The Remote Desktop Connection Handbook

The Remote Desktop Connection
Handbook
Brad Hards
Urs Wolfer
The Remote Desktop Connection Handbook
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Contents
1
Introduction
5
2
The Remote Frame Buffer protocol
6
3
Using Remote Desktop Connection
7
3.1
Connecting Remote Desktop Connection to compatible servers . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.1.1
Server name entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.1.2
Using an invitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.2
What happens when you connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3
Controlling the remote desktop connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.1
Using window mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3.3.2
Using full screen mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
3.4
Bookmarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1 History Bookmarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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10
3.5
Managing Remote Desktop Connection configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
4
Questions and Answers
13
5
Credits and License
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Abstract
Remote Desktop Connection is a client application that allows you to view or even control
the desktop session on another machine that is running a compatible server. VNC and RDP is
supported.
The Remote Desktop Connection Handbook
Chapter 1
Introduction
Remote Desktop Connection is a client application that allows you to view or even control the
desktop session on another machine that is running a compatible server.
You would typically use Remote Desktop Connection with the KDE VNC server (Desktop Sharing), which is also known as Krfb, since it closely matches the special features of Remote Desktop
Connection.
If you want to start Remote Desktop Connection from Konsole, the command is krdc.
Please report any problems or feature requests to the KDE mailing lists or file a bug at
http://bugs.kde.org.
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Chapter 2
The Remote Frame Buffer protocol
This chapter provides a brief description of the Remote Frame Buffer protocol used by Remote
Desktop Connection and by other compatible systems. If you are already familiar with Remote
Frame Buffer, you can safely skip this chapter.
The high level implementation of a system using the Remote Frame Buffer protocol is known as
Virtual Network Computer, or more often just as VNC.
Remote Frame Buffer (or RFB for short) is a simple protocol for remote access to graphical user
interfaces. It works at the frame-buffer level, which roughly corresponds to the rendered screen
image, which means that it can be applied to all windowing systems (including X11, Mac® OS
and Microsoft® Windows® ). Remote Frame Buffer applications exist for many platforms, and
can often be free re-distributed.
In the Remote Frame Buffer protocol, the application that runs on the machine where the user
sits (containing the display, keyboard and pointer) is called the client. The application that runs
on the machine where the framebuffer is located (which is running the windowing system and
applications that the user is remotely controlling) is called the server. Remote Desktop Connection is the KDE client for the Remote Frame Buffer protocol. Desktop Sharing is the KDE server
for the Remote Frame Buffer protocol.
It takes a reasonable amount of network traffic to send an image of the framebuffer, so Remote
Frame Buffer works best over high bandwidth links, such as a local area network. It is still
possible to use Remote Desktop Connection over other links, but performance is unlikely to be
as good.
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Chapter 3
Using Remote Desktop Connection
It is very easy to use Remote Desktop Connection - it has a simple interface, as shown in the
screenshot below.
3.1
Connecting Remote Desktop Connection to compatible
servers
Remote Desktop Connection is a client, and it needs to be used with compatible servers. There
are different ways to connect to those servers:
• Directly typing the server name (or IP address) into the Connect to: input.
• By using an invitation that you received. Desktop Sharing uses invitations, and can send them
by email.
Let’s look at each of these in turn.
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The Remote Desktop Connection Handbook
3.1.1
Server name entry
If you know the host name (or IP address) of the server you want to connect to, you can enter it
directly into the Connect to: input.
If you want to connect to a machine named megan, which is running a VNC server on screen 1
(5901), you can enter megan:1 or megan:5901 and choose vnc as the protocol in the drop down
box.
Similary, if you are using a RDP server on that machine, you can enter megan. Choose rdp as the
protocol. RDP does not need the screen number to be specified. If the server runs the RDP server
not on the default port, you may specify it in the following way: megan:3910
You need to enter an URL in percent encoded syntax, i.e. @ as %40, for e.g. username%40ad.d
omain.example
3.1.2
Using an invitation
Within the Desktop Sharing server application, it is possible to send invitations over email (and
in other ways, although email is the most useful). If you receive this type of email invitation, you
can just click on the link provided in the mail. This will start Remote Desktop Connection if it is
not already running, and connect to the server specified in the invitation.
3.2
What happens when you connect
Notice: Before connecting, ensure that the target computer (server) is available on the network
and, if necessary, that its firewall has been correctly configured or disabled.
No matter how you select the server to connect to, the next thing that happens is that Remote
Desktop Connection asks you about the network connection to the server, as shown below:
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The Remote Desktop Connection Handbook
There are three speed settings for the VNC protocol:
• High Quality (LAN, direct connection), which is the default, and you should evaluate how well
this setting performs before selecting a lower performance option that uses less bandwidth.
• Medium Quality (DSL, Cable, fast Internet).
• Low Quality (Modem, ISDN, slow Internet).
If you always operate over the same link type, you can deselect the checkbox labeled Show this
dialog again for this host, which means that you won’t be asked about the connection type again
for this host, providing you identify it in the same way. For example, if a host has two names,
and deselect the checkbox when connecting using one name, you won’t get asked if you connect
using that name, although you will be asked if you use the other name, or the IP address.
You select the appropriate speed setting, and select the OK to proceed.
You can see the connection status in the icon in the tab.
Depending on the configuration of the server, you may (and almost certainly will) need to provide a password to authenticate to the server. Remote Desktop Connection will provide a password dialog similar to that shown below.
Remote Desktop Connection has the ability to save the password for further connections to the
same host. It uses KWallet for doing this. You need to check the Remember password (KWallet)
check box if you like to use this feature.
After authentication, you will be connected to the remote server, and can begin using Remote
Desktop Connection to observe or control the remote desktop.
3.3
Controlling the remote desktop connection
Having connected to the remote server, you would normally use the keyboard and mouse to
control the windowing system and applications on that remote machine.
You can view the remote desktop either as a full screen, or as a window on the local desktop. You
can change between these modes using icons shown below.
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The Remote Desktop Connection Handbook
Full screen mode is normally better when you are helping a remote user, because you can see all
of what they can see. Window mode is most useful when you are working both remotely and
locally - perhaps referring to some local documentation and then using those instructions on the
remote machine.
3.3.1
Using window mode
In window mode, you can terminate the connection by closing the window, by clicking on the
logout button.
3.3.2
Using full screen mode
In full screen mode, you can change the appearance of the toolbar. The transparency of the
toolbar can be changed with scrollwheel.
3.4
Bookmarks
Remote Desktop Connection has the ability to manage bookmarks. If you need to connect often
to the same remote desktop, you can add an entry for this connection to the bookmark list. You
can do so with a click on Bookmarks → Add Bookmark.
3.4.1
History Bookmarks
Remote Desktop Connection saves last used remote desktop connections. You can access these
special bookmarks at Bookmarks → History. Of course you can also delete a bookmark of this
list if you don’t need it anymore in the list. Just click Delete Bookmark which appears after a
click with the right mouse button on the bookmark you would like to delete.
3.5
Managing Remote Desktop Connection configuration
Using Settings → Configure KRDC..., you can open a dialog to modify the behavior of Remote
Desktop Connection. Selecting that button brings up a window as shown below:
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The Remote Desktop Connection Handbook
Chapter 4
Questions and Answers
1. Why does RDP support not work?
RDP support in Remote Desktop Connection depends on xfreerdp (FreeRDP). Make sure
that you have installed this runtime dependency.
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The Remote Desktop Connection Handbook
Chapter 5
Credits and License
Remote Desktop Connection
The Remote Desktop Connection project has been started by Tim Jansen tim@tjansen.de. As a
Google Summer of Code 2007 project, Urs Wolfer uwolfer @ kde.org has completely rewritten
Remote Desktop Connection. Thanks to Google for making this possible, and thanks to the great
mentor of this Summer of Code project, Brad Hards bradh@frogmouth.net.
Documentation Copyright (c) 2003 Brad Hards bradh@frogmouth.net Documentation Copyright
(c) 2007 Urs Wolfer uwolfer @ kde.org
This documentation is licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.
This program is licensed under the terms of the GNU General Public License.
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