HORITA TCP-50 SMPTE TIME CODE PROCESSOR USER MANUAL

HORITA TCP-50 SMPTE TIME CODE PROCESSOR USER MANUAL
HORITA
TCP-50
SMPTE TIME CODE PROCESSOR
USER MANUAL
For Models TCP-50, RM-50/TCP, SR-50/TCP
And AO-50/TCP
Doc. 073144-00
Rev. B
(C) Copyright 2014
P.O. Box 3993, Mission Viejo, CA 92690 (949) 489-0240 www.horita.com
COPYRIGHT
(C) 2014 HORITA Co. Inc.,
All rights reserved
No part of this document may be copied or reproduced in any form or by any means without prior
written consent of HORITA Co. INC., P.O. Box 3993, Mission Viejo, CA 92690.
HORITA Co. INC. makes no warranties with respect to this documentation and disclaims any
warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.
HORITA, its logo, and TCP-50 are trademarks of HORITA Co., Inc.
2
Table Of Contents
1 GENERAL
5
1-1
5
Word and Acronym Definitions
2 FEATURES
6
3 CONNECTING
7
3.1
3.2
3.3
7
8
8
8
8
3.4
Connecting Power
Operating From Battery Power
Connecting Video IN and OUT
Figure 3-1, Basic TCP-50 Hookup
Connecting Time Code IN and OUT
4 OPERATING
8
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
8
8
8
9
9
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10
11
13
14
15
15
15
16
16
16
17
17
17
18
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.16
4.17
4.18
4.19
4.20
4.21
4.22
4.23
4.24
4.25
4.26
4.27
4-28
4.29
4.30
4.31
4.32
4.33
4.34
4.35
Front Panel Switches
POWER Switch
MODE Switch
POSITION Switch
CHAR Switch
TCP-50 Mode Flow Diagram Explanation
Figure 4-1, TCP-50 Mode Flow Diagram
LED Operation
Table 4-1, TCP-50 LED Operation
Entering and Exiting the Setup Menus
Selecting Different Setup Menu Items
Changing the Selected Menu Item
"DISPLAY SETUP" Menu
"TIMECODE SETUP" Menu
"TCR ERR ANALYZER" Menu
"USERBIT SETUP" Menu
Selecting Local Titling Mode and
Character Selection
Table 4-2, Character Set
Inserting Spaces and Deleting Characters
Centering a Line of Text
Turning the Display Off and On
Time Code Jam and Genlock Operations
"Jamming"
"Genlock"
AUT SET JAM/LOK Mode Operation
Table 4-3, TCP-Auto Jam/Tolerance/Genlock
Settings
Time Code Frame Rate Translation
Time Code Offset
Time Code Backup or Repair
Time Code User Bit Substitution
Time Code "Start/Stop" Operation
Time Code Error Analyzer
SIGNAL INPUT Error
SYNC PAT Error
FPS Error
DROP/N-DROP Error
VALID TIME Error
VALID SEQUENCE Error
18
18
18
19
19
19
20
20
20
20
20
20
21
3
5 MAINTENANCE
21
5.1
5.2
5.3
21
21
21
21
21
21
5.4
5.5
Cleaning
Service and Troubleshooting
Adjustments
Figure 5-1, Adjustment Locations
Horizontal Size Adjustment
Video Level & Equalization Adjustment
6-SPECIFICATIONS
22
4
1
GENERAL
This manual provides instructions for installing and operating the HORITA TCP-50 Time Code Processor.
The TCP-50 is intended for use in field, studio, editing, engineering, and post production situations where it is desired to
translate between time code frame rates, add an offset to an existing time code value, repair a time code signal, evaluate
time code signal integrity, or provide a seamless switchover to a backup time code signal should a master time code signal
fail.
The TCP-50 consists of a SMPTE longitudinal Time Code Reader (TCR) and a SMPTE longitudinal Time Code Generator
(TCG) which operate together to perform the various translation functions. The TCP-50 has a time code input for the TCR
and a time code output from the TCG. There is also a composite video input to lock the TCG time code to a video reference
("genlock"), and to overlay the video with the TCR and TCG time code numbers or various TCP-50 operational setup
menus.
The TCP-50 also allows user entry up to 9 lines of 20 characters each of source ID or other alphanumeric titling
information.
All of the TCP-50 setup information, operating mode selection, and titling information is saved in a battery backed up, nonvolatile memory, and restored at power up.
1.1 Word and Acronym Definitions
Word and acronym definitions used in this manual are defined below:
DF
Drop Frame time code - A 30FPS time code numbering system consisting of hours, minutes, seconds, and
frames (HR:MN:SC:FR) running at the slightly slower frame rate of 29.97FPS rate causes the "real" time
indicated by the numbers to also run slightly slower, gradually falling behind real time to accumulate an
error of about 3 1/2 seconds an hour.
To correct this error in real time, some frame numbers are "skipped" or "dropped" from the expected
numbering sequence. The formula is that at the start of each minute, except for a new tens of minute, the
frame number sequence progresses from frame number 29 to frame number 02, rather than from frame
number 29 to frame number 00. This skipping ahead by 2 frame numbers a minute causes the time code
time to match that of real time.
EBU
European Broadcast Union - European standards setting organization.
FPS
Frames-Per-Second of video, film, or time code.
23.976FPS - video "film" camera frame rate proportionally slowed to match 29.97FPS video rate
24FPS - film speed frame rate.
25FPS - European PAL television frame rate.
29.97FPS US NTSC color television frame rate.
29.97DF - "Drop frame" time code that matches US television frame rate as well as real time.
29.97NDF - "Non-drop frame time code that matches US television frame rate but whose time value runs
slower than real time.
30FPS - US television BW frame rate.
Freerun
Not locked to a reference.
Genlock
To lock signals together such that one is a timing reference for the other. For example, to lock time code
generation to a video reference so that each frame of time code is generated in exact synchronism with
each video frame.
Jam, jamming,
To preset a time code generator to the same time as a time jammed
generated time code to be the same as the read time code.
LTC
Longitudinal (or Linear) Time Code - time code that has a frequency range that allows it to be recorded
on an audio recorder or the audio track of a video recorder. Generally, longitudinal refers to being
5
code reader to cause the
recorded on a continuous path along the length of the tape, rather than on "tracks" via a spinning head as
video is recorded.
See "TC"
NDF
Non-Drop Frame time code - time code that does not skip frame numbers 00 and 01 at the start of each
minute, but then whose time does not match that of real time.
NTSC
National Television Systems Committee - US standards setting organization.
SMPTE
Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers - US standards setting organization.
TC
Time Code - An electronic timing signal consisting of two audio tones that represent binary ones and
zeros which are then in turn used to encode a unique number for a each frame of video or film.
Instead of simply numbering the frames starting from 1 and proceeding on up, the frames are numbered
with an hours, minutes, seconds, frame value. This is so that, as long as there are an exact number of
frames in a second (no fractional number of frames in a second), the resulting frame number is also a
number that matches real time. This is convenient for editing television and film.
See "LTC"
TCR
Time Code Reader - reads and decodes SMPTE longitudinal time code.
TCG
Time Code Generator - generates SMPTE longitudinal time code.
UB
User Bits - Extra "user" information embedded within the hours, minutes, and seconds of the actual time
code numbers.
2
FEATURES
•
Four separate setup screens containing five menus for DISPLAY, TIMECODE, TCR ERR ANALYZER, USERBIT,
and SYSTEM setup provide simple and easy user selection of character attributes such as size, position, black/white,
etc., time code and user bit values, translation modes, monitoring of time code reading errors, and selection of video
standard.
•
Time Code Reader (TCR) portion of the TCP-50 reads SMPTE/EBU Longitudinal Time Code (LTC) at frame rates of
23.976FPS (Frames-Per-Second) 24FPS, 25FPS, drop and non-drop frame 29.97FPS, and 30FPS, at play speed +/20%.
•
TCR "Auto FPS" detect mode automatically detects 24, 25, 29.97 drop frame and 30FPS frame rates. Other frame
rates can be manually set.
•
TCR can display a video overlay of the time code and/or user bit numbers.
•
TCR "Error Analyzer" displays six 4-digit counter values for time code reading errors due to loss of the TCR input
signal, a bad time code "sync" pattern, a bad FPS value, a drop/non-drop frame error, an invalid time code number, or
an invalid time code sequence.
•
TCR Error Analyzer also features a time code/video phase meter display which shows the timing relationship between
the TCR time code signal input and the video signal input. This is useful to determine if and at what point the time
code is locked to the incoming video or if the time code is free-running.
•
TCG can video overlay display the SMPTE/EBU Longitudinal Time Code (LTC) output.
•
TCG can generate time code at 23.976FPS, 24FPS, 25FPS, 29.97FPS DF (Drop Frame), 29.97FPS Non-Drop Frame,
and 30FPS (non-drop frame), with a freerun accuracy of +/- 1 frame-per-hour.
•
TCG can manually or automatically "Jam" (preset) to the TCR time code input value.
6
•
A TCG automatic Jam can be set to take place if the time difference between the TCR and TCG time code values
exceeds a user settable value of from zero seconds and frames to over 59 seconds and 29 frames.
•
TCG can be set to "freerun" or to "genlock" (phase lock) the generated time code to incoming video or to the TCR time
code input.
•
When transcoding between any combination of frame rates of 24FPS, 25FPS, and 30FPS, or between 23.976 and
29.97 non-drop frame, the TCG can be set to genlock to the TCR time code so that although the frame rates are
different, each second of the time codes occur at the same time.
•
TCG can be set to run continuously after once being started, or to start and stop in response to the input time code
being read.
•
A special TCG Auto Jam/Genlock setup mode automatically sets up the TCP-50 for an optimum Jam type, Jam error
tolerance, and genlock mode according to the TCR and TCG frame rate selections.
•
TCG time code output can be offset from the TCR input time code by positive or negative values from 1-frame up to a
23:59:59:29 time value.
•
The TCG "user bit" portion of the generated time code can be set to match that of the TCR input or can be set to
substitute manually entered values for each of the eight (8) "nibbles" of the generated user bits.
•
TCR and TCG Video overlay displays can be set as black or white characters, with or without a background, with size
selectable between four horizontal and four vertical values.
•
The nine lines of the video overlay display can be automatically numbered (and unnumbered) from 1-9 for easier
placing of time code or source ID information on the screen.
•
Front panel LED blinks to indicate time code is being read and video is present.
•
Operates from a small AC power adapter, which is included, or can be operated in the field from 9-to-14 volts DC
battery power.
•
Available in desktop (TCP-50), Rackmount (RM-50/TCP), Rackmount Add On (AO-50/TCP) or Shortrack (SR50/TCP) models.
3
CONNECTING
3.1 Connecting Power
Included with your TCP-50 is an AC power adapter that provides a 9 volt, 500 milliamperes DC output. This adapter is
equipped with a miniature phone plug with the "+" (positive) voltage output connected to the front tip of the plug.
Insert the power plug into the TCP-50 "+9V POWER" connector and plug the adapter into 110-120 volt, 60-Hz AC power.
WARNING:
ELECTRICALLY OPERATED PRODUCT
As with all electrical products, precautions should be observed during handling and use to prevent electrical shock.
NOTE:
Make sure the plug is inserted all the way into the power connector or else damage to the power adapter may result. The
TCP-50 has internal protection circuitry to prevent it from being damaged should the wrong polarity of power be applied.
However, do not use an adapter of more than 9 volts at 500 milliamperes or damage to the TCP-50 may result.
7
3.2 Operating From Battery Power
You can operate your TCP-50 from battery power in order to use it in the field to process time code or add source Id or
other titling information.
The TCP-50 can be operated from 9-to-14 volts DC, obtained either from a conventional 12 volt video camera battery or
other DC source.
3.3 Connecting Video IN and OUT
Figure 3-1 shows a basic hookup for the TCP-50 when used with a typical video source and a video recorder or monitor.
VIDEO/TC
SOURCE
Video OUT
TC OUT
TCP-50
Video OUT
IN Video
IN TC
TC OUT
VIDEO REC.
OR MONITOR
IN Video
IN TC
Figure 3-1, Basic TCP-50 Hookup
Connect video from the video source to the BNC connector labeled VIDEO IN on the TCP-50. Connect VIDEO OUT from
the TCP-50 to downstream video equipment such as video monitors or video recorders, as desired.
When the TCP-50 is powered up, the VIDEO IN input is terminated at 75 Ohms. When powered off, video is looped
directly from VIDEO IN to VIDEO OUT, bypassing the TCP-50.
3.4 Connecting Time Code IN and OUT
Connect time code from the time code source to the RCA connector labeled TC IN on the TCP-50. Connect TC OUT from
the TCP-50 to the downstream equipment as desired.
4
OPERATING
To operate the TCP-50, connect video and time code in and out, apply power, and set the POWER switch to ON. A red
LED above the power switch lights steady on or begins flashing when the TCP-50 is powered up.
When the TCP-50 is first powered up, its operation returns to that which was selected when the TCP-50 was last powered
down. The POSITION and CHAR switches operate to provide quick and convenient control of the horizontal and vertical
position of the display, without going through any "menu" operations.
4.1 Front Panel Switches
There are four toggle type switches on the front panel, labeled POWER, MODE, POSITION, and CHAR. Operation of
each of these switches is described in the following paragraphs.
4.2 POWER Switch
The power switch turns TCP-50 power on and off. A red LED located above the power switch lights to indicate power is on
and also blinks at different rates to indicate presence of the time code and video inputs as described in more detail in later
paragraphs.
4.3 MODE Switch
The MODE switch is a three position momentary action switch used to select and control the basic operate/setup modes of
the TCP. The center position of the switch is off and the switch can be actuated to either DISPLAY or SETUP positions.
When the MODE switch is first actuated to SETUP, the TCP-50 switches into SETUP mode and the previously selected
setup menu and menu item are displayed. Thereafter, each time SETUP is selected the TCP-50 selects a different setup
menu.
8
There are four setup screens and five setup menus titled: DISPLAY SETUP, TIMECODE SETUP, TCR ERR
ANALYZER, USERBIT SETUP, and SYSTEM SETUP.
When actuated to DISPLAY from SETUP, the TCP-50 displays a video overlay of the TCR and TCG time code times
and/or user bit values, if enabled via an associated menu selection, as well as any source ID information entered for display.
4.4 POSITION Switch
The POSITION switch is a three position momentary action switch labeled with left/right and up/down arrows. This switch
is used to select various menu items when the TCP-50 is in SETUP mode, or to select the screen position for a character
when entering data in DISPLAY mode.
4.5 CHAR Switch
The CHAR (character) switch is a three position momentary action switch labeled PREV/NEXT and is used to change a
selected menu item's value when in SETUP mode, for example Y/N, ON/OFF, etc., or to select a specific character when
entering data in DISPLAY mode.
4.6 TCP-50 Mode Flow Diagram Explanation
Figure 4-1 shows how operation of the TCP-50 changes as the MODE switch is actuated between DISPLAY and SETUP.
The down arrow means that the MODE switch is actuated down to SETUP, the up arrow means that the switch is actuated
up to DISPLAY.
The diagram shows that, for example, if the TCP-50 was displaying source ID information, actuating the MODE switch to
SETUP would cause the TCP-50 to display a SETUP menu, while actuating the switch to DISPLAY would cause the
display to turn off.
UP arrow = DISPLAY
DOWN arrow = SETUP
Insert/Del Spaces
Enter Title Information
Title Display OFF
(DOWN arrow)
Title Display ON
Setup Menu Display ON
(Auto return to SETUP display)
Next SETUP Menu
Figure 4-1, TCP-50 Mode Flow Diagram
4.7 LED Operation
The front panel LED blinks at different rates to provide indication of TCP-50 operation. This is shown in Table 4-1.
LED Condition
OFF
Steady ON
Slow blink, 1-sec. ON/OFF
Fast blink ON/OFF
Combination Slow/Fast blink
Meaning
Power off
Video present, no time code
No video present
Reading time code
Reading time code, no video
Table 4-1, TCP-50 LED Operation
9
4.8 Entering and Exiting the Setup Menus
The setup menus allow selection of various display and character attributes, operating modes and functions, entering user
bit data, and error monitoring.
To display the setup menus, toggle the MODE switch to SETUP and release. Depending on the actual mode that the TCP50 is operating in, you may have to toggle the switch a few times to enter a setup menu.
The selected item on the setup menu is indicated by it "flashing" on and off, and the POSITION and CHAR switches now
serve to select and change the flashing menu item.
To exit the setup mode, actuate the MODE switch to DISPLAY and release.
4.9 Selecting Different Setup Menu Items
Menu items are selected via the POSITION switch. Flashing of the menu selection moves on to the next item each time the
POSITION switch is actuated and released. Actuating the switch down causes the selection to move to the right and down,
actuating the switch up causes the reverse action. Holding the POSITION switch actuated causes quick scanning through
the menu items.
Generally, user selectable and changeable items are preceded by a colon “:” character. Menu items or values that result
from internal TCP-50 calculations or automatically selected items are preceded by an equal “=” character.
4.10 Changing the Selected Menu Item
This section contains a detailed description of each setup menu, each setup menu item, and the specific operation of the
TCP-50 for each item selection option.
After a menu item is selected, the choices available for that item are accessed via the CHAR switch. Actuating the CHAR
switch down or up scans forward or backward through the choices available. Holding the switch actuated causes automatic
scanning through the choices.
4.11 "DISPLAY SETUP" Menu
A typical DISPLAY SETUP menu appears on the TCP-50 screen as follows:
*DISPLAY SETUP*
CHAR:WHT
BACK: ON
SIZE
H:1X V:2X
POSITION
H:17 V:30
CLR SCR:N
SYS RST:N
NUMBER LINES 1-9:
N
TCR/TCG SELECT:
TCR
TC
DSP: ON
POS:L8
UB DSP:OFF
POS:L6
The following paragraphs provide a detailed explanation of each of the DISPLAY SETUP menu items.
ITEM
CHAR
FUNCTION
Selects character “color” .
SELECTIONS
WHT = white characters
BLK = black characters
BACK
Selects character
background.
ON = background is on
OFF = background is off
SIZE
Character Horizontal
and Vertical size.
H (Horizontal)
V (Vertical)
1X = 1 time (1.0 H pixels)
2X = 2 times (2.0 H pixels)
3X = 3 times (3.0 H pixels)
4X = 4 times (4.0 H pixels)
1X = 1 time (7 H lines)
10
ITEM
FUNCTION
SELECTIONS
2X = 2 times (14 H lines)
3X = 3 times (28 H lines)
4X = 4 times (42 H lines)
Horizontal sizes 3 and 4 are not practical for displaying time code or user bit data, but can be
used for display of large source ID characters if desired.
POSITION
H (Horizontal)
V (Vertical)
06-64 Numerical reference.
05-64 Numerical reference.
The H and V position value controls the horizontal and vertical position of entire matrix of 9 lines of 20 characters each.
CLR SCR
Clear screen
Y = Clear title screen of
all text.
SYS RST
System reset
Y = Reset TCP-50 system.
System reset initializes all variable data in the TCP-50 to default values. A hardware selected SYSTEM RESET function is
accessible by powering up the TCP-50 while holding the MODE switch in the "SETUP" position, then releasing it.
NUMBER
LINES 1-9
Numbers lines on screen.
Y = Add line numbers
N = Remove line numbers
Numbering of the lines helps adjust H and V position and size and locate where on the screen to place text or the time code
or user bit displays. The lines are automatically numbered with 1-9 at the left side of the display when "Y" is selected. The
numbers are removed when "N" is selected.
TCR/TCG
SELECT
Selects the TCR or TCG
for display setup.
TCR = Time code reader
TCG = Time code generator
TC
Time code display
ON = TC display is on
OFF = TC display is off
POS
TC display line number
position.
L1-L9 = TC is displayed on
selected Line-1 to line-9
UB
User bit display
ON = UB display is on
OFF = UB display is off
POS
User bit display line
number position.
L1-L9 = UBs are displayed on
selected Line-1 to Line-9.
4.12 "TIMECODE SETUP" Menu
A typical TIMECODE SETUP menu appears on the TCP-50 screen as follows:
*TIMEOCDE SETUP*
TCR
00:00:00:00
FRM RATE:
DF AUT29
TCG FREE
00:00:00:00
FRM RATE:
DF 29.97
OFFSET:
+00:00:00:00
AUT SET JAM/LOK: ON
JAM AUT=Y
TOL:00:01
LOK:TCR=Y
ERR 00:00
ITEM
TCR
FUNCTION
TCR time code value
being read.
SELECTIONS
00:00:00:00 - to - 23:59:59:29
Format is HR:MN:SC:FR
FR (frame) value shown is for
11
ITEM
FUNCTION
SELECTIONS
30 FPS time code.
FRM RATE
TCR frame rate being
read or selected for
reading.
23.97, 24, 25, DF 29.97,
ND 29.97, 30, AUT??,
AUT24, AUT25, AUT29,
AUT30, frames-per-second
(FPS).
AUT?? is displayed when the TCR automatic frame rate mode is first selected. It is replaced with one of the
"AUT" frame rates after the frame rate of the incoming time code is detected, which may require a second or two.
TCG
TCG time code value.
FREE
STSP
00:00:00:00 - to - 23:59:59:29
FR (frame) value shown is for
30 FPS time code.
TCG runs continuously one started
Incrementing of the TCG time code stops if
the TCR input time code stops or is invalid
FRM RATE
TCG frame rate being
generated.
23.97, 24, 25, DF 29.97
ND 29.97, 30, frames-persecond (FPS).
OFFSET
User settable time offset
between time code being
read and time code being
generated. Offset can be
set for + or -.
+/-00:00:00:00 - to +/- 23:59:59:29
+ 00:00:00:01 means that
the TCG time code is ahead of
the TCR time code by +1-frame number.
FR (frame) value shown is for
30 FPS time code.
AUT SET
JAM/LOK
Automatically sets up
optimum TCP-50 jam and
genlock modes according
to the TCR and TCG
frame rates selected.
Y = Enable auto setup
N = Disable auto setup
JAM
Selects the type of “jam”
the TCP-50 is to perform.
“Jam” is when the TCG
is preset to the same
time as the TCR time
code being read.
OFF = Jam mode is off.
AUT = Jam TCG if time
difference between TCR
and TCG is ever greater
than “TOL” time.
1X = Jam one (1) time only.
TOL
Amount of time
difference permitted
to exist between TCR
and TCG before the
TCG is jammed to TCR
time (JAM = AUT).
Actual TCR/TCG time
difference is displayed
as the “ERR” value
00:00 = 00 seconds and frames
59:29 = 59 seconds, 29 frames.
FR (frames) value shown is for
30 FPS time code.
LOK
Selects the type of
genlock the TCP-50 is to
perform. “Genlock” is
when the TCG time code
output is phase locked
to input video or TCR
OFF = Genlock is off. TCG
“free runs”.
VID = TCG is to genlock
to input video.
TCR = TCG is to genlock
to TCR time code input time code.
12
ITEM
Y/N
FUNCTION
Indicates status of
selected genlock
action.
SELECTIONS
Y = Genlocked
N = Not genlocked
ERR
Absolute frame
difference between TCR
and TCG as determined
at the time each frame of
time code is generated.
An automatic jam is
performed if this value
exceeds the TOL value,
when JAM = AUT.
00:00 = 00 seconds and frames
59:29 = 59 seconds, 29 frames.
Error values greater than 59:29
are detected, but not displayed.
FR (frame) value shown is for
30 FPS time code.
4.13 "TCR ERR ANALYZER" Menu
A typical TCR ERR ANALYZER menu appears on the TCP-50 screen as follows:
*TCR ERR ANALYZER*
RESET ERR COUNTS:
N
SIGNAL INPUT
G 0000
SYNC PAT
G 0000
FPS
G 0000
DROP/N-DROP
G 0000
VALID TIME
G 0000
VALID SEQ
G 0000
TC/V PHA
+++++G- - - - ITEM
RESET ERR
COUNTS
FUNCTION
Resets all 4-digit
error counters to
0000. All counters
count up to 9999.
SELECTIONS
Y = Reset counters
N = Leave counts as is
SIGNAL
INPUT
Indicates presence
of good TCR input
level. Each loss of
input signal counts
counter up one count
G = Good signal level
B = Bad signal level
SYNC PAT
Indicates good “sync”
pattern detected in
input time code. Each
sync pattern error counts
counter up one count.
G = Good sync pattern
B = Error in sync pattern
FPS
Indicates FPS detected
in TCR input time code
matches that as selected
for the TCR FRM RATE
A frame rate error counts
counter up one count.
G = Good frame rate
B = Frame rate error
DROP/N
DROP
Indicates match between
drop/non-drop frame type
of time code being read
and that of code selected.
A drop/non-drop frame
error counts the counter
up one count.
G = Good match
B = Drop/non-drop error
13
ITEM
VALID TIME
FUNCTION
Indicates time read is a
valid time code number
from 00:00:00:00 to
23:59:59:29. An invalid
time counts the counter
up one count.
SELECTIONS
G = Good time code number
B = Invalid time code number
VALID SEQ
Indicates time code
being read is in
correct sequence of
each successive frame
number being +1 frame
greater than that of the
previous frame. Each
sequence error counts
the counter up one
count. (Note that the
TCP-50 does not read
time code in reverse.)
G = Good sequence
B = Bad sequence
TC/V PHASE
+++++
-----
Indicates phase relationship between incoming time code and video. The center of the time code is represented by the white
block. The center of the video frame is represented by the gap at the center of the “+” and “-“signs.
The position of the white “block” within the “+” and “-“ signs indicates the phase relationship of the two. The time code is
leading the video when the block is in the “+” area, lagging when in the “-“ area.
If time code is not locked to
video the block continuously moves through the “+” and “-“ signs.
4.14 "USERBIT SETUP" Menu
*USERBIT SETUP*
NUMBER
87 65 43 21
TCR(R)
00:00:00:00
MAN(M)
00:00:00:00
SELECT:
RR:RR:RR:RR
TCG OUT
00:00:00:00
*SYSTEM SETUP*
STD:NTSC
TCP-50 V110
ITEM
NUMBER
FUNCTION
Identifies the eight
"nibbles" of extra data
within the time code.
This data is referred to
as "user bits". A nibble
is 4-bits of data.
SELECTIONS
87 65 43 21
TCR(R)
Displays the "hex"
value of each nibble
of user bit data being
read by the TCR.
00:00:00:00
up to
FF:FF:FF:FF
MAN(M)
Displays the "hex"
value of each nibble
of manually entered
user bit data.
00:00:00:00
up to
FF:FF:FF:FF
14
ITEM
SELECT
FUNCTION
Displays the users
selection of either
TCR (R) or MAN (M)
data for each user bit
nibble being output
from the TCG.
SELECTIONS
Any combination of
R or M selection
for each nibble of
data.
TCG OUT
Displays the "hex"
value of the actual
user bit data being
output from the TCG.
00:00:00:00
up to
FF:FF:FF:FF
STD
Composite video
standard for lines
and fields.
NTSC = 525/60
PAL = 625/50
4.15 Selecting Local Titling Mode and Entering and Editing Data.
To select the text entry TITLE mode for the TCP-50, actuate and release the MODE switch to DISPLAY until the screen
displays a flashing cursor. The flashing cursor shows the position of where the next character will be entered.
4.16 Character Selection
Use the POSITION and CHAR switches to move the cursor and select the desired characters for entry as shown in Table
4.2. A blank (transparent) character is available between each grouping, and the numeric characters can be quickly accessed
by scanning in the reverse (PREV) direction.
These switches operate in much the same manner as those found on the simple titlers on many camcorders. The POSITION
"arrow" switches select a character's position, and the CHAR NEXT/PREV switches select a particular character from
various numeric, alpha, punctuation, and math symbols. You can actuate a switch for a single selection at a time, or hold it
down for 2-seconds and cause automatic and rapid selection.
When starting in the NEXT direction, the character set goes from A-Z, 0-9, punctuation, math symbols, back to A-Z, etc.
Starting PREV goes in exact reverse, proceeding from 9-0, then Z-A, math symbols, punctuation, etc. This is so you don't
have to go through the alphabet to get to the numbers, or go through the numbers to get to the alpha characters. A blank
space character is placed between each group of characters for added convenience
Alphabet
A-Z
blank
upper case only
transparent
Punctuation
.
,
'
&
:
?
period
comma
apostrophe
ampersand
colon
question mark
Punctuation (cont.)
!
exclamation point
blank
transparent
Table 4-2, Character Set
15
Graphics
black box
white box
up arrow
down arrow
left arrow
right arrow
center dot
underscore
blank
(not actually under a character)
transparent
Math Symbols
~
)
(
/
*
+
=
blank
approximately
right parentheses
left parentheses
slash (divide)
asterisk (multiply)
hyphen (minus)
plus (add)
equal
transparent
Numbers
0-9
blank
transparent
black cursor size box
white cursor size box
(cont.) Table 4-2, Character Set
4.17 Inserting Spaces and Deleting Characters
Actuating the MODE switch to DISPLAY when in the Title mode places the TCP-50 into the Insert/Delete mode. In this
mode the cursor flashes more rapidly.
The POSITION switch is used to move the cursor to a desired line or character. Actuating the CHAR switch to PREV
deletes the character under the cursor and pulls the remainder of the line to the left. Actuating the CHAR switch to NEXT
inserts a space under the cursor and moves the line to the right.
4.18 Centering a Line of Text
The Insert/Delete mode is convenient for centering a line of text once entered. First, enter the text desired on each line,
starting at the left of the screen. After the desired text is entered, switch to the Insert/Delete mode, position the cursor at the
start of the line, and insert (or delete) spaces using the NEXT/PREV switch until the line of text is centered or placed where
desired.
4.19 Turning the Display Off and On
When the MODE switch is first actuated to DISPLAY after the TCP-50 is displaying the titles, the display is turned off. If
actuated to SETUP, the TCP-50 display is turned back on. In this manner the TCP-50 display can be quickly switched on
and off using the front panel MODE switch.
16
4.20 Time Code Jam and Genlock Operations
Although related, jamming and genlocking of time code are two different functions. Jamming is the action of
"instantly" presetting all of the TCP's time code generator HR:MN:SC:FR values to some other time value, while
genlocking is the action of having the time code generator's timing be maintained in synchronism with another
reference timing signal.
4.21 "Jamming"
Many of the TCP-50 time code operations involve setting the time code generator to the same time value as the time code
being read by the time code reader. This operation is referred to as "jamming" the TCG. When the jam operation is
completed, the TCG is jammed and is running, at least for that moment, in step with the incoming time code to the TCP-50.
In the TCP-50, jamming can be turned off, be set to occur just one time, or be set to occur automatically if the time value
between the TCR and TCG ever exceeds a user preset amount. Generally, the TCG is jammed just one time if the TCR and
TCG frame rates are not lockable to each other.
The TCG is jammed after the TCR acquires valid time code the first time after power up. In addition, the TCP-50 performs
a jam operation whenever any of the following setup menu items are changed
•
•
•
•
•
TCR frame rate.
TCG frame rate.
Offset sign and offset amount not zero.
Offset value.
Jam "type" (AUTO, 1X).
4.22 "Genlock"
After the TCG has been jammed to the TCR, it can be kept "locked" to the TCR's time code input or to the composite video
input signal. This is referred to as "genlocked" (GENnerator LOCKed). Genlocked means phase locked and this in turn
means that, for example, if the frame rates of the TCP-50 time code in and time code out were the same, and if the TCG
was genlocked to the TCR, that both time codes would match exactly, bit-for-bit as they were being read and generated.
When the TCR was reading the input bits for the units of frames, the TCG would be outputting the exact bits for the units
of frames.
When the time code is genlocked to video, this means that the TCG starts generating the frames value of the time code
exactly at the start of the video frame, and ends with the time code hours value and sync pattern exactly at the end of the
video frame. This process is continuously repeated as each frame of time code and video is generated, and helps insure that
when a time code number is later read, that it is for that particular video frame that it overlaid in time.
When genlocking to video, if the frame rates of the video and the (TCG) time code do not match, then the TCG time code
can not be genlocked to the video.
If the time code input to the TCR is not locked to video this can be accomplished by selecting VID as the genlock mode,
which then locks the TCG time code output to the composite video input. If the natural time drift between the TCR input
time code and the TCG time code causes the error to ever exceed the TOL value, the TCR will re-jam the generator.
When genlocking to time code, if the frame rates of the TCR and TCG time codes do not match, the TCG can still be
genlocked to the TCR time code as long as the frame rates resolve at each second. This means that in the TCP, the 24FPS,
25FPS, and 30FPS frame rates can be genlocked to each other, as well as can the 23.976FPS and 29.97FPS frame rates to
each other.
When genlocking to time code and integer frame rates are selected (24FPS, 25FPS, 30FPS) genlock is checked on each
"00" second and the TCG is phase locked to the incoming TCR time code accordingly.
When one of the time codes is drop-frame and the other is not, then an accumulating error of 2 frames a minute occurs due
to the drop-frame time code jumping from frame number 29 to 02 at each minute (all right, except on the tens-of-minutes).
Although the 29.97ND and 23.976 frame rates can be genlocked to each other they can not be genlocked to any other
integer time code used as the genlock source because they simply run slower than real time.
17
4.23 AUT SET JAM/LOK Mode Operation
The AUT SET JAM/LOK feature automatically sets optimum TCP-50 Jam and Genlock operation according to the frame
rates selected for the TCR and TCG. This auto setup mode should provide optimum operation of the TCP-50 for all typical
frame rate translation needs. Table 4.3 shows the automatic settings for each combination of TCR and TCG frame rate
selections.
TCR FPS
23.976
24
25
29.97DF
29.97ND
30
TCG FPS
23.976
24, 25,
29.97DF, 30
29.97NDF
JAM
Auto
TOL
1-Frm
GENLOCK
TCR
1X
Auto
-- -8-Frm
Off
TCR
23.976, 29.97DF
29,97NDF
24
25
30
1X
Auto
Auto
Auto
-- -1-Frm
2-Frm
8-Frm
Off
TCR
TCR
TCR
23.976, 29.97DF
29,97NDF
24
25
30
1X
Auto
Auto
Auto
-- -2-Frm
1-Frm
7-Frm
Off
TCR
TCR
TCR
23.976, 24, 25
29.97ND, 30
29.97DF
1X
Auto
-- -1-Frm
Off
TCR
24, 25,
29,97DF, 30
23.976
29.97ND
1X
Auto
Auto
-- -8-Frm
1-Frm
Off
TCR
TCR
23.976, 29.97DF
29.97NDF
24
25
30
1X
Auto
Auto
Auto
-- -8-Frm
7-Frm
1-Frm
Off
TCR
TCR
TCR
1X = 1-time, -- -- = N/U. The 1-Frm, 2-Frm, 7-Frm, and 8-Frm tolerance settings are values chosen to include normal frame
count errors expected to occur within each second, especially with two different frame rates selected, plus one additional
frame for error in the measuring process.
Table 4-3, TCP-Auto Jam/Tolerance/Genlock Settings
4.24 Time Code Frame Rate Translation
One of the uses of the HORITA TCP-50 is to translate time codes from one frame rate to another frame rate, for example
when converting from NTSC video and time code numbers to PAL video and time code numbers. To perform this
operation simply select the frame rate of the input time code and the frame rate of the desired output time code. The TCP50 will then read the input time code, jam the generator to the TCR, then output the time code at the TCG frame rate.
Certain jam and genlock restrictions apply when translating time codes and these should be reviewed in the section on jam
and genlock operations.
4.25 Time Code Offset
The TCP-50 allows the output time code value to offset from the input time code value by permitting the user to introduce
either a positive or negative amount of offset. This is useful if the time code and video frame relationship has been changed
because the video has been delayed by TBC's or frame-store devices. Offsetting the time code an opposite amount can
restore the time code number/video image relationship.
18
The offset value is entered as a typical hours, minutes, seconds, frames time code number, along with a + or - sign value.
When the TCG is jammed to the TCR, this plus or minus offset amount is applied to the TCR time that the TCR is jammed
too. If the offset is set to a value of "+00:00:00:01", then the TCG time code output is ahead of the TCR time code input by
exactly 1-frame.
It should be noted that this offset amount is subtracted from the TCG time when checking to verify that the TCG is
genlocked to the TCR, so that is why it does not appear as an "ERR" value and cause an automatic jam when the TCP-50
auto jam function is turned on.
4.26 Time Code Backup or Repair
The TCP-50 can be used as a backup time code generator by setting it's TCR and TCG frame rates to the same FPS value.
With this setting, the TCG output time code matches that of the TCR input time code and if the input is ever lost , the TCG
will seamlessly continue to output correct time code.
This same action can be used to "repair" poor time code because once the TCG is jammed, it will continue to output new
time code to replace the poor input time code as it comes and goes.
4.27 Time Code User Bit Substitution
The time code "user bits" are actually four bytes of data that are carried along with each frame of the time code. The four
bytes are further divided into eight "nibbles" of data, each nibble having four binary bits and a "hexadecimal" (hex) value.
What all this means is that the numbers from 0-9 and characters A, B, C, D, E, and-F can be encoded into each of the eight
nibbles of the user bits and used for whatever purpose needed.
Although sometimes the user bits are setup to contain the date, scene and take, production number, or other information, the
user bits are generally not used much, simply because of the user's limited access to them. However, even if originally not
used, the TCP-50 can substitute new user bit data in the output time code from the TCG if desired. This is useful if you
wish to add a date into the time code or other information, such as a production number, scene/take number, or whatever,
when making a video copy with time code.
To use just this feature, set up the TCP-50 to operate in a time code backup or repair mode and then go to the "USERBIT
SETUP" menu and enter the desired data into the MAN(M) user bit fields. For example, the date can be entered as 07 08 05
in user bit fields 87 65 43.
After this, go to the SELECT menu item and change the selection to "M" for user bit nibbles 87 65 and 43. This manually
entered date information will now be output in the user bits of the time code.
4.28 Time Code "Start/Stop" Mode Operation
In Start/Stop mode, if the TCR is reading good time code, the TCG outputs incrementing time code at the selected frame
rate. If the input time code is removed or stops incrementing, the TCG time code output stops incrementing. This condition
is sometimes described as the time code being held or "frozen" at the last valid number.
There are several ways that the input time code can become invalid and the TCG responds a little differently for these
different ways. The time code signal itself can just stop, dropout, or it can have an invalid framing pattern or an incorrect
number of total bits. It can have an invalid time value, or "drop frame" value, or frame rate value.
In the Start/Stop mode, any of these errors, singly or in combination, will eventually cause the input time code to become
invalid and , in turn, cause the TCG time code output to "freeze". This may occur within a single frame of the input time
code, or it may take several frames of erroneous input time code, depending on the type of error(s). Therefore, the time code
value that the TCG freezes at may be several frames later in time from the last good input time code read.
When the input time code again starts up, that is starts incrementing or becomes readable, the TCG is "re-jammed" and
normal incrementing output time code generation resumes, starting from the jam time code value.
It should be noted that if the TCP-50 jam mode is set to "MAN" and "OFF", then the TCP-50 TCG does not re-jam when the
input time code resumes, but instead continues from is last valid number.
19
4.29 Time Code Error Analyzer
The time code error analyzer detects and displays six common time code error conditions to help a time code user evaluate
the overall condition of the time code.
The error analyzer displays a "G" for good and a "B" for bad for each error detect function. When a "B" is displayed it
flashes fast to get attention. Each time the measured condition changes from G to B, the associated counter is counted up by
+1 count. Thus, to count a particular counter, the associated condition has to first be detected as good, and then switch to
bad.
All of the error counts can be reset to zero, 0000, by selecting "Y" on the TCR ERR ANALYZER menu item "RESET ERR
COUNTS". The six error conditions measured are described in detail in the following paragraphs.
4.30 SIGNAL INPUT Error
The signal input error counter is counted up if the level of the time code input signal to the TCR falls below a value that can
be read by the TCR. This level is checked once each frame of time code and each time a signal input failure is detected, the
error count is counted up.
Note that a "good" signal level does not mean that it is a time code signal, just that the level of the signal at the input to the
TCP-50 is good.
4.31 SYNC PAT Error
In addition to the time code and user bit data, the time code has what is referred to as a "sync" pattern embedded within it. It
is this sync pattern that allows determining where the start of the time code and user bit data begins and ends, and the
direction and speed of the time code.
The TCP-50 reads time code only at "play" speed and in "forward" direction. If there is a failure of some kind within the
sync pattern, then the time code cannot be read. Each time a sync pattern failure is detected, the SYNC PAT error counter is
counted up.
4.32 FPS Error
The FPS error detect counts up the associated error counter each time there is a difference noticed between the actual FPS
rate of the time code input to the TCR and the FPS rate selected for TCR operation. For example, if 25 FPS time code is
input to the TCR and the TCR is set to and has been operating at 24FPS, an FPS error will occur, be detected, and count up
the FPS error counter.
4.33 DROP/N-DROP Error
When reading drop frame time code a special bit within the time code identifies it as drop-frame format time code. If this
bit is detected when reading any other code format except 29.97DF time code, a DROP/N-DROP error is detected and the
associated error counter is counted up.
4.34 VALID TIME Error
Time code has a format of hours (HR), minutes (MN), seconds (SC), and frames (FR), usually displayed in the format of:
HR:MN:SC:FM.
Over a 24 hour period, the smallest time code number is 00:00:00:00 (midnight), the largest is 23:59:59:29, with 29 being
the largest frame number for the 29.97 and 30 FPS rates. The maximum frame number for 23.976 and 24 FPS is 23, and for
25FPS it's 24.
After the time code is read, the TCR checks each HR, MN, SC, and FR number to be sure that it does not exceed the
maximum value allowed for time code. If this happens then the associated counter is counted up.
20
4.35 VALID SEQUENCE Error
When time code is generated it follows a format of each successive frame number being greater in value by one frame. This
sequence is checked by the TCR and if the time code numbers read do not stay in sequence, the associated TCP-50 error
counter is counted up.
5
MAINTENANCE
5.1 Cleaning
1. Do not attempt to disassemble your TCP-50 to clean it.
2. Clean your TCP-50 using only a damp cloth.
3. NEVER use water or solvents such as alcohol, window cleaner, etc., to clean your TCP-50.
5.2 Service and Troubleshooting
If you suspect your TCP-50 is not operating properly, check the following:
1. Check all video and time code coaxial cables and connections for opens or shorts.
2. If using an AC power adapter different from the one supplied with the TCP-50, make sure it supplies the TCP-50 with at
least 9 volts (maximum of 14 volts) when the TCP-50 is switched on.
You may return your TCP-50 to HORITA for service. Please contact HORITA first, either by phone or mail, before
returning your unit.
5.3 Adjustments
Adjustments are provided for video level and equalization and horizontal size.
To access the adjustments, remove the bottom cover from the TCP-50 by removing the two screws from the front panel and
then sliding the bottom cover out towards the front.
If you have a Rackmount or Shortrack packaged TCP-50, remove the four screws from the top cover and remove the cover.
All adjustments are located on the circuit board as shown in Figure 5-1.
C25
EQ
R20
VID
R23 LEVEL
+
H SIZE
+
FRONT
Figure 5-1, Adjustment Locations
5.4 Horizontal Size Adjustment
1. Adjust H-SIZE control R20 for the desired horizontal size. Note that this adjustment also affects the size of the setup
screen displays.
5.5 Video Level & Equalization Adjustment
1. Connect a 1-volt P-P video sweep signal to VIDEO IN and a waveform monitor or oscilloscope to VIDEO OUT. Make
sure the video output is terminated.
21
2. Adjust VID LEVEL control R23 for a 1-volt P-P output level (unity gain).
3. Adjust C25 for flattest frequency response out to 5 MHz.
4. Re-assemble the TCP-50.
6
SPECIFICATIONS
Power
Operation
Connector
AC Adapter
9-to-14V DC, 160 milliamperes
3.5 MM mini phone jack
9 volt, 500 milliamperes
Video
IN/OUT
Level
Connector
Standard RS-170 1V P-P
composite video terminated
at 75 Ohm
BNC
Time Code
IN
OUT
Connector
200 mV - to - 10V P-P
1.6V P-P square wave. Rise
time is approximately 35uS.
RCA
Switches And Controls
POWER ON/OFF
MODE
POSITION
CHAR
Toggle switch with red LED above
Momentary toggle switch
Momentary toggle switch
Momentary toggle switch
Environment
Operating
Storage
5C to 40C (41F to 104F)
-10C to 60C (14F to 140F)
Dimensions
1.75"H, 3.5"W, 4.5"D
Weight
Approximately 13 Oz. (shipping weight approximately. 29 Oz. including power adapter)
Specifications subject to change without notice
22
23
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