Hardware Manual - RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc.

CML24BT cpuModules™
User’s Manual
BDM-610000084
Revision A
®
www.rtd.com
ISO9001 and AS9100 Certified
“Accessing the Analog World”®
CML24BT cpuModules™ User’s Manual
RTD Document Number: BDM-610000084 Revision A
Copyright © 2009-2016 RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. All rights reserved.
Trademarks
Advanced Analog I/O, Advanced Digital I/O, aAIO, aDIO, a2DIO, Autonomous SmartCal, “Catch the Express”,
cpuModule, dspFramework, dspModule, expressMate, ExpressPlatform, HiDANplus, “MIL Value for COTS prices”,
multiPort, PlatformBus, and PC/104EZ are trademarks, and “Accessing the Analog World”, dataModule, IDAN, HiDAN,
RTD, and the RTD logo are registered trademarks of RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc (formerly Real Time Devices,
Inc.). PS/2 is a trademark of International Business Machines Inc. PCI, PCI Express, and PCIe are trademarks of PCI-SIG.
PC/104, PC/104-Plus, PCI-104, PCIe/104, PCI/104-Express and 104 are trademarks of the PC/104 Embedded
Consortium. All other trademarks appearing in this document are the property of their respective owners.
Failure to follow the instructions found in this manual may result in damage to the product described in this manual,
or other components of the system. The procedure set forth in this manual shall only be performed by persons qualified
to service electronic equipment. Contents and specifications within this manual are given without warranty, and are
subject to change without notice. RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. shall not be liable for errors or omissions in this
manual, or for any loss, damage, or injury in connection with the use of this manual.
ii
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
CML24BT cpuModules™
®
www.rtd.com
ISO9001 and AS9100 Certified
“Accessing the Analog World”®
Revision History
iv
Revision
Date
A
05/27/2016
CML24BT cpuModule
Reason for Change
Initial release
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction
CML24BT cpuModules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
aDIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
Ordering Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
CML24BT Model Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Kits and Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
4
Board Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RTD Enhanced BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
9
Block Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Physical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
11
12
13
Migrating to RTD’s Intel E3800 Series cpuModules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Connector Pinout & Function Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New I/O Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connector Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
aDIO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UEFI Shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
15
15
17
17
17
Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18
Chapter 2
Getting Started
Connector Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Selecting the Stack Order for the CML24BT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
Stack Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
Connecting to the Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Power Input Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Connecting to the Utility Port 2.0 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Booting the CML24BT cpuModule for the First Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Chapter 3
Connecting the cpuModule
Proper Grounding Techniques. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
Connector Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
Auxiliary Power (CN3). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
Utility Port 2.0 Connector (CN5) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
USB 2.0 Connector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32
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Speaker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Reset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Soft Power Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32
32
32
33
SVGA Video Connector (CN18) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
DisplayPort Connector (CN19) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
Serial Port 1 (CN7) and Serial Port 2 (CN8) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Serial Port UART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS-232 Serial Port (Default) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS-422 or RS-485 Serial Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS-422 Mode Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS-485 Mode Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dual Serial Port Modes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
37
38
39
40
41
Advanced Digital I/O (aDIO™) Port (CN6). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
USB 2.0 Connector (CN17) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
Ethernet (10/100/1000Base-T and -TX) Connectors (CN20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus (CN1 - Top and CN2 - Bottom) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
PCIe/104 Type 2 Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PCIe Link Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
50
Optional RTC Battery Input (CN13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
Fan Power (CN15) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
Chapter 4
Using the cpuModule
The RTD Enhanced BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
Configuring the RTD Enhanced BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering the BIOS Setup through the Graphical BIOS Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Field Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
54
55
Operating System Specific Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
Windows® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Linux® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
56
Non-Standard Serial Port Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57
Advanced Digital I/O Ports (aDIO™). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58
Digital I/O Register Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port 1 Data register is a read/write byte direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Digital Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Match Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Strobe Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58
60
60
60
60
60
61
SATA Controller Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
SATA Port Mappings, by Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Onboard SATA Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SATA Links on the PCIe/104 Type Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Native IDE Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
62
62
62
Watchdog Timer Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63
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Thermal Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
Thermal Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ACPI-Enforced Thermal Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Critical Trip Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Passive Trip Point. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
64
64
64
Power Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Button Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Low-Power Wake Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AT vs. ATX Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ATX Power Supply Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reducing Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
65
65
66
66
66
Multi-Color LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
Reset and Event Status Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
Features and Settings That Can Affect Boot Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
Boot Device Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Add-On Cards With BIOS Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VGA Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hard Drive Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitor Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
70
70
70
70
System Recovery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
Reset Button Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Load Default BIOS Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Serial Power-On-Self-Test (POST) Code Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
71
71
Appendix A
Hardware Reference
Jumper Settings and Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74
Onboard PCI/PCIe Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75
Physical Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
Heatsink Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
Appendix B
Troubleshooting
Common Problems and Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
Troubleshooting a PC/104 System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
How to Obtain Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82
Appendix C
IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout
IDAN Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
84
IDAN Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
84
IDAN Connector Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85
External I/O Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
87
Appendix D
BDM-610000084
Additional Information
Rev A
Table of Contents
vii
Application Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93
Drivers and Example Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93
Interrupt Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93
Serial Port Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93
PC/104 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93
Appendix E
viii
Limited Warranty
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 1
Introduction
This manual provides comprehensive hardware and software information for users developing with the
CML24BT PCI/104-Express cpuModule.
Note Read the specifications beginning on page 11 prior to designing with the cpuModule.
This manual is organized as follows:
Chapter 1
Introduction
introduces main features and specifications
Chapter 2
Getting Started
provides abbreviated instructions to get started quickly
Chapter 3
Connecting the cpuModule
provides information on connecting the cpuModule to peripherals
Chapter 4
Using the cpuModule
provides information to develop applications for the cpuModule, including general
cpuModule information, detailed information on storing both applications and system
functions, and using utility programs
Appendix A
Hardware Reference
lists jumper locations and settings, physical dimensions, and processor thermal
management
Appendix B
Troubleshooting
offers advice on debugging problems with your system
Appendix C
IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout
provides connector pinouts for the cpuModule installed in an RTD Intelligent Data
Acquisition Node (IDAN) frame
Appendix D
Additional Information
lists sources and websites to support the cpuModule installation and configuration
Appendix E
Limited Warranty
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 1: Introduction
1
CML24BT cpuModules
RTD's CML24BT cpuModule represents the latest in low power PCI Express embedded controllers. Based on an
Intel Atom E3800 Series processor and chipset, the CML24BT is offered with either a low power 1.46 Ghz
Single-Core processor, a 1.33GHz Dual-Core processor, or a 1.91 GHz Quad-Core proccessor. The DDR3 memory
interface on the single- and dual-core models operate up to 1066 MT/s (533 MHz) while the quad-core is 1333MT/s (666 MHz). All memory chips are soldered directly onto the board.
The video interface of the cpuModule’s Intel Atom’s processor supports dual analog SVGA and DisplayPort
outputs. The two video outputs are independent, and can display separate images and display timings, with
audio support on the DisplayPort. Maximum resolution of both video outputs is 1920 x 1200.
A Serial-ATA (SATA) controller provides a fast 3.0 Gbit/sec connection to the hard drives. Network connectivity
is provided by one integrated 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet controller. High-speed peripheral connections include
USB 2.0, with up to 480 Mb/sec data throughput. One additional SATA link and four USB 2.0 connections permit
further expandability on the top and bottom-side PCIe/104 Type 2 connectors. The bottom PCIe/104 connector
also has four x1 PCI Express Gen 2.0 links. Other features include RS-232/422/485 COM ports and Advanced
Digital I/O (aDIO).
RTD has gone the extra mile to include additional advanced features for maximum flexibility. These include an
onboard surface-mount flash drive with a standard SATA interface. An Advanced Watchdog Timer is provided
that can generate an interrupt or reset when the timer expires. The CML24BT is also available in a rugged and
fanless IDAN enclosure.
Factory
Use
(CN4)
PCI Bus (CN16)
SATA Disk Chip (U16)
Factory
Use
(CN9)
COM2&4
(CN9)
DisplayPort
(CN19)
COM1&3
(CN7)
SVGA
Video
(CN18)
aDIO
(CN6)
USB 2.0
(CN17)
Battery
(CN13)
Utility
Port 2.0
(CN5)
Ethernet
(CN20)
Fan Connector
(CN15)
PCIe/104 Bus
(CN1 Top & CN2 Bottom)
Figure 1
2
CML24BT cpuModule
Auxiliary Power
(CN3)
CML24BT cpuModule (top view)
BDM-610000084
Rev A
You can easily customize the cpuModule by stacking PCI/104-Express or PCIe/104 modules such as video
controllers, Digital Signal Processors, drive carriers, LAN controllers, or analog and digital data acquisition
modules. Stacking modules onto the cpuModule avoids expensive installations of backplanes and card cages,
and preserves the module's compactness.
The cpuModule uses the RTD Enhanced BIOS. Drivers in the BIOS allow booting from hard disk, or UEFI shell,
thus enabling the system to be used with traditional disk drives or nonmechanical drives. Booting to USB devices
is also supported.
The cpuModule and BIOS are compatible with any real-time operating systems for PC compatible computers,
although these may require creation of custom drivers to use the aDIO and watchdog timer.
aDIO
RTD’s exclusive aDIO™ is 12 digital bits configured as 8 bit-direction programmable and 4-bit port-direction
programmable I/O, plus 2 strobe inputs giving you any combination of inputs and outputs. Match, event, and
strobe interrupt modes mean no more wasting valuable processor time polling digital inputs. Interrupts are
generated when the 8 bit-direction programmable digital inputs match a pattern or on any value change event.
Bit masking allows selecting any subgroup of eight bits. The strobe input latches data into the bit-programmable
port and generates an interrupt.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 1: Introduction
3
Ordering Information
The CML24BT cpuModule is available with a selection of processors and heatsinks. The cpuModule can also be
purchased as part of an Intelligent Data Acquisition Node (IDAN™) building block, which consists of the
cpuModule and a milled aluminum IDAN frame. The IDAN building block can be used in just about any
combination with other IDAN building blocks to create a simple but rugged PC/104 stack. Refer to Appendix C,
IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout, for more information. The CML24BT cpuModule can also be purchased as part of
a custom-built RTD HiDAN™ or HiDANplus High Reliability Intelligent Data Acquisition Node. Contact RTD for
more information on its high reliability PC/104 systems.
CML24BT Model Options
The basic cpuModule model options are shown below. Refer to the RTD website (www.rtd.com) for more
detailed ordering information and any new variations that may be available.
Table 1
CML24BT cpuModule Model Options
Part Number
Description
CML24BTS1460HR-4096
Intel Atom E3815, Single Core 1.46 GHz 4GB DDR3-SDRAM, 15.24mm stack height
CML24BTD1330HR-4096
Intel Atom E3825, Dual Core 1.33 GHz 4GB DDR3-SDRAM, 15.24mm stack height
CML24BTQ1910HR-4096
Intel Atom E3845, Quad Core 1.91 GHz 4GB DDR3-SDRAM, 22mm stack height
Cable Kits and Accessories
For maximum flexibility, RTD does not provide cables with the cpuModule. You may wish to purchase the
CML24BT cpuModule cable kit (P/N XK-CM108), which contains:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Utility Port 2.0 multi-function cable (2x USB 2.0 ports, battery, reset button, power button, speaker)
Two serial port cables (DIL-10 to DSUB-9)
VGA monitor cable (DIL-10 to high density 15-pin DSUB)
aDIO cable (DIL-16 to DSUB-25)
Two USB cables (5-pin SIL to USB A)
PCIe/104 Type 2 break-out board (provides standard PC interfaces for SATA and USB devices)
One Ethernet cable (DIL-10 to RJ-45)
For additional accessories, refer to the RTD website.
4
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Board Features
•
Intel Atom E3800 Series Processor:
Part Number
Cores
Core
Frequency
L1 Cache
(data)
L1 Cache
(instruction)
L2 Cache
CML24BTS1460
One
1.46 GHz
32 KByte
32 KByte
512 KByte
1
1
Stack Height
0.600” (15.24mm)
1
CML24BTD1330
Two
1.33 GHz
32 KByte
32 KByte
512 KByte
0.600” (15.24mm)
CML24BTQ1910
Four
1.91 GHz
32 KByte1
32 KByte1
512 KByte1
0.866” (22mm)
1. Discreet L1 and L2 cache structures for each core
–
Intel Atom technology
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
E3825 Dual Core Processor
E3845 Quad Core Processor
–
ACPI 5.0 compliant
–
Thermal Throttling reduces clock speed to prevent thermal runaway
–
22 nm process
–
Max Core Temperature of 110 C
2-4 GBytes BGA DDR3 SDRAM
–
Single-channel memory interface
–
Transfer rates up to 1333 MT/s Data Rate
–
Surface Mounted for maximum reliability
–
Features robust Error Code Correction (ECC)
Stackable 156-pin PCIe/104 Type 2 bus on top
–
One SATA 2.0, Rev 2.0 3GB/s
–
Two USB 2.0
–
ATX Power Supply Signaling
–
RTC Battery
Stackable 156-pin PCIe/104 Type 2 bus on bottom
–
Four PCI Express x1 Links. Gen 2, 5 GT/s
–
Two USB 2.0
–
ATX Power Supply Signaling
–
RTC Battery
Advanced Thermal Management
–
Thermal Monitor throttles processor and memory to prevent thermal runaway
–
Passive Fanless Heatsink
–
Modified heatsinks and flat heat spreaders are available
–
Optional connector for external fan
–
Passive Structural Heatsink & Heatpipes in IDAN and HiDAN System Configurations
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI)
–
BDM-610000084
E3815 Single Core Processor
Rev A
ACPI 5.0 Compliant
Chapter 1: Introduction
5
–
Wake events include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
6
USB event (device insertion, keyboard keystroke, etc.)
Power Switch
etc.
Real-Time Clock (external battery required to maintain time only)
Nonvolatile storage of CMOS settings without battery
Advanced Watchdog timer
Complete PC-compatible Single Board Computer
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
I/O
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Analog VGA Interface
–
RGB CRT output
–
Maximum Resolution 1920 x 1200
DisplayPort Interface
–
Embedded DisplaypPort (eDP) 1.3
–
DisplayPort, DVI, and HDMI
–
Audio over DisplayPort
Gigabit Ethernet
–
Intel 82574IT Controllers (PRO1000 Series)
–
10/100/1000 Auto-negotiation
–
Jumbo Frame Support (9kB)
–
Automatic MDI/MDI-X crossover capable
Software-configurable RS-232/422/485 serial ports
–
16550 compatible UARTs for high-speed
–
120 Ohm Termination resistors for RS-422/485 through BIOS Configuration
–
Fully jumperless configuration
–
Increased FIFO size of 512 bytes
–
Supports echo cancellation, Auto-RTS and Auto-CTS
–
Each serial port can be configured as two limited serial ports for a total of four serial ports
Advanced Digital I/O (aDIO)
–
One 8-bit bit-programmable I/O with Advanced Digital Interrupt Modes
–
One 4-bit port programmable as input or output
–
Event Mode Interrupt generates an interrupt when any input bit changes
–
Match Mode Interrupt generates an interrupt when input bits match a preset value
–
External Strobe Mode latches 8 data inputs and generates and interrupt
–
Two Strobes can be configured as readable inputs
Two USB 2.0 (Universal Serial Bus) Ports
–
Supports 480 Mb/s (high-speed), 12Mb/s (full-speed), and 1.5Mbs (low speed) peripherals
–
Automatic resettable over-current protection (500 mA @ 5 Vdc per port)
–
USB Boot capability
–
Seven ports total (3 on 0.1” I/O headers, 4 on PCIe bus connectors)
Serial ATA (SATA)
–
Two SATA revision 2.0 links with transfer rates up to 3.0 Gbit/sec
•
•
–
•
BDM-610000084
One link to the onboard surface-mount SATA Flash drive
Onboard 32 GB SATA Flash drive
•
•
–
One link to the top-side PCIe connector
Built in Wear Leveling, Error Correction and Bad Block Management
SMART supported (Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology
Compatability mode supports legacy operating systems.
Utility Port 2.0 Connector
Rev A
Chapter 1: Introduction
7
•
•
8
–
1x USB 2.0 (Universal Serial Bus) Port with over-current protection
–
Speaker port (0.1 W output)
–
Hardware Reset input
–
Soft Power Button input
Battery input for Real Time Clock
Power Management
–
ACPI 5.0 Support - Advanced Configuration and Power interface
–
ATX support for “Soft Off”
–
ATX Power signals
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
RTD Enhanced BIOS
•
•
•
•
•
BDM-610000084
User-configurable using built-in Setup program
Flash-based CMOS Setup; no battery required to store CMOS settings
Supports boot from SATA or USB
UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) Shell
Special RTD Reliability Enhancements
Rev A
Chapter 1: Introduction
9
Block Diagram
The next figure shows a simplified block diagram of the CML24BT cpuModule.
Figure 2
10
CML24BT cpuModule
CML24BT cpuModule Simplified Block Diagram
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Specifications
Physical Characteristics
Basic dimensions and the weight of the CML24BT are listed below. For a more detailed dimensional drawing,
refer to the Physical Dimensions section on page 76.
•
Dimensions
–
Board Size
•
•
–
Single- and Dual-core models: 15.240 mm (0.866”)
Quad-core models 22.000 mm (0.866")
Stand-off Height Below the CPU:
•
•
Width (W): 90.170 mm W (3.550")
Stand-off Height Above the CPU:
•
•
–
Length (L): 95.885 mm L (3.775")
All versions: 15.240mm (0.600")
Approximate Weight with Heatsink
–
Single-core models: 0.12 kg (0.26 lb)
–
Dual-core models: 0.16 kg (0.36 lb)
–
Quad-core models: 0.19 kg (0.42 lb)
Power Consumption
Exact power consumption depends on the actual application. Typical power consumption of the CML24BT is
listed in Table 2. Tables 3 thru 8 show the power consumption for common applications. It is expected that
power consumption of a typical application will be a combination of these scenarios.
Table 2
Typical Power Consumption
Part Number
Typical Power Consumption
CML24BTS615HR-4096
6.3 W
CML24BTD1330HR-4096
6.8 W
CML24BTQ1910HR-4096
8.7 W
Note The measurements listed above are intended to represent common usage scenarios. The
cpuModule’s power consumption is heavily influenced by the running software and system activity.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 1: Introduction
11
Operating Conditions
Table 3
Symbol
Parameter
VCC5
5V Supply Voltage
Operating Conditions
Test Condition
1
Min.
Max.
4.75V
5.25V
VCCSTBY
5V Standby Voltage
4.75V
5.25V
ICCSTBY
5V Standby Current1
-
500mA
Ta
Ambient Operating
Temperature2
-40
+85C
Ts
Storage Temperature
-40
+70C
Rh
Humidity
0
90%
Non-Condensing
1. 5V Standby is used to power the board when the main supply is turned off (power down modes
S3-S5). It is not required for board operation.
2. With supplied heat sink solution. Depending on the CPU usage, performance may degrade as the
ambient temperature approaches the maximum. Contact RTD Tech Support for more
information.
12
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Electrical Characteristics
The table below lists the Electrical Characteristics of the CML24BT. Operating outside of these parameters may
cause permanent damage to the cpuModule.
Table 4
Symbol
Electrical Characteristics
Parameter
Test Condition
Min.
Max.
0.5 A
5.0 A
USB Ports
Ioc
Overcurrent Limit
Each port
SVGA Port
VOH
Output Voltage High
HSYNC, VSYNC
IOH = –8.0 mA
2.4 V
3.3 V
VOL
Output Voltage Low
HSYNC, VSYNC
IOL = 8.0 mA
0.0 V
0.5 V
VOH
Output Voltage High
DDC_*
IOH = –4.0 mA
2.4 V
3.3 V
VOL
Output Voltage Low
DDC_*
IOL = 8.0 mA
0.0 V
0.4 V
VIH
Input Voltage High
DDC_*
—
2.0 V
5.5 V
VIL
Input Voltage Low
DDC_*
—
-0.3 V
0.8 V
IDDCvcc
Supply Current for
DDC Electronics
—
500 mA
DisplayPort
IVCC
Supply Current
—
500 mA
VOH
Output Voltage High
RL = 3 k
5.0 V
7.0 V
VOL
Output Voltage Low
RL = 3 k
-7.0 V
-5.0 V
VIH
Input Voltage High
—
2.0 V
15 V
VIL
Input Voltage Low
—
-15 V
0.6 V
Serial Ports - RS-232
Serial Ports - RS-422/485
VOD1
Differential Output
RL = 100 Ohm
2.0 V
VOD2
Differential Output
RL = 54 Ohm
1.5 V
VOC
Common Mode
Output
RL = 54 or 100
Ohm
VTH
Differential Input
Threshold
VI
Absolute Max Input
Voltage
3.0 V
-200 mV
-50 mV
-18 V
18 V
aDIO
BDM-610000084
Rev A
VOH
Output Voltage High
IOH = –29 mA
2.4 V
3.3 V
VOL
Output Voltage Low
IOL = 17 mA
0.0 V
0.5 V
VIH
Input Voltage High
—
1.8 V
5.5 V
VIL
Input Voltage Low
—
-0.3 V
IADIOvcc
Supply current
—
0.8 V
500 mA
Chapter 1: Introduction
13
Table 4
Symbol
Parameter
TMIN
Update Interval
Electrical Characteristics
Test Condition
Min.
—
1ms
Max.
Utility Port 2.0 Connector (CN5)
VRTC
Input RTC Voltage1
—
IRTC
RTC Battery Current
—
< 4 uA
IUTILvcc
Utility Supply
Current
—
500 mA
IFAN
Input Current to Fan
2.3 V
3.6 V
Optional Fan Connector (CN15)
—
200 mA
1. Only required to maintain date and time when power is completely removed from the system.
Not required for board operation.
14
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Migrating to RTD’s Intel E3800 Series cpuModules
When migrating to RTD’s Intel E3800 Series cpuModules, there are several differences from some preceding RTD
cpuModule product families of which the customer should be aware.
Connector Pinout & Function Differences
The Intel E3800 Series cpuModules have several connector-related differences, which are summarized below.
Complete information about the connectors on the CML24BT can be found in Chapter 3, Connecting the
cpuModule.
New I/O Connectors
The CML24BT cpuModule introduces a new I/O connector that was not present on some previous RTD
cpuModules:
•
DisplayPort (CN19)
–
Provides video and audio output
–
Unlike legacy LVDS and flat panel connectors which needed to have their BIOS pre-configured
to a specific manufacturer’s flat panel parameters, the DisplayPort connector is compatible with
any display that has a DisplayPort interface.
Connector Differences
While some connectors on the CML24BT have identical pinouts as on previous cpuModule generations, the
features of the connector are sometimes different. Other connectors have entirely different pinouts than those
on previous cpuModule generations. Connectors with pinout and feature differences include:
•
Auxiliary Power Connector (CN3)
–
12 pins (unlike the 10-pin connector on RTD Montevina cpuModules)
–
+5V and +12V inputs (unlike +5V only auxiliary power connectors found on previous RTD
cpuModule generations)
•
–
•
•
BDM-610000084
While the RTD Intel E3800 Series CPU only requires +5 volts, +12V may optionallly be
connected to CN3 if it is required by any other device in the system.
The Auxilliary Power Connector excludes ATX power signaling. The ATX power signals are
provided on the PCIe/104 Type 2 bus connectors.
Utility Port 2.0 (CN5)
–
Replaces the legacy Utility Port multi-function connector
–
Replaces the PS/2 Mouse and Keyboard connections with one USB 2.0 port
–
The pinout of the Utility Port 2.0 is not compatible with previous generations of RTD
cpuModules.
COM Ports (CN7 and CN8)
–
Connector CN7 can be configured to output Serial POST codes out of the TXD pin when in
single RS-232 mode (unlike RTD Montevina cpuModules, where the DTR pin was configured for
serial POST code output on the second port of CN7 in dual-port mode). For more information,
refer to Serial Power-On-Self-Test (POST) Code Output on page 71.
–
Of all single and dual-port modes, only the single RS-232 pinout is compatible with previous
generations of RTD cpuModules.
–
Dual-mode COM port pinouts permit dual RS-232, dual RS-422, and dual RS-485 modes. Unlike
some previous generations of RTD cpuModules, a dual “combined” mode with RS-232 and
RS-422/458 is not supported.
Rev A
Chapter 1: Introduction
15
16
–
Unlike some previous cpuModule generations, the single-mode RS-422/485 pinouts of the
CML24BT do not include the DCD, DSR, DTR, and RI signals.
–
When a COM port connector is configured for dual-port mode, enabling/disabling COM port
termination enables/disables the termination for both ports on that connector. (Some previous
generations of cpuModules have the ability to independently enable/disable termination on
both ports when configured for dual-mode.)
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Software Differences
The Intel E3800 Series cpuModules have several software-related differences, which are summarized below.
Complete information about these CML24BT features can be found in Chapter 4, Using the cpuModule.
aDIO
While the 16-pin aDIO connector is pin-for-pin compatible with previous generations of RTD cpuModules (such
as the Intel Core 2 Duo series), the hardware is slightly different, and requires that writes ands reads to/from the
aDIO ports happen no more than once per millisecond. Migrating legacy software to the E3800 Series that
utilizes RTD’s Advanced Digital I/O may require that you add this delay prior to all reads and writes.
UEFI Shell
Previous generations of RTD cpuModules contained a Failsafe Boot ROM image, which permitted the
cpuModule to boot to a DOS prompt even when no disk drives were connected to the system. The RTD E3800
Series cpuModules provide a similar prompt, called the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) Shell, which
provides an enviroment to execute simple commands when no bootable devices are connected to the system.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 1: Introduction
17
Contact Information
RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc.
103 Innovation Blvd.
State College, PA 16803-0906
USA
18
Phone:
Fax:
+1-814-234-8087
+1-814-234-5218
E-mail:
sales@rtd.com
techsupport@rtd.com
Internet:
http://www.rtd.com
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 2
Getting Started
For many users, the factory configuration of the CML24BT cpuModule can be used to get a PC/104 system
operational. You can get your system up and running quickly by following the simple steps described in this
chapter, which are:
1.
Before connecting the cpuModule, the user must be properly grounded to prevent electrostatic
discharge (ESD). For more information, refer to Proper Grounding Techniques on page 28.
2.
Connect power.
3.
Connect the Utility Port 2.0 cable.
4.
Connect a USB keyboard.
5.
Connect a monitor to the SVGA connector or DisplayPort interface.
6.
Default BIOS configuration.
7.
UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) shell.
Refer to the remainder of this chapter for details on each of these steps.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 2: Getting Started
19
Connector Locations
Figure 3 shows the connectors of the CML24BT cpuModule.
PCI Bus (CN16)
Factory
Use
(CN4)
SATA Disk Chip (U16)
Factory
Use
(CN9)
COM2&4
(CN9)
DisplayPort
(CN19)
COM1&3
(CN7)
SVGA
Video
(CN18)
aDIO
(CN6)
USB 2.0
(CN17)
Battery
(CN13)
Utility
Port 2.0
(CN5)
Ethernet
(CN20)
Fan Connector
(CN15)
PCIe/104 Bus
(CN1 Top & CN2 Bottom)
Figure 3
Auxiliary Power
(CN3)
CML24BT Connector Locations
Note Pin 1 of each connector is indicated by a white silk-screened square on the top side of the board
and a square solder pad on the bottom side of the board.
20
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Table 5
CML24BT Basic Connectors
Connector
Function
Size and Pitch
Mating Connector
CN1
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus (Top)
156-pin, 0.635mm
Samtec ASP-129646-03
CN2
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus (Bottom)
156-pin, 0.635mm
Samtec ASP-129637-03
CN3
Auxiliary Power
1x12, 0.1”
FCI 65039-025LF
CN5
Utility Port 2.0
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN6
aDIO
2x8, 0.1”
3M 89116-0001
CN7
Serial Port 1 (COM 1&3)
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN8
Serial Port 2 (COM 2&4)
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN13
RTC Battery Input (optional)
1x2, 2mm
FCI 69305-002LF
CN15
Optional Fan Connector
1x3, 2mm
FCI 69305-003LF
CN17
USB 2.0
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN18
Video (SVGA)
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN19
DisplayPort
Molex P/N Series
47272-xxxx
Molex P/N Series
68783-xxxx
CN20
Ethernet
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
WARNING If you connect power incorrectly, the module will almost certainly be damaged or destroyed.
Such damage is not covered by the RTD warranty! Please verify connections to the module before
applying power.
Power is normally supplied to the cpuModule through the top or bottom PCIe connectors (CN1 or CN2). If you
are placing the cpuModule onto a stack that has a PCIe/104 power supply, you do not need to make additional
connections to supply power.
Alternatively, if you are using the cpuModule without a PC/104 stack or with a stack that does not include a
power supply, refer to Auxiliary Power (CN3) on page 30 for an alternative method on how to power the
cpuModule.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 2: Getting Started
21
Selecting the Stack Order for the CML24BT
There are several things to consider when selecting the order of boards in the stack. Before selecting the order,
be sure to determine which bus connector on each board is the “Active” bus. Typically, if a peripheral module has
both PCIe and PCI bus connectors, only the PCIe is active and the PCI is pass-through. The following is a list of
rules to use to determine the stack order:
22
1.
The PCIe connectors above and below the CPU have completely separate signals. Therefore it is
possible to attach boards to the PCIe connector above and below the CPU.
2.
Any board that uses a SATA link must be within one board of the CPU.
3.
Any board that uses a PCIe link must be within six boards of the CPU. Peripheral boards that repopulate
a PCIe link should be placed closer to the CPU than any peripheral boards that use a PCIe link without
repopulating.
4.
To preserve power integrity, it is recommended that there be no more than six boards between the CPU
and the power supply.
5.
In order to maintain maximum performance over the full temperature range, it is recommended that
a PCIe spacer be used between the CPU and any board immediately above it.
6.
A maximum of four PCI boards may be attached to any PCI bus.
7.
The PCIe to PCI bridge (if one exists in the stack) must be at one end of the PCI bus segment, and all of
the peripheral cards at the other end. There may be up to eight PCI pass-through connectors between
the PCIe to PCI bridge and the peripheral cards.
8.
There must be no more than two boards between the first PCI peripheral and the last PCI peripheral.
If there are four PCI peripheral cards in a PCI bus segment, there may not be any PCI pass-through
connections between them.
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Stack Example
The figure below shows an example of a complete system stack. Most systems will be a subset of this example.
This example stack may be further expanded with PCIe to PCIe bridges, or a PCIe to PCI bridge.
Unconnected & Unused
PCI Bus Segment
No more than eight
PCI Pass-Through
Connectors
All four PCI
Peripherals
together
USB Peripheral with pass-through PCI
PCI
PCIe
USB Peripheral with pass-through PCI
PCI
PCIe
SATA Hard Drive Carrier
PCIe
Spacer
PCIe
CML24BT CPU
PCIe
PCI
PCIe x1 Peripheral
PCIe
PCI
PCIe x1 Peripheral
PCIe
PCI
PCIe x1 Peripheral
PCIe
PCI
PCIe x1 to PCI Bridge
PCI
PCIe
Power Supply
PCI
PCIe
USB Peripheral with pass-through PCI
PCI
PCIe
USB Peripheral with pass-through PCI
PCI
PCIe
PCI Peripheral
PCI
PCI Peripheral with pass-through ISA
PCI
ISA
PCI Peripheral with pass-through ISA
PCI
ISA
PCI Peripheral with pass-through ISA
PCI
ISA
SATA within two
boards of CPU
Spacer to improve
cooling.
PCIe within six
boards of CPU
Unconnected & Unused
ISA Bus Segment
Figure 4
BDM-610000084
Rev A
System Stacking Example
Chapter 2: Getting Started
23
Connecting to the Stack
The bus connectors of the cpuModule are simply plugged onto a PC/104 stack to connect to other devices.
Follow the procedure below to ensure that stacking of the modules does not damage connectors or electronics.
WARNING Do not force the module onto the stack! Wiggling the module or applying too much pressure
may damage it. If the module does not readily press into place, remove it, check for bent pins or
out-of-place keying pins, and try again.
For mechanical dimensions, including board-to-board spacing, see Physical Dimensions on page 76.
1.
Turn off power to the PC/104 system or stack.
2.
Always work at an ESD protected workstation, and wear a grounded wrist-strap.
3.
Select and install stand-offs to properly position the cpuModule on the stack.
4.
Remove the cpuModule from its anti-static bag.
5.
Check that pins of the bus connector are properly positioned.
6.
Check the stacking order; make sure all of the busses used by the peripheral cards are connected to the
cpuModule.
7.
Hold the cpuModule by its edges and orient it so the bus connector pins line up with the matching
connector on the stack.
8.
Gently and evenly press the cpuModule onto the PC/104 stack.
Power Input Connections
Power to the board must come from either the top or bottom PCIe/104 Type 2 bus connectors (CN1 or CN2),
or the auxiliary power connector (CN3). These connectors provide the required +5V DC voltage rail input to the
cpuModule. While the RTD Intel E3800 Series CPU only requires +5 volts, +12V may optionallly be connected to
CN3 if it is required by any other device in the system.
WARNING While the PCI bus connector (CN16) has a +12V pin, it is not connected to the cpuModule,
as the pin does not meet the cpuModule’s current requirement. If the cpuModule is only connected to the
power supply via the PCI connector, the cpuModule’s LED will turn red, indicating that the +12V input
rail is not present.
Note Although it is possible to power the cpuModule through the Auxiliary Power connector, the
preferred method is to power it through the bus connector from a power supply in the stack. The
cpuModule can have large current transients during operation, which make powering it through wires
difficult. Powering through the bus eliminates such problems as voltage drop and lead inductance.
24
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Connecting to the Utility Port 2.0 Connector
The Utility Port 2.0 connector (CN5) implements the following interfaces:
•
•
•
•
•
One USB 2.0 (Universal Serial Bus) port
Speaker port (0.1 W output)
Hardware Reset input
Battery input for Real Time Clock
Soft Power Button input
To use these interfaces, you must connect to the Utility Port 2.0 connector (CN5). The Utility Port 2.0 cable from
the RTD cable kit provides a small speaker, two USB 2.0 ports for a keyboard and mouse, a push-button for
resetting the system, a soft-power button, and a lithium battery to provide backup power for the real time clock.
Refer to Utility Port 2.0 Connector (CN5) on page 31 to connect devices to the Utility Port 2.0 connector.
Booting the CML24BT cpuModule for the First Time
You can now apply power to the cpuModule.If you press ESC on a keyboard while booting, the cpuModule will
enter Setup. Once you have configured the cpuModule using Setup, save your changes and reboot. If you don’t
presse ESC, the cpuModule will boot using the current settings.
Note You may miss the initial sign-on messages if your monitor takes a while to power on.
Note By default, cpuModules are shipped with a UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) shell.
When no other bootable device is installed in the system, the system will boot to it exclusively. This
internal bootable shell may be disabled in the BIOS screen’s boot menu.
WARNING Incorrect modifications to the BIOS can cause your system to break. If you are unsure of any
changes made to the BIOS there is a Load RTD Defaults option under the Exit tab in the SCU. This
option restores the BIOS to the default factory settings.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 2: Getting Started
25
26
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 3
Connecting the cpuModule
This chapter provides information on all CML24BT cpuModule connectors.
Proper Grounding Techniques—page 28
Connector Locations—page 28
Auxiliary Power (CN3)—page 30
Utility Port 2.0 Connector (CN5)—page 31
SVGA Video Connector (CN18)—page 34
DisplayPort Connector (CN19)—page 35
Serial Port 1 (CN7) and Serial Port 2 (CN8)—page 37
Advanced Digital I/O (aDIO™) Port (CN6)—page 43
USB 2.0 Connector (CN17)—page 44
Ethernet (10/100/1000Base-T and -TX) Connectors (CN20)—page 46
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus (CN1 - Top and CN2 - Bottom)—page 47
Optional RTC Battery Input (CN13)—page 51
Fan Power (CN15)—page 51
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
27
Proper Grounding Techniques
Before removing the CML24BT from its static bag, proper grounding techniques must be used to prevent
electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage to the cpuModule. Common grounding procedures include an anti-static
mat on a workbench, which may connect to an anti-static wrist strap (also known as an ESD wrist strap) on the
wrist of the technician or engineer.
Connector Locations
Figure 5 shows the connectors of the CML24BT cpuModule.
PCI Bus (CN16)
Factory
Use
(CN4)
SATA Disk Chip (U16)
Factory
Use
(CN9)
COM2&4
(CN9)
DisplayPort
(CN19)
COM1&3
(CN7)
SVGA
Video
(CN18)
aDIO
(CN6)
USB 2.0
(CN17)
Battery
(CN13)
Utility
Port 2.0
(CN5)
Ethernet
(CN20)
Fan Connector
(CN15)
PCIe/104 Bus
(CN1 Top & CN2 Bottom)
Figure 5
Auxiliary Power
(CN3)
CML24BT Connector Locations
Note Pin 1 of each connector is indicated by a white silk-screened square on the top side of the board
and a square solder pad on the bottom side of the board. Pin 1 of the bus connectors match when
stacking PC/104 modules.
28
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Table 6
BDM-610000084
CML24BT Basic Connectors
Connector
Function
Size and Pitch
Mating Connector
CN1
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus (Top)
156-pin, 0.635mm
Samtec ASP-129646-03
CN2
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus (Bottom)
156-pin, 0.635mm
Samtec ASP-129637-03
CN3
Auxiliary Power
1x12, 0.1”
FCI 65039-025LF
CN5
Utility Port 2.0
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN6
aDIO
2x8, 0.1”
3M 89116-0001
CN7
Serial Port 1 (COM1&3)
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN8
Serial Port 2 (COM2&4)
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN13
RTC Battery Input (optional)
1x2, 2mm
FCI 69305-002LF
CN15
Optional Fan connector
1x3, 2mm
FCI 69305-003LF
CN17
USB 2.0
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN18
Video (SVGA)
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
CN19
DisplayPort
Molex P/N Series
47272-xxxx
Molex P/N Series
68783-xxxx
CN20
Ethernet
2x5, 0.1”
3M 89110-0001
Rev A
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
29
Auxiliary Power (CN3)
The Auxiliary Power connector (CN3) can be used to supply power to devices that are attached to the
cpuModule. These devices include hard drive, front-end boards for data acquisition systems, and other devices.
Power can also be conveyed to the module through the Auxiliary Power connector (CN3). The Intel E3800 Series
cpuModule only requires +5 VDC and ground for operation. +12 V may optionally be connected to CN3 if it is
required by any other device in the system.
Note Although it is possible to power the cpuModule through the Auxiliary Power connector, the
preferred method is to power it through the bus connector from a power supply in the stack. The
cpuModule can have large current transients during operation, which make powering it through wires
difficult. Powering through the bus eliminates such problems as voltage drop and lead inductance.
If using the Auxiliary Power connector to power the system, care must be taken to ensure good power
connections. The power and ground leads must be twisted together, or as close together as possible to reduce
lead inductance. A separate lead must be used for each of the power pins. All 5V pins and all ground pins must
be connected. Do not use wire smaller than 20 gauge, and take care to ensure the length of the wire does not
exceed 2 ft. The power supply solution must be verified by measuring voltage at the Auxiliary Power Connector
and verifying that it meets the input voltage specifications. The voltage at the connector should be checked with
an oscilloscope while the system is operational.
WARNING This 12-pin power connector is not compatible with previous generations of RTD
cpuModules.
WARNING If you connect power incorrectly, the module will almost certainly be destroyed. Please verify
power connections to the module before applying power.
G
Table 7
Auxiliary Power Connector (CN3)
Pin
Signal
Function
1
GND
Ground
2
+5 V
+5 Volts DC
3
+5 V
+5 Volts DC
4
GND
Ground
5
GND
Ground
6
+12 V1
+12 Volts DC
7
+12 V1
+12 Volts DC
8
GND
Ground
9
GND
Ground
10
+5 V
+5 Volts DC
11
+5 V
+5 Volts DC
12
GND
Ground
1. +12 V not required for operation of the cpuModule
30
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Utility Port 2.0 Connector (CN5)
The Utility Port 2.0 connector implements the following functions:
•
•
•
•
•
1x USB 2.0 (Universal Serial Bus) Port
Speaker port (0.1 W output)
Hardware Reset input
Soft Power Button input
Battery input for Real Time Clock
Table 8 provides the pinout of the Utility Port 2.0 connector.
Table 8
Utility Port 2.0 Connector (CN5)
Pin
Signal
Function
In/Out
1
SPKR
Speaker Output (open collector)
out
2
PWR
+5 V
out
3
RESET#
Manual Push-Button Reset
4
DATA–
Bidirectional data line for USB1
5
PWRSW#
6
DATA+
7
GND
Ground
out
8
GND
Ground
out
9
BAT
RTC Battery Input
10
Shield GND
in
in/out
Soft Power Button
in
Bidirectional data line for USB1
in/out
in
Shield Ground
out
WARNING The pinout of the Utility Port 2.0 connector is not compatible with previous generations of
RTD cpuModules. Attaching a legacy Utility Port harness to the Utility Port 2.0 connector may damage
or destroy the cpuModule.
Facing the connector pins, the pinout is:
BDM-610000084
Rev A
9
7
5
3
1
BAT
GND
PWRSW#
RESET#
SPKR
Shield GND
GND
DATA+
DATA-
PWR
10
8
6
4
2
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
31
USB 2.0 Connector
One USB 2.0 compliant connector is available on connector CN5. Table 8 provides the pinout of the USB
connector.
Note For proper operation at USB 2.0 speeds, be sure to use a cable that is rated for USB 2.0, such as the
cable kit supplied by RTD.
Speaker
A speaker output is available on pins 1 and 2 of the Utility Port 2.0 connector. These outputs are controlled by a
transistor to supply 0.1 W of power to an external speaker. The external speaker should have 8 Ohm impedance
and be connected between pins 1 and 2.
System Reset
Pin 3 of the Utility Port 2.0 connector allows connection of an external push-button to manually reset the system.
The push-button should be normally open, and connect to ground when pushed. The type of reset generated by
this button can be set in the BIOS configuration utility.
Soft Power Button
Pin 5 of the Utility Port 2.0 connector allows connection of an external push-button to send a soft power signal
to the system. The push-button should be normally open, and connect to ground when pushed. For more
information on the modes of the Soft Power Button, refer to the Power Management section in Chapter 4, Using
the cpuModule
32
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Battery
Pin 9 of the Utility Port 2.0 connector is the connection for an external backup battery. This battery is used by
the cpuModule when system power is removed in order to preserve the date and time of the real time clock.
Connecting a battery is only required to maintain time when power is completely removed from the cpuModule.
A battery is not required for board operation.
WARNING The optional RTC battery input connector (CN13) should be left unconnected if the
multi-function connector (CN5) has a battery connected to pin 9.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
33
SVGA Video Connector (CN18)
Table 9 provides the pinout of the video connector.
Table 9
SVGA Video Connector (CN18)
Pin
Signal
Function
In/Out
1
VSYNC
Vertical Sync
out
2
HSYNC
Horizontal Sync
out
3
DDCSCL
Monitor Communications Clock
out
4
RED
Red Analog Output
out
5
DDCSDA
6
GREEN
7
Monitor Communications Data
bidirectional
Green Analog Output
out
PWR
+5 V
out
8
BLUE
Blue Analog Output
out
9
GND
Ground
out
10
GND
Ground
out
Facing the connector pins of the SVGA Video connector (CN18), the pinout is:
34
CML24BT cpuModule
9
7
5
3
1
GND
PWR
DDCSDA
DDCSCL
VSYNC
GND
BLUE
GREEN
RED
HSYNC
10
8
6
4
2
BDM-610000084
Rev A
DisplayPort Connector (CN19)
The DisplayPort connector on the CML24BT cpuModule is a standard PC DisplayPort connector complete with
latch holes to provide a rugged connecting solution for latching DisplayPort cables.
The DisplayPort supports all mandatory features of the VESA Embedded DisplayPort (eDP) 1.3 standard and
supports audio over the connection. Full bandwidth transmission is supported over a two meter cable, with
reduced bandwidth transmission supported up to a length of 15 meters.
The connection can directly output single-link HDMI and DVI signals by using a simple passive adapter. Passive
adapters acheive HDMI and DVI signaling by adjusting the lower signal levels output by the connector.
Table 10 provides the pinout of the DisplayPort connector.
Table 10
DisplayPort Connector (CN19)
Pin
Signal
Standard Function
DVI / HDMI mode1
1
LN0+
Main Link, Lane 0 (positive)
TMDS Channel 2 (positive)
out
2
GND
Ground
Ground
out
3
LN0-
Main Link, Lane 0 (negative)
TMDS Channel 2 (negative)
out
4
LN1+
Main Link, Lane 1 (positive)
TMDS Channel 1 (positive)
out
5
GND
Ground
Ground
out
6
LN1-
Main Link, Lane 1 (negative)
TMDS Channel 1 (negative)
out
7
LN2+
Main Link, Lane 2 (positive)
TMDS Channel 0 (positive)
out
8
GND
Ground
Ground
out
9
LN2-
Main Link, Lane 2 (negative)
TMDS Channel 0 (negative)
out
10
LN3+
Main Link, Lane 3 (positive)
TMDS Clock (positive)
out
11
GND
Ground
Ground
out
12
LN3-
Main Link, Lane 3 (negative)
TMDS Clock (negative)
out
13
CFG1
Configuration Pin 1
Cable Adapter Detect
In/Out
out
2
14
CFG2
Configuration Pin 2
Consumer Electronics Control
15
AUX+
Auxiliary Channel (positive)
DDC Clock
16
GND
Ground
Ground
17
AUX-
Auxiliary Channel (negative)
DDC Data
18
HPD
Hot Plug Detect
Hot Plug Detect
in
19
DPG
Return for DPV
Return for DPV
out
20
DPV
+3.3V DC Power
+3.3V DC Power
out
out
in/out
out
in/out
1. Requires special passive adapter
2. HDMI mode only
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
35
Facing the connector pins of the DisplayPort connector (CN19), the pinout is:
36
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
DPG
AUX-
AUX+
CFG1
GND
LN2-
LN2+
GND
LN0-
LN0+
DPV
HPD
GND
CFG2
LN3-
LN3+
GND
LN1-
LN1+
GND
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Serial Port 1 (CN7) and Serial Port 2 (CN8)
Serial Port 1 (COM1) is implemented on connector CN7, and Serial Port 2 (COM2) is implemented on connector
CN8. The serial ports are normally configured as PC compatible full-duplex RS-232 ports, but you may use the
BIOS Setup program to reconfigure these ports as half-duplex RS-422 or full-duplex RS-422 or RS-485. If you
reconfigure the ports, you must also select the I/O address and corresponding interrupt using Setup. Table 11
provides the standard I/O addresses and corresponding interrupts.
Table 11
Serial Port Settings
I/O Address (hex)
IRQ
03F8
IRQ4
02F8
IRQ3
03E8
IRQ4
02E8
IRQ3
Serial Port UART
The serial ports are implemented with a 16550/16750-compatible UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver/
Transmitter). This UART is capable of baud rates up to 115.2 kbaud, and includes a 64-byte FIFO. Refer to any
standard PC-AT hardware reference for the register map of the UART.
It is possible to change the slew rate for the UARTs of the cpuModule to allow the serial ports to operate at higher
speeds than 115200 bps. For more information see Chapter 4 - “Non-Standard Serial Port Modes”.
RS-232 Serial Port (Default)
The default serial port mode is full-duplex RS-232. With this mode enabled, the serial port connectors must be
connected to RS-232 compatible devices. Table 12 provides the serial port connector pinout and shows how to
connect to an external DB-25 or DB-9 compatible serial connector.
Table 12
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Serial Port in RS-232 Mode
Pin
Signal
Function
In/Out
DB-25
DB-9
1
DCD
Data Carrier Detect
in
8
1
2
DSR
Data Set Ready
in
6
6
3
RXD
Receive Data
in
3
2
4
RTS
Request To Send
out
4
7
5
TXD
Transmit Data
out
2
3
6
CTS
Clear To Send
in
5
8
7
DTR
Data Terminal Ready
out
20
4
8
RI
Ring Indicate
in
22
9
9
GND
Signal Ground
—
7
5
10
GND
Signal Ground
—
—
—
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
37
Facing the serial port’s connector pins, the pinout is:
9
7
5
3
1
GND
DTR
TXD
RXD
DCD
GND
RI
CTS
RTS
DSR
10
8
6
4
2
RS-422 or RS-485 Serial Port
You may use the BIOS setup utility to configure the serial ports as RS-422 or RS-485. In this case, you must
connect the serial port to an RS-422 or RS-485 compatible device.
When using RS-422 mode, you can use the serial ports in either half-duplex (two-wire) or full-duplex (four-wire)
configurations.
Note The cpuModule has a 120 Ohm termination resistor. Termination is usually necessary on all RS-422
receivers and at the ends of the RS-485 bus. Termination resistors can be enabled in the BIOS setup utility.
When using full-duplex in RS-422 mode, connect the ports as shown in Table 13.
Table 13
Full-Duplex Connections
Port 1
Port 2
RXD+
TXD+
TXD+
RXD+
RXD–
TXD–
TXD–
RXD–
In RS-485 mode, the connection of the ports is always half-duplex, as the transceivers’ transmitters are
connected to the receivers internally.
38
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
RS-422 Mode Pinout
Table 14 provides the serial port connector pinout when RS-422 mode is enabled.
Table 14
Serial Port in RS-422 Mode
Pin
Signal
Function
In/Out
DB-9
1
TXD–
Transmit Data (–)
out
1
2
—
Reserved
—
6
3
TXD+
Transmit Data (+)
out
2
4
—
Reserved
—
7
5
RXD+
Receive Data (+)
in
3
6
—
Reserved
—
8
7
RXD–
Receive Data (–)
in
4
8
—
Reserved
—
9
9
GND
Signal Ground
—
5
10
GND
Signal Ground
—
—
Facing the serial port connector, the pinout is:
9
7
5
3
1
GND
RXD-
RXD+
TXD+
TXD-
GND
Rsvd
Rsvd
Rsvd
Rsvd
10
8
6
4
2
WARNING The pinout of the COM ports in RS-422 mode is not compatible with previous generations
of RTD cpuModules.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
39
RS-485 Mode Pinout
Table 15 provides the serial port connector pinout when RS-482 mode is enabled
Table 15
Serial Port in RS-485 Mode
Pin
Signal
Function
In/Out
DB-9
1
D–
Data (–)
in/out
1
2
—
Reserved
—
6
3
D+
Data (+)
in/out
2
4
—
Reserved
—
7
5
—
Reserved
—
3
6
—
Reserved
—
8
7
—
Reserved
—
4
8
—
Reseved
—
9
9
GND
Signal Ground
—
5
10
GND
Signal Ground
—
—
Facing the serial port connector, the pinout is:
9
7
5
3
1
GND
Rsvd
Rsvd
D+
D-
GND
Rsvd
Rsvd
Rsvd
Rsvd
10
8
6
4
2
WARNING The pinout of the COM ports in RS-485 mode is not compatible with previous generations
of RTD cpuModules.
Note When using the serial port in RS-485 mode, the serial transmitters are enabled and disabled under
software control. The transmitters are enabled by manipulating the Request To Send (RTS*) signal of the
serial port controller. This signal is controlled by writing bit 1 of the Modem Control Register (MCR) as
follows:
• If MCR bit 1 = 1, then RTS* = 0, and serial transmitters are disabled
• If MCR bit 1 = 0, then RTS* = 1, and serial transmitters are enabled
Note For more information on the serial port registers, including the MCR, refer to the Serial Port
Programming reference in Appendix D.
40
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Dual Serial Port Modes
The serial port connectors can be configured as dual serial ports in the BIOS. This enhancement in dual RS-232
comes at the cost of losing the DSR and DTR signals, which are only available in single RS-232 mode.
The mapping between the connectors and COM port numbers is shown in Table 16. The supported
combinations of serial port modes are listed in Table 17, which also includes a reference to the corresponding
connector pinout.
Table 16
Dual Serial Port Connections
Connector
COM A
COM B
CN7
COM 1
COM 3
CN8
COM 2
COM 4
Table 17
Dual Serial Port Modes
COM A
COM B
Pinout
Reference
Echo Mode
RS-232
RS-232
Table 18
—
RS-422
RS-422
Table 19
—
RS-485
RS-485
Table 20
echo cancelled
RS-485
RS-485
Table 19
with echo1
1. Dual RS-485 mode with echo uses dual RS-422 mode pinout
WARNING The dual serial port mode pinouts of the COM ports are not compatible with previous
generations of RTD cpuModules.
Note The cpuModule has 120 Ohm termination resistors. Termination is usually necessary on all RS-422
receivers and at the ends of the RS-485 bus. Termination resistors can be enabled in the BIOS setup utility.
When termination is enabled in dual port mode, it is enabled for both ports.
Table 18
BDM-610000084
Rev A
COM A (RS-232) and COM B (RS-232)
Pin
Signal
Function
In/Out
DB-9
1
DCD1
COM A - Data Carrier Detect
in
1
2
CTS1
COM A - Clear To Send
in
6
3
RXD1
COM A - Receive Data
in
2
4
TXD2
COM B - Transmit Data
out
7
5
TXD1
COM A - Transmit Data
out
3
6
RXD2
COM B - Receive Data
in
8
7
RTS1
COM A - Request To Send
out
4
8
RI1
in
9
COM A - Ring Indicate
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
41
Table 18
COM A (RS-232) and COM B (RS-232)
Pin
Signal
Function
9
GND
10
GND
Table 19
In/Out
DB-9
Signal Ground
—
5
Signal Ground
—
—
COM A (RS-422) and COM B (RS-422)1
Pin
Signal
Function
In/Out
DB-9
1
TXD1-
COM A- Transmit Data (–)
out
1
2
TXD2-
COM B - Transmit Data (–)
out
6
3
TXD1+
COM A - Transmit Data (+)
out
2
4
TXD2+
COM B - Transmit Data (+)
out
7
5
RXD1+
COM A - Receive Data (+)
in
3
6
RXD2+
COM B - Receive Data (+)
in
8
7
RXD1-
COM A- Receive Data (–)
in
4
8
RXD2-
COM B - Receive Data (–)
in
9
9
GND
Signal Ground
—
5
10
GND
Signal Ground
—
—
1. Dual RS-485 mode with echo uses dual RS-422 mode pinout
Table 20
42
CML24BT cpuModule
Pin
Signal
1
COM A (RS-485) and COM B (RS-485)
Function
In/Out
DB-9
D1-
COM A- Data (–)
in/out
1
2
D2-
COM B - Data (–)
in/out
6
3
D1+
COM A - Data (+)
in/out
2
4
D2+
COM B - Data (+)
in/out
7
5
—
Reserved
—
3
6
—
Reserved
—
8
7
—
Reserved
—
4
8
—
Reserved
—
9
9
GND
Signal Ground
—
5
10
GND
Signal Ground
—
—
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Advanced Digital I/O (aDIO™) Port (CN6)
Connector CN6 is configured as an aDIO port. aDIO is 12 digital bits configured as 8-bit programmable and 4-bit
port programmable I/O, providing any combination of inputs and outputs. Match, event, and strobe interrupt
modes mean no more wasting valuable processor time polling digital inputs. Interrupts are generated when the
8-bit programmable digital inputs match a pattern, or on any value change event. Bit masking allows selecting
any subgroup of 8 bits. The strobe input latches data into the bit programmable port and generates an interrupt.
Refer to Advanced Digital I/O Ports (aDIO™)—page 58 for information on programming the aDIO.
Table 21
aDIO Pinout
CN6 Pin
Function
CN6 Pin
Function
1
P0-0
2
P0-1
3
P0-2
4
P0-3
5
P0-4
6
P0-5
7
P0-6
8
P0-7
9
strobe 0
10
strobe 1
11
P1-0
12
P1-1
13
P1-2
14
P1-3
15
GND
16
+5 V1
1. Available during standby.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
43
USB 2.0 Connector (CN17)
Two USB 2.0 compliant connectors are available on connector CN17. Table 22 provides the pinout of the USB
connector.
Table 22
USB Connector (CN17)
Pin
Signal
Function
In/Out
1
VCC1
Supply +5 V to USB1
out
2
VCC2
Supply +5 V to USB2
out
3
DATA1–
Bidirectional data line for USB1
in/out
4
DATA2–
Bidirectional data line for USB2
in/out
5
DATA1+
Bidirectional data line for USB1
in/out
6
DATA2+
Bidirectional data line for USB2
in/out
7
GND
Ground
out
8
GND
Ground
out
9
Shield GND
Shield Ground
out
10
Shield GND
Shield Ground
out
Note For proper operation at USB 2.0 speeds, be sure to use a cable that is rated for USB 2.0, such as the
cable kit supplied by RTD.
44
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Facing the connector pins, the pinout of CN17 is:
BDM-610000084
Rev A
9
7
5
3
1
Shield GND
GND
DATA1+
DATA1–
VCC1
Shield GND
GND
DATA2+
DATA2–
VCC2
10
8
6
4
2
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
45
Ethernet (10/100/1000Base-T and -TX) Connectors (CN20)
This connector provides a 10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet connection. Table 23 provides the pinout of the Ethernet
connector. For 1000Base-T, all four pairs are used for transmit and receive.
To use the onboard 10/100/1000 Ethernet controller, Ethernet must be enabled in the BIOS.
When enabled, the multi-color LED will blink to indicate an Ethernet connection. For more information, refer to
the Multi-Color LED section on page 67.
Table 23
46
CML24BT cpuModule
RJ-45 Pin
10-Pin DIL Pin
3
Ethernet Connector (CN20)
Signal
Function
1
B+ (RX+)
Receive+ (10/100)
6
2
B- (RX–)
Receive– (10/100)
4
3
C+
5
4
C-
1
5
A+ (TX+)
Transmit+ (10/100)
2
6
A- (TX–)
Transmit– (10/100)
7
7
D+
8
8
D-
—
9
AGND
Ethernet Ground
—
10
AGND
Ethernet Ground
9
7
5
3
1
AGND
D+
A+
C+
B+
AGND
D–
A–
C–
B–
10
8
6
4
2
BDM-610000084
Rev A
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus (CN1 - Top and CN2 - Bottom)
Connectors CN1 and CN2 carry the signals of the PCIe/104 PCIe bus. These signals match definitions found in
the PCI/104-Express & PCIe/104 Specification Version 3.1 from the PC/104 Embedded Consortium. Table 24
lists the pinouts of the PC/104-Express bus connector.
WARNING Not all PCIe cards are compatible with the PCIe/104 Type 2 connector. Be sure that all of the
boards attached to this bus are compatible before powering the system.
Table 24
BDM-610000084
Rev A
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus Signal Assignments (Top View)1
Pin
Signal
Signal
Pin
1
USB_OC#
PE_RST#
2
3
+3.3V
5
2
2
4
USB_1p
USB_0p
6
7
USB_1n
USB_0n
8
9
GND
GND
10
11
PEx1_1Tp (CN2 only)
PEx1_0Tp (CN2 only)
12
13
PEx1_1Tn (CN2 only)
PEx1_0Tn (CN2 only)
14
15
GND
GND
16
17
PEx1_2Tp (CN2 only)
PEx1_3Tp (CN2 only)
18
19
PEx1_2Tn (CN2 only)
PEx1_3Tn (CN2 only)
20
21
GND
GND
22
23
PEx1_1Rp (CN2 only)
PEx1_0Rp (CN2 only)
24
25
PEx1_1Rn (CN2 only)
PEx1_0Rn (CN2 only)
26
27
GND
GND
28
29
PEx1_2Rp (CN2 only)
PEx1_3Rp (CN2 only)
30
31
PEx1_2Rn (CN2 only)
PEx1_3Rn (CN2 only)
32
33
GND
GND
34
35
PEx1_1Clkp (CN2 only)
PEx1_0Clkp (CN2 only)
36
37
PEx1_1Clkn (CN2 only)
PEx1_0Clkn (CN2 only)
38
39
+5V_STBY
+5V_STBY
40
41
PEx1_2Clkp (CN2 only)
PEx1_3Clkp (CN2 only)
42
43
PEx1_2Clkn (CN2 only)
PEx1_3Clkn (CN2 only)
44
45
CPU_DIR
PWRGOOD
46
47
Reserved
Reserved
48
49
Reserved
Reserved
50
51
Reserved
PSON#
52
+5 Volts
+3.3V
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
47
Table 24
48
CML24BT cpuModule
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus Signal Assignments (Top View)1
Signal
Signal
Pin
53
STK0
STK1
54
55
GND
GND
56
57
Reserved
Reserved
58
59
Reserved
Reserved
60
61
GND
GND
62
63
Reserved
Reserved
64
65
Reserved
Reserved
66
67
GND
GND
68
69
Reserved
Reserved
70
71
Reserved
Reserved
72
73
GND
GND
74
75
Reserved
Reserved
76
77
Reserved
Reserved
78
79
GND
GND
80
81
Reserved
SATA_0Tp (CN1 only)
82
83
Reserved
SATA_0Tn (CN1 only)
84
85
GND
GND
86
87
Reserved
Reserved
88
89
Reserved
Reserved
90
91
GND
GND
92
93
Reserved
Reserved
94
95
Reserved
Reserved
96
97
GND
GND
98
99
Reserved
Reserved
100
101
Reserved
Reserved
102
103
GND
GND
104
+5 Volts
Pin
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Table 24
PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus Signal Assignments (Top View)1
Signal
Signal
Pin
105
STK2
Reserved
106
107
GND
GND
108
109
Reserved
Reserved
110
111
Reserved
Reserved
112
113
GND
GND
114
115
Reserved
Reserved
116
117
Reserved
Reserved
118
119
GND
GND
120
121
Reserved
Reserved
122
123
Reserved
Reserved
124
125
GND
GND
126
127
Reserved
Reserved
128
129
Reserved
Reserved
130
131
GND
GND
132
133
Reserved
SATA_0Rp (CN1 only)
134
135
Reserved
SATA_0Rn (CN1 only)
136
137
GND
GND
138
139
Reserved
Reserved
140
141
Reserved
Reserved
142
143
GND
GND
144
145
Reserved
Reserved
146
147
Reserved
Reserved
148
149
GND
GND
150
151
Reserved
Reserved
152
153
Reserved
Reserved
154
155
GND
GND
156
+12 Volts3
Pin
1. Signals marked with (#) are active low.
2. +3.3V is not required for board operation. For power input requirements, see Table 3.
3. +12 Volts not required for operation.
PCIe/104 Type 2 Compatibility
The PCIe/104 Type 2 connector is compatible with any PCI/104-Express or PCIe/104 peripheral module that
does not use the x16 Link. This includes any card that uses the PCIe x1 links, USB, or a power supply. In addition,
this connector can be used to add SATA devices to the system.
If a card is installed that is not compatible with the Type 2 connector, the CPU will keep the system in soft-off,
and the LED will be Cyan to indicate that there is a Bus Stacking Error. If this feature is not desired, JP6 can be
installed to disable the Bus Stacking Error feature.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
49
PCIe Link Configuration
This cpuModule supports a total of four PCIe x1 links for system expansion, all of which are on the bottom-side
PCIe/104 connector, CN2. Three of the links on CN2 are connected directly to the chipset. The fourth link is
connected through a PCIe packet switch, which shares the bandwidth of a single x1 link back to the chipset with
the onboard PCIe-to-PCI bridge and the gigabit Ethernet controller. Table 25 below shows the configuration of
the PCIe x1 links on CN1 and CN2.
Table 25
Link
Location
Link 3
Closest to CPU
CML24BT cpuModule
Connection
Direct
Link 2
Direct
Link 1
Direct
Link 0
50
CN2 Link Configuration
Farthest from CPU
Shared
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Optional RTC Battery Input (CN13)
The optional RTC battery input is the connection for an external backup battery. This battery is used by the
cpuModule when system power is removed in order to preserve the date and time of the real time clock.
Connecting a battery is only required to maintain time when power is completely removed from the cpuModule.
A battery is not required for board operation.
Table 26
Optional RTC Battery Input (CN13)
Pin
Signal
Function
1
BAT
RTC Battery Input
2
GND
Ground
WARNING This optional RTC battery connector (CN13) should be left unconnected if the Utility Port
2.0 connector (CN5) has a battery connected.
Fan Power (CN15)
While a fan is not required for board operation, the optional fan connector provides the means for a fan to be
connecteed to the system. The pinout for the connector is shown below.
Table 27
Optional Fan Connector (CN15)
Pin
Signal
Function
1
+5 V
Fan power
2
GND
Ground
3
Reserved
WARNING The fan connector (CN15) should be left unconnected if it is not used.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 3: Connecting the cpuModule
51
52
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 4
Using the cpuModule
This chapter provides information for users who wish to develop their own applications programs for the
CML24BT cpuModule.
This chapter includes information on the following topics:
The RTD Enhanced BIOS —page 54
Operating System Specific Usage—page 56
Non-Standard Serial Port Modes —page 57
Advanced Digital I/O Ports (aDIO™)—page 58
SATA Controller Configuration—page 62
Watchdog Timer Control—page 63
Thermal Management—page 64
Power Management—page 65
Multi-Color LED—page 67
Features and Settings That Can Affect Boot Time—page 70
System Recovery—page 71
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
53
The RTD Enhanced BIOS
The RTD Enhanced BIOS is software that interfaces hardware-specific features of the cpuModule to an operating
system (OS). Physically, the BIOS software is stored in a Flash EPROM on the cpuModule. Functions of the BIOS
are divided into two parts.
The first part of the BIOS is known as POST (power-on self-test) software, and it is active from the time power is
applied until an OS boots (begins execution). POST software performs a series of hardware tests, sets up the
machine as defined in Setup, and begins the boot of the OS.
The second part of the BIOS is known as the CORE BIOS. It is the normal interface between cpuModule hardware
and the OS which is in control. It is active from the time the OS boots until the cpuModule is turned off. The
CORE BIOS provides the system with a series of software interrupts to control various hardware devices.
Configuring the RTD Enhanced BIOS
The cpuModule Setup program allows you to customize the cpuModule's configuration. Selections made in
Setup are stored on the board and are read by the BIOS at power-on.
Entering the BIOS Setup through the Graphical BIOS Menu
You can run Setup by rebooting the cpuModule and repeatedly pressing the ESC key. This will bring to you to a
graphical BIOS menu with several options described in the table below.
To enter Setup, navigate to the SCU option with the arrow keys, and press Enter.
Table 28
Key
Continue
Boot Manager
Device Management
Boot From File
SCU
54
CML24BT cpuModule
Graphical BIOS Menu Options
Function
Exit the graphical menu, and proceed with booting
Select a device to boot to during the current power cycle, and
overrde the selected boot device order in the Setup
Set the primary video BIOS during the current power cycle, and
view a list of the system’s detected devices (disk, video, network,
input, etc.)
Displays a list of bootable files in the system
Traditional BIOS Setup
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Field Selection
To move between fields in Setup, use the keys listed below. When you are finished with Setup, save your changes
and exit. The system will automatically reboot.
Table 29
Key
Function
F1
Help
, ,
,
Setup Keys
Move between fields
F5, F6
Selects next/previous values in fields
Enter
Go to the submenu for the field
ESC
To previous menu then to exit menu
F9
Load Setup defaults
F10
Save settings and exit Setup
Main Menu Setup Fields
The following is a list of Main Menu Setup fields.
Table 30
Main Menu Setup Fields
Field
Active Keys
Selections
Main
Press Enter to select
Access system information such as the cpuModule’s
serial number, CPU speed and type, BIOS version, FPGA
version, and CMOS time and date settings
Advanced
Press Enter to select
Setup advanced RTD cpuModule features, including
boot options, aDIO and serial port configuration, and
miscellaneous feature control.
Security
Press Enter to select
Setup the supervisor and access password
Boot
Press Enter to select
Set the system boot sequence
Power
Press Enter to select
Set up various power savings modes
Exit
Press Enter to select
Save or discard changes and exit the BIOS, or load the
default BIOS settings
Note Future BIOS versions may have slightly different setup menus and options.
Note The Main page shows the cpuModule’s serial number, BIOS Version, and FPGA Version. These
numbers can be useful if you need techsupport for your cpuModule.
WARNING Incorrect modifications to the BIOS can cause your system to break. If you are unsure of any
changes made to the BIOS there is a Load RTD Defaults option under the Exit tab in the SCU. This
option restores the BIOS to the default factory settings.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
55
Operating System Specific Usage
Windows®
The CML24BT is fully supported under Windows 10 and Windows 7. Both 32 bit and 64 bit editions are
supported. Drivers for onboard peripherals such as video and Ethernet are provided on thecompanion DVD that
is shipped with the board. Updated drivers may be available for download from teh RTD website. (www.rtd.com)
Linux®
The CML24BT is fully supported with Linux kernel version 3.1 and onward. Using the CML24BT with previous
versions of the kernel will require additional configuration steps to fully utilize video.
56
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Non-Standard Serial Port Modes
It is possible to change the input clock rate for the UARTs of the cpuModule to allow the serial ports to operate
at higher speeds than 115,200 bps. This is accomplished by modifying the baud rate multiplier for each serial
port.
Non-standard baud rates are supported for all COM port modes of the CML24BT. :
Table 31
Baud Rate Multiplier Registers
Connector
Port
Address Range (hex)
CN7 (A)
COM 1
EE0–EE1h
CN7 (B)
COM 3
EE2–EE3h
CN8 (A)
COM 2
EE4–EE5h
CN8 (B)
COM 4
EE6–EE7h
To set an alternate maximum baud rate for a serial port, write the value which corresponds to the desired
multplier to the port’s baud rate multiplier register:
Table 32
Value
Baud Rade Multipliers
Maximum Baud Rate
bps
Multiplier
0x0E28
115,200
1x
0x38A0
460,800
4x
0x713F
921,600
8x
0x7AE1
1,000,000
8.7x
Note When using the non-standard high speed serial port modes, it is highly recommended to use
hardware flow control, whenever possible.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
57
Advanced Digital I/O Ports (aDIO™)
This board supports 12 bits of TTL/CMOS compatible digital I/O (TTL signaling). These I/O lines are grouped
into two ports, Port 0 and Port 1. Port 0 is bit programmable; Port 1 is byte programmable. Port 0 supports RTD’s
Advanced Digital Interrupt modes. The three modes are strobe, match and event. Strobe mode generates an
interrupt and latches Port 0 when the strobe input transitions from low to high. Match mode generates an
interrupt when an 8-bit pattern is received in parallel that matches the match mask register. Event mode
generates an interrupt when a change occurs on any bit. In any mode, masking can be used to monitor selected
lines.
When the CPU boots, all digital I/O lines are programmed as inputs, meaning that the digital I/O line’s initial
state is undetermined. If the digital I/O lines must power up to a known state, an external 10 k-Ohm resistor must
be added to pull the line high or low.
The 8-bit control read/write registers for the digital I/O lines are located from I/O address EC0h to EC3h. These
registers are written to zero upon power up. From EC0h to EC3h, the name of these registers are Port 0 data,
Port 1 data, Multi-Function, and DIO-Control register.
Note While the 16-pin aDIO connector is pin-for-pin compatible with previous generations of RTD
cpuModules (such as the Montevina series), the hardware is slightly different, and requires that writes
ands reads to/from the aDIO ports happen no more than once per millisecond. Migrating legacy software
to the E3800 Series that utilizes RTD’s Advanced Digital I/O may require that you add this delay prior to
all reads and writes.
Note RTD provides drivers that support the aDIO interface on popular operating systems. RTD
recommends using these drivers instead of accessing the registers directly.
Digital I/O Register Set
Table 33
Port 0 Data I/O Address EC0h
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
D0
P0.7
P0.6
P0.5
P0.4
P0.3
P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
Port 0 Data register is a read/write bit direction programmable register. A particular bit can be set to input or
output. A read of an input bit returns the value of port 0. A read of an output bit returns the last value written
to Port 0. A write to an output bit sends that value to port 0.
Table 34
Port 1 Data I/O Address EC1h
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
D0
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
P1.3
P1.2
P1.1
P1.0
Port 1 Data register is a read/write byte direction programmable register. A read on this register when it is
programmed to input will read the value at the aDIO connector. A write on this register when it is programmed
as output will write the value to the aDIO connector. A read on this register when it is set to output will read the
last value sent to the aDIO connector.
Table 35
D7
D6
D5
Multi-Function I/O Address EC2h
D4
D3
D2
D1
D0
The multi-function register is a read/write register whose contents are set by the DIO-Control register. See the
DIO-Control register description for a description of this register.
58
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Table 36
D7
D6
DIO-Control I/O Address EC3h—Read Access
D5
D4
Strobe 1 Status
0 = no strobe
1 = strobe
Strobe 0 Status
0 = no strobe
1 = strobe
Digital IRQ Status
0 = no digital interrupt
1 = digital interrupt
Table 37
D7
D6
D3
Digital IRQ Mode
00 = Disabled
01 = strobe Mode
10 = event mode
11 = match mode
D2
D1
D0
Multi-Function
Register Select
00 = clear mode
01 = port 0 direction
10 = mask register
11 = compare register
Port 1 Direction
0 = input
1 = output
DIO-Control I/O Address EC3h—Write Access
D5
D4
Reserved
D3
Digital IRQ Mode
00 = Disabled
01 = strobe Mode
10 = event mode
11 = match mode
D2
D1
Port 1 Direction
0 = input
1 = output
D0
Multi-Function
Register Select
00 = clear mode
01 = port 0 direction
10 = mask register
11 = compare register
Multi-Function at Address EC2h1
Table 38
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
01 Port 0 direction
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
0 no mask, 1 mask
10 DIO mask
M7
M6
M5
M4
M3
M2
M1
M0
read/write
11 compare
C7
C6
C5
C4
C3
C2
C1
C0
read/write
00 clear
0 in, 1 out
1. Contents based on bits D0 and D1 of DIO-Control.
Clear Register:
A read to this register Clears the IRQs and a write to this register sets the DIO-Compare, DIO- Mask,
DIO-Control, Port 1, and Port 0 to zeros. A write to this register is used to clear the board.
Port 0 Direction Register:
Writing a zero to a bit in this register makes the corresponding pin of the aDIO connector an input. Writing
a one to a bit in this register makes the corresponding pin of the aDIO connector an output.
Mask Register:
Writing a zero to a bit in this register will not mask off the corresponding bit in the DIO-Compare register.
Writing a one to a bit in this register masks off the corresponding bit in the DIO-Compare register. When all
bits are masked off the aDIOs comparator is disabled. This condition means Event and Match mode will not
generate an interrupt. This register is used by Event and Match modes.
Compare Register:
A Read/Write register used for Match Mode. Bit values in this register that are not masked off are compared
against the value on Port 0. A Match or Event causes bit 6 of DIO-Control to be set and if the aDIO is in
Advanced interrupt mode, the Match or Event causes an interrupt.
BDM-610000084
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Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
59
Port 1 Data register is a read/write byte direction
Interrupts
In order to use an interrupt with aDIO, the interrupt must first be selected in the BIOS setup utility under
Advanced, RTD Advanced Options,RTD aDIO, aDIO Interrupt. The Digital I/O can use interrupts 3, 5, 6, 10,
and 11. To configure the aDIO interrupt, navigage to the BIOS Setup option, the “Advanced”, “RTD aDIO”, and
“aDIO Interrupt” menu options. The BIOS will automatically reserve the selected interrupt so that is it not
assigned to PCI devices. Then, select the appropriate interrupt mode in the DIO Control register.
Advanced Digital Interrupts
There are three Advanced Digital Interrupt modes available. These three modes are Event, Match, and Strobe.
The use of these three modes is to monitor state changes at the aDIO connector. Interrupts are enabled by
writing to the Digital IRQ Mode field in the DIO-Control register.
Event Mode
When this mode is enabled, Port 0 is latched into the DIO-Compare register at 8.33 MHz. The aDIO circuitry
includes deglitching logic. The deglitching requires pulses on Port 0 to be at least 120 ns in width. As long as
changes are present longer than that, the event is guaranteed to register. Pulses as small as 60 ns can register as
an event, but they must occur between the rising and falling edge of the 8.33 MHz clock. To enter Event mode,
set bits [4:3] of the DIO-Control register to “10”.
Match Mode
When this mode is enabled, Port 0 is latched into the DIO-Compare register at 8.33 MHz. The aDIO circuitry
includes deglitching logic. The deglitching requires pulses on Port 0 to be at least 120 ns in width. As long as
changes are present longer than that, the match is guaranteed to register. Pulses as small as 60 ns can register as
a match, but they must occur between the rising and falling edge of the 8.33 MHz clock. To enter Match mode,
set bits [4:3] of the DIO-Control register to “11”.
Note Make sure bits [4:3] are set BEFORE writing the DIO-Compare register. If you do not set them first,
the contents of the DIO-Compare register could be lost because the Event mode latches in Port 0 into the
DIO-Compare register.
60
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Figure 6
aDIO Match Mode
Strobe Mode
Another interrupt mode supported by aDIO is Strobe mode. This allows the strobe pin of the DIO connector to
trigger an interrupt. A low to high transition on the strobe pin will cause an interrupt request. The request will
remain high until the Clear Register is read from. Additionally, the Compare Register latched in the value at Port
0 when the Strobe pin made a low to high transition. No further strobes will be available until a read of the
Compare Register is made. You must read the Compare Register, and then clear interrupts so that the latched
value in the compare register is not lost. To enter Strobe mode, set bits [4:3] of the DIO-Control register to “01”.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
61
SATA Controller Configuration
The CML24BT has two SATA links, each permitting SATA revision 2.0 transfer rates up to 3.0 Gbit/sec.
One SATA link resides on the top PCIe/104 Type 2 connector (CN1), and the second SATA link connects to the
onboard SATA storage. Both may be enabled or disabled through the BIOS setup.
SATA Port Mappings, by Connector
Table 39 shows the SATA port configuration of the CML24BT cpuModule:
Table 39
Designator
SATA Port Layout
Physical Position, Index
E3800 Port
Index
Channel Assignment
(Legacy IDE Mode)
CN1
SATA PCIe link 0
0
Primary Master
n/a
Onboard SATA storage
1
Primary Slave
Onboard SATA Storage
The cpuModule was designed to be used in embedded computing applications. In such environments, rotating
media like hard disks and floppy disks are not very desirable. It is possible to eliminate rotating storage devices
by placing your operating system and application software into the cpuModule's onboard SATA storage.
SATA Links on the PCIe/104 Type Connectors
Both SATA links are connected tothe Intel E3800 CPU’s SATA controller which can be configured for either ACHI
or IDE mode through the BIOS . However, the operating system must support the selected mode for the device
to operate correctly. The default configuration for the controller is ACHI mode.
When in IDE mode, the user has an additional option to change the IDE emulation mode to Native Mode or
Legacy Mode.When the SATA controller is configured for IDE mode, Native Mode is the default IDE emulation
mode.
Native IDE Mode
Native Mode allows more flexibility than Legacy Mode, as it permits the system to modify the resources used by
the SATA controller. When in Native Mode, the SATA controller only requires a single IRQ. Unlike Legacy Mode,
this IRQ may be changed by the user or the operating system for better distribution of the system IRQs. When
IRQs in the system are more evenly distributed, interrupt latency is minimized. The base address of the controller
may also be modified.
Legacy IDE Mode
When in this mode, the controller will be fixed to use two interrupts: IRQs 14 and 15. Similarly, the I/O address
of the controller will be fixed in the system. When in Legacy Mode, only a primary and secondary channel may
be used in the system.
62
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Watchdog Timer Control
The cpuModule includes a Watchdog Timer, which provides protection against programs “hanging”, or getting
stuck in an execution loop where they cannot respond correctly. The watchdog timer consists of a counter, a
reset generator, and an interrupt generator. When the counter reaches the interrupt time-out, it can generate an
interrupt. When the counter reaches the reset time-out, the system is reset. The counter is “refreshed,” or set back
to zero by reading from a specific register. The watchdog can also be put into an “inactive” state, in which no
resets or interrupts are generated.
The ability to generate an interrupt allows the application to gracefully recover from a bad state. For example,
consider a system that has a reset time-out of 2 seconds, interrupt time-out of 1 second, and the watchdog timer
is refreshed every 0.5 seconds. If something goes wrong, an interrupt is generated. The Interrupt service routine
then attempts to restart the application software. If it is successful, the application is restarted in much less time
than a full reboot would require. If it is not successful, the system is rebooted.
Due to system latency, it is recommended that the Watchdog be refreshed at about half of the reset time-out
period, or half of the interrupt time-out period, whichever is applicable.
Register Description
The Advanced Watchdog Timer has a Setup Register and a Runtime Register. The Setup Register is set by the
BIOS, and can be adjusted by entering the BIOS Setup Utility, and going to “Advanced”, “RTD Advanced Options”,
“RTD Miscellaneous Feature Control”. The Setup Register may also be read by the driver to determine if the
Watchdog is enabled, and the interrupt and base address that it is using.
Note Enabling the watchdog timer in the BIOS does not actually arm it. The watchdog timer can be
armed by accessing I/O address E85h, as explained below.
Table 40
D7
D6
D5
D4
Advanced Watchdog Setup Register E8Bh
D3
D2
D1
WDT_IRQ
Select Interrupt for WDT
000 = Disabled
001 = IRQ5
010 = Reserved
011 = IRQ10
100 = IRQ11
101 = Reserved
110 = IRQ3
111 = IRQ6
Reserved
Table 41
D0
Reg_Enable
0 = Watchdog timer is disabled and
Runtime Register will not appear
in I/O map
1 = Watchdog Timer is enabled.
Runtime Register will appear in
I/O map
Advanced Watchdog Runtime Register E85h
D7
D6
WDT_Active
0 = Watchdog
timer is
disabled.
1 = Watchdog is
armed and
can generate
resets and
interrupts.
WDT_IRQ_Ena
0 = Watchdog
interrupt is
disabled.
1 = Watchdog
interrupt is
enabled.
D5
D4
Reserved
D3
D2
WDT_IRQ_Time
Select Interrupt
time for
WDT
00 = 0.25s
01 = 0.50s
10 = 0.75s
11 = 1.00s
D1
D0
WDT_RST_Time
Select Reset time
for WDT
00 = 2.00s
01 = 0.50s
10 = 0.75s
11 = 1.00s
Reading the Runtime Register also refreshes the watchdog timer.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
63
Thermal Management
The cpuModule has several thermal features which can be used to monitor and control the board’s temperature
when extreme operating conditions are prevalent.
Thermal Warning
The cpuModule includes a Thermal Warning mechanism which will assert a signal when the processor’s
temperature has reached or exceeded 100 C. At this time, a bit will be set in the reset and event status register
to indicate that this temperature has been entered. Although the LED has turned white and a thermal warning
bit has been set, the CPU will maintain the current power and operating state.
For more information on the reset status register, refer to Reset and Event Status Register—page 68.
ACPI-Enforced Thermal Protection
When the maximum thermal junction temperature of the prcoessor is reached, the system is at risk of
malfuctioning, and the cpuModule may become permanently damanged.
For operating system with ACPI support, the system offers two mechanisms to help prevent the processor from
reaching its maximum thermal junction temperature -- the Critical Trip Point and the Passive Trip Point. Both
of these temperatures may be configured in the BIOS Setup.
Critical Trip Point
The Critial Trip Point controls the temperature at which an ACPI operating system will shut down the system.
Upon entering the Critical Trip state, the operating system will issue a command to the processor, and the
CML24BT will immediately transition to the S5 (Soft-Off) ACPI power state.
To exit the Critial Trip state (and S5), the CPU temperature must be reduced to a point that the internal thermal
sensors are below the Critical Trip Point. Next, a power cycle or RSM reset (deepest reset) is required. The reset
button may be configured as an RSM reset (default BIOS setting) in the BIOS setup utility.
For more information on the S5 power state, refer to Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI)—page
65.
Passive Trip Point
The Passive Trip Point controls the temperature at which an ACPI operating system will begin to throttle the
processor.
Further Temperature Reduction
The cpuModule’s temperature is directly related to power consumption. Reducing the power consumption of
the cpuModule will have an effect on the cpuModule’s temperature. Suggested methods for reducing the
cpuModule’s power consumption can be found in the Power Management section on page 65.
64
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Power Management
The CML24BT cpuModule supports various powering mechanisms which allow the cpuModule to monitor
power consumption and temperature, and achieve minimal power consumption states. These unique features
include thermal monitoring and thermal throttling, as well as ACPI low power modes. Various wake options are
also available to resume normal system power.
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI)
The cpuModule supports several different ACPI low power modes, including the S3, S4, and S5 sleeping states.
These suspend modes are described below:
•
S3 (Suspend to RAM): When the system wakes from this mode, operating systems allow applications
to resume where they left off, as the state of the application is preserved in memory.
•
S4 (Hibernate): When the system enters this state, the operating system will save the current state of
applications and relevant data to disk, thus allowing the system RAM to be powered down.
•
S5 (Soft-Off): The system is in a soft off state, and must be rebooted when it wakes.
Power Button Modes
The soft power button input of the Utility Port 2.0 connector (CN5) can be configured by the operating system
as a suspend button (transition to S3) or as soft power button (transition to S5). Consult your operating system
documentation for information on how to configure it. The power button will always cause a transition to S5 if
pressed for 4 seconds or longer, without interaction from the operating system.
The soft power button of the Utility Port 2.0 connector (CN5) is the only mechanism to wake the system from
S4 and S5.
Note When the reset button of the Utility Port 2.0 connector is configured as a power button (via the
BIOS setup utility), it inherits the ACPI suspend and resume features of the power button.
Low-Power Wake Options
The cpuModule supports several methods of waking from a low power state.
•
Resume from USB: Operating systems that support S3 permit waking the system from the USB
interfaces. Common USB wake methods include insertion of a USB device, a USB keyboard stroke, or
movement from another USB device, such as mouse.
•
Resume on RTC Alarm / Timeout: The RTC Alarm allows the system to turn on at a certain time every
day.
Table 42
Supported ACPI Resume/Wake Mechanisms
Resume/Wake Mechanism
BDM-610000084
Rev A
S3
S4
S5
Wake from USB
Y
—
—
Wake from RTC Alarm / Timeout
Y
—
—
Power Button Input (CN5)
Y
Y
Y
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
65
AT vs. ATX Power Supplies
Both AT and ATX power supplies may be used with the CML24BT cpuModule, however AT power supplies do
not provide any standby power to the cpuModule. When an AT power supply is used to power the system, low
power modes that require a standby power to wake the system will not be fully supported.
ATX power supplies do provide a standby power, thus allowing the system to utilize all low power modes
supported by the hardware. When an ATX supply is used to power the cpuModule, lower power modes can be
achieved. During these low power modes, the standby power from the ATX power supply provides power to a
small circuit on the CPU, which is used to watch for a system wake event.
ATX Power Supply Signals
The PCIe/104 Type 2 Bus connectors (CN1 & CN2) provide two ATX style signals., +5V Standby and PSON#. The
+5V Standby rail is used to power certain parts of the cpuModule when the main power supply is turned off, i.e.
during Suspend-to-RAM (S3), Hibernate (S4), or Soft-Off (S5) power modes. The PSON# signal is an active low
open-drain output that signals the power supply to turn on. Use of these signals allows the power consumption
to drop to below 1W during standby modes, and still enable any of the wake events.
Reducing Power Consumption
In addition to the CPU’s low power modes, power consumption can further be reduced by making some
modifications to the BIOS setup. When the following features are disabled in the BIOS, the CPU’s power
consumption will decrease:
•
•
•
•
•
66
Ethernet
USB Ports
SATA Controller
Serial Ports
Multi-Color LED
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Multi-Color LED
The CML24BT has a Multi-Color LED which can be enabled or disabled in the BIOS setup screen. The color of the
LED indicates the status of the board, as shown in Table 43.
Table 43
LED Colors
Color
Description
Green
Normal Operation
Blue
SATA Activity
Red1
cpuModule is in reset
Yellow (Red + Green)
cpuModule is in Standby
White (R+G+B)
cpuModule is approaching thermal limit2
Cyan (Blue + Green)
Ethernet Link at 100 Mbps or Bus Stacking Error
Magenta (Blue + Red)
Ethernet Link at 1000 Mbps
Blink
Ethernet Activity
1. If power is applied to the cpuModule while jumper JP5 is installed, the LED will be red. This does not
indicate that the board is in reset
2. The LED will remain White until the system is shut down.
The LED can also be controlled manually by writing to I/O Port EA7h, as shown in Table 44 and Table 45.
Table 44
Multi-Color LED I/O Address EA5h
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
D1
D0
Multi-Color LED
The following table lists the color displayed and the value written.
Table 45
Manual LED Colors
I/O Port EA7h Value
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Color
0x00
Automatic (see Table 43)
0x08
Off (will reduce system power consumption)
0x09
Blue
0x0A
Green
0x0B
Cyan (Green + Blue)
0x0C
Red
0x0D
Magenta (Red + Blue)
0x0E
Yellow (Red + Green)
0x0F
White (Red + Green + Blue)
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
67
Reset and Event Status Register
The cpuModule has several different signals on board which can cause a system reset. If a reset occurs, the reset
status register can be used to see which reset (or resets) have been asserted on the cpuModule. These resets may
be cleared by the user.
Similar to resets, there are several signals on the cpuModule which indicate that a special event has occured.
These may also be monitored and cleared by the user.
•
Examine Resets and Events: Reading from I/O ports 0xED0h through 0xED3 will indicate if a reset has
been asserted or if an event has occured. If a 1 is read, the corresponding reset has been asserted. If a 0
is read from the bit, the reset has not been asserted. For events
•
Clear Reset and Event: Each reset and event can be cleared by writing a 1 to the selected bit of I/O port
0xED0h.
Table 46
D7
Reset and Event Status I/O Address ED0h - Read Access
D6
Sleep S4
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
D5
Table 47
CML24BT cpuModule
D1
D0
PwrGood 5V Alwys
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
Main 5V Power
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
PwrGood 3.3V Alwys
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
PwrGood 1.5V Alwys
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
D5
D4
Pwr Good Vcore
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
PwrGood 1.0V
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
68
D2
Reset and Event Status I/O Address ED1h - Read Access
D6
PwrGood 1.05V
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
D3
PwrGood 1.0V Alwys
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
PwrGood 1.8V Alwys
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
RSM Reset
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
D7
D4
D3
D2
Sleep S3
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
PwrGood Vgfx
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
D1
D0
PwrGood 1.2V Alwys
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
PwrGood 1.9V Alwys
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
Memory Pwr Good
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Table 48
D7
Reset and Event Status I/O Address ED2h - Read Access
D6
WDT Trip
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
D5
Table 49
D6
Reserved
BDM-610000084
Rev A
D2
D1
D0
PwrGood 1.8V
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
PwrGood 1.35V
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
PwrGood 3.3V
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
Reserved
Reset and Event Status I/O Address ED3h - Read Access
D5
D4
ATX Pwr Good
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
Reserved
D3
Mem. Term. Voltage
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
Platform Reset
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
Thermal Warning
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
D7
D4
D3
D2
D0
Soft Power Off
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
Reserved
Bus Stack Error
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
D1
Reserved
Utility Reset
1 = reset asserted
0 = no reset
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
69
Features and Settings That Can Affect Boot Time
The boot time of a system is dependent upon numerous system settings as well as devices attached to a system.
This section addresses some devices and settings that can increase or decrease a system’s boot time.
Boot Device Order
The BIOS contains a list of devices to try booting from. If you wish to boot to a particular device (for example, a
hard drive), make sure that it is first in the boot order. This will speed up boot times.
Add-On Cards With BIOS Extensions
Some add-on cards have an integrated BIOS extension. The most common examples are SCSI controllers and
network cards with boot ROMs. During POST, the BIOS executes the card's extension code. This extension code
is third-party code, which is beyond RTD's control. The BIOS extension will most likely increase the boot time.
Exactly how much it increases boot time will depend on the particular card and firmware version.
VGA Controller
VGA controllers have a VGA BIOS that must be initialized during POST. It can take some time to initialize the
VGA BIOS. Exactly how long will depend on the particular VGA controller and BIOS version.
Hard Drive Type
During Hard Drive initialization, each device must be probed. Some devices take longer to probe. 2.5-inch hard
drives tend to take longer than 3.5-inch ones, because they spin at a lower RPM.
Monitor Type
Some monitors take a while to power on. Desktop flat panels are especially slow. This does not affect the actual
boot time of the CPU. However, the CPU may boot before the monitor powers on.
70
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
System Recovery
Reset Button Recovery
The CML24BT provides several methods for recovering from an incorrectly configured system. In order to enter
the recovery mode, follow the steps below:
1.
Remove power from the system, including standby power.
2.
Press and hold the reset button attached to the Utility Port 2.0 connector.
3.
Apply power to the system while continuing to hold the reset button.
4.
Wait the amount of time shown in Table 50 for the desired recovery mode.
5.
Release the reset button, allowing the system to boot.
Table 50
Reset Button Recovery Modes
Hold Time1
Mode
0-4 seconds
No recovery mode. System will stay in reset while button is pressed.
4-8 seconds
Load Default BIOS Settings
8-12 seconds
Serial POST Code Output
1. To assist with timing while the reset button is pushed, the LED will blink OFF at 5 second
intervals.
Load Default BIOS Settings
Loading BIOS defaults allows recovery from an incorrectly configured display device, incorrect boot options, and
many other incorrect settings. It is also a good starting point when making BIOS changes. After restoring defaults,
the BIOS settings should be reviewed and modified as needed.
The default BIOS can be restored either by using Reset Button Recovery, or the “Load RTD Defaults” option in
the BIOS.
Serial Power-On-Self-Test (POST) Code Output
The POST Codes represent a series of events that take place in a system during the Power On Self Test. If the POST
fails, the system will not boot as expected. Knowing which POST code the failure occurred may help system
debug.
This recovery mode configures serial port connector CN7 as single RS-232, and sends the POST codes on the
transmit pin. The port settings are 115kbps, 8 bits, no parity, one stop bit. When using this recovery mode, the
POST codes can be logged on another computer running terminal software. Contact RTD technical support for
more details.
Note POST Codes over the serial port (CN7) may also be enabled by installing JP5 and JP6 prior to
power cycling the cpuModule. For more information, see Jumper Settings and Locations on page 74.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Chapter 4: Using the cpuModule
71
72
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Appendix A
Hardware Reference
This appendix provides information on CML24BT cpuModule hardware, including:
Jumper Settings and Locations—page 74
Onboard PCI/PCIe Devices—page 75
Physical Dimensions—page 76
Heatsink Dimensions—page 77
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Appendix A: Hardware Reference
73
Jumper Settings and Locations
Many cpuModule options are configured by positioning jumpers. Jumpers are labeled on the board as JP
followed by a number.
Figure 7 shows the jumper locations that are used to configure the cpuModule. Table 51 lists the jumpers and
their settings.
JP5
JP6
Figure 7
CML24BT Jumper Locations (top side)
Table 51
Jumper
74
CML24BT Jumpers
Pins
Function
Default
JP5
2
Reserved
open
JP6
2
Used to disable the Bus Stacking Error detection. See PCIe/104 Type 2
Compatibility on page 49.
pins 1–2: Disable Bus Stacking Error detection
open: Enable Bus Stacking Error detection (normal operation)
open
JP5 + JP6
2
Used to configure serial port connector CN7 as single RS-232, and sends
the POST codes on the transmit pin. See Serial Power-On-Self-Test (POST)
Code Output on page 71
pins 1–2 ( JP5 and JP6): Enable POST Codes over Serial Port CN7
open: Normal operation
open
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Onboard PCI/PCIe Devices
The CML24BT cpuModule has several onboard PCI/PCIe devices, all of which are listed in the table below. This
table shows a typical configuration, and the actual devices may change based on BIOS settings.
Table 52
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Onboard PCI/PCIe Devices
Device ID
Vendor ID
Description
0F00
8086
Host bridge
0F31
8086
VGA-compatible controller
0F23
8086
SATA Controller
0F18
8086
Other en/decription
0F48
8086
PCI-to-PCI bridge
0F4A
8086
PCI-to-PCI bridge
0F4C
8086
PCI-to-PCI bridge
0F4E
8086
PCI-to-PCI bridge
0F34
8086
Universal Serial Bus (USB) EHCI
0F1C
8086
ISA bridge
0F12
8086
SMBus (System Management Bus)
8605
10B5
PCI-to-PCI bridge
8605
10B5
PCI-to-PCI bridge
8605
10B5
PCI-to-PCI bridge
8605
10B5
PCI-to-PCI bridge
8112
10B5
PCI-to-PCI bridge
10D3
8086
Ethernet Controller (CN20)
Appendix A: Hardware Reference
75
Physical Dimensions
Figure 8 shows the mechanical dimensions of the CML24BT cpuModule.
Figure 8
76
CML24BT cpuModule
CML24BT Physical Dimensions (±0.005 inches)
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Heatsink Dimensions
To maximize the thermal performance of the cpuModule while keeping the total board weight to a minimum,
various heatsinks are offered with each ordering part number. Use the table below to correlate the heatsink
figure to each ordering part number.
Table 53
BDM-610000084
Rev A
CML24BT cpuModule Model Options
Part Number
Core Frequency
Stack Height
Standard Heatsink
CML24BTS1460HR-4096
1.46 GHz
0.600” (15.24mm)
Figure 9
CML24BTD1330HR-4096
1.33 GHz
0.600” (15.24mm)
Figure 10
CML24BTQ1910HR-4096
1.91 GHz
0.866” (22mm)
Figure 11
Figure 9
CML24BTS1460 Heatsink
Figure 10
CML24BTD1330 Heatsink
Appendix A: Hardware Reference
77
Figure 11
78
CML24BT cpuModule
CML24BTQ1910 Heatsink
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Appendix B
Troubleshooting
Many problems you may encounter with operation of your CML24BT cpuModule are due to common errors.
This appendix includes the following sections to help you get your system operating properly.
Common Problems and Solutions —page 80
Troubleshooting a PC/104 System—page 81
How to Obtain Technical Support—page 82
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Appendix B: Troubleshooting
79
Common Problems and Solutions
Table 54 lists some of the common problems you may encounter while using your CML24BT cpuModule, and
suggests possible solutions.
If you are having problems with your cpuModule, review this table before contacting RTD Technical Support.
Table 54
Troubleshooting
Problem
Additional Symptoms
Possible Cause(s)
cpuModule does not boot
(no video output)
LED is red
(in reset)
Input power is inadequate. Refer to Chapter 1, Electrical Characteristics.
Verify input voltages are correct. If power is supplied via CN3, check for
cabling issues.
Malfunctioning peripheral card. Remove all peripheral cards from the
system.
LED is yellow
(in standby)
cpuModule is in “Soft Off” due to operating system shutdown. Press
power button to wake.
ATX power supply is not turning on. Check jumpers on power supply.
Verify PSON# signal.
LED is cyan
(bus stacking error)
See Chapter 3, PCIe/104 Type 2 Compatibility
LED is green
(normal operation)
cpuModule may be booted, but video is not connected properly.
Attach a keyboard and verify the operation of the Num Lock and Caps
Lock LEDs. If they respond as expected, the cpuModule is booted.
Check the video cable connections.
Video output may have been disabled in the BIOS. Try loading BIOS
defaults per Chapter 4, System Recovery.
If a PCI device is installed, the slot selection switch/jumpers may not be
set correctly.
Peripheral card may be interfering with boot sequence. Remove all
peripheral cards from the system.
cpuModule reboots
unexpectedly
cpuModule is running
Windows
By default, Windows will automatically reboot when a Bugcheck (Blue
Screen) is triggered. Disable this feature in the Control Panel. This will
allow you to see the error and identify the root cause.
cpuModule is powered via
Auxiliary Power Connector
(CN3)
Power cabling issues. Verify all pins on CN3 are reliably connected with
proper gauge wires.
Power supply noise or current limiting. Check power pins with an
oscilloscope and verify they remain in range.
Power supply may not respond quickly enough to changes in power
consumption. Switch to a different power supply (a PCI Express power
supply is recommended)
Peripheral card(s) installed
Peripheral card(s) may be overloading the power supply. Reduce the
system to just the cpuModule and power supply and see if the problem
re-appears. (Note that CN3 is intended for powering the cpuModule
only.)
cpuModule does not boot
to USB device
USB device has a high power
draw (e.g. DVD or hard drive)
Some USB devices are not fully compliant and draw too much current.
Consider switching to a self-powered USB device with its own AC/DC
power supply.
Date/time not saved when
system is off
No RTC battery
A battery must be attached to the Utility Port 2.0 connector (CN5) to
maintain date/time when main power is removed. For a list of alternate
battery inputs, refer to Watchdog Timer Control—page 63.
System performance lower
than expected
LED is white
cpuModule is overheating and the processor is throttling. Increase the
cooling (more airflow, larger heatsink, etc).
80
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Troubleshooting a PC/104 System
If you have reviewed the preceding table and still cannot isolate the problem with your CML24BT cpuModule,
please try the following troubleshooting steps. Even if the resulting information does not help you find the
problem, it will be very helpful if you need to contact technical support.
BDM-610000084
1.
Simplify the system. Remove items one at a time and see if one particular item seems to cause the
problem.
2.
Swap components. Try replacing items in the system one-at-a-time with similar items.
Rev A
Appendix B: Troubleshooting
81
How to Obtain Technical Support
If after following the above steps, you still cannot resolve a problem with your CML24BT cpuModule, please
gather the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
cpuModule model, BIOS version, and serial number
List of all boards in system
List of settings from cpuModule Setup program
Printout of autoexec.bat and config.sys files (if applicable)
Description of problem
Circumstances under which problem occurs
Then contact RTD Technical Support:
Phone: 814-234-8087
82
Fax:
814-234-5218
E-mail:
techsupport@rtd.com
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Appendix C
IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout
Like all other RTD PC/PCI-104 and PCIe/104 modules, cpuModules can be packaged in Intelligent Data
Acquisition Node (IDAN) frames, which are milled aluminum frames with integrated heat sinks and heat pipes
for fanless operation. RTD modules installed in IDAN frames are called building blocks. IDAN building blocks
maintain the simple but rugged stacking concept of PC/PCI-104 and PCIe/104. Each RTD module is mounted in
its own IDAN frame and all I/O connections are brought to the walls of each frame using standard PC connectors.
On the CML24BT, no connections are made from module to module internal to the system other than through
the PCIe/104 Type 2 bus, enabling quick interchangeability and system expansion without hours of rewiring and
board redesign.
The CML24BT cpuModule can also be purchased as part of a custom-built RTD HiDAN™ or HiDANplus™ High
Reliability Intelligent Data Acquisition Node. This appendix provides the dimensions and pinouts of the
CML24BT installed in an IDAN frame. Contact RTD for more information on high reliability IDAN, HiDAN, and
HiDANplus PC/PCI-104 systems.
IDAN—Adhering to the PC/PCI-104 and PCIe/104
stacking concept, IDAN allows you to build a
customized system with any combination of RTD
modules.
IDAN Heat Pipes—Advanced heat pipe technology
maximizes heat transfer to heat sink fins.
HiDANplus—Integrating the modularity of
IDAN with the ruggedization of HiDAN,
HiDANplus enables connectors on all system
frames, with signals running between frames
through a dedicated stack-through raceway.
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Appendix C: IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout
83
IDAN Contents
The IDAN-CML24BT contains both a CML24BT cpuModule and a SATA34106 storage module which provides
a 2.5” SATA interface to the first SATA link on the CPU’s top PCIe/104 Type 2 connector (CN1).
Also inside the IDAN-CML24BT unit is a CMOS battery which is connected to the battery input connection of
the cpuModule’s Utility Port 2.0 connector. The frame of the IDAN-CML24BT brings out the cpuModule’s
multi-color LED as well as the cpuModule’s reset button. While a power button is not provided on the exterior
of the frame, the reset button is configurable as as a power button through the BIOS Setup utility.
For additional flexbility, the 25-pin “D” connector which provides connections to the cpuModule’s aDIO
connector (CN6) includes connections to several pins on the Utility Port 2.0 connector, which include the reset
button input, power button input, and RTC battery input.
For more information on cpuModule’s battery input and reset button input on the Utility Port 2.0 connector,
refer to the Utility Port 2.0 Connector (CN5) on page 31.
IDAN Dimensions
The IDAN frame for the CML24BT is shown in the figure below:
PCIe/104 Bus
Back Panel
SATA34106
2.5” Drive Carrier
Front Panel
Figure 12
84
CML24BT cpuModule
IDAN-CML24BT
BDM-610000084
Rev A
IDAN Connector Locations
The diagrams below show the connector locations for the headers of the CML24BT as they are brought out on
the front and back panels of the IDAN-CML24BT. For a full description of each connector on the CML24BT, refer
to Connecting the cpuModule on page 27.
Multi-Color LED
SVGA Video
(CN18)
COM1&3
(CN7)
USB 2.0
(CN5)
Reset Button
Figure 13
COM2&4
(CN8)
aDIO
(CN6)
IDAN-CML24BT Front Panel
DisplayPort
(CN19)
Ethernet
(CN20)
USB 2.0
(CN17)
Figure 14
BDM-610000084
Rev A
IDAN-CML24BT Back Panel
Appendix C: IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout
85
Table 55
86
IDAN-CML24BT Connectors
Designator
Function
CN5
USB Port (Utility Port 2.0)
USB Type A
Series “A” Receptacle
Series “A” Plug
CN6
aDIO
25-pin D (female)
Adam Tech DB25SD
Adam Tech DB25PD
CN7
Serial Port 1 (COM1&3)
9-pin D (male)
Adam Tech DE09PD
Adam Tech DE09SD
CN8
Serial Port 2 (COM2&4)
9-pin D (male)
Adam Tech DE09PD
Adam Tech DE09SD
CN17
USB 2.0
9-pin D (male)
Adam Tech DE09PD
Adam Tech DE09SD
CN18
Video (SVGA)
15-pin high-density D
(female)
Adam Tech HDT15SD
Adam Tech HDT15PD
CN19
DisplayPort
DisplayPort (female)
Molex 47272 series
Molex 68783 series
CN20
Ethernet
9-pin D (male)
Adam Tech DE09PD
Adam Tech DE09SD
CML24BT cpuModule
Connector
Description
IDAN Panel
Connector
Mating
Connector
BDM-610000084
Rev A
External I/O Connections
Table 56
COM1/COM2 (Single Port Mode)— 9-Pin D Connector (male)
Table 57
CPU Pin
IDAN Pin
(DB-9)
Single
RS-232
Single
RS-422
Single
RS-485
1
1
DCD
TXD–
D–
2
6
DSR
—
—
3
2
RXD
TXD+
D+
4
7
RTS
—
—
5
3
TXD
RXD+
—
6
8
CTS
—
—
7
4
DTR
RXD–
—
8
9
RI
—
—
9
5
GND
GND
GND
COM1/COM2 (Dual Port Mode)— 9-Pin D Connector (male)
CPU Pin
IDAN Pin
(DB-9)
Dual
RS-232
Dual
RS-422
Dual
RS-485
1
1
DCD1
TXD1-
D1-
3
2
RXD1
TXD1+
D1+
5
3
TXD1
RXD1+
—
7
4
RTS1
RXD1-
—
9
5
GND
GND
GND
2
6
CTS1
TXD2-
D2-
4
7
TXD2
TXD2+
D2+
6
8
RXD2
RXD2+
—
8
9
RI1
RXD2-
—
Table 58
BDM-610000084
Rev A
aDIO — 25-Pin D Connector (female)
IDAN Pin #
aDIO Port
CPU Pin #
(CN6)
CPU Pin #
(CN5)
1
P0-0
1
—
2
P0-2
3
—
3
P0-4
5
—
4
P0-6
7
—
5
Strobe 0
9
—
6
P1-0
11
—
7
P1-2
13
—
8
GND
15
—
Appendix C: IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout
87
Table 58
88
CML24BT cpuModule
aDIO — 25-Pin D Connector (female)
IDAN Pin #
aDIO Port
CPU Pin #
(CN6)
CPU Pin #
(CN5)
9
reserved
—
—
10
reserved
—
—
11
reserved
—
—
12
Soft Power Button Input
—
5
13
GND (for RTC Battery Input)
—
7
14
P0-1
2
—
15
P0-3
4
—
16
P0-5
6
—
17
P0-7
8
—
18
Strobe 1
10
—
19
P1-1
12
—
20
P1-3
14
—
21
+5 V
16
—
22
reserved
—
—
23
reserved
—
—
24
Push-Button Reset Input
—
3
25
RTC Battery Input
—
9
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Table 59
IDAN Pin #
BDM-610000084
Rev A
SVGA — 15-Pin High Density D Connector (female)
Signal
Function
CPU Pin #
1
Red
Red Analog Output
4
2
Green
Green Analog Output
6
3
Blue
Blue Analog Output
8
4
Reserved
Reserved
—
5
GND
Ground
9
6
GND
Ground
9
7
GND
Ground
9
8
GND
Ground
10
9
+5 V
+ 5 Volts
7
10
GND
Ground
10
11
Reserved
Reserved
—
12
DDC Data
Monitor data
5
13
HSYNC
Horizontal Sync
2
14
VSYNC
Vertical Sync
1
15
DDC CLK
Monitor Clock
3
Appendix C: IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout
89
Table 60
DisplayPort Connector
Pin
Signal
Standard Function
DVI / HDMI mode1
1
LN0+
Main Link, Lane 0 (positive)
TMDS Channel 2 (positive)
out
2
GND
Ground
Ground
out
3
LN0-
Main Link, Lane 0 (negative)
TMDS Channel 2 (negative)
out
4
LN1+
Main Link, Lane 1 (positive)
TMDS Channel 1 (positive)
out
5
GND
Ground
Ground
out
6
LN1-
Main Link, Lane 1 (negative)
TMDS Channel 1 (negative)
out
7
LN2+
Main Link, Lane 2 (positive)
TMDS Channel 0 (positive)
out
8
GND
Ground
Ground
out
9
LN2-
Main Link, Lane 2 (negative)
TMDS Channel 0 (negative)
out
10
LN3+
Main Link, Lane 3 (positive)
TMDS Clock (positive)
out
11
GND
Ground
Ground
out
12
LN3-
Main Link, Lane 3 (negative)
TMDS Clock (negative)
out
13
CFG1
Configuration Pin 1
Cable Adapter Detect
out
14
CFG2
Configuration Pin 2
Consumer Electronics Control2
out
15
AUX+
Auxiliary Channel (positive)
DDC Clock
16
GND
Ground
Ground
17
AUX-
Auxiliary Channel (negative)
DDC Data
18
HPD
Hot Plug Detect
Hot Plug Detect
in
19
DPG
Return for DPV
Return for DPV
out
20
DPV
+3.3V DC Power
+3.3V DC Power
out
In/Out
in/out
out
in/out
1.Requires special passive adapter
2.HDMI mode only
Facing DisplayPort connector, the pinout is:
90
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
DPG
AUX-
AUX+
CFG1
GND
LN2-
LN2+
GND
LN0-
LN0+
DPV
HPD
GND
CFG2
LN3-
LN3+
GND
LN1-
LN1+
GND
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Table 61
IDAN Pin #
Signal
Function
Mode
CPU Pin #
1
VCC1
+5 V to USB1
output
1
2
Data USB1–
USB1 Data–
input/output
3
3
Data USB1+
USB1 Data+
input/output
5
4
GND
Ground
—
7
5
Shield GND
Shield Ground
—
9
6
VCC2
+5 V to USB2
output
2
7
Data USB2–
USB2 Data–
input/output
4
8
Data USB2+
USB2 Data+
input/output
6
9
GND
Ground
—
8
Table 62
BDM-610000084
USB — 9-Pin D Connector (male)
Rev A
Ethernet — 9-Pin D Connector (male)
IDAN Pin #
RJ-45 Pin
Signal
CPU Pin #
1
3
B+ (RX+)
1
2
4
C+
3
3
1
A+ (TX+)
5
4
7
D+
7
5
—
Ground
9
6
6
B- (RX–)
2
7
5
C-
4
8
2
A- (TX–)
6
9
8
D-
8
Appendix C: IDAN™ Dimensions and Pinout
91
92
CML24BT cpuModule
BDM-610000084
Rev A
Appendix D
Additional Information
Application Notes
RTD offers many application notes that provide assistance with the unique feature set of the CML24BT
cpuModule. For the latest application notes, refer to the RTD website.
Drivers and Example Programs
To obtain the latest versions of drivers and example programs for this cpuModule, refer to the RTD website.
Interrupt Programming
For more information about interrupts and writing interrupt service routines, refer to the following book:
Interrupt-Driven PC System Design
by Joseph McGivern
ISBN: 0929392507
Serial Port Programming
For more information about programming serial port UARTs, consult the following book:
Serial Communications Developer's Guide
by Mark Nielson
ISBN: 0764545701
PC/104 Specifications
A copy of the latest PC/104specifications can be found on the webpage for the PC/104 Embedded Consortium:
http://www.pc104.org
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Appendix D: Additional Information
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Appendix E
Limited Warranty
RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. warrants the hardware and software products it manufactures and produces
to be free from defects in materials and workmanship for one year following the date of shipment from RTD
Embedded Technologies, Inc. This warranty is limited to the original purchaser of product and is not transferable.
During the one year warranty period, RTD Embedded Technologies will repair or replace, at its option, any
defective products or parts at no additional charge, provided that the product is returned, shipping prepaid, to
RTD Embedded Technologies. All replaced parts and products become the property of RTD Embedded
Technologies. Before returning any product for repair, customers are required to contact the factory for a Return
Material Authorization number.
This limited warranty does not extend to any products which have been damaged as a result of accident, misuse,
abuse (such as: use of incorrect input voltages, improper or insufficient ventilation, failure to follow the
operating instructions that are provided by RTD Embedded Technologies, “acts of god” or other contingencies
beyond the control of RTD Embedded Technologies), or as a result of service or modification by anyone other
than RTD Embedded Technologies. Except as expressly set forth above, no other warranties are expressed or
implied, including, but not limited to, any implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular
purpose, and RTD Embedded Technologies expressly disclaims all warranties not stated herein. All implied
warranties, including implied warranties for merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, are limited to
the duration of this warranty. In the event the product is not free from defects as warranted above, the
purchaser's sole remedy shall be repair or replacement as provided above. Under no circumstances will RTD
Embedded Technologies be liable to the purchaser or any user for any damages, including any incidental or
consequential damages, expenses, lost profits, lost savings, or other damages arising out of the use or inability to
use the product.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages for consumer
products, and some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above
limitations or exclusions may not apply to you.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc.
103 Innovation Blvd.
State College PA 16803-0906
USA
Website: www.rtd.com
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