590 Instruction Manual Englsih Rev2

peterson
AutoStrobe™ 590 Strobe Tuner
Instruction Manual
Revised 5-99 for Software Revision 1.11
by
Michael Skubic
© 1998-99 Peterson Electro-Musical Products, Inc.
11601 S. Mayfield Avenue, Alsip IL 60803-2476
Phone: 1-708-388-3311 FAX: 1-708-388-3341
email@petersonemp.com
http://www.petersontuners.com
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE ORGANIZATION OF THIS MANUAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1
THE AutoStrobe 590—AT A GLANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1
1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1
2. BEFORE TURNING IT ON: READ THIS SECTION! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1
THE AutoStrobe 590—IN DEPTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5
1. SUMMARY OF FEATURES AND FRONT PANEL CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5
2. AUTOMATIC AND MANUAL NOTE SELECTION ON THE AutoStrobe 590 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7
3. SETUP MENUS—CHOOSING POWER-UP DEFAULTS / TEMPERAMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8
a) DESCRIPTION AND INITIAL ACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8
b) VIEWING AND MODIFYING PARAMETER DEFAULTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 9
c) VIEWING AND ALTERING TEMPERAMENT FILES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 11
4. TUNING INSTRUMENTS THAT PLAY IN OTHER THAN THE KEY OF "C" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 23
5. ENHANCED RESOLUTION OF INTONATION MEASUREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 24
6. CHECKING INTONATION WITH THE AutoStrobe 590 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 24
7. USING THE PETERSON AutoStrobe 590 AS A METRONOME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 25
GLOSSARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 28
APPENDIX A:
WHY USE A "REAL" STROBE TUNER? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 29
APPENDIX B:
WHY BE CONCERNED ABOUT UNEQUAL TEMPERAMENTS? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 30
INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 31
THE ORGANIZATION OF THIS MANUAL
Congratulations on your purchase of the peterson AutoStrobe™ 590 strobe tuner. For your convenience, this manual
is organized into three major sections. The first, "The AutoStrobe 590—At A Glance", comprises just three short pages of
"must read" information that everyone should read before attempting to turn the Model 590 on and use it.
The next section, "The AutoStrobe 590—In Depth", provides detailed information about all controls and features available
in this device, how they are used, accessed, viewed, and manipulated.
The last section includes a glossary of terms used in this manual, two appendices with supporting background about some
of the exclusive capabilities of your AutoStrobe 590, and an index of terms for easy access to specific areas of the manual

by subject. Terms found in the glossary first appear in the main sections of this manual with a superscripted " " for
"glossary".
THE AutoStrobe 590—AT A GLANCE
1. INTRODUCTION
The peterson AutoStrobe™ 590 combines the best from over 40 years of strobe tuner technology with our latest
advances in automatic note detection, image stability/clarity, and alternate temperament capabilities. We've integrated the
classic eight-octave strobe disc tuning system with precision digital microprocessor and motor control technologies to
provide a versatile tuner with unsurpassed accuracy and features. In addition, when not being used as an instrument tuner,
the Model 590 functions as a programmable audio/visual metronome. This instrument is designed for simple "user-friendly"
operation with little need to "press buttons" once the initial desired settings have been entered. It is the best choice for music
educators, musicians, manufacturers, and for any application where an accurate and versatile tuner is required.
2. BEFORE TURNING IT ON: READ THIS SECTION!
OK, OK! We know you're all aflutter with anticipation, but it's really important (you can always tell by all the bold and
italics stuff!) to take care of a few details to avoid unintentionally wreaking some havoc. The following short sub-sections
will guide you through turning the AutoStrobe 590 on and using the basic features without damage to the unit or to your ears!
IMPORTANT PRECAUTION: The Model 590 is designed to be used with 95-105V, 110-120V, 210-230, or 230-250V,
50/60 Hz AC power sources. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT FOR THE VOLTAGE SELECTOR CARD LOCATED IN THE
FUSE CASE AT THE BACK OF THE TUNER TO BE SET FOR THE PROPER VOLTAGE BEFORE PLUGGING
IN THE LINE CORD........... FAILURE TO DO SO MAY RESULT IN SEVERE DAMAGE TO THE INSTRUMENT!
Checking the AC Voltage Selection
1) First remove the power-line cord from the unit.
2) Slide the small, clear, plastic safety door of the power entry/fuse module completely to the left so as to expose the fuse
chamber.
3) A small fiberglass wafer or Voltage Selection Card is inserted horizontally just below the fuse and fuse-pull lever in this
chamber. The currently selected voltage setting (100, 120, 220, or 240) will be plainly visible in large, dark numerals
on this card. If the current selection matches the power-line voltage in your area, you do not need to change the
selection. Simply slide the plastic window back to the right and plug the tuner line cord into the power entry receptacle
at the left. You can even skip ahead over the next section—just remember that if you ever need to accommodate
different power line voltages, this next sub-section will guide you through it.
Changing the AC Voltage Selection
If the visible indication on the Voltage Selection Card does NOT match the power-line voltage in your area:
4) Pull the "Fuse Pull" lever out and to the left until the fuse is released on one end.
Page 1
5) Completely remove the fuse from the unit.
6) Make sure the "Fuse Pull" lever is in the absolute far left position, completely clear of the Voltage Selection Card.
7) Insert the tip of a needle-nose pliers, scissors, or other suitable item through the small hole at the edge of the selection
card. (NOTE: if you believe that you will need to switch this card often, you might consider acquiring a special
extraction tool available from Peterson.)
8) Gently but firmly pry the card straight back and out of the fuse chamber by using the upper lip of the power entry/fuse
module as a leverage point and pushing on the upper part of the tool you've selected.
9) Flip or rotate the card so the proper voltage indication will be visible when the card is re-inserted (top, left).
10) Re-insert card by pushing firmly with fingers.
11) Reconfirm that the proper voltage selection is now the one that is visible on the card.
12) Push the "Fuse Pull" lever about halfway to the right and reinstall fuse (left end first).
13) Slide safety door back to the right.
14) Plug the tuner line cord into the power entry receptacle at the left.
Basic Operation: A Quick Tutorial

We will first give a summary of how to use the AutoStrobe 590 for basic tuning using the equal-tempered scale and
A=440 Hz as the pitch reference. We follow later with detailed instructions on how to use the other features available on
the tuner.
The Model 590 has both audio-sensitive input (a built-in microphone which is active whenever the EXTERNAL INPUT jack
is empty) and audio output (a 3.5 mm jack for external headphones, a 1/4" EXTERNAL SPEAKER jack, and a built-in
speaker which is active whenever the headphone and EXTERNAL SPEAKER jacks are empty). The audio output allows
the Model 590 to function as a precision audio tuner or audio metronome. This output consists of an amplified version of
the audio input as well as a steady tone which reflects the exact "standard" frequency that the strobe tuner is currently using
as the reference pitch (as indicated by the OCTAVE knob at the top left of the front panel as well as the current temperament,

key, semi-tone scale note, "Concert A" pitch reference, and current global cents (¢) deviation indicated on the tuner's LCD
display screen). The balance and overall volume of these audio outputs are controlled by the dual knobs (bottom ring and
top cap, respectively) at the left side of the front panel directly below the "OCTAVE" control knob.
NOTE: When the headphone jack is unused and a microphone—either built-in or external—is active, the balance control
(bottom ring knob of the VOL—BAL control) should ALWAYS be in the fully clockwise (internal tone only) position.
Otherwise an undesirable (you know the sound!) audio feedback condition can occur. When using a non-acoustic instrument
(an electric guitar or a band instrument fitted with the new "silent mute" technology, for example), turning the BALance
control counter-clockwise allows the Model 590 to function as a "practice amp". (High input levels will produce a distortion
sound familiar to electric guitarists and can be used to good effect!)
In addition, the volume control allows for very loud output (to be easily heard across a noisy room). It is good practice to
ensure the volume (outer cap knob) is turned low (counter-clockwise) before switching the Model 590 on since it will
begin producing its internally-generated audio tone soon after power-up.
The manual OCTAVE control mentioned above allows the standard-pitch, audio output tone to sound in any one of five
octave ranges. This permits the user to independently adjust the output tone relative to the sound to be tuned for the most
pleasing or functionally clear combination. All of the above manual front panel controls—VOLume, BALance, and
OCTAVE—also affect the sound of metronome "blips" when the Model 590 is configured to operate as a metronome.
After you have checked the back of the Model 590 as detailed above to verify that the voltage selector switch is set to the
correct position of 100, 120, 220, or 240 Volts AC, connect the line cord to an AC outlet receptacle, push the power switch
at the right of the strobe disc to the "up" position and follow these easy steps to use the tuner.
Page 2
PETERSON
MODEL 590 TUNER
REVISION X.XX
SERIAL # T590 XXXXX
The initial screen during the power up phase is depicted here.
Line three shows the software revision number and line four the
serial number of the particular tuner.
NOTE: We advise that you write down the serial number shown on this initial screen and keep it with your records for
future reference in case anything should happen to your unit that would prevent this screen from appearing.
At the conclusion of the power-up tests, the strobe wheel will begin rotating and will flicker slightly due to random noise
in the room. The display panel will then change to the normal RUN screen as shown below:
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
AUTO
SETUP MODE
1
2
MET
3
4
The first line indicates that the tuner is set for instruments
referenced to the Key of C. Line two indicates that the standard
for A is 440 Hz, the current note setting is "C", and that the global

pitch offset is set at 0 cents deviation. Line three shows that the
tuner is currently set to automatically detect the nearest standard
pitch present in the audio input and use it as the current note
reference for tuning. The items on line four always indicate the
current function, if any, of the four Function buttons (labeled 1
through 4) directly beneath the LCD display. This is explained in
greater detail later in this manual.
The built-in microphone will pick up an instrument from across a relatively quiet room. However, if you are working in a
noisy environment it may be helpful to use an external microphone (inserted in the EXTERNAL INPUT jack on the front
panel) to be more selective and point the microphone directly at the instrument you wish to tune.
Your AutoStrobe 590 tuner can function in either of two ways: MANual mode or AUTOmatic mode. Unless you choose
to change the default, the tuner will power up in the AUTO mode. In this condition, any strong audio tone input to the builtin microphone (or EXTERNAL INPUT jack) will be internally analyzed—usually in well under a second—and the standardpitched semitone nearest in frequency to that of the input sound will appear on the LCD screen. The motor for the strobe
disc will automatically adjust in speed so that you can view the tuning of this input sound relative to this nearest standard
pitch. (The internally-generated audio tone is automatically adjusted as well.) Although it is rotating very rapidly, one or
more circular bands on the disc will appear to be moving very slowly or will appear to be standing still. The lowest band
exhibiting this effect indicates which octave the audio input signal occupies. If the rotation appears to be to the left (counterclockwise), your input sound is flat compared to this nearest standard-pitched semitone. If the rotation appears to be to the
right (clockwise), the input sound is sharp compared to the standard. If the image appears to be standing still, the input is
perfectly in tune with the standard. Furthermore, the slower the disc appears to be rotating, the closer the input sound is to
the standard. This makes for a very simple and natural visual feedback when bringing an input sound into tune.
To tune to a different note, simply cease the current audio input and sound a different pitch. If the new input is closer to a
different standard-pitched semitone, the tuner will re-analyze the input, indicate this new pitch on the LCD screen, and, once
again, automatically adjust the motor so that the disc will properly indicate the relative tuning of this new input to the nearest
standard-pitched semitone.
NOTE: It is expected that the automatic note selection may not respond well at either extreme of pitch. The unit’s circuitry
is less sensitive at these extremes, and sounds of short duration or with strong, non-harmonic overtones can interfere with
the note detection. Automated note selection at pitch extremes is best optimized by using an external microphone (at the
EXTERNAL INPUT jack on the front panel) and placing it near the sound source. Alternatively, of course, MANual mode
note selection may be chosen to avoid the difficulty entirely.
Page 3
NOTE: The automatic note detection feature is based on reference tuning of A=440 Hz and Global Cent Offset (which
appears on the second line of the RUN screen) set to 0 cents. Any deviation from these tuning references will limit proper
note sensing to less than the usual ±50 cents range. For most applications, deviations in the range of A430 to A450 or,
separately, up to about ±40 cents Global Cent Offset will yield reasonable results for automatic note selection. Of course,
there are no limitations over the full range of offsets available in the tuner when using MANual note selection.
HINT: When tuning a stringed instrument like a guitar or bass, image clarity and automatic note selection are usually
improved by plucking away from the bridge with a fingertip (as opposed to a fingernail or pick) using medium force. This
minimizes the harmonic (overtone) content of the tone while maximizing the fundamental frequency that is to be tuned.
Page 4
THE AutoStrobe 590—IN DEPTH
1. SUMMARY OF FEATURES AND FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
We will begin with a brief description of the front panel controls, indicators, and basic features of the Model 590. This will
provide you with a quick reference guide to the front panel of the tuner. Detailed information about each feature is explained
in the succeeding sections of this manual.
FRONT PANEL
13 7 8
12
1
2 3 4
5
4 9 10
peterson
KEY=C
A=440
KEY
OCTAVE
ENTER
VOL
BAL
EXTERNAL
INPUT
C
AUTO
SETUP MODE
1
2
1
=
+2
--1
<
POWER
DISPLAY
00 4
MET
3
2
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
4
THRU
C#
AutoStrobe
TM
C
D#
D
F#
E
F
G#
G
A#
A
B
model 590 tuner
14
3
11 5
6
1. STABLE, ACCURATE, DIGITALLY-CONTROLLED STROBE — The back-illuminated, eight-octave band strobe
disc is spun by a digitally-controlled motor. The rotation speeds are derived from a quartz crystal reference for the
ultimate in accuracy and stability. Hence, no warm-up period is required, and the instrument will maintain its 1/10 of

1 cent accuracy with no need for re-calibration…EVER! The International Standard Pitch of A=440 Hz (cycles per
second) is the factory default but can be raised or lowered in 1 Hz increments from A = 350 Hz to A = 550 Hz. The
Model 590 can be customized to power-up with an altered Concert A pitch as one of the storable SETUP parameters
available to the user. The unparalleled accuracy of this system also allows the Model 590 to reliably distinguish the

nuances of multiple temperaments , both standard and customizable, beyond the conventional equal-tempered scale.
2. POWER SWITCH — The down or OFF position disengages the line voltage; the up or ON position permits the unit
to power up.
3. SELF-CONTAINED MICROPHONE & EXTERNAL PATCH THROUGH INPUT — The Model 590 is equipped
with a built-in condenser microphone for simple use with acoustic inputs. The intonation of notes sounded into this
microphone will be immediately visible on the strobe tuning disc when automatic note detection is enabled (which is
the factory-default power-up condition). Immediately to the right of the internal microphone is a 1/4" jack for an
external input such as an external microphone, guitar-type pick-up, or any low or line-level audio signal in electrical
form. (An appropriate external microphone is available from peterson as part #: 170172.) The internal microphone
is automatically disconnected whenever a 1/4" connector is inserted into this "EXTERNAL INPUT" jack. To the right
of the "EXTERNAL INPUT" jack is a 1/4" THRU jack. This passively conducts the input signal—internal mic or
external input, whichever is currently active—back out to additional audio devices allowing the 590 tuner to be
permanently placed within your "audio chain" for your convenience. (NOTE: On the rack-mount version R590, these
two jacks are duplicated at the rear of the tuner to allow for rear-only patching that is typical in rack systems.)
Page 5
4. EIGHTY-CHARACTER LCD MENU SCREEN — Simplicity and ease of operation are enhanced by the intuitive
and user-friendly menu screen displays which address all the functional features of the tuner.
5. FOUR MENU-DRIVEN FUNCTION BUTTONS — The action of each of these four push buttons is defined by
whatever specific description is currently displayed immediately above them on the bottom line of the LCD screen.
These software-defined buttons permit great flexibility and simple user interaction with the Model 590.
6. TWELVE MANUAL NOTE-SELECTION BUTTONS — These 12 push buttons permit traditional manual selection
of the scale note to which the audio input is to be tuned. The Model 590 also permits (by default) an "AUTO" or
"hands-off" tuning mode where the standard scale note closest in pitch to the incoming audio signal is automatically
selected by the unit.
7. ENTER — This push button is used to select specific values of scale note cent deviations when editing customized
temperament files used in specialized tuning applications. It is also used to make some of the user selections under the
temperament programming menus of the tuner. Under the normal RUN screen, ENTER is used in conjunction with the
UP ARROW/DOWN ARROW buttons to access enhanced resolution of the global cent offset parameter displayed on
that screen.
8. KEY — This push button is used to allow the Model 590 to reference scale notes in the same key base as the instrument
to be tuned. Note names are internally transposed from "Concert Standard" notes allowing the user to see and access
notes in the transposition with which he is most comfortable. For example, if a clarinetist enters a KEY of B= and plays
the "C" position of a B= clarinet, the strobe disc will indicate the "in tune" standing pattern when the LCD display
indicates note "C" even though the pitch being played is Concert B=. Each press of the KEY button will advance the
current key of the tuner one step within the sequence: C, B=, F, E=, and back to C. (Please note that all buttons which
affect motor speed are disabled while the motor is accelerating to a new speed.)
9. UP ARROW / DOWN ARROW — These two push buttons increment or decrement various parameters on the LCD
screen depending upon which screen is currently active. While the RUN screen is active, they control the global cent
offset parameter displayed on the second line of the LCD. (Individual note cent offsets are separately programmable
under Temperament File menus.) While controlling either global cent offset in the RUN screen or individual note
offsets under the File menus, pressing both the UP and DOWN arrow buttons simultaneously will provide an immediate
“reset value to 0” operation. When either button is depressed and held to continuously increment or decrement these
cent values, advancement will proceed, after one initial step, at 5 times the currently set resolution. These new features
help to speed manipulation of the cents parameter.
Each time the ENTER button is pressed simultaneously with either arrow button, the resolution of the global cent offset
parameter is advanced one step within the sequence: 1, 0.5, 0.1, and back to 1 cent resolution. Under some Temperament
File menus, the arrow buttons advance a cursor to select characters when naming files.
10. DISPLAY +2 / -1 — This push button alters the strobe motor speeds so as to cause audio input in a given octave to be
read on higher or lower bands on the strobe disc. While this effectively expands the range of tuning to an unprecedented
11 octaves, it is most often used to push the standing strobe pattern for very high or low-pitched instruments toward the
more easily-read middle strobe disc bands. However, with our latest innovations in automatic strobe clarity, this will
often be unnecessary. Each press of this button will advance the current display mode one step within the sequence:
normal, +2, -1, and back to normal. For a given input pitch, the "+2" mode shifts the lowest strobe disc band exhibiting
a standing pattern two positions higher than would appear in the "normal" display. This would be most useful with very
low-pitched notes. For a given input, the "-1" mode shifts the lowest strobe disc band exhibiting a standing pattern one
position lower than would appear in the "normal" display. This would be most useful with very high-pitched notes.
(Please note that all buttons which affect motor speed are disabled while the motor is accelerating to a new speed.)
11. METRONOME ON/OFF — This push button controls functioning of the built-in metronome when operation as a tuner
is not required. When the RUN screen is active, this button mimics the operation of the "4" function button by switching
to the METRONOME screen on the LCD and preparing for metronome operation. Once the METRONOME screen is
activated by either of these methods, the METRONOME ON/OFF button toggles actual metronome cycling on and off.
Page 6
This button is connected in parallel with the 1/4-inch jack at the rear of the tuner labeled "METRONOME SWITCH".
Any momentary-close contact device such as a footswitch may be used in place of or in addition to the METRONOME
ON/OFF button at any time. (The front-panel button will continue to operate with a device plugged into this rear jack
unless the device is held in the closed position—make sure that the device operates in a momentary-close fashion. A
proper footswitch is available from peterson as part #: 140070.)
12. VOLume - BALance DUAL CONTROL — The AutoStrobe 590 contains a Metronome/Tone audio output section.
The output sound emanates from the 3" internal speaker unless a) the 1/4" EXTERNAL SPEAKER jack at the rear of
the unit is connected—normally to an 8 or 16 ohm speaker—or b) the 3.5 mm front panel jack is connected—normally
to headphones or an audio line-level input. When used as a tuner, a tone rich in harmonics is generated which reflects
exactly the frequency selected by the user as determined by the current temperament, key, scale note, global cent offset,
and Concert A frequency. When used as a metronome, the Model 590 produces audible "blips" to indicate timing of
musical beats. In either case, the top cap knob of this dual control affects the sound volume or amplitude of the audio
signal being produced. The ring knob beneath it controls the balance of internally generated sound (tone or metronome)
to amplified input sound (from the built-in mic or external input, whichever is currently active). Turned fully counterclockwise: only amplified input is present in the output audio; turned fully clockwise: only internally generated sound
is audible.
13. OCTAVE CONTROL — This manual switch places the internally generated audio tone or metronome blip (whichever
is currently active) at one of five octave ranges to optimize clarity.
14. HEADPHONE JACK — This is a standard 3.5 mm-sized headphone jack for private listening of internally-generated
tone and external sound as controlled by the VOLume, BALance, and OCTAVE front panel controls. Insertion into this
jack cuts off both the internal speaker and any signal to the EXTERNAL SPEAKER jack at the rear of the unit.
2. AUTOMATIC AND MANUAL NOTE SELECTION ON THE AutoStrobe 590
Your AutoStrobe 590 tuner can function in either of two ways: MANual mode or AUTOmatic mode. Unless you choose
to change the default, the tuner will power up in the AUTO mode. In this condition, any strong audio tone input to the builtin microphone (or EXTERNAL INPUT jack) will be internally analyzed—usually in well under a second—and the standardpitched semitone nearest in frequency to that of the input sound will appear on the LCD screen. The motor for the strobe
disc will automatically adjust in speed so that you can view the tuning of this input sound relative to this nearest standard
pitch. (The internally-generated audio tone is automatically adjusted as well.) Although it is rotating very rapidly, one or
more circular bands on the disc will appear to be moving very slowly or will appear to be standing still. The lowest band
exhibiting this effect indicates which octave the audio input signal occupies. If the rotation appears to be to the left (counterclockwise), your input sound is flat compared to this nearest standard-pitched semitone. If the rotation appears to be to the
right (clockwise), the input sound is sharp compared to the standard. If the image appears to be standing still, the input is
perfectly in tune with the standard. Furthermore, the slower the disc appears to be rotating, the closer the input sound is to
the standard. This makes for a very simple and natural visual feedback when bringing an input sound into tune.
To tune to a different note, simply cease the current audio input and sound a different pitch. If the new input is closer to a
different standard-pitched semitone, the tuner will re-analyze the input, indicate this new pitch on the LCD screen, and, once
again, automatically adjust the motor so that the disc will properly indicate the relative tuning of this new input to the nearest
standard-pitched semitone.
The AutoStrobe 590 can also be placed in MANual mode by pressing the "2" button while the label above it in the LCD
screen indicates "MODE" (that is, when the normal RUN screen is active). Directly above this MODE label on the LCD,
an indication of the currently active note-select mode—AUTO or MAN—appears. Pressing the "2" button will toggle this
note select mode and the LCD indication will be updated.
Page 7
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
1
MET
2
3
+
÷
7
AUTO
SETUP MODE
2
4
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
MAN
SETUP MODE
1
MET
2
3
4
Accessing Manual Note Select Mode
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
1
2
MET
3
4
+
÷
7
MAN
SETUP MODE
2
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
AUTO
SETUP MODE
1
2
MET
3
4
Accessing Auto Note Select Mode
While the MAN MODE is indicated, the selection of note will not be affected by the incoming audio signal and must be
selected by pressing one of the note buttons below the strobe disc. This feature is useful when extraneous audio tones are
present in the environment (making automatic selection difficult) or when one purposely wishes to measure tuning of various
harmonics (partials) present in the audio input.
NOTE: The automatic note detection feature is based on reference tuning of A=440 Hz and Global Cent Offset (which
appears on the second line of the RUN screen) set to 0 cents. Any deviation from these tuning references will limit proper
note sensing to less than the usual ±50 cents range. For most applications, deviations in the range of A430 to A450 or,
separately, up to about ±40 cents Global Cent Offset will yield reasonable results for automatic note selection. Of course,
there are no limitations over the full range of offsets available in the tuner when using MANual note selection.
3. SETUP MENUS—CHOOSING POWER-UP DEFAULTS / TEMPERAMENTS
a) DESCRIPTION AND INITIAL ACCESS
The AutoStrobe 590 allows the user to customize the power-up condition of several important parameters which a given user
might otherwise have to set each time the unit is turned on. This capability is found under the SETUP menu. In addition,
temperaments may be created, edited, activated, and stored or deleted from non-volatile memory in a separate branch under
this menu.
The SETUP menu is activated from the normal RUN screen by pressing the "1" button:
Page 8
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
AUTO
SETUP MODE
2
3
+
÷
7
1
MET
1
4
SETUP MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
OPTN FILE
1
2
RUN
DIAG
3
4
Accessing the Setup Screen
b) VIEWING AND MODIFYING PARAMETER DEFAULTS
The "OPTN" or Option selection provides further menu screens, each of which is dedicated to viewing and/or altering a given
SETUP parameter. The SETUP parameters, their valid ranges, and the buttons used to alter them are summarized below:
SCREEN
PARAMETER SETTING
VALID RANGE:
BUTTONS:
RUN (before
entering SETUP)
Strobe Disc Band
DISPLAY +2 / -1
+2, -1, Normal, ...
Factory Default: Normal
L
1st SETUP
parameter screen
Concert A Pitch Reference
Recalibration
350 Hz to 550 Hz in 1 Hz
increments
Factory Default: A=440
L
L
2nd SETUP
parameter screen
Musical KEY Setting
C, B=, F, E=, ...
Factory Default: KEY=C
L
3rd SETUP
parameter screen
Auto-Note Selection Mode
Setting
OFF, ON
Factory Default: ON
4th SETUP
parameter screen
Metronome
BEATS/MINute Rate
40 TO 240
Factory Default: 120
4th SETUP
parameter screen
Metronome
BEATS/MEASure Length
1 TO 8
Factory Default: 4
L
L
L
L
L
L
DISPLAY
+2
—
-1
3
DOWN
4
UP
KEY
3
OFF
4
ON
8
9
Increment
2
DOWN
3
UP
Decrement
Each press of the "1" button (labeled "NEXT") will sequence through screens for each of these parameters except for the
Strobe DISPLAY +2/-1 parameter which does not have a SETUP screen. Except for the Concert A pitch reference
recalibration, these parameters can be altered more directly from the RUN screen. However, altering the power-up state of
these parameters can only be effected under SETUP.
Page 9
As each SETUP screen is accessed, the value of each parameter shown is the CURRENT state of the parameter as last altered
by any method: directly under the RUN or METRONOME screens, a previous access to the SETUP screens, or, if neither
of these occurred, the last power-up default settings. Conversely, any change to these parameters under a SETUP screen will
be reflected immediately upon exiting SETUP whether the changes were stored or not.
Continuing in order from the SETUP screen, the screen for recalibrating the Concert A pitch reference is accessed by
pressing the "1" button (labeled OPTN):
SETUP MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
FILE
RUN
DIAG
1
2
3
4
+
÷
NEXT
7
OPTN
1
RECALIBRATE TUNER?
NOW A= XXX
1
RUN
DOWN
UP
2
3
4
Accessing the Concert A Recalibration Screen
As with all the SETUP parameter screens, an immediate escape to the normal RUN screen is an option if viewing or changing
a particular parameter is all that is desired. Hitting the appropriate value-altering buttons—in this case, buttons "3" and
"4"—will cause an immediate update of the LCD screen. Hitting the "1" button (NEXT) will activate the next parameter
screen:
RECALIBRATE TUNER?
NOW A= XXX
NEXT
DOWN
UP
2
3
4
+
÷
7
1
RUN
1
KEY SETTING
KEY IS NOW : X
NEXT
RUN
1
2
3
4
Accessing the Key Setting Screen
The KEY screen uses the front panel KEY button to alter the KEY setting just as it will under the RUN screen.
KEY SETTING
KEY IS NOW : X
RUN
1
2
3
+
4
÷
7
NEXT
1
Accessing the Auto-Note Setting Screen
Page 10
AUTO–NOTE SETTING
MODE IS NOW : XXX
NEXT
RUN
OFF
1
2
3
ON
4
AUTO–NOTE SETTING
MODE IS NOW : XXX
NEXT
2
OFF
ON
3
4
1
÷
7
1
RUN
+
METRONOME SETTINGS
BEATS/MIN=XXX
X=BEATS/MEAS
NEXT DOWN UP
RUN
1
2
3
4
Accessing the Metronome Setting Screen
The Metronome SETUP screen is unique in that two parameters are accessible on one screen. The front panel UP
ARROW/DOWN ARROW buttons are used to modify the BEATS/MIN parameter; the "2" and "3" Function buttons modify
the BEATS/MEAS parameter.
Finally, hitting the "1" button (NEXT) under the Metronome SETUP screen activates the System Memory Store screen:
1
2
3
4
+
1
÷
7
METRONOME SETTINGS
BEATS/MIN=XXX
X=BEATS/MEAS
NEXT DOWN UP
RUN
STORE VALUES IN
SYSTEM MEMORY?
NO
YES
RUN
1
2
3
4
Accessing the Memory Storage Screen
STORE VALUES IN
SYSTEM MEMORY?
NO
YES
RUN
1
2
3
Button #1 returns to the Setup menu.
Button #2 saves new values and returns to the SETUP menu.
Button #3 returns to RUN screen and uses new values
(new values are not put into startup memory with #3).
4
Pressing the "1" button (NO) at this time will cause no changes in stored memory and revert back to the SETUP menu screen.
Pressing the "3" button (RUN) at this time will cause no changes in stored memory and revert back to the normal RUN
screen.
Pressing the "2" button (YES) at this time will save the SETUP parameters in the state in which they were last placed and
return the screen to the SETUP menu. The power-up condition of the Model 590 will now reflect these latest parameter
settings until new values are once again stored under SETUP.
c) VIEWING AND ALTERING TEMPERAMENT FILES
Temperament refers to the specific frequency (pitch) intervals placed between notes in a musical scale. With 12 notes per
octave (the most prevalent case but, by no means, the only case), there are an infinite number of ways to set the audio
frequencies of these notes relative to one another. Through the centuries, many have wrestled with the challenge of creating
the most pleasing, yet universally flexible, temperament of these 12 intervals. It turns out that it is mathematically impossible
Page 11
to achieve both completely, that is, if by "pleasing", one means smooth beat-free intervals, and, if by "flexible", one means
satisfactory harmony in all possible key signatures.
The AutoStrobe 590 always powers up with Equal Temperament and all offsets applied to notes when defining (editing)
custom temperaments are relative to it. In other words, if one creates a temperament in which the C# note is 5.2 cents sharp
from the pitch for C# in an equal-tempered scale, a setting of +05.2¢ would be entered. Since the overall frequency standard
(both internationally and for the Model 590) is "Concert A", it is suggested that custom temperaments be created with the
"A" scale note maintained at 00.0¢ offset and then adjusting the other scale notes appropriately. In this way, the "A=xxx"
setting under the SETUP menu will still be physically accurate.
The Model 590 comes with 8 non-erasable, unmodifiable temperaments including standard equal temperament. They vary
considerably in the "pleasing versus flexible" compromise that all temperaments must address. Those familiar with published
temperaments will recognize most of these eight temperaments as both historically and musically useful:
T590 NAME
FULL NAME
DESCRIPTION
EQUA
EQUAL
All semi-tone intervals are identical: 12/2 or .6% above previous
note. All keys signatures are equally playable.
PYTH
PYTHAGOREAN
Perfect 4ths and 5ths; 3rds are poor. Avoid G< major and minor
keys. F<, C< major and E=, B= minor diatonic keys are very good.
JUMA
JUST (MAJOR)
Perfect triads in 12 keys: C, G, A, E, E=, F major and A, E, F<, C<,
C, G minor. Avoid all other keys.
P5TH
POWER FIFTHS
Tempered for clean 5ths when playing electric guitar with distortion.
MEAN
QUARTER COMMA
MEAN-TONE
Perfect/excellent triads in 16 keys. Avoid D=, G=, A=, B major and
B=, E=, F, G< minor keys.
WRK3
WERCKMEISTER—III
Well-tempered; strong differentiation of key color. Avoid D=, G=,
A=, B major and B=, E=, F minor keys.
KRN3
KIRNBERGER—III
Similar to WRK3 but also avoid E=, E major and C, C<, G< minor
keys.
YONG
YOUNG
Mild differentiation of key color. Avoid D=, E=, G=, A= major and
B=, C, E=, F minor keys.
Although they cannot be edited directly, one may always copy any one of these permanent temperaments into a custom
temperament which can then be viewed or edited further on a note-by-note basis. The Model 590 permits up to 64 userprogrammable temperaments which can be created in this way or "from scratch".
The FILE (temperament) menus are accessed under the SETUP screen. Thus, the first step when starting from the normal
RUN screen is to press the “1” button to enter SETUP:
Page 12
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
AUTO
SETUP MODE
2
3
1
÷
7
1
+
4
SETUP MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
OPTN
FILE
RUN
DIAG
1
2
3
4
Accessing the Setup Screen
The next step—accessing the FILE menus—is accomplished by pressing the “2” button (now labeled: FILE):
SETUP MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
FILE
RUN
DIAG
1
2
3
4
2
÷
7
OPTN
+
TEMPERAMENT MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
START COPY
–EDIT –DEL RUN STOP
1
2
3
4
Accessing the File Menu Screen
Under this TEMPERAMENT MENU screen, all temperament-related activities are accessible through the four Function
buttons below the LCD display and are summarized in the following table:
TEMPERAMENT ACTIVITY
ACCESSED THROUGH:
Select and activate a pre-existing
temperament
START
–EDIT
Create(edit), name, and activate a new
temperament
START
–EDIT
Copy an existing temperament, edit the
copy (if desired), name, and activate
the new temperament.
COPY
–DEL
Delete a non-factory temperament
COPY
–DEL
Return to the RUN screen with no
change
RUN
Deactivate(STOP) the current nonequal temperament and revert to equal
temperament
STOP
FUNCTION
BUTTON:
L
L
L
L
L
L
1
1
2
2
3
4
The following flowcharts plot the various steps required to accomplish these temperament activities. The four examples
highlight only the sequence of button presses typically necessary for just one of these activities, that is to say, with no
mistakes or back-tracking.
The following key will assist in understanding the "shorthand" of these flowcharts:
Page 13
1. To the right (or sometimes above) each front panel function button—"1" through "4"—depicted on the flowchart is the
exact label for that button as shown on the LCD display at the current step in the programming.
2. With the exception of the top two LCD screen drawings in each flowchart, the word descriptions at various steps do not
necessarily appear on the LCD screens but are meant only to explain the action at these steps.
L
" icon indicates that the user must press one of the buttons depicted horizontally to the right
3. The appearance of the "
of it in order to execute a choice in the current step of the programming and advance to the next step.
4. A diamond (") box indicates that the next step in the programming depends upon specific choices made up to that point.
For example, under the "Creating A New Temperament" flowchart, a box labeled "4 characters?" is encountered. If the
user has entered four characters for the temperament name at this point, the next step will follow the "YES" path
downward in the chart (at which point the LCD display re-labels the function buttons as indicated). If, at any given time,
this diamond box is encountered when less than four characters have been chosen (as is normally the case for at least
the first three times the box is encountered), the "NO" path is followed. In this example, that means that the function
buttons continue to allow positioning of the cursor under various characters and/or selecting (or removing) a character
from the current temperament name under construction.
NOTE: When deleting temperaments, the motor for the rotating strobe disc will always be turned off. The motor will
begin again upon returning to the RUN screen when temperament activity is concluded.
Page 14
3
or
L
4 NEXT
L
L
L
*
*
RUN
3 BKSP
*
2 OK
YES
*
3 RUN
YES
ENTER
*
4
NO
CHNG
2 DEL
or
*
1 REDO
NO
Add character
over cursor
2 BB>
Move cursor
left or right
* Name
Pick
Name
already exists?
1 EDIT
*
*
*
3
NEW
4 characters?
CNCL
Remove
*last character
NO
1
1 < BB or
3 CNCL
4
L
L
STARTCEDIT
*
New temperament
stored in memory
3 DONE
ENTER
*
Activates new temperament
L
L
L
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
*
Edit Notes
4
START
Activates new
temperament
*
CNCL
2
*
1
1st page: factory presets
Succeeding pages: up to
255 custom temperaments
EDIT
Next note
L
Custom only
L
L
Select Temperament
L
L
SETUP
00 4
*
2 FILE
*
1
C
L
L
3
L
YES
*
*
2
YES
NO
*
*
*
1 YES
Settings copied
4 SLCT
*
CNCL
*
DEL
*
*
L
L
L
3
*
NO
or
4 NEXT
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
Next note
Activates new temperament
ENTER
Stored in
memory
3 DONE
L
L
2
SLCT
*
*
*
Temprmnt Deleted
1 YES
4
*
4 BACK
any key
*
Edit Notes
L
RUN
*
CNCL
*
*
3
L
L
L
2 COPYCDEL
Select from custom
temperaments only
2
L
Activates equal temperament
3 RUN
4
Select temperament
to copy from
*
2 NO
Delete
previous?
2 DEL
1 YES
CNCL
*
L
L
L
*
Remove last
character
Name
already exists?
*
*
STOP
Move cursor
2 BB> left or right
3 BKSP
*
4
COPY
4 characters?
1 RENAME
NO
NO
1
1 < BB or
ENTER
L
Add character
over cursor
L
L
L
RUN
SCREEN
Name Copy
TEMPERAMENT MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
START COPY
SEDIT SDEL RUN STOP
L
L
MAN
SETUP MODE
KEY=C
A=440
EXAMPLE—SELECTING AND ACTIVATING AN EXISTING TEMPERAMENT
3
L
or
4 NEXT
ENTER
L
L
L
L
L
*
1 EDIT
NO
*
*
RUN
3 BKSP
*
2 OK
YES
*
3 RUN
YES
ENTER
*
4
or
NO
CHNG
2 DEL
*
1 REDO
NO
Add character
over cursor
2 BB>
Move cursor
left or right
* Name
Pick
Name
already exists?
*
3
NEW
4 characters?
CNCL
Remove
*last character
*
1
1 < BB or
3 CNCL
4
L
L
STARTCEDIT
*
New temperament
stored in memory
3 DONE
ENTER
*
Activates new temperament
L
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
*
Edit Notes
4
START
Activates new
temperament
*
CNCL
2
*
1
1st page: factory presets
Succeeding pages: up to
255 custom temperaments
EDIT
Next note
L
Custom only
L
L
Select Temperament
L
L
SETUP
00 4
*
2 FILE
*
1
C
L
L
3
L
Remove last
character
*
*
2
*
NO
*
*
1 YES
Settings copied
4 SLCT
*
CNCL
*
DEL
*
*
L
L
L
3
*
2
NO
or
4 NEXT
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
Next note
Activates new temperament
ENTER
Stored in
memory
3 DONE
L
L
*
SLCT
*
*
Temprmnt Deleted
1 YES
4
*
4 BACK
any key
*
Edit Notes
L
RUN
*
CNCL
*
*
3
L
L
L
2 COPYCDEL
Select from custom
temperaments only
2
L
Activates equal temperament
3 RUN
4
Select temperament
to copy from
*
2 NO
Delete
previous?
2 DEL
YES
already exists?
YES
*Name
1 YES
CNCL
*
L
L
L
*
*
STOP
Move cursor
2 BB> left or right
3 BKSP
*
4
COPY
4 characters?
1 RENAME
NO
NO
1
1 < BB or
ENTER
L
Add character
over cursor
L
L
L
RUN
SCREEN
Name Copy
TEMPERAMENT MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
START COPY
SEDIT SDEL RUN STOP
L
L
MAN
SETUP MODE
KEY=C
A=440
EXAMPLE—CREATING A NEW TEMPERAMENT
3
or
L
4 NEXT
L
L
L
*
*
*
RUN
3 BKSP
*
2 OK
YES
*
3 RUN
YES
ENTER
*
4
or
NO
CHNG
2 DEL
*
1 REDO
NO
Add character
over cursor
2 BB>
Move cursor
left or right
*
Pick Name
Name
already exists?
1 EDIT
NO
*
3
NEW
4 characters?
CNCL
Remove
*last character
*
1
1 < BB or
3 CNCL
4
L
L
STARTCEDIT
*
New temperament
stored in memory
3 DONE
ENTER
*
Activates new temperament
L
L
L
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
*
Edit Notes
4
START
Activates new
temperament
*
CNCL
2
*
1
1st page: factory presets
Succeeding pages: up to
255 custom temperaments
EDIT
Next note
L
Custom only
L
L
Select Temperament
L
L
SETUP
00 4
*
2 FILE
*
1
C
L
L
3
*
L
YES
*
*
2
YES
NO
*
*
*
1 YES
Settings copied
4 SLCT
*
CNCL
*
DEL
*
*
L
L
L
3
*
NO
4 NEXT
or
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
Next note
Activates new temperament
ENTER
Stored in
memory
3 DONE
L
L
2
SLCT
*
*
*
Temprmnt Deleted
1 YES
4
*
4 BACK
any key
*
Edit Notes
L
RUN
*
CNCL
*
*
3
L
L
L
2 COPYCDEL
Select from custom
temperaments only
2
L
Activates equal temperament
3 RUN
4
Select temperament
to copy from
*
2 NO
Delete
previous?
2 DEL
1 YES
CNCL
L
L
L
*
Remove last
character
Name
already exists?
*
*
STOP
Move cursor
2 BB> left or right
3 BKSP
*
4
COPY
4 characters?
1 RENAME
NO
NO
1
1 < BB or
ENTER
L
Add character
over cursor
L
L
L
RUN
SCREEN
Name Copy
TEMPERAMENT MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
START COPY
SEDIT SDEL RUN STOP
L
L
MAN
SETUP MODE
KEY=C
A=440
EXAMPLE—COPYING FROM AN EXISTING TEMPERAMENT AND EDITING
3
or
L
4 NEXT
L
L
L
*
*
*
2 OK
YES
*
3 RUN
YES
Name
already exists?
1 EDIT
*
*
3 CNCL
NO
3 BKSP
ENTER
*
4
or
NO
CHNG
2 DEL
*
1 REDO
NO
Add character
over cursor
2 BB>
Move cursor
left or right
* Name
Pick
*
3 RUN
NEW
4 characters?
Remove
last character
*
1
1 < BB or
4 CNCL
L
L
STARTCEDIT
*
New temperament
stored in memory
3 DONE
ENTER
*
Activates new temperament
L
L
L
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
*
Edit Notes
4
START
Activates new
temperament
*
CNCL
2
*
1
1st page: factory presets
Succeeding pages: up to
255 custom temperaments
EDIT
Next note
L
Custom only
L
L
Select Temperament
L
L
SETUP
00 4
*
2 FILE
*
1
C
L
L
*
L
*
*
*
2 NO
*
2 NO
*
*
*
3 RUN
*
4 CNCL
1 YES
Settings copied
4 SLCT
Select temperament
to copy from
1 YES
3 CNCL
L
L
L
*
Delete
previous?
2 DEL
YES
already exists?
*Name
YES
4 characters?
1 RENAME
NO
NO
Remove last
character
L
*
L
L
2 NO
4 NEXT
or
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
Next note
Activates new temperament
*
Stored in
memory
ENTER
*
3 DONE
L
L
*
*
*
Temprmnt Deleted
Edit Notes
L
*
4 BACK
4 SLCT
*
any key
1 YES
*
3 RUN
3 CNCL
L
L
Select from custom
temperaments only
*
*
L
2 COPYCDEL
2 DEL
L
Activates equal temperament
Move cursor
2 BB> left or right
3 BKSP
*
*
4 STOP
1 COPY
1 < BB or
ENTER
L
Add character
over cursor
L
L
L
RUN
SCREEN
Name Copy
TEMPERAMENT MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
START COPY
SEDIT SDEL RUN STOP
L
L
MAN
SETUP MODE
KEY=C
A=440
EXAMPLE—DELETING A USER-PROGRAMMED TEMPERAMENT
A comprehensive flowchart at the end of this instruction manual shows ALL possible paths through the temperament menus
and provides a good reference once the fundamental concept of the these menus is understood. You may note that at almost
every point, there is a button function (like BACK or REDO) which jumps to a logical earlier step of the current activity or
a button function (like RUN or CNCL—short for "cancel") which jumps out of the current activity with no changes made.
Let’s run through one of the examples in detail. To create a new temperament file from scratch, follow the steps already
outlined above to enter the FILE menu. This takes us to the second screen shown on the flowcharts. For this example, we
will be following along on the second temperament example flowchart entitled: EXAMPLE—CREATING A NEW
TEMPERAMENT. We see from that flowchart that the next step is to press “1” which is, at this point, labeled STARTEDIT:
TEMPERAMENT MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
START COPY
–EDIT –DEL RUN STOP
2
3
÷
7
1
+
1
4
SELECT TEMPERAMENT
EQUA PYTH JUMA P5TH
MEAN WRK3 KRN3 YONG
NEW
CNCL START
1
2
3
4
Accessing the Temperament Select Screen
At this point we are given the choice of selecting from among the preset Temperament Files in the tuner or selecting more
options with the Function buttons below the screen. In this example, we intend to create a new temperament, and, thus, we
press the “1” button labeled “NEW”:
SELECT TEMPERAMENT
EQUA PYTH JUMA P5TH
MEAN WRK3 KRN3 YONG
NEW
CNCL START
2
3
4
÷
7
1
+
1
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=_ _ _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
1
2
3
4
Accessing the PICK NAME Screen
Notice upon entering the PICK NAME screen that the cursor (underline) is positioned under the “A” in the selection string.
While this screen is active, hitting the front panel ENTER button will cause whatever character is underlined to be added
to the TEMPERAMENT FILE name shown on the third screen line (after “TMPR=”). The underlines here are simply placeholders that are replaced by selected characters. To select a different character to enter into the name, the “1” or “2” buttons
will retreat or advance, respectively, the current cursor position (i.e., the character selection underline) as indicated by the
back-arrow and forward-arrow over these buttons on the screen..
NOTE: Hitting the “1” button while the cursor is on “A” will cause the cursor to “wrap around” to the last selection
character—the “blank” after “9” on the third screen line—to reduce the time it would take to scroll from a character at the
beginning of the selections to one near the end. Similarly, hitting the “2” (advance or — — >) button while the current
cursor selection is this last “blank” character will cause the cursor position to “wrap around” to the top (or “A”).
Since we are beginning on the very first selection character, “A”, we would now press the “2” button to move the cursor
forward under the “B” (in anticipation of naming our Temperament File: “BG 1”, i.e., “B”, “G”, “blank”, “1”).
Page 19
1
2
3
+
2
÷
7
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=_ _ _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
4
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=_ _ _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
1
2
3
4
Selecting a Character To Enter Into the New Temperament File Name
The cursor underline is now under the “B” in the selection string, but no character has been added to the temperament file
name. To do this we must press the ENTER button on the front panel. (Note our position in the flowchart.)
1
2
3
+
ENTER
÷
7
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=_ _ _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
4
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=B _ _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
1
2
3
4
Entering a Selected Character Into the New Temperament File Name
Notice that a “B” character has now been entered into the first of the four Temperament File name positions. Also note that
we remain on the PICK NAME screen at this time. All file names must have exactly 4 characters (although any number of
the four may be the “blank” character), and the tuner will remain on this selection screen until we have selected a character
for all four positions in the name field area (or, alternatively, if we opt to cancel (CNCL) the whole operation with button
“4”).
In order to advance the cursor to fall under the “G” (in anticipation of our next character selection), we could press the “2”
button five times in quick succession. Alternatively, if the “2” button is held in the pressed position, the cursor will advance
automatically one character at a time and several times a second. (This same hold feature is present on the “1” button when
reversing the cursor.) This is typically how we would advance the cursor any time we would need to move the cursor by
more than two or three characters.
1
2
3
4
+
2
(Press and hold)
7
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=B _ _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
÷
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=B _ _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
1
2
3
Selecting the Second Character To Enter Into the New Temperament File Name
Once again, we must press the ENTER button to actually add our selection to the Temperament File name:
Page 20
4
1
2
3
+
ENTER
÷
7
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=B _ _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
4
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=B G _ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
1
2
3
4
Entering the Second Character Into the New Temperament File Name
For the third character, a “blank” in our example of “BG 1”, we could either continue to advance through the letters and
numbers in the selection string to arrive at the “blank” character or we could make use of the wrap-around feature and reverse
the cursor through “A” to the “blank”. This requires traversing only seven characters, so let us proceed with the shortcut:
1
2
3
+
1
(Press and hold)
÷
7
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=B G_ _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
4
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
TMPR=B G_ _
23456789
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
1
2
3
4
Selecting the Third Character To Enter Into the New Temperament File Name
And, once again, entering:
1
2
3
4
+
ENTER
7
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
TMPR=B G _ _
23456789
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
÷
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
TMPR=B G _
23456789
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
1
2
3
4
Entering the Third Character Into the New Temperament File Name
Notice the place-holding underline in the third position of the name is now completely blank. For our final character, we
see that it will be faster to retreat the cursor back to the “1” character than to wrap-around forward through “A” and beyond:
Page 21
1
2
3
+
1
(Press and hold)
÷
7
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
TMPR=B G _
23456789
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
4
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=B G _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
1
2
3
4
Selecting the Final Character To Enter Into the New Temperament File Name
And, finally:
1
2
3
+
ENTER
÷
7
PICK NAME = ABCDEFGH
I JKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ01
23456789
TMPR=B G _
< — —
— — >
BKSP
CNCL
THE NAME CHOSEN FOR
TEMPERAMENT IS: BG 1
REDO
1
OK
2
CNCL
3
4
4
Entering the Final Character Into the New Temperament File Name
You may briefly see the PICK NAME screen updated with the final name character, but this new “verify” screen will appear
as soon as you release the ENTER button at this point. On the flowchart, we have now exited the loop defined by the
“4 characters?” decision box; in other words, since we have now entered four characters into our temperament file name we
now exit through the path labeled “YES” (in answer to the “4 characters?” question). Note that, at any time up to this point,
if we had mistakenly entered an incorrect character, we could have hit the “3” button (BKSP) to backspace through the last
character entered into the name at the time. Backspacing and entering characters can be repeated indefinitely until the fourth
name character is entered and this final verify screen is activated. We still have an opportunity to start completely from
scratch in naming our temperament file by hitting the “1” (REDO) button at this point. We may also cancel the entire
temperament creation process and return to the RUN screen with no permanent changes by pressing the “3” (CNCL) button.
Typically, however, being confident and consummate professionals, we will press “2” to OK our selection:
THE NAME CHOSEN FOR
TEMPERAMENT IS: BG 1
REDO
2
CNCL
3
4
2
7
1
OK
+
÷
TMPR = BG 1
NOTE= C
KEY= C
00. 0 ¢
DONE NEXT
1
2
3
4
Verify Temperament File Name and Begin Note Editing
NOTE: If you had chosen either a name that you have already used and stored in the unit or a name used as one of the
factory defaults, a different screen will be activated which indicates the problem and permits you to return to the
TEMPERAMENT MENU screen with no changes. You must then decide which course of action you wish to take: proceed
with creating a temperament file with a different name or delete the previously created user file and then create your new
temperament file using this original name.
Page 22
We are assuming that we have chosen a valid name for our file and have, consequently, followed the “NO” path from the
“Name already exists?” decision box on the flowchart. Thus, we have now entered the “Edit Notes” phase of our
temperament file creation. From this one screen, we can now define the note offsets for all 12 scale notes. Note that this
screen shows you which temperament file you are editing as well as which scale note you are editing. Also note that a
“KEY=C” indication is shown on the top line.
NOTE: Regardless of what key signature was current before entering the edit process for temperaments , the key always
reverts to “C” for the purposes of defining note offsets. Once the editing process is complete and you return to the RUN
screen, you may enter any of the alternate keys with the usual results. However, if you applied an offset of 1.1 cents to “D”,
for example, this offset will always apply to “Concert D” regardless of the new KEY you have selected.
The “cents” indication on the second line of this screen is always indicates the individual offset currently selected for the
displayed note. Had we been editing a previously defined temperament file, this first screen may have shown a non-zero
number here. Because we are creating a new temperament file this and all the remaining 11 notes will be initialized to
00.0 cents.
NOTE: Regardless of the resolution previously chosen under the RUN screen, temperament file editing is always carried
out in the highest (0.1 cent) resolution of the tuner.
As you can see from the flowchart, changing the cent value for the current note offset is accomplished with the UP ARROW
and DOWN ARROW buttons next to the screen. Once we set the desired offset for the displayed note, we may either hit
button “4” (NEXT) or the ENTER button. Either one temporarily saves our offset selection and automatically points the
display to the next note in the sequence. At any time short of defining all 12 notes, we may exit and permanently save the
file by hitting button “3” (DONE) and then the ENTER button. This will save our temperament file with all the note offsets
we had entered to that point. Any notes that we declined to define in an editing session will be saved with the initial zero
values (or previously defined offset values if we were editing a pre-existing file). Thus, had we been merely editing a preexisting temperament file, we may have wished to only “tweak” several values and not redefine the whole file.
Once a temperament is activated, its name will appear at the upper right-hand corner of the RUN screen:
KEY= C
A=440
TMPR= PYTH
C
00 ¢
AUTO
SETUP MODE
1
2
MET
3
4
4. TUNING INSTRUMENTS THAT PLAY IN OTHER THAN THE KEY OF "C"
The Model 590 solves one of the biggest difficulties for wind players and other non-"C" instrument musicians when using
a precision tuner. Mental transposition of your note into the key of "C" is no longer required. The tuner can be easily shifted
to show the correctly transposed note names for tones played on C, B=, F, and E= instruments.
When the Model 590 is displaying the normal RUN screen, simply press the button labeled "KEY". Multiple presses of this
button will cycle the tuner through the musical instrument tuning keys of C, B=, F, and E=. You may press the KEY button
as many times as you wish and the tuner will sequence through the keys of C, B=, F, E=, C, etc. The pitch referenced by
the tuner will change as the speed of the strobe disc is internally transposed for the new tuning key. (Note that any button,
such as KEY, which causes a change in strobe disc speed will be temporarily disabled while the motor is accelerating to its
destination speed.) When in Auto-Note mode, sound your note and the scale note displayed on the LCD screen will reflect
the transposition from "concert pitch" that corresponds with the currently selected KEY parameter shown in upper left hand
corner of the RUN screen.
Page 23
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
1
2
MET
3
4
+
÷
7
AUTO
SETUP MODE
KEY
KEY= Bb
A=440
C
AUTO
SETUP MODE
1
2
00 ¢
MET
3
4
Choosing Alternate KEY Transpositions
5. ENHANCED RESOLUTION OF INTONATION MEASUREMENTS
As you continue to practice your intonation with the Model 590, you will find that your pitch accuracy continually improves.
As you find yourself playing more and more closely to perfect intonation, you may wish to adjust the tuner more precisely
to your pitch. The Model 590 has tuning accuracy to within 0.1 cents. The tuner may be adjusted to your note within that
same accuracy. The tuner always powers up with a displayed resolution of 1 cent. This is shown as "00 ¢". When operating
under the RUN screen, the tuner can be set for enhanced resolution of either 0.5 cents or 0.1 cents. Press and hold the
ENTER button, then press either the UP ARROW or DOWN ARROW button and the resolution will be changed to
0.5 cents. To further enhance the resolution to 0.1 cent increments, first release the ENTER button, then press and hold it
again while you press either the UP ARROW or DOWN ARROW button. The LCD screen always presents enhanced
resolution of 0.5 cents and 0.1 cents by showing "xx.x ¢", that is, three digits with a decimal point in the number.
When the tuner is set for enhanced resolution, the UP ARROW and DOWN ARROW buttons increment/decrement the
tuning adjustments of the tuner in steps of 0.5 cents or 0.1 cents. This permits intonation measurements with an accuracy
of 1/200 or 1/1000 semitone.
The resolution of the tuner may be returned to 1 cent resolution by again using the UP ARROW or DOWN ARROW buttons
in conjunction with the ENTER button (press and hold the ENTER button and then press either UP ARROW or DOWN
ARROW). The tuner resolution cycles through a selection sequence of 1 cent, 0.5 cent, 0.1 cent, 1 cent, etc. Note that the
tuner requires you to release the ENTER button between each step of this resolution selection cycle. Then press and hold
it again to go to the next resolution selection.
Note: Upon returning to the RUN screen from FILE (temperament) menus, 0.1 cent resolution remains active.
Other possible uses of the enhanced resolution of 0.5 cents, or 0.1 cent could be for exact measurements of precise partial
tone frequencies during the manufacture of percussive musical instruments (for example - bells, chimes, gongs, etc.), or for

specific scientific research into the timbral structure of complex sounds and vibrations in the musical and audible frequency
spectrum. Yet another use is to allow the tuner to more precisely match a currently sharp or flat instrument (such as a piano
or organ) so that the tuner can then be used to tune other instruments in the ensemble.
6. CHECKING INTONATION WITH THE AutoStrobe 590
When you wish to check your playing intonation, the tuner can assist in a very simple manner. You will need a partner to
adjust the tuner to the note(s) you are checking.
When checking and adjusting your own intonation, it is probably better to use an external microphone. Turn your back to
the tuner while playing your note so you don't see the indications on the tuning disc while your partner is making the
adjustments. That way you will be less likely to slowly change your intonation at the same time your partner is adjusting
the tuner to the note you are playing.
Page 24
a.
Connect an external microphone to the EXTERNAL INPUT connector of the tuner. Set this microphone on a stand
so that you can face away from the tuner.
b. Adjust the tuner to the tuning key of your instrument as detailed above. If necessary, raise or lower the standard
tuning reference pitch of the tuner (Concert A setting under the SETUP menu).
c.
You are now ready to begin. For the remainder of this section we will assume that your instrument is tuned in "C"
to a pitch of A = 440 Hz. The normal RUN screen of the tuner will be displayed:
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
AUTO
SETUP MODE
1
2
MET
3
4
d. Play your note into the microphone, while your partner watches the strobe window. While you are sounding your
note, your partner will press the UP ARROW and/or DOWN ARROW buttons until the dark markings on the tuning
wheel appear to be stationary. When these markings are stationary, the tuner is in tune with the note you are
playing.
e.
The display will show the correctness of your intonation by indicating how many cents sharp or flat your partner
adjusted the tuner to match the note as you actually played it. This is presented at the "+" (sharp) or "-" (flat)
"xx.x ¢" (cents) location of the display screen.
f.
Musical tuning is measured by a unit called cents, representing a 1/100 division of a semitone. There are 1200 cents
in each octave, and exactly 100 cents between each half-step note in equal temperament tuning. The Model 590
is adjustable in a range of ±1/2 semitone (+50.0 cents sharp to -50.0 cents flat) from being perfectly in tune
(00.0 cents) at the selected temperament and scale note.
7. USING THE PETERSON AutoStrobe 590 AS A METRONOME
The Model 590, when not needed as a tuning instrument, can function as a fully programmable audio/visual metronome.
There are two methods to initiate its use. The bottom line of the LCD screen ALWAYS indicates the current functions (if
any) of the four Function buttons (labeled "1" through "4") directly beneath. When the normal RUN screen (shown below
at the left) is active, button "4" is labeled "MET" for metronome. Pressing this button once, will cause the Model 590 to
cease operating as a strobe tuner and prepare for metronome operation by a) replacing the RUN LCD screen with the
METRONOME screen, and b) spinning the strobe motor at a new unchanging speed which is explained below.
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
1
2
MET
3
4
+
÷
7
MAN
SETUP MODE
4
METRONOME OFF
BEATS/MIN=XXX
X=BEATS/MEAS
DOWN UP
TUNER
1
2
3
4
Accessing Metronome Screen - Method 1
Page 25
(Note that, at this point, the metronome has not actually been turned on; no audio or visual metronome beats have begun
cycling.) The second method available for initiating the Metronome screen is to press the "Metronome On/Off" button below
the "1" button on the front panel ONCE while the RUN screen is active.
KEY= C
A=440
C
00 ¢
AUTO
SETUP MODE
2
3
+
÷
7
1
MET
4
METRONOME OFF
BEATS/MIN=XXX
X=BEATS/MEAS
DOWN UP
TUNER
1
2
3
4
Accessing Metronome Screen - Method 2
This Metronome On/Off button is connected in parallel with the "METRONOME SWITCH" 1/4-inch jack at the rear of the
unit. Any momentary-close contact device such as a footswitch may be used in place of or in addition to this button at any
time. (The front-panel button will continue to operate with a device plugged into this rear jack unless the device is held in
the closed position—make sure that the device operates in a momentary-close fashion. A proper footswitch is available from
peterson as part #140070.)
METRONOME OFF
BEATS/MIN=240
X=BEATS/MEAS
DOWN UP
TUNER
2
3
4
÷
7
1
+
!
Once the METRONOME screen is active, you may initiate several operations: metronome rate changes, measure length
changes, and metronome on/off. The current rate for the metronome, expressed in beats/minute (BEATS/MIN), is always
displayed on the second line of this screen and is always adjustable (even when the metronome is running) with the "up
arrow" and "down arrow" buttons to the right of the LCD screen. The factory default setting is 120 beats/minute and the
Model 590 will continue to power-up with this value regardless of changes made in this screen from a previous session. (If
desired, the power-up default may be changed under the SETUP screens which are described in an earlier section of this
manual.) The range of values for metronome rate is 40 to 240 BEATS/MIN. Incrementing or decrementing above and below
these limits causes the parameter to "wrap around" to the opposite limit. This effectively reduces the time required to change
the rate from a very high setting to a low one or vice versa. For example, changing from 238 BEATS/MIN to 45
BEATS/MIN would require one to decrement through 193 values but by incrementing through 240, only 8 values are
traversed!
METRONOME OFF
BEATS/MIN= 40
X=BEATS/MEAS
DOWN UP
TUNER
1
2
3
4
BEATS/MIN Wrap Through Limit Example
A second metronome parameter, beats per measure (BEATS/MEAS), is also displayed on this screen and may be adjusted
at any time that the METRONOME screen is active (even while the metronome is running) with the "1" and "2" function
buttons labeled "DOWN" and "UP" respectively. The factory default setting is 4 BEATS/MEAS and the Model 590 will
continue to power-up with this value regardless of changes made in this screen from a previous session. (If desired, the
power-up default may be changed under the SETUP screens which are described in an earlier section of this manual.)
Each time it is started (as described in the next section), the metronome will consistently begin at the first beat of a measure.
A measure is characterized by an initial "accented" beat followed by from 0 to 7 "unaccented" beats. This produces measures
Page 26
of from 1 to 8 beats in length which is the range of the BEATS/MEAS parameter. As with the BEATS/MIN parameter,
values will "wrap around"—1 around to 8 or 8 around to 1—if one attempts to decrement or increment through the limits.
Once it is started (and a suitable volume is set), the metronome will sound a short "blip" at each beat. The accented blips
are distinguished from the unaccented ones by a distinctly higher-pitched sound. The pitch of these blips—both accented
and unaccented—are affected by the "OCTAVE" knob at the left side of the front panel. This allows one to tailor the
metronome sounds to optimally "cut through" any instrument sounds regardless of register. On the top line of the LCD
screen display, the cycling of beats is visually shown by the alternation of two characters between dark and blank. Accented
beats cause an added exclamation (!) character to appear to the left of these other characters.
The concept of distinguishable measure boundaries greatly simplifies the task of synchronizing multiple players at both the
beginning of play and throughout a piece (assuming a static meter is maintained). In more advanced situations which include
meter shifts, a BEATS/MEAS setting of "1" will produce an unchanging blip tone from beat to beat.
Once the metronome screen is active (by one of the methods depicted above), the actual cycling of blip sounds (and their
visual counterparts) are initiated and stopped by pressing the Metronome On/Off button (below the "1" button under the
display screen:
METRONOME OFF
BEATS/MIN=XXX
X=BEATS/MEAS
DOWN UP
TUNER
2
3
4
÷
7
1
+
METRONOME ON
! $
BEATS/MIN=XXX
X=BEATS/MEAS
DOWN UP
TUNER
1
2
3
4
Starting the Metronome
As described above in activating the metronome screen, a footswitch jack labeled "METRONOME SWITCH" at the rear
of the unit is connected in parallel with the Metronome On/Off button. Thus, any momentary-close contact device such as
a footswitch may be used in place of or in conjunction with this front-panel button at any time. (The front-panel button will
continue to operate with a device plugged into this rear jack unless the device is held in the closed position—make sure that
the device operates in a momentary-close fashion. A proper footswitch is available from peterson as part #: 140070.)
GLOSSARY
cent - an audio frequency interval which is defined by the division of an equally-tempered semitone interval into 100 equalratio steps. Each cent is 1200/2 times the previous one in frequency, making it about 0.058% higher in frequency than the
previous one.
equal-tempered -type of note scaling within a musical octave in which a perfect 2:1 octave frequency ratio is divided into
equal-ratio scale notes. In a twelve-tone scale, each note's frequency is 12/2 times the previous one making each scale note
about 6% higher in frequency than the previous one.
equal temperament - a musical scale in which the scale notes are at equal ratios from one to the next. In a twelvetone/octave scale, this ratio is 12/2 making each scale note about 6% higher in frequency than the previous one. This scaling
choice provides for identical musical intervals regardless of the root note used for the key signature. In exchange for this
flexibility, all intervals have varying degrees of built-in dissonance associated with them.
temperament - frequency scaling of the notes within a musical octave.
timbre - the "character" or quality of a sound, distinct from pitch and volume, which distinguishes one sound from another.
All natural sounds may be thought of as containing various simple-tone (sinusoidal) frequencies in varying strengths. It is
Page 27
the relative strength and frequency of these over-tones or "partials" and the manner in which these parameters change over
the course of the sound that makes a note from a piano, for example, distinguishable from that of a trumpet.
Page 28
APPENDIX A:
WHY USE A "REAL" STROBE TUNER?
There are many cheap "strobe pattern" tuners on the market which attempt to emulate the look of the image produced by an
authentic rotating strobe disc. This is usually done with an array of LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) which are simply turned
ON or OFF in sequence so as to "appear" that the light image is drifting left or right.
While such schemes may satisfy an economic niche, they miss out on the almost magical (and supremely functional) aspects
of a true strobe effect. All of these emulation schemes necessarily have one thing in common: a digital decision must be
made to interpret when to indicate an "in tune" signal (either by lighting a special green LED or otherwise creating a nonsequencing pattern on the LEDs). This creates several problems.
The most glaring of these is the "dead band" problem. The circuitry to form an "In tune?/Out of tune?" decision can, indeed,
be very simple and cheap but, by its very nature, it implies that some amount of "out-of-tuneness" must be tolerated when
making an "in tune" indication. This is because a frequency that is EXACTLY in tune is an infinitely narrow point. If a
circuit could be made to react to only this point (which is impossible by the way), getting that treasured "Green LED" to turn
on would be even more of a frustration than it already is on such tuners. In fact, given the normal pitch fluctuations in a real
instrument, the light would simply never be ON (or at best be turned on for such short periods that you would never see it).
As the manufacturers of such tuners widen the band of "out of tuneness" around that ideal frequency—the deviation from
perfect tuning that they decide is "in tune enough" for you—a more stable indication is made. Note that this is at the expense
of your ever knowing how close or far from perfect tuning you are up to the limit of this "dead band". Such devices typically

give up at about ±1 cent deviation and usually allow several times this degree of inaccuracy before the "in tune" signal
reverts to an "out-of-tune" indication. Of course, the really bad news is: the total worse case error is double that. (You could
tune your instrument near the sharp end of the dead band, another player might land near the flat end.)
How bad is this level of detuning? Pretty bad! Over the centuries, many have wrestled with the concepts of intonation and
temperament—the art of setting appropriate pitch intervals for the various musical notes. As it happens, there is no one
temperament that allows for truly in-tune musical intervals over multiple key signatures. The level of concern in these cases:

as small as 1 or 2 cents! For example, music in modern western culture is overwhelmingly based upon equal temperament .
We have grown accustomed to some of the inherent inaccuracies of this temperament, yet it does present problems. For
instance, one of the milder imperfections is the production of intervals of fifths which are between 1 and 2 cents flat from
"perfect" non-beating intervals (...and you don't even want to know how bad the thirds are!) In many cases, this is quite
acceptable. However, with harmonically rich instruments—a brass section or an electronically distorted guitar, for
example—even this level of detuning can be disturbing. (Good brass players actually adjust the intonation of the notes they
play to minimize this problem. This is why "a good section is hard to find!") In the case of the guitar where such on-the-fly
adjustments are impossible, adding another couple of cents inaccuracy because of tuning device limitations can yield
positively raucous results. In the orchestral case, the added imprecision could spread the instruments out to the point that
even accomplished players would have difficulty "lipping" the notes accurately. Of course, with their limited precision, the
pseudo-strobe tuners have no hope of properly distinguishing between temperaments. The best that they can do is center
on equal-tempered notes (with their particular shortcomings) and lop on a "dead band" for good measure.
The magic of a true strobe lies in the responsiveness and "smoothness" of the effect from "flat" to "perfectly in tune" to
"sharp". Physically, no change of state occurs in the tuner—no discrete decision takes place. Your eye simply interprets
the effect of the spinning pattern in relation to the blinking illumination behind it. Thus, the response to the user as the input
pitch is adjusted is literally at the speed of light! This is a perfect visual analogy to the effect of hearing two sound sources
"beat" against each other when they are out of tune. Moreover, your ability to discern movement in the strobe image
(indicating an out-of-tune audio source) is actually more sensitive than that of hearing audio beats and much more sensitive
(about 10 to 20 times more!) than "pseudo-strobe" tuners. This level of precision in your Model 590 tuner not only allows
unprecedented accuracy in tuning to "standard" pitches, but permits one to utilize the subtler shades of altered
temperaments—both pre-programmed and user-programmable—discussed in the SETUP section of this manual.
Page 29
APPENDIX B:
WHY BE CONCERNED ABOUT UNEQUAL TEMPERAMENTS?
Temperament refers to the specific frequency (pitch) intervals placed between notes in a musical scale. With 12 notes per
octave (the most prevalent case but, by no means, the only case), there are an infinite number of ways to set the audio
frequencies of these notes relative to one another. Through the centuries, many have wrestled with the challenge of creating
the most pleasing, yet universally flexible, temperament of these 12 intervals. It turns out that it is mathematically impossible
to achieve both completely, that is, if by "pleasing", one means smooth beat-free intervals, and, if by "flexible", one means
satisfactory harmony in all possible key signatures.
Since compromise is the only option, it should come as no surprise that there exists about as many different well-defined
temperaments as there are people who have attempted to create them. The fact is: both of these goals—pleasing and
flexible—are moving targets. The requirements of harmonicity and key signature flexibility have changed greatly over the
centuries in general and vary just as greatly from person to person. For example, a piece in the 18th-century baroque style
might never modulate from a single key signature (or perhaps just to the very similar "5th" key). A temperament which is
functional in just a handful of keys might be (and was) satisfactory. In 20th-century western music, all keys and scale notes
are fair game, sometimes even within a single piece. Moreover, through the years, people have become more accepting of
complex and "closer" simultaneously sounded harmonic intervals. Harmonies that would have been considered unbearably
dissonant 150 years ago are now considered "colorful"—even beautiful—by many today. With such complex harmony and
effects like parallel harmonic movement, it is generally better to have harmonic relationships that are moderately imperfect,

but equally imperfect over all key signatures. Thus, Equal Temperament has generally won out in modern music. You may
never have considered before that it is the adherence to this temperament that allows one to unthinkingly transpose a musical
piece to any key on a piano with no ill effects.
So, why worry about altered temperaments if equal temperament is so pervasive? The reasons are many and varied. Because
equal temperament lands so squarely in favor of flexibility, some of the intervals are, well, not very pleasing. For example,
major thirds are about 14 cents sharp from the "perfect" non-beating interval...and how often do you play a piece of music
with no major thirds anywhere? In some music, on some instruments, this is bearable. (We certainly have had a lot of
opportunity to get used to it!) But play a major third interval using a brass or reed sound (with no chorusing or other effects)
on a standard equally-tempered synthesizer, and you will understand something about why people still want to hear "live"

horn sections. No matter how good the actual timbre of the synthesized sound is, there is something very "unhorn-like"
and disturbing about that simple harmony. Good brass and reed players constantly, and sometimes unconsciously, "lip" the
notes they play to minimize intervalic beating with notes played by others in their section.
Players of other types of instruments are not so lucky. There can be no adjusting of strings on-the-fly while playing a fretted
string instrument like a guitar; there is no "lipping" possible while playing several hundred pipes in a pipe organ. If one is
playing a program which includes classical period pieces, he will simply never achieve on an equally-tempered instrument
the beautiful effect that the composer had envisioned when composing the piece for a Just or Mean-Tone tempered
instrument. Similarly, because of their unique use of certain musical intervals, instruments like the steel slide guitar can
benefit by purposely tuning to un-equal temperaments.
Sometimes unequal temperament can be used to help correct inherent deficiencies in certain types of instruments. Fretted
instruments like the guitar are designed to be equally-tempered but it turns out that slightly altered tunings of the open strings
and harmonics relative to the fretted notes can improve the overall sound of the instrument. This is because real strings do
not act quite the same as the theoretical models that must be assumed when designing musical instruments around them.
Similarly, makers of musical instruments (such as the steel drum, bells, xylophone, etc.) which have very inharmonic timbres
can benefit from a tuner with altered temperament capabilities by using the note offsets to mimic the desired "harmonics"
(or, more accurately, partial frequencies) inherent in a given sounded tone. The programmable nature of temperaments in
the Model 590 means less work compared to constantly "dialing in" different harmonic offsets.
INDEX
Page 30
AC Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1
accuracy
tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5
Auto-Note selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3, Page 7, Page 9
offset limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4, Page 8
AUTOmatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3, Page 7
BALANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 7
buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6
Concert A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5, Page 10
controls
BALANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 7
front-panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5
OCTAVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 7
VOLUME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 7
default settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 9
DISPLAY +2/-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6, Page 9
EXTERNAL INPUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 3, Page 5
EXTERNAL SPEAKER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2
factory defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 9
footswitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7, Page 26, Page 27
frequency calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 10
headphones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 7
intonation training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 24
KEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6, Page 9, Page 23
LCD screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6
initial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2
RUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3
MANual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3, Page 7
menu
FILE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 12
SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8
temperament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 12
METRONOME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 25
beats/measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 27
beats/minute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 26
on/off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 27
rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 26
METRONOME settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 9, Page 25
METRONOME SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7, Page 26, Page 27
microphone
built-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 3
external . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3, Page 5
MODE
automatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3, Page 7
manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3, Page 7
note selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3, Page 7
OCTAVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 7
pitch calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 10
pitch reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5, Page 10
factory default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5, Page 9
power-up settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 9
resolution
tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 24
Page 31
screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6
FILE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 12
initial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2
RUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3
temperament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 12
serial number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3
SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8
strobe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 29
accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 29
tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5, Page 29
temperaments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8, Page 11
creation example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 19
factory default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 12
unequal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 30
Voltage Selection Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1
VOLUME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2, Page 7
AutoStrobe™ is a trademark of Peterson Electro-Musical Products, Inc.
All contents © Copyright 1998-1999 by Peterson Electro-Musical Products, Inc. No part or parts may be copied or
reproduced without the expressed written consent of Peterson Electro-Musical Products, Inc.
Page 32
or
L
4 NEXT
L
L
L
*
*
*
RUN
3 BKSP
*
2 OK
YES
*
3 RUN
YES
ENTER
Move cursor
left or right
*
4
or
NO
CHNG
2 DEL
*
1 REDO
NO
Add character
over cursor
2 BB>
Pick Name
Name
already exists?
1 EDIT
*
*
*
3
NEW
4 characters?
CNCL
Remove
*last character
NO
1
1 < BB or
L
3 CNCL
4
L
*
STARTCEDIT
New temperament
stored in memory
3 DONE
ENTER
*
Activates new temperament
L
L
L
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
*
Edit Notes
4
START
Activates new
temperament
*
3
2
*
CNCL
EDIT
Next note
L
Custom only
L
L
1
1st page: factory presets
Succeeding pages: up to
255 custom temperaments
Select Temperament
L
L
SETUP
00 4
*
2 FILE
*
1
C
L
L
3
*
L
YES
*
*
2
YES
NO
*
*
*
1 YES
Settings copied
4 SLCT
*
CNCL
*
DEL
*
*
L
L
L
3
*
NO
4 NEXT
or
ENTER
Inc / Dec cents
of currently
displayed note
Next note
Activates new temperament
ENTER
Stored in
memory
3 DONE
L
L
2
SLCT
*
*
*
Temprmnt Deleted
1 YES
4
*
4 BACK
any key
*
Edit Notes
L
RUN
*
CNCL
*
*
3
L
L
L
2 COPYCDEL
Select from custom
temperaments only
2
L
Activates equal temperament
3 RUN
4
Select temperament
to copy from
*
2 NO
Delete
previous?
2 DEL
1 YES
CNCL
L
L
L
*
Remove last
character
Name
already exists?
*
*
STOP
cursor
2 BB> Move
left or right
3 BKSP
*
4
COPY
4 characters?
1 RENAME
NO
NO
1
1 < BB or
ENTER
L
Add character
over cursor
L
L
L
RUN
SCREEN
Name Copy
TEMPERAMENT MENU
PLEASE SELECT MODE
START COPY
SEDIT SDEL RUN STOP
L
L
MAN
SETUP MODE
KEY=C
A=440
FLOWCHART OF TEMPERAMENT MENUS