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Introducing logical servers: Making data center
infrastructures more adaptive
technology brief, 2nd edition
Abstract.............................................................................................................................................. 2
Introduction......................................................................................................................................... 2
Overview of logical servers................................................................................................................... 3
Why use logical servers? ...................................................................................................................... 5
Logical servers in an HP BladeSystem environment................................................................................... 5
Comprehensive management ................................................................................................................ 6
Managing logical servers using HP Insight Dynamics – VSE software ......................................................... 7
Conclusion.......................................................................................................................................... 8
Appendix: HP Virtual Connect technology .............................................................................................. 9
For more information.......................................................................................................................... 11
Call to action .................................................................................................................................... 11
Abstract
This technology brief describes the HP strategy and long-term vision for logical servers to make a data
center infrastructure more adaptive. Products based on logical server technology will be implemented
in stages and released at the right time for the market.
Logical servers are a new class of abstracted servers that allows administrators to manage physical
machines and virtual machines using the same management construct. The logical server approach
enables administrators to plan, deploy, move, adjust, and manage server instances in their
environments regardless of how the logical server is created.
A logical server is defined by a server profile that is easily created and moved across physical and
virtual machines. A logical server profile includes the definition of the system services and resources—
whether these services and resources are virtual, physical, shared, or unshared—everything that the
operating system (OS) and application stack for a given workload require to operate. The logical
server profile is managed in software and can be applied to the creation of a virtual machine (VM)
using software-layer abstraction (hypervisor technology as the VM host) or to a physical machine (PM)
using physical-layer abstraction (HP Virtual Connect technology as the PM host).
Logical servers simplify routine administrative operations and processes and make the data center
more efficient. The logical server also enables flexibility and adaptability of the application/OS
workload without impacting shared network and storage domains.
This technology brief is intended for readers who are familiar with existing server virtualization
technology such as virtual machine software. For additional information about virtual machine
software, see the technology brief titled: “Server virtualization technology for the x86-based HP
BladeSystem and ProLiant servers,” available at
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c01067846/c01067846.pdf.
The appendix contains a brief description of HP Virtual Connect technology for readers that are not
familiar with the technology.
Introduction
Virtualization in general, regardless of how it is implemented, uses some level of abstraction to allow
resources to be pooled and shared so that applications are more loosely coupled to underlying
hardware. As a result, IT administrators using virtualization have the ability to adjust resources based
on workload or location, so IT supply can more easily meet the dynamic needs of business.
Virtualization allows administrators to divide resources as needed and to set rules that reallocate
resources where and when needed, based on business priorities.
IT administrators are increasingly turning to server virtualization technologies such as virtual machine
software to provide flexibility and operational efficiencies in the data center. Virtual machine
technology is a powerful capability that can reduce costs and power use while improving resource
utilization. Since virtual machines can be easily moved from one server to another, they provide a
greater level of flexibility than traditional physical servers. However, not all applications are wellsuited for virtual machines today, particularly those with high I/O or deterministic latency
requirements.
Server virtualization technologies can be applied in other parts of the IT stack to deliver flexibility and
operational efficiencies. A powerful example is HP Virtual Connect, which abstracts connections from
servers to network and storage resources.
Through the concept of logical server abstraction, HP is bringing Virtual Connect, virtual machine,
and integrated management technologies together so IT administrators can create and manage virtual
machines and physical machines in the same manner throughout the lifecycle of a server. The logical
server approach is a key component for the HP Adaptive Infrastructure strategy. Through logical
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servers, HP enables IT administrators to significantly accelerate their speed of change for greater
flexibility.
Overview of logical servers
A logical server is a management abstraction that simplifies and optimizes the provisioning and
re-provisioning of servers. Because a logical server is abstracted from the underlying platform, it
makes those underlying resources anonymous to the application/OS stack (Figure 1). A logical server
can be created from a discrete physical server, from within a pool of physical resources, or from a
virtual machine. From left to right, Figure 1 illustrates logical servers created within a physical
resource pool; created using a physical resource pool and a software-based virtual machine; and
from a typical discrete server using software-based virtual machines. 1
Figure 1. Logical server abstraction – decouples the underlying hardware from the application/OS workload
A logical server profile describes an abstracted system image 2 (including the system services and
resources), whether these are virtual, physical, shared, or unshared. The system image includes
everything that the OS and application stack require to operate on a particular workload. For
example, a logical server profile would include attributes describing entitlements such as power
allocation, processor and memory requirements, PCI Express devices (local I/O), network connections
(distributed I/O), and storage. The logical server is managed in software. This could be software local
to the platform as firmware integrated into the hardware or software on a centralized management
server (CMS).
In addition to the discrete network fabrics shown in Figure 1, a unified fabric could also be implemented with RDMA, LAN,
and iSCSI support integrated into the Ethernet NIC.
2
System image is a term that represents the services and components that are exposed to the OS, including the componentlevel connection, the node identifiers, and the BIOS services and configuration.
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3
Figure 2 illustrates how a logical server could be created from a physical resource pool using HP
Virtual Connect (VC) modules to form a VC domain. The logical server can be created from and
moved to any compatible resources in a domain; or it can remain as an inactive profile without any
defined resources. The ability to move the logical server profile requires sharing of resources 3 at all
levels, including shared storage solutions for the OS boot image, the application image, and the
application data.
Figure 2. Creating logical servers using resource pools such as Virtual Connect domains
The key components for a logical server environment include
• Stateless compute environment—for instance, servers connected to shared storage that share all
boot, application, and data volumes using methods such as Fibre Channel SANs. This provides the
means for a logical server to move to other physical machines or virtual machines by connecting
another machine to the same storage resource.
• Physical layer abstraction—for physical machines in a resource pool to be created as logical
servers.
• Software layer abstraction—to create logical server profiles using virtual machines, whether the
virtual machines are within a physical resource pool or on a discrete server, as shown in Figure 1.
• HP Insight Dynamics – VSE software—software to assist with creating and managing logical
servers. Insight Dynamics – VSE runs on a CMS and replaces the manual steps for creating and
3
Sharing may be done concurrently or sequentially.
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managing logical servers with procedural, structured processes. The software includes capabilities
to determine ideal placement of logical server workloads.
Why use logical servers?
Because logical servers are abstracted or decoupled from the underlying platforms, the underlying
hardware takes the identity presented by the logical server profile. An administrator will be able to
move a logical server from one physical machine to another or from a virtual machine to another in a
matter of minutes. For example, an administrator can define a logical server for an application/OS
stack, and then move that logical server to a different set of resources (an “x-to-x” or “like-to-like”
change). Administrators can also change the definition of that logical server to accommodate
changing business needs (an “x-to-y” or “like-to-unlike” change).
As a result of a logical server being defined through a logical server profile, administrators can tackle
problems in ways previously impossible:
• Assign and manage logical server profiles based on business function rather than server technology
• Accelerate time to production by quickly re-purposing test and development hardware without
complicated re-installation or archiving test environments for re-use
• Create affordable, easy-to-configure high-availability systems by using spare capacity within
existing infrastructure
• Transform large-scale consolidation projects that used to take years into a more simple, ongoing
process of re-purposing the infrastructure
The “fluid architecture” of logical servers enhances operational efficiencies and accelerates the speed
of IT change throughout every process in the data center: planning, setup, ongoing maintenance, and
changes due to capacity or availability.
Logical servers in an HP BladeSystem environment
HP logical servers offer the strongest value when implemented in the BladeSystem c-Class environment
because it was designed from the ground up to facilitate resource sharing. HP Virtual Connect
technology, unique to the HP BladeSystem, is the enabling technology used to deploy logical servers
directly on physical machines in a resource pool. See the appendix for background on Virtual
Connect technology.
In the future, resource pools can be logically grouped together at the data center level, or from site-tosite, using a CMS. After resource pools are logically grouped, a logical server could be moved
beyond the boundaries of its physical resource pool for planned upgrades or disaster recovery
solutions.
In addition, HP Virtual Connect enhances the capabilities of virtual machines. Virtual Connect
provides specific improvements to a virtual machine environment:
• Makes moves within the resource pool (Virtual Connect domain) transparent to network and
storage; no coordination is required between an administrator of logical servers (typically a server
administrator) and the Ethernet network or storage area network (SAN) administrators. This
simplifies and speeds up common server management activities including provisioning, upgrades,
technology refresh, consolidation, and server failover.
• Expands the ease of migration across a physical resource pool. The hardware boundary for a
physical resource pool (Virtual Connect domain) may consist of many servers, their storage, and
many BladeSystem c-Class enclosures. As of this writing, a Virtual Connect domain can include up
to 100 BladeSystem c7000 enclosures using Virtual Connect Enterprise Manager software. As a
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result of the broadened resource pool boundary, administrators will have a simplified workflow
process for a much greater number of resources.
• Enables bulk provisioning of network resources, whether connected to physical machines or virtual
machines.
• Exists side-by-side with virtual machines to provide abstraction and mobility for the widest range of
server resources and applications.
• Improves security by allowing lock-down mechanisms such as port-based zoning to be implemented
in a virtualized environment using physical resource pools. Certain environments that require higher
security in the data center network have resisted using virtual machine environments because of an
inability to lock down network addresses to specific ports on the data center network switch. With
the physical-layer abstraction provided by Virtual Connect, administrators will now have this
capability in a virtualized environment.
Comprehensive management
HP is uniquely positioned in the industry with its partner relationships, broad portfolio of in-house
technology, and professional services to bring together comprehensive management solutions
including a variety of programmatic and graphical user interfaces. The relationships that HP has
established, such as those with hypervisor vendors, will enable HP to recommend partner solutions
that are complementary to the HP solutions. This allows customers to choose whether they want to
establish a “fully HP” solution stack or bring in third-party offerings for specific functions. Customers
can engage with partner solutions at multiple management levels.
HP provides customers the opportunity to seamlessly manage their data center infrastructures, either
by using HP solutions alone or by incorporating partner solutions. HP delivers software that can
manage all logical servers, whether created on physical machines or virtual machines.
To provide such a comprehensive management structure, HP will be incorporating intelligence into
every level of infrastructure:
• Hardware components and platforms
• Infrastructure management software
• Enterprise/application management software
Hardware management includes tools to manage the physical hardware set-up, such as Onboard
Administrator, Integrated Lights-Out, Virtual Connect Manager, and HP StorageWorks Command
View EVA Software. These embedded managers are physically attached to the resource or have a
domain scope that encompasses the physical part of the platform. They give the capability to bind,
manage, and control compute and storage resources through their own user interfaces.
Infrastructure management will include tools such as the HP Insight Dynamics – VSE software and
Virtual Connect Enterprise Manager, both of which are tightly coupled with HP Systems Insight
Manager. These tools, sometimes referred to as domain or centralized managers, can provision the
application/OS, monitor logical servers, visualize the infrastructure, and analyze the server
virtualization technologies. These infrastructure-level tools have control over multiple domains or site to
site.
Enterprise-level, centralized management tools will allow administrators to work cohesively with
multiple management layers to provide business-level monitoring and orchestration. IT administrators
need to make hardware and software decisions based on meeting business objectives or application
performance levels. HP offers software such as HP Server Automation (formerly Opsware Server
Automation System) and HP Operations Center (formerly HP OpenView Operations).
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Managing logical servers using HP Insight Dynamics – VSE
software
The logical server management functionality included in HP Insight Dynamics – VSE software provides
an integrated manager for all logical servers, whether they are created using physical or virtual
machines. The logical server management interface provides a graphical view of the system topology,
allowing administrators to easily visualize and manage all servers, their connectivity, and unique
server attributes. Administrators can use this tool to define and deploy logical servers, monitor logical
servers, define the access and control capabilities through role-based control, analyze capacities, and
adjust the logical servers to meet their needs.
The Insight Dynamics – VSE software suite builds on the HP Virtual Server Environment (VSE). HP VSE
is a robust and mature software tool that has been managing HP Integrity physical and virtual systems
for many years, including HP Superdomes. VSE allows administrators to optimize capacity of physical
hardware partitions, standalone servers, and software-based partitions—all from a single
management console. Insight Dynamics – VSE further expands on these capabilities by adding
support for ProLiant and BladeSystem c-Class servers, adding new logical server management, and
adding improved tools with linkages across the HP portfolio.
Insight Dynamics – VSE links with Virtual Machine Management and Server Migration Pack Universal
for ProLiant-hosted hypervisors and virtual machines. Logical server management is also integrated
with capacity planning technology that is part of Insight Dynamics – VSE. Administrators can view
historical utilization data and pre-test workloads onto different sets of server resources. For example,
they can carry out what-if scenarios, and evaluate performance, power implications, and
consolidation scenarios. An administrator can also drag and drop a logical server with immediate
best-fit information through a five-star rating system—not merely the first virtual machine or physical
machine that would fit a logical server profile. Figure 3 shows an example of the logical server
management interface, highlighting the logical server perspective with the ability to create and edit
logical server profiles, to activate or deactivate a logical server, to migrate a logical server, and so
on.
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Figure 3. Example user interface for managing logical servers
HP Insight Dynamics – VSE leverages the already shipping software, Virtual Connect Enterprise
Manager (VCEM), which allows administrators to seamlessly manage up to 1600 c-Class server
blades (up to 100 c7000 enclosures) using a single console application. With VCEM, administrators
have a single server edge/network management point for multiple c-Class enclosures, and do not
have to manage Virtual Connect server edge/network configurations for each enclosure individually.
The Virtual Connect Enterprise Manager provides a central pool of Virtual Connect LAN and SAN
addresses for multiple enclosures. It allows administrators to logically link separate domains and move
VC server profiles between Virtual Connect domains, as long as the servers are physically connected
to the same networks. More information about Virtual Connect Enterprise Manager is available at
www.hp.com/go/vcem.
Conclusion
For years, HP and other companies have been promoting virtualization and the Adaptive
Infrastructure as a means to provide flexibility in the data center. Logical servers are a powerful way
to deliver some of these benefits such as resource allocation for balancing workloads and seamless
moves from test or development servers to production servers.
With its logical server capability, HP is providing a unifying solution allowing administrators to
maintain control over their entire server environments regardless of the underlying platforms and
technologies used.
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Appendix: HP Virtual Connect technology
Historically, an industry-standard server was bound individually to specific network connections as
indicated by the black lines on the left-hand side of Figure A-1. This meant that every time a server
was moved, added, or changed in the network, network administrators had to account for associated
MAC address changes. Similarly, storage administrators would have to update SAN fabric zoning to
account for WWN changes.
Figure A-1. Traditional server networking environment
With the introduction of HP Virtual Connect network virtualization technology with the BladeSystem
c-Class, IT administrators have a means to virtualize the network connections at the server edge. This
takes the existing LAN and SAN management interfaces and adds an abstraction layer, or
virtualization layer, between the edge of the server and the edge of the network. As a result, the
external networks connect to a shared resource pool of servers rather than to individual servers. LAN
and SAN administrators no longer have to change WWNs or MAC addresses every time the server
blade changes. In Figure A-2, the virtualization layer is identified as Virtual Connect Manager.
The firmware-based Virtual Connect Manager resident in each Virtual Connect module manages the
server connection profiles for a specific c-Class enclosure and preserves the identity of those network
connections into the data center.
For additional information about Virtual Connect technology for network connections, see the
technology brief titled “HP Virtual Connect technology implementation for the HP BladeSystem
c-Class” available at
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00814156/c00814156.pdf
and the HP website at www.hp.com/go/blades.
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Figure A-2. Server networking environment using HP Virtual Connect technology
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For more information
For additional information, refer to the resources listed below.
Source
Hyperlink
HP BladeSystem
www.hp.com/go/bladesystem/
HP Insight Dynamics – VSE
www.hp.com/go/insightdynamics
HP virtualization solutions
www.hp.com/go/virtualization
Call to action
Send comments about this paper to TechCom@HP.com.
© 2008 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained
herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and
services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such
products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an
additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or
omissions contained herein.
Windows is a U.S. registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Linux is a U.S. registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
TC080706TB, July 2008
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