing
23 = Node is Operational but not all TxPDOs were received
The DiagFlag indicates whether an emergency telegram was received from the slave. The telegram can then
be read in the System Manager or the PLC via ADS (see ADS interface). Please consult the slave
manufacturer regarding interpretation of the data. The flag is reset once the Diag buffer was read.
The EmergencyCounter is incremented after each emergency telegram.
CAN Layer 2 communication
If you have selected this checkbox, the entire CANopen network management for this device is deactivated.
It is not started, monitored etc. The PDO inputs are detected as pure CAN (layer 2) telegrams and enable
the controller to operate in event driven mode.
CAN interface
Any CAN data can be sent via the CAN interface. There is a choice between 11-bit identifier (CAN 2.0A) or
29-bit identifier (CAN 2.0B).
Message structure with 29-bit support
• Length (0..8)
• CobId
◦ Bit 0-28: 11 Bit identifier / 29 Bit identifier
◦ Bit 30: RTR
◦ Bit 31: 0: normal Message (11 Bit Identifier), 1: extended Message (29 Bit-Identifier)
• Data[8]
Sending data: In NoOfTxMessages enter the number of data to be sent from the Tx buffer. If the buffer has
capacity for 10 entries, the maximum number of telegrams that can be send consecutively is 10. "Length"
defines the number of PDO data bytes (maximum 8 bytes). Enter the data, then enter the CAN message ID
in "codId". Now increment the TxCounter value.
Sample code: Sending messages from the PLC
if Outputs.TxCounter = Inputs.TxCounter then
for i=0 to NumberOfMessagesToSend do
Outputs.TxMessage[i] = MessageToSend[i];
End_for
Outputs.NoOfTxMessages = NumberOfMessagesToSend;
Outputs.TxCounter := Outputs.TxCounter + 1;
end_if
Sample code: Receiving messages from the PLC
if Outputs.RxCounter <> Inputs.RxCounter then
for i := 0 to (Inputs.NoOfRxMessages-1) do
MessageReceived[i] := Inputs.RxMessage [i];
End_for
Outputs.RxCounter := Outputs.RxCounter+1;
end_if
Also see about this
2 DIP switch [} 33]
2 Emergency telegrams and diagnostics [} 56]
44
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Parameterization and commissioning
6.3.4
Web Services
Upnp webpages
There is a Upnp webpage on the CX80xx for diagnostics.
User name: guest
Password: 1
Enter the IP address or the device name.
Example
http://cx-0f94ac/config
http://172.16.17.55/config
The diagnostic page was revised starting from image v354c.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
45
Parameterization and commissioning
Web visualization
There is a web visualization on the CX80xx. This can be prepared and activated with the help of the PLC
Control in TwinCAT.
The call is made via the IP address or the device name in a web browser.
Further information can be taken from the documentation on the web visualization (see TwinCAT
Supplements PLC HMI Web).
Example
46
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Parameterization and commissioning
http://cx-0f94ac/TcWebVisu/
http://172.16.17.44/TcWebVisu/
Ascertain before logging in (i.e. in the logged out condition) whether a ADS connection is established to the
CX – "TwinCAT Running" in the bottom right-hand corner must be green. If that is not the case, please go
onto Online/Selection of the target system again and call the CX once again.
The following path must be specified for downloading the web data for the web user interface:
\hard disk\twincat\boot\webvisu\
If that is not the case, the PLC Control will copy the data into the wrong folder and the webpage will be
displayed incorrectly or not at all.
Remote Display
This page describes the steps for remotely controlling a CE device with CE operating system from a further
PC by ‘Remote Display’.
Software required on the PC:
• Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP or Windows 7
• Microsoft Remote Display (CERHOST, available license-free from Microsoft)
Establishing the connection
The "Remote Display" tool is started on the PC. The address of the CE device can now be entered under the
menu option "File - > Connect"; this can be both the TCP-IP address or, if available, also the name of the CE
device.
If the CE device is provided with password protection, then the password must also be entered accordingly.
No password is set in the delivery condition.
After entering the target address, the user interface of the CE device is available for remote control on the
PC.
Download
6.3.5
: http://infosys.beckhoff.com/content/1033/cx805x_hw/Resources/zip/1608562059.zip
Real Time Clock (RTC)
The RTC is read out via the FB_LocalSystemTime function blocks and can be set with the NT_SetLocalTime
block (see TcUtilities.lib).
The RTC is supplied by the battery and can thus continue to run in the power-off state.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
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Parameterization and commissioning
6.3.6
1-second UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply)
Technical concept
The 1-second UPS is an UltraCap capacitor, which, in the event of a voltage outage, continues to supply
power to the processor for approx. 4 to 5 seconds, so that persistent data can be saved. Data saving
generally takes less than 4 to 5 seconds. However, due to ageing of the components used, one should
assume that the UPS can provide power for a maximum of 1 second. You can assume that data saving
continues to work smoothly, even after many years. If you save data yourself, we recommend that this
should take place within 1 second. Should it take longer, we would advise against it.
The 1-second UPS supplies neither the K-bus nor the E-bus with power. Please note that the data of these
devices may already be invalid when the 1-second UPS is activated. Also, the fieldbus system (or Ethernet)
may not work or not work properly once the 1-second UPS was activated.
Saving of the persistent data only takes place in conjunction with the function block FB_S_UPS_CX80xx.
This block must be called cyclically. We strongly recommend using the default values for the block.
Saving and loading persistent data
The persistent data are stored on the SD card as a wdp file. When the PLC starts up, the wdp file is loaded
from the SD card, saved there as a wd~-file (backup), and then deleted. Another current wpd file is not
written until the system is shut down or the 1-second UPS is activated. If no wdp file is present when the CX
starts up, the persistent data are invalid and are deleted (default setting).
The reason is that the 1-second UPS was activated before the TwinCAT PLC was started during startup of
the CX. In this case no persistent data were saved, since the system was unable to ensure sufficient buffer
time for saving the data.
Loading a backup of the persistent data
To load the persistent data from the backup (wp~-file), it has to be enabled in the System Manager.
Or via the following registry entry:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Beckhoff\TwinCAT\Plc]"ClearInvalidPersistentData"= 0
The default factory setting is "1".
Checking whether current persistent data (from wdp file) or saved persistent data from the backup
(wd~-file) were loaded
In this example, the CX8090 indicates via the ERR LED whether the persistent data were loaded. The LED
cannot be used for other CX8xxx models.
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Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Parameterization and commissioning
IF systeminfo.bootDataFlags.4 AND NOT
systeminfo.bootDataFlags.5 THEN
F_CX8090_LED_ERR(eLED_GREEN_ON); (* persistent
data is OK *)
ELSIF systeminfo.bootDataFlags.4 AND systeminfo.bootDataFlags.5
THEN
F_CX8090_LED_ERR(eLED_RED_ON); (* load backup persistent data *)
ELSE
F_CX8090_LED_ERR(eLED_RED_FLASHING_200ms); (* no
persistent data *)
END_IF
Purpose of the 1-second UPS
Note
6.3.7
The 1-second UPS should only be used for managing the persistent data. Other applications are not supported and are not covered by our complaints procedure. Retain data cannot be used for the 1-second UPS!
CPU load
In the delivery condition the CPU load display is deactivated on all CX80xx devices (it is displayed with a
constant 10%). The CPU load display is deactivated because it accounts for a considerable portion of the
CPU load itself. The CPU load can be activated for brief diagnostic help; however, we recommend that you
deactivate it again after the diagnostics.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/SOFTWARE/BECKHOFF/TWINCAT/RTime/EnableRTimeMeasurement 0
deactivated, 1 activated
A TwinCAT restart of the CX80xx is necessary after making the setting.
CPU load
The CPU load is calculated internally with 10 ms. The CPU load display may fluctuate very
strongly if one or more tasks exceeding 10 ms are used.
Note
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
49
Programming
7
Programming
7.1
Library for CX80xx
Download
: http://infosys.beckhoff.com/content/1033/cx805x_hw/Resources/zip/1608565003.zip
7.2
Seconds UPS
7.2.1
Function blocks
FUNCTION_BLOCK FB_S_UPS_CX80xx
The FB_S_UPS function block can be used on the CX80xx with the seconds UPS in order to activate the
seconds UPS from the PLC. This allows the persistent data to be saved and a quick shutdown to be
performed in the event of a power failure. If possible the default values of the INPUTs of the FB_S_UPS
should be retained.
Loss of data
Attention
The seconds UPS can be used only for a few seconds in the event of a power failure in order, for example, to save persistent data. The data must be saved in the fast persistent
mode "SPDM_2PASS", even though this can lead to real-time violations. Sufficient router
memory must be configured for the storage of the persistent data!
The second UPS does not have sufficient capacity for bridging power failures. Saving can take place only on
Micro SD cards.
A QuickShutdown is performed automatically in the eSUPS_WrPersistData_Shutdown mode (standard
setting) after the storage of the persistent data.
In the eSUPS_WrPersistData_NoShutdown mode only the persistent data are saved, no QuickShutdown is
performed.
In the eSUPS_ImmediateShutdown mode a QuickShutdown is executed immediately without saving data.
In the eSUPS_CheckPowerStatus mode only a check is performed as to whether a power failure has
occurred. If this is the case, the module only switches back to the PowerOK state after the expiry of
tRecoverTime (10s).
Independent of the mode and thus independent of the saving or the shutting down of the controller, the UPS
switches the main board off after the capacitors have discharged, even if the voltage has returned in the
meantime.
Caution when using files:
If other applications or the PLC keep other files open or write to them, this can lead to faulty
files if the UPS switches off the controller.
Attention
50
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Programming
VAR_INPUT
VAR_INPUT
sNetID : T_AmsNetId := ''; (* '' = local netid *)
iPLCPort : UINT := AMSPORT_R0_PLC_RTS1; (* PLC Runtime System for writing persistent data *)
iUPSPort : UINT := 16#4A8; (* Port for reading Power State of UPS, dafault 16#4A8 *)
tTimeout : TIME := DEFAULT_ADS_TIMEOUT; (* ADS Timeout *)
eUpsMode : E_S_UPS_Mode := eSUPS_WrPersistData_Shutdown; (* UPS mode (w/wo writing persistent data, w/wo shutdown) *)
ePersistentMode : E_PersistentMode := SPDM_2PASS; (* mode for writing persistent data *)
tRecoverTime : TIME := T#10s; (* ON time to recover from short power failure in mode eSUPS_WrPersistData_NoShutdown/eSUPS_CheckPowerStatus *)
END_VAR
E_S_UPS_Mode
sNetID : AmsNetID of the controller.
iPLCPort : Port number of the PLC runtime system (AMSPORT_R0_PLC_RTS1 = 801,
AMSPORT_R0_PLC_RTS2 = 811, AMSPORT_R0_PLC_RTS3 = 821, AMSPORT_R0_PLC_RTS4 = 831).
iUPSPort : Port number via which the UPS status is read (standard value is 16#4A8).
tTimeout : Timeout for the execution of the QuickShutdown.
eUpsMode : The eUpsMode defines whether persistent data are to be written and whether a
QuickShutdown is to be performed.
Standard value is eSUPS_WrPersistData_Shutdown, i.e. with writing of the
persistent data and then QuickShutdown. See E_S_UPS_Mode.
ePersistentMode : Mode for the writing of the persistent data. Standard value is SPDM_2PASS.
SPDM_2PASS, all persistent data are saved at once, which can lead to the cycle
time being exceeded.
SPDM_VAR_BOOST, here, each persistent variable is written separately; if there is
a large amount of persistent data this can accordingly take many cycles. This is not recommended as some
data may be lost if the time of the seconds UPS is not sufficient. tRecoverTime : Time after which the UPS reverts to the PowerOK status in the case of UPS modes
without shutdown.
The tRecoverTime must be somewhat longer than the maximum holding time of the
UPS, since the UPS switches off even when the voltage returns.
VAR_OUTPUT
VAR_OUTPUT
bPowerFailDetect : BOOL; (* TRUE while powerfailure is detected *)
eState : E_S_UPS_State; (* current ups state *)
END_VAR
E_S_UPS_State
bPowerFailDetect : True during the power failure; False if the supply voltage is present.
eState : Internal state of the function block, for values see E_S_UPS_State.
VAR_GLOBAL
VAR_GLOBAL
eGlobalSUpsState : E_S_UPS_State; (* current ups state *)
END_VAR
E_S_UPS_State
eGlobalUpsState : Internal state of the function block as a global copy of the VAR_OUTPUT eState; for
values see E_S_UPS_State.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
51
Programming
Prerequisites
Development environment
TwinCAT v2.11.0 build
2220 or higher (R3)
52
Target platform
Hardware
ARM
Seconds UPS
Version: 1.3
PLC libraries to be
linked
TcSystemCX80xx.lib
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Programming
7.2.2
Data types
TYPE E_S_UPS_Mode
eSUPS_WrPersistData_Shutdown: Schreiben der Persistenten Daten und dann QuickShutdown
eSUPS_WrPersistData_NoShutdown: Nur Schreiben der Persistenten Daten (kein QuickShutdown)
eSUPS_ImmediateShutdown: Nur QuickShutdown (kein Schreiben der Persistenten Daten)
eSUPS_CheckPowerStatus: Nur Status ermitteln (weder Schreiben der Persistenten Daten noch QuickShutdown)
Prerequisites
Development environment
TwinCAT v2.11.0 build
2220 or higher (R3)
Target platform
Hardware
ARM
Seconds UPS
PLC libraries to be
linked
TcSystemCX80xx.lib
TYPE E_S_UPS_State
eSUPS_PowerOK: in allen Modi: Versorgungsspannung ist OK
eSUPS_PowerFailure: in allen Modi: Versorgungsspannung fehlerhaft (steht nur einen Zyklus an)
eSUPS_WritePersistentData: im Modus eSUPS_WrPersistData_Shutdown: Schreiben der Persistenten Daten ist aktiv
im Modus eSUPS_WrPersistData_NoShutdown: Schreiben der Persistenten Daten ist aktiv
eSUPS_QuickShutdown: im Modus eSUPS_WrPersistData_Shutdown: QuickShutdown ist aktiv
im Modus eSUPS_ImmediateShutdown: QuickShutdown ist aktiv
eSUPS_WaitForRecover: im Modus eSUPS_WrPersistData_NoShutdown: Warten auf Wiederkehr der Spannung
im Modus eSUPS_CheckPowerStatus: Warten auf Wiederkehr der Spannung
eSUPS_WaitForPowerOFF: im Modus eSUPS_WrPersistData_Shutdown: Warten auf das Abschalten durch die USV
im Modus eSUPS_ImmediateShutdown: Warten auf das Abschalten durch die USV
Prerequisites
Development environment
TwinCAT v2.11.0 build
2220 or higher (R3)
Target platform
Hardware
ARM
Seconds UPS
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
PLC libraries to be
linked
TcSystemCX80xx.lib
53
Programming
7.3
Diagnostics
7.3.1
FUNCTION F_CX80xx_ADDRESS
With this function the address selection switch or the DIP switch of the CX80xx device can be read out.
Here, for example, you can activate different parts of the program depending on the address by reading the
switch position.
VAR_INPUT
VAR_INPUT
iCX_Typ : INT; END_VAR
iCX_Typ : The CX type used is entered here - just the number without the designation CX: for
example, CX8031 is then entered as 8031.
VAR_OUTPUT
F_CX80xx_ADDRESS : INT;
F_CX80xx_ADDRESS : -1, non-implemented CX, address of the switch
Prerequisites
Development environment
TwinCAT v2.11.0 build
2220 or higher (R3)
Target platform
Hardware
ARM
CX80xx
7.4
CAN
7.4.1
Reading the CAN baud rate
PLC libraries to be
linked
TcSystemCX80xx.lib
The baud rate can be displayed and evaluated via InfoData[1]. This can be helpful for slaves with AutoBaud,
to ascertain whether the right baud rate was found if there is an issue with the communication, for example.
NodeState value
0x01040400
0x01040600
0x01040C00
0x010A0C00
0x01160C00
0x011C0C00
0x013A0C00
0x01940C00
0x01941A10
54
Description
1 MBaud
800 kBaud
500 kBaud
250 kBaud
125 kBaud
100 kBaud
50 kBaud
20 kBaud
10 kBaud
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Programming
7.4.2
Sending any CAN message
Sending any CAN message
The ADSWRITE command can be used to send any CAN message.
Input parameters
NETID
Port number
IDXGRP
IDXOFFS
LEN
SRCADDR
Description
NetId of the CAN interface
200
16#0000F921
0
11 bytes
Pointer to an 11 byte ARRAY
Table 3: Structure of the 11 byte CAN data
Byte
Description
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
COB-ID LowByte
COB-ID HighByte
LEN (length)
Data[1]
Data[2]
Data[3]
Data[4]
Data[5]
Data[6]
Data[7]
Data[8]
Example Node 7 SDO 0x607
Len 8 Download Request 0x2100
(Index)
Sub Index 1 - Value "1"
0x06 (SDO Low Byte)
0x07 (SDO High Byte)
0x08 (LEN, may be 5 in this case)
0x22 (Download Request)
0x00 (Index Low Byte)
0x21 (Index High Byte)
0x01 (Sub Index)
0x01 (Value "1")
0x00
0x00
0x00
7.4.3
CX8050 Master
7.4.3.1
SDO communication from the PLC
ADS blocks are used for SDO communication from the PLC. These blocks can be used for sending SDO
telegrams and receiving the response of the slave (ADSWRITE / ADSREAD).
Input parameters
NETID
Port number
IDXGRP
IDXOFFS
LEN
Description
ADS NetID of the CAN interface
0x1000hex + NodeId (slave number)
SDO Index
SDO Subindex
Length of SDO data (1...4)
Setting individual CANopen nodes to pre-operational or operational state
The ADSWRTCTL block can be used to set individual CANopen nodes to pre-operational or operational
state.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
55
Programming
Input parameters
NETID
Port number
ADSSTATE
DEVSTATE
LEN
SRCADDR
Description
ADS NetID of the CAN interface
0x1000hex + NodeId (slave number)
ADSSTATE_RUN
0 - Pre / 1 - Operational
0
0
Restarting the CAN interface
The ADSWRTCTL block can be used to stop and restart the SSB. It should be stopped first before restarting
it.
Input parameters
NETID
Port number
ADSSTATE
DEVSTATE
LEN
SRCADDR
7.4.3.2
Description
ADS NetID of the CAN interface
200dec
ADSSTATE_STOP, ADSSTATE_RUN
0
0
0
Emergency telegrams and diagnostics
The status of the CAN slave is indicated by NodeState. The DiagFlag is set if an emergency telegram was
received. The EmergencyCounter is incremented with each emergency telegram.
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CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Programming
NodeState value
0
1
2
4
5
8
11
12
13
14
20
22
23
Description
No error
Node deactivated
Node not found
SDO syntax error at Start Up
SDO data mismatch at Start Up
Node start up in progress
Bus-OFF
Pre-Operational
Servere bus fault
Guarding: toggle error
TxPDO too short
Expected TxPDO is missing
Node is Operational but not all TxPDOs were
received
ADS Port 200
Reading of emergency telegrams with AdsRead
Input parameters
NETID
Port number
IDXGRP
IDXOFFS
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Description
NetId of the CAN interface
200
16#xxxxF180 (xxxx) Node-Id, the Diag flag is only
reset when at least 106 bytes are read
16#xxxxF181 (xxxx) Node-Id, the Diag flag is reset
immediately
Byte Offset
Version: 1.3
57
Programming
Table 4: Description of the array
Offset
0-1
Bit
Bit 0
Bit 1
4-5
Bit 2
Bit 3 - 15
Bit 0 - 14
Bit 15
Bit 0 - 4
6
Bit 5 - 15
Bit 0 - 7
7
Bit 0 - 7
8-9
10
11
12
13
14 - 15
16 - 19
20 - 23
24 - 25
Bit 0 - 7
Bit 0 - 7
Bit 0 - 7
Bit 0 - 7
Bit 0 - 7
Bit 0 - 15
2-3
Value / description
reserved
Boot up message not received or
incorrect
Emergency-Overflow
reserved
TX-PDO (i+1) received
All TX PDOs 16-n received
1: Incorrect TX PDO length
2: Synchronous TX PDO absent
3: Node signalling PREOPERATIONAL
4: Event timer timed out for TX
PDO
5: No response and guarding is
activated
6: Toggling missed several times
and guarding activated
Associated COB ID
1: Incorrect value during SDO
upload
2: Incorrect length during SDO
upload
3: Abort during SDO up/download
4: Incorrect date during a boot-up
message
5: Timeout while waiting for a bootup message
2: Incorrect SDO command
specifier
3: SDO toggle bit has not changed
4: SDO length too great
5: SDO-Abort
6: SDO-Timeout
SDO up/download index
SDO up/download sub-index
reserved
Abort errorClass
Abort errorCode
Abort additionalCode
Read value (if offset 6 = 1)
Expected value (if offset 6 = 1)
Number of consecutive
emergencies
Emergencies (8 bytes each)
26-n
58
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Programming
7.4.4
CX8051 Slave
7.4.4.1
Receiving SDO data in the PLC
SDO data that are unknown to the CANopen part of the software and cannot be processed automatically are
transferred to the PLC, where they are evaluated and answered via ADS notification.
To this end the ADS port must be enabled in the System Manager under CAN device (CX8051).
SDO Read request
Data to be read must be received with ADSREADIND and answered with ADSREADRES.
Input parameter ADSREADIND
NETID
Port number
IDXGRP
IDXOFFS
LEN
Description
NetID of the CAN interface
0x1000hex + node number
16#8000_0000 + SDO Index (IDXGRP.31 = ADSNotification)
SDO sub index
not required for reading
You now have to respond to the ADS indication with an ADS read response.
Input parameter ADSREADRES
NETID
Port number
INVOKEID
RESULT
LEN
Description
NetID of the CAN interface
0x1000hex + node number
INVOKEID of the ADSREADIND block
error <> 0, error-free = 0
Length of the data
SDO Write request
Data to be written must be received with ADSWRITEIND and answered with ADSWRITERES.
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Output parameter ADSWRITEIND
NETID
Port number
IDXGRP
IDXOFFS
LEN
Description
NetID of the CAN interface
0x1000hex + node number
16#8000_0000 + SDO Index (IDXGRP.31 = ADS
Notification)
SDO Subindex
Number of received data in bytes
You now have to respond to the ADS indication with an ADS write response.
Input parameter ADSWRITERES
NETID
Port number
INVOKEID
RESULT
7.4.4.2
Description
NetID of the CAN interface
0x1000hex + node number
INVOKEID of the ADSWRITEIND block
error <> 0, error-free = 0
Switching slave node to PreOp from the PLC
The ADSWRTCTL block can be used to set individual CANopen nodes to pre-operational or operational
state. A fixed baud rate is required for this purpose.
Input parameters
NETID
Port number
ADSSTATE
DEVSTATE
LEN
SRCADDR
60
Description
NetId of the CAN interface
0x1000hex + NodeId (slave number)
ADSSTATE_RUN
0 - Pre / 1 - Operational
0
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8
Ethernet X001 Interface
8.1
System introduction
8.1.1
Ethernet
Ethernet was originally developed by DEC, Intel and XEROX (as the "DIX" standard) for passing data
between office devices. The term nowadays generally refers to the IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD specification,
published in 1985. Because of the high acceptance around the world this technology is available everywhere
and is very economical. This means that it is easy to make connections to existing networks.
There are now a number of quite different transmission media: coaxial cable (10Base5), optical fiber
(10BaseF) or twisted pairs (10BaseT) with screen (STP) or without screen (UTP). A variety of topologies
such as ring, line or star can be constructed with Ethernet.
Ethernet transmits Ethernet packets from a sender to one or more receivers. This transmission takes place
without acknowledgement, and without the repetition of lost packets. To achieve reliable data
communication, there are protocols, such as TCP/IP, that can run on top of Ethernet.
MAC-ID
The sender and receiver of Ethernet packets are addressed by means of the MAC-ID. The MAC-ID is a 6
byte identification code unique to every Ethernet device in the world. The MAC-ID consists of two parts. The
first part (i.e. the first 3 bytes) is a manufacturer identifier. The identifier for Beckhoff is 00 01 05. The next 3
bytes are assigned by the manufacturer and implement a unique serial number. The MAC-ID can, for
example, be used for the BootP protocol in order to set the TCP/IP number. This involves sending a
telegram containing the information such as the name or the TCP/IP number to the corresponding node. You
can read the MAC-ID with the KS2000 configuration software.
The Internet Protocol (IP)
The internet protocol (IP) forms the basis of this data communication. IP transports data packets from one
device to another; the devices can be in the same network, or in different networks. IP here looks after the
address management (finding and assigning MAC-IDs), segmentation and routing. Like the Ethernet
protocol, IP does not guarantee that the data is transported - data packets can be lost, or their sequence can
be changed.
TCP/IP was developed to provide standardized, reliable data exchange between any number of different
networks. TCP/IP is thus substantially independent of the hardware or software being used. Although the
term is often used as if it were a single concept, a number of protocols are layered together: e.g. IP, TCP,
UDP, ARP and ICMP.
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) which runs on top of IP is a connection-oriented transport protocol.
It includes error detection and error handling mechanisms. Lost telegrams are repeated.
User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
UDP is connectionless transport protocol. It provides no control mechanism when exchanging data between
sender and receiver. This results in a higher processing speed than, for example, TCP. Checking whether or
not the telegram has arrived must be carried out by the higher-level protocol.
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Ethernet X001 Interface
Fig. 4: Ethernet protocol
Protocols running on top of TCP/IP and UDP/IP
The following protocols can run on top of TCP/IP or UDP:
• ADS
• ModbusTCP
Both of these protocols are implemented in parallel on the Bus Coupler, so that no configuration is needed to
activate the protocols.
ADS can be used on top of either TCP or UDP, but ModbusTCP is always based on TCP/IP.
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8.1.2
Topology example
CX805x
Observe system load
Note
Observe the system load of your CX805x when using further Ethernet protocols such as
ModbusTCP/UDP or Web Services. A high load can slow down Ethernet communication
significantly.
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8.2
ADS-Communication
Communication
The ADS protocol (ADS: Automation Device Specification) is a transport layer within the TwinCAT system. It
was developed for data exchange between the different software modules, for instance the communication
between the NC and the PLC. This protocol enables communication with other tools from any point within
the TwinCAT. If communication with other PCs or devices is required, the ADS protocol can use TCP/IP as a
basis. Within a networked system it is thus possible to reach all data from any point.
The ADS protocol runs on top of the TCP/IP or UDP/IP protocols. It allows the user within the Beckhoff
system to use almost any connecting route to communicate with all the connected devices and to
parameterize them. Outside the Beckhoff system a variety of methods are available to exchange data with
other software tools.
Software interfaces
ADS-OCX
The ADS-OCX is an Active-X component. It offers a standard interface to, for instance, Visual Basic, Delphi,
etc.
ADS-DLL
You can link the ADS-DLL (DLL: Dynamic Link Library) into your C program.
OPC
The OPC interface is a standardized interface for communication used in automation engineering. Beckhoff
offer an OPC server for this purpose.
Protocol
The ADS functions provide a method for accessing the Bus Coupler information directly from the PC. ADS
function blocks can be used in TwinCAT PLC Control for this. The function blocks are contained in the
PLCSystem.lib library. It is also equally possible to call the ADS functions from AdsOCX, ADSDLL or OPC.
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AMSNetID
The AMSNetID provides a reference to the device that is to be addressed. This is taken from the MAC
address of the first Ethernet port (X001) and is printed on the side of the CX80xx. For the AMSNetID the
bytes 3 to 6 plus ".1.1" are typically used.
Example:
MAC address 00-01-05-01-02-03
AMSNetID 5.1.2.3.1.1
Port number
The port number distinguishes sub-elements in the connected device.
Port 801: local process data PLC runtime 1
Index group
The index group distinguishes different data within a port.
Index offset
Indicates the offset, the byte from which reading or writing is to start.
Len
Gives the length of the data, in bytes, that is to be read or written.
TCP port number
The TCP port number for the ADS protocol is 48898 or 0xBF02.
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9
CAN
9.1
Introduction
CANopen is a widely used CAN application layer, developed by the CAN in Automation association (CiA,
http://www.can-cia.org), which has meanwhile been adopted for international standardization.
Device Model
CANopen consists of the protocol definitions (communication profile) and of the device profiles that
standardize the data contents for the various device classes. Process data objects (PDO) [} 71] are used for
fast communication of input and output data. The CANopen device parameters and process data are stored
in a structured object directory. Any data in this object directory is accessed via service data objects (SDO).
There are, additionally, a few special objects (such as telegram types) for network management (NMT),
synchronization, error messages and so on.
Communication Types
CANopen defines a number of communication classes for the input and output data (process data objects):
• Event driven [} 71]: Telegrams are sent as soon as their contents have changed. This means that the
process image as a whole is not continuously transmitted, only its changes.
• Cyclic synchronous [} 71]: A SYNC telegram causes the modules to accept the output data that was
previously received, and to send new input data.
• Requested [} 71]: A CAN data request telegram causes the modules to send their input data.
The desired communication type is set by the Transmission Type [} 71] parameter.
Device Profile
The BECKHOFF CANopen devices support all types of I/O communication, and correspond to the device
profile for digital and analog input/output modules (DS401 Version 1). For reasons of backwards
compatibility, the default mapping was not adapted to the DS401 V2 profile version.
Transmission Rates
Nine transmission rates from 10 kbaud up to 1 Mbaud are available for different bus lengths. The effective
utilization of the bus bandwidth allows CANopen to achieve short system reaction times at relatively low data
rates.
Topology
Topology [} 26]
CAN is based on a linear topology. The number of devices participating in each network is logically limited by
CANopen to 128, but physically the present generation of drivers allows up to 64 nodes in one network
segment. The maximum possible size of the network for any particular data rate is limited by the signal
transit time required on the bus medium. For 1 Mbaud, for instance, the network may extend 25 m, whereas
at 50 kbaud the network may reach up to 1000 m. At low data rates the size of the network can be increased
by repeaters, which also allow the construction of tree structures.
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Bus access procedures
CAN utilizes the Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) procedure, i.e. all participating devices have the
same right of access to the bus and may access it as soon as it is free (multi-master bus access). The
exchange of messages is thus not device-oriented but message-oriented. This means that every message is
unambiguously marked with a prioritized identifier. In order to avoid collisions on the bus when messages
are sent by different devices, a bit-wise bus arbitration is carried out at the start of the data transmission. The
bus arbitration assigns bus bandwidth to the messages in the sequence of their priority. At the end of the
arbitration phase only one bus device occupies the bus, collisions are avoided and the bandwidth is optimally
exploited.
Configuration and parameterization
The TwinCAT System Manager allows all the CANopen parameters to be set conveniently. An "EDS" file (an
electronic data sheet) is available on the BECKHOFF website (http://www.beckhoff.com) for the
parameterization of BECKHOFF CANopen devices using configuration tools from other manufacturers.
Certification
The BECKHOFF CANopen devices have a powerful implementation of the protocol, and are certified by the
CAN in Automation Association (http://www.can-cia.org).
9.2
Protocol description
9.2.1
Network Management
Simple Boot-Up
CANopen allows the distributed network to boot in a very simple way. After initialization, the modules are
automatically in the Pre-Operational state. In this state it is already possible to access the object directory
using service data objects (SDOs) with default identifiers, so that the modules can be configured. Since
default settings exist for all the entries in the object directory, it is in most cases possible to omit any explicit
configuration.
Only one CAN message is then required to start the module: Start_Remote_Node: Identifier 0, two data
bytes: 0x01, 0x00. It switches the node into the Operational state.
Network Status
The states and the state transitions involved as CANopen boots up can be seen from the state diagram:
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CAN
Pre-Operational
After initialization the Bus Coupler goes automatically (i.e. without the need for any external command) into
the Pre-Operational state. In this state it can be configured, since the service data objects (SDOs) are
already active. The process data objects, on the other hand, are still locked.
Operational
In the Operational state the process data objects are also active.
If external influences (such as a CAN error, or absence of output voltage) or internal influences (such as a KBus error) mean that it is no longer possible for the Bus Coupler to set outputs, to read inputs or to
communicate, it attempts to send an appropriate emergency message, goes into the fault state, and thus
returns to the Pre-Operational state. In this way the NMT status machine in the network master can also
immediately detect fatal errors.
Stopped
In the Stopped state (formerly: Prepared) data communication with the Coupler is no longer possible - only
NMT messages are received. The outputs go into the fault state.
State Transitions
The network management messages have a very simple structure: CAN identifier 0, with two bytes of data
content. The first data byte contains what is known as the command specifier (cs), and the second data byte
contains the node address, the node address 0 applying to all nodes (broadcast).
11 bit
identifier
0x00
2 bytes of user data
cs
Node-ID
The following table gives an overview of all the CANopen state transitions and the associated commands
(command specifier in the NMT master telegram):
Status transition
(1)
(2)
(3), (6)
(4), (7)
(5), (8)
(9), (10), (11)
(12), (13), (14)
Command Specifier cs Explanation
- The initialization state is reached
automatically at power-up
- After initialization the preoperational state is reached
automatically - this involves
sending the boot-up message.
cs = 1 = 0x01 Start_Remote_Node.
Starts the module, enables outputs,
starts transmission of PDOs.
cs = 128 = 0x80 Enter_Pre-Operational. Stops PDO
transmission, SDO still active.
cs = 2 = 0x02 Stop_Remote_Node.
Outputs go into the fault state,
SDO and PDO switched off.
cs = 129 = 0x81 Reset_Node. Carries out a reset.
All objects are reset to their poweron defaults.
cs = 130 = 0x82 Reset_Communication. Carries out
a reset of the communication
functions. Objects 0x1000 0x1FFF are reset to their power-on
defaults.
Example 1
The following telegram puts all the modules in the network into the error state (outputs in a safe state):
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11 bit
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0x00
2 bytes of user data
0x02
0x00
Example 2
The following telegram resets node 17:
11 bit
identifier
0x00
2 bytes of user data
0x81
0x11
Boot-up message
After the initialization phase and the self test, the Bus Coupler sends the boot-up message, a CAN message
with no data bytes and with the identifier of the emergency message: CAN-ID = 0x700 + Node-ID. In this way
temporary failure of a module during operation (e.g. due to a voltage interruption), or a module that is
switched on at a later stage, can be reliably detected, even without Node Guarding. The sender can be
determined from the message identifier (see default identifier allocation).
It is also possible, with the aid of the boot-up message, to recognize the nodes present in the network at
start-up with a simple CAN monitor, without having to make write access to the bus (such as a scan of the
network by reading out parameter 0x1000).
Finally, the boot-up message communicates the end of the initialization phase; the Bus Coupler signals that
it can now be configured or started.
Firmware BA
Up to firmware status BA the emergency identifier was used for the boot up message.
Note
Format of the Boot-up message
11 bit
1 byte of user data
identifier
0x700
0x00
(=1792) +
Node-ID
Node Monitoring
Heartbeat and guarding mechanisms are available to monitor failures in the CANopen network. These are of
particular importance for CANopen, since modules do not regularly speak in the event-driven mode of
operation. In the case of "guarding", the devices are cyclically interrogated about their status by means of a
data request telegram (remote frame), whereas with "heartbeat" the nodes transmit their status on their own
initiative.
Guarding: Node Guarding and Life Guarding
Node Guarding is used to monitor the non-central peripheral modules, while they themselves can use Life
Guarding to detect the failure of the guarding master. Guarding involves the master sending remote frames
(remote transmit requests) to the guarding identifier of the slaves that are to be monitored. These reply with
the guarding message. This contains the slave’s status code and a toggle bit that has to change after every
message. If either the status or the toggle bit do not agree with that expected by the NMT master, or if there
is no answer at all, the master assumes that there is a slave fault.
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Guarding procedure
Protocol
The toggle bit (t) transmitted in the first guarding telegram has the value 0. After this, the bit must change
(toggle) in every guarding telegram so that the loss of a telegram can be detected. The node uses the
remaining seven bits to transmit its network status (s):
s
4 = 0x04
5 = 0x05
127 = 0x7F
Status
Stopped (formerly: prepared)
Operational
Pre-Operational
Example
The guarding message for node 27 (0x1B) must be requested by a remote frame having identifier 0x71B
(1819dec). If the node is Operational, the first data byte of the answer message alternates between 0x05 and
0x85, whereas in the Pre-Operational state it alternates between 0x7F and 0xFF.
Guard time and life time factor
If the master requests the guard messages in a strict cycle, the slave can detect the failure of the master. In
this case, if the slave fails to receive a message request from the master within the set Node Life Time (a
guarding error), it assumes that the master has failed (the watchdog function). It then puts its outputs into the
error state, sends an emergency telegram, and returns to the pre-operational state. After a guarding time-out
the procedure can be re-started by transmitting a guarding telegram again.
The node life time is calculated from the guard time (object 0x100C) and life time factor (object 0x100D)
parameters:
Life time = guard time x life time factor
If either of these two parameters is "0" (the default setting), the master will not be monitored (no life
guarding).
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Heartbeat: Node Monitoring without Remote Frame
In the heart beat procedure, each node transmits its status message cyclically on its own initiative. There is
therefore no need to use remote frames, and the bus is less heavily loaded than under the guarding
procedure.
The master also regularly transmits its heartbeat telegram, so that the slaves are also able to detect failure of
the master.
Heartbeat procedure
Protocol
The toggle bit is not used in the heart beat procedure. The nodes send their status cyclically (s). See
Guarding.
9.2.2
Process Data Objects (PDO)
Introduction
In many fieldbus systems the entire process image is continuously transferred - usually in a more or less
cyclic manner. CANopen is not limited to this communication principle, since the multi-master bus access
protocol allows CAN to offer other methods. Under CANopen the process data is not transferred in a master/
slave procedure, but follows instead the producer-consumer model. In this model, a bus node transmits its
data, as a producer, on its own accord. This might, for example, be triggered by an event. All the other nodes
listen, and use the identifier to decide whether they are interested in this telegram, and handle it accordingly.
These are the consumers.
The process data in CANopen is divided into segments with a maximum of 8 bytes. These segments are
known as process data objects (PDOs). The PDOs each correspond to a CAN telegram, whose specific CAN
identifier is used to allocate them and to determine their priority. Receive PDOs (RxPDOs) and transmit
PDOs (TxPDOs) are distinguished, the name being chosen from the point of view of the device: an input/
output module sends its input data with TxPDOs and receives its output data in the RxPDOs. This naming
convention is retained in the TwinCAT System Manager.
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Communication parameters
The PDOs can be given different communication parameters according to the requirements of the
application. Like all the CANopen parameters, these are also available in the device's object directory, and
can be accessed by means of the service data objects. The parameters for the receive PDOs are at index
0x1400 (RxPDO1) onwards. There can be up to 512 RxPDOs (ranging up to index 0x15FF). In the same
way, the entries for the transmit PDOs are located from index 0x1800 (TxPDO1) to 0x19FF (TxPDO512).
The BECKHOFF Bus Couplers or Fieldbus Coupler Box modules make 16 RxPDO and TxPDOs available
for the exchange of process data (although the figure for Economy and LowCost BK5110 and LC5100
Couplers and the Fieldbus Boxes is 5 PDOs each, since these devices manage a lower quantity of process
data). The FC510x CANopen master card supports up to 192 transmit and 192 receive PDOs for each
channel - although this is restricted by the size of the DPRAM. Up to 32 TxPDOs and 32 RxPDOs can be
handled in slave mode.
For each existing process data object there is an associated communication parameter object. The TwinCAT
System Manager automatically assigns the set parameters to the relevant object directory entries. These
entries and their significance for the communication of process data are explained below.
PDO Identifier
The most important communication parameter in a PDO is the CAN identifier (also know as the
communication object identifier, or COB-ID). It is used to identify the data, and determines their priority for
bus access. For each CAN data telegram there may only be one sender node (producer), although all
messages sent in the CAN broadcast procedure can be received, as described, by any number of nodes
(consumers). Thus a node can make its input information available to a number of bus devices at the same
time - even without transferring them through a logical bus master. The identifier is located in sub-index 1 of
the communication parameter set. It is coded as a 32-bit value in which the least significant 11 bits (bits
0...10) contain the identifier itself. The data width of the object of 32 bits also allows 29-bit identifiers in
accordance with CAN 2.0B to be entered, although the default identifiers always refer to the more usual 11bit versions. Generally speaking, CANopen is economical it its use of the available identifiers, so that the use
of the 29-bit versions remains limited to unusual applications. It is therefore also not supported by a
Beckhoff's CANopen devices. The highest bit (bit 31) can be used to activate the process data object or to
turn it off.
A complete identifier list [} 143] is provided in the appendix.
PDO linking
In the system of default identifiers, all the nodes (here: slaves) communicate with one central station (the
master), since slave nodes do not listen by default to the transmit identifier of any other slave node.
Default identifier allocation: Master/Slave
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PDO linking: Peer to Peer
If the consumer-producer model of CANopen PDOs is to be used for direct data exchange between nodes
(without a master), the identifier allocation must be appropriately adapted, so that the TxPDO identifier of the
producer agrees with the RxPDO identifier of the consumer: This procedure is known as PDO linking. It
permits, for example, easy construction of electronic drives in which several slave axes simultaneously listen
to the actual value in the master axis TxPDO.
PDO Communication Types: Outline
CANopen offers a number of possible ways to transmit process data (see also: Notes on PDO
Parameterization [} 78]).)
.
Event driven
The ”event" is the alteration of an input value, the data being transmitted immediately after this change. The
event-driven flow can make optimal use of the bus bandwidth, since instead of the whole process image it is
only the changes in it that are transmitted. A short reaction time is achieved at the same time, since when an
input value changes it is not necessary to wait for the next interrogation from a master.
As from CANopen Version 4 it is possible to combine the event driven type of communication with a cyclic
update. Even if an event has not just occurred, event driven TxPDOs are sent after the event timer has
elapsed. If an event does occur, the event timer is reset. For RxPDOs the event timer is used as a watchdog
in order to monitor the arrival of event driven PDOs . If a PDO does not arrive within a set period of time, the
bus node adopts the error state.
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Polled
The PDOs can also be polled by data request telegrams (remote frames). In this way it is possible to get the
input process image of event-driven inputs onto the bus, even when they do not change, for instance through
a monitoring or diagnostic device brought into the network while it is running. The time behavior of remote
frame and answer telegrams depends on what CAN controller is in use (Fig. 8). Components with full
integrated message filtering ("FullCAN") usually answer a data request telegram immediately, transmitting
data that is waiting in the appropriate transmit buffer - it is the responsibility of the application to see that the
data there is continuously updated. CAN controllers with simple message filtering (BasicCAN) on the other
hand pass the request on to the application which can now compose the telegram with the latest data. This
does take longer, but does mean that the data is up-to-date. BECKHOFF use CAN controllers following the
principle of Basic CAN.
Since this device behavior is usually not transparent to the user, and because there are CAN controllers still
in use that do not support remote frames at all, polled communication can only with reservation be
recommended for operative running.
Synchronized
It is not only for drive applications that it is worthwhile to synchronize the determination of the input
information and the setting the outputs. For this purpose CANopen provides the SYNC object, a CAN
telegram of high priority but containing no user data, whose reception is used by the synchronized nodes as
a trigger for reading the inputs or for setting the outputs.
PDO transmission types: Parameterisation
The PDO transmission type parameter specifies how the transmission of the PDO is triggered, or how
received PDOs are handled.
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Transmission
type
0
1-240
241-251
252
253
254, 255
Cyclical
Acyclical
Synchronous
X
X
X
X
- reserved -
Asynchronous Only RTR
X
X
X
X
X
The type of transmission is parameterized for RxPDOs in the objects at 0x1400ff, sub-index 2, and for
TxPDOs in the objects at 0x1800ff, sub-index 2.
Acyclic Synchronous
PDOs of transmission type 0 function synchronously, but not cyclically. An RxPDO is only evaluated after the
next SYNC telegram has been received. In this way, for instance, axis groups can be given new target
positions one after another, but these positions only become valid at the next SYNC - without the need to be
constantly outputting reference points. A device whose TxPDO is configured for transmission type 0 acquires
its input data when it receives the SYNC (synchronous process image) and then transmits it if the data
correspond to an event (such as a change in input) having occurred. Transmission type 0 thus combines
transmission for reasons that are event driven with a time for transmission (and, as far as possible, sampling)
and processing given by the reception of "SYNC".
Cyclic Synchronous
In transmission types 1-240 the PDO is transmitted cyclically: after every ”nth" SYNC (n = 1...240). Since
transmission types can be combined on a device as well as in the network, it is possible, for example, for a
fast cycle to be agreed for digital inputs (n = 1), whereas the data for analog inputs is transmitted in a slower
cycle (e.g. n = 10). RxPDOs do not generally distinguish between transmission types 0...240: a PDO that has
been received is set to valid when the next SYNC is received. The cycle time (SYNC rate) can be monitored
(object 0x1006), so that if the SYNC fails the device reacts in accordance with the definition in the device
profile, and switches, for example, its outputs into the fault state.
The FC510x card provides full support for the synchronous type of communication: transmitting the SYNC
telegram is coupled to the linked task, so that new input data is available every time the task begins. The
card will recognize the absence of a synchronous PDO, and will report it to the application.
Only RTR
Transmission types 252 and 253 apply to process data objects that are transmitted exclusively on request by
a remote frame. 252 is synchronous: when the SYNC is received the process data is acquired. It is only
transmitted on request. 253 is asynchronous. The data here is acquired continuously, and transmitted on
request. This type of transmission is not generally recommended, because fetching input data from some
CAN controllers is only partially supported. Because, furthermore, the CAN controllers sometimes answer
remote frames automatically (without first requesting up-to-date input data), there are circumstances in which
it is questionable whether the polled data is up-to-date. Transmission types 252 and 253 are for this reason
not supported by the BECKHOFF PC cards.
Asynchronous
The transmission types 254 + 255 are asynchronous, but may also be event-driven. In transmission type
254, the event is specific to the manufacturer, whereas for type 255 it is defined in the device profile. In the
simplest case, the event is the change of an input value - this means that every change in the value is
transmitted. The asynchronous transmission type can be coupled with the event timer, thus also providing
input data when no event has just occurred.
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Version: 1.3
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CAN
Inhibit time
The ”inhibit time" parameter can be used to implement a ”transmit filter" that does not increase the reaction
time for relatively new input alterations, but is active for changes that follow immediately afterwards. The
inhibit time (transmit delay time) specifies the minimum length of time that must be allowed to elapse
between the transmission of two of the same telegrams. If the inhibit time is used, the maximum bus loading
can be determined, so that the worst case latency can then be found.
Although the BECKHOFF FC510x PC cards can parameterize the inhibit time on slave devices, they do not
themselves support it. The transmitted PDOs become automatically spread out (transmit delay) as a result of
the selected PLC cycle time - and there is little value in having the PLC run faster than the bus bandwidth
permits. The bus loading, furthermore, can be significantly affected by the synchronous communication.
Event Timer
An event timer for transmit PDOs can be specified by sub-index 5 in the communication parameters. Expiry
of this timer is treated as an additional event for the corresponding PDO, so that the PDO will then be
transmitted. If the application event occurs during a timer period, it will also be transmitted, and the timer is
reset.
In the case of receive PDOs, the timer is used to set a watchdog interval for the PDO: the application is
informed if no corresponding PDO has been received within the set period. The FC510x can in this way
monitor each individual PDO.
Notes on PDO Parameterization [} 78]
PDO Mapping
PDO mapping refers to mapping of the application objects (real time data) from the object directory to the
process data objects. The CANopen device profile provide a default mapping for every device type, and this
is appropriate for most applications. Thus the default mapping for digital I/O simply represents the inputs and
outputs in their physical sequence in the transmit and receive process data objects.
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The default PDOs for drives contain 2 bytes each of a control and status word and a set or actual value for
the relevant axis.
The current mapping can be read by means of corresponding entries in the object directory. These are
known as the mapping tables. The first location in the mapping table (sub-index 0) contains the number of
mapped objects that are listed after it. The tables are located in the object directory at index 0x1600ff for the
RxPDOs and at 0x1A00ff for the TxPDOs.
Digital and analog input/output modules: Read out the I/O number
The current number of digital and analog inputs and outputs can be determined or verified by reading out the
corresponding application objects in the object directory:
Parameters
Number of digital input bytes
Number of digital output bytes
Number of analog inputs
Number of analog outputs
Object directory address
Index 0x6000, sub-index 0
Index 0x6200, sub-index 0
Index 0x6401, sub-index 0
Index 0x6411, sub-index 0
Variable mapping
As a rule, the default mapping of the process data objects already satisfies the requirements. For special
types of application the mapping can nevertheless be altered: the Beckhoff CANopen Bus Couplers, for
instance, thus support variable mapping, in which the application objects (input and output data) can be
freely allocated to the PDOs. The mapping tables must be configured for this: as from Version 4 of
CANopen, only the following procedure is permitted, and must be followed precisely:
1.
2.
3.
4.
First delete the PDO (set 0x1400ff, or 0x1800ff, sub-index 1, bit 31 to "1")
Set sub-index 0 in the mapping parameters (0x1600ff or 0x1A00ff) to "0"
Change mapping entries (0x1600ff or 0x1A00ff, SI 1..8)
Set sub-index 0 in the mapping parameters to the valid value. The device then checks the entries for
consistency.
5. Create PDO by entering the identifier (0x1400ff or 0x1800ff, sub-index 1).
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Dummy Mapping
A further feature of CANopen is the mapping of placeholders, or dummy entries. The data type entries stored
in the object directory, which do not themselves have data, are used as placeholders. If such entries are
contained in the mapping table, the corresponding data from the device is not evaluated. In this way, for
instance, a number of drives can be supplied with new set values using a single CAN telegram, or outputs on
a number of nodes can be set simultaneously, even in event-driven mode.
9.2.3
PDO Parameterization
Even though the majority of CANopen networks operate satisfactorily with the default settings, i.e. with the
minimum of configuration effort, it is wise at least to check whether the existing bus loading is reasonable:
80% bus loading may be acceptable for a network operating purely in cyclic synchronous modes, but for a
network with event-driven traffic this value would generally be too high, as there is hardly any bandwidth
available for additional events.
Consider the Requirements of the Application
The communication of the process data must be optimized in the light of application requirements which are
likely to be to some extent in conflict. These include
• Little work on parameterization - useable default values are optimal
• Guaranteed reaction time for specific events
• Cycle time for regulation processes over the bus
• Safety reserves for bus malfunctions (enough bandwidth for the repetition of messages)
• Maximum baud rate - depends on the maximum bus length
• Desired communication paths - who is speaking with whom
The determining factor often turns out to be the available bus bandwidth (bus load).
Determine the Baud Rate
We generally begin by choosing the highest baud rate that the bus will permit. It should be borne in mind that
serial bus systems are fundamentally more sensitive to interference as the baud rate is increased. The
following rule therefore applies: just as fast as necessary. 1000 kbit/s are not usually necessary, and only to
be unreservedly recommended on networks within a control cabinet where there is no electrical isolation
between the bus nodes. Experience also tends to show that estimates of the length of bus cable laid are
often over-optimistic - the length actually laid tends to be longer.
Determine the Communication Type
Once the baud rate has been chosen it is appropriate to specify the PDO communication type(s). These
have different advantages and disadvantages:
• Cyclic synchronous communication provides an accurately predictable bus loading, and therefore a
defined time behavior - you could say that the standard case is the worst case. It is easy to configure:
The SYNC rate parameter sets the bus loading globally. The process images are synchronized: Inputs
are read at the same time, output data is set valid simultaneously, although the quality of the
synchronization depends on the implementation. The Beckhoff FC510x PC cards are capable of
synchronizing the CANopen bus system with the cycles of the application program (PLC or NC).
The guaranteed reaction time under cyclic synchronous communication is always at least as long as
the cycle time, and the bus bandwidth is not exploited optimally, since old data, i.e. data that has not
changed, is continuously transmitted. It is however possible to optimize the network through the
selection of different SYNC multiples (transmission types 1...240), so that data that changes slowly is
transmitted less often than, for instance, time-critical inputs. It must, however, be borne in mind that
input states that last for a time that is shorter than the cycle time will not necessarily be communicated.
If it is necessary for such conditions to be registered, the associated PDOs for asynchronous
communication should be provided.
• Event-driven asynchronous communication is optimal from the point of view of reaction time and the
exploitation of bus bandwidth - it can be described as "pure CAN". Your choice must, however, also
take account of the fact that it is not impossible for a large number of events to occur simultaneously,
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CAN
leading to corresponding delays before a PDO with a relatively low priority can be sent. Proper network
planning therefore necessitates a worst-case analysis. Through the use of, for instance, inhibit time
[} 71], it is also necessary to prevent a constantly changing input with a high PDO priority from blocking
the bus (technically known as a "babbling idiot"). It is for this reason that event driving is switched off by
default in the device profile of analog inputs, and must be turned on specifically. Time windows for the
transmit PDOs can be set using progress timers: the telegram is not sent again before the inhibit time
[} 71] has elapsed, and not later than the time required for the progress timer to complete.
• The communication type is parameterized by means of the transmission type [} 71].
It is also possible to combine the two PDO principles. It can, for instance, be helpful to exchange the set and
actual values of an axis controller synchronously, while limit switches, or motor temperatures with limit values
are monitored with event-driven PDOs. This combines the advantages of the two principles: synchronicity for
the axis communication and short reaction times for limit switches. In spite of being event-driven, the
distributed limit value monitoring avoids a constant addition to the bus load from the analog temperature
value.
In this example it can also be of value to deliberately manipulate the identifier allocation, in order to optimize
bus access by means of priority allocation: the highest priority is given to the PDO with the limit switch data,
and the lowest to that with the temperature values.
Optimization of bus access latency time through modification of the identifier allocation is not, however,
normally required. On the other hand the identifiers must be altered if masterless communication is to be
made possible (PDO linking [} 71]). In this example it would be possible for one RxPDO for each axis to be
allocated the same identifier as the limit switch TxPDO, so that alterations of the input value can be received
without delay.
Determining the Bus Loading
It is always worth determining the bus loading. But what bus loading values are permitted, or indeed
sensible? It is first necessary to distinguish a short burst of telegrams in which a number of CAN messages
follow one another immediately - a temporary 100% bus loading. This is only a problem if the sequence of
receive interrupts that it caused at the CAN nodes can not be handled. This would constitute a data overflow
(or CAN queue overrun). This can occur at very high baud rates (> 500 kbit/s) at nodes with software
telegram filtering and relatively slow or heavily loaded microcontrollers if, for instance, a series of remote
frames (which do not contain data bytes, and are therefore very short) follow each other closely on the bus
(at 1 Mbit/s this can generate an interrupt every 40 µs; for example, an NMT master might transmit all its
guarding requests in an unbroken sequence). This can be avoided through skilled implementation, and the
user should be able to assume that the device suppliers have taken the necessary trouble. A burst condition
is entirely normal immediately after the SYNC telegram, for instance: triggered by the SYNC, all the nodes
that are operating synchronously try to send their data at almost the same time. A large number of arbitration
processes take place, and the telegrams are sorted in order of priority for transmission on the bus. This is
not usually critical, since these telegrams do contain some data bytes, and the telegrams trigger a sequence
of receive interrupts at the CAN nodes which is indeed rapid, but is nevertheless manageable.
Bus loading most often refers to the value averaged over several primary cycles, that is the mean value over
100-500 ms. CAN, and therefore CANopen, is indeed capable of managing a bus loading of close to 100%
over long periods, but this implies that no bandwidth is available for any repetitions that may be necessitated
by interference, for asynchronous error messages, parameterization and so on. Clearly, the dominant type of
communication will have a large influence on the appropriate level of bus loading: a network with entirely
cyclic synchronous operation is always in any case near to the worst case state, and can therefore be
operated with values in the 70-80% range. The figure is very hard to state for an entirely event-driven
network: an estimate must be made of how many events additional to the current state of the system might
occur, and of how long the resulting burst might last - in other words, for how long the lowest priority
message will be delayed. If this value is acceptable to the application, then the current bus loading is
acceptable. As a rule of thumb it can usually be assumed that an event-driven network running with a base
loading of 30-40% has enough reserve for worst-case scenarios, but this assumption does not obviate the
need for a careful analysis if delays could have critical results for the plant.
The BECKHOFF FC510x PC cards indicate the bus loading via the System Manager. This variable can also
be processed in the PLC, or can be displayed in the visualization system.
The amount data in the process data objects is of course as relevant as the communication parameters: the
PDO mapping [} 71].
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CAN
9.2.4
Service Data Objects (SDO)
The parameters listed in the object directory are read and written by means of service data objects. These
SDOs are Multiplexed Domains, i.e. data structures of any size that have a multiplexer (address). The
multiplexer consists of a 16-bit index and an 8-bit sub-index that address the corresponding entries in the
object directory.
SDO protocol: access to the object directory
The CANopen Bus Couplers are servers for the SDO, which means that at the request of a client (e.g. of the
IPC or the PLC) they make data available (upload), or they receive data from the client (download). This
involves a handshake between the client and the server.
When the size of the parameter to be transferred is not more than 4 bytes, a single handshake is sufficient
(one telegram pair): For a download, the client sends the data together with its index and sub-index, and the
server confirms reception. For an upload, the client requests the data by transmitting the index and subindex of the desired parameter, and the server sends the parameter (including index and sub-index) in its
answer telegram.
The same pair of identifiers is used for both upload and download. The telegrams, which are always 8 bytes
long, encode the various services in the first data byte. All parameters with the exception of objects 1008h,
1009h and 100Ah (device name, hardware and software versions) are only at most 4 bytes long, so this
description is restricted to transmission in expedited transfer.
Protocol
The structure of the SDO telegrams is described below.
Client -> Server, Upload Request
11 bit
8 bytes of user data
identifier
0x600
0x40
Index0
(=1536de
z) + node
ID
80
Index1
SubIdx
0x00
Version: 1.3
0x00
0x00
0x00
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Parameters
Explanation
Index0 Index low byte (Unsigned16, LSB)
Index1 Index high byte (Unsigned16, MSB)
SubIdx Sub-index (Unsigned8)
Client -> Server, Upload Response
11 bit
8 bytes of user data
identifier
0x580
0x4x
Index0
(=1408de
c) + node
ID
Index1
SubIdx
Parameters
Index0
Index1
SubIdx
Data0
Data3
Data0
Data1
Data2
Data3
Explanation
Index low byte (Unsigned16, LSB)
Index high byte (Unsigned16, MSB)
Sub-index (Unsigned8)
Data low low byte (LLSB)
Data high high byte (MMSB)
Parameters whose data type is Unsigned8 are transmitted in byte D0, parameters whose type is Unsigned16
use D0 and D1.
The number of valid data bytes is coded as follows in the first CAN data byte (0x4x):
Number of param- 1
eter bytes
First CAN data byte 0x4F
2
3
4
0x4B
0x47
0x43
Client -> Server, Download Request
11 bit
8 bytes of user data
identifier
0x600
0x22
Index0
(=1536de
c) + node
ID
Index1
SubIdx
Parameters
Index0
Index1
SubIdx
Data0
Data3
Data0
Data1
Data2
Data3
Explanation
Index low byte (Unsigned16, LSB)
Index high byte (Unsigned16, MSB)
Sub-index (Unsigned8)
Data low low byte (LLSB)
Data high high byte (MMSB)
It is optionally possible to give the number of valid parameter data bytes in the first CAN data byte
Number of param- 1
eter bytes
First CAN data byte 0x2F
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
2
3
4
0x2B
0x27
0x23
Version: 1.3
81
CAN
This is, however, not generally necessary, since only the less significant data bytes up to the length of the
object directory entry that is to be written are evaluated. A download of data up to 4 bytes in length can
therefore always be achieved in Beckhoff bus nodes with 22h in the first CAN data byte.
Client -> Server, Download Response
11 bit
8 bytes of user data
identifier
0x580
0x60
Index0
(=1408de
c) + node
ID
Index1
SubIdx
Parameters
Index0
Index1
SubIdx
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
Explanation
Index low byte (Unsigned16, LSB)
Index high byte (Unsigned16, MSB)
Sub-index (Unsigned8)
Breakdown of Parameter Communication
Parameter communication is interrupted if it is faulty. The client or server send an SDO telegram with the
following structure for this purpose:
11 bit
8 bytes of user data
identifier
0x580
0x80
Index0
(client) or
0x600(ser
ver) +
node ID
Index1
SubIdx
Parameters
Index0
Index1
SubIdx
Error0
Error3
Error0
Error1
Error2
Error3
Explanation
Index low byte (Unsigned16, LSB)
Index high byte (Unsigned16, MSB)
Sub-index (Unsigned8)
SDO error code low low byte (LLSB)
SDO error code high high byte (MMSB)
List of SDO error codes (reason for abortion of the SDO transfer):
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SDO error code
0x05 03 00 00
0x05 04 00 01
0x06 01 00 00
0x06 01 00 02
0x06 02 00 00
0x06 04 00 41
0x06 04 00 42
0x06 04 00 43
0x06 04 00 47
0x06 06 00 00
0x06 07 00 10
0x06 07 00 12
0x06 07 00 13
0x06 09 00 11
0x06 09 00 30
0x06 09 00 31
0x06 09 00 32
0x06 0A 00 23
0x08 00 00 21
0x08 00 00 22
Explanation
Toggle bit not changed
SDO command specifier invalid or unknown
Access to this object is not supported
Attempt to write to a Read_Only parameter
The object is not found in the object directory
The object can not be mapped into the PDO
The number and/or length of mapped objects would
exceed the PDO length
General parameter incompatibility
General internal error in device
Access interrupted due to hardware error
Data type or parameter length do not agree or are
unknown
Data type does not agree, parameter length too great
Data type does not agree, parameter length too short
Sub-index not present
General value range error
Value range error: parameter value too great
Value range error: parameter value too small
Resource not available
Access not possible due to local application
Access not possible due to current device status
Further, manufacturer-specific error codes have been introduced for register communication (index 0x4500,
0x4501):
SDO error code
0x06 02 00 11
0x06 02 00 10
0x06 01 00 22
0x06 07 00 43
0x06 01 00 21
0x05 04 00 40
0x06 06 00 21
0x06 09 00 10
0x05 04 00 47
9.3
Objekt dictionary
9.3.1
Object Directory - Structure
Explanation
Invalid table: Table or channel not present
Invalid register: table not present
Write protection still set
Incorrect number of function arguments
Function still active, try again later
General routing error
Error accessing BC table
General error communicating with terminal
Time-out communicating with terminal
All the CANopen objects relevant for the Bus Coupler are entered into the CANopen object directory. The
object directory is divided into three different regions:
1. communication-specific profile region (index 0x1000 – 0x1FFF).
This contains the description of all the parameters specific to communication.
2. manufacturer-specific profile region (index 0x2000 – 0x5FFF).
Contains the description of the manufacturer-specific entries.
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3. standardized device profile region (0x6000 – 0x9FFF).
Contains the objects for a device profile according to DS-401.
Every entry in the object directory is identified by a 16 bit index. If an object consists of several components
(e.g. object type array or record), the components are identified by an 8-bit sub-index. The object name
describes the function of an object, while the data type attribute specifies the data type of the entry. The
access attribute specifies whether an entry may only be read, only written, or may be both read and written.
Communication-specific region
All the parameters and objects necessary for the CANopen Bus Coupler’s communication are in this region
of the object directory. The region from 0x1000 to 0x1018 contains various general communication-specific
parameters (e.g. the device name).
The communication parameters (e.g. identifiers) for the receive PDOs are located in the region from 0x1400
to 0x140F (plus sub-index). The mapping parameters of the receive PDOs are in the region from 0x1600 to
0x160F (plus sub-index). The mapping parameters contain the cross-references to the application objects
that are mapped into the PDOs and the data width of the corresponding object (see also the section dealing
with PDO Mapping).
The communication and mapping parameters for the transmit PDOs are located in the regions from 0x1800
to 0x180F and from 0x1A00 to 0x1A0F.
Manufacturer-specific region
This region contains entries that are specific to BECKHOFF, e.g.:
• data objects for special terminals
• objects for register communication providing access to all the Bus Couplers’ and Bus Terminals’
internal registers
• objects for simplified configuration of the PDOs
Standardized device profile region
The standardized device profile region supports the device profile of CANopen DS-401, Version 1. Functions
are available for analog inputs that can adapt communication in the event-driven operating mode to the
requirements of the application and to minimize the loading of the bus:
• limit value monitoring
• Delta function
• activation/deactivation of event-driven mode
9.3.2
Object List
[Gefahrinformation hier einfügen!]
Note
84
NoteThe objects in the object directory can be reached by SDO access, but not generally
through the KS2000removed link: KS2000 configuration software. On the other hand, all the
registers that can be configured with KS2000 can also be reached using SDO access to the
object directory (objects 0x4500 and 0x4501) - even though this does not offer the same
convenience as the KS2000 software.
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Parameters Index
Device type
[} 89]
0x1000
Error register 0x1001
[} 89]
0x1003
Error store
[} 89]
0x1005
Sync
Identifier
[} 89]
Sync Interval 0x1006
[} 89]
Device name 0x1008
[} 89]
0x1009
Hardware
version
[} 89]
0x100A
Software
version
[} 89]
0x100B
Node
number
[} 89]
Guard time 0x100C
[} 89]
0x100D
Life time
factor [} 89]
0x100E
Guarding
identifier
[} 89]
0x1010
Save
parameters
[} 89]
Load default 0x1011
values [} 89]
0x1014
Emergency
identifier
[} 89]
0x1016
Consumer
heartbeat
time [} 89]
0x1017
Producer
heartbeat
time [} 89]
0x1018
Device
identifier
(identity
object)
[} 89]
BK5120/
BK515x
x
BK5110
LC5100
BX5100
BC5150
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
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Version: 1.3
85
CAN
Parameters Index
Server SDO
parameters
[} 89]
0x1200
Communicati 0x1400 0x1404
on
parameters
for the 1st 5th RxPDOs
[} 89]
Communicati 0x1405 0x140F
on
parameters
for the
6th-16th
RxPDOs
[} 89]
Communicati 0x1410 0x141F
on
parameters
for the 17th –
32nd RxPDOs
[} 89]
Mapping 1st 0x1600 -5th RxPDO 0x1604
[} 89]
Mapping 6th 0x1605 –16th RxPDO 0x160F
[} 89]
0x1610 Mapping
17th –32nd 0x161F
RxPDO
[} 89]
Communicati 0x1800 0x1804
on
BK5120/
BK515x
x
BK5110
LC5100
x
x
x
x
x
x
BX5100
BC5150
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
parameters
for the 1st
-5th TxPDOs
[} 89]
Communicati 0x1805 0x180F
on
parameters
for the
6th-16th
TxPDOs
[} 89]
86
x
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Parameters Index
Communicati 0x1810 0x181F
on
parameters
for the 17th
-32nd
TxPDOs
[} 89]
Mapping 1st 0x1A00 –5th TxPDO 0x1A04
[} 89]
Mapping 6th 0x1A05 –16th TxPDO 0x1A0F
BK5120/
BK515x
BK5110
LC5100
BX5100
BC5150
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
[} 89]
Mapping
17th –32nd
TxPDO
[} 89]
Flag area
%MB0-511
Flag area
%MB511-102
3
Flag area
%MB1024-15
35
Flag area
%MB1536-20
47
Flag area
%MB2048-25
59
Flag area
%MB2560-30
71
Flag area
%MB3072-35
84
Flag area
%MB3585-40
95
0x1A10 0x1A1F
x
0x2F00
x
x
0x2F01
x
x
0x2F02
x
x
0x2F03
x
x
0x2F04
x
x
0x2F05
x
x
0x2F06
x
x
0x2F07
x
x
3-byte
special
terminals,
input data
[} 89]
0x2600
x
3-byte
special
terminals,
output data
[} 89]
0x2700
x
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Version: 1.3
87
CAN
Parameters Index
4-byte
special
terminals,
input data
[} 89]
0x2800
BK5120/
BK515x
x
4-byte
special
terminals,
output data
[} 89]
0x2900
x
5-byte
special
terminals,
input data
[} 89]
0x2A00
x
5-byte
special
terminals,
output data
[} 89]
0x2B00
x
6-byte
special
terminals,
input data
[} 89]
0x2C00
x
6-byte
special
terminals,
output data
[} 89]
0x2D00
x
8-byte
special
terminals,
input data
[} 89]
0x3000
x
8-byte
special
terminals,
output data
[} 89]
0x3100
x
0x4500
Bus node
register
communicati
on [} 89]
0x4501
Bus
Terminal /
Extension Box
register
communicati
on [} 89]
x
x
x
x
x
x
88
BK5110
LC5100
Version: 1.3
BX5100
BC5150
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Parameters Index
0x5500
Activate
PDOs [} 89]
NetId
0x5FFE
Digital inputs 0x6000
[} 89]
0x6126
Interrupt
mask [} 89]
0x6200
Digital
outputs
[} 89]
0x6401
Analog
inputs [} 89]
0x6411
Analog
outputs
[} 89]
Event control 0x6423
analog inputs
[} 89]
0x6424
Upper limit
value analog
inputs [} 89]
0x6425
Lower limit
value analog
inputs [} 89]
0x6426
Delta
function for
analog inputs
[} 89]
9.3.3
BK5120/
BK515x
x
BK5110
LC5100
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
BX5100
BC5150
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
Objects and Data
Device type
Index
Sub-index Name
0x1000
0
Type
Attribute
Device type Unsigned32 ro
Mapping
N
Default
Meaning
value
0x0000000 Statement
0
of device
type
The 32 bit value is divided into two 16 bit fields:
MSB
Additional information
0000 0000 0000 wxyz
LSB
Device profile number
0x191 (401dez)
The additional information contains data related to the signal type of the I/O device:
z=1 signifies digital inputs,
y=1 signifies digital outputs,
x=1 signifies analog inputs,
w=1 signifies analog outputs.
A BK5120 with digital and analog inputs, but with no outputs, thus returns 0x00 05 01 91.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
89
CAN
Special terminals (such as serial interfaces, PWM outputs, incremental encoder inputs) are not considered. A
Coupler that, for example, only has KL6001 serial interface terminals plugged in, thus returns 0x00 00 01 91.
The device type supplies only a rough classification of the device. The terminal identifier register of the Bus
Coupler can be read for detailed identification of the Bus Couplers and the attached terminals (for details see
register communication index 0x4500).
Error register
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x1001
0
Unsigned8 ro
Bit 4
Comm.
Error
register
Attribute
Mapping
Meaning
N
Default
value
0x00
Bit 2
reserved
Bit 1
reserved
Bit 0
Generic
Error
register
The 8 bit value is coded as follows:
Bit 7
ManSpec.
Bit 6
reserved
Bit 5
reserved
Bit 3
reserved
ManSpec. Manufacturer-specific error, specified more precisely in object 1003.
Comm. Communication error (CAN overrun)
Generic An error that is not more precisely specified has occurred (the flag is set at every error message)
Error store
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
0x1003
0x00
Predefined Unsigned8 rw
error field
(Error
store)
N
Default
value
0x00
1
Actual error Unsigned32 ro
N
None
...
10
...
Standard
error field
...
N
...
None
...
-Unsigned32 ro
Mapping
Meaning
Object
1003h
contains a
description
of the error
that has
occurred in
the device sub-index 0
has the
number of
error states
stored.
Last error
state to
have
occurred
...
A maximum
of 10 error
states are
stored.
The 32 bit value in the error store is divided into two 16 bit fields:
MSB
Additional code
LSB
Error Code
The additional code contains the error trigger (see emergency object) and thereby a detailed error
description.
New errors are always saved at sub-index 1, all the other sub-indices being appropriately incremented. The
whole error store is cleared by writing a 0 to sub-index 0.
90
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
If there has not been an error since power up, then object 0x1003 only consists of sub-index 0 with a 0
entered into it. The error store is cleared by a reset or a power cycle.
As is usual in CANopen, the LSB is transferred first, followed by the MSB.
Sync Identifier
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x1005
0
Unsigned32 rw
COB-ID
Sync
Message
Attribute
Mapping
N
Default
Meaning
value
0x8000008 Identifier of
0
the SYNC
message
The bottom 11 bits of the 32 bit value contain the identifier (0x80=128 dec). Bit 30 indicates whether the
device sends the SYNC telegram (1) or not (0). The CANopen I/O devices receive the SYNC telegram, and
accordingly bit 30=0. For reasons of backwards compatibility, bit 31 has no significance.
Sync Interval
Index
Sub-index Name
0x1006
0
Type
Attribute
Communica Unsigned32 rw
tion cycle
period
Mapping
N
Default
Meaning
value
0x0000000 Length of
0
the SYNC
interval in
µs.
If a value other than zero is entered here, the bus node will go into the fault state if, during synchronous PDO
operation, no SYNC telegram is received within the watchdog time. The watchdog time corresponds here to
1.5 times the communication cycle period that has been set - the planned SYNC interval can therefore be
entered.
The I/O update is carried out at the Beckhoff CANopen bus nodes immediately after reception of the SYNC
telegram, provided the following conditions are satisfied:
- Firmware status C0 or above (CANopen Version 4.01 or higher).
- All PDOs that have data are set to synchronous communication (0..240).
- The sync interval has been entered in object 0x1006 and (sync interval x lowest PDO transmission type) is
less than 90ms.
The modules are then synchronised throughout.
Device name
Index
Sub-index Name
0x1008
0
Type
Manufactur Visible
er Device String
Name
Attribute
Mapping
ro
N
Default
value
BK51x0,
LC5100,
IPxxxxB510 or
ILxxxxB510
Meaning
Device
name of the
bus node
Since the returned value is longer than 4 bytes, the segmented SDO protocol is used for transmission.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
91
CAN
Hardware version
Index
Sub-index Name
0x1009
0
Type
Manufactur Visible
er
String
hardwareversion
Attribute
Mapping
ro
N
Default
value
-
Meaning
Hardware
version
number of
the bus
node
Since the returned value is longer than 4 bytes, the segmented SDO protocol is used for transmission.
Software version
Index
Sub-index Name
0x100A
0
Type
Manufactur Visible
er software- String
version
Attribute
Mapping
ro
N
Default
value
-
Meaning
Software
version
number of
the bus
node
Since the returned value is longer than 4 bytes, the segmented SDO protocol is used for transmission.
Node number
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x100B
0
Unsigned32 ro
Node-ID
Attribute
Mapping
N
Default
value
none
Meaning
Default
value
0
Meaning
Default
value
0
Meaning
Set node
number
The node number is supported for reasons of compatibility.
Guard time
Index
Sub-index Name
0x100C
0
Type
Attribute
Guard time Unsigned16 rw
[ms]
Mapping
N
Interval
between
two guard
telegrams.
Is set by
the NMT
master or
configuratio
n tool.
Life time factor
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x100D
0
Unsigned8 rw
92
Life time
factor
Attribute
Version: 1.3
Mapping
N
Life time
factor x
guard time
= life time
(watchdog
for life
guarding)
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
If a guarding telegram is not received within the life time, the node enters the error state. If the life time factor
and/or guard time = 0, the node does not carry out any life guarding, but can itself be monitored by the
master (node guarding).
Guarding identifier
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x100 E
0
Unsigned32 ro
COB-ID
guarding
protocol
Attribute
Mapping
N
Default
value
0x000007x
y, xy =
NodeID
Meaning
Identifier of
the
guarding
protocol
The guarding identifier is supported for reasons of compatibility. Changing the guarding identifier has no
longer been permitted since version 4 of CANopen.
Save parameters
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1010
0
Store
Parameter
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
1
1
store all
Unsigned32 rw
parameters
N
1
Meaning
Number of
store
options
Stores all
(storable)
parameters
By writing the string save in ASCII code (hexadecimal 0x65766173) to sub-index 1, the current parameters
are placed into non-volatile storage. (The byte sequence on the bus including the SDO protocol: 0x23 0x10
0x10 0x01 0x73 0x61 0x76 0x65).
The storage process takes about 3 seconds, and is confirmed, if successful, by the corresponding TxSDO
(0x60 in the first byte). Since the Bus Coupler is unable to send or receive any CAN telegrams during the
storage process, saving is only possible when the node is in the pre-operational state. It is recommended
that the entire network is placed into the pre-operational state before such storage. This avoids a buffer
overflow.
Data saved includes:
• The terminals currently inserted (the number of each terminal category)
• All PDO parameters (identifier, transmission type, inhibit time, mapping).
[Gefahrinformation hier einfügen!]
NoteThe stored identifiers apply afterwards, not the default identifiers derived from the
node addresses. Changes to the DIP switch setting no longer affects the PDOs!
Note
• All SYNC parameters
• All guarding parameters
• Limit values, delta values and interrupt enables for analog inputs
Parameters directly stored in the terminals by way of register communication are immediately stored there in
non-volatile form.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
93
CAN
Load default values
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1011
0
Restore
Parameter
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
4
1
Restore all Unsigned32 rw
parameters
N
1
4
Set
Unsigned32 rw
manufactur
er Defaults
N
1
Meaning
Number of
reset
options
Resets all
parameters
to their
default
values
Resets all
coupler
parameters
to
manufactur
er’s settings
(including
registers)
Writing the string load in ASCII code (hexadecimal 0x64616F6C) into sub-index 1 resets all parameters to
default values (as initially supplied) at the next boot (reset).
(The byte sequence on the bus including the SDO protocol: 0x23 0x11 0x10 0x01 0x6C 0x6F 0x61 0x64).
This makes the default identifiers for the PDOs active again.
Emergency identifier
Index
Sub-index Name
0x1014
0
Type
Attribute
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
Emergency
Mapping
N
Default
value
0x0000008
0, +
NodeID
Meaning
Identifier of
the
emergency
telegram
The bottom 11 bits of the 32 bit value contain the identifier (0x80=128 dec). The MSBit can be used to set
whether the device sends (1) the emergency telegram or not (0).
Alternatively, the bus node's diagnostic function can also be switched off using the Device diagnostics bit in
the K-Bus configuration (see object 0x4500).
94
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Consumer heartbeat time
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1016
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
2
1
Consumer
heartbeat
time
Unsigned32 rw
N
0
Meaning
The
consumer
heartbeat
time
describes
the
expected
heartbeat
cycle time
and the
node ID of
the
monitored
node
Watchdog
time in ms
and node
ID of the
monitored
node
The 32-bit value is used as follows:
MSB
Bit 31...24
Reserved (0)
LSB
Bit 15...0
Heartbeat time in ms (unsigned16)
Bit 23...16
Node ID (unsigned8)
The monitored identifier can be obtained from the node ID by means of the default identifier allocation:
Guard-ID = 0x700 + Node-ID.
As is usual in CANopen, the LSB is transferred first, followed by the MSB.
Producer heartbeat time
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x1017
0
Unsigned16 rw
Producer
heartbeat
time
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Attribute
Version: 1.3
Mapping
N
Default
value
0
Meaning
Interval in
ms
between
two
transmitted
heartbeat
telegrams
95
CAN
Device identifier (identity object)
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x1018
0
Identity
Object:
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
Vendor ID
Unsigned32 ro
N
2
Product
Code
Unsigned32 ro
N
3
Revision
Number
Serial
Number
Unsigned32 ro
N
Unsigned32 ro
N
4
Product
BK5120
BK5110
LC5100
IPwxyz-B510
IL2301-B510
96
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
4
Meaning
The identity
object
contains
general
information
about the
type and
version of
the device.
0x0000000 Manufactur
2
er identifier.
Beckhoff
has vendor
ID 2
Depends
Device
on the
identifier
product
Version
number
Production
date
low word,
high byte:
calendar
week (dec),
low word,
low byte:
calendar
year
Product Code
0x11400
0x113F6
0x113EC
0x2wxyz
0x2008FD
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Server SDO parameters
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1200
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Client >Server
Unsigned32 ro
N
2
COB-ID
Server >Client
Unsigned32 ro
N
Default
value
2
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameters
of the
server
SDO. Subindex 0:
number of
following
parameters
0x000006x COB-ID
y,
RxSDO
xy=Node-ID (Client ->
Server)
0x0000058 COB-ID
0 + Node- TxSDO
ID
(Client ->
Server)
This is contained in the object directory for reasons of backwards compatibility.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
97
CAN
Communication parameters for the 1st RxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1400
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameters
for the first
receive
PDO. Subindex 0:
number of
following
parameters
0x000002x COB-ID
y,
(Communic
xy=Node-ID ation Object
Identifier)
RxPDO1
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used in the
RxPDO.
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer.
Watchdog
time
defined for
monitoring
reception of
the PDO.
Sub-index 1 (COB-ID): The bottom 11 bits of the 32 bit value (bits 0-10) contain the CAN identifier. The MSB
(bit 31) indicates whether the PDO exists currently (0) or not (1). Bit 30 indicates whether an RTR access to
this PDO is permissible (0) or not (1). Changing the identifier (bits 0-10) is not allowed while the object exists
(bit 31=0). Sub-index 2 contains the type of the transmission (see introduction to PDOs).
98
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Communication parameters for the 2nd RxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x1401
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Attribute
Version: 1.3
Mapping
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameter
for the
second
receive
PDO.
0x000003x COB-ID
y,
(Communic
xy=Node-ID ation Object
Identifier)
RxPDO2
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used in the
RxPDO.
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer.
Watchdog
time
defined for
monitoring
reception of
the PDO.
99
CAN
Communication parameters for the 3rd RxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x1402
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
100
Attribute
Version: 1.3
Mapping
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameter
for the third
receive
PDO.
0x000004x COB-ID
y,
(Communic
xy=Node-ID ation Object
Identifier)
RxPDO3
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used in the
RxPDO.
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer.
Watchdog
time
defined for
monitoring
reception of
the PDO.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Communication parameters for the 4th RxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x1403
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Attribute
Version: 1.3
Mapping
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameters
for the
fourth
receive
PDO.
0x000005x COB-ID
y,
(Communic
xy=Node-ID ation Object
Identifier)
RxPDO4
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used in the
RxPDO.
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer.
Watchdog
time
defined for
monitoring
reception of
the PDO.
101
CAN
Communication parameters for the 5th-16th RxPDOs
Index
Sub-index Name
0x1404 0
Number of
0x140F
elements
(dependin
g on the
device
type)
1dth="5%"> COB-ID
1
Type
Attribute
Mapping
Unsigned8 ro
N
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameter
for the 5th to
16th receive
PDOs.
0x8000000 COB-ID
(Communic
ation Object
Identifier)
RxPDO5...1
6
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used in the
RxPDO.
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer.
Watchdog
time
defined for
monitoring
reception of
the PDO.
The number of RxPDOs for each bus node type can be found in the technical data.
102
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Mapping parameters for the 1st RxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1600
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 rw
N
1
1st mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
2
2nd mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
...
8
...
...
...
th
8 mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
...
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Mapping
parameter
of the first
receive
PDO; subindex 0:
number of
mapped
objects.
0x6200010 1st mapped
8
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
0x6200020 2nd mapped
8
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
...
...
0x6200080 8th mapped
8
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
The first receive PDO (RxPDO1) is provided by default for digital output data. Depending on the number of
outputs inserted, the necessary length of the PDO is automatically determined, and the corresponding
objects are mapped. Since the digital outputs are organised in bytes, the length of the PDO in bytes can be
found directly at sub-index 0.
Changes to the mapping
The following sequence must be observed in order to change the mapping (specified as from CANopen,
version 4):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Delete PDO (set bit 31 in the identifier entry (sub-index 1) of the communication parameters to 1)
Deactivate mapping (set sub-index 0 of the mapping entry to 0)
Change mapping entries (sub-indices 1...8)
Activate mapping (set sub-index 0 of the mapping entry to the correct number of mapped objects)
Create PDO (set bit 31 in the identifier entry (sub-index 1) of the communication parameters to 0)
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
103
CAN
Mapping parameters for the 2nd RxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1601
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 rw
N
1
1st mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
2
2nd mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
...
8
...
...
...
th
8 mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
...
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Mapping
parameter
of the
second
receive
PDO; subindex 0:
number of
mapped
objects.
0x6411011 1st mapped
0
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
0x6411021 2nd mapped
0
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
...
...
0x0000000 8th mapped
0
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
The second receive PDO (RxPDO2) is provided by default for analog outputs. Depending on the number of
outputs inserted, the necessary length of the PDO is automatically determined, and the corresponding
objects are mapped. Since the analog outputs are organised in words, the length of the PDO in bytes can be
found directly at sub-index 0.
A specific sequence must be observed in order to change the mapping (see object index 0x1600).
104
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
CAN
Mapping parameters for the 3rd-16th RxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
0x16020
0x160F
(dependin
g on the
device
type)
Number of
elements
Type
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Unsigned8 rw
N
1
1st mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
0x0000000
0 (see text)
2
2nd mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
0x0000000
0 (see text)
...
8
...
...
...
th
8 mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
...
N
...
0x0000000
0 (see text)
Meaning
Mapping
parameters
for the third
to sixteenth
receive
PDOs; subindex 0:
number of
mapped
objects.
1st mapped
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
2nd mapped
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
...
8th mapped
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
The 3rd to 16th receive PDOs (RxPDO3ff) are automatically given a default mapping by the bus node
depending on the attached terminals (or depending on the extension modules). The procedure is described
in the section on PDO Mapping.
A specific sequence must be observed in order to change the mapping (see object index 0x1600).
[Gefahrinformation hier einfügen!]
Note
NoteDS401 V2 specifies analog input and/or output data as the default mapping for PDOs
3+4. This corresponds to Beckhoff's default mapping when less than 65 digital inputs or
outputs are present. In order to ensure backwards compatibility, the Beckhoff default mapping is retained - the mapping behaviour of the devices therefore corresponds to DS401
V1, where in all other respects they accord with DS401 V2.
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CAN
Communication parameters for the 1st TxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1800
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameters
for the first
transmit
PDO. Subindex 0:
number of
following
parameters
0x0000018 COB-ID
0 + Node- (Communic
ID
ation Object
Identifier)
TxPDO1
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Repetition
delay [value
x 100 µs]
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer
Sub-index 1 (COB-ID): The bottom 11 bits of the 32 bit value (bits 0-10) contain the CAN identifier. The MSB
(bit 31) indicates whether the PDO exists currently (0) or not (1). Bit 30 indicates whether an RTR access to
this PDO is permissible (0) or not (1). Changing the identifier (bits 0-10) is not allowed while the object exists
(bit 31=0). Sub-index 2 contains the type of transmission, sub-index 3 the repetition delay between two
PDOs of the same type, while sub-index 5 contains the event timer. Sub-index 4 is retained for reasons of
compatibility, but is not used. (See also the introduction to PDOs.)
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Communication parameters for the 2nd TxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1801
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameters
for the
second
transmit
PDO. Subindex 0:
number of
following
parameters
0x0000028 COB-ID
0 + Node- (Communic
ID
ation Object
Identifier)
TxPDO1
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Repetition
delay [value
x 100 µs]
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer
The second transmit PDO is provided by default for analog inputs, and is configured for event-driven
transmission (transmission type 255). Event-driven mode must first be activated (see object 0x6423),
otherwise the inputs can only be interrogated (polled) by remote transmission request (RTR).
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Communication parameters for the 3rd TxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1802
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameters
for the third
transmit
PDO. Subindex 0:
number of
following
parameters
0x0000038 COB-ID
0 + Node- (Communic
ID
ation Object
Identifier)
TxPDO1
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Repetition
delay [value
x 100 µs]
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer
The third transmit PDO contains analog input data as a rule (see Mapping). It is configured for event-driven
transmission (transmission type 255). Event-driven mode must first be activated (see object 0x6423),
otherwise the inputs can only be interrogated (polled) by remote transmission request (RTR).
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Communication parameters for the 4th TxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1803
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameters
for the
fourth
transmit
PDO. Subindex 0:
number of
following
parameters
0x0000048 COB-ID
0 + Node- (Communic
ID
ation Object
Identifier)
TxPDO1
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Repetition
delay [value
x 100 µs]
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer
The fourth transmit PDO contains analog input data as a rule (see Mapping). It is configured for event-driven
transmission (transmission type 255). Event-driven mode must first be activated (see object 0x6423),
otherwise the inputs can only be interrogated (polled) by remote transmission request (RTR).
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Communication parameters for the 5th-16th TxPDOs
Index
Sub-index Name
0x18040
0x180F
(dependin
g on the
device
type)
110
Type
Attribute
Mapping
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
COB-ID
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
Transmissi Unsigned8 rw
on Type
N
3
Inhibit Time Unsigned16 rw
N
4
CMS
Priority
Group
Unsigned8 rw
N
5
Event
Timer
Unsigned16 rw
N
Version: 1.3
Default
value
5
Meaning
Communica
tion
parameters
for the 5th to
16th
transmit
PDOs. Subindex 0:
number of
following
parameters
0x0000000 COB-ID
(Communic
ation Object
Identifier)
TxPDO1
255
Transmissi
on type of
the PDO
0
Repetition
delay [value
x 100 µs]
Present for
reasons of
backwards
compatibilit
y, but not
used.
0
EventTimer
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CAN
Mapping 1st TxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1A00
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 rw
N
1
1st mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
2
2nd mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
...
8
...
...
...
th
8 mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
...
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Mapping
parameter
of the first
transmit
PDO; subindex 0:
number of
mapped
objects.
0x6000010 1st mapped
8
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
0x6000020 2nd mapped
8
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
...
...
0x6000080 8th mapped
8
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
The first transmit PDO (TxPDO1) is provided by default for digital input data. Depending on the number of
inputs inserted, the necessary length of the PDO is automatically determined, and the corresponding objects
are mapped. Since the digital inputs are organised in bytes, the length of the PDO in bytes can be found
directly at sub-index 0.
A specific sequence must be observed in order to change the mapping (see object index 0x1600).
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Mapping 2nd TxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x1A01
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 rw
N
1
1st mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
2
2nd mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
...
8
...
...
...
th
8 mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
...
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Mapping
parameter
of the
second
transmit
PDO; subindex 0:
number of
mapped
objects.
0x6401011 1st mapped
0
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
0x6401021 2nd mapped
0
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
...
...
8th mapped
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
The second transmit PDO (TxPDO2) is provided by default for analog input data. Depending on the number
of inputs inserted, the necessary length of the PDO is automatically determined, and the corresponding
objects are mapped. Since the analog inputs are organised in words, the length of the PDO in bytes can be
found directly at sub-index 0.
A specific sequence must be observed in order to change the mapping (see object index 0x1600).
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Mapping 3rd-16th TxPDO
Index
Sub-index Name
0x1A020
0x1A0F
(dependin
g on the
device
type)
Number of
elements
Type
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Unsigned8 rw
N
1
1st mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
0x0000000
0 (see text)
2
2nd mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
N
0x0000000
0 (see text)
...
8
...
...
...
th
8 mapped Unsigned32 rw
object
...
N
...
0x0000000
0 (see text)
Meaning
Mapping
parameters
for the third
to sixteenth
transmit
PDOs; subindex 0:
number of
mapped
objects.
1st mapped
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
2nd mapped
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
...
8th mapped
application
object (2
bytes index,
1 byte subindex, 1
byte bit
width)
The 3rd to 16th transmit PDOs (TxPDO3ff) are automatically given a default mapping by the bus node
depending on the attached terminals (or depending on the extension modules). The procedure is described
in the section on PDO Mapping.
A specific sequence must be observed in order to change the mapping (see object index 0x1600).
[Gefahrinformation hier einfügen!]
Note
NoteDS401 V2 specifies analog input and/or output data as the default mapping for PDOs
3+4. This corresponds to Beckhoff's default mapping when less than 65 digital inputs or
outputs are present. In order to ensure backwards compatibility, the Beckhoff default mapping is retained - the mapping behavior of the devices therefore corresponds to DS401 V1,
where in all other respects they accord with DS401 V2.
For the sake of completeness, the following object entries are also contained in the object directory (and
therefore also in the EDS files):
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Index
0x2000
0x2100
0x2200
Meaning
Digital inputs (function identical to object 0x6000)
Digital outputs (function identical to object 0x6100)
1-byte special terminals, inputs (at present no
terminals corresponding to this type are included in
the product range)
1-byte special terminals, outputs (at present no
terminals corresponding to this type are included in
the product range)
2-byte special terminals, inputs (at present no
terminals corresponding to this type are included in
the product range)
2-byte special terminals, outputs (at present no
terminals corresponding to this type are included in
the product range)
7-byte special terminals, inputs (at present no
terminals corresponding to this type are included in
the product range)
7-byte special terminals, outputs (at present no
terminals corresponding to this type are included in
the product range)
0x2300
0x2400
0x2500
0x2E00
0x2F00
3-byte special terminals, input data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x2600
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
1
1st input
block
...
128th input
block
Unsigned24 ro
Y
0x000000
...
...
Unsigned24 ro
...
Y
...
0x000000
...
0X80
Attribute
Mapping
Meaning
Number of
available 3byte special
channels,
inputs
1st input
channel
...
128th input
channel
Example of special terminals with 3-byte input data (in the default setting): KL2502 (PWM outputs, 2 x 3
bytes)
3-byte special terminals, output data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x2700
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
1
1st output
Unsigned24 rww
block
...
...
...
th
128 output Unsigned24 rww
block
...
0X80
Attribute
Mapping
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Y
0x000000
...
Y
...
0x000000
Meaning
Number of
available 3byte special
channels,
outputs
1st output
channel
...
128th output
channel
Example of special terminals with 3-byte output data (in the default setting): KL2502 (PWM outputs, 2 x 3
bytes)
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4-byte special terminals, input data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x2800
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
1st input
block
...
128th input
block
Unsigned32 ro
Y
...
...
Unsigned32 ro
...
Y
...
0X80
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Number of
available 4byte special
channels,
inputs
0x0000000 1st input
0
channel
...
...
0x0000000 128th input
0
channel
Examples of special terminals with 4-byte input data (in the default setting): KL5001, KL6001, KL6021,
KL6051
4-byte special terminals, output data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x2900
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
1
1st output
Unsigned32 rww
block
...
...
...
th
128 output Unsigned32 rww
block
...
0X80
Attribute
Mapping
N
Y
...
Y
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Number of
available 4byte special
channels,
outputs
0x0000000 1st output
0
channel
...
...
0x0000000 128th output
0
channel
Examples of special terminals with 4-byte output data (in the default setting): KL5001, KL6001, KL6021,
KL6051
5-byte special terminals, input data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x2A00
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
1st input
block
...
64th input
block
Unsigned40 ro
Y
...
...
Unsigned40 ro
...
Y
...
0X40
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Number of
available 5byte special
channels,
inputs
0x0000000 1st input
000
channel
...
...
0x0000000 64th input
000
channel
Example of special terminals with 5-byte input data (in the default setting): KL1501
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5-byte special terminals, output data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x2B00
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
1st output
block
...
64th output
block
Unsigned40 rww
Y
...
...
Unsigned40 rww
...
Y
...
0X40
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Number of
available 5byte special
channels,
outputs
0x0000000 1st output
000
channel
...
...
0x0000000 64th output
000
channel
Example of special terminals with 5-byte output data (in the default setting): KL1501
6-byte special terminals, input data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x2C00
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
1st input
block
...
64th input
block
Unsigned48 ro
Y
...
...
Unsigned48 ro
...
Y
...
0X40
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Number of
available 6byte special
channels,
inputs
0x0000000 1st input
000
channel
...
...
0x0000000 64th input
000
channel
Example of special terminals with 6-byte input data (in the default setting): KL5051, KL5101, KL5111
6-byte special terminals, output data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x2D00
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
1st output
block
...
64th output
block
Unsigned48 rww
Y
...
...
Unsigned48 rww
...
Y
...
0X40
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Number of
available 6byte special
channels,
outputs
0x0000000 1st output
000
channel
...
...
0x0000000 64th output
000
channel
Example of special terminals with 6-byte output data (in the default setting): KL5051, KL5101, KL5111
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8-byte special terminals, input data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x3000
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
1st input
block
...
64th input
block
Unsigned64 ro
Y
...
...
Unsigned64 ro
...
Y
...
0x40
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Number of
available 6byte special
channels,
inputs
0x0000000 1st input
000
channel
...
...
0x0000000 64th input
000
channel
Example for special terminals with 8-byte input data: KL5101 (with word alignment, not according to the
default setting)
8-byte special terminals, output data
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x3100
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
1st output
block
...
64th output
block
Unsigned64 rww
Y
...
...
Unsigned64 rww
...
Y
...
0X40
Attribute
Mapping
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
Meaning
Number of
available 6byte special
channels,
outputs
0x0000000 1st output
000
channel
...
...
0x0000000 64th output
000
channel
Example for special terminals with 8-byte output data: KL5101 (with word alignment, not according to the
default setting)
Bus node register communication
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x4500
0 Unsigned32 rw
Register
Access
Attribute
Mapping
N
Default
value
none
Meaning
Access to
internal bus
node
registers
The 32 bit value is composed as follows:
MSB
Access (bit 7) + table
number (bits 6...0)
[0..1] + [0...0x7F]
Register number
High byte register value
LSB
Low byte register value
[0...0xFF]
[0...0xFF]
[0...0xFF]
As is usual in CANopen, the LSB is transferred first, followed by the MSB.
Accessing index 0x4500 allows any registers in the bus station to be written or read. The channel number
and the register are addressed here with a 32 bit data word.
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Reading the register value
The coupler must first be informed of which register is to be read. This requires an SDO write access to the
appropriate index/sub-index combination, with:
- table number (access bit = 0) in byte 3
- register address in byte 2 of the 32-bit data value.
Bytes 1 and 0 are not evaluated if the access bit (MSB of byte 3) equals 0. The register value can then be
read with the same combination of index and sub-index.
After the writing of the register address to be read, the coupler sets the access bit to 1 until the correct value
is available. Thus an SDO read access must check that the table number lies in the range from 0...0x7F.
An access error during register communication is indicated by the corresponding return value in the SDO
protocol (see the SDO section, Breakdown of parameter communication).
An example of reading register values
It is necessary to determine which baud rate index has been assigned to switch setting 1,1 (DIP 7,8). (See
the section covering Network addresses and baud rates). To do this, the value in table 100, register 3, must
be read. This means that the following SDO telegrams must be sent:
Write access (download request) to index 4500, sub-index 0, with the 32 bit data value 0x64 03 00 00.
Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=23 00 45 00 00 00 03 64
Then a read access (upload request) to the same index/sub-index. The data value sent here is irrelevant (00
is used here).
Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=40 00 45 00 00 00 00 00
The coupler responds with the upload response telegram:
Id=0x580+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=43 00 45 00 04 00 03 64
This tells us that the value contained in this register is 4, and this baud rate index corresponds to 125 kbit/s
(the default value).
Writing register values
SDO write access to the corresponding combination of index and sub-index with:
- table number + 0x80 (access bit = 1) in byte 3
- register address in byte 2
- high byte register value in byte 1
- low byte register value in byte 0 of the 32-bit data value.
Remove coupler write protection
Before the registers of the Bus Coupler can be written, the write protection must first be removed. In order to
do this, the following values must be written in the given sequence to the corresponding registers:
Step
Table
Register
Value
1.
99 2
45054 (0xAFFE)
2.
3.
99
99
1
0
1 (0x0001)
257 (0x0101)
Corresponding
SDO download
value (0x4500/0)
0xE3 02 AF FE
(0xE3=0x63(=99)+
0x80)
0xE3 01 00 01
0xE3 00 01 01
Remove coupler write protection (CAN representation)
In order to remove the coupler write protection, the following SDO telegrams (download requests) must thus
be sent to the coupler:
Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=23 00 45 00 FE AF 02 E3
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Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=23 00 45 00 01 00 01 E3
Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=23 00 45 00 01 01 00 E3
An example of writing register values
After the write protection has been removed, the baud rate index for DIP switch setting 1,1 is to be set to the
value 7. This will assign a baud rate of 20 kbaud to this switch setting.
This requires the value 7 to be written into table 100, register 3. This is done with an SDO write access
(download request) to index 0x4500, sub-index 0 with the 32 bit value E4 03 00 07 (0xE4 = 0x64+0x80):
Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=23 00 45 00 07 00 03 E4
Identify terminals
The identifier of the coupler (or of the bus station) and of the attached Bus Terminals can be read from the
Bus Coupler's table 9. Register 0 then contains the identifier of the Bus Coupler itself, register 1 the identifier
of the first terminal and register n the identification of the nth terminal:
Table number
9
9
Register number
0
1-255
Description
Value range
Bus station identifier
0 - 65535
Identifier of the extension 0 - 65535
module/bus terminal
The Bus Coupler description in register number 0 contains 5120 = 0x1400 for the BK5120, 5110 = 0x13F6
for the BK5110 and 5100 = 0x13EC for the LC5100. The Fieldbus Box modules contain the identifier 510 dec
= 0x1FE in register 0.
In the case of analog and special terminals, the terminal identifier (dec) is contained in the extension module
identifier or the terminal description.
Example: if a KL3042 is plugged in as the third terminal, then register 3 contains the value 3042dec (0x0BE2).
The following bit identifier is used for digital terminals:
MSB
1
s6
s5
s4
s3
s2
s1
LSB
0
0
s0
0
0
0
0
a
e
s6...s1: data width in bits; a=1: output terminal; e=1: input terminal
This identifier scheme results in the terminal descriptions listed below:
Extension module identifier
0x8201
Meaning
2 bit digital input terminal, e.g. KL1002, KL1052,
Kl9110, KL9260
2 bit digital output terminal, e.g. KL2034, KL2612,
KL2702
4 bit digital input terminal, e.g. KL1104, KL1124,
KL1194
4 bit digital output terminal, e.g. KL2124, KL2134,
KL2184
4 bit digital input/output terminal, e.g. KL2212
0x8202
0x8401
0x8402
0x8403
General coupler configuration (table 0)
Table 0 of the Bus Coupler contains the data for the general coupler configuration. It is not, as a general rule,
necessary to change this; however, for special applications it is possible to change the settings using the
KS2000 configuration software, or through direct access via register communication. The write protection
must first be removed in order to do this (see above).
The relevant register entries are described below:
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CAN
K-Bus configuration
Table 0, register 2, contains the K-Bus configuration, and is coded as follows (default value: 0x0006):
MSB
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
LSB
0
0
0
0
0
D
G
A
A: Auto-reset
If there is a K-Bus error, attempts are made cyclically to start the K-Bus up again through a reset. If
emergency telegrams and guarding are not evaluated, activation of auto-reset can lead to output and input
information being lost without that loss being noticed.
0: No auto-reset (default)
1: Auto-reset active
G: Device diagnostics
Reporting (by means of emergency telegram), that, for example
- a current input is open circuit (with diagnostics)
- 10 V exceeded at a 1-10V input terminal
0: Device diagnostics switched off
1: Device diagnostics active (default)
D: Diagnostic data
from digital terminals is included in the process image (e.g. KL2212). This flag is only evaluated when device
diagnostics is active (see above).
0: Do not display
1: Display (default)
Process image description
Table 0, register 3, contains the process image description, and is coded as follows (default value: 0x0903):
MSB
0
0
0
0
k1
k0
f1
f0
LSB
0
0
a
0
d
k
1
1
k0...k1: Reaction to K-Bus errors
0,2: Inputs remain unchanged (default = 2);
1: Set inputs to 0 (TxPDO with zeros is sent)
f0...f1: Reaction to fieldbus error
0: Stop the K-Bus cycles, watchdog in the terminals triggers, fault output values become active. The old
output values are initially set during a restart.
1: Set outputs to 0, then stop the K-Bus cycles (default). 2: Outputs remain unchanged.
a: Word alignment (of analog and special terminals)
0: No alignment (default)
1: Map data to word boundaries (process data always starts on an even address in the PDO)
d: Data format for complex terminals (analog and special terminals)
0: Intel format (default)
120
Version: 1.3
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CAN
1: Motorola format
k: Evaluation of complex terminals (analog and special terminals)
0: User data only (default)
1: Complete evaluation (note: analog channels then, for example, need 3 input and 3 output bytes instead of,
e.g., 2 input bytes; instead of 4 channels per PDO, 2 channels require a RxPDO and a TxPDO)
Bus Terminal / Extension Box register communication
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
0x4501
0
Access
Terminal
Register
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
none
1
Access
Unsigned32 rw
Reg.
Terminal 1
N
none
...
0XFE
...
Access
Reg.
Terminal
254
...
N
...
none
...
...
Unsigned32 rw
Mapping
Meaning
Index
0x4501
allows
access to
all the
registers in
the bus
terminal or
extension
module.
Sub-index 0
contains
the number
of attached
bus
terminals.
Access to
bus
terminal or
extension
module
register 1
...
Access to
bus
terminal or
extension
module
register 254
The 32 bit value is composed as follows:
MSB
Access (bit 7) + channel
number (bits 6...0)
[0..1] + [0...0x7F]
Register number
High byte register value
LSB
Low byte register value
[0...0xFF]
[0...0xFF]
[0...0xFF]
As is usual in CANopen, the LSB is transferred first, followed by the MSB.
Accessing index 0x4501 allows the user registers in the bus terminal or extension module to be written or
read. The modules have a set of registers for each input or output channel. The modules are addressed by
means of the sub-index; the channel number and register are addressed in the 32-bit data value. Channel
number 0 corresponds here to the first channel, 1 to the second channel, and so forth.
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CAN
Reading the register value
The coupler must first be informed of which register is to be read. This requires an SDO write access to the
appropriate index/sub-index combination, with:
- channel number (access bit = 0) in byte 3
- register address in byte 2 of the 32-bit data value.
Bytes 1 and 0 are not evaluated if the access bit (MSB of byte 3) equals 0. The register value can then be
read with the same combination of index and sub-index.
After the writing of the register address to be read, the coupler sets the access bit to 1 until the correct value
is available. Thus an SDO read access must check that the table number lies in the range from 0...0x7F.
An access error during register communication is indicated by the corresponding return value in the SDO
protocol (see the SDO section, Breakdown of parameter communication).
An example of reading register values
The thermocouple type to which the second input channel of a KL3202 Thermocouple Input Terminal has
been set is to be determined. This requires feature register 32 to be read. The terminal is located in the fifth
slot, next to the Bus Coupler. This means that the following SDO telegrams must be sent:
Write access (download request) to index 4501, sub-index 5 with 32 bit data value 01 20 00 00 (0x01 = 2nd
channel, 0x20 = register 32)
Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=23 01 45 05 00 00 20 01
Then a read access (upload request) to the same index/sub-index. The data value sent here is irrelevant
(0x00 is used here).
Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=40 01 45 05 00 00 00 00
The coupler responds with the upload response telegram:
Id=0x580+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=43 01 45 05 06 31 20 01
This means that the feature register contains the value 31 06. The upper 4 bits indicate the thermocouple
type. Their value here is 3, which means that PT500 is the type that has been set for this channel (see the
KL3202 documentation).
Writing register values
SDO write access to the corresponding combination of index and sub-index with:
- channel number + 0x80 (access bit = 1) in byte 3
- register address in byte 2
- high byte register value in byte 1
- low byte register value in byte 0 of the 32-bit data value.
[Gefahrinformation hier einfügen!]
Attention
WarningIf the write protection is not removed (as a result, for instance, of a faulty codeword), then although a write access to the terminal register will be confirmed (SDO download response), the value is not in fact entered into the register. It is therefore recommended that the value is read back after writing and compared.
Remove terminal write protection
Before the user registers in the Bus Terminal (register 32-xx, depending on terminal type or extension
module) can be written to, it is first necessary for write protection to be removed. The following codeword is
written for this purpose into register 31 of the channel concerned:
Write protection
122
Channel
Register
Value
1,2, 3 or 4
31 (0x1F)
4661 (0x1235)
Version: 1.3
Corresponding
SDO download
value (0x4500/0)
8y 1F 12 35 (y =
channel number)
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Remove terminal write protection (CAN representation)
In order to remove the terminal's write protection, the following SDO telegram must thus be sent to the
coupler:
Id=600 + Node-ID DLC=8; Data=23 01 45 xx 35 12 1F 8y
where xx is the terminal's slot, and y indicates the channel.
An example of removing write protection
Suppose that a KL3202 Thermocouple Input Terminal is inserted into slot 5 of a BK5120 that has node
address 3, then the write protection for the first channel can be removed as follows:
Id=0x603 DLC=8; Data=23 01 45 05 35 12 1F 80
The following telegram is sent for the second channel:
Id=0x603 DLC=8; Data=23 01 45 05 35 12 1F 81
An example of writing register values
The type of thermocouple attached to the second channel of the KL3202 Terminal in slot 5 is now to be
changed to PT1000. For this purpose, the value 2 must be written into the upper 4 bits (the upper nibble) of
the feature register. It is assumed to that the default values are to be supplied for all the other bits in the
feature register. Once the write protection has been removed, SDO write access (download request) is used
to write the following 32 bit value into index 0x4501, sub-index 05: 81 20 21 06 (0x81=01+0x80;
0x20=32;0x2106 = register value).
The corresponding telegram on the bus looks like this:
Id=0x600+Node-ID DLC=8; Data=23 01 45 05 06 21 20 81
Activate PDOs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x5500
0 Unsigned32 rw
Activate
PDO
Defaults
Attribute
Mapping
N
Default
Meaning
value
0x0000000 sets PDO
0
communica
tion
parameters
for PDOs
2...11
CANopen defines default identifiers for 4 transmit (Tx) and 2 receive (Rx) PDOs, all other PDOs being
initially deactivated after the nodes have started up. Index 0x5500 can activate all the PDOs that, in
accordance with the terminals inserted, are filled with process data (manufacturer-specific default mapping).
A manufacturer-specific default identifier allocation is carried out here for PDO5…11, while the transmission
type and a uniform inhibit time is set for PDO2…11. PDOs that do not have process data (and which are
thus superfluous in the present configuration) are not activated.
[Gefahrinformation hier einfügen!]
NoteThis object can only be written in the pre-operational state!
Note
The 32-bit value is used as follows:
MSB
Transmission Type
RxPDOs
Transmission Type
TxPDOs
High byte inhibit time
LSB
Low byte inhibit time
As is usual in CANopen, the LSB is transferred first, followed by the MSB.
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CAN
Example
Activate PDOs for bus node number 1, set inhibit time to 10ms (=100 x 100µs), set transmission type for
TxPDOs to 255, and set transmission type for RxPDOs to 1. The following telegram must be sent:
Id=0x601 DLC=8; Data=23 00 55 00 64 00 FF 01
The node responds with the following telegram:
Id=0x601 DLC=8; Data=60 00 55 00 00 00 00 00
Identifiers used
The default identifier allocation for the additional PDOs leaves the pre-defined regions for guarding, SDOs
etc. free, assumes a maximum of 64 nodes in the network with PDO6 as the next node, and proceeds
according to the following scheme:
Object
TxPDO5
RxPDO5
TxPDO6
RxPDO6
TxDPO7
RxPDO7
TxPDO8
RxPDO8
TxPDO9
RxPDO9
TxDPO10
RxPDO10
TxPDO11
RxPDO11
Function code
1101
1111
00111
01001
01011
01101
01111
10001
10011
10101
10111
11001
11011
11101
Resulting COB ID (hex)
0x681 - 0x6BF
0x781 - 0x7BF
0x1C1 - 0x1FF
0x241 - 0x27F
0x2C1 - 0x2FF
0x341 - 0x37F
0x3C1- 0x3FF
0x441 - 0x47F
0x4C1 - 0x4FF
0x541 - 0x57F
0x5C1 - 0x5FF
0x641 - 0x67F
0x6C1 - 0x6FF
0x741 - 0x77F
Resulting COB ID (dec)
1665 - 1727
1921- 1983
449 - 511
577 - 639
705 - 767
833 - 895
961 - 1023
1089 - 1151
1217 - 1279
1345 - 1407
1473 - 1535
1601- 1663
1729 - 1791
1857 - 1919
[Gefahrinformation hier einfügen!]
Attention
WarningEnsure that index 0x5500 is not used if Bus Couplers with more than 5 PDOs are
present in networks with node addresses > 64, otherwise identification overlaps can occur.
In that case, the PDO identifiers must be set individually.
For the sake of clarity, the default identifiers defined according to CANopen are also listed here:
Object
Emergency
TxPDO1
RxPDO1
TxPDO2
RxPDO2
TxDPO3
RxPDO3
TxPDO4
RxPDO4
SDO (Tx)
SDO (Rx)
Guarding / Heartbeat/
Bootup
Function code
0001
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1110
Resulting COB ID (hex)
0x81 - 0xBF [0xFF]
0x181 - 0x1BF [0x1FF]
0x201 - 0x23F [0x27F]
0x281 - 0x2BF [0x2FF]
0x301 - 0x33F [0x37F]
0x381 - 0x3BF [0x3FF]
0x401 - 0x43F [0x47F]
0x481 - 0x4BF [0x4FF]
0x501 - 0x53F [0x57F]
0x581 - 0x5BF [0x5FF]
0x601 - 0x63F [0x67F]
0x701 - 0x73F [0x77F]
Resulting COB ID (dec)
129 - 191 [255]
385 - 447 [511]
513 - 575 [639]
641 - 676 [767]
769 - 831 [895]
897 - 959 [1023]
1025 - 1087 [1151]
1153 - 1215 [1279]
1281- 1343 [1407]
1409 - 1471 [1535]
1537 - 1599 [1663]
1793 - 1855 [1919]
The identifiers that result from the DIP switch settings on the coupler are given, as are the identifier regions
for the node addresses 64...127 (not settable in Bus Couplers BK5110, BK5120 and LC5100) in square
brackets. Addresses 1…99 can be set for the Fieldbus Box modules and the BK515x Bus Couplers.
124
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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CAN
The appendix [} 143] contains a tabular summary of all the identifiers.
Digital inputs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x6000
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
1
1st input
block
...
254th input
block
Unsigned8 ro
Y
0x00
...
...
Unsigned8 ro
...
Y
...
0x00
Mapping
Default
Meaning
value
Depending The
on type
number of
32-bit
interrupt
masks = 2
x the
number of
TxDPOs
0xFFFFFFF IR-mask
F
bytes 0...3
TxPDO1
0xFFFFFFF IR-mask
F
bytes 4...7
TxPDO1
0xFFFFFFF IR-mask
F
bytes 0...3
TxPDO2
...
...
0xFFFFFFF IR-mask
F
bytes 4...7
TxPDO16
...
0XFE
Attribute
Mapping
Meaning
Number of
available
digital 8-bit
input data
blocks
1st input
channel
...
254th input
channel
Interrupt mask
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
0x6126
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
1
IR-Mask0
TxPDO1
Unsigned32 rw
N
2
IR-Mask1
TxPDO1
Unsigned32 rw
N
3
IR-Mask0
TxPDO2
Unsigned32 rw
N
...
0x20
...
IR-Mask1
TxPDO16
...
...
Unsigned32 rw
...
N
By default, every change in the value in an event-driven PDO causes a telegram to be sent. The interrupt
mask makes it possible to determine which data changes are evaluated for this purpose. By clearing the
appropriate ranges within the PDOs they are masked out for event-driving purposes (interrupt control). The
interrupt mask does not just govern all the PDOs with digital inputs, but all the TxPDOs that are present. If
the TxPDOs are shorter than 8 bytes, then the superfluous part of the IR mask is not evaluated.
The interrupt mask only has an effect on TxPDOs with transmission types 254 and 255. It is not stored in the
device (not even through object 0x1010). Changes to the mask at runtime (when the status is operational)
are possible, and are evaluated starting from the next change of input data.
The interrupt mask for TxPDOs with analog input data is not evaluated if either limit values (0x6424, 0x6425)
or the delta function (0x6426) have been activated for the inputs.
This entry has been implemented in firmware C3 and above.
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CAN
Example of data assignment
Application example
The value contained in a fast counter input is only to be transmitted when bits in the status word (the latch
input, for instance) have changed. This requires the 32 bit counter value to be masked out (zeroed) in the
interrupt mask. The status is located in byte 0, while the counter value is, by default, contained in bytes or
1..4 of the corresponding PDOs (TxPDO3 in this example, because < 65 digital and < 5 analog inputs are
present).
This means that index 0x6126, sub-index5 must receive the value 0x0000 00FF and that sub-index6 must
have 0xFFFF FF00 written into it.
The corresponding SDOs therefore appear as follows:
11 bit
8 bytes of user data
identifier
0x600+
0x22
0x26
0x61
node ID
11 bit
8 bytes of user data
identifier
0x600+
0x22
0x26
0x61
node ID
0x05
0xFF
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x06
0x00
0xFF
0xFF
0xFF
Meaning
Digital outputs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x6200
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
1
1st input
block
...
254th input
block
Unsigned8 rw
Y
0x00
...
...
Unsigned8 rw
...
Y
...
0x00
...
0XFE
126
Attribute
Version: 1.3
Mapping
Number of
available
digital 8-bit
output data
blocks
1st output
channel
...
254th output
channel
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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CAN
Analog inputs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x6401
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
1
1st input
Unsigned16 ro
Y
0x0000
...
0XFE
...
254th input
...
...
Unsigned16 ro
...
Y
...
0x0000
Meaning
Number of
analog
input
channels
available
1st input
channel
...
254th input
channel
The analog signals are displayed left aligned. The representation in the process image is therefore
independent of the actual resolution. Detailed information on the data format can be found at the relevant
signal type.
Analog outputs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
0x6411
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
1
1st input
block
...
254th input
block
Unsigned16 rw
Y
0x0000
...
...
Unsigned16 rw
...
Y
...
0x0000
...
0XFE
Attribute
Mapping
Meaning
Number of
analog
output
channels
available
1st output
channel
...
254th output
channel
The analog signals are displayed left aligned. The representation in the process image is therefore
independent of the actual resolution. Detailed information on the data format can be found at the relevant
signal type.
Event driven analog inputs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x6423
0 Boolean
rw
N
Global
Interrupt
Enable
Default
value
FALSE (0)
Meaning
Activates
the eventdriven
transmissio
n of PDOs
with analog
inputs.
Although, in accordance with CANopen, the analog inputs in TxPDO2..4 are by default set to transmission
type 255 (event driven), the event (the alteration of an input value) is suppressed by the event control in
object 0x6423, in order to prevent the bus from being swamped with analog signals. It is recommended that
the flow of data associated with the analog PDOs is controlled either through synchronous communication or
through using the event timer. In event-driven operation, the transmission behavior of the analog PDOs can
be parameterized before activation by setting the inhibit time (object 0x1800ff, sub-index 3) and/or limit value
monitoring (objects 0x6424 + 0x6425) and/or delta function (object 0x6426).
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127
CAN
Upper limit value analog inputs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x6424
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
1
upper limit
1st input
Unsigned16 rw
Y
0x0000
...
0XFE
...
upper limit
254th input
...
...
Unsigned16 rw
...
Y
...
0x0000
Meaning
Number of
analog
input
channels
available
Upper limit
value for 1st
input
channel
...
Upper limit
value for
254th input
channel
Values different from 0 activate the upper limit value for this channel. A PDO is then transmitted if this limit
value is exceeded. In addition, the event driven mode must be activated (object 0x6423). The data format
corresponds to that of the analog inputs.
Lower limit value analog inputs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x6425
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
1
lower limit
1st input
Unsigned16 rw
Y
0x0000
...
0XFE
...
lower limit
254th input
...
...
Unsigned16 rw
...
Y
...
0x0000
Meaning
Number of
analog
input
channels
available
Lower limit
value for 1st
input
channel
...
Lower limit
value for
254th input
channel
Values different from 0 activate the lower limit value for this channel. A PDO is then transmitted if the value
falls below this limit value. In addition, the event driven mode must be activated (object 0x6423). The data
format corresponds to that of the analog inputs.
128
Version: 1.3
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CAN
Delta function for analog inputs
Index
Sub-index Name
Type
Attribute
Mapping
0x6426
0
Number of
elements
Unsigned8 ro
N
Default
value
Depending
on type and
fittings
1
delta value Unsigned16 rw
1st input
Y
0x0000
...
0XFE
...
...
...
delta value Unsigned16 rw
254th input
...
Y
...
0x0000
Meaning
Number of
analog
input
channels
available
Delta value
for the 1st
input
channel
...
Delta value
for the 254th
input
channel
Values different from 0 activate the delta function for this channel. A PDO is then transmitted if the value has
changed by more than the delta value since the last transmission. In addition, the event driven mode must
be activated (object 0x6423). The data format corresponds to that of the analog inputs (delta value: can only
have positive values).
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129
Error handling and siagosis
10
Error handling and siagosis
10.1
LED displays
Ethernet interface X001
Interface X001
LED green
LED yellow
130
Ethernet (CX805x)
on
flashing
Version: 1.3
Meaning
Link present
Activity
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Error handling and siagosis
CAN master LEDs of the CX8050
Labeling
TC
Meaning
Color
Indicates the status of the red
coupler
Green
Blue
Meaning
TwinCAT is in "stop"
mode
TwinCAT is in "run" mode
TwinCAT is in "config"
(If red DIP switch 1 is set mode
to on when starting the
coupler)
Green on / Red off
CAN is OK
Green off / Red on
CAN in bus off
Green 200 ms / Red 200 CAN Warning
ms
Green off / Red on
CAN not configured
Green on / Red off
All nodes have NodeState
=0
Green 200 ms / Red 200 All boxes in OP state, but
ms
the tasks have not yet
started
Green off / Red 200 ms
Not all nodes in OP
Green off / Red on
No boxes configured
CAN
Shows the CAN status
TX/RX
Indicates CAN errors
CANopen slave LEDs of the CX8051
Labeling
TC
Meaning
Color
Indicates the status of the red
coupler
Green
Blue
CAN
Shows the CAN status
TX/RX
Indicates CAN errors
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Meaning
TwinCAT is in "stop"
mode
TwinCAT is in "run" mode
TwinCAT is in "config"
(If red DIP switch 1 is set mode
to on when starting the
coupler)
Green on / Red off
CAN is OK
Green off / Red on
CAN in bus off
Green 200 ms / Red 200 CAN Warning
ms
Green and red flashing
Baud rate search active
rapidly
Green off / Red on
CAN not configured
Green on
Everything OK
Green 200 ms / Red 200 All boxes in OP state, but
ms
the tasks have not yet
started
Green off / Red 200 ms
Not all boxes in OP
Green off / Red on
No boxes configured
Version: 1.3
131
Error handling and siagosis
Power supply terminal LEDs
Operation with E-bus terminals
Operation with K-bus terminals
Display LED
1 Us 24 V (top left, 1st row)
2 Up 24 V (top right, 1st row)
3 L/A (left centre, 2nd row)
Description
CX80xx supply voltage
Power contacts supply voltage
EtherCAT LED
4 K-BUS RUN (right centre, 2nd
row)
6 K-BUS ERR (bottom right, 3rd
row)
K-bus LED RUN
132
K-bus LED ERR
Version: 1.3
Meaning
connected to -24 V
connected to -24 V
flashing green: EtherCAT
communication active
connected to E-bus / no data traffic
not connected to E-bus
Lights up green: K-bus running,
everything OK
Lights up red: K-bus error - see Kbus error code
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
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Error handling and siagosis
K-bus error codes
Error code
Persistent, continuous
flashing
Error code argument
Description
EMC problems
Remedy
• Check power supply
for undervoltage or
overvoltage peaks
• Implement EMC
measures
3 pulses
0
K-bus command error
4 pulses
0
K-Bus data error, break
behind the Bus Coupler
n
Break behind Bus
Terminal n
5 pulses
n
6 pulses
0
1
K-bus error in register
communication with Bus
Terminal n
Error at initialisation
Internal data error
8
Internal data error
0
Process data lengths do
not correspond to the
configuration
K-bus reset failed
7 pulses
1..n
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
• If a K-bus error is
present, it can be
localized by a restart
of the coupler (by
switching it off and
then on again)
- No Bus Terminal
inserted
- One of the Bus
Terminals is defective;
halve the number of Bus
Terminals attached and
check whether the error is
still present with the
remaining Bus Terminals.
Repeat until the defective
Bus Terminal is located.
Check whether the n+1
Bus Terminal is correctly
connected; replace if
necessary.
Check whether the Bus
End Terminal 9010 is
connected.
Exchange the nth bus
terminal
Exchange Bus Coupler
Perform a hardware reset
on the Bus Coupler
(switch off and on again)
Perform a hardware reset
on the Bus Coupler
(switch off and on again)
Check the Bus Terminals
for the configured Bus
Terminals
Check the Bus Terminals
133
Appendix
11
Appendix
11.1
First steps
The following components are necessary for the first steps
• PC with TwinCAT 2.11 R3
• Ethernet cable
• Power supply (24 VDC), cabling material
• a KL2xxx or an EL2xxx, digital output terminal, end terminal
Required TwinCAT version
TwinCAT 2.11 R3 is required for the programming of the CX80xx series. Older TwinCAT
versions and TwinCAT 3.x are not supported!
Note
1. Connect K-bus or E-bus terminals to the controller.
2. Connect voltage to the CX80xx (see power supply [} 22]).
3. Connect Ethernet (CX80xx X001) to your network or a direct connection to your PC (make sure in the
case of a peer-to-peer connection that the IP addressing in your PC is set to DHCP).
4. Wait a while, approx. 1 to 2 minutes; either the CX80xx will be assigned an address by the DHCP server
(usually fast) or, if it does not find a DHCP server, it uses a local IP address.
5. Switch on TC on the PC in Config Mode (TwinCAT icon blue) and start the System Manager
6. In the System Manager, click on the PC symbol (Choose Target System) or press >F8<
7. The following dialog box opens; click on Search (Ethernet).
134
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
8. Select Option 1 if you have addressed via DHCP or Option 2 in case of DHCP or local IP address. Then
click on "Broadcast search".
Your network is scanned for Beckhoff controllers. If none is found, this means that the DHCP of the controller
is not yet completed or the network settings on your PC are incorrect. A network cable that has not been
connected can naturally also be the cause, but this should not be the case if point 3 has been done.
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
135
Appendix
9. The host name is composed by default of "CX" and the last 3 bytes of the MAC address. You can find the
MAC address on the side of the CX80xx. The MAC address is always 6 bytes long and the first three bytes
are the vendor ID, which is always 00 01 05 in the case of Beckhoff devices.
An "X" next to Connected means that the CX is already known in the system and can be used. To make it
known, click in the list on the CX with which you want to connect and then click on "Add route". An input
mask opens with "User name" and "Password". By default there is no password, simply confirm by clicking
on OK. Afterwards the "X" should appear next to connected.
10. Next, the CX should appear in the list of the devices; select it and confirm by clicking on OK.
11. Check whether the connection is there. In the System Manager in the bottom right-hand corner. It must
be blue or green and may not be yellow.
12. If the setting is green, switch the CX to Config Mode with "Shift F4" or click on the blue TC icon in the
System Manager. The System Manager now asks you whether you really want to switch to Config Mode;
confirm by clicking on OK.
13. The setting at the bottom right must now change to blue and the TC LED on the CX80xx must now also
light up blue.
14. Now click on I/O Devices and then on Scan Devices...
15. A message appears, informing you that not everything will be automatically detected.
16. The CCAT interface is usually found (CX8090) or the corresponding fieldbus interface (other CX80xx
devices) and either a K-bus interface or an EtherCAT interface, depending now on which terminals you have
connected to the CX. The CCAT interface must be present in the System Manager file and may not be
deleted. If an error message should appear when scanning, check the revision level of your TwinCAT
version and perform an update if necessary.
136
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
17. Now we come to the programming. To do this, open the PLC Control and select File -> New. The PLC
Control asks you for the target system. Select CX (ARM). Afterwards it asks you for the function block; set
the ST language (structured text). Now write a small program...
Translate the program. If it is error free (a warning must come, that it is OK) save the project under an
arbitrary name, translate it again and save it once again.
18: Switch once again to the System Manager and add the program under PLC - Configuration. A
FileName.typ file is sought.
19: Now open the project, then the task and then outputs, in which there must be a variable MAIN.bToggle.
You can link this with the hardware. To do this, click on "Linked to...".
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
137
Appendix
Select a digital output. Now you can download the configuration to the CX and switch the CX to Run Mode.
To do this, click on the ‘cube’ or press Ctrl + Shift + F4. The TC LED on the CX must then light up green.
20. Switch back to PLC Control, go to "Online/Selection of the target system", select the correct CX, click on
it and select runtime system 1. Now "Online/login" again (F11) transfer the PLC program, then "Online/
Start" (F5). The LED on your terminal must now flash.
21. As a final step Online/Generate a boot project. This completes the project and your first program is
stored on the CX.
Congratulations, the foundations have now been laid and are ready to be built on. We wish you every
success!
138
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
11.2
Image Update
There are two different possibilities to update the image of the CX80xx.
Prerequisites
• Please make sure before the update that your CX80xx supports the image that you
want to load.
Note
• When updating the image, please first update all existing files and only then copy the
new image.
Always copy all files and directories in order to update a CX80xx.
Update via USB
USB port as ignition source in ATEX areas
Gases or dusts can be ignited by a spark discharge when the USB port is used.
CAUTION
Switch off the power supply and wait until the 1-second UPS has discharged. Ensure that
there is no explosive atmosphere before you use the USB port.
A USB cable is required for this!
• Switch off the CX80xx
• Set red Dip switch (under the flap) DIP 1 to ON
• Switch on the CX
• Connect the PC with USB
• Delete all files (we recommend that you backup all files first), no formatting
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
139
Appendix
• Wait until copying has finished, then remove the USB cable
• Switch DIP switch 1 to OFF
• Switch off the CX80xx
• Switch on the CX80xx; it may take a little longer the first time
Update the MicroSD card
A MicroSD card reader is required for this!
• Remove the MicroSD card from the switched-off CX device.
• Insert the MicroSD card into the reader
• Delete all files (we recommend that you backup all files first), no formatting
• Load the new image
• Wait until copying has finished, then remove the MicroSD card
• Insert the MicroSD card into the SD slot of the switched-off CX again
• Now switch on the CX again; it may take a little longer the first time
140
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
11.3
Certification
11.3.1
ATEX
The CX8xxx Embedded PCs, which are certified for use in potentially explosive atmospheres, have the
following IDs:
II 3 G Ex nA IIC T4 Gc
II 3 D Ex tc IIIC T135 ºC Dc
DEKRA 16ATEX0052 X
Ta: 0°C-55°C
Serial number
The name plate of the CX8xxx Embedded PCs shows a consecutive serial number, a hardware version and
a date of manufacture:
Legend:
n:
h:
dd:
mm:
yyyy:
Serial number, consecutive number
Hardware version, ascending number
Production day
Production month
Production year
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
141
Appendix
11.3.2
FCC
FCC Approvals for the United States of America
FCC: Federal Communications Commission Radio Frequency Interference Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to
Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses,
and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction
manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a
residential area is likely to cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to correct the
interference at his own expense.
FCC Approval for Canada
FCC: Canadian Notice
This equipment does not exceed the Class A limits for radiated emissions as described in the Radio
Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
11.3.3
UL
The UL-certified CX8xxx Embedded PCs have the following IDs:
Compliance with UL requirements:
Compliance with the following UL requirements is required, in order to guarantee the UL certification for the
CX8xxx Embedded PC:
• The Embedded PCs must not be connected to unlimited voltage sources.
• Embedded PCs may only be supplied from a 24 V DV voltage source. The voltage source must be
insulated and protected with a fuse of maximum 4 A (corresponding to UL248).
• Or the power supply must originate from a voltage source that corresponds to NEC class 2. An NEC
class 2 voltage source must not be connected in series or parallel with another NEC class 2 voltage
source.
142
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
11.4
CAN Identifier List
The list provided here should assist in identifying and assigning CANopen messages. All the identifiers
allocated by the CANopen default identifier allocation are listed, as well as the manufacturer-specific default
identifiers issued by BECKHOFF via object 0x5500 [} 89] (only to be used in networks with node addresses
less than 64).
The following values can be used as search aids and "entry points" in the extensive identifier table in the
*chm edition of the documentation:
Decimal: 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900
Hexadecimal: 0x181 0x1C1 0x201 0x301 0x401 0x501 0x601 0x701
Identifier allocation via object 0x5500 follows this scheme:
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
143
Appendix
Object
Emergency
TxPDO1
Resulting COB ID (hex)
0x81 - 0xBF [0xFF]
0x181 - 0x1BF [0x1FF]
Resulting COB ID (dec)
129 - 191 [255]
385 - 447 [511]
RxPDO1
0x201 - 0x23F [0x27F]
513 - 575 [639]
TxPDO2
0x281 - 0x2BF [0x2FF]
641 - 676 [767]
RxPDO2
0x301 - 0x33F [0x37F]
769 - 831 [895]
TxDPO3
0x381 - 0x3BF [0x3FF]
897 - 959 [1023]
RxPDO3
0x401 - 0x43F [0x47F]
1025 - 1087 [1151]
TxPDO4
0x481 - 0x4BF [0x4FF]
1153 - 1215 [1279]
RxPDO4
0x501 - 0x53F [0x57F]
1281- 1343 [1407]
TxPDO5
0x681 - 0x6BF
1665 - 1727
RxPDO5
0x781 - 0x7BF
1921- 1983
TxPDO6
0x1C1 - 0x1FF
449 - 511
RxPDO6
0x241 - 0x27F
577 - 639
TxDPO7
0x2C1 - 0x2FF
705 - 767
RxPDO7
0x341 - 0x37F
833 - 895
TxPDO8
0x3C1- 0x3FF
961 - 1023
RxPDO8
0x441 - 0x47F
1089 - 1151
TxPDO9
0x4C1 - 0x4FF
1217 - 1279
RxPDO9
0x541 - 0x57F
1345 - 1407
TxDPO10
0x5C1 - 0x5FF
1473 - 1535
RxPDO10
0x641 - 0x67F
1601- 1663
TxPDO11
0x6C1 - 0x6FF
1729 - 1791
RxPDO11
0x741 - 0x77F
1857 - 1919
SDO (Tx)
0x581 - 0x5BF [0x5FF]
1409 - 1471 [1535]
144
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
Object
SDO (Rx)
Resulting COB ID (hex)
0x601 - 0x63F [0x67F]
Resulting COB ID (dec)
1537 - 1599 [1663]
Guarding / Heartbeat/ Bootup
0x701 - 0x73F [0x77F]
1793 - 1855 [1919]
Identifier List
Identifiers marked with * are given manufacturer-specific assignments on the Bus Couplers after writing
index 0x5500
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
145
Appendix
dec
hex
hex
0
Telegram dec
type
NMT
874
0
128
80
SYNC
875
36B
129
81
876
36C
130
82
877
36D
131
83
878
36E
132
84
879
36F
133
85
880
370
134
86
881
371
135
87
882
372
136
88
883
373
137
89
884
374
138
8A
885
375
139
8B
886
376
140
8C
887
377
141
8D
888
378
142
8E
889
379
143
8F
890
37A
144
90
891
37B
145
91
892
37C
146
92
893
37D
147
93
894
37E
148
94
895
37F
149
95
897
381
150
96
898
382
151
97
899
383
152
98
EMCY
Nd.1
EMCY
Nd.2
EMCY
Nd.3
EMCY
Nd.4
EMCY
Nd.5
EMCY
Nd.6
EMCY
Nd.7
EMCY
Nd.8
EMCY
Nd.9
EMCY
Nd.10
EMCY
Nd.11
EMCY
Nd.12
EMCY
Nd.13
EMCY
Nd.14
EMCY
Nd.15
EMCY
Nd.16
EMCY
Nd.17
EMCY
Nd.18
EMCY
Nd.19
EMCY
Nd.20
EMCY
Nd.21
EMCY
Nd.22
EMCY
Nd.23
EMCY
Nd.24
900
384
146
36A
Telegram
type
RxPDO7*,
Nd.42
RxPDO7*,
Nd.43
RxPDO7*,
Nd.44
RxPDO7*,
Nd.45
RxPDO7*,
Nd.46
RxPDO7*,
Nd.47
RxPDO7*,
Nd.48
RxPDO7*,
Nd.49
RxPDO7*,
Nd.50
RxPDO7*,
Nd.51
RxPDO7*,
Nd.52
RxPDO7*,
Nd.53
RxPDO7*,
Nd.54
RxPDO7*,
Nd.55
RxPDO7*,
Nd.56
RxPDO7*,
Nd.57
RxPDO7*,
Nd.58
RxPDO7*,
Nd.59
RxPDO7*,
Nd.60
RxPDO7*,
Nd.61
RxPDO7*,
Nd.62
RxPDO7*,
Nd.63
TxPDO3*,
dec
hex
1430
596
1431
597
1432
598
1433
599
1434
59A
1435
59B
1436
59C
1437
59D
1438
59E
1439
59F
1440
5A0
1441
5A1
1442
5A2
1443
5A3
1444
5A4
1445
5A5
1446
5A6
1447
5A7
1448
5A8
1449
5A9
1450
5AA
1451
5AB
1452
5AC
TxPDO3*, 1453
Nd.2
TxPDO3*, 1454
Nd.3
TxPDO3*, 1455
Nd.4
5AD
Version: 1.3
5AE
5AF
Telegram
type
SDO Tx
Nd.22
SDO Tx
Nd.23
SDO Tx
Nd.24
SDO Tx
Nd.25
SDO Tx
Nd.26
SDO Tx
Nd.27
SDO Tx
Nd.28
SDO Tx
Nd.29
SDO Tx
Nd.30
SDO Tx
Nd.31
SDO Tx
Nd.32
SDO Tx
Nd.33
SDO Tx
Nd.34
SDO Tx
Nd.35
SDO Tx
Nd.36
SDO Tx
Nd.37
SDO Tx
Nd.38
SDO Tx
Nd.39
SDO Tx
Nd.40
SDO Tx
Nd.41
SDO Tx
Nd.42
SDO Tx
Nd.43
SDO Tx
Nd.44
SDO Tx
Nd.45
SDO Tx
Nd.46
SDO Tx
Nd.47
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
153
99
154
9A
155
9B
156
9C
157
9D
158
9E
159
9F
160
A0
161
A1
162
A2
163
A3
164
A4
165
A5
166
A6
167
A7
168
A8
169
A9
170
AA
171
AB
172
AC
173
AD
174
AE
175
AF
176
B0
177
B1
178
B2
Telegram
type
EMCY
Nd.25
EMCY
Nd.26
EMCY
Nd.27
EMCY
Nd.28
EMCY
Nd.29
EMCY
Nd.30
EMCY
Nd.31
EMCY
Nd.32
EMCY
Nd.33
EMCY
Nd.34
EMCY
Nd.35
EMCY
Nd.36
EMCY
Nd.37
EMCY
Nd.38
EMCY
Nd.39
EMCY
Nd.40
EMCY
Nd.41
EMCY
Nd.42
EMCY
Nd.43
EMCY
Nd.44
EMCY
Nd.45
EMCY
Nd.46
EMCY
Nd.47
EMCY
Nd.48
EMCY
Nd.49
EMCY
Nd.50
dec
hex
901
385
902
386
903
387
904
388
905
389
906
38A
907
38B
908
38C
909
38D
910
38E
911
38F
912
390
913
391
914
392
915
393
916
394
917
395
918
396
919
397
920
398
921
399
922
39A
923
39B
924
39C
925
39D
926
39E
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
TxPDO3*,
Nd.5
TxPDO3*,
Nd.6
TxPDO3*,
Nd.7
TxPDO3*,
Nd.8
TxPDO3*,
Nd.9
TxPDO3*,
Nd.10
TxPDO3*,
Nd.11
TxPDO3*,
Nd.12
TxPDO3*,
Nd.13
TxPDO3*,
Nd.14
TxPDO3*,
Nd.15
TxPDO3*,
Nd.16
TxPDO3*,
Nd.17
TxPDO3*,
Nd.18
TxPDO3*,
Nd.19
TxPDO3*,
Nd.20
TxPDO3*,
Nd.21
TxPDO3*,
Nd.22
TxPDO3*,
Nd.23
TxPDO3*,
Nd.24
TxPDO3*,
Nd.25
TxPDO3*,
Nd.26
TxPDO3*,
Nd.27
TxPDO3*,
Nd.28
TxPDO3*,
Nd.29
TxPDO3*,
Nd.30
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1456
5B0
1457
5B1
1458
5B2
1459
5B3
1460
5B4
1461
5B5
1462
5B6
1463
5B7
1464
5B8
1465
5B9
1466
5BA
1467
5BB
1468
5BC
1469
5BD
1470
5BE
1471
5BF
1473
5C1
1474
5C2
1475
5C3
1476
5C4
1477
5C5
1478
5C6
1479
5C7
1480
5C8
1481
5C9
1482
5CA
Telegram
type
SDO Tx
Nd.48
SDO Tx
Nd.49
SDO Tx
Nd.50
SDO Tx
Nd.51
SDO Tx
Nd.52
SDO Tx
Nd.53
SDO Tx
Nd.54
SDO Tx
Nd.55
SDO Tx
Nd.56
SDO Tx
Nd.57
SDO Tx
Nd.58
SDO Tx
Nd.59
SDO Tx
Nd.60
SDO Tx
Nd.61
SDO Tx
Nd.62
SDO Tx
Nd.63
TxPDO10
TxPDO10
*, Nd.2
TxPDO10
*, Nd.3
TxPDO10
*, Nd.4
TxPDO10
*, Nd.5
TxPDO10
*, Nd.6
TxPDO10
*, Nd.7
TxPDO10
*, Nd.8
TxPDO10
*, Nd.9
TxPDO10
*, Nd.10
147
Appendix
dec
hex
179
B3
180
B4
181
B5
182
B6
183
B7
184
B8
185
B9
186
BA
187
BB
188
BC
189
BD
190
BE
191
BF
385
181
386
182
387
183
388
184
389
185
390
186
391
187
392
188
393
189
394
18A
395
18B
396
18C
397
18D
148
Telegram
type
EMCY
Nd.51
EMCY
Nd.52
EMCY
Nd.53
EMCY
Nd.54
EMCY
Nd.55
EMCY
Nd.56
EMCY
Nd.57
EMCY
Nd.58
EMCY
Nd.59
EMCY
Nd.60
EMCY
Nd.61
EMCY
Nd.62
EMCY
Nd.63
TxPDO1
dec
hex
927
39F
928
3A0
929
3A1
930
3A2
931
3A3
932
3A4
933
3A5
934
3A6
935
3A7
936
3A8
937
3A9
938
3AA
939
3AB
940
3AC
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.2
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.3
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.4
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.5
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.6
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.7
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.8
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.9
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.10
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.11
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.12
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.13
941
3AD
942
3AE
943
3AF
944
3B0
945
3B1
946
3B2
947
3B3
948
3B4
949
3B5
950
3B6
951
3B7
952
3B8
Telegram
type
TxPDO3*,
Nd.31
TxPDO3*,
Nd.32
TxPDO3*,
Nd.33
TxPDO3*,
Nd.34
TxPDO3*,
Nd.35
TxPDO3*,
Nd.36
TxPDO3*,
Nd.37
TxPDO3*,
Nd.38
TxPDO3*,
Nd.39
TxPDO3*,
Nd.40
TxPDO3*,
Nd.41
TxPDO3*,
Nd.42
TxPDO3*,
Nd.43
TxPDO3*,
Nd.44
TxPDO3*,
Nd.45
TxPDO3*,
Nd.46
TxPDO3*,
Nd.47
TxPDO3*,
Nd.48
TxPDO3*,
Nd.49
TxPDO3*,
Nd.50
TxPDO3*,
Nd.51
TxPDO3*,
Nd.52
TxPDO3*,
Nd.53
TxPDO3*,
Nd.54
TxPDO3*,
Nd.55
TxPDO3*,
Nd.56
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1483
5CB
1484
5CC
1485
5CD
1486
5CE
1487
5CF
1488
5D0
1489
5D1
1490
5D2
1491
5D3
1492
5D4
1493
5D5
1494
5D6
1495
5D7
1496
5D8
1497
5D9
1498
5DA
1499
5DB
1500
5DC
1501
5DD
1502
5DE
1503
5DF
1504
5E0
1505
5E1
1506
5E2
1507
5E3
1508
5E4
Telegram
type
TxPDO10
*, Nd.11
TxPDO10
*, Nd.12
TxPDO10
*, Nd.13
TxPDO10
*, Nd.14
TxPDO10
*, Nd.15
TxPDO10
*, Nd.16
TxPDO10
*, Nd.17
TxPDO10
*, Nd.18
TxPDO10
*, Nd.19
TxPDO10
*, Nd.20
TxPDO10
*, Nd.21
TxPDO10
*, Nd.22
TxPDO10
*, Nd.23
TxPDO10
*, Nd.24
TxPDO10
*, Nd.25
TxPDO10
*, Nd.26
TxPDO10
*, Nd.27
TxPDO10
*, Nd.28
TxPDO10
*, Nd.29
TxPDO10
*, Nd.30
TxPDO10
*, Nd.31
TxPDO10
*, Nd.32
TxPDO10
*, Nd.33
TxPDO10
*, Nd.34
TxPDO10
*, Nd.35
TxPDO10
*, Nd.36
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
398
18E
399
18F
400
190
401
191
402
192
403
193
404
194
405
195
406
196
407
197
408
198
409
199
410
19A
411
19B
412
19C
413
19D
414
19E
415
19F
416
1A0
417
1A1
418
1A2
419
1A3
420
1A4
421
1A5
422
1A6
423
1A7
Telegram
type
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.14
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.15
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.16
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.17
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.18
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.19
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.20
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.21
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.22
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.23
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.24
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.25
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.26
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.27
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.28
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.29
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.30
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.31
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.32
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.33
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.34
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.35
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.36
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.37
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.38
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.39
dec
hex
953
3B9
954
3BA
955
3BB
956
3BC
957
3BD
958
3BE
959
3BF
961
3C1
962
3C2
963
3C3
964
3C4
965
3C5
966
3C6
967
3C7
968
3C8
969
3C9
970
3CA
971
3CB
972
3CC
973
3CD
974
3CE
975
3CF
976
3D0
977
3D1
978
3D2
979
3D3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
TxPDO3*,
Nd.57
TxPDO3*,
Nd.58
TxPDO3*,
Nd.59
TxPDO3*,
Nd.60
TxPDO3*,
Nd.61
TxPDO3*,
Nd.62
TxPDO3*,
Nd.63
TxPDO8
dec
hex
1509
5E5
1510
5E6
1511
5E7
1512
5E8
1513
5E9
1514
5EA
1515
5EB
1516
5EC
TxPDO8*,
Nd.2
TxPDO8*,
Nd.3
TxPDO8*,
Nd.4
TxPDO8*,
Nd.5
TxPDO8*,
Nd.6
TxPDO8*,
Nd.7
TxPDO8*,
Nd.8
TxPDO8*,
Nd.9
TxPDO8*,
Nd.10
TxPDO8*,
Nd.11
TxPDO8*,
Nd.12
TxPDO8*,
Nd.13
TxPDO8*,
Nd.14
TxPDO8*,
Nd.15
TxPDO8*,
Nd.16
TxPDO8*,
Nd.17
TxPDO8*,
Nd.18
TxPDO8*,
Nd.19
1517
5ED
1518
5EE
1519
5EF
1520
5F0
1521
5F1
1522
5F2
1523
5F3
1524
5F4
1525
5F5
1526
5F6
1527
5F7
1528
5F8
1529
5F9
1530
5FA
1531
5FB
1532
5FC
1533
5FD
1534
5FE
Version: 1.3
Telegram
type
TxPDO10
*, Nd.37
TxPDO10
*, Nd.38
TxPDO10
*, Nd.39
TxPDO10
*, Nd.40
TxPDO10
*, Nd.41
TxPDO10
*, Nd.42
TxPDO10
*, Nd.43
TxPDO10
*, Nd.44
TxPDO10
*, Nd.45
TxPDO10
*, Nd.46
TxPDO10
*, Nd.47
TxPDO10
*, Nd.48
TxPDO10
*, Nd.49
TxPDO10
*, Nd.50
TxPDO10
*, Nd.51
TxPDO10
*, Nd.52
TxPDO10
*, Nd.53
TxPDO10
*, Nd.54
TxPDO10
*, Nd.55
TxPDO10
*, Nd.56
TxPDO10
*, Nd.57
TxPDO10
*, Nd.58
TxPDO10
*, Nd.59
TxPDO10
*, Nd.60
TxPDO10
*, Nd.61
TxPDO10
*, Nd.62
149
Appendix
dec
hex
424
1A8
425
1A9
426
1AA
427
1AB
428
1AC
429
1AD
430
1AE
431
1AF
432
1B0
433
1B1
434
1B2
435
1B3
436
1B4
437
1B5
438
1B6
439
1B7
440
1B8
441
1B9
442
1BA
443
1BB
444
1BC
445
1BD
446
1BE
447
1BF
449
1C1
450
1C2
150
Telegram
type
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.40
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.41
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.42
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.43
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.44
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.45
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.46
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.47
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.48
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.49
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.50
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.51
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.52
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.53
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.54
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.55
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.56
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.57
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.58
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.59
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.60
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.61
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.62
TxPDO1,
DI, Nd.63
TxPDO6
dec
hex
980
3D4
981
3D5
982
3D6
983
3D7
984
3D8
985
3D9
986
3DA
987
3DB
988
3DC
989
3DD
990
3DE
991
3DF
992
3E0
993
3E1
994
3E2
995
3E3
996
3E4
997
3E5
998
3E6
999
3E7
1000
3E8
1001
3E9
1002
3EA
1003
3EB
1004
3EC
TxPDO6*, 1005
Nd.2
3ED
Telegram
type
TxPDO8*,
Nd.20
TxPDO8*,
Nd.21
TxPDO8*,
Nd.22
TxPDO8*,
Nd.23
TxPDO8*,
Nd.24
TxPDO8*,
Nd.25
TxPDO8*,
Nd.26
TxPDO8*,
Nd.27
TxPDO8*,
Nd.28
TxPDO8*,
Nd.29
TxPDO8*,
Nd.30
TxPDO8*,
Nd.31
TxPDO8*,
Nd.32
TxPDO8*,
Nd.33
TxPDO8*,
Nd.34
TxPDO8*,
Nd.35
TxPDO8*,
Nd.36
TxPDO8*,
Nd.37
TxPDO8*,
Nd.38
TxPDO8*,
Nd.39
TxPDO8*,
Nd.40
TxPDO8*,
Nd.41
TxPDO8*,
Nd.42
TxPDO8*,
Nd.43
TxPDO8*,
Nd.44
TxPDO8*,
Nd.45
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1535
5FF
1537
601
1538
602
1539
603
1540
604
1541
605
1542
606
1543
607
1544
608
1545
609
1546
60A
1547
60B
1548
60C
1549
60D
1550
60E
1551
60F
1552
610
1553
611
1554
612
1555
613
1556
614
1557
615
1558
616
1559
617
1560
618
1561
619
Telegram
type
TxPDO10
*, Nd.63
SDO Rx
SDO Rx
Nd.2
SDO Rx
Nd.3
SDO Rx
Nd.4
SDO Rx
Nd.5
SDO Rx
Nd.6
SDO Rx
Nd.7
SDO Rx
Nd.8
SDO Rx
Nd.9
SDO Rx
Nd.10
SDO Rx
Nd.11
SDO Rx
Nd.12
SDO Rx
Nd.13
SDO Rx
Nd.14
SDO Rx
Nd.15
SDO Rx
Nd.16
SDO Rx
Nd.17
SDO Rx
Nd.18
SDO Rx
Nd.19
SDO Rx
Nd.20
SDO Rx
Nd.21
SDO Rx
Nd.22
SDO Rx
Nd.23
SDO Rx
Nd.24
SDO Rx
Nd.25
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
451
1C3
452
1C4
453
1C5
454
1C6
455
1C7
456
1C8
457
1C9
458
1CA
459
1CB
460
1CC
461
1CD
462
1CE
463
1CF
464
1D0
465
1D1
466
1D2
467
1D3
468
1D4
469
1D5
470
1D6
471
1D7
472
1D8
473
1D9
474
1DA
475
1DB
476
1DC
Telegram
type
TxPDO6*,
Nd.3
TxPDO6*,
Nd.4
TxPDO6*,
Nd.5
TxPDO6*,
Nd.6
TxPDO6*,
Nd.7
TxPDO6*,
Nd.8
TxPDO6*,
Nd.9
TxPDO6*,
Nd.10
TxPDO6*,
Nd.11
TxPDO6*,
Nd.12
TxPDO6*,
Nd.13
TxPDO6*,
Nd.14
TxPDO6*,
Nd.15
TxPDO6*,
Nd.16
TxPDO6*,
Nd.17
TxPDO6*,
Nd.18
TxPDO6*,
Nd.19
TxPDO6*,
Nd.20
TxPDO6*,
Nd.21
TxPDO6*,
Nd.22
TxPDO6*,
Nd.23
TxPDO6*,
Nd.24
TxPDO6*,
Nd.25
TxPDO6*,
Nd.26
TxPDO6*,
Nd.27
TxPDO6*,
Nd.28
dec
hex
1006
3EE
1007
3EF
1008
3F0
1009
3F1
1010
3F2
1011
3F3
1012
3F4
1013
3F5
1014
3F6
1015
3F7
1016
3F8
1017
3F9
1018
3FA
1019
3FB
1020
3FC
1021
3FD
1022
3FE
1023
3FF
1025
401
1026
402
1027
403
1028
404
1029
405
1030
406
1031
407
1032
408
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
TxPDO8*,
Nd.46
TxPDO8*,
Nd.47
TxPDO8*,
Nd.48
TxPDO8*,
Nd.49
TxPDO8*,
Nd.50
TxPDO8*,
Nd.51
TxPDO8*,
Nd.52
TxPDO8*,
Nd.53
TxPDO8*,
Nd.54
TxPDO8*,
Nd.55
TxPDO8*,
Nd.56
TxPDO8*,
Nd.57
TxPDO8*,
Nd.58
TxPDO8*,
Nd.59
TxPDO8*,
Nd.60
TxPDO8*,
Nd.61
TxPDO8*,
Nd.62
TxPDO8*,
Nd.63
RxPDO3
dec
hex
1562
61A
1563
61B
1564
61C
1565
61D
1566
61E
1567
61F
1568
620
1569
621
1570
622
1571
623
1572
624
1573
625
1574
626
1575
627
1576
628
1577
629
1578
62A
1579
62B
1580
62C
RxPDO3*,
Nd.2
RxPDO3*,
Nd.3
RxPDO3*,
Nd.4
RxPDO3*,
Nd.5
RxPDO3*,
Nd.6
RxPDO3*,
Nd.7
RxPDO3*,
Nd.8
1581
62D
1582
62E
1583
62F
1584
630
1585
631
1586
632
1587
633
Version: 1.3
Telegram
type
SDO Rx
Nd.26
SDO Rx
Nd.27
SDO Rx
Nd.28
SDO Rx
Nd.29
SDO Rx
Nd.30
SDO Rx
Nd.31
SDO Rx
Nd.32
SDO Rx
Nd.33
SDO Rx
Nd.34
SDO Rx
Nd.35
SDO Rx
Nd.36
SDO Rx
Nd.37
SDO Rx
Nd.38
SDO Rx
Nd.39
SDO Rx
Nd.40
SDO Rx
Nd.41
SDO Rx
Nd.42
SDO Rx
Nd.43
SDO Rx
Nd.44
SDO Rx
Nd.45
SDO Rx
Nd.46
SDO Rx
Nd.47
SDO Rx
Nd.48
SDO Rx
Nd.49
SDO Rx
Nd.50
SDO Rx
Nd.51
151
Appendix
dec
hex
477
1DD
478
1DE
479
1DF
480
1E0
481
1E1
482
1E2
483
1E3
484
1E4
485
1E5
486
1E6
487
1E7
488
1E8
489
1E9
490
1EA
491
1EB
492
1EC
493
1ED
494
1EE
495
1EF
496
1F0
497
1F1
498
1F2
499
1F3
500
1F4
501
1F5
502
1F6
152
Telegram
type
TxPDO6*,
Nd.29
TxPDO6*,
Nd.30
TxPDO6*,
Nd.31
TxPDO6*,
Nd.32
TxPDO6*,
Nd.33
TxPDO6*,
Nd.34
TxPDO6*,
Nd.35
TxPDO6*,
Nd.36
TxPDO6*,
Nd.37
TxPDO6*,
Nd.38
TxPDO6*,
Nd.39
TxPDO6*,
Nd.40
TxPDO6*,
Nd.41
TxPDO6*,
Nd.42
TxPDO6*,
Nd.43
TxPDO6*,
Nd.44
TxPDO6*,
Nd.45
TxPDO6*,
Nd.46
TxPDO6*,
Nd.47
TxPDO6*,
Nd.48
TxPDO6*,
Nd.49
TxPDO6*,
Nd.50
TxPDO6*,
Nd.51
TxPDO6*,
Nd.52
TxPDO6*,
Nd.53
TxPDO6*,
Nd.54
dec
hex
1033
409
1034
40A
1035
40B
1036
40C
1037
40D
1038
40E
1039
40F
1040
410
1041
411
1042
412
1043
413
1044
414
1045
415
1046
416
1047
417
1048
418
1049
419
1050
41A
1051
41B
1052
41C
1053
41D
1054
41E
1055
41F
1056
420
1057
421
1058
422
Telegram
type
RxPDO3*,
Nd.9
RxPDO3*,
Nd.10
RxPDO3*,
Nd.11
RxPDO3*,
Nd.12
RxPDO3*,
Nd.13
RxPDO3*,
Nd.14
RxPDO3*,
Nd.15
RxPDO3*,
Nd.16
RxPDO3*,
Nd.17
RxPDO3*,
Nd.18
RxPDO3*,
Nd.19
RxPDO3*,
Nd.20
RxPDO3*,
Nd.21
RxPDO3*,
Nd.22
RxPDO3*,
Nd.23
RxPDO3*,
Nd.24
RxPDO3*,
Nd.25
RxPDO3*,
Nd.26
RxPDO3*,
Nd.27
RxPDO3*,
Nd.28
RxPDO3*,
Nd.29
RxPDO3*,
Nd.30
RxPDO3*,
Nd.31
RxPDO3*,
Nd.32
RxPDO3*,
Nd.33
RxPDO3*,
Nd.34
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1588
634
1589
635
1590
636
1591
637
1592
638
1593
639
1594
63A
1595
63B
1596
63C
1597
63D
1598
63E
1599
63F
1601
641
1602
642
1603
643
1604
644
1605
645
1606
646
1607
647
1608
648
1609
649
1610
64A
1611
64B
1612
64C
1613
64D
1614
64E
Telegram
type
SDO Rx
Nd.52
SDO Rx
Nd.53
SDO Rx
Nd.54
SDO Rx
Nd.55
SDO Rx
Nd.56
SDO Rx
Nd.57
SDO Rx
Nd.58
SDO Rx
Nd.59
SDO Rx
Nd.60
SDO Rx
Nd.61
SDO Rx
Nd.62
SDO Rx
Nd.63
RxPDO10
RxPDO10
*, Nd.2
RxPDO10
*, Nd.3
RxPDO10
*, Nd.4
RxPDO10
*, Nd.5
RxPDO10
*, Nd.6
RxPDO10
*, Nd.7
RxPDO10
*, Nd.8
RxPDO10
*, Nd.9
RxPDO10
*, Nd.10
RxPDO10
*, Nd.11
RxPDO10
*, Nd.12
RxPDO10
*, Nd.13
RxPDO10
*, Nd.14
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
503
1F7
504
1F8
505
1F9
506
1FA
507
1FB
508
1FC
509
1FD
510
1FE
511
1FF
513
201
514
202
515
203
516
204
517
205
518
206
519
207
520
208
521
209
522
20A
523
20B
524
20C
525
20D
526
20E
527
20F
528
210
529
211
Telegram
type
TxPDO6*,
Nd.55
TxPDO6*,
Nd.56
TxPDO6*,
Nd.57
TxPDO6*,
Nd.58
TxPDO6*,
Nd.59
TxPDO6*,
Nd.60
TxPDO6*,
Nd.61
TxPDO6*,
Nd.62
TxPDO6*,
Nd.63
RxPDO1
dec
hex
1059
423
1060
424
1061
425
1062
426
1063
427
1064
428
1065
429
1066
42A
1067
42B
1068
42C
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.2
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.3
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.4
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.5
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.6
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.7
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.8
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.9
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.10
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.11
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.12
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.13
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.14
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.15
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.16
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.17
1069
42D
1070
42E
1071
42F
1072
430
1073
431
1074
432
1075
433
1076
434
1077
435
1078
436
1079
437
1080
438
1081
439
1082
43A
1083
43B
1084
43C
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
RxPDO3*,
Nd.35
RxPDO3*,
Nd.36
RxPDO3*,
Nd.37
RxPDO3*,
Nd.38
RxPDO3*,
Nd.39
RxPDO3*,
Nd.40
RxPDO3*,
Nd.41
RxPDO3*,
Nd.42
RxPDO3*,
Nd.43
RxPDO3*,
Nd.44
RxPDO3*,
Nd.45
RxPDO3*,
Nd.46
RxPDO3*,
Nd.47
RxPDO3*,
Nd.48
RxPDO3*,
Nd.49
RxPDO3*,
Nd.50
RxPDO3*,
Nd.51
RxPDO3*,
Nd.52
RxPDO3*,
Nd.53
RxPDO3*,
Nd.54
RxPDO3*,
Nd.55
RxPDO3*,
Nd.56
RxPDO3*,
Nd.57
RxPDO3*,
Nd.58
RxPDO3*,
Nd.59
RxPDO3*,
Nd.60
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1615
64F
1616
650
1617
651
1618
652
1619
653
1620
654
1621
655
1622
656
1623
657
1624
658
1625
659
1626
65A
1627
65B
1628
65C
1629
65D
1630
65E
1631
65F
1632
660
1633
661
1634
662
1635
663
1636
664
1637
665
1638
666
1639
667
1640
668
Telegram
type
RxPDO10
*, Nd.15
RxPDO10
*, Nd.16
RxPDO10
*, Nd.17
RxPDO10
*, Nd.18
RxPDO10
*, Nd.19
RxPDO10
*, Nd.20
RxPDO10
*, Nd.21
RxPDO10
*, Nd.22
RxPDO10
*, Nd.23
RxPDO10
*, Nd.24
RxPDO10
*, Nd.25
RxPDO10
*, Nd.26
RxPDO10
*, Nd.27
RxPDO10
*, Nd.28
RxPDO10
*, Nd.29
RxPDO10
*, Nd.30
RxPDO10
*, Nd.31
RxPDO10
*, Nd.32
RxPDO10
*, Nd.33
RxPDO10
*, Nd.34
RxPDO10
*, Nd.35
RxPDO10
*, Nd.36
RxPDO10
*, Nd.37
RxPDO10
*, Nd.38
RxPDO10
*, Nd.39
RxPDO10
*, Nd.40
153
Appendix
dec
hex
530
212
531
213
532
214
533
215
534
216
535
217
536
218
537
219
538
21A
539
21B
540
21C
541
21D
542
21E
543
21F
544
220
545
221
546
222
547
223
548
224
549
225
550
226
551
227
552
228
553
229
554
22A
555
22B
154
Telegram
type
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.18
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.19
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.20
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.21
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.22
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.23
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.24
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.25
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.26
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.27
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.28
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.29
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.30
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.31
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.32
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.33
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.34
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.35
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.36
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.37
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.38
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.39
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.40
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.41
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.42
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.43
dec
hex
1085
43D
1086
43E
1087
43F
1089
441
1090
442
1091
443
1092
444
1093
445
1094
446
1095
447
1096
448
1097
449
1098
44A
1099
44B
1100
44C
1101
44D
1102
44E
1103
44F
1104
450
1105
451
1106
452
1107
453
1108
454
1109
455
1110
456
1111
457
Telegram
type
RxPDO3*,
Nd.61
RxPDO3*,
Nd.62
RxPDO3*,
Nd.63
RxPDO8
dec
hex
1641
669
1642
66A
1643
66B
1644
66C
RxPDO8*,
Nd.2
RxPDO8*,
Nd.3
RxPDO8*,
Nd.4
RxPDO8*,
Nd.5
RxPDO8*,
Nd.6
RxPDO8*,
Nd.7
RxPDO8*,
Nd.8
RxPDO8*,
Nd.9
RxPDO8*,
Nd.10
RxPDO8*,
Nd.11
RxPDO8*,
Nd.12
RxPDO8*,
Nd.13
RxPDO8*,
Nd.14
RxPDO8*,
Nd.15
RxPDO8*,
Nd.16
RxPDO8*,
Nd.17
RxPDO8*,
Nd.18
RxPDO8*,
Nd.19
RxPDO8*,
Nd.20
RxPDO8*,
Nd.21
RxPDO8*,
Nd.22
RxPDO8*,
Nd.23
1645
66D
1646
66E
1647
66F
1648
670
1649
671
1650
672
1651
673
1652
674
1653
675
1654
676
1655
677
1656
678
1657
679
1658
67A
1659
67B
1660
67C
1661
67D
1662
67E
1663
67F
1665
681
1666
682
1667
683
Version: 1.3
Telegram
type
RxPDO10
*, Nd.41
RxPDO10
*, Nd.42
RxPDO10
*, Nd.43
RxPDO10
*, Nd.44
RxPDO10
*, Nd.45
RxPDO10
*, Nd.46
RxPDO10
*, Nd.47
RxPDO10
*, Nd.48
RxPDO10
*, Nd.49
RxPDO10
*, Nd.50
RxPDO10
*, Nd.51
RxPDO10
*, Nd.52
RxPDO10
*, Nd.53
RxPDO10
*, Nd.54
RxPDO10
*, Nd.55
RxPDO10
*, Nd.56
RxPDO10
*, Nd.57
RxPDO10
*, Nd.58
RxPDO10
*, Nd.59
RxPDO10
*, Nd.60
RxPDO10
*, Nd.61
RxPDO10
*, Nd.62
RxPDO10
*, Nd.63
TxPDO5
TxPDO5*,
Nd.2
TxPDO5*,
Nd.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
556
22C
557
22D
558
22E
559
22F
560
230
561
231
562
232
563
233
564
234
565
235
566
236
567
237
568
238
569
239
570
23A
571
23B
572
23C
573
23D
574
23E
575
23F
577
241
578
242
579
243
580
244
581
245
582
246
Telegram
type
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.44
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.45
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.46
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.47
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.48
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.49
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.50
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.51
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.52
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.53
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.54
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.55
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.56
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.57
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.58
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.59
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.60
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.61
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.62
RxPDO1,
DO, Nd.63
RxPDO6
dec
hex
1112
458
1113
459
1114
45A
1115
45B
1116
45C
1117
45D
1118
45E
1119
45F
1120
460
1121
461
1122
462
1123
463
1124
464
1125
465
1126
466
1127
467
1128
468
1129
469
1130
46A
1131
46B
1132
46C
RxPDO6*,
Nd.2
RxPDO6*,
Nd.3
RxPDO6*,
Nd.4
RxPDO6*,
Nd.5
RxPDO6*,
Nd.6
1133
46D
1134
46E
1135
46F
1136
470
1137
471
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
RxPDO8*,
Nd.24
RxPDO8*,
Nd.25
RxPDO8*,
Nd.26
RxPDO8*,
Nd.27
RxPDO8*,
Nd.28
RxPDO8*,
Nd.29
RxPDO8*,
Nd.30
RxPDO8*,
Nd.31
RxPDO8*,
Nd.32
RxPDO8*,
Nd.33
RxPDO8*,
Nd.34
RxPDO8*,
Nd.35
RxPDO8*,
Nd.36
RxPDO8*,
Nd.37
RxPDO8*,
Nd.38
RxPDO8*,
Nd.39
RxPDO8*,
Nd.40
RxPDO8*,
Nd.41
RxPDO8*,
Nd.42
RxPDO8*,
Nd.43
RxPDO8*,
Nd.44
RxPDO8*,
Nd.45
RxPDO8*,
Nd.46
RxPDO8*,
Nd.47
RxPDO8*,
Nd.48
RxPDO8*,
Nd.49
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1668
684
1669
685
1670
686
1671
687
1672
688
1673
689
1674
68A
1675
68B
1676
68C
1677
68D
1678
68E
1679
68F
1680
690
1681
691
1682
692
1683
693
1684
694
1685
695
1686
696
1687
697
1688
698
1689
699
1690
69A
1691
69B
1692
69C
1693
69D
Telegram
type
TxPDO5*,
Nd.4
TxPDO5*,
Nd.5
TxPDO5*,
Nd.6
TxPDO5*,
Nd.7
TxPDO5*,
Nd.8
TxPDO5*,
Nd.9
TxPDO5*,
Nd.10
TxPDO5*,
Nd.11
TxPDO5*,
Nd.12
TxPDO5*,
Nd.13
TxPDO5*,
Nd.14
TxPDO5*,
Nd.15
TxPDO5*,
Nd.16
TxPDO5*,
Nd.17
TxPDO5*,
Nd.18
TxPDO5*,
Nd.19
TxPDO5*,
Nd.20
TxPDO5*,
Nd.21
TxPDO5*,
Nd.22
TxPDO5*,
Nd.23
TxPDO5*,
Nd.24
TxPDO5*,
Nd.25
TxPDO5*,
Nd.26
TxPDO5*,
Nd.27
TxPDO5*,
Nd.28
TxPDO5*,
Nd.29
155
Appendix
dec
hex
583
247
584
248
585
249
586
24A
587
24B
588
24C
589
24D
590
24E
591
24F
592
250
593
251
594
252
595
253
596
254
597
255
598
256
599
257
600
258
601
259
602
25A
603
25B
604
25C
605
25D
606
25E
607
25F
608
260
156
Telegram
type
RxPDO6*,
Nd.7
RxPDO6*,
Nd.8
RxPDO6*,
Nd.9
RxPDO6*,
Nd.10
RxPDO6*,
Nd.11
RxPDO6*,
Nd.12
RxPDO6*,
Nd.13
RxPDO6*,
Nd.14
RxPDO6*,
Nd.15
RxPDO6*,
Nd.16
RxPDO6*,
Nd.17
RxPDO6*,
Nd.18
RxPDO6*,
Nd.19
RxPDO6*,
Nd.20
RxPDO6*,
Nd.21
RxPDO6*,
Nd.22
RxPDO6*,
Nd.23
RxPDO6*,
Nd.24
RxPDO6*,
Nd.25
RxPDO6*,
Nd.26
RxPDO6*,
Nd.27
RxPDO6*,
Nd.28
RxPDO6*,
Nd.29
RxPDO6*,
Nd.30
RxPDO6*,
Nd.31
RxPDO6*,
Nd.32
dec
hex
1138
472
1139
473
1140
474
1141
475
1142
476
1143
477
1144
478
1145
479
1146
47A
1147
47B
1148
47C
1149
47D
1150
47E
1151
47F
1153
481
1154
482
1155
483
1156
484
1157
485
1158
486
1159
487
1160
488
1161
489
1162
48A
1163
48B
1164
48C
Telegram
type
RxPDO8*,
Nd.50
RxPDO8*,
Nd.51
RxPDO8*,
Nd.52
RxPDO8*,
Nd.53
RxPDO8*,
Nd.54
RxPDO8*,
Nd.55
RxPDO8*,
Nd.56
RxPDO8*,
Nd.57
RxPDO8*,
Nd.58
RxPDO8*,
Nd.59
RxPDO8*,
Nd.60
RxPDO8*,
Nd.61
RxPDO8*,
Nd.62
RxPDO8*,
Nd.63
TxPDO4
dec
hex
1694
69E
1695
69F
1696
6A0
1697
6A1
1698
6A2
1699
6A3
1700
6A4
1701
6A5
1702
6A6
1703
6A7
1704
6A8
1705
6A9
1706
6AA
1707
6AB
1708
6AC
TxPDO4*,
Nd.2
TxPDO4*,
Nd.3
TxPDO4*,
Nd.4
TxPDO4*,
Nd.5
TxPDO4*,
Nd.6
TxPDO4*,
Nd.7
TxPDO4*,
Nd.8
TxPDO4*,
Nd.9
TxPDO4*,
Nd.10
TxPDO4*,
Nd.11
TxPDO4*,
Nd.12
1709
6AD
1710
6AE
1711
6AF
1712
6B0
1713
6B1
1714
6B2
1715
6B3
1716
6B4
1717
6B5
1718
6B6
1719
6B7
Version: 1.3
Telegram
type
TxPDO5*,
Nd.30
TxPDO5*,
Nd.31
TxPDO5*,
Nd.32
TxPDO5*,
Nd.33
TxPDO5*,
Nd.34
TxPDO5*,
Nd.35
TxPDO5*,
Nd.36
TxPDO5*,
Nd.37
TxPDO5*,
Nd.38
TxPDO5*,
Nd.39
TxPDO5*,
Nd.40
TxPDO5*,
Nd.41
TxPDO5*,
Nd.42
TxPDO5*,
Nd.43
TxPDO5*,
Nd.44
TxPDO5*,
Nd.45
TxPDO5*,
Nd.46
TxPDO5*,
Nd.47
TxPDO5*,
Nd.48
TxPDO5*,
Nd.49
TxPDO5*,
Nd.50
TxPDO5*,
Nd.51
TxPDO5*,
Nd.52
TxPDO5*,
Nd.53
TxPDO5*,
Nd.54
TxPDO5*,
Nd.55
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
609
261
610
262
611
263
612
264
613
265
614
266
615
267
616
268
617
269
618
26A
619
26B
620
26C
621
26D
622
26E
623
26F
624
270
625
271
626
272
627
273
628
274
629
275
630
276
631
277
632
278
633
279
634
27A
Telegram
type
RxPDO6*,
Nd.33
RxPDO6*,
Nd.34
RxPDO6*,
Nd.35
RxPDO6*,
Nd.36
RxPDO6*,
Nd.37
RxPDO6*,
Nd.38
RxPDO6*,
Nd.39
RxPDO6*,
Nd.40
RxPDO6*,
Nd.41
RxPDO6*,
Nd.42
RxPDO6*,
Nd.43
RxPDO6*,
Nd.44
RxPDO6*,
Nd.45
RxPDO6*,
Nd.46
RxPDO6*,
Nd.47
RxPDO6*,
Nd.48
RxPDO6*,
Nd.49
RxPDO6*,
Nd.50
RxPDO6*,
Nd.51
RxPDO6*,
Nd.52
RxPDO6*,
Nd.53
RxPDO6*,
Nd.54
RxPDO6*,
Nd.55
RxPDO6*,
Nd.56
RxPDO6*,
Nd.57
RxPDO6*,
Nd.58
dec
hex
1165
48D
1166
48E
1167
48F
1168
490
1169
491
1170
492
1171
493
1172
494
1173
495
1174
496
1175
497
1176
498
1177
499
1178
49A
1179
49B
1180
49C
1181
49D
1182
49E
1183
49F
1184
4A0
1185
4A1
1186
4A2
1187
4A3
1188
4A4
1189
4A5
1190
4A6
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
TxPDO4*,
Nd.13
TxPDO4*,
Nd.14
TxPDO4*,
Nd.15
TxPDO4*,
Nd.16
TxPDO4*,
Nd.17
TxPDO4*,
Nd.18
TxPDO4*,
Nd.19
TxPDO4*,
Nd.20
TxPDO4*,
Nd.21
TxPDO4*,
Nd.22
TxPDO4*,
Nd.23
TxPDO4*,
Nd.24
TxPDO4*,
Nd.25
TxPDO4*,
Nd.26
TxPDO4*,
Nd.27
TxPDO4*,
Nd.28
TxPDO4*,
Nd.29
TxPDO4*,
Nd.30
TxPDO4*,
Nd.31
TxPDO4*,
Nd.32
TxPDO4*,
Nd.33
TxPDO4*,
Nd.34
TxPDO4*,
Nd.35
TxPDO4*,
Nd.36
TxPDO4*,
Nd.37
TxPDO4*,
Nd.48
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1720
6B8
1721
6B9
1722
6BA
1723
6BB
1724
6BC
1725
6BD
1726
6BE
1727
6BF
1729
6C1
1730
6C2
1731
6C3
1732
6C4
1733
6C5
1734
6C6
1735
6C7
1736
6C8
1737
6C9
1738
6CA
1739
6CB
1740
6CC
1741
6CD
1742
6CE
1743
6CF
1744
6D0
1745
6D1
1746
6D2
Telegram
type
TxPDO5*,
Nd.56
TxPDO5*,
Nd.57
TxPDO5*,
Nd.58
TxPDO5*,
Nd.59
TxPDO5*,
Nd.60
TxPDO5*,
Nd.61
TxPDO5*,
Nd.62
TxPDO5*,
Nd.63
TxPDO11
TxPDO11
*, Nd.2
TxPDO11
*, Nd.3
TxPDO11
*, Nd.4
TxPDO11
*, Nd.5
TxPDO11
*, Nd.6
TxPDO11
*, Nd.7
TxPDO11
*, Nd.8
TxPDO11
*, Nd.9
TxPDO11
*, Nd.10
TxPDO11
*, Nd.11
TxPDO11
*, Nd.12
TxPDO11
*, Nd.13
TxPDO11
*, Nd.14
TxPDO11
*, Nd.15
TxPDO11
*, Nd.16
TxPDO11
*, Nd.17
TxPDO11
*, Nd.18
157
Appendix
dec
hex
635
27B
636
27C
637
27D
638
27E
639
27F
641
281
642
282
643
283
644
284
645
285
646
286
647
287
648
288
649
289
650
28A
651
28B
652
28C
653
28D
654
28E
655
28F
656
290
657
291
658
292
659
293
660
294
661
295
158
Telegram
type
RxPDO6*,
Nd.59
RxPDO6*,
Nd.60
RxPDO6*,
Nd.61
RxPDO6*,
Nd.62
RxPDO6*,
Nd.63
TxPDO2
dec
hex
1191
4A7
1192
4A8
1193
4A9
1194
4AA
1195
4AB
1196
4AC
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.2
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.3
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.4
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.5
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.6
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.7
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.8
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.9
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.10
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.11
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.12
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.13
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.14
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.15
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.16
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.17
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.18
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.19
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.20
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.21
1197
4AD
1198
4AE
1199
4AF
1200
4B0
1201
4B1
1202
4B2
1203
4B3
1204
4B4
1205
4B5
1206
4B6
1207
4B7
1208
4B8
1209
4B9
1210
4BA
1211
4BB
1212
4BC
1213
4BD
1214
4BE
1215
4BF
1217
4C1
Telegram
type
TxPDO4*,
Nd.49
TxPDO4*,
Nd.40
TxPDO4*,
Nd.41
TxPDO4*,
Nd.42
TxPDO4*,
Nd.43
TxPDO4*,
Nd.44
TxPDO4*,
Nd.45
TxPDO4*,
Nd.46
TxPDO4*,
Nd.47
TxPDO4*,
Nd.48
TxPDO4*,
Nd.49
TxPDO4*,
Nd.50
TxPDO4*,
Nd.51
TxPDO4*,
Nd.52
TxPDO4*,
Nd.53
TxPDO4*,
Nd.54
TxPDO4*,
Nd.55
TxPDO4*,
Nd.56
TxPDO4*,
Nd.57
TxPDO4*,
Nd.58
TxPDO4*,
Nd.59
TxPDO4*,
Nd.60
TxPDO4*,
Nd.61
TxPDO4*,
Nd.62
TxPDO4*,
Nd.63
TxPDO9
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1747
6D3
1748
6D4
1749
6D5
1750
6D6
1751
6D7
1752
6D8
1753
6D9
1754
6DA
1755
6DB
1756
6DC
1757
6DD
1758
6DE
1759
6DF
1760
6E0
1761
6E1
1762
6E2
1763
6E3
1764
6E4
1765
6E5
1766
6E6
1767
6E7
1768
6E8
1769
6E9
1770
6EA
1771
6EB
1772
6EC
Telegram
type
TxPDO11
*, Nd.19
TxPDO11
*, Nd.20
TxPDO11
*, Nd.21
TxPDO11
*, Nd.22
TxPDO11
*, Nd.23
TxPDO11
*, Nd.24
TxPDO11
*, Nd.25
TxPDO11
*, Nd.26
TxPDO11
*, Nd.27
TxPDO11
*, Nd.28
TxPDO11
*, Nd.29
TxPDO11
*, Nd.30
TxPDO11
*, Nd.31
TxPDO11
*, Nd.32
TxPDO11
*, Nd.33
TxPDO11
*, Nd.34
TxPDO11
*, Nd.35
TxPDO11
*, Nd.36
TxPDO11
*, Nd.37
TxPDO11
*, Nd.38
TxPDO11
*, Nd.39
TxPDO11
*, Nd.40
TxPDO11
*, Nd.41
TxPDO11
*, Nd.42
TxPDO11
*, Nd.43
TxPDO11
*, Nd.44
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
662
296
663
297
664
298
665
299
666
29A
667
29B
668
29C
669
29D
670
29E
671
29F
672
2A0
673
2A1
674
2A2
675
2A3
676
2A4
677
2A5
678
2A6
679
2A7
680
2A8
681
2A9
682
2AA
683
2AB
684
2AC
685
2AD
686
2AE
687
2AF
Telegram
type
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.22
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.23
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.24
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.25
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.26
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.27
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.28
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.29
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.30
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.31
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.32
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.33
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.34
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.35
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.36
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.37
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.38
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.39
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.40
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.41
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.42
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.43
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.44
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.45
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.46
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.47
dec
hex
1218
4C2
1219
4C3
1220
4C4
1221
4C5
1222
4C6
1223
4C7
1224
4C8
1225
4C9
1226
4CA
1227
4CB
1228
4CC
1229
4CD
1230
4CE
1231
4CF
1232
4D0
1233
4D1
1234
4D2
1235
4D3
1236
4D4
1237
4D5
1238
4D6
1239
4D7
1240
4D8
1241
4D9
1242
4DA
1243
4DB
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
TxPDO9*,
Nd.2
TxPDO9*,
Nd.3
TxPDO9*,
Nd.4
TxPDO9*,
Nd.5
TxPDO9*,
Nd.6
TxPDO9*,
Nd.7
TxPDO9*,
Nd.8
TxPDO9*,
Nd.9
TxPDO9*,
Nd.10
TxPDO9*,
Nd.11
TxPDO9*,
Nd.12
TxPDO9*,
Nd.13
TxPDO9*,
Nd.14
TxPDO9*,
Nd.15
TxPDO9*,
Nd.16
TxPDO9*,
Nd.17
TxPDO9*,
Nd.18
TxPDO9*,
Nd.19
TxPDO9*,
Nd.20
TxPDO9*,
Nd.21
TxPDO9*,
Nd.22
TxPDO9*,
Nd.23
TxPDO9*,
Nd.24
TxPDO9*,
Nd.25
TxPDO9*,
Nd.26
TxPDO9*,
Nd.27
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1773
6ED
1774
6EE
1775
6EF
1776
6F0
1777
6F1
1778
6F2
1779
6F3
1780
6F4
1781
6F5
1782
6F6
1783
6F7
1784
6F8
1785
6F9
1786
6FA
1787
6FB
1788
6FC
1789
6FD
1790
6FE
1791
6FF
1793
701
1794
702
1795
703
1796
704
1797
705
1798
706
1799
707
Telegram
type
TxPDO11
*, Nd.45
TxPDO11
*, Nd.46
TxPDO11
*, Nd.47
TxPDO11
*, Nd.48
TxPDO11
*, Nd.49
TxPDO11
*, Nd.50
TxPDO11
*, Nd.51
TxPDO11
*, Nd.52
TxPDO11
*, Nd.53
TxPDO11
*, Nd.54
TxPDO11
*, Nd.55
TxPDO11
*, Nd.56
TxPDO11
*, Nd.57
TxPDO11
*, Nd.58
TxPDO11
*, Nd.59
TxPDO11
*, Nd.60
TxPDO11
*, Nd.61
TxPDO11
*, Nd.62
TxPDO11
*, Nd.63
Guarding
Guarding
Nd.2
Guarding
Nd.3
Guarding
Nd.4
Guarding
Nd.5
Guarding
Nd.6
Guarding
Nd.7
159
Appendix
dec
hex
688
2B0
689
2B1
690
2B2
691
2B3
692
2B4
693
2B5
694
2B6
695
2B7
696
2B8
697
2B9
698
2BA
699
2BB
700
2BC
701
2BD
702
2BE
703
2BF
705
2C1
706
2C2
707
2C3
708
2C4
709
2C5
710
2C6
711
2C7
712
2C8
713
2C9
714
2CA
160
Telegram
type
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.48
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.49
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.50
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.51
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.52
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.53
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.54
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.55
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.56
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.57
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.58
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.59
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.60
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.61
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.62
TxPDO2,
AI, Nd.63
TxPDO7
dec
hex
1244
4DC
1245
4DD
1246
4DE
1247
4DF
1248
4E0
1249
4E1
1250
4E2
1251
4E3
1252
4E4
1253
4E5
1254
4E6
1255
4E7
1256
4E8
1257
4E9
1258
4EA
1259
4EB
1260
4EC
TxPDO7*,
Nd.2
TxPDO7*,
Nd.3
TxPDO7*,
Nd.4
TxPDO7*,
Nd.5
TxPDO7*,
Nd.6
TxPDO7*,
Nd.7
TxPDO7*,
Nd.8
TxPDO7*,
Nd.9
TxPDO7*,
Nd.10
1261
4ED
1262
4EE
1263
4EF
1264
4F0
1265
4F1
1266
4F2
1267
4F3
1268
4F4
1269
4F5
Telegram
type
TxPDO9*,
Nd.28
TxPDO9*,
Nd.29
TxPDO9*,
Nd.30
TxPDO9*,
Nd.31
TxPDO9*,
Nd.32
TxPDO9*,
Nd.33
TxPDO9*,
Nd.34
TxPDO9*,
Nd.35
TxPDO9*,
Nd.36
TxPDO9*,
Nd.37
TxPDO9*,
Nd.38
TxPDO9*,
Nd.39
TxPDO9*,
Nd.40
TxPDO9*,
Nd.41
TxPDO9*,
Nd.42
TxPDO9*,
Nd.43
TxPDO9*,
Nd.44
TxPDO9*,
Nd.45
TxPDO9*,
Nd.46
TxPDO9*,
Nd.47
TxPDO9*,
Nd.48
TxPDO9*,
Nd.49
TxPDO9*,
Nd.50
TxPDO9*,
Nd.51
TxPDO9*,
Nd.52
TxPDO9*,
Nd.53
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1800
708
1801
709
1802
70A
1803
70B
1804
70C
1805
70D
1806
70E
1807
70F
1808
710
1809
711
1810
712
1811
713
1812
714
1813
715
1814
716
1815
717
1816
718
1817
719
1818
71A
1819
71B
1820
71C
1821
71D
1822
71E
1823
71F
1824
720
1825
721
Telegram
type
Guarding
Nd.8
Guarding
Nd.9
Guarding
Nd.10
Guarding
Nd.11
Guarding
Nd.12
Guarding
Nd.13
Guarding
Nd.14
Guarding
Nd.15
Guarding
Nd.16
Guarding
Nd.17
Guarding
Nd.18
Guarding
Nd.19
Guarding
Nd.20
Guarding
Nd.21
Guarding
Nd.22
Guarding
Nd.23
Guarding
Nd.24
Guarding
Nd.25
Guarding
Nd.26
Guarding
Nd.27
Guarding
Nd.28
Guarding
Nd.29
Guarding
Nd.30
Guarding
Nd.31
Guarding
Nd.32
Guarding
Nd.33
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
715
2CB
716
2CC
717
2CD
718
2CE
719
2CF
720
2D0
721
2D1
722
2D2
723
2D3
724
2D4
725
2D5
726
2D6
727
2D7
728
2D8
729
2D9
730
2DA
731
2DB
732
2DC
733
2DD
734
2DE
735
2DF
736
2E0
737
2E1
738
2E2
739
2E3
740
2E4
Telegram
type
TxPDO7*,
Nd.11
TxPDO7*,
Nd.12
TxPDO7*,
Nd.13
TxPDO7*,
Nd.14
TxPDO7*,
Nd.15
TxPDO7*,
Nd.16
TxPDO7*,
Nd.17
TxPDO7*,
Nd.18
TxPDO7*,
Nd.19
TxPDO7*,
Nd.20
TxPDO7*,
Nd.21
TxPDO7*,
Nd.22
TxPDO7*,
Nd.23
TxPDO7*,
Nd.24
TxPDO7*,
Nd.25
TxPDO7*,
Nd.26
TxPDO7*,
Nd.27
TxPDO7*,
Nd.28
TxPDO7*,
Nd.29
TxPDO7*,
Nd.30
TxPDO7*,
Nd.31
TxPDO7*,
Nd.32
TxPDO7*,
Nd.33
TxPDO7*,
Nd.34
TxPDO7*,
Nd.35
TxPDO7*,
Nd.36
dec
hex
1270
4F6
1271
4F7
1272
4F8
1273
4F9
1274
4FA
1275
4FB
1276
4FC
1277
4FD
1278
4FE
1279
4FF
1281
501
1282
502
1283
503
1284
504
1285
505
1286
506
1287
507
1288
508
1289
509
1290
50A
1291
50B
1292
50C
1293
50D
1294
50E
1295
50F
1296
510
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
TxPDO9*,
Nd.54
TxPDO9*,
Nd.55
TxPDO9*,
Nd.56
TxPDO9*,
Nd.57
TxPDO9*,
Nd.58
TxPDO9*,
Nd.59
TxPDO9*,
Nd.60
TxPDO9*,
Nd.61
TxPDO9*,
Nd.62
TxPDO9*,
Nd.63
RxPDO4
dec
hex
1826
722
1827
723
1828
724
1829
725
1830
726
1831
727
1832
728
1833
729
1834
72A
1835
72B
1836
72C
RxPDO4*,
Nd.2
RxPDO4*,
Nd.3
RxPDO4*,
Nd.4
RxPDO4*,
Nd.5
RxPDO4*,
Nd.6
RxPDO4*,
Nd.7
RxPDO4*,
Nd.8
RxPDO4*,
Nd.9
RxPDO4*,
Nd.10
RxPDO4*,
Nd.11
RxPDO4*,
Nd.12
RxPDO4*,
Nd.13
RxPDO4*,
Nd.14
RxPDO4*,
Nd.15
RxPDO4*,
Nd.16
1837
72D
1838
72E
1839
72F
1840
730
1841
731
1842
732
1843
733
1844
734
1845
735
1846
736
1847
737
1848
738
1849
739
1850
73A
1851
73B
Version: 1.3
Telegram
type
Guarding
Nd.34
Guarding
Nd.35
Guarding
Nd.36
Guarding
Nd.37
Guarding
Nd.38
Guarding
Nd.39
Guarding
Nd.40
Guarding
Nd.41
Guarding
Nd.42
Guarding
Nd.43
Guarding
Nd.44
Guarding
Nd.45
Guarding
Nd.46
Guarding
Nd.47
Guarding
Nd.48
Guarding
Nd.49
Guarding
Nd.50
Guarding
Nd.51
Guarding
Nd.52
Guarding
Nd.53
Guarding
Nd.54
Guarding
Nd.55
Guarding
Nd.56
Guarding
Nd.57
Guarding
Nd.58
Guarding
Nd.59
161
Appendix
dec
hex
741
2E5
742
2E6
743
2E7
744
2E8
745
2E9
746
2EA
747
2EB
748
2EC
749
2ED
750
2EE
751
2EF
752
2F0
753
2F1
754
2F2
755
2F3
756
2F4
757
2F5
758
2F6
759
2F7
760
2F8
761
2F9
762
2FA
763
2FB
764
2FC
765
2FD
766
2FE
162
Telegram
type
TxPDO7*,
Nd.37
TxPDO7*,
Nd.38
TxPDO7*,
Nd.39
TxPDO7*,
Nd.40
TxPDO7*,
Nd.41
TxPDO7*,
Nd.42
TxPDO7*,
Nd.43
TxPDO7*,
Nd.44
TxPDO7*,
Nd.45
TxPDO7*,
Nd.46
TxPDO7*,
Nd.47
TxPDO7*,
Nd.48
TxPDO7*,
Nd.49
TxPDO7*,
Nd.50
TxPDO7*,
Nd.51
TxPDO7*,
Nd.52
TxPDO7*,
Nd.53
TxPDO7*,
Nd.54
TxPDO7*,
Nd.55
TxPDO7*,
Nd.56
TxPDO7*,
Nd.57
TxPDO7*,
Nd.58
TxPDO7*,
Nd.59
TxPDO7*,
Nd.60
TxPDO7*,
Nd.61
TxPDO7*,
Nd.62
dec
hex
1297
511
1298
512
1299
513
1300
514
1301
515
1302
516
1303
517
1304
518
1305
519
1306
51A
1307
51B
1308
51C
1309
51D
1310
51E
1311
51F
1312
520
1313
521
1314
522
1315
523
1316
524
1317
525
1318
526
1319
527
1320
528
1321
529
1322
52A
Telegram
type
RxPDO4*,
Nd.17
RxPDO4*,
Nd.18
RxPDO4*,
Nd.19
RxPDO4*,
Nd.20
RxPDO4*,
Nd.21
RxPDO4*,
Nd.22
RxPDO4*,
Nd.23
RxPDO4*,
Nd.24
RxPDO4*,
Nd.25
RxPDO4*,
Nd.26
RxPDO4*,
Nd.27
RxPDO4*,
Nd.28
RxPDO4*,
Nd.29
RxPDO4*,
Nd.30
RxPDO4*,
Nd.31
RxPDO4*,
Nd.32
RxPDO4*,
Nd.33
RxPDO4*,
Nd.34
RxPDO4*,
Nd.35
RxPDO4*,
Nd.36
RxPDO4*,
Nd.37
RxPDO4*,
Nd.38
RxPDO4*,
Nd.39
RxPDO4*,
Nd.40
RxPDO4*,
Nd.41
RxPDO4*,
Nd.42
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1852
73C
1853
73D
1854
73E
1855
73F
1857
741
1858
742
1859
743
1860
744
1861
745
1862
746
1863
747
1864
748
1865
749
1866
74A
1867
74B
1868
74C
1869
74D
1870
74E
1871
74F
1872
750
1873
751
1874
752
1875
753
1876
754
1877
755
1878
756
Telegram
type
Guarding
Nd.60
Guarding
Nd.61
Guarding
Nd.62
Guarding
Nd.63
RxPDO11
RxPDO11
*, Nd.2
RxPDO11
*, Nd.3
RxPDO11
*, Nd.4
RxPDO11
*, Nd.5
RxPDO11
*, Nd.6
RxPDO11
*, Nd.7
RxPDO11
*, Nd.8
RxPDO11
*, Nd.9
RxPDO11
*, Nd.10
RxPDO11
*, Nd.11
RxPDO11
*, Nd.12
RxPDO11
*, Nd.13
RxPDO11
*, Nd.14
RxPDO11
*, Nd.15
RxPDO11
*, Nd.16
RxPDO11
*, Nd.17
RxPDO11
*, Nd.18
RxPDO11
*, Nd.19
RxPDO11
*, Nd.20
RxPDO11
*, Nd.21
RxPDO11
*, Nd.22
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
767
2FF
769
301
770
302
771
303
772
304
773
305
774
306
775
307
776
308
777
309
778
30A
779
30B
780
30C
781
30D
782
30E
783
30F
784
310
785
311
786
312
787
313
788
314
789
315
790
316
791
317
792
318
793
319
Telegram dec
type
TxPDO7*, 1323
Nd.63
RxPDO2 1324
hex
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.2
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.3
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.4
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.5
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.6
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.7
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.8
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.9
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.10
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.11
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.12
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.13
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.14
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.15
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.16
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.17
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.18
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.19
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.20
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.21
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.22
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.23
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.24
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.25
1325
52D
1326
52E
1327
52F
1328
530
1329
531
1330
532
1331
533
1332
534
1333
535
1334
536
1335
537
1336
538
1337
539
1338
53A
1339
53B
1340
53C
1341
53D
1342
53E
1343
53F
1345
541
1346
542
1347
543
1348
544
1349
545
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
52B
52C
Telegram
type
RxPDO4*,
Nd.43
RxPDO4*,
Nd.44
RxPDO4*,
Nd.45
RxPDO4*,
Nd.46
RxPDO4*,
Nd.47
RxPDO4*,
Nd.48
RxPDO4*,
Nd.49
RxPDO4*,
Nd.50
RxPDO4*,
Nd.51
RxPDO4*,
Nd.52
RxPDO4*,
Nd.53
RxPDO4*,
Nd.54
RxPDO4*,
Nd.55
RxPDO4*,
Nd.56
RxPDO4*,
Nd.57
RxPDO4*,
Nd.58
RxPDO4*,
Nd.59
RxPDO4*,
Nd.60
RxPDO4*,
Nd.61
RxPDO4*,
Nd.62
RxPDO4*,
Nd.63
RxPDO9
dec
hex
1879
757
1880
758
1881
759
1882
75A
1883
75B
1884
75C
1885
75D
1886
75E
1887
75F
1888
760
1889
761
1890
762
1891
763
1892
764
1893
765
1894
766
1895
767
1896
768
1897
769
1898
76A
1899
76B
1900
76C
RxPDO9*,
Nd.2
RxPDO9*,
Nd.3
RxPDO9*,
Nd.4
RxPDO9*,
Nd.5
1901
76D
1902
76E
1903
76F
1904
770
Version: 1.3
Telegram
type
RxPDO11
*, Nd.23
RxPDO11
*, Nd.24
RxPDO11
*, Nd.25
RxPDO11
*, Nd.26
RxPDO11
*, Nd.27
RxPDO11
*, Nd.28
RxPDO11
*, Nd.29
RxPDO11
*, Nd.30
RxPDO11
*, Nd.31
RxPDO11
*, Nd.32
RxPDO11
*, Nd.33
RxPDO11
*, Nd.34
RxPDO11
*, Nd.35
RxPDO11
*, Nd.36
RxPDO11
*, Nd.37
RxPDO11
*, Nd.38
RxPDO11
*, Nd.39
RxPDO11
*, Nd.40
RxPDO11
*, Nd.41
RxPDO11
*, Nd.42
RxPDO11
*, Nd.43
RxPDO11
*, Nd.44
RxPDO11
*, Nd.45
RxPDO11
*, Nd.46
RxPDO11
*, Nd.47
RxPDO11
*, Nd.48
163
Appendix
dec
hex
794
31A
795
31B
796
31C
797
31D
798
31E
799
31F
800
320
801
321
802
322
803
323
804
324
805
325
806
326
807
327
808
328
809
329
810
32A
811
32B
812
32C
813
32D
814
32E
815
32F
816
330
817
331
818
332
819
333
164
Telegram
type
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.26
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.27
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.28
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.29
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.30
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.31
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.32
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.33
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.34
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.35
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.36
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.37
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.38
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.39
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.40
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.41
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.42
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.43
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.44
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.45
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.46
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.47
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.48
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.49
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.50
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.51
dec
hex
1350
546
1351
547
1352
548
1353
549
1354
54A
1355
54B
1356
54C
1357
54D
1358
54E
1359
54F
1360
550
1361
551
1362
552
1363
553
1364
554
1365
555
1366
556
1367
557
1368
558
1369
559
1370
55A
1371
55B
1372
55C
1373
55D
1374
55E
1375
55F
Telegram
type
RxPDO9*,
Nd.6
RxPDO9*,
Nd.7
RxPDO9*,
Nd.8
RxPDO9*,
Nd.9
RxPDO9*,
Nd.10
RxPDO9*,
Nd.11
RxPDO9*,
Nd.12
RxPDO9*,
Nd.13
RxPDO9*,
Nd.14
RxPDO9*,
Nd.15
RxPDO9*,
Nd.16
RxPDO9*,
Nd.17
RxPDO9*,
Nd.18
RxPDO9*,
Nd.19
RxPDO9*,
Nd.20
RxPDO9*,
Nd.21
RxPDO9*,
Nd.22
RxPDO9*,
Nd.23
RxPDO9*,
Nd.24
RxPDO9*,
Nd.25
RxPDO9*,
Nd.26
RxPDO9*,
Nd.27
RxPDO9*,
Nd.28
RxPDO9*,
Nd.29
RxPDO9*,
Nd.30
RxPDO9*,
Nd.31
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1905
771
1906
772
1907
773
1908
774
1909
775
1910
776
1911
777
1912
778
1913
779
1914
77A
1915
77B
1916
77C
1917
77D
1918
77E
1919
77F
1921
781
1922
782
1923
783
1924
784
1925
785
1926
786
1927
787
1928
788
1929
789
1930
78A
1931
78B
Telegram
type
RxPDO11
*, Nd.49
RxPDO11
*, Nd.50
RxPDO11
*, Nd.51
RxPDO11
*, Nd.52
RxPDO11
*, Nd.53
RxPDO11
*, Nd.54
RxPDO11
*, Nd.55
RxPDO11
*, Nd.56
RxPDO11
*, Nd.57
RxPDO11
*, Nd.58
RxPDO11
*, Nd.59
RxPDO11
*, Nd.60
RxPDO11
*, Nd.61
RxPDO11
*, Nd.62
RxPDO11
*, Nd.63
RxPDO5
RxPDO5*,
Nd.2
RxPDO5*,
Nd.3
RxPDO5*,
Nd.4
RxPDO5*,
Nd.5
RxPDO5*,
Nd.6
RxPDO5*,
Nd.7
RxPDO5*,
Nd.8
RxPDO5*,
Nd.9
RxPDO5*,
Nd.10
RxPDO5*,
Nd.11
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
820
334
821
335
822
336
823
337
824
338
825
339
826
33A
827
33B
828
33C
829
33D
830
33E
831
33F
833
341
834
342
835
343
836
344
837
345
838
346
839
347
840
348
841
349
842
34A
843
34B
844
34C
845
34D
846
34E
Telegram
type
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.52
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.53
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.54
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.55
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.56
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.57
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.58
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.59
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.60
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.61
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.62
RxPDO2,
AO, Nd.63
RxPDO7
dec
hex
1376
560
1377
561
1378
562
1379
563
1380
564
1381
565
1382
566
1383
567
1384
568
1385
569
1386
56A
1387
56B
1388
56C
RxPDO7*,
Nd.2
RxPDO7*,
Nd.3
RxPDO7*,
Nd.4
RxPDO7*,
Nd.5
RxPDO7*,
Nd.6
RxPDO7*,
Nd.7
RxPDO7*,
Nd.8
RxPDO7*,
Nd.9
RxPDO7*,
Nd.10
RxPDO7*,
Nd.11
RxPDO7*,
Nd.12
RxPDO7*,
Nd.13
RxPDO7*,
Nd.14
1389
56D
1390
56E
1391
56F
1392
570
1393
571
1394
572
1395
573
1396
574
1397
575
1398
576
1399
577
1400
578
1401
579
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Telegram
type
RxPDO9*,
Nd.32
RxPDO9*,
Nd.33
RxPDO9*,
Nd.34
RxPDO9*,
Nd.35
RxPDO9*,
Nd.36
RxPDO9*,
Nd.37
RxPDO9*,
Nd.38
RxPDO9*,
Nd.39
RxPDO9*,
Nd.40
RxPDO9*,
Nd.41
RxPDO9*,
Nd.42
RxPDO9*,
Nd.43
RxPDO9*,
Nd.44
RxPDO9*,
Nd.45
RxPDO9*,
Nd.46
RxPDO9*,
Nd.47
RxPDO9*,
Nd.48
RxPDO9*,
Nd.49
RxPDO9*,
Nd.50
RxPDO9*,
Nd.51
RxPDO9*,
Nd.52
RxPDO9*,
Nd.53
RxPDO9*,
Nd.54
RxPDO9*,
Nd.55
RxPDO9*,
Nd.56
RxPDO9*,
Nd.57
Version: 1.3
dec
hex
1932
78C
1933
78D
1934
78E
1935
78F
1936
790
1937
791
1938
792
1939
793
1940
794
1941
795
1942
796
1943
797
1944
798
1945
799
1946
79A
1947
79B
1948
79C
1949
79D
1950
79E
1951
79F
1952
7A0
1953
7A1
1954
7A2
1955
7A3
1956
7A4
1957
7A5
Telegram
type
RxPDO5*,
Nd.12
RxPDO5*,
Nd.13
RxPDO5*,
Nd.14
RxPDO5*,
Nd.15
RxPDO5*,
Nd.16
RxPDO5*,
Nd.17
RxPDO5*,
Nd.18
RxPDO5*,
Nd.19
RxPDO5*,
Nd.20
RxPDO5*,
Nd.21
RxPDO5*,
Nd.22
RxPDO5*,
Nd.23
RxPDO5*,
Nd.24
RxPDO5*,
Nd.25
RxPDO5*,
Nd.26
RxPDO5*,
Nd.27
RxPDO5*,
Nd.28
RxPDO5*,
Nd.29
RxPDO5*,
Nd.30
RxPDO5*,
Nd.31
RxPDO5*,
Nd.32
RxPDO5*,
Nd.33
RxPDO5*,
Nd.34
RxPDO5*,
Nd.35
RxPDO5*,
Nd.36
RxPDO5*,
Nd.37
165
Appendix
dec
hex
847
34F
848
350
849
351
850
352
851
353
852
354
853
355
854
356
855
357
856
358
857
359
858
35A
859
35B
860
35C
861
35D
862
35E
863
35F
864
360
865
361
866
362
867
363
868
364
869
365
870
366
871
367
872
368
166
Telegram
type
RxPDO7*,
Nd.15
RxPDO7*,
Nd.16
RxPDO7*,
Nd.17
RxPDO7*,
Nd.18
RxPDO7*,
Nd.19
RxPDO7*,
Nd.20
RxPDO7*,
Nd.21
RxPDO7*,
Nd.22
RxPDO7*,
Nd.23
RxPDO7*,
Nd.24
RxPDO7*,
Nd.25
RxPDO7*,
Nd.26
RxPDO7*,
Nd.27
RxPDO7*,
Nd.28
RxPDO7*,
Nd.29
RxPDO7*,
Nd.30
RxPDO7*,
Nd.31
RxPDO7*,
Nd.32
RxPDO7*,
Nd.33
RxPDO7*,
Nd.34
RxPDO7*,
Nd.35
RxPDO7*,
Nd.36
RxPDO7*,
Nd.37
RxPDO7*,
Nd.38
RxPDO7*,
Nd.39
RxPDO7*,
Nd.40
dec
hex
1402
57A
1403
57B
1404
57C
1405
57D
1406
57E
1407
57F
1409
581
1410
582
1411
583
1412
584
1413
585
1414
586
1415
587
1416
588
1417
589
1418
58A
1419
58B
1420
58C
1421
58D
1422
58E
1423
58F
1424
590
1425
591
1426
592
1427
593
1428
594
Telegram
type
RxPDO9*,
Nd.58
RxPDO9*,
Nd.59
RxPDO9*,
Nd.60
RxPDO9*,
Nd.61
RxPDO9*,
Nd.62
RxPDO9*,
Nd.63
SDO Tx
dec
hex
1958
7A6
1959
7A7
1960
7A8
1961
7A9
1962
7AA
1963
7AB
1964
7AC
SDO Tx
Nd.2
SDO Tx
Nd.3
SDO Tx
Nd.4
SDO Tx
Nd.5
SDO Tx
Nd.6
SDO Tx
Nd.7
SDO Tx
Nd.8
SDO Tx
Nd.9
SDO Tx
Nd.10
SDO Tx
Nd.11
SDO Tx
Nd.12
SDO Tx
Nd.13
SDO Tx
Nd.14
SDO Tx
Nd.15
SDO Tx
Nd.16
SDO Tx
Nd.17
SDO Tx
Nd.18
SDO Tx
Nd.19
SDO Tx
Nd.20
1965
7AD
1966
7AE
1967
7AF
1968
7B0
1969
7B1
1970
7B2
1971
7B3
1972
7B4
1973
7B5
1974
7B6
1975
7B7
1976
7B8
1977
7B9
1978
7BA
1979
7BB
1980
7BC
1981
7BD
1982
7BE
1983
7BF
Version: 1.3
Telegram
type
RxPDO5*,
Nd.38
RxPDO5*,
Nd.39
RxPDO5*,
Nd.40
RxPDO5*,
Nd.41
RxPDO5*,
Nd.42
RxPDO5*,
Nd.43
RxPDO5*,
Nd.44
RxPDO5*,
Nd.45
RxPDO5*,
Nd.46
RxPDO5*,
Nd.47
RxPDO5*,
Nd.48
RxPDO5*,
Nd.49
RxPDO5*,
Nd.50
RxPDO5*,
Nd.51
RxPDO5*,
Nd.52
RxPDO5*,
Nd.53
RxPDO5*,
Nd.54
RxPDO5*,
Nd.55
RxPDO5*,
Nd.56
RxPDO5*,
Nd.57
RxPDO5*,
Nd.58
RxPDO5*,
Nd.59
RxPDO5*,
Nd.60
RxPDO5*,
Nd.61
RxPDO5*,
Nd.62
RxPDO5*,
Nd.63
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
dec
hex
873
369
11.5
Telegram dec
type
RxPDO7*, 1429
Nd.41
hex
595
Telegram dec
type
SDO Tx
Nd.21
hex
Telegram
type
Bibliography
English books
• Konrad Etschberger:
Controller Area Network,
Ixxat Press, 2001. 440 pages.
ISBN 3-00-007376-0
• M. Farsi, M. Barbosa:
CANopen Implementation,
RSP 2000. 210 pages.
ISBN 0-86380-247-8
German books
• Holger Zeltwander (Pub.):
CANopen,
VDE Verlag, 2001. 197 pages,
ISBN 3-800-724480
• Konrad Etschberger:
Controller Area Network, Grundlagen, Protokolle, Bausteine, Anwendungen. (Principles, protocols,
components, applications.)
Hanser Verlag, 2000. 431 pages.
ISBN 3-446-19431-2
General fieldbus technology
• Gerhard Gruhler (Pub.):
Feldbusse und Geräte-Kommunikationssysteme, Praktisches Know-How mit
Vergleichsmöglichkeiten. (Fieldbus and Device Communication Systems, Practical Know-how with
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Version: 1.3
167
Appendix
Comparative Resources)
Franzis Verlag, 2001. 244 pages.
ISBN 3-7723-5745-8
Standards
• ISO 11898:
Road Vehicles - Interchange of digital information - Controller Area Network (CAN) for high speed
communication.
• CiA DS 301:
CANopen Application Layer and Communication Profile. Available from the CAN in Automation
Association (http://www.can-cia.org).
• CiA DS 401:
CANopen Device Profile for Generic I/O Modules. Available from the CAN in Automation Association
(http://www.can-cia.org).
11.6
List of Abbreviations
CAN
Controller Area Network. A serial bus system standardized in ISO 11898. The technology on which
CANopen is based.
CiA
CAN in Automation e.V.. An international association of manufacturers and users based in Erlangen,
Germany.
COB
Communication Object. A CAN telegram with up to 8 data bytes.
COB-ID
Communication Object Identifier. Telegram address (not to be confused with the node address). CANopen
uses the 11-bit identifier according to CAN 2.0A.
NMT
Network Management. One of the service primitives of the CANopen specification. Network management is
used to initialise the network and to monitor nodes.
PDO
Process Data Object. A CAN telegram for the transfer of process data (e.g. I/O data).
RxPDO
Receive PDO. PDOs are always identified from the point of view of the device under consideration. Thus a
TxPDO with input data from an I/O module becomes an RxPDO from the controller's point of view.
SDO
Service Data Object. A CAN telegram with a protocol for communication with data in the object directory
(typically parameter data).
TxPDO
Transmit PDO (named from the point of view of the CAN node).
168
Version: 1.3
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
Appendix
11.7
Support and Service
Beckhoff and their partners around the world offer comprehensive support and service, making available fast
and competent assistance with all questions related to Beckhoff products and system solutions.
Beckhoff's branch offices and representatives
Please contact your Beckhoff branch office or representative for local support and service on Beckhoff
products!
The addresses of Beckhoff's branch offices and representatives round the world can be found on her internet
pages:
http://www.beckhoff.com
You will also find further documentation for Beckhoff components there.
Beckhoff Headquarters
Beckhoff Automation GmbH & Co. KG
Huelshorstweg 20
33415 Verl
Germany
Phone:
Fax:
e-mail:
+49(0)5246/963-0
+49(0)5246/963-198
info@beckhoff.com
Beckhoff Support
Support offers you comprehensive technical assistance, helping you not only with the application of
individual Beckhoff products, but also with other, wide-ranging services:
• support
• design, programming and commissioning of complex automation systems
• and extensive training program for Beckhoff system components
Hotline:
Fax:
e-mail:
+49(0)5246/963-157
+49(0)5246/963-9157
support@beckhoff.com
Beckhoff Service
The Beckhoff Service Center supports you in all matters of after-sales service:
• on-site service
• repair service
• spare parts service
• hotline service
Hotline:
Fax:
e-mail:
CX8050, CX8051 - Embedded-PCs for
CANopen and CAN
+49(0)5246/963-460
+49(0)5246/963-479
service@beckhoff.com
Version: 1.3
169
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