HP Intelligent Management Center

HP Intelligent Management Center
HP Intelligent Management Center
Base Platform Administrator Guide
Abstract
This guide contains comprehensive information for network administrators, engineers, and operators who manage the IMC
platform.
Part number: 5998-1344
Software version: IMC PLAT 5.1 (E0202)
Document version: 5PW103-20111222
Legal and notice information
© Copyright 2010-2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
No part of this documentation may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means
without prior written consent of Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND WITH REGARD TO
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MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Hewlett-Packard shall not be
liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection with
the furnishing, performance, or use of this material.
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herein.
Acknowledgments
Adobe® is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.
Microsoft® and Windows® are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates.
Contents
1 Introduction to IMC ······················································································································································ 1
IMC Overview ··································································································································································· 1
IMC base platform features ············································································································································· 1
Role based administrative controls ························································································································· 2
Resource management············································································································································· 3
Configuration and change management··············································································································· 4
Network asset management···································································································································· 5
Real time fault management ···································································································································· 5
Performance monitoring and management ··········································································································· 6
Global ACL management ········································································································································ 7
Security monitoring ·················································································································································· 8
Global VLAN management ····································································································································· 8
Virtual Network Manager ······································································································································· 9
Reporting ··································································································································································· 9
Intuitive user interface ··········································································································································· 10
IMC service modules ····················································································································································· 10
Wireless Service Manager ··································································································································· 10
Voice Service Manager ········································································································································ 11
User Access Manager··········································································································································· 11
Endpoint Admission Defense································································································································ 12
User Behavior Auditor ·········································································································································· 13
QoS Manager ······················································································································································· 13
Network Traffic Analyzer ····································································································································· 14
MPLS VPN Manager ············································································································································· 14
Service Health Manager ······································································································································ 15
How IMC works ····························································································································································· 15
SOA framework ····························································································································································· 18
2 Planning considerations for a successful implementation ······················································································ 20
Knowing your organization’s network resource management requirements ·················································· 20
Identifying network infrastructure stakeholders ·································································································· 20
Identifying stakeholder needs ······························································································································ 21
Common data requirements ································································································································· 21
Knowing your network infrastructure ··························································································································· 23
Knowing your network topology ························································································································· 23
Knowing your device vendors, series, and models ··························································································· 24
Knowing access requirements and standards of your organization ······························································· 24
Identifying security policies and restrictions for monitoring ·············································································· 25
Identifying the integration requirements and opportunities ······················································································· 25
Translating requirements into actions··························································································································· 25
3 Exploring the IMC interface ······································································································································ 29
Logging into IMC ··························································································································································· 29
Exploring the IMC home page ····································································································································· 29
Basic operations on the IMC home page ··········································································································· 30
Alarm, performance and resource widgets ········································································································ 33
Customizing spaces and system-defined widgets ······························································································ 43
Customizing RSS widgets ····································································································································· 45
Device status via status bar ·································································································································· 45
Alarm sound settings ············································································································································· 46
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Navigating IMC functions ···································································································································· 48
Quick Start ····························································································································································· 59
Floating menus of the navigation tree ················································································································· 59
Navigating IMC using breadcrumb trails···················································································································· 59
Online help system························································································································································· 61
System-wide help ··················································································································································· 61
Context sensitive help ··········································································································································· 62
Global search ································································································································································· 63
Performing a basic device search ······················································································································· 63
Performing a basic user search ··························································································································· 64
Performing an advanced search for a device ···································································································· 64
Performing an advanced search for an interface ······························································································ 65
Performing an advanced search for a user ········································································································ 65
Personalizing the IMC web interface ··························································································································· 66
Accessing a favorite·············································································································································· 66
Adding a favorite ·················································································································································· 66
Modifying a favorite ············································································································································· 67
Sorting favorites ····················································································································································· 67
Deleting a favorite ················································································································································· 67
Wizard Center ······························································································································································· 68
Quick Start ····························································································································································· 68
Support third-party device ···································································································································· 69
Task Management·························································································································································· 70
Accessing Task Management ······························································································································ 70
Message history····················································································································································· 71
Message options ··················································································································································· 71
Logging out of IMC ························································································································································ 72
4 Configuring IMC for use············································································································································ 73
Securing IMC and access to managed resources ······································································································ 73
Resource Management: managing network resources with global settings ···························································· 74
Device access templates ······································································································································· 74
Configuring vendor and device information ······································································································ 92
Managing filters to filter interfaces ···················································································································· 101
Operator management: managing secure access to IMC ······················································································ 103
Managing operator groups································································································································ 104
Securing IMC access via authentication services ···························································································· 108
Securing IMC through operator login control templates ················································································· 111
Establishing IMC password strategies ·············································································································· 113
Managing IMC operators ·································································································································· 114
Modifying IMC passwords ································································································································· 124
Managing online IMC operator access ············································································································ 124
Group Management: managing resources using groups in IMC ··········································································· 126
Device groups ······················································································································································ 126
User groups ·························································································································································· 132
Configuring IMC for alarm notifications···················································································································· 135
Mail server settings ············································································································································· 135
SMSC settings ······················································································································································ 136
Integrating IMC alarms into other management systems ················································································ 137
IMC hierarchical alarm configuration ··············································································································· 137
MIB management ························································································································································· 138
Adding a compiled MIB to IMC ························································································································ 138
Compiling a MIB in IMC ···································································································································· 139
Removing a compiled MIB from IMC ················································································································ 140
Configuration center options ······································································································································ 141
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File transfer mode options ·································································································································· 141
Backup policy options ········································································································································· 142
IMC system settings and maintenance functions ······································································································ 144
System settings ····················································································································································· 144
Data export ·························································································································································· 147
Log files ································································································································································ 149
Data analysis management ································································································································ 150
My Favorites ························································································································································ 151
Configuring default monitor indices ·················································································································· 151
Configuring network asset audit options ·········································································································· 152
5 Resource management ··········································································································································· 153
Adding devices in IMC ··············································································································································· 154
Adding devices manually to IMC ······················································································································ 154
Auto discovering devices···································································································································· 158
Adding devices by importing device information···························································································· 172
Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views ··························································································· 176
Viewing devices via the Device View ··············································································································· 177
Viewing devices via the IP View ························································································································ 179
Viewing devices via the Network Topology····································································································· 181
Viewing devices with custom views ·················································································································· 201
Viewing device interfaces with port groups ·············································································································· 206
Managing port groups ······································································································································· 206
Searching for devices in IMC ····································································································································· 210
Searching for a device using the basic search feature ··················································································· 211
Searching for a device using the advanced search feature ··········································································· 211
Managing one device via device details ·················································································································· 212
Accessing the device details page ···················································································································· 212
Managing multiple devices using batch operations································································································· 276
Using batch mode to configure SNMP settings ······························································································· 276
Using batch mode to configure Telnet settings································································································· 278
Using batch mode to configure SSH settings ··································································································· 279
Using batch mode to configure polling intervals ····························································································· 280
Using batch mode to modify login types ·········································································································· 281
Using batch mode to modify ping settings ······································································································· 282
Using batch mode to modify interface up/down alarm filter ········································································· 282
Checking device configurations in batch mode······························································································· 283
Modifying device configurations in batch mode ····························································································· 284
Managing multiple devices from the device list········································································································ 299
Navigating to the device list ······························································································································ 300
Device list management options ························································································································ 301
Navigating to the device list ······························································································································ 308
Device list management options ························································································································ 310
Terminal access ···························································································································································· 317
Allocating IP addresses······································································································································· 318
Unauthorized access ··········································································································································· 323
History access log ··············································································································································· 329
Real-time location ················································································································································ 332
Access configuration ··········································································································································· 333
IP to MAC address binding································································································································ 340
Unauthorized access processing policy············································································································ 344
Network Asset Manager ············································································································································· 345
Viewing network assets ······································································································································ 345
Asset OID ····························································································································································· 350
Managing asset information in Network Asset Manager··············································································· 353
iii
Network asset auditing ······································································································································· 356
Virtual Network Manager ··········································································································································· 358
Viewing virtual network ······································································································································ 359
Configuring servers in Virtual Network Manager ··························································································· 364
Configuring virtual machines in Virtual Network Manager ··········································································· 366
6 Extending and customizing functions to support third-party devices ································································· 375
Extending an existing function to support third-party devices ················································································· 375
Creating a vendor folder ···································································································································· 375
Creating a drive index file and a drive folder ································································································· 376
Creating drive definition file ······························································································································ 377
Defining the common service (CLICommon) ····································································································· 379
Defining services and actions for a component ······························································································· 380
Defining specific services ··································································································································· 381
Defining the TCL script and Perl script ·············································································································· 385
Extending a customized function ································································································································ 386
Defining background custom script ··················································································································· 387
7 Configuration and change management ············································································································· 403
Configuration templates ····································································································································· 403
Software library ··················································································································································· 403
Configuration compare ······································································································································ 404
Configuration audit and reports ························································································································ 404
Software update ·················································································································································· 404
Auto backup plan ················································································································································ 404
Configuration check ············································································································································ 404
Using the Configuration Center ·································································································································· 405
Accessing the Configuration Center·················································································································· 405
Querying for devices in the Configuration Center ·························································································· 406
Device configuration options in the Configuration Center ············································································· 407
Managing device configurations with templates ······································································································ 420
Accessing configuration templates ···················································································································· 420
Querying configuration templates ····················································································································· 421
Organizing configuration templates ················································································································· 422
Creating a configuration template ···················································································································· 423
Modifying a configuration template ·················································································································· 429
Renaming a configuration template ·················································································································· 431
Copying a configuration template····················································································································· 431
Exporting a configuration template ··················································································································· 433
Deploying a configuration template ·················································································································· 434
Deleting a configuration template ····················································································································· 434
Managing the software library ··································································································································· 434
Viewing the software library ······························································································································ 434
Viewing the details of a software library entry ································································································ 435
Searching for a software library entry ·············································································································· 436
Importing software into the software library from a file ·················································································· 436
Importing software into the software library from a device ············································································ 437
Adding OSM software into the software library······························································································ 437
Renaming a software library entry ···················································································································· 438
Modifying a software library entry···················································································································· 439
Exporting a software library entry ····················································································································· 440
Deleting a software library entry ······················································································································· 440
Establishing baselines by using a software library entry ················································································ 440
Comparing device configurations ······························································································································ 441
Configuration center ··········································································································································· 441
General configuration compare ························································································································ 442
iv
Deploying configurations and software by using IMC’s deployment guide·························································· 442
Deploying a device configuration ····················································································································· 443
Deploying software ············································································································································· 443
Deploying a file ··················································································································································· 444
Restoring a device configuration ······················································································································· 445
Restoring device software··································································································································· 445
Deploying OSM software ··································································································································· 445
Managing deployment tasks······································································································································· 446
Accessing the deployment task list ···················································································································· 446
Searching for a deployment task ······················································································································· 447
Viewing execution result page··························································································································· 448
Modifying a deployment task ···························································································································· 449
Copying a deployment task ······························································································································· 450
Running a deployment task ································································································································ 450
Suspending a deployment task ·························································································································· 451
Resuming a deployment task······························································································································ 451
Deleting a deployment task ································································································································ 452
Managing automatic deployment plans ···················································································································· 452
Automatic deployment plan management ········································································································ 453
Initial configuration file management················································································································ 471
Managing automatic backup plans ··························································································································· 475
Automatic device configuration backups·········································································································· 475
Manual device configuration backups backups ······························································································ 479
Backup history reporting····································································································································· 479
Auditing configurations ··············································································································································· 482
Configuration backup report······························································································································ 483
Configuration baseline report ···························································································································· 484
Software update report ······································································································································· 487
Software baseline report ···································································································································· 488
Compliance check ······················································································································································· 490
Compliance policy ·············································································································································· 490
Rule examples ······················································································································································ 504
Check tasks ·························································································································································· 508
Fixing violating devices ······································································································································ 511
Check task history ··············································································································································· 513
Task execution results, task execution report, and configuration retrieval report ········································ 515
Configuration check by using the display command ······················································································ 522
8 Event and alarm management ······························································································································· 525
Event and alarm overview··········································································································································· 525
Trap management ························································································································································ 526
Browsing traps ····················································································································································· 526
Trap details page ················································································································································ 527
Trap query ···························································································································································· 528
Filtering traps with existing IMC Trap filter rules ····························································································· 529
Filtering traps with user-defined trap filter rules ······························································································· 534
Generating alarms from traps ···························································································································· 538
Trap definition settings ········································································································································ 544
Syslog management ···················································································································································· 554
Syslog overview··················································································································································· 554
Browsing Syslog entries ······································································································································ 554
Querying Syslog entries in IMC ························································································································ 555
Syslog details ······················································································································································· 556
Filtering Syslog entries ········································································································································ 557
Configuring alarms for Syslog messages ········································································································· 558
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Using Syslog to alarm rules ································································································································ 562
Browsing alarms ··························································································································································· 568
Alarm details ························································································································································ 569
Querying alarms in IMC····································································································································· 571
Browsing real-time alarms ·································································································································· 572
Browsing root alarms ·········································································································································· 575
Browsing all alarms············································································································································· 580
Faulty devices ······················································································································································ 585
Alarm statistics ····················································································································································· 585
TopN ····································································································································································· 586
Configuring alarm notifications ·································································································································· 587
Managing email alarm notifications ················································································································· 587
Managing SMS alarm notifications ·················································································································· 594
Managing alarm forwarding: Integrating with other management systems ················································· 599
Managing hierarchical alarm settings ·············································································································· 605
Access device and core device alarm settings ································································································ 605
9 Performance management ····································································································································· 607
Managing performance with global index settings ································································································· 607
Accessing global index settings ························································································································· 608
Searching global index settings ························································································································ 608
Managing global index settings ························································································································ 609
Managing individual device monitoring settings ····································································································· 614
Accessing the monitor list ··································································································································· 614
Switching monitor list ·········································································································································· 615
Searching for monitors········································································································································ 615
Managing device monitors ································································································································ 617
Viewing performance reports ····································································································································· 622
Accessing performance view list ······················································································································· 622
Querying performance view list ························································································································ 623
Organizing performance views with folders ···································································································· 624
Managing performance views ··························································································································· 625
Managing IMC’s performance monitor settings for topology maps······································································· 633
Accessing data shown in topo ··························································································································· 633
Managing data shown in topo ·························································································································· 634
Managing real-time performance monitor ················································································································ 635
Viewing real-time monitor window ···················································································································· 636
Managing Monitors ············································································································································ 636
Managing monitor graphs ································································································································· 640
Managing performance option ·································································································································· 643
Setting display option ········································································································································· 643
Setting monitor option········································································································································· 643
10 Access control list management ·························································································································· 645
Simplifying ACL rule creation using the assistant ····································································································· 646
Managing services using the ACL assistant ····································································································· 647
Managing net address groups using the ACL assistant ·················································································· 650
Managing time ranges using the ACL assistant ······························································································· 653
Configuring subnet mask type for ACL management ······················································································ 657
Managing ACL templates in IMC······························································································································· 658
Viewing ACL templates ······································································································································· 659
Creating ACL templates ······································································································································ 661
Modifying ACL templates ··································································································································· 671
Copying an ACL template ·································································································································· 680
Exporting an ACL template ································································································································ 681
Deleting ACL templates······································································································································· 681
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Managing the rules in a template ····················································································································· 682
Managing ACL resources in IMC ······························································································································· 697
Managing ACLs··················································································································································· 697
Managing rule sets ············································································································································· 699
Managing the rules in a rule set ························································································································ 743
Managing device ACL configurations ······················································································································· 754
ACL device list management ······························································································································ 755
ACL device configurations·································································································································· 757
Deploying ACLs using IMC’s ACL deployment wizard ··························································································· 782
Managing the deployment task list ··················································································································· 782
Managing deployments using the ACL deployment wizard··········································································· 787
11 Security control center ·········································································································································· 801
Managing security attack alarms ······························································································································· 801
Attack alarm list overview ·································································································································· 802
Real-time attack alarm overview ························································································································ 807
Viewing attacks through topology maps ·········································································································· 810
Executing an action for an attack alarm ··········································································································· 813
Managing security control policies ···························································································································· 815
Viewing the security control policy list ·············································································································· 816
Adding a security control policy ························································································································ 816
Modifying a security control policy ··················································································································· 819
Deleting a security control policy ······················································································································ 821
Executing a security control policy ···················································································································· 821
Viewing SCC reports ··················································································································································· 822
Integrating SCC with SMS ·········································································································································· 824
12 VLAN management ·············································································································································· 827
Global VLAN management········································································································································· 827
Viewing the global VLAN list ····························································································································· 827
Global VLAN query ············································································································································ 828
Creating a global VLAN····································································································································· 828
Deleting a global VLAN ····································································································································· 829
Adding devices to a global VLAN ···················································································································· 829
Deleting a VLAN from devices ··························································································································· 830
VLAN device management ········································································································································· 830
Viewing the VLAN device list ····························································································································· 830
Query device ······················································································································································· 831
VLAN device details············································································································································ 832
Virtual interface tab············································································································································· 834
Access port tab ···················································································································································· 836
Trunk port tab ······················································································································································ 838
Hybrid port tab ···················································································································································· 840
VLAN deployment task ················································································································································ 842
Viewing deployment task ··································································································································· 842
Searching the VLAN deployment task··············································································································· 843
Deleting VLAN deployment task entries ············································································································ 844
VLAN topology maps ·················································································································································· 844
Viewing VLAN topo maps ·································································································································· 844
Deploying VLANs using batch mode ························································································································· 845
Batch deployment for VLAN creation ················································································································ 845
Batch deployment for access ports ···················································································································· 846
Batch deployment for trunk ports ······················································································································· 847
Batch deployment for hybrid ports ···················································································································· 847
vii
13 Reporting in IMC ·················································································································································· 849
My real time reports····················································································································································· 849
Resource statistics report····································································································································· 850
Alarm analysis reports ········································································································································ 850
Performance analysis summary reports ············································································································· 851
Customizing my real time report page ······················································································································ 851
Resetting my report·············································································································································· 851
Real time reports ·························································································································································· 852
Real time report templates ·································································································································· 852
Managing real time reports ······························································································································· 855
Managing real time report data sources ·········································································································· 858
Real time report options ······································································································································ 860
Scheduling real time reports ······································································································································· 860
Quick custom reports ··················································································································································· 866
Quick custom report templates ·························································································································· 866
Managing quick custom reports ························································································································ 869
14 Support and other resources ······························································································································· 872
Contacting HP ······························································································································································ 872
Subscription service ············································································································································ 872
Related information ······················································································································································ 872
Documents ···························································································································································· 872
Websites ······························································································································································ 872
Conventions ·································································································································································· 873
About HP IMC documents ··········································································································································· 873
Index············································································································································································· 875
viii
1 Introduction to IMC
IMC Overview
Network managers, engineers, and operators face complex challenges in their mission to deliver a reliable
and available network infrastructure. They must manage an array of technologies that, together, constitute
the network infrastructure including wireless LAN, MPLS, voice, and more. They must ensure the successful
delivery of business services that run on it. They must manage network users as resources to ensure network
availability and reliable access for all users. Also, they must manage these resources–networks, users, and
services– in the context of the need and demand for established practices of operational excellence. These
practice areas include how:
•
The IT staff manages and audits device configurations and configuration changes
•
Faults in the network are detected, reported, and resolved
•
The performance of the infrastructure and the services that run on them are measured, monitored, and
maintained
•
Operators identify and address security threats, user identity, authentication, and behavior issues.
IMC is a comprehensive management platform that simplifies how IT staff can successfully meet these
challenges. IMC was built from the ground up to support the FCAPS model for comprehensive management
of the network infrastructure. In addition, IMC was designed to support the ITIL operational center of
excellence IT practices model. IMC’s single–pane management paradigm enables end-to-end business
management of IT services to address the stringent demands of today’s mission-critical enterprise IT
operations.
IMC provides scalability by supporting distributed and hierarchical system architectures, through additional
operating system and database support to meet the requirements of complex networks. IMC uses a SOA
model to provide full resource, service, and user management. Its modular design enables the integration of
traditionally separate management tools. IMC enables enterprises to expand their infrastructure
management in scale and to seamlessly accommodate new technologies at the same time.
IMC base platform features
IMC consists of a base platform and service modules that offer additional functionalities. The base platform
provides administrators and operators with the basic and advanced functionality needed to manage IMC
and the devices managed by IMC. The IMC base platform provides the following functions:
•
Administrative controls for managing IMC and access to it. This includes granting or restricting
operator access to IMC features through operator and operator group management. The base platform
also includes features for the system-wide management of device data collection and information
shared by all IMC modules including the creation and maintenance of device, user, and service groups,
and device vendor, series, and device model information. It also includes SNMP MIB management and
other system-wide settings and functions. See "Role based administrative controls" (page 2).
•
A broad feature set for network device management, from the ability to manage SNMP, Telnet, and
SSH configurations on a device to configuring Spanning Tree and PoE energy management for
managed switches and much more. See "Resource management" (page 3).
1
•
Management of the configuration and system software files on devices managed by IMC. This includes
storing, backing up, baselining, comparing, and deploying configuration and software files. See
"Configuration and change management" (page 4).
•
Real time management of events and the translation of events into faults and alarms in IMC. This
includes creating, managing, and maintaining alarm lists, trap and Syslog filters and definitions, and
configurations for notifications of alarms. See "Real time fault management" (page 5).
•
Monitoring, reporting, and alarming on the performance of the network and the devices that comprise
it. This includes managing global and device specific monitors and thresholds as well as creating views
and reports for displaying performance information. See "Performance monitoring and management"
(page 6).
•
Access control list (ACL) management. This includes creating and maintaining ACL templates,
resources, and rule sets and deploying ACL rule sets to devices managed by IMC. It also includes
monitoring and leveraging ACLs that exist on devices for deployment to other network devices. See
"Global ACL management" (page 7).
•
Monitoring and managing security attacks and the alarms they generate. See "Security monitoring"
(page 8).
•
Global management of VLANs on all devices that support VLANs, managed by IMC. See "Global
VLAN management (page 8).
These are the functional areas of IMC’s base platform. In addition, the IMC framework and suite of services
also includes service modules for extending the scope and reach of IMC’s ability to manage the network
infrastructure.
Role based administrative controls
For network engineers, operators or managers to be successful, they must have the tools and access to the
resources they need. These tools should support the IT staff in accomplishing the task of IT service delivery
within the IT guidelines and practices for operational excellence. IMC enables organizations to meet these
requirements because it provides administrators with both the tools and the ability to grant access to only
those features and resources operators need. IMC provides controls and audit trails to support IT
management best practices.
In IMC, management rights and access to all resources managed by IMC are granted or restricted through
the use of three IMC features: operator groups, device groups, and custom views of the devices. Through the
configuration of the operator account these three features converge to define the specific set of access and
management rights and restrictions assigned to each operator. First, administrators define operator by
selecting which IMC features members of the group can access. The IMC features that an administrator can
grant or restrict access through operator groups include Resource Management, Alarm Management,
Intelligent Configuration Center, Report Management, Performance Management, Network Asset
Management, Security Control Center, Virtual Network Management, ACL Management, VLAN
Management, Syslog Management, QoS Management, Data Analysis Management, and the Data
Analyzer. Administrators can grant or rescind operator access to these functional areas of IMC as well as to
specific features within these areas.
Next, administrators create device groups, which enable administrators to group devices by device type
(usually a grouping of similar device types). Once device groups are created, administrators can assign
operators to a device group, thus granting them access and rights to manage the devices in that group. In
other words, operators do not have access and cannot even view devices that are not included in the groups
to which they have been granted access.
Lastly, operators can create custom views, which also allow administrators to grant or restrict access and
management rights to a group of devices in the custom view.
2
After creating the operator groups, device groups, and device views, the administrator assigns or restricts
rights through the configuration of the operator account.
In addition to these flexible role-based administrative controls, IMC provides administrators with the
following administrative controls over IMC features and the devices managed through IMC:
•
Supports secure operator access to IMC via LDAP or RADIUS authentication.
•
Provides operators with the ability to view the online activity of IMC operators and tools for logging
online operators off and blocking their access temporarily or permanently.
•
Employs the concept of access control to enable administrators to permit or deny operator access to
IMC based on individual IP addresses as well as IP address ranges.
•
Supports IT compliance practices by providing audit trails that detail changes IMC operators have
made to devices in the infrastructure.
Resource management
IMC provides comprehensive element management for HP, H3C, and 3Com devices from the convenience
of a single web portal. From the Resource tab, operators have access to a feature set for managing and
monitoring many aspects of a device. IMC offers these management capabilities for a wide range of devices
including routers, switches, wireless, voice, desktops, and servers. From this portal, operators can add,
configure, monitor or manage one device at a time or multiple devices. In addition, operators can create
batch jobs for managing more than one device.
IMC provides operators with several methods for adding devices. Operators can add devices manually.
Operators can also use one of IMC’s four auto discovery methods: Routing-Based, ARP-Based, IPSec
VPN-Based, or network segment based auto discovery to add devices to IMC. Operators can also add
devices by importing a comma delimited list of devices and their attributes. Finally, operators can use IMC’s
batch operation feature for adding devices.
IMC also provides operators with four different views for monitoring and managing devices:
•
Device View groups devices by device type.
•
IP View groups devices by IP address.
•
Network Topology View offers operators a physical view of devices by generating a topology map of
the network. Operators can create custom maps down to individual racks in the data center. Topology
maps down to data center maps in IMC are active. A left mouse click on a topology map provides
device monitoring information. A right mouse click on a topology map provides operators with device
configuration and management features.
•
Custom View provides operators with user-defined views to support the needs of their organization.
IMC incorporates access control features into the custom view enabling administrators to manage
access to devices through the use of these views. All views provide operators with summary color-coded
views of current alarm status for devices in each view.
All views provide operators with access to IMC’s device monitoring and management features. From
top-level summary views, operators can drill down to the Device List. From devices lists, operators can
navigate to the Device Details page for each device.
The Device Details page provides operators with both summary and detailed information and real time data
that operators need to ascertain the health and status of a device. The Device Details page provides
operators with summary information including device label and system name, IP Address and Mask, location
and contact information, hardware, product and serial number information. In addition, the Device Details
page offers operators real time performance data, real time service monitoring data, and configuration
management details for the selected device.
3
From the Device Details page, operators can take action to troubleshoot issues with the selected device. Also,
operators can Telnet or SSH to the device, ping or traceroute to the device or launch a Web Manager or
Device Panel view.
From the Device Details page, operators can also configure the selected device. Operators can modify
SNMP, Telnet, or SSH settings, polling, ping, or Web manager parameters or configure ACLs for the selected
device. Depending on the device type, operators can also view and configure PoE, VLAN interfaces, address
binding, port security, RMON, Spanning Tree, and protocols including RIP, BGP, and OSPF.
Configuration and change management
IMC’s Configuration Center combines the tasks of network device change and configuration management.
With this feature, operators have the tools necessary to effectively manage device configurations and audit
changes while also adhering to practices that support operational excellence.
Like IMC’s Resource Management feature, the Configuration Center has a portal for accessing most of IMC’s
change and configuration management features. From this portal, operators have access to the
configuration management details and history for devices managed by IMC. Operators can view the latest
startup and running configurations for managed devices. Operators can also modify, restore, compare,
deploy, backup, restore, and establish a baseline for configuration files. From this same page, operators can
view configuration and software histories, prepare a device for software upgrades by removing unneeded
files, and deploy software to devices.
Configuration templates provide operators with support for standardizing device configurations. . With these
templates, operators can create, store, baseline, and deploy configuration templates to one or more devices.
Operators can create templates using a portion or an entire configuration file that has been backed up to
IMC. Operators can also import a portion or an entire configuration file into a template, and can create
templates from scratch. In IMC, configuration templates are either file based or segment based. A file based
configuration template contains the contents of an entire configuration file. A segment based configuration
template contains just a portion of a configuration file. Once a template has been created, it becomes
available in the Deployment Guide for deployment to one or more compatible devices.
IMC also provides operators with a convenient facility for storing system software and other files in the
Software Library. Operators can upload system or other files from devices managed by IMC or from the
operator’s local computer. After uploading software to the Software Library, operators can establish a
software baseline for devices using entries in the software library. Operators can then run software baselines
to identify devices whose software differs from the baseline. System software in the Software Library
becomes available in the Deployment Guide for deployment to one or more compatible devices.
The Deployment Guide provides operators with a process for selecting the configuration files or software to
be deployed and the devices to deploy them to. As part of this process, IMC validates whether or not a
configuration file or system software file can be successfully deployed. IMC also checks device resources to
ensure that there are sufficient resources on every device to support a successful configuration file or software
deployment. If not, operators can use the Clean Device Space feature to make room for new deployments.
This ensures successful deployments and minimizes network outages due to configuration or system software
deployment failures. Once a deployment task has been submitted to IMC, operators can view and manage
the progress and results of a task using the Deployment Task List.
The Auto Backup Plan provides operators with the ability to schedule automated backups of device
configurations. With this feature, operators can back up the startup or running configuration files for all
manageable devices. IMC also provides operators with reporting on backup histories and from this page
operators can quickly deploy a backup configuration file when necessary.
Most system and network administrators appreciate the value of a tool that compares the contents of two files.
Using the Compare with other Device Configurations feature, operators can view two configuration files
side-by-side and quickly identify what has changed as IMC highlights all differences. Additionally, IMC
4
notifies an operator of a changed device configuration. Operators can choose to view the entire file or only
the differences, in addition to viewing each difference.
IMC also provides operators with the ability to track or audit changes to device configurations. IMC provides
you with four auditing features. The Configuration Backup Report provides a view of the backup history of
both the startup and running configuration files for devices managed by IMC. Operators can also initiate a
configuration file restore for one or more devices from this report.
Using the Configuration Baseline Report feature, operators can view IMC’s comparisons of the startup and
running configuration files against the configured baseline file. If changes between the files exist, IMC notes
these changes and provides a link for the operator to manually compare the contents of the two files. From
the Configuration Baseline Report page, operators can also launch the Deployment Guide to restore the
baseline configuration to the device.
The Software Update Report provides operators with software update histories for all devices managed in
IMC. From this page, operators can also launch the Deployment Guide to restore selected software to the
source device.
With the Software Baseline Report, operators can compare the current system software against the
configured baseline file. If differences between the baseline version and the current system software exist,
IMC notes these differences. From the Software Baseline Report page, operators can launch the Deployment
Guide to restore the baseline software to the device.
The Configuration Check feature supports organizations in adhering to compliance and standards. This
feature enables operators to write rules and then create groups of rules that check the configuration of
devices. First, the operator creates check rules that can include the contents of an entire configuration file or
configuration command or just a portion. Then, operators can combine check rules into groups for ease of
deployment. Once rules and groups are created, operators then create a configuration Check Task that
combines rules or groups of rules with the list of selected devices and compares the device configuration
against the content configured in the rules. Configuration check tasks results are displayed in the
configuration check Task Report.
Network asset management
With Network Asset Manager, administrators and operators can track assets as well as changes to assets.
This feature provides operators with a list of asset and drilldown capabilities into individual device details or
device audit details. Operators can also query IMC for specific audit records and manage the device
auditing process.
Real time fault management
IMC’s integrated network management system of fault, performance, auditing, security, and configuration
reduces the effort required to manage complex network infrastructures. This becomes apparent to network
managers with the integration of fault management. With IMC, network managers have one database of
network devices in IMC that drives various tasks of network management. IMC’s database is leveraged in all
IMC functions, including fault management. No longer do network managers have to maintain multiple
databases for each functional area of performance, fault, asset, configuration, and security.
Like most IMC features, the alarm or event management system in IMC uses the existing device database and
couples it with sophisticated SNMP trap processing and Syslog parsing algorithms to intelligently generate
alarms for notifying operators and support organizations when a network failure or an event of interest
occurs. IMC uses rules to define what an event of interest is and which events generate alarms. IMC includes
pre-defined system rules and also provides operators with the ability to create user-defined rules for
generating events and alarms.
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IMC also includes root symptom analysis and built-in downstream event suppression by mapping out the
network infrastructure and defining relationships between devices. IMC defines these relationships
automatically through its comprehensive discovery algorithms. Using this information, IMC intelligently
distinguishes between alarms that are most likely pointing to the root cause and those that are merely a
symptom of a problem elsewhere in the infrastructure. Operators can specify alarm presentation based on
these distinctions. IMC also provides operators with the ability to modify IMC’s mapping of the core and
access devices used for root cause or symptom analysis and event suppression.
As with most other features, IMC provides operators with a single pane for viewing alarms in IMC as well as
several alarm viewing options. From each of the alarm views, operators can drill down to view the detailed
information for a particular alarm and take actions to correct the problem. Operators can also drill down to
the Device Details page for accessing the monitoring information and configuration features for the device
reporting issues.
IMC also offers operators the ability to notify members of the support organization. IMC supports email and
SMS or text notifications. In addition, operators can forward alarms generated in IMC to other IMC
instances or to other management systems including Help Desk system and manager of managers systems.
Performance monitoring and management
True to the FCAPS model, IMC also provides you with the ability to monitor the performance of devices
managed by IMC. The Performance Management features of IMC provide operators with the ability to
customize the collection, alarming and presentation of performance data. In addition, operators can
leverage system or user-defined global or individual monitors to collect performance information, generate
historical reports, and generate alarms when performance monitors meet threshold conditions. IMC enables
the real time and historical performance management for managed devices.
IMC provides over two hundred global system defined monitors for measuring the availability, reachability,
and performance of network devices. In addition to monitoring for standard device types such as routers and
switches, IMC also supports the performance monitoring of technologies including IPSec VPNs, WLAN,
QoS, VSM, and RMON. In addition, IMC provides operators with the ability to compile MIBs into IMC and
create custom global monitors, which can then be applied to the monitor sets for one or more devices.
Sixteen of the over two hundred system defined monitors are configured with polling intervals, threshold
settings, and alarm level settings to enable immediate, proactive performance monitoring of devices
managed in IMC. Of these sixteen, IMC by default is configured to automatically add four primary
performance monitors to devices when they are added to IMC. By default, IMC monitors devices for
availability, response time, CPU usage, and memory usage.
IMC provides operators with flexibility for customizing global monitors including threshold settings.
Operators can also add global monitors to the monitor sets for individual devices. This enables operators to
tailor the performance monitoring for every device if needed. Operators can also customize the threshold
settings for individual device monitors.
Once performance monitors have been created, operators can add performance views that include one or
more monitors. Operators can add performance view shortcuts to the left navigation system, enabling
one-click access to performance data for mission-critical devices. As with most of IMC’s features,
performance data and the configuration of performance monitoring can be accessed from multiple places
and most easily from the Device Details page.
IMC provides the real time monitor feature, which allows you to monitor the performance indexes of the key
devices in your network, so that you can detect and solve problems in time.
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Global ACL management
ACL Manager provides operators with a comprehensive feature set for managing ACLs for devices managed
by IMC. With ACL Manager, operators can view and configure existing ACLs on a device managed by IMC,
and import ACLs from devices into ACL Manager as a template or as an ACL resource. Once ACL templates
and resources are created, they can be deployed to devices managed by IMC. Using ACL’s convenient ACL
Deployment wizard, operators can easily and successfully deploy ACLs and ACL uses to devices managed
by IMC. With ACL Manager’s Deployment task management features, operators can monitor and manage
the deployment of ACLs and ACL resources. ACL Manager supports four types of ACLs: Basic, Advanced,
Link, and User-Defined. With these four ACL types, operators can create rules based on 1) Source IP address
or address range and mask; 2) Layer 3 and Layer 4 information including IP source and destination
addresses, Layer 4 protocol information; 3) Layer 2 information including MAC source and destination
addresses; and 4) user defined hexadecimal patterns and masks.
ACL templates in ACL Manager serve as a container for the configuration options required to create an ACL.
Once an ACL template has been created, it can be imported as an ACL resource. An ACL resource in ACL
Manager is an ACL that contains one or more rule sets. ACL resources, once created, can then be deployed
to devices managed by IMC that support ACLs.
The ACL Assistant facilitates ACL template rule creation by modularizing some of the configuration
components of an ACL rule, including services, network addresses, and time ranges. With services,
operators can define one or more TCP or UDP ports as a named service. With net address groups, operators
can specify an IP address or range of IP addresses and their subnet mask. With time ranges, operators
specify fixed or recurring date and time ranges. Once these are created, the services, net address groups,
and time range groups become available for use when configuring rules for templates.
ACL Manager also offers administrators and operators a feature set for simplifying the task of managing
ACLs and their rule sets. The ACL Resource List provides operators with a single portal for viewing and
managing all of the ACLs that can be deployed to network devices. From the ACL Resource List, operators
can view, add, rename, and delete ACLs.
From the ACL Resource List, operators navigate to the Rule Set List for managing every aspect of a rule set for
a given ACL. From this page, operators can view information for every rule in a set as well as take action on
all of the rules in the list. Actions include adding, modifying, copying, deploying, or deleting existing rule sets.
From the Rule Set List, operators can also import the contents of a template into a new rule set of an existing
ACL.
ACL Manager also provides operators with two key features for managing the effect on network
performance that an ACL can have. First, operators can redefine or sort manually the order of appearance
of rules in a rule set, which can be crucial to its effectiveness when the rule set’s match order is based on the
order of rule appearance. In addition, ACL Manager provides operators with an Optimize feature for
evaluating the effect of rules on network performance as well as making and implementing
recommendations for reducing the effect of ACLs on network performance.
ACL Manager also simplifies and streamlines the process for managing ACLs on devices. With ACL
Manager, operators have a single portal for viewing and managing the ACL configurations on all devices
that support ACLs. ACL Manager also provides operators with a single portal for managing ACL
configurations for the selected device. From this portal, operators can view, synchronize, and refresh the ACL
configuration data for the device as well as modify the ACL configuration polling interval. Options are also
provided for managing ACL device configurations, including adding and deleting ACL definitions, exporting
ACL text files, and applying ACLs as packet filters or VLAN filters to one or more interfaces on the device.
ACL Manager facilitates the deployment of ACLs and rule sets using the ACL Deployment wizard. This wizard
provides operators with a step-by-step process for successfully deploying ACLs and ACL uses for packet and
VLAN filtering as well as removing ACLs and ACL uses. During the deployment task configuration process,
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IMC evaluates the selected devices and ACLs to determine whether or not the task can be executed
successfully. IMC identifies when devices do not match the configuration selections and display warning
messages and evaluation results to guide the successful deployment of ACL resources. The ACL Deployment
wizard provides a facility for viewing and managing all deployment tasks via the ACL Deployment Task List.
Security monitoring
IMC offers administrators and operators a proactive and integrated security monitoring and management
system with SCC. SCC provides operators with real time threat monitoring, detection, and analysis. In
addition, SCC includes the ability to define security control policies that enable operators to take manual or
automated actions when a security attack occurs.
IMC detects and provides actions for security and threats that include Flow Exception, Flow Monitor
Abnormal, Flow Monitor Serious, IP Spoofing, WinNuke, SYN Flood, ICMP Flood, UDP Flood, IP Sweep,
TCP Port Scan, UDP Port Scan, IPS Worm, IPS Scan, Tracert, Large ICMP, Smurf, ICMP Redirect, ICMP
Unreachable, Fraggle, Source Route, Route Record, Land, Teardrop, TCP Flag, Ping of Death, Frag Flood, IP
Fragment, Scan, ARP Overspeed, DHCP Server Detect, and Duplicate ARP Address.
IMC monitors many of these security threats in real time by receiving and processing two data sources:
Syslog events and SNMP traps sent by devices. The Syslog messages that IMC alarms on include Duplicate
Addresses, ARPOverspeed, DHCP Server Detect, and IMC’s attack event. IMC also processes SNMP traps
sent by managed devices The SNMP traps that SCC currently supports for security attack alarms include
Duplicate Address, ARPOverspeed, DHCP-Server Detect, Flow Monitor Abnormal for IMC’s UAM
component, Flow Monitor Serious for UAM’s component, and SecCenter. Once IMC has detected and
escalated a security event to an alarm, it is displayed in one of the two tabular views, the Attack Alarm List
and the Real Time Attack Alarm List for security attack alarms. SCC also provides operators with a visual
display of attacks through the attack path topology map.
Operators can respond to attack alarms by initiating actions, such as shutting down an interface, sending an
email, sending a message to the online user, kicking the online user off, and adding the online user to the
blacklist.
SCC also provides integration with IMC’s EAD service module that enables SCC to receive security events
from IPS and other security aware devices in the network and turn those events into actions, such as isolating
or blocking endpoints to protect network assets.
Through the use of security control policies, operators can proactively manage their response to security
threats and attacks. Service control policies allow operators to define what actions are taken in response to
attack alarms. A security control policy combines the identification and alarming of a security attack with an
action that can be taken in response to the security attack. The actions configured for security control policies
can be executed manually or they can be configured to run automatically upon detection of the security
attack.
Like many IMC modules, SCC also provides operators with summarized reporting of security attacks in the
last hour. Summary reports include the Top 10 Attack Alarms Report, Top 10 Attack Sources Report, Top 10
Attack Destinations Report, and Execution Results Report.
SCC can be integrated with the SMS. You can open the SMS management page in SCC to view information
about security devices managed by the SMS. Through the SMS, SCC integrates the monitoring functions for
security devices in the entire network.
Global VLAN management
With IMC, operators have the ability to manage VLANs globally or on a per device basis. IMC’s Global
VLAN option gives operators the ability to create standardized VLANs across all devices in the infrastructure
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that support VLANs. Operators can create VLANs and add, configure, or remove them from all devices that
support this feature.
IMC also employs the batch operation concept to VLAN management by enabling operators to create and
configure VLANs on one or more devices, including configuring access, trunk, or hybrid ports using the
batch feature for VLAN management.
For individual device VLAN management, operators can select devices for configuring VLANS. From the
same interface, operators can also configure virtual interfaces, access ports, trunk ports, or hybrid ports for
each VLAN.
With IMC’s VLAN Topo option, operators can launch a network topology view that highlights devices for the
selected VLAN and grays out devices that are not part of the VLAN. Operators can actively monitor and
manage devices in the selected VLAN from the topology map.
Virtual Network Manager
VNM provides the ability to manage virtual network devices such as servers, virtual machines, and virtual
switches. You can view virtual network resource configuration in Virtual Network View. By creating a vSwitch
or port group, you can plan and manage your network.
In addition, VNM provides the virtual machine migration function. You can migrate a virtual machine from
a server with limited resources to a server with enough resources to ensure the efficiency of the virtual
machine. VNM automatically collects data on the vManager—a server that manages virtual servers. In the
Migration Recommendation List, you can select manual or automatic migration. After the migration is
complete, you can view the migration report.
With the Topology function, you can see the virtual network architecture to facilitate planning a virtual
network.
Reporting
IMC offers administrator and operator performance and resource reporting options in the Report tab. From
this tab, operators can find template driven reports for network assets, configuration and configuration
changes, network device and link status and events, alarms, and network device health. In addition,
operators can find reports on network user and service activity and device and link detail reports.
There are two types of report categories in IMC:
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Real Time Report offers operators reports on resource statistics, configuration and change, fault or
alarm and performance reporting on network devices and interfaces, users and services.
•
Quick Custom Report provides two types of informational reports – device and link. Device detail
reports include information on device status, label, IP address, MAC address, device type, model,
vendor, location, contact, sysOID, hardware version, software version, serial number and product
number for managed devices. Quick custom reports based on link details include information on
devices connected to either end of a link. This information includes device name, port, IP address, and
port speed.
IMC provides every operator with the ability to customize the reporting interface to meet individual reporting
needs. Using the Add My Real Time Report and the Add My Quick Report links, operators can customize the
Report main page to include only those reports that are most useful. After adding a report to the Report main
page, operators can access the report by clicking on the report name link and entering report parameters,
including date and time, to access the information they need quickly.
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Intuitive user interface
IMC includes many features that enable administrators and operators to effectively manage the network
infrastructure. . The tabular navigation system located at the top of every IMC page provides one click access
to most of IMC’s features. Most of IMC’s main features include lists that provide operators with access to the
managed resources. Most lists provide active links for drilling down into the details for individual
components, such as the Device Details page. From these individual device or component pages, operators
can access the IMC features that enable them to manage, monitor, configure, and audit network resources.
IMC also provides operators with many paths to the same destination. For convenience, IMC provides
operators with quick start guides and With the My Favorites feature, operators can create links to the IMC
features they use most often. Once created, My Favorites links become available on every IMC page through
the My Shortcut→My Favorites link located in the upper left corner of the left navigation system.
IMC provides two forms of online help:
•
Universal online help system provides operators with detailed information on IMC features with
examples and instructions.
•
User interface provides operators with context sensitive help that includes instructions and guidance
specific to a particular page or feature User interface also provides a basic and advanced search
facility available on almost every window in IMC. Using this feature, operators can quickly access the
device details for any device based on the search criteria they entered. Most lists in IMC also provide
operators with the ability to search or filter the list based on the criteria entered.
IMC service modules
IMC’s modular and scalable SOA architecture supports extension of IMC’s scope of coverage beyond the
functionality of the base platform.
Additional and optional service modules are available to extend coverage. These additional areas of
coverage include managing wireless and voice devices, QoS, MPLS VPNs, user access and behavior, traffic
analysis, and endpoint security. IMC provides these additional areas of management from a single,
integrated platform and web portal.
Wireless Service Manager
IMC provides network administrators and engineers with a unified management system for both wired and
wireless networks. With IMC’s Wireless Service Manager module, operators can perform wireless LAN
WLAN device configuration, topology, performance monitoring, RF coverage and planning, WLAN
intrusion detection and defense, and generate WLAN service reports from the same platform they use to
manage wired networks. In addition, IMC provides operators with historical reports for monitoring how
wireless network usage, performance, and roaming patterns have changed over months or years.
WSM provides the following functionality:
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Unified management of wired and wireless devices includes network devices such as ACs, APs, Fit APs
and mobile terminals.
•
Wireless and wired network scans to identify and locate unauthorized rogue APs on a network,
including those that are not in range of authorized APs or sensors. Once detected, rogue APs or
unauthorized users are denied access to the network.
•
Detects wireless attacks and sends alerts about network vulnerabilities to administrators.
•
Provides specialized views and reports for multiple classes of users—from Level ½ helpdesk staff to
network engineers, security auditors, IT managers and other user-defined groups.
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•
Provides template support for wireless device configuration that facilitates centralized configuration and
control over wireless devices.
•
UAM’s wireless service logical topology mapping provides visually display of wireless network
deployment and the current state of devices and links on the network.
•
Provides information about a mobile terminal on the network, including its MAC address, signal
strength, transmit rate set, RSSI, SSID, channels used, and associated AC and AP. It also provides the
roaming records of each mobile terminal.
•
Provides topologies that show real-time RF information about the wireless network.
•
Provides rogue device detection that identifies wireless intrusions as well as the intrusion AP. WSM also
enables you to query information about the intrusion AP and add the intrusion AP to a blacklist.
•
Provides wireless statistics reports that you can query and customize.
From a single pane, operators can manage the wired and the wireless infrastructure using IMC’s base
platform and the Wireless Service Manager.
Voice Service Manager
IMC coupled with the VSM module offers operators an integrated management solution that provides a
comprehensive set of tools for managing converged voice and data networks easily and efficiently. IMC’s
VSM offers a single pane for voice resource and service management for 3Com and H3C voice
infrastructures, including VCX® Connect platforms, Media Gateway, and IP phones. IMC VSM also provides
comprehensive management and notification of any issues that may impact service quality. VSM monitors
the network using built-in rules, diagnoses problems, tracks changes to IP phone status, and tracks inventory
of communications devices and IP phones. It also provides tools to facilitate rapid troubleshooting and fault
isolation; service-level, real-time alerting, and reporting are built in.
VSM provides the following functionality:
•
The ability to configure, monitor, and optimize the performance of media servers, gateways, and
endpoints.
•
Monitoring of VoIP traffic.
•
Real-time, graphical service-level views of the entire VoIP infrastructure.
•
Tracking the real-time operational status of every VCX system and IP phone.
•
Notification of issues that may impact service quality.
•
Tracking of changes to IP phone status.
•
Tracking and inventory of communications devices and IP phones.
•
Tools to facilitate rapid troubleshooting and fault isolation.
•
Real-time tracking, evaluation, and reporting on user experience and metrics such as delay, loss, and
jitter. Measures service quality and calculates reports associated with active calls on the system.
•
Call quality metrics gathered from IP phones that enable administrators to assess call quality and
address issues proactively.
•
IMC’s VSM module provides complete monitoring and management of the voice infrastructure,
including VCX, NBX, and related IP telephony devices, ensuring a single pane of management and
service quality for voice infrastructure-related devices.
User Access Manager
The UAM module provides IMC users with authentication and authorization services for endpoints accessing
the network edge. As a component of the IMC management platform, UAM supports access policies across
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devices such as Ethernet switches, routers, broadband access servers, and VPN access gateways to centrally
manage access for wired, wireless, and remote users. UAM, together with the base IMC platform and other
IMC modules, provides network operators with integrated management of users, resources, and services.
UAM provides the following functionality:
•
RADIUS server that supports centralized AAA management of endpoints that connect and use network
services.
•
Policy management provides access control with tiered privilege levels. IMC UAM enables multiple
802.1X authentication methods such as PAP, CHAP, EAP, and MS-CHAPv2, and leverages existing user
directories as a RADIUS proxy directly to LDAP-compliant user stores such as the Microsoft Active
Directory, Novelle Directory, OpenLDAP, or as a local user store.
•
Realms can be created within UAM to authenticate user names and passwords against distributed
UAM databases. This provides authentication redundancy, increasing security and enabling the
authentication of roaming users. IMC UAM provides flexible authorization policies to dictate access by
defining access policies for individual users, devices, and groups. Additionally, policies provide the
ability to control access by location and time of day.
•
Reporting capabilities through its centralized, Web-based management console, enabling network
administrators to quickly scan the activity and status of all devices currently or historically connected to
the network. Reports may be used for real-time analysis, historical analysis, compliance auditing, and
troubleshooting.
•
A comprehensive directory of all network attached devices and endpoints—including printers, IP
telephony equipment, uninterruptible power supplies, HVAC systems, PXE boot hosts and badge
readers—to provide additional control and authentication for "non-networking" devices.
•
A single, central database of devices, users, and available services — important for networks that
include more than one remote communications server and access device.
•
Topology view of access services provides immediate visualization of the access infrastructure and
online users. This provides a tool for monitoring and managing access systems and users.
User Access Manager is integrated with other IMC services and features, providing operators with one pane
for managing critical network resources.
Endpoint Admission Defense
The EAD module supports operators in reducing network vulnerabilities by integrating security policy
management and endpoint posture assessment for identifying and evaluating, alerting on, and isolating
risks at the network edge. NAC solutions have typically involved the integration of several functions that were
usually deployed, configured, managed, and audited as independent systems. The HP IMC management
platform provides all of these functions in a single platform, eliminating the complexity of managing multiple
systems. With EAD, IMC integrates security threat evaluation, identification, location, security event
awareness, and the execution of protective measures into a centrally managed and monitored platform. IMC
reduces implementation costs and complexity while increasing overall network security.
EAD provides the following functionality:
•
Reduces the risk of malicious code or actions by detecting endpoint patches, viruses, ARP attacks,
abnormal traffic, the installation and execution of sensitive software, as well as the status of system
services.
•
Works in conjunction with the user access manager to define and apply appropriate security posture
policies to every user or device on the network. With EAD, administrators can build policies for
operating systems and operating system patches, registry settings, applications, processes, and
services into their EAD policies.
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•
The EAD security policy component allows administrators to control endpoint admission based on
identity and the posture of the endpoint. Network operators can regulate network access based on
identity, posture to prevent unauthorized access to network assets and resources. If an endpoint is not
compliant with required software packages and updates, network assets can be protected by blocking
or isolating endpoints’ access or by non-intrusive actions such as notification and monitoring of the
endpoint.
•
Works in conjunction with the iNode desktop client to gather endpoint posture information to determine
if an endpoint is compliant with established security policies.
•
With the iNode desktop client, key data theft protection features can also be enabled, such as
controlling access to USB and CD drives, to protect sensitive data.
•
To ensure continued security, EAD provides continual monitoring of endpoint traffic, installed software,
running processes and registry changes.
•
IMC leverages the existing instrumentation of network devices supporting NetStream and sFlow data to
provide greater visibility and control over network usage. Interaction with the integrated User Access
Manager component enables traffic flows to be linked with users rather than IP addresses alone for
comprehensive auditing of network usage. EAD also provides operators with an EAD Service report
that allows administrators and operators to view and analyze statistics related to security services.
EAD provides operators with a single console for identifying, evaluating, locating, monitoring, reporting on,
and protecting the network from the many threats that can be introduced at the network edge.
User Behavior Auditor
The UBA module is a log auditing tool that enables operators to view user and network access information.
UBA is designed to process large, complex log files and present the information in a simplified tabular format.
UBA provides auditing of NAT, Web, and FTP site visits and more.
UBA provides the following functionality:
•
UBA supports processing of log files from NAT, NetStream, Flow, and the DIG probe. With UBA log
analysis, operators have visibility into user behavior that supports problem identification and resolution
as well as network resource planning.
•
UBA can perform general behavior audits as well as NAT audits, Web visiting audits, FTP audits, and
mail audits.
•
User defined auditing templates
The combination of UAM and UBA offers operators tools for managing user access and authentication to
critical network resources as well as visibility into the behavior of users on the network.
QoS Manager
The QoSM is the core component of IMC’s QoS solution. QoSM provides operators with a common set of
QoS device and configuration management features for easily managing QoS for different device types.
IMC’s QoSM straightforward implementation of QoS management enables operators to focus on most
critical aspects of QoS management - service planning. The QoS manager provides the following functions:
•
Auto discovery feature for discovering the real time QoS configurations for devices in the network.
•
Traffic classification is the basis for providing differentiated services. QoSM enables operators to
organize traffic into different classes based on the configured match criteria, such as source or
destination address, IP protocol type, port number, and more.
•
For managing traffic control and network resources effectively, QoSM enables operators to configure
CAR, GTS, priority marking, queue scheduling, and congestion avoidance.
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•
Enables operators to perform traffic control through the use of QoS policies. QoS policies in IMC allow
operators to associate a class with traffic behavior. QoSM supports multiple class-to-traffic behavior
associations in a policy.
•
Like the Configuration Center in IMC’s base platform, QoSM also utilizes a deployment manager for
applying QoS policies to targeted devices. Operators can define different deployment schemes based
on the network design, enabling operators to manage and maintain QoS services throughout the
network. The QoSM deployment manager enables operators to manage the application and removal
of QoS policies for devices that support QoS. With the QoSM auditing feature, operators can check
the consistency between the current configurations on the devices and the policy applications in the
scheme.
•
Leverages ACL information on devices to provide operators with a method for creating and managed
ACLs.
•
List of QoS-capable devices that enables operators to quickly and effectively manage their QoS
implementations
•
SLA Manager allows you to manage and monitor network performance through the management of
service types, service levels, and SLA instances.
The three types of reports are instance report, SLA Service Agreement report, and user-defined group SLA
report.
Network Traffic Analyzer
The NTA provides operators with real time traffic analysis. NTA is a graphical network monitoring tool that
leverages industry standard sources of network traffic data to generate real-time displays of TopN users and
applications. Routers and switches that support NetFlow provide NTA with the data that feeds NTA reports.
NTA analysis and reports support operators in understanding how network bandwidth and resources are
being used as well as with information on which hosts and uses are consuming network resources. NTA also
supports operators in identifying network bottlenecks, with support in taking corrective measures. The
information provided by NTA supports mission critical network management activities such as network
planning, monitoring, optimization, and troubleshooting.
NTA provides the following features and benefits:
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Uses embedded instrumentation available in switches and routers including sFlow, NetFlow, and
Netstream. This lowers the cost of network monitoring by eliminating the need for expensive probes.
•
Supports both the strategic and tactical aspects of network management. NTA delivers detailed
information on network bandwidth usage pattern, enabling operators and engineers to make
well-informed policy and planning decisions. NTA also provides detailed information on specific
applications, users, and ports, enabling operators to quickly determine the source of spikes and bursts
to proactively monitor, control, and manage network usage.
•
Provides network managers with network-wide surveillance of complex multilayer switched and routed
environments, ensuring the rapid identification and resolution of threats to the network. This information
allows administrators to identify suspicious behavior, respond to security threats, ensure quality of
service, and enforce security policies.
MPLS VPN Manager
The MVM module brings operators VPN monitoring and management features for MPLS networks to the IMC
suite of network management applications.
MVM provides the following features:
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•
Allows operators to auto discover, map MPLS VPN topologies, monitor, audit, measure performance,
and manage VPN deployment for MPLS networks.
•
Support for heterogeneous networks that include MPLS VPN devices from Cisco, H3C, and Huawei
VPN devices.
•
Includes a MVM TE sub-component that provides monitoring of TE devices, addition and publishing of
tunnels, and protection of service quality.
•
MVM TE enables operators to monitor the entire MPLS VPN network, distribute suitable network
resource and ensure service quality.
Service Health Manager
With the increase of network applications, various services impose higher requirements on the reliability and
stability of the network. It is difficult for the network administrator to provide a reliable network for services
and make sure that various applications can satisfy the customer requirements.
Service Health Manager provides the following functions:
•
Visual service quality management
•
Integration of the alarm, performance, NTA, and NQA data
•
Use of the KQI and SLA to monitor and measure the service health and visually manage the service
health
•
Visual display of SLA statistics and rating results in diagrams and tables, so that you can understand the
overall service level and promptly find out potential problems
How IMC works
Network managers have been challenged by the number of systems that were required to manage and
monitor the network infrastructure. Separate, specialized systems were and continue to be used for
managing network faults, configuration, performance, auditing, assets, security, and performance. Network
managers were required to maintain separate databases of devices and device information. Integration and
interoperability between these systems were often and continue to be complex and expensive. The end result
was often monolithic systems with large feature sets that were not always aligned with the services or needs
of IT organizations or Network Operations Centers with multiple consoles, all reporting different,
uncorrelated information about the health and performance of the network infrastructure.
The SOA model for application development has changed what is possible for management of the network
infrastructure. SOA is an adaptable set of design principles oriented around business services that inform
how an application is developed and integrates with other applications. An application developed with an
SOA architecture provides its users with a set of loosely integrated services with well defined interfaces and
a method for users of those services to become aware of, communicate with, and use the services made
available by the SOA application.
In SOA, a "service" is a unit of work that is bounded, well defined, and well understood. Each service is
independent, with a set of defined interfaces that other applications can call upon to execute in a standard
way without requiring any knowledge of how the service is performed. A service can be a business process
or a step in a business process. Services can be combined, used, and reused to create applications that meet
business needs. SOA also defines how services or service providers and service consumers communicate. A
service provider is a module or service in the application that provides a service, function, or unit of work. A
service consumer is a service that makes use of the service offered by a service module and can be another
service in the application. In SOA, service providers publish the services they offer and the requirements to
participate in those services. The format of service requests and responses are well defined for both service
15
providers and service consumers. Service requests and responses are published on the shared message or
communication bus and service providers and consumers both subscribe to messages sent on the bus.
From a software development perspective, SOA applications benefit by the separation of the business logic
from the layers that manage and communicate with computer and other resources such as web and
database interfaces. Web interfaces in SOA applications are provided for the most part by common libraries
defined at the basic and service presentation layer. This means that developers can rely on existing and
established libraries for quickly delivering a consistent, coherent user interface. In addition, developers can
leverage existing modules or protocols at the data abstraction layer for communicating with databases and
devices they read data from or write data to.
IMC is a suite of loosely integrated services based on a SOA framework that delivers unified resource
management for devices in the network infrastructure based on the FCAPS model. IMC service modules
encompass the FCAPS model for delivering fault, configuration, asset and auditing, performance, and
security management in a single framework. In addition, IMC provides service modules that extend to other
value added service areas including MPLS VPN management, wireless service management, traffic analysis,
voice service management, guest access management, authentication and authorization, and EPON
provisioning. In addition, IMC provides business service solutions including SLA management, desktop asset
management, network access control solutions, and user behavior monitoring and management.
Three layers in IMC conform to the three layers of a SOA framework. The first layer is the Data Abstraction
and Data Access Layer, allowing for the separation of the business logic from database communications. The
Data Abstraction layer provides access data for resources managed by IMC as well as access to databases
that store information about the managed resources. IMC leverages industry standard technologies such as
JDBC and JNDI for handling IMC database communications. Using JDBC as the interface to the database
enables IMC to communicate with virtually any database that also supports JDBC. IMC also relies on
industry standard protocols including SNMP, Syslog, Telnet, and SSH for communicating with and collecting
information on devices managed by IMC.
The IMC platform also has a Service Presentation Layer and Basic Presentation Layer that also separates the
business logic from the processes that present IMC’s services and data to the IMC administrators and
operators. IMC leverages common and external SPL to deliver a unified user interface for the base IMC
platform and IMC modules based on XML and Web Services. Using a unified Web SDK allows IMC to use
Java libraries to publish and subscribe on the message bus for the presentation of information in a web
format. IMC also leverages report platforms and topology platforms at the presentation layer to deliver IMC
topology mapping and reporting services.
The heart of IMC is the Service Logic Layer and Common Service Units of its SOA framework, also known as
the middleware. The standard and external Service Logic Libraries (SLL) at the Service Logic Layer contain the
business logic internal to IMC that drives the data analytics and processing analytics for all services
delivered by IMC. The CSU in IMC—Resource, Fault, Security, Performance, Configuration, Log, and Data
Analyzer —are the processes external to the business logic that manage access and communication
between the business logic at the Service Logical Layer and the processes at the Presentation and Data
Abstraction and Access Layers. In other words, the Common Service Units are what make the business logic
contained available to all other processes in IMC as it handles publishing and subscription within IMC for
all services. Figure 1 (page 17) shows a graphical representation of the IMC framework and the components
that constitute it.
16
Figure 1 IMC platform framework
The example scenario is initiating an auto discovery. Navigate to the Device Details page for a device just
discovered and shutdown an interface on the device. Assume the Home page as the starting point for this
exercise. This is a high level overview of the process and does not contain specific, packet for packet,
request/response pairs.
From IMC’s home page, click the Resource tab located at the top of the Home page. The common SPL
publishes the request for the Resource page to the communication bus. The Resource CSU picks up the
request and invokes the DAL for the data that is used to render the dynamic data (device status) that is
displayed on the Resource home page. The DAL publishes a call to the database for current information on
the status of devices in IMC and the database picks up the request. The results of the database query for
current information are stored in the Data Cache. The Resource CSU picks up the results of the database
query and publishes the Home page response with the dynamic data to the communication bus. The
common SPL picks up the Home page response and renders it on the operator’s local computer.
Next, click the
Auto Discovery link to begin the process of automatically discovering and adding
devices to IMC. The common SPL publishes the request for auto discovery on the communication bus, which
is picked up by the Service Logic Layer. The Service Logic Layer identifies and forwards the request to the
appropriate CSU, in this case the Resource CSU. The Resource CSU publishes the Auto Discovery response
on the communication bus, which the common SPL picks up. The common SPL renders the auto discovery
configuration page on the operator’s computer.
Next, enter configuration parameters for the auto discovery and click the Auto Discovery button to begin the
discovery process. The common SPL publishes the configuration information we entered for the auto
discovery on the communication bus, which is picked up by the Resource CSU. The Resource CSU initiates
the discovery CSU and pushes data through the JDBC interface into tables in the IMC database using the
communication bus. In addition, the Resource CSU publishes the data to the communication bus, which is
picked up by the common SPL for real time web updates on the operator’s local computer. The Resource CSU
manages these parallel processes of discovery, of pushing and processing of data to the database, and of
updating the operator’s web interface with a current status.
17
Next, navigate to the Device View and click All Devices to view a list of all devices. The navigation prompts
the common SPL to publish a request for the All Devices page, which is picked up and responded to by the
Resource CSU. The Resource CSU publishes a request for data, since IMC views all have dynamic data,
which is picked up by the Data Abstraction Layer. The Data Abstraction layer responds to the request by
publishing a response with current information from the Data Cache or by initiating a query to the database,
if necessary, to render current real time status information on the All Devices page. The Resource CSU
publishes the response, which the common SPL picks up and displays on the operator’s local computer.
Then, navigate to the Device Details page for the device by clicking on the link in the Device Label field from
the All Devices list. The navigation prompts the common SPL to publish the request for the data specific to the
selected device for the Device Details page, which is picked up by the SLL. The SLL identifies which of the
several CSUs should be invoked by the request and forwards the request to the appropriate CSU, in this case
the Resource CSU. The Resource CSU again publishes a request for data, which is picked up by the Data
Abstraction Layer. The Data Abstraction Layer responds to the request by initiating a query to the database
to render the Device Details information for the requested device. The Data Abstraction Layer publishes the
response, which is picked up by the Resource CSU and published on the communication bus, which the
Service Logical Layer picks up and displays on the operator’s local computer.
From the Device Details page, click the Interface List to drill down into the list of interfaces for the selected
device and from there click on the interface to shut down. The navigation prompts the common SPL to publish
the request for the Interface List and the Interface Details page for the specific interface. The SLL picks up both
requests. The SLL identifies which of the several CSUs should be invoked by the request and forwards the
request to the appropriate CSU, in this case the Resource CSU. The Resource CSU again publishes the
request for data, which is picked up by the Data Abstraction Layer. The Data Abstraction layer responds to
the request by initiating a query to the database to render the information on the Interface List page. The
Data Abstraction layer publishes a response, which is picked up by the Resource CSU and published on the
communication bus, which the common SPL picks up and displays on the operator’s local computer.
Lastly, click the
DOWN option from the Action menu located on the right of the Interface Details page.
The navigation prompts the common SPL to publish the request for the interface
DOWN function, which
is picked up by the SLL. The SLL identifies which of the several CSUs should be invoked by the request and
forwards the request to the appropriate CSU, in this case the Configuration CSU. The Configuration CSU
publishes the request on the communication bus, which is picked up by the Data Abstraction Layer. The Data
Abstraction layer determines which of the 2500+ device abstractions is required to fulfill this DOWN request.
(A device abstraction in IMC includes a combination of information about the device including vendor,
device type, model, command set, and execution method.) Once the Data Abstraction Layer has identified
the abstraction to use, it then publishes a request on the communication bus for the method of communication.
The IMC database picks up the request and publishes the communication method (SNMP, Telnet, or SSH)
configured for the device. The Data Abstraction layer picks up the response and begins communicating with
the device itself using the communication method specified by the database. Using the command set and
execution method specified in the abstraction, the Data Abstraction Layer issues the interface DOWN
request to the device. The Data Abstraction Layer then publishes the status for the DOWN request to the
communication bus, which is picked up by the Configuration CSU. The Configuration CSU publishes the
status to the communication bus, which is picked up by the common SPL and rendered on the operator’s local
computer.
SOA framework
The SOA single, integrated framework provides organizations with a foundation for network management
based on the FCAPS model that is both scalable and extensible. Network infrastructures can grow in size, in
demand for performance, in diversity of device types, and in demand for new functionality and IMC grows
with them. First, networks grow in size. With IMC’s SOA framework, organizations can deploy multiple IMC
18
systems to new areas of growth. All IMC instances can communicate with each other and share information
through hierarchical or parent/child relationships with each other.
Networks can also grow in their demand for higher performance from IMC as the demand for network
services and network management services grows. Given IMC’s distributed processing at the CSU or
middleware layer and a communication bus that all IMC instances and service modules publish and
subscribe to, operators can meet this demand by deploying separate instances of one or more CSUs. For
example, organizations that have high demand for fault management may consider deploying the Fault CSU
on a dedicated system. Or, large organizations that use IMC to manage device configurations and change
may consider deploying the Configuration CSU on a dedicated system for higher performance.
IMC can also grow in diversity of device types that can be managed. IMC abstracts information about
device vendors, device types, command sets, and execution methods and stores this at the Data Abstraction
Layer that is shared by all CSU modules. This means that IMC can easily and seamlessly add new devices
as they emerge and continue to add abstractions for existing devices with each new release of IMC.
Given IMC’s SOA framework, HP continues to develop new CSU modules at the middleware layer that are
aligned with IT functional needs as those needs change and grow. Extending IMC to meet new functional
needs is as simple as developing a new Common Service Unit that participates in the publish/subscribe
communication bus and shared Data Access Layer and IMC database resources.
In short, IMC’s framework offers administrators and operators room to grow as their networks grow and their
demand for integrated network management grows.
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2 Planning considerations for a successful
implementation
Executing a successful deployment of IMC requires gathering information about what infrastructure
stakeholders need as well as what information they have about the network infrastructure, devices that
comprise it, and services that run on it. Understanding what your stakeholders’ needs and requirements are
help you understand how IMC must be configured to meet those needs. Stakeholders and IT staff also have
very valuable information on the network, its idiosyncrasies and performance that also support you in
configuring IMC successfully.
In addition to interviewing stakeholders to understand what their requirements are, you need to investigate
various areas of the network infrastructure. You need to know your network in order to ensure a successful
implementation of IMC.
Once you have interviewed your stakeholders and investigated the many and varied layers of a network
infrastructure, you are ready to begin translating requirements into actionable configuration tasks to create
a successful deployment of IMC.
Knowing your organization’s network resource management
requirements
Collaborating with your stakeholders to identify their needs and to determine if and how their needs are met
by IMC is critical to the successful deployment of IMC. Therefore, identifying and interviewing your
stakeholders to understand their requirements for IMC and to gather from them the information you need to
configure IMC effectively is a great place to begin planning your IMC deployment.
Identifying network infrastructure stakeholders
To ensure a successful IMC deployment, you must identify your organization users and their needs. The most
likely stakeholders of IMC are those who manage, engineer, and support the network infrastructure. This
includes network managers, engineers, administrators, and the NOC staff. The network engineering and
operations teams benefit significantly by the services IMC offers and they are the greatest source of
information and experience for guiding a successful deployment of IMC.
Network security teams also have a need or interest in gaining visibility into the network infrastructure.
Teams that engineer and support data center environments also benefit by IMC. Teams that develop and
support databases and applications also have some interest or need for visibility into the network
infrastructure. Systems management staff responsible for managing system software upgrades and patches
have an interest in the visibility that IMC provides.
Teams that support the tracking and resolution of failures and problems, including Help Desks, have an
interest in IMC. For organizations that have formal or informal processes for monitoring, managing, and
reporting on service quality and compliance with service level agreements are also IMC stakeholders.
Organizations that deal with governance, risk and compliance issues and initiatives, those who deal with
auditing IT controls are also stakeholders for IMC. Managers, engineers and teams charged with meeting
the performance requirements of the network and those who plan for the future capacity demands for IT
services are also key stakeholders of IMC.
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Each group of stakeholders has a unique perspective and store of knowledge and experience of the network
infrastructure that help guide a successful IMC deployment. The most obvious example is the network
engineering team who can provide network diagrams, and device model and series information for network
devices. They also should participate in the decisions regarding which traps or Syslog events from network
devices should be escalated to alarms and which traps should be filtered. They should also provide input into
alarm thresholds and frequency of alerting. For organizations that do in-house application development, QA
teams can be a resource for information on application environments as well as what services, systems, and
devices should be monitored and what the device and application dependencies are. Also, they can help
guide alarm threshold definitions.
Identifying stakeholder needs
The requirements for most stakeholders can be reduced to two basic needs: visibility and access. Visibility is
the ability to see into the network infrastructure; to see into the devices, resources, links, and systems that
constitute it; and the ability to see how well the network is performing and meeting the organization’s needs.
Delivering visibility to stakeholders is accomplished by collecting data from network resources, analyzing it,
and presenting it in various formats. In addition, some if not all stakeholders need access to IMC to configure
or manage devices and to obtain data.
Common data requirements
Use the following questions as a starting point for developing your own process and set of questions for
gathering requirements from those people in your organization who use or benefit by IMC.
1.
What Data is needed?

What are the devices, resources, or systems that constitute the services that the stakeholders are
responsible for?
The list of devices, resources, systems that a stakeholder offers provide you with two key pieces of
information: 1) the list of resources to monitor; and 2) the vendor, series, and model information
you need to research to determine what metrics or data is available and therefore what data you
can collect from every device.

What are the key metrics or performance indicators that the stakeholders use to measure the
effectiveness of the services they are responsible for delivering?
The list of key metrics or performance indicators that a stakeholder offers provide you with several
key pieces of information: 1) how the stakeholder measures success; 2) what the stakeholder
needs in terms of data to measure success; and 3) if the information that the stakeholder needs can
or cannot be met by the data collected by IMC from the devices, services, or systems that
constitute the service the stakeholder delivers.

What are the quantifiable targets or goals that the stakeholders have set for delivering on their
service commitments?
The list of goals that a stakeholder defines enables you to align with the stakeholder’s needs and
use IMC to meet the organization’s needs and goals. In addition, this information helps define
threshold settings for alarms and monitoring requirements.

What baseline data do the stakeholders have for measuring their targets and goals against?
Having baseline data enables you to measure the effect that IMC has had on supporting the
realization of the organization’s goals and aligning IT with business objectives.
2.
For What Timeframe?
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
Is the data for alarming purposes? Is the data needed in near real time? If so, what are the service
level commitments for performance, outage duration, or service availability? How long can the
organization wait before being notified of a problem or outage?
These questions identify some of the monitoring requirements for fault or event management. Fault
management identifies current failures or problems that need immediate attention. The collection
and processing of data and event notification for fault monitoring need to align with the service
level commitments that stakeholders make. For example, a service level commitment of 99.999%
network reachability translates into about five minutes of network outage per year. Therefore, the
polling interval used for monitoring for reachability must be significantly less than five minutes in
order to support the achievement of this service level commitment.

Is historical reporting required? If so, in what areas is historical reporting needed? On resource
performance? On faults or events in the network? On device configurations and changes to
configurations? On network assets and changes to network assets? On security events? On access
to IMC and changes to IMC?
These questions identify in what areas historical reporting is needed. Historical reporting can
encompass everything from network and performance management to asset, configuration,
change, incident, problem, and service level management. In fact, most groups require some form
of historical reporting and the key is to provide stakeholders with reports targeted to meet their
needs.

What level of data granularity is needed? How much summarization is needed? For how long
does data need to be retained?
The first question can be translated to how frequently data must be polled from the devices, a key
requirement as it defines how you configure polling in IMC. How many data samples does the
stakeholder need to reliably measure for their key performance indicators? Once you have this
information, you can evaluate the load that polling places on 1) the resources being monitored;
2) the network resource and bandwidth consumption that monitoring introduces; and 3) the
processing and storage load that places on IMC. Ultimately, this involves finding a balance
between stakeholder needs and network and IMC resource consumption.
Data retention and summarization requirements vary for different stakeholders. The on-call
network operations team usually requires data retention with less summarization, typically one
day to one week of data retention. Less summarization or more granularity is needed for network
operations teams as they are most closely focused on pinpointing when, how, and why problems
occurred. The data retention and summarization requirements of performance analysts whose
time horizon may be up to one month or more fall in a mid-range. Capacity planner time horizons
are much longer and may span five years and with much greater data summarization.
Data retention is another matter for asset, problem, incident, change and configuration
management as both detail and summary reports are required. In such cases, data export options
may be considered.
3.
In What Format?

If the data is needed for alarming purposes, what method is used? Email or SMS text notifications?
Console display of events and alarms? Integration with other management systems? Integration
with Help Desk ticketing systems?
The format and method for the delivery of data varies considerably for stakeholders. Operations
teams needing data as quickly as possible rely on methods such as Email or SMS text messaging,
console presentation or integration with other management systems for the quick delivery of data.
Oftentimes, operations teams and NOCs use one or more of these methods and formats for data.

If the data is needed for historical reporting, what kinds of reports are needed? Tabular,
graphical?
22
Historical reporting requirements typically focus more on how the data is presented.
Understanding how your stakeholders want the data presented (bar charts, pie charts, scatter
graphs, and tables) helps you meet their needs.

Is export to raw data files required?
Many times stakeholders want raw data as they have their own systems for analyzing and
presenting the data in ways most useful for them. Additionally, stakeholders may have data
retention or polling requirements that extend beyond the scope or ability of IMC. Understanding
the data requirements of your stakeholders enables you to know whether or not exporting data
from IMC is the best option available for your stakeholders.
Stakeholder access and configuration requirements
In addition to the data that provides stakeholders with visibility into network resources and services,
stakeholders also need access to IMC. Access may be needed for viewing purposes only, for configuring
and managing devices, users, and services in IMC, or for the configuration and management of IMC itself.
Understanding what levels of access are needed to IMC and the devices, users, and resources it manages
helps you configure IMC to support stakeholder needs.
Knowing your network infrastructure
To deploy IMC successfully, you need to have a clear understanding of the network infrastructure that IMC
monitors and manages.
Knowing your network topology
While IMC does auto discoveries, it relies on the accurate identification of seed IP addresses to begin the
discovery process. Identifying those IP addresses that best serve as seed IP addresses to discover the whole
of your network ensures a successful IMC deployment. Also, IMC can auto discover logical relationships in
the network infrastructure and this influences how IMC identifies root and symptom alarms in its event
deduplication and root cause analysis algorithms. If needed, you can make adjustments to the devices IMC
defines as the core and access devices that determine how root and symptom alarms are identified. The
network documentation that you need includes topology maps, IP addressing schemes, and information
identifying areas of your network that require special attention. The topology maps you need should ideally
include both physical and logical diagrams of the network. A logical map helps you understand the
relationships between devices and verify the accuracy of the topology maps generated by IMC. Physical
diagrams, including data center maps and details of individual wiring racks, support you in creating
accurate data center topology maps in IMC.
Next you need current and accurate documentation on the IP address schemes used. IP address
documentation should also include any areas in your infrastructure that have overlapping address spaces. In
addition, this documentation should include any locations or devices on the network that use non-routable IP
addresses.
The network documentation should also identify areas or zones in your network that have special access
requirements. For example, many companies prefer to separate internal corporate user traffic from external
customer traffic and use layers of firewalls to separate these zones. In addition, many corporations create
zones within zones to create secure application environments for the web, application, and database tiers.
Tiers and zones may have specific access requirements. Understanding the management system
requirements is necessary to configure IMC to manage devices in those tiers and zones.
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Knowing your device vendors, series, and models
IMC uses device vendor, series, and model information in the Configuration Center to determine whether or
not configuration and software files can be successfully deployed to devices in the network. Knowing what
you have and configuring this information when IMC cannot auto discover supports you in managing the
complex task of device configuration and software and patch management.
Make a list of all of the vendors that provide the devices and resources that are the building blocks of your
network. In addition, gather the device series and model information for every unique device type in your
environment. Take the output of an asset inventory for your network and combine it with the device vendor,
model, and series information you have gathered so that you have clear and comprehensive details for all
devices in your network. Comparing asset inventories to IMC’s database of devices provides a gap analysis
of what you have versus what IMC knows about your network.
Identifying device vendor, series, and model information enables you to more easily identify and research
vendor specific enterprise MIBs that contain objects, including traps, for customized and optimized
monitoring of devices. Once you have identified the MIB objects you want to poll for, you can create
user-defined global index monitors that you can apply to all devices of the same vendor series and model
type. Once you have identified the traps you want to process, you can create user-defined trap definitions
and apply them to all devices of the same type.
Having concise, usable, and consistently applied device naming standards simplifies IMC administration
and use IMC uses the MIB-2 object sysName, the administratively assigned name for a managed device, as
the Device Label or name in IMC unless an IMC administrator or operator configures a custom Device Label.
Knowing access requirements and standards of your
organization
The two aspects to access to consider in the planning stages of an IMC deployment are:
•
Access requirements for your organization and restrictions for IMC to manage devices
•
Requirements for providing operators with access to IMC
IMC uses several methods to manage devices. First, IMC uses SNMP (v1, v2c, or v3) to poll devices for
management and monitoring data and also to receive SNMP traps from devices for proactive notification of
events on managed devices. Second, IMC uses ping or ICMP requests for status polling and reachability
statistics for devices managed by it. IMC also uses Telnet or SSH to manage devices.
You need to understand your organization’s policy on the use of SNMP, ICMP, Telnet, and SSH in the various
zones and application tiers in your network in order to use IMC to manage devices in them. In addition, IMC
uses TCP and UDP ports to communicate with other IMC servers and modules and understanding your
organization’s policy on permitting this traffic facilitates a successful implementation.
You need to work with the teams that manage access control lists and firewall rules to ensure that SNMP,
ICMP, Telnet, and SSH traffic are permitted for all networks, zones, and application tiers that have resources
you want to manage. In addition, you need to ensure that the TCP and UDP ports that IMC uses to
communicate with other servers and modules are also permitted. Alternatively, your organization may have
a management VLAN or subnet dedicated to management systems for which this traffic is permitted for
devices in the VLAN or subnet. If your organization has such a VLAN or subnet, be sure to locate the IMC
servers in this VLAN or subnet.
To manage a device using SNMP, Telnet, and SSH, you need to configure the device to support these
protocols. For SNMP, this requires enabling SNMP on every managed device, using the version of SNMP
your organization mandates. It also requires configuring the device to forward SNMP traps to IMC if you
24
have designated IMC as the device to process and display SNMP traps. You need to configure IMC with the
SNMP configuration information that allows it to both SNMP poll devices as well as to receive SNMP traps
from managed devices. Use the SNMP templates feature to configure IMC for all devices that are monitored
and managed using SNMP. You can configure IMC to receive traps from devices when the devices are
auto-discovered or added to IMC.
With Telnet and SSH, you need to configure every device to enable Telnet and/or SSH sessions to it. See the
vendor documentation for instructions. You also need to configure IMC with the Telnet or SSH configuration
information in order for IMC to establish a session with a managed device. You can use Telnet and SSH
templates to simplify the process of adding device specific Telnet and SSH configuration information to IMC.
Some features in IMC require a Telnet or SSH application on the operator’s local computer. IMC can use the
native Telnet and SSH clients that most operating systems provide. Check with your organization’s
requirements regarding the use of Telnet or SSH for secure access to managed devices.
Identifying security policies and restrictions for monitoring
To successfully deploy IMC, you must identify the various zones and application tiers in your network and
what the access policies are for each of them. Is ICMP, SNMP, Telnet, and SSH traffic permitted to and from
each one of these zones that contains one or more devices you want to manage and the VLANs or subnets
that IMC resides on? Or, what is required to permit ICMP, SNMP, Telnet, and SSH traffic to these zones and
tiers?
You need to configure the version of SNMP that is mandated by your organization on each device to be
managed using SNMP. This SNMP configuration on the device must match the SNMP configuration for the
device in IMC.
You need to identify your organization’s requirements for the use of Telnet or SSH for managed devices and
configure each device and IMC accordingly.
Identifying your organization’s password requirements for SNMP community strings, Telnet, and SSH
passwords as well as IMC operator accounts enables you to configure IMC to meet those requirements.
Identifying the integration requirements and
opportunities
IMC may not be the only management system in your infrastructure. Consider the following questions to
determine how to accomplish integration:
•
Is IMC the destination for events and alarms generated by IMC as well as by other management
systems?
•
Is IMC the repository and console for SNMP traps and Syslog events?
•
Does your organization have a manager of IMCs or other system that processes events from many
management systems?
•
Does your organization have a help desk to which events and alarms should be forwarded?
Translating requirements into actions
The first step in a successful deployment is gathering requirements. The next step is translating requirements
into actions, which vary by organization.
The following lists provide some ideas for configuring IMC:
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Compiling information
•
Compile a list of vendors that include vendor contact information.
•
Compile a list of vendor series information for all unique device series.
•
Compile a list of vendor model information for all unique device models.
•
Identify what metrics collected by IMC can be translated into key metrics or performance indicators to
meet stakeholder requirements. Do any of the metrics require enterprise MIBs that need to be compiled
into IMC? New user-defined global monitors created?
•
Obtain MIBs to compile into IMC to support additional fault and performance monitoring.
•
Compile MIBs into IMC.
•
Compile a list of devices that includes the following information for each device:

Vendor

Series Name

Model Name

SNMP Settings

Telnet Parameters

SSH Parameters

Default or Custom status polling requirements

Default or Custom configuration polling requirements

Default or Custom performance monitoring requirements

List of services running on the device that require monitoring

Management IP Address

Identify people that require access for viewing or managing the device.

Identify recipients of email or text notifications for alarms for this device.

Identify device groups to which this device should belong.

Identify custom views to which this device should belong.
Network infrastructure
•
Work with your organization’s network, security, and change control teams to implement network
management VLANs and to permit traffic between IMC and all devices managed by IMC for all zones
and tiers in application environments.
•
Make or request changes to device naming conventions to simplify and standardize naming between
IMC and the physical devices.
Event and performance management
•
Verify that IMC’s system-defined trap and Syslog definitions capture all events and escalate events to
alarms for devices as defined by the requirements you have gathered.
•
Verify that IMC’s system defined trap and Syslog filters eliminate unwanted events as needed.
•
Configure user-defined trap and Syslog definitions and configure to escalate to alarms as needed to
meet requirements.
•
Configure user-defined trap and Syslog filters to eliminate unwanted events.
•
Create user-defined global monitors to meet stakeholder requirements for monitoring performance and
reporting.
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•
Customize as needed the default set of monitor indices before adding devices to IMC so that once
devices are added the default set of monitors are applied.
•
Define performance monitoring thresholds for global monitors that map to key metrics for devices as
needed or that notify operators of degraded conditions.
•
Configure status and configuration polling intervals for devices to map to key metrics and service level
commitments.
•
Configure email, SMS, and alarm forwarding to other management systems based on requirements.
•
Identify custom reporting requirements for faults, performance, configuration, change, security, and
asset management.
•
Configure Data Export based on data export and retention requirements.
Groups and views
•
Define operator groups based on stakeholder requirements for access to IMC feature and devices,
users, and services managed by IMC.
•
Create device, user, and service groups based on stakeholder requirements for device access and
management requirements.
•
Create custom views based on stakeholder requirements for access to devices.
•
Add vendor, device series, device category, and device model information.
Device access
•
Create an SNMP template for every unique SNMP configuration.
•
Create a Telnet template for every unique Telnet configuration.
•
Create an SSH template for every unique SSH configuration.
•
Create an SOAP template for Virtual Network Manager to manage virtual network devices.
•
Create a WMI template for Virtual Network Manager to manage virtual network devices.
•
Create a PowerShell template for Virtual Network Manager to manage virtual network devices.
System configuration
•
Configure the transfer mode option for configuration center for transferring software and configuration
files.
Adding devices
•
Compile a list of seed IP addresses that allows you to streamline the discovery process.
•
Develop a strategy for adding devices to the network using one or more of IMC’s auto discovery
methods.
•
Auto discover devices using one or more methods as needed and include in the configuration the
ability to automatically register IMC to receive SNMP traps from supported devices for all devices
configured to send SNMP traps to IMC.
•
Add devices manually that cannot or were not auto discovered and include in the configuration the
ability to automatically register IMC to receive SNMP traps from supported devices for all devices
configured to send SNMP traps to IMC.
•
Add devices to device groups and custom views based on information gathered.
•
Add device vendor, series, category, and model information to devices manually added or to devices
for which this information could not be discovered automatically.
•
Using physical maps, create data center maps for dynamic data center mapping.
27
•
Use the IP address scheme documentation to document the allocation of IP addresses in IMC.
•
Map IP to Mac addresses and MAC addresses to interfaces as needed.
•
Configure Asset Manager to collect asset information based on stakeholder requirements.
•
Configure configuration backups and configuration checks as dictated by requirements.
•
Configure performance views to meet historical reporting requirements for chart type and metrics.
•
Configure My Real Time Reports as needed to meet reporting requirements.
•
Apply configuration and software baselines to all devices.
•
Disable status polling for devices that cannot be pinged.
Access to IMC
•
Create operator accounts based on requirements gathered for operator access to devices and IMC
services and features.
•
Configure a password strategy in IMC that aligns IMC passwords with organizational policies on
passwords.
•
Configure IMC to use an existing LDAP system for password authentication if your organization uses
LDAP.
•
Restrict operator access to IMC as needed by configuring login control templates.
28
3 Exploring the IMC interface
IMC provides unified visibility for all IMC features, services and components via a single web portal. This
web portal offers a common launch point for all installed IMC base and add-on modules.
IMC administrators use this web portal for configuring all IMC settings and functions. Network infrastructure
engineers, administrators, and managers will use the web portal for performing tasks from viewing and
managing network user activity to configuring devices and viewing their current status and performance.
Standard IMC supports access to IMC resources from mobile clients. It allows you to view faulty device and
interface information, query specific device information, view alarm information, perform device reachability
test (ping), view custom views and device views, and log in to IMC through the browser on a mobile client.
IMC supports the Android and iPhone clients.
In this chapter, we will explore the IMC web interface. We will also explore IMC’s context sensitive online
help. The online help system provides help for each window as well as system-wide help.
IMC also provides administrators with the ability to customize IMC to meet their individual needs. We will
explore how to customize the IMC interface to meet individual administrator needs.
Logging into IMC
To log into IMC:
1.
Enter the URL for the IMC server in your browser, including the port number for IMC.
−
http://servername:portnumber/imc
−
https://servername:portnumber/imc
Where server name is the name of the IMC server and port number is the TCP port assigned to
IMC during installation.
Alternatively, you can use the IP address of the server in lieu of the server name.
2.
Enter the user ID assigned to you in the Operator field.
3.
Enter your password in the Password field.
4.
Click Login or press Enter.
Exploring the IMC home page
The IMC home page displays information in a hierarchical way. It comprises two layers, space and widget.
If you log in to the IMC for the first time, you can see the default space, which comprises six widgets
displaying the alarm, resource, and performance summary information of the IMC, as shown in Figure 2
(page 30).
IMC’s modules also offer a variety of widgets in order to meet your viewing and monitoring needs. You can
customize a space and add system-defined alarm, resource, performance, and other modules’ widgets to
your space. In addition, you can customize RSS widgets, which provide you with the ability to subscribe to
the RSS feeds.
29
Figure 2 IMC home page
For the default space displayed on your first login to the IMC home page, no data is available for any
widgets. After you add devices to IMC, the system generates statistics immediately and displays them in the
default space.
Basic operations on the IMC home page
On the IMC home page, you can perform basic operations on the spaces and widgets.
Freezing/Unfreezing a space tab
1.
Move the pointer over the
changes to
.
icon on the top left corner of the default space, and the
2.
To freeze the space tab, click
. Then the
icon changes to
appear on the top of the space, as shown in Figure 3.
icon
, and a tab bar and function links
The name of the default space is Welcome.
3.
To unfreeze the space tab, click
.
Then the tab bar and function links of the space are hidden. The space tab and relevant links are
shown in Figure 3 (page 31).
30
Figure 3 Space tab and relevant links
Adding a space
1.
Click
of the space tab, and a new space tab named "New Space"
appears.
2.
Type the name for the new space, and click any blank part of the page to complete naming the space.
Renaming a space
•
To rename a space, click
or
next to the space name on the space tab, and select Rename from the list,
•
Double click the space, type a new name for the space, and click any blank part of the page to
complete renaming the space.
Switching between spaces
To switch between spaces, click the relevant space tabs.
Saving a space
To save current space, click
Save on the top right corner of the space.
If no modification is made for the current space,
space.
Save is displayed in gray. You do not need to save the
Deleting a space
1.
Click
next to the space name on the space tab.
2.
Select Delete from the list.
3.
Confirm your operation.
You cannot delete the default space Welcome.
Adding new widgets to a space
1.
Launch the dialog box for adding widgets by clicking
Edit on the top right corner of the space.
If no widget is contained in the space,
is displayed in the middle of the space. You can
launch the dialog box for adding widgets by clicking the button.
By default, the dialog box provides 13 types of resource, alarm, and performance statistics widgets
defined by the system.
31
2.
Select the layout for widgets:
On the top middle of the widget adding dialog box, select a layout.


3.
means two widgets are displayed per row. The left widget occupies 2/3 and the right
occupies 1/3 of the row.
means two widgets are displayed per row. The left widget occupies 1/3 and the right
occupies 2/3 of the row.

means two widgets are displayed per row, each occupying 1/2 of the row.

means three widgets are displayed per row, each occupying 1/3 of the row.
Locate a widget by using one of the following methods:

Query a widget
On the top right corner of the dialog box, type the keyword of a widget name and click Query. All
widgets matching the query criteria are displayed in the dialog box. The query supports fuzzy
matching and is case-sensitive.

Sort widgets
a. On the top left corner of the dialog box, select the All, Resource, Alarm and Performance tab to
display all widgets, resource-related widgets, alarm-related widget, and performance-related
widgets.
b. On the bottom right corner of the page, click Previous or Next to display widgets on the previous
or next pages.
Use either method to display the desired widgets in the dialog box.
4.
Click
for a widget to add it to the space.
Then
changes to Succeeded, indicating the widget is added successfully.
You can add up to 10 widgets to a space.
5.
Click OK to complete the operations and return to the space.
Changing the widget layout of a space
1.
Click
Edit on the top right corner of the space to launch the widget dialog box.
On the top middle of the widget dialog box, select a layout.


2.
means two widgets are displayed per row. The left widget occupies 2/3 and the right
occupies 1/3 of the row.
means two widgets are displayed per row. The left widget occupies 1/3 and the right
occupies 2/3 of the row.

means two widgets are displayed per row, each occupying 1/2 of the row.

means three widgets are displayed per row, each occupying 1/3 of the row.
Click OK to complete the operations and return to the space.
Expanding/Collapsing all widgets of a space
•
Click
Expand All on the top right corner to expand all widgets of the current space, or
•
Click
Collapse All on the top right corner to collapse all widgets of the current space.
Expanding/Collapsing a widget of the space
•
Click
Restore on the top left corner of a widget to expand it, or
32
•
Click
Minimize on the top left corner of a widget to collapse it.
Dragging and dropping a widget
1.
Move the pointer over the name bar of a widget.
2.
When the cursor becomes a black cross
place the widget to the desired position.
, drag and drop the name bar to
Maximizing a widget
1.
To maximize a specific widget, click
Maximize on the top right corner of the widget.
2.
To return the widget to its original widow size, click
Restore on the top left corner of the widget.
Displaying a widget in a new window
To display a widget in a new window, click
New Window on the top right corner of the widget.
Refreshing a widget manually
To refresh a widget, click
Refresh on the top right corner of the widget.
Setting the refresh interval
1.
Click the Setting icon
on the top right corner of the widget to launch the Setting dialog box. If other
parameters are required for the widget, two options, Setting and Refresh Interval, are provided.
2.
Click Refresh interval to enter the refresh interval setting window.
If no other parameters are required for the widget, the Setting dialog box appears. The available
options include No Refresh, 1, 5, 10, and 30, in minutes.
3.
Select a refresh interval, and click OK.
Deleting a widget from the space
To delete a widget, click
Delete on the top right corner, and then confirm your operation.
Alarm, performance and resource widgets
By default, IMC provides 13 types of resource, alarm and performance statistics widgets defined by the
system.
Alarm TopN
By default, the Alarm TopN widget, shown in Figure 4 (page 34) displays top 5 devices generating the most
alarms (the y-axis indicates the device type, and the x-axis indicates the alarm quantity). The content includes
the device information (Device Label (IP) by default), alarm type, and the quantities of alarm.
33
Figure 4 Alarm TopN
The color of the alarm for each device reflects in real time. Color-coding of the severity or alarm level
conforms to industry standards and is displayed in the list below:
•
Critical
•
Major
•
Minor
•
Warning
Click the Setting icon
box.
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
•
Alarm Level—Specifies for the alarm view which the alarm to be displayed. The available options
include Critical, Major and Higher, Minor and Higher, Warning and Higher.
•
Alarm Statistics—Specifies the quantities of device to be displayed for the Alarm view. The available
options include 5, 10.
CPU utilization (%) – TopN
By default, the CPU utilization table, shown in Figure 5 (page 35), displays the top 5 high-utilization CPUs
within the last hour. The content includes the time range, device/slot that the CPU belongs, and the CPU
utilization.
34
Figure 5 CPU utilization
Click the Setting icon
box:
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
•
Time Range—Specifies the time range for statistics collection. The available options include Last Hour,
Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, and Last Year.
•
Top—Specifies the number of monitoring instances for the widget. The available options include 5, 10,
20, and 30.
By default, CPU Utilization (%) - TopN widget is displayed on the Welcome space of the IMC home page.
Memory utilization (%) – TopN
By default, the memory utilization table, shown in Figure 6 (page 35), displays the top 5 high-utilization
memories within the last hour. The content includes the time range, device/slot that the memory belongs, and
the memory utilization.
Figure 6 Memory utilization
35
Click the Setting icon
box:
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
•
Time Range—Specifies the time range for statistics collection. The available options include Last Hour,
Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, and Last Year.
•
Top—Specifies the number of monitoring instances for the widget. The available options include 5, 10,
20, and 30.
By default, Memory Utilization (%) – TopN widget is displayed on the Welcome space of the IMC home
page.
Device response time (ms) – TopN
By default, the device response time table, Figure 7 (page 36), displays the top 5 devices with the longest
response time within the last hour. The content includes the time range, device name and IP, and the response
time.
Figure 7 Device Response Time
Click the Setting icon
box:
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
•
Time Range—Specifies the time range for statistics collection. The available options include Last Hour,
Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, and Last Year.
•
Top—Specifies the number of devices for the widget. The available options include 5, 10, 20, and 30.
By default, Device Response Time (ms) – TopN widget is displayed on the Welcome space of the IMC home
page.
Device unreachability (%) – TopN
By default, the device unreachability table, Figure 8 (page 37), displays the top 5 devices with the highest
unreachability rate within the last hour. The content includes the time range, device name and IP, and the
unreachability rate.
36
Figure 8 Device unreachability
Click the Setting icon
box:
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
•
Time Range—Specifies the time range for statistics collection. The available options include Last Hour,
Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, and Last Year.
•
Top—Specifies the number of devices for the widget. The available options include 5, 10, 20, and 30.
By default, Device Unreachability (%) – TopN widget is displayed on the Welcome space of the IMC home
page.
Bandwidth utilization (In) (%) – TopN
By default, the Bandwidth Utilization (In) table, Figure 9 (page 37), displays the top 5 devices with the
highest inbound traffic bandwidth utilization within the last hour. The content includes the time range, device
name, IP, and the Interface In-Bandwidth Usage.
Figure 9 Bandwidth utilization (In)
37
Click the Setting icon
box.
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
•
Time Range—Specifies the time range for statistics collection. The available options include Last Hour,
Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, and Last Year.
•
Top—Specifies the number of devices for the widget. The available options include 5, 10, 20, and 30.
Bandwidth utilization (Out) (%) – TopN
By default, the Bandwidth Utilization (Out) table, Figure 10 (page 38), displays the top 5 devices with the
highest outbound traffic bandwidth utilization within the last hour. The content includes the time range,
device name, IP, and the Interface Out-Bandwidth Usage.
Figure 10 Bandwidth utilization (Out)
Click the Setting icon
box.
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
•
Time Range—Specifies the time range for statistics collection. The available options include Last Hour,
Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, and Last Year.
•
Top—Specifies the number of devices for the widget. The available options include 5, 10, 20, and 30.
Customize TopN
By default, the Customize TopN widget, shown in Figure 11 (page 39), displays the CPU utilization (%) TopN
view, which displays the top 5 highest-utilization CPUs within the last hour. The content includes the time
range, device information (Device Label (IP) by default), Instance, and Data.
38
Figure 11 Customize TopN
Click the Setting icon
box.
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
•
Monitor Index—Specifies the performance you want to monitor, The available options include CPU
Usage (%), Memory Usage (%), Response Time of Device (ms), Device Unreachability Proportion (%), IP
Datagram Receiving Rate (datagrams/s), IP Datagram Forwarding Rate (datagrams/s), Discarded
Proportion of input Datagrams, Discarded Proportion of output IP Datagrams, Interface Receiving Rate
(bits/s), Interface Transmitting Rate (bits/s), Interface In-Bandwidth Usage (%), Interface
out-Bandwidth Usage (%), Interface Receiving Broadcasting Rate (package/s), Interface Transmitting
Broadcasting Rate (package/s), Proportion of Receiving Packets Discarded (%), and Proportion of
Sending Packets Discarded (%).
•
Time Range—Specifies the time range for statistics collection. The available options include Last Hour,
Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, and Last Year.
•
Top—Specifies the number of devices for the widget. The available options include 5, 10, 20, and 30.
Network
The Network widget, shown in Figure 12 (page 39), displays the number of devices in different IP segments
and custom views in the IMC.
Figure 12 Network
The color of the icon for each IP segment or custom view reflects in real time the most severe alarm or severity
level of any device within the IP segment or custom view. Color-coding of the severity or alarm level conforms
to industry standards and is displayed in the list below:
•
Critical
39
•
Major
•
Minor
•
Warning
•
Normal
•
Informational
•
Unmanaged
These IP views provide drilldown to lists of all devices with their IP segments. To access these views, click the
link of the IP segment.
These custom views provide drilldown to lists of all devices with their respective groups. To access these views,
click the name of the custom view.
Click the Setting icon
Setting dialog box.
on the top right corner of the widget and select the Setting option to launch the
•
Columns—Specifies the quantities of IP segments and custom views to be displayed per row for the
widget. The available options include 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10.
•
Network—Specifies the content to be displayed for the widget. Select Both to display both IP view and
custom view; select IP View to display only IP view; select Custom View to display only custom view.
By default, Network widget is displayed on the Welcome space of the IMC home page.
For more information about the IP view and custom view, see "5 Resource management" (page 153).
Device View
As shown in Figure 13 (page 40), Device View involves two charts. The chart at the top displays the
quantities of various devices in the current system (the y-axis indicates the device type, and the x-axis
indicates the device quantity). The pie chart at the bottom displays the quantity and percentage of devices
by their alarm status.
Figure 13 Device View
40
The color of the icon for each custom view reflects in real time the most severe alarm or severity level of any
device within the custom view. Color-coding of the severity or alarm level conforms to industry standards and
is displayed in the list below:
•
Critical
•
Major
•
Minor
•
Warning
•
Normal
•
Informational
•
Unmanaged
By default, Device View widget is displayed on the Welcome space of the IMC home page.
IP Topology
The IP Topology widget, shown in Figure 14 (page 41), displays the IP view.
Figure 14 IP Topology
Click the Setting icon
box.
•
on the top right corner of the widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog
Subnet—Specifies the subnet for which the topology is to be displayed. The available options include
the existing subnets of the system.
You can use the following tools to view the custom view:
•
Displays the network in its original proportion.
•
Enables you to zoom in on the topology view.
•
Enables you to zoom out on the topology view.
•
Enables you to fit the contents of the topology view into the window.
41
•
Enables you to magnify the contents on the topology view. To exit magnify mode, click the icon
again.
Provides a separate bird’s eye view window of the topology map.
•
•
Expands the topology view to full screen. To exit full screen mode, right-Click the topology view
and select Exit Full Screen from the shortcut menu.
For more information about custom view, see "5 Resource management" (page 153).
Custom Topology
The Custom Topology widget, shown in Figure 15 (page 42), displays all custom views.
Figure 15 Custom Topology
Click the Setting icon
dialog box.
•
on the top right corner of the widget and select the Setting to launch the Setting
View—Specifies the custom view for which the topology is to be displayed. The available options
include the existing custom views of the system.
You can use the following tools to view the custom view:
•
Displays the network in its original proportion.
•
Enables you to zoom in on the topology view.
•
Enables you to zoom out on the topology view.
•
Enables you to fit the contents of the topology view into the window.
•
•
Enables you to magnify the contents on the topology view. To exit magnify mode, click on the icon
again.
Provides a separate bird’s eye view window of the topology map.
42
•
Expands the topology view to full screen. To exit full screen mode, right-click the topology view
and select Exit Full Screen from the shortcut menu.
For more information about custom view, see "5 Resource management" (page 153).
Port Group
The Port Group widget, shown in Figure 16 (page 43), displays the port group list. You can click a port group
name to view detailed port information.
Figure 16 Port Group
Click the Setting icon
dialog box.
•
on the top right corner of the widget and select the Setting to launch the Setting
Columns—Specifies the quantities of IP segments and custom views to be displayed per row for the
widget. The available options include 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10.
For more information about Port Group, see "5 Resource management" (page 153).
Customizing spaces and system-defined widgets
In addition to the default Welcome space defined by the system, you can customize a space and add
widgets to your space as needed.
To customize a space and add widgets to your space:
1.
Log in to the IMC, move the pointer over the
icon changes to
.
2.
Click
icon on the top left corner of the space, and the
to freeze the space tab.
A tab bar appears on the top of the space.
3.
Click
of the space tab, and a new space tab named "New Space"
appears.
4.
Type the name for the new space, and click any blank part of the page to complete naming the space.
5.
Launch the dialog box for adding widgets by clicking
Edit on the upper right corner of the space.
By default, the dialog box provides system-defined alarm, resource, and performance widgets located
under the Widgets tab.
6.
Select the layout for widgets.
On the top middle of the widget adding dialog box, select a layout.


means two widgets are displayed per row. The left widget occupies 2/3 and the right
occupies 1/3 of the row.
means two widgets are displayed per row. The left widget occupies 1/3 and the right
occupies 2/3 of the row.

means two widgets are displayed per row, each occupying 1/2 of the row.

means three widgets are displayed per row, each occupying 1/3 of the row.
43
7.
Locate a system-defined widget by using one of the following methods.

Query a widget
Select the Widget tab in the dialog box. On the top right corner of the dialog box, type the
keyword of a widget name and click Query. All widgets matching the query criteria are displayed
in the dialog box. The query supports fuzzy matching and is case-sensitive.

Sort widgets
Select the Widget tab in the dialog box. On the top left corner of the dialog box, select the All,
Alarm, Performance, and Resource sub-tabs to display all widgets, alarm-related widgets,
performance-related widgets, and resource-related widgets. On the bottom right corner of the
page, click Previous or Next to display widgets on the previous or next pages.
Use either method to display the desired widgets in the dialog box.
8.
Click the
button of a widget to add it to the space. Then
changes to
Succeeded, indicating the widget is added successfully. You can add up to 10 widgets to a space.
7.
Click OK to complete the operations and return to the space.
8.
Click









Setting on the top right corner of a widget and select Setting to launch the Setting dialog box:
Time Range—Specifies the time range for statistics collection. The available options include Last
Hour, Today, Yesterday, This Week, Last Week, This Month, Last Month, This Year, and Last Year.
Top—Specifies the number of devices for the widget. The available options include 5, 10, 20, and
30.
Columns—Specifies the quantities of IP segments and custom views to be displayed per row for the
widget. The available options include 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10. This parameter is available only for the
Network widget.
Network—Specifies the content to be displayed for the widget. Select Both to display both IP view
and custom view; select IP View to display only IP view; select Custom View to display only custom
view. This parameter is available only for the Network widget.
Subnet—Specifies the subnet for which the topology is to be displayed. The available options
include the existing subnets of the system. This parameter is available only for the IP Topology
widget.
View—Specifies the custom view for which the topology is to be displayed. The available options
include the existing custom views of the system. This parameter is available only for the Custom
Topology widget.
Monitor Index—Specifies the performance you want to monitor, The available options include CPU
Usage (%), Memory Usage (%), Response Time of Device (ms), Device Unreachability Proportion
(%), IP Datagram Receiving Rate (datagrams/s), IP Datagram Forwarding Rate (datagrams/s),
Discarded Proportion of input Datagrams, Discarded Proportion of output IP Datagrams, Interface
Receiving Rate (bits/s), Interface Transmitting Rate (bits/s), Interface In-Bandwidth Usage (%),
Interface out-Bandwidth Usage (%), Interface Receiving Broadcasting Rate (package/s), Interface
Transmitting Broadcasting Rate (package/s), Proportion of Receiving Packets Discarded (%),
Proportion of Sending Packets Discarded (%). This parameter is available only for the Customize
TopN widget.
Alarm Level—Specifies for the alarm view which the alarm to be displayed. The available options
include Critical, Major and Higher, Minor, and Higher, Warning and Higher. This parameter is
available only for the Alarm widget.
Alarm Statistics—Specifies the quantities of device to be displayed for the Alarm view. The
available options include 5, 10. This parameter is available only for the Alarm widget.
44
9.
Click OK to confirm your changes.
10.
Click
Save on the top right corner of the space to save your configurations.
Customizing RSS widgets
RSS widgets offer you the ability to subscribe to the RSS feeds. To customize RSS widgets:
1.
Log in to IMC, move the pointer over the
changes to
.
icon on the top left corner of the space, and the
2.
Click
3.
Click the tab you want to add the RSS widget to.
4.
Launch the dialog box for adding widgets by clicking
5.
Click the RSS tab in the dialog box to customize the RSS widget.
6.
Enter the following RSS information:
icon
to freeze the space tab. Then a tab bar appears on the top of the space.
Edit on the upper right corner of the space.
RSS Site: Enter the URL of the RSS feed you want to subscribe.
RSS Title: Enter the name of the RSS widget.
7.
Click the
Check button to test the validity of the RSS feed URL.
8.
Click the
Add button to add another RSS widget.
Device status via status bar
A summary of all alarms, shown in Figure 17 (page 46) is displayed on the IMC status bar located at the
bottom of the Home page, as shown below. Click the icons for each severity or alarm level for drilling down
into the alarms for each level.
45
Figure 17 Status bar
Alarm sound settings
IMC provides operators with the ability to customize the use of sound files for notifying them when new
alarms are received or when existing alarms have not been cleared or recovered. Operators can use IMC
system sound files or they can upload custom sound files. These sound files are then applied to severity or
alarm levels.
To enable system-defined sound files for alarm levels:
1.
Navigate to the Alarm Sound Setting dialog box by clicking the sound icon
corner of the IMC home page.
located in the lower left
The Alarm Sound Setting dialog box appears.
2.
Select when you want alarm sound files to play from the Sound Occasion Setting section of the Alarm
Sound Setting dialog box.
3.
Do one of the following:


If you want IMC to play sound files only when new alarms have been received, click the radio
button
to the left of When receiving new alarms, or
If you want IMC to play sound files when unrecovered alarms exist in IMC, click the radio button
to the left of When existed unrecovered alarms.
You can configure IMC to play sound files for one or more alarm levels.
4.
To select the alarm levels you want to play sound files for, click the checkbox
level.
46
to the left of the alarm
You can use the system sound files that are configured by default or you can choose which sound file
you want to use for each alarm level.
5.
To select a sound file you want to apply to an alarm level, click the Select button associated with the
alarm level.
The Select Voice File page appears.
6.
Click the radio button
to the left of the sound file you want to apply.
7.
Click Select to apply your sound file selection.
8.
Click Set to apply your changes.
9.
Click Default to restore the default sound settings.
10.
Click Close to close the Alarm Sound Setting dialog box.
IMC supports the ability to add custom sound files to alarm sound notifications.
To enable custom sound files for alarm levels:
1.
Navigate to the Alarm Sound Setting dialog box by clicking the sound icon
corner of the IMC home page.
located in the lower left
The Alarm Sound Setting dialog box appears.
2.
Select when you want alarm sound files to play from the Sound Occasion Setting section of the Alarm
Sound Setting dialog box.
3.
Do one of the following:


4.
If you want IMC to play sound files only when new alarms have been received, click the radio
button
to the left of When receiving new alarms, or
If you want IMC to play sound files when unrecovered alarms exist in IMC, click the radio button
to the left of When existed unrecovered alarms.
Click Voice File Manager link located in the upper right corner of the Alarm Sound Setting dialog box.
The Upload Voice File page appears.
5.
Click Browse to browse your local directories for the sound file.
6.
Click Upload to upload the selected sound file.
7.
Verify that the Upload Voice File page indicates that the file was uploaded successfully.
8.
Click Back to return to the Alarm Sound Setting dialog box.
9.
Select the alarm levels you want to apply the custom sound file to by clicking the checkbox
left of the alarm level.
10.
Click the Select button associated with the alarm level you want to apply the custom sound file to.
to the
The Select Voice File page appears.
11.
Click the radio button
to the left of the custom sound file you uploaded.
12.
Click Select to apply your sound file selection and return to the Alarm Sound Setting dialog box.
13.
Click Set to apply your changes.
14.
Click Default to restore the default sound settings.
15.
Click Close to close the Alarm Sound Setting dialog box.
Sound files must be in PCM format (WAV) and the bit rate must be less than or equal to 352 kbps. The
filename must include the .wav extension.
To disable sound files for alarm levels:
47
1.
Navigate to the Alarm Sound Setting dialog box by clicking the sound icon
corner of the IMC home page.
located in the lower left
The Alarm Sound Setting dialog box appears.
2.
To remove sound settings, click the checked box
sounds for.
to the left of the alarm level you want to disable
3.
Click Set to apply your changes.
4.
Click Close to close the Alarm Sound Setting window.
5.
Restart the browser for the sound setting changes to take effect.
Navigating IMC functions
IMC provides you the following ways to navigate functions:
•
After you log in to IMC, move the pointer over a tab on top of the page, and a list appears, as shown
in Figure 18 (page 48). Select the desired function to enter the relevant page.
•
After you log in to IMC, click a tab on top of the page. After the page is refreshed, select the desired
function from the left navigation tree to enter the relevant page, as shown in Figure 19 (page 49).
Figure 18 Tabular navigation
48
Figure 19 Tabular navigation system and navigation tree
The tabular navigation system includes the six functional areas of IMC: Resource (or performance)
management, User management, Service management, Alarm (or fault) management, Report, and IMC
System wide settings and configuration. All IMC features and functions can be found under these tabs.
The navigation tree located on the left of every IMC page contains context sensitive options that change as
you navigate using the tabular navigation system. For example, if you click Resource from the tabular
navigation system, the navigation tree on the left displays various features and functions under resource
management including View Management, Resource Management, Terminal Access, Network Assets,
Virtual Network Manager and Performance Management.
Resource tab
The Resource tab on the tabular navigation system displays the Resource Management page, shown in
Figure 20 (page 49).
Figure 20 Resource management page
49
The main Resource page contains real time status views including:
•
Custom View Snapshot—Real time status view for custom views
•
View Snapshot—Real time status view by device type
•
Faulty Device List—Real time status view of all devices reporting errors
In addition, the lower portion of the Resource page provides tabs for viewing real time performance
statistics for a subset of devices for the last hour.
The navigation tree on the left includes the ability to navigate to various real time status views of the network
infrastructure including:
•
Network Topology—Provides a real time status view of the network infrastructure based on topology
•
Port Group—Displays user-defined port group information.
•
Custom View—Provides a real time status view of devices prioritized into custom views by the
administrator or operator
•
IP View—Provides a real time status view of the network infrastructure organized by IP address
•
Device View—Provides a real time status view of the network infrastructure organized by device type
You can also manage perform configuration tasks using the navigation tree including:
•
Resource Management—Manages resources within IMC including adding devices, device auto
discovery, batch operations, and device/topology import and export.
•
Terminal Access—Manages IP addresses including address allocation, binding, IP address location,
discovery and device access.
•
Network Assets—Implements network asset functions including asset audits and reporting.
•
Virtual Network Manager—Manages the virtual network including servers, virtual switches, and virtual
machines.
•
Performance Management—Configures real time reports on device performance, including
configuration of real time performance status reporting on the main Resource page.
Topology Maps
Topology maps available under the Resource tab have special navigation features.
•
Left Mouse Click
A left mouse click with a node or link selected on the topology map, shown in Figure 21 (page 51), displays
information about the selected node or link as shown below. To select a node or link, click the node or link
using the left mouse button.
50
Figure 21 Left mouse click in topology
•
Right Mouse Click
A right mouse click with a node or link selected on the topology map, shown in Figure 22 (page 52), displays
a list of information and configuration options that can be applied to the selected node or link, as shown
below.
51
Figure 22 Right mouse click in topology
A right mouse click with nothing selected displays a menu for map configuration.
52
Resource Tab: Device Details
The Device Details page under the Resource tab also has special features. To access the Device Details page,
click any active link in IMC that contains the device name/IP address.
The following section provides a high level overview of the Device Details page. For more detailed
information about this page, see "Device details page" (page 212).
•
Right Pane
The right pane of the Device Details page, shown in Figure 23 (page 53), contains many information and
configuration options that apply to the selected device while the navigation tree on the left offers
configuration options for global settings.
Figure 23 Right pane
NOTE:
The figure above contains only a partial view of the navigation pane.
For more information on using features and functions under the Resource tab, see "5 Resource management"
(page 153).
User tab
Users are resources on the network that both use and impact network infrastructure resources. To view and
manage network user and their activity, click the User tab, shown in Figure 24 (page 54), located in the
upper portion of the IMC interface. The views available under the User tab depend on the installation of user
management modules (for example, Guest Access Manager and User Access Manager).
53
Figure 24 User tab
The main User page contains real time status views of user activity including:
•
24-Hour Online History—Shows the number of secure, insecure, and unknown users on the network.
•
Realtime Statistical Chart for Online Users—Shows a statistical view of the number of secure, insecure
and unknown users in real time.
•
24-Hour Security History—Shows the number of users that are in breach of security policies for
patches, virus protection, unsanctioned software, and other security violations.
•
Security Chart of the Day—Displays security threats and attacks based on IMC’s security log.
•
Top10 User Groups by Online Count—Displays the top 10 groups with the most online users. The
groups have been configured by the IMC administrator or operator.
The navigation tree on the left includes configuration options for:
•
User Management—Gives you the ability to add, delete, modify platform users and change their group
assignments, search for users, add supplemental information to user profiles, import users, and delete
users in individual or batch mode.
•
Access User View—Allows you to manage the access account associated with the platform user.
•
Guest Management—Allows you to manage the guest accounts provided by IMC UAM.
•
Guest Access Manager—Allows you to manage the guest accounts provided by IMC Platform.
Guest Management is similar to Guest Access Manager. They are independent of each other. Guest Access
Management requires only the installation of the IMC Platform. Guest Management requires the installation
of both the IMC Platform and IMC UAM.
Service tab
Management of network infrastructure services can be accessed by clicking the Service tab, shown in Figure
25 (page 55), in the tabular navigation system.
54
Figure 25 Service tab
The Service page serves as a portal for you to access all of the service modules that together constitute the
IMC system. This includes modules for the base IMC system
•
Security Control Center
•
Configuration Center
•
ACL Management
•
VLAN Management
For more information on using the services listed above, refer to the sections of this manual that correspond
with these modules.
The Service page also serves as a portal for add-on modules that support you in managing and maintaining
more functions of network infrastructure management including:
•
User Access Manager
•
EAD Security Policy Manager
•
Desktop Asset Manager
•
Wireless Service Management
•
Voice Service Manager
•
MPLS TE
•
MPLS VPN Manager
•
VPLS
•
Traffic Analysis
•
User Behavior Auditor Management
Icons for the aforementioned service modules appear under the Service tab after a successful installation of
each module has been completed.
For more information on these modules and their use, please refer to the user guides for the corresponding
service module.
Alarm tab
The real time event or fault management features of IMC can be accessed by clicking the Alarm tab, shown
in Figure 26 (page 56), of the tabular navigation system.
55
Figure 26 Alarm tab
The Alarm tab is IMC’s portal into the reporting of faults on the network infrastructure. IMC lists real time
alarms or faults, sorted by most recent in the main portion of the Alarm page.
From this page, you can drill down into individual alarm details by clicking the Description field of an
individual alarm.
You can also quickly access the device in alarm mode by clicking the Alarm Source of an individual alarm.
This navigates the operator to Device Details for the device in alarm mode.
The navigation tree has the following configuration and viewing options:
•
Real-Time Alarms—View, delete, and recover the recent 50 unrecovered alarms with the exception of
information alarms.
•
Root Alarms—View, delete, and recover the most recent important alarms with the exception of
information alarms.
•
All Alarms—View all alarms.
•
Faulty Devices—View devices grouped by device type that are currently reporting a fault or error.
•
Alarm Statistics—View statistical analysis of alarm distribution in real time.
•
TopN—View devices grouped by severity of alarm.
The navigation tree also has the following configuration and viewing options:
•
Alarm Settings—Configure alarm settings to include email and SMS notification, alarm forwarding to
IMC as well as to other management systems, and downstream alarm suppression.
•
Trap Management—Browse, filter traps, add and modify trap definitions within IMC.
•
Syslog Management—Browse, filter and configure Syslog events.
For more information on using features and functions under the Alarm tab, see "8 Event and alarm
management" (page 525).
Report tab
Real time and historical reports in IMC can be accessed by clicking the Report tab, shown in Figure 27 (page
57), of the tabular navigation system.
56
Figure 27 Report tab
From the Report tab, you can access real time and historical reports. The main pane in the Report tab
provides a listing of all configured Real Time reports.
From this pane, you can also add quick reports and schedule reports as well as delete reports.
From the navigation tree on the left, you can customize reports, add report templates, and schedule reports.
For more information on using features and functions under the Report tab, see "13 Reporting in IMC" (page
849).
System tab
System-wide configuration options and system level functions can be accessed by clicking the System tab,
shown in Figure 28 (page 58), of the tabular navigation system located in the upper portion of the IMC
interface.
57
Figure 28 System tab
You can configure system wide resources and settings including:
•
Resource Management—Configures IMC to manage devices globally by configuring templates for
SNMP, Telnet, SSH, SOAP, PowerShell, and WMI access. Manage devices through vendor, series,
model and category definitions and MIB management.
•
Operator Management—Manages access to IMC via operator accounts and groups; and manage
IMC access through login controls and password strategies.
•
Group Management—Manages IMC device groups, user groups and service groups.
•
Hierarchical NMS—Manages the flow of data and alarms through IMC’s hierarchical alarm settings.
•
System Configuration—Configures IMC system parameters, log details, data export, alarm and
performance monitoring, SMS configuration, and mail server settings.
•
Data Analysis Management—Analyzes the data collected by IMC and provides the analysis results to
each IMC module. Typically it is not configured or operated by administrators and operators.
The navigation tree on the left for the System tab provides a shortcut to all system functions provided in the
System tab.
For more information on using features and functions under the System tab, see "4 Configuring IMC for use"
(page 73).
58
Quick Start
You can see a Quick Start link in the left navigation tree of some IMC components. Quick Start briefly
describes the functions of the modules and their relations within a component, and offers name links to the
configuration pages.
Floating menus of the navigation tree
The IMC navigation tree provides floating menus, as shown in Figure 29 (page 59).
Figure 29 Floating menus of the navigation tree
The floating menu displays the secondary links of the link that your mouse pointer lies on, so that you can
quickly locate and expand a functional link. Point to a link marked with the icon and the floating menu of the
link appears. Click a link on the floating menu to navigate to the corresponding functional page.
Navigating IMC using breadcrumb trails
A breadcrumb trail, shown in Figure 30 (page 60), is a secondary navigation method that supports you in
accessing more easily features and functions of the IMC system.
They are also an effective visual aid that displays the operator’s location within the context of IMC’s web
interface.
This feature also offers you a great resource of contextual information for knowing where they are and
moving more quickly to where they want to be.
59
Figure 30 Breadcrumb trail
The breadcrumb trail shown above indicates that the administrator or operator is in the switch view under
View Management option on the Resource tab. The administrator or operator can quickly navigate back to
the All Devices page by clicking on the All Devices link in the Breadcrumb trail.
The first value for the breadcrumb trail in the IMC interface is most often one of the functional areas of IMC
that are denoted by the tabs in the tabular navigation system. Thus the starting points for any navigation in
IMC are these tabs and their breadcrumb counterpart:
Resource→
User→
Service→
Report→
System→
The breadcrumb under Alarm tab is not started with Alarm→ . It displays only the name of the function.
The breadcrumb for operator group management that can be found under the system tab would be
System→Operator Group.
All features and functions within IMC can be found under one of these tabs. An overview of these functional
areas is provided in the previous section of this chapter. The breadcrumb navigation convention used in IMC
and described here is used throughout the IMC manuals to describe the navigation path for IMC features
and functions.
WARNING:
IMC’s online help system also employs breadcrumb trails to support you in effectively and quickly
navigating it.
60
Online help system
IMC offers two levels of online help, system wide help and context sensitive help.
System-wide help
System-wide help can be accessed by clicking the Help link, shown in Figure 31 (page 61), located in the
upper right corner of the IMC page.
Figure 31 Help link
Clicking this link displays the main help page, shown in Figure 32 (page 62), with help organized by
functional groups within IMC.
61
Figure 32 Help
The main pain of the system-wide help includes useful resources for managing and using IMC. These
resources include an overview of the IMC platform, a quick start guide, managing resources within IMC and
more.
On the navigation tree located on the left of the Help page, help is organized by functional groups within
IMC.
Searching IMC system online help
Operators can query the online help system using the Search field located at the upper left corner of the Help
page by entering search criteria in the field provided. Results of the search query are displayed in the left
pane of the IMC interface.
Context sensitive help
Context sensitive help can be accessed by clicking on the Help link located in the upper right corner of the
main pane of IMC functional pages, shown in Figure 33 (page 63). The help system displays online help
relevant to the operator’s current page.
The context sensitive help link is located below the system wide help link.
62
Figure 33 Context sensitive help
Global search
Global search includes basic query and advanced query. Basic query helps you search devices and users.
Advanced query helps you search devices, interfaces, and users.
Performing a basic device search
To perform a basic device search:
1.
Navigate to basic query.
The basic query field
most IMC pages.
2.
can be found in the upper right corner of
Select the
Query Devices option from the list by clicking the
of the search field.
search icon located to the left
IMC supports fuzzy matching for most search and filtering features.
3.
Enter a full or partial device name or IP address in the field provided.
4.
Click Go.
All devices matching the specified criteria are displayed on the Device List.
5.
Click Export Excel or Export CSV on the right of Device List to launch the Download Exported Data
window, and click the Download Exported Data link to export the query result in the format of Excel or
CSV.
63
Performing a basic user search
To perform a basic user search:
1.
Navigate to basic query.
The basic query field
most IMC pages.
2.
can be found in the upper right corner of
Select the
Query Users option from the list by clicking the
the search field.
search icon located to the left of
IMC supports fuzzy matching for most search and filtering features.
3.
Enter a full or partial user name in the field provided.
4.
Click Go.
Performing an advanced search for a device
To perform an advanced device search:
1.
Navigate to the Advanced Query page.
2.
Click the Advanced link located in the upper right corner of the IMC page.
3.
Click the radio button
4.
Enter the following information in the Advanced Query page:




to the left of Query Devices to perform a device search.
Device Label—IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field. You can enter a partial or complete
name for the devices you want to locate in the Device Label field.
Device IP—Enter the IP address of the device you want to search for in the Device IP field. Select
Fuzzy from the list located to the right of the Device IP if you want to enter a partial IP address.
Select Exact from this list if you want IMC to search for an exact match for the IP address you have
entered.
MAC—Enter the MAC address of the device you want to search for in the MAC field. IMC supports
fuzzy matching for this field. You can enter a partial or complete MAC address for the devices you
want to locate.
Bridge MAC—Enter the MAC address for the Bridge device that you want to query for in the Bridge
Mac field.

Device Category—Select the device category from the Device Category list.

Device Status—Select the device status from the Device Status list.

Device Series—Select the device series from the Device Series list.


Contact—Enter the contact name information you want to search by. IMC supports fuzzy matching
for this field, allowing you to enter a partial or complete string for the contact in the Contact field.
Location—Enter the location information you want to search by. IMC supports fuzzy matching for
this field, allowing you to enter a partial or complete string for location in the Location field.
5.
Device Reachability—Select device reachability status from the Device Reachability list.
6.
Click Query.
All devices matching the specified criteria are displayed on the Device List.
64
7.
Click Export Excel or Export CSV on the right of Device List to launch the Download Exported Data
window, and click the Download Exported Data link to export the query result in the format of Excel or
CSV.
Performing an advanced search for an interface
To perform an advanced interface search:
1.
Navigate to the Advanced Query page.
2.
Click the Advanced link located in the upper right corner of the IMC page.
3.
Click the radio button
4.
Enter the following information in the Advanced Query page:

to the left of Query Interfaces to perform search for interfaces.
Interface Alias—IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field. You can enter a partial or complete
name for the interface alias you want to locate in the Interface Alias field.

Interface Type—Select the interface type you want to search from the Interface Type list.

Speed—Select the interfaces speed from the Speed list.






Interface IP—Enter the IP address of the interface you want to search for in the Interface IP field.
Select Fuzzy from the list located to the right of the Interface IP if you want to enter a partial IP
address. Select Exact from this list if you want IMC to search for an exact match for the IP address
you have entered.
MAC Address—Enter the MAC address of the interface you want to search for in the MAC Address
field. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field, allowing you to enter a partial or complete MAC
address for the interfaces you want to locate.
Device Label—Enter a partial or complete name of the device to which the interface belongs in the
Device Label field. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field, allowing you to enter a partial or
complete string for the device name.
Device IP—Enter the IP address of the device to which the interface belongs in the Device IP field.
Select Fuzzy from the list located to the right of the Device IP if you want to enter a partial IP
address. Select Exact from this list if you want IMC to search for an exact match for the IP address
you have entered.
Management Status—Select the management status of the interfaces you want to search for from
the Management Status list.
Operational Status—Select the operational status of the interfaces you want to search for from the
Operational Status list.
5.
Click Query.
6.
Click Save as Filter to save the query criteria as a filter, which you can view in the Filter List.
The filter can be used by port groups to filter interfaces.
For more information on filters, see "Managing filters to filter interfaces" (page 101).
Performing an advanced search for a user
To perform an advanced user search:
1.
Navigate to the Advanced Query page.
2.
Click the Advanced link located in the upper right corner of the IMC page.
3.
Click the radio button
to the left of Query Users to perform a user search.
65
4.
Enter the following information in the Advanced Query page:






User Name—Enter the user’s name in the User Name field. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this
field. Therefore, you can enter a partial or complete string for the users you want to locate.
Identity Number—Enter the Identity number for the user you want to search for in the Identity
Number field. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field. Therefore, you can enter a partial or
complete string for the identify number for the users you want to locate.
Contact Address—Enter the contact address information for the user in the Contact Address field.
IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field. Therefore, you can enter a partial or complete string for
the contact address for the users you want to locate.
Telephone—Enter the telephone number of the user in the Telephone Number field. IMC supports
fuzzy matching for this field. Therefore, you can enter a partial or complete telephone number for
the users you want to locate.
Email—Enter the email address of the user in the Email field. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this
field. Therefore, you can enter a partial or complete email address for the users you want to locate.
User Group—Click the user group icon
5.
Click
6.
Click the radio button
7.
Click OK.
8.
Click Query.
to select the group to which this user belongs.
Expand All to expand all groups.
to the left of the group you want to search by.
Personalizing the IMC web interface
You can customize IMC’s web page by storing favorites for quick access to often-used pages within IMC.
Accessing a favorite
To access a favorite:
1.
Point to the
My Shortcut link located at the top of the left navigation tree.
A list of predefined and user defined favorites appears.
2.
Point to the
My Favorites folder option.
The list of favorites that have configured is displayed in a popup list to the right.
3.
Click the favorite you want to access.
Adding a favorite
To add a favorite:
1.
Click the
pages.
Add to My Favorites link located in the upper right corner of the main pane of most IMC
2.
Enter the new name of the favorite link in the Name field.
3.
Click OK to confirm adding the link to my favorites.
4.
Refresh or reload the page in your web browser to access the newly created favorite.
66
Modifying a favorite
To modify a favorite link:
1.
Navigate to System→My Favorites.
2.
Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
3.
Click System Configuration on the navigation tree on the left.
4.
Click
My Favorites under System Configuration from the navigation system on the left.
The Manage My Favorites list is displayed on the main page.
5.
Click the
icon located to the left of the folders and links displayed in Manage My Favorites list to
expand the view to display all links under the selected folder.
6.
Click the modify icon
7.
Enter the new name of the favorite link in the Name field.
8.
Select the folder to which you want to move the link from the Folder list.
9.
Click OK.
10.
Click Refresh to refresh the Manage My Favorites list.
associated with the link you want to modify.
Sorting favorites
To change the display order of My Favorites links:
1.
Navigate to System→My Favorites.
2.
Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
3.
Click System Configuration on the navigation tree on the left.
4.
Click
My Favorites under System Configuration from the navigation system on the left.
The Manage My Favorites list is displayed on the main page.
5.
Do one of the following:




Click the up arrow key icon
associated with the link you want to move up one position, or
Click the up arrow key icon
or
associated with the link you want to move to the top in the folder,
Click the down arrow key icon
or
associated with the link you want to move down one position,
Click the down arrow key icon
folder.
associated with the link you want to move to the bottom in the
Deleting a favorite
To delete a favorite:
1.
Navigate to System→My Favorites.
2.
Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
3.
Click System Configuration on the navigation tree on the left.
4.
Click
My Favorites under System Configuration from the navigation system on the left.
The Manage My Favorites list is displayed on the main page.
67
5.
Click the
icon located to the left of the folders and links displayed in Manage My Favorites list to
expand the view to display all links under the selected folder.
6.
Click the delete icon
7.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected link.
8.
Click Refresh to refresh the Manage My Favorites list.
in the Manage My Favorites list associated with the link you want to delete.
WARNING:
If you delete a folder, all of its contents are also deleted. Once a folder has been deleted, it cannot be
recovered.
Wizard Center
IMC provides a Wizard Center to configure common functions and third-party devices. You can enter the
pages for configuring common functions through Quick Start, and enter the pages for configuring third-party
devices through Support third-party device.
Quick Start
To enter the pages for configuring different functions through Quick Start:
1.
Point to the
My Shortcut link located at the top of the left navigation tree.
A list of predefined and user-defined favorites appears.
2.
Point to the
Wizard Center folder option.
3.
Click Quick Start in the popup list to the right.
The Quick Start window, containing five pages, appears. You can click a page number to enter the
target page. The following functions are available on the pages:
Device access settings
SNMP settings
Telnet settings
SSH settings
Default performance monitor indexes
Configure default performance monitor indexes
Configure performance monitor option
Add device
Auto discover device
Manually add device
View and topology
Add user-defined view and topology
Arrange topology elements and recover links
Add interface view
Configuration backup
Add auto backup plan
68
Modify backup policy option
Custom home page
Add new space and select interested widgets
4.
To enter the next page, click
.
5.
To return to the previous page, click
6.
To enter the page for configuring a function, click the function name link.
7.
To switch to the Support third-party device window, point to the
third-party device.
.
link, and select Support
Support third-party device
To enter the third-party device configuration page:
1.
Point to the
My Shortcut link located at the top of the left navigation tree.
A list of predefined and user-defined favorites appears.
2.
Point to the
Wizard Center folder option.
3.
Click Support third-party device in the popup list to the right.
The Support third-party device window, containing five pages, appears. You can click the page
number to enter the target page. The following functions are available on the pages:
Register third-party device information
Add device vendor
Add device series
Add device model
Advanced alarm settings
Add trap events
Import user-defined trap events from MIB file
Escalate trap event to alarm
Advanced performance settings
Add performance index
Display performance indexes in topology
Configuration management
Add telnet script
Compliance policy check
Add compliance policy
Add check task
Customize device panel
Import third-part panels from device panel project files
4.
To enter the next page, click
.
5.
To return to the previous page, click
6.
To enter the page for configuring a function, click the function name link.
.
69
7.
To switch to the Quick Start window, point to the
link, and select Quick Start.
Task Management
Task Management helps you easily view the status and execution result of tasks, and restore and suspend
tasks. With the message delivery function, you can obtain task execution result and query message history.
Task Management supports ACL, iCC, General Config, Compliance, and VLAN.
Accessing Task Management
After you create the tasks for the components supported by Task Management, the tasks are displayed on the
Task Management page. You can view the current status and execution result of each task, and restore or
suspend specific tasks.
To access task management:
1.
Point to the
My Shortcut link located at the top of the left navigation tree.
A list of predefined and user defined favorites appears.
2.
Point to the
Task Management folder option.
The popup list appears.
3.
Click
Task Management in the popup list.
The task management window appears.
The window displays two properties by default.
4.
Click
on the top right corner to expand the window and display more properties.
5.
Click
the top of the window to display the next component.
6.
Click the component name on the top of the window to enter the component task list.

Task Name—Displays the task name and creation time. Before a task name,
executed successfully;
means the task fails to be executed;
executed or is being executed.

means the task is
means the task is waiting to be
Status—Refers to the current task status, which can be Finished, Waiting for Execution, or Suspend.
Finished means the task has been executed; Waiting for Execution means the task is waiting to be
executed; Suspend means the tasks is suspended.
7.

Execution Time—Displays the previous execution time.

Next Execution—Displays the next execution time.

Operation—Provides operations related to the task.
Depending on whether a task is waiting to be executed, suspended, or has been executed, select from
the following:

8.
If a task is waiting to be executed,
the task.
is displayed in the Operation column. Click

If a task is suspended,
is displayed in the Operation column. Click

If a task has been executed, nothing is displayed in the Operation column.
to restore the task.
If the Task list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
70
to suspend

Click
to page forward in the Task List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Task List.

Click
to page backward in the Task List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Task List.
9.
Enter part of a task name or a complete task name, and click Query to display matching tasks of the
component on the task list.
10.
Select a refresh interval, No Refresh, 1, 5, or 10, from the Refresh Interval (minutes) list. IMC then
refreshes task status of all components at the specified interval.
Task Management displays only the following tasks:
•
All periodical tasks.
•
Tasks that start in 24 hours and have been executed.
•
Tasks that start after 24 hours and have not been executed.
Message history
After you enable the message delivery function, Task Management sends task execution result messages to
the administrator, and logs the event. You can view the message history through the Message History
function.
To access message history:
1.
Point to the
My Shortcut link located at the top of the left navigation tree.
A list of predefined and user defined favorites are displayed.
2.
Point to the
Task Management folder option.
The popup list appears.
3.
Click
Message History in the popup list.
The History Messages window appears.



Time: Displays the task execution time.
Message Type: Displays the task type, which can be iCC, ACL, VLAN, Generic Config, or
Compliance.
Message: Indicate the summary information of the message.
If the Task list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
4.

Click
to page forward in the Task List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Task List.

Click
to page backward in the Task List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Task List.
Select a message type from the Message Type list, and click Query.
All matching entries are displayed.
Message options
To set message options:
71
1.
Point to the
My Shortcut link located at the top of the left navigation tree.
A list of predefined and user defined favorites are displayed.
2.
Point to the
Task Management folder option.
The popup list appears.
3.
Click
Message Options in the popup list to the right.
The Push Settings window appears.
4.
Select Enable or Disable from the Enable Push list.



5.
If you select Enable, Task Management sends task execution result messages to the administrator.
If you select Manual Close from the Message Display list, you must manually close the message
delivery window upon receiving a message.
If you select Auto Close in 10 Seconds, the message delivery window automatically closes in 10
seconds. This option takes effect when you enable the message delivery function.
Click OK.
Logging out of IMC
To log out of IMC:
1.
Click Logout located in the upper right page of any IMC page.
2.
Click OK when prompted to confirm logout.
72
4 Configuring IMC for use
Effective implementation and maintenance of IMC depends on pre-discovery planning and configuration.
This chapter describes the functional areas of IMC that are most effectively used when configured and
implemented prior to populating IMC with users, devices, and resources. In addition, the chapter includes
basic IMC system-wide configuration and maintenance functions.
Securing IMC and access to managed resources
IMC offers you powerful control over network resources including network devices, network users, and
services. Therefore, securing IMC is at the top of the list of priorities for configuring IMC for use. This section
describes the security options available in IMC that secure its use, the access and control over resources it
offers you, and the data IMC uses to manage resources. Operator groups: Operator groups enable you to
assign or remove IMC management privileges by group. You can also create custom groups to further extend
administrative control over access to IMC and the network resources managed by it. For configuring
operator groups, see "Managing operator groups" (page 104).
Operator roles: You have the ability to assign various levels of rights to individual operator accounts with the
ability to restrict access by views and groups. For configuring operator accounts, see "Managing IMC
operators" (page 114).
Login control templates: You can permit or deny operator access to IMC by IP address. For configuring login
control templates, see "Securing IMC through operator login control templates" (page 111).
Integration with authentication services: IMC supports secure access to IMC through integration with
RADIUS and LDAP for operator authentication to IMC. For more information, see "Securing IMC access via
authentication services" (page 108).
Password strategy: IMC enables you to define system-wide password requirements for all operators that
have access to IMC. For configuring password strategies, see "Establishing IMC password strategies" (page
113).
Online operators: You can view current IMC access and activity through the Online Operators feature.
Through this feature, you can log operators off as well as block access to IMC in real time. For more
information on this feature, see "Managing online IMC operator access" (page 124).
SNMP configuration: For secure communications between IMC and managed devices, IMC supports
SNMPv1, v2c and various forms of v3. In addition, IMC also supports global SNMP community string
management for all managed devices once devices are configured to be managed by IMC. For configuring
SNMP through templates, see "SNMP (page 74).
Telnet and SSH device access: IMC also supports remote device access through Telnet and SSH with the
ability to use templates to configure Telnet and SSH settings. For configuring Telnet and SSH templates, see
"Device access templates" (page 74).
73
Resource Management: managing network resources
with global settings
IMC incorporates many services and features that enable you to easily and effectively manage global
network resources.
Resource Management covers the configuration of templates and device vendor, series and model
definitions that support you in easily managing access to network devices.
In addition, Resource Management also includes the configuration of filters, which are used by port groups
to filter interfaces.
Device access templates
Device access templates enable you to save SNMP, Telnet, SSH, SOAP, PowerShell, and WMI configuration
settings that IMC uses to access network devices. You can apply these templates when adding devices to
IMC, performing auto discovery to populate IMC with newly discovered devices, or to configure device
parameters in individual device or batch mode.
SNMP templates
IMC uses SNMP to query and manage remote network devices. The SNMP template feature allows you to
save SNMP configuration settings in IMC, which can then be applied when adding new devices to IMC.
SNMP templates store IMC’s SNMP configurations for devices to support IMC’s communication with the
device. SNMP Templates do not configure the SNMP settings on the device itself.
This feature is particularly useful for organizations that use a variety of SNMP configurations, such as using
different SNMP configurations based on device type, geographical location, or organizational support
models.
Viewing the SNMP template list
To view the SNMP templates list:
1.
Navigate to System→SNMP Template.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SNMP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SNMP templates in the SNMP Template List displayed in the main pane of the System
SNMP Template window.
SNMP Template List

Name: Contains the SNMP template name.

Parameter type: Identifies which version of SNMP this template is configured for.


Timeout (seconds): Contains the SNMP timeout value for the associated template. The Timeout
counter determines how long IMC will wait for an SNMP reply from the managed device before
declaring that the request has timed out.
Retries: Contains the SNMP retries value for the associated template. The retries parameter defines
how many times the management system (IMC) will send SNMP retries in an attempt to
communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure.
74


Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify SNMP Template page for the associated
template.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated template.
If the SNMP template list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the SNMP Template List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the SNMP Template List.

Click
to page backward in the SNMP Template List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the SNMP Template List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding an SNMPv1 or v2c template
To add a SNMPv1 or v2c template:
1.
Navigate to System→SNMP Template.
2.
Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
3.
Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
4.
Click
SNMP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SNMP template entries in the SNMP Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System SNMP Template window.
5.
Click Add.
6.
Enter the following information in the Add SNMP Template page.
7.
Enter a unique name for the SNMP template name in the Name field.
You cannot modify the name of a template once the template has been created. To modify the name,
you must first delete the template and then recreate it with the new name.
8.
Select the version of SNMP that is configured for use on the managed devices from the Parameter Type
list.
9.
Select SNMPv1, SNMPv2c, SNMPv3 and so on.
10.
Enter the Read-Only community string that is configured on the managed devices in the Read-Only
Community String field.
The default is ‘public’.
11.
Enter the Read-Write community string configured on the managed devices in the Read-Write
Community String field.
The default is ‘private’.
SNMP configuration settings for each managed device must match the SNMP settings configured on
it. For information on configuring SNMP settings on the managed devices, refer to your vendor
documentation.
12.
Enter the SNMP timeout value (1–60 seconds) in the Timeout field.
This parameter determines how long IMC waits for an SNMP reply from the managed device before
declaring that the request has timed out.
13.
Enter the number of SNMP retries (1–20) in the Retries field.
75
The retries parameter defines how many times the management system (IMC) sends SNMP retries in an
attempt to communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure. The default is 3.
14.
Click OK.
Adding an SNMPv3 template
To add a SNMPv3 template:
15.
Navigate to System→SNMP Template.
16.
Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
17.
Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
18.
Click
SNMP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SNMP template entries in the SNMP Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System SNMP Template window.
19.
Click Add.
20.
Enter the following information in the Add SNMP Template page.
21.
Enter a unique name for the SNMP template name in the Name field.
22.
Select the SNMPv3 type that matches the version of SNMP configured on the devices to be managed
by this template from the Parameter Type list, shown in Table 1 (page 76).
Table 1 SNMP parameters
Parameter type option
Description
SNMPv1
SNMP version 1.
SNMPv2c
SNMP version 2c.
SNMPv3 No-Priv No_Auth
SNMPv3 with no authentication and no encryption.
SNMPv3 No-Priv Auth-Md5
SNMPv3 with no encryption and with MD5 authentication.
SNMPv3 No-Priv Auth-Sha
SNMPv3 with no encryption and with SHA authentication.
SNMPv3 Priv-Des Auth-Md5
SNMPv3 with DES encryption and Md5 authentication.
SNMPv3 Priv-Des Auth-Sha
SNMPv3 with DES encryption and SHA authentication.
SNMPv3 Priv-Aes128 Auth-Md5
SNMPv3 with Aes 128 bit encryption and Md5 authentication.
SNMPv3 Priv-Aes128 Auth-Sha
SNMPv3 with Aes 128 bit encryption and Sha authentication.
SNMPv3 Priv-Aes192 Auth-Md5
SNMPv3 with Aes 192 bit encryption and Md5 authentication.
SNMPv3 Priv-Aes192 Auth-Sha
SNMPv3 with Aes 192 bit encryption and Sha authentication.
SNMPv3 Priv-Aes256 Auth-Md5
SNMPv3 with Aes 256 bit encryption and Md5 authentication.
SNMPv3 Priv-Aes256 Auth-Sha
SNMPv3 with Aes 256 bit encryption and Sha authentication.
23.
Enter the username that is configured on the managed devices in the Username field.
24.
If prompted, enter the authentication password that is configured on the managed devices in the
Authentication Password field.
25.
If prompted, enter the encryption password that is configured on the managed devices in the
Encryption Password field.
26.
Enter the SNMP timeout value in the Timeout field.
76
Valid range is 1–60 seconds. The timeout parameter defines how long the system will wait for the
device to respond to SNMP requests before reporting that the request has timed out.
27.
Enter the SNMP retries value in the Retries field.
Valid range is 1–20. The retries parameter defines how many times the management system (IMC)
sends SNMP retries in an attempt to communicate with the managed device. The default is 3.
28.
Click OK.
The SNMP templates you have created now appear as configuration options when adding devices to IMC
by auto discovery, by batch mode or by adding devices individually. For more information, see "Adding
devices in IMC" (page 154).
Modifying an SNMP template
To modify an SNMP template:
29.
Navigate to System→SNMP Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SNMP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SNMP template entries in the SNMP Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→SNMP Template window.
30.
Click the Modify icon
to modify.
in the SNMP Template List associated with the SNMP template you want
31.
Modify any of the configuration information displayed in the Modify SNMP Template page.
For more information on template parameters, see "Adding an SNMPv1 or v2c or "Adding an
SNMPv3 .
32.
Click OK.
Deleting an SNMP template
To delete an SNMP template:
1.
Navigate to System→SNMP Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SNMP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SNMP template entries in the SNMP Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System SNMP Template window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the SNMP Template List associated with the SNMP template you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected SNMP template.
Telnet templates
IMC uses Telnet to provide you with remote access to managed devices. IMC also uses Telnet for certain
network resource management functions.
77
The Telnet template feature allows you to save Telnet configuration settings in IMC, which can then be
applied when adding new devices to IMC, performing an auto discovery, or configuring devices in
individual or batch mode. Telnet templates store IMC’s Telnet configurations for devices to support IMC’s
communication with the device. Telnet templates do not configure the Telnet settings on the device itself.
Viewing the Telnet template list
To view the Telnet template list:
1.
Navigate to System→Telnet Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Telnet Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all Telnet templates in the Telnet Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Telnet Template window.
Telnet template list

Name: Contains the Telnet template name.

Authentication Mode: Identifies which form of authentication this template is configured for.



Timeout (seconds): Contains the Telnet timeout value for the associated template. The Timeout
counter defines how long the system will wait for the device to respond in seconds.
Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify Telnet Template page for the associated
template.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated template.
If the Telnet template list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Telnet Template List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Telnet Template List.

Click
to page backward in the Telnet Template List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Telnet Template List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding a Telnet template
To add a Telnet template:
1.
Navigate to System→Telnet Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Telnet Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all Telnet templates in the Telnet Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Telnet Template window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the following information in the Add Telnet Template page.
4.
Enter a unique name for the Telnet template in the Name field.
78
You cannot modify the name of a template once the template has been created. To modify the name,
you must first delete the template and then recreate it with a new name.
5.
Select the mode to match the telnet authentication mode configured on the managed devices from the
Authentication Mode list.
Options include Password, Username + Password, Super Password, Password + Super Password,
Username + Password + Super Password, No Username + No Password, and Username + No
Password.
6.
If prompted, enter the username that is configured on managed devices in the Username field.
7.
If prompted, enter the password that is configured on the managed devices in the Password field.
8.
If prompted, enter the super password that is configured on the managed devices in the Super
Password field.
9.
Enter the Telnet timeout value in the Timeout field.
Valid range is 1–60 seconds. The timeout parameter defines how long the system waits for the device
to respond in seconds.
10.
Click OK.
The Telnet templates you have added now appear as configuration options when configuring devices
individually or in batch mode.
The Telnet configuration settings in IMC must match the Telnet settings configured on the managed devices.
For information on configuring Telnet settings on the managed devices, refer your vendor’s documentation.
The Telnet templates also appear as configuration options when adding devices to IMC by auto discovery,
by batch mode or by adding devices individually. For more information, see "Adding devices in IMC" (page
154).
Modifying a Telnet template
To modify a Telnet template:
1.
Navigate to System→Telnet Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Telnet Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all Telnet templates in the Telnet Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Telnet Template window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the Telnet Template List associated with the Telnet template you want to
3.
Modify the authentication mode setting to match the Telnet authentication mode configured on the
managed devices.
Options include Password, Username + Password, Super Password, Password + Super Password,
Username + Password + Super Password, No Username + No Password, and Username + No
Password.
4.
Modify the username to match the username configured on managed devices, if prompted.
5.
Modify the password to match the password configured on the managed devices, if prompted.
6.
Enter the super password to match the super password configured on the managed devices, if
prompted.
79
7.
Modify the Telnet Timeout value.
Valid range is 1–60 seconds. The timeout parameter defines how long the system waits for the device
to respond in seconds.
8.
Click OK.
Deleting a Telnet template
To delete a Telnet template:
1.
Navigate to System→Telnet Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Telnet Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all Telnet templates in the Telnet Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Telnet Template window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the Telnet Template List associated with the Telnet template you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected Telnet template.
SSH templates
IMC uses SSH to enable secure remote access to managed devices. IMC also uses SSH for certain network
resource management functions.
The SSH template feature allows you to save SSH configuration settings in IMC, which can then be applied
when adding new devices to IMC, performing an auto discovery, or configuring devices in individual or
batch mode. SSH templates store IMC’s SSH configurations for devices to support IMC’s communication with
the device. SSH templates do not configure the SSH settings on the device itself.
Viewing the SSH Template List
To view the SSH templates list:
1.
Navigate to System→SSH Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SSH Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SSH templates in the SSH Template List displayed in the main pane of the System
→SSH Template window.
SSH template list

Name: Contains the SSH template name.

Authentication Mode: Identifies which form of authentication this template is configured for.

User Name: Contains the user name.

Timeout (seconds): Contains the SSH timeout value for the associated template. The Timeout
counter defines how long the system will wait for the device to respond in seconds.
80



Retries: Contains the SSH retries value for the associated template. The retries parameter defines
how many times the management system (IMC) will send retries in an attempt to communicate with
the managed device before reporting a failure.
Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify SSH Template page for the associated
template.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated template.
If the SSH Template list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the SSH Template List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the SSH Template List.

Click
to page backward in the SSH Template List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the SSH Template List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding an SSH template
To add an SSH template:
1.
Navigate to System→SSH Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SSH Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SSH templates in the SSH Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→SSH Template window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the following information in the Add SSH Template page.
4.
Enter a unique name for the SSH template name in the Name field.
You cannot modify the name of a template once the template has been created. To modify the name,
you must first delete the template and then recreate it with a new name.
5.
Select the mode that matches the SSH configuration mode configured on the managed devices from
the Authentication Mode list.
Authentication mode options include Password, Private Key, Password + Private Key,
Password+Super Password, Private Key+Super Password, and Password+Private Key+Super
Password.
6.
Enter the username that is configured on managed devices in the User Name field.
7.
Enter the password that is configured on the managed devices in the Password field.
If prompted, enter the path and filename of the private key file that contains the key that enables login
in the Private Key File field.
If prompted, enter the private key password for the private key file in the Private Key Password field.
If prompted, enter the super password that is configured on the managed devices in the Super
Password field.
8.
Enter the TCP port for SSH configured on managed devices in the Port field. The default TCP port is 22.
9.
Enter the SSH timeout value in the Timeout field.
81
Valid range is 1–120 seconds. The timeout parameter defines how long the system waits for the
device to respond in seconds before declaring that the response has timed out. The default setting is
10 seconds.
10.
Enter the number of SSH retries in the Retries field.
Valid range is 1–5. The retries parameter defines how many times the management system (IMC)
sends SSH retries in an attempt to communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure.
The default setting is 3.
11.
Click OK.
The SSH templates you have added now appear as options when configuring devices individually or
in batch mode.
The SSH configuration settings in IMC must match the SSH settings configured on the managed devices. For
information on configuring SSH settings on the managed devices, refer your vendor’s documentation. The
SSH templates also appear as configuration options when adding devices to IMC by auto discovery, by
batch mode or by adding devices individually. For more information, see "Adding devices in IMC" (page
154).
Modifying an SSH template
To modify an SSH template:
1.
Navigate to System→SSH Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SSH Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SSH templates in the SSH Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→SSH Template window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the SSH Template List associated with the SSH template you want to
3.
Select the authentication mode to match the SSH configuration on the managed devices from the
Authentication Mode list.
Authentication mode options include Password, Password + Private Key, and Private Key.
4.
Modify the username to match the username that is configured on managed devices in the User Name
field.
5.
Modify the password to match the password that is configured on the managed devices in the
Password field.
If prompted, modify the path and filename of the private key file that contains the key that enables
login in the Private Key File field.
If prompted, modify the private key password for the private key file as needed in the Private Key
Password field.
If prompted, enter the super password that is configured on the managed devices in the Super
Password field.
6.
Modify the TCP port for SSH to match what is configured on managed devices in the Port field. The
default TCP port is 22.
7.
Modify the SSH timeout value as needed in the Timeout field.
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Valid range is 1–120 seconds. The timeout parameter defines how long the system waits for the
device to respond in seconds before declaring that the response has timed out. The default setting is
10 seconds.
8.
Modify the number of SSH retries as needed in the Retries field.
Valid range is 1–5. The retries parameter defines how many times the management system (IMC)
resends SSH retries in an attempt to communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure.
The default setting is 3.
9.
Click OK.
Deleting an SSH template
To delete an SSH template:
1.
Navigate to System→SSH Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SSH Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SSH templates in the SSH Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→SSH Template window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the SSH Template List associated with the SSH template you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected SSH template.
SOAP templates
With Virtual Network Manager deployed, the SOAP Template appears in the System tab. IMC uses SOAP
to enable secure remote access to managed VMware virtual network devices, including vManager and ESX
server.
The SOAP template feature allows you to save SOAP configuration settings in IMC, which can then be
applied when adding new virtual network devices to IMC, performing an auto discovery, or configuring
devices in individual or batch mode. SOAP templates store the IMC SOAP configurations for devices to
support IMC's communication with the device. SOAP templates do not configure the SOAP settings on the
device itself.
Viewing the SOAP Template List
To view the SOAP templates list:
1.
Navigate to System→SOAP Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SOAP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SOAP templates in the SOAP Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→SOAP Template window.
SOAP template list

Template Name Contains the SOAP template name.
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
Access URL Contains the access URL for the configured SOAP template.

User Name Contains the user name.


Modify Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify SOAP Template page for the associated
template.
Delete Contains an icon for deleting the associated template.
If the SOAP template list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the SOAP Template List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the SOAP Template List.

Click
to page backward in the SOAP Template List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the SOAP Template List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
You can sort the SOAP Template List by the Template Name and User Name fields. Click the column
label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to toggle
between the various sort options specific to each field
Adding an SOAP template
To add an SOAP template:
1.
Navigate to System→SOAP Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SOAP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SOAP templates in the SOAP Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→SOAP Template window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the following information in the Add SOAP Template page.
4.
Enter a unique name for the SOAP template name in the Template Name field.
You cannot modify the name of a template once the template has been created. To modify the name,
you must first delete the template and then recreate it with the new name.
5.
Select the protocol to match the SOAP configuration on the managed devices from the Protocol list.
Protocol options include http and https.
6.
Enter the port number that is configured on managed devices in the Port field.
The default port number is 80 for http, or 443 for https.
7.
Enter the root path that is configured on managed devices in the Root Path field.
The default setting is sdk.
8.
Enter the username that is configured on managed devices in the Username field.
9.
Enter the password that is configured on the managed devices in the Password field.
10.
If you want to test whether the configured SOAP Template can connect to a vManager/physical
server, click the Test connection to vManager/physical server checkbox, and the Select button
appears.
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11.
Click the Select button to select a vManager/physical server.
Adding devices by View
To add devices by view:
1.
From the Select Devices dialog box, click the By View tab.
2.
Expand the view you want to select devices from by clicking on the arrow to the left of the three view
options, IP View, Device View, or Custom View.
3.
Click the view you want to select devices from the navigation tree on the left. The devices from the
group you click appear in the Devices Found field to the right of the navigation tree. You can select
devices from more than one group by clicking more than one group.
4.
Highlight the devices you want to select from the Devices Found list and click the Add selected button
to add them to the selected devices list.
5.
To remove one or more devices, select them and click Remove selected
6.
Confirm that the devices you have found have been added by reviewing the Selected Devices list.
7.
Click OK.
8.
Confirm that the devices now appear in the Devices List field.
.
Adding devices by Advanced query
You can also add devices using the Advanced query option to search IMC using various criteria and use the
results of the search to add devices. To do so:
1.
Click Select located to the right of the Selected Devices field.
2.
From the Select Devices dialog box, click the Advanced tab.
3.
Enter values in one or more of the search parameters listed here:



Device IP: Enter the IP address you want to query for. Click on the Exact Query checkbox if you
want IMC to search for the exact IP address you have entered. Leave the Exact Query box
unchecked if you want IMC to match only a certain portion of the IP address.
Device IP List: Configure multiple device IP addresses to be searched. Click the
link. Then, the
Device IP List Configuration window appears. Enter one or multiple device IP addresses in the Input
Device IP field (if you enter multiple IP addresses, enter one IP address on each line), and then click
Add to add the entered IP addresses to the Device IP List field below. Repeat the steps above to add
all device IP addresses to be searched. To delete an IP address in the Device IP List field, select the
IP address and then click Delete. Click OK to complete the operation. Make sure that the device IP
addresses to be searched have been added to the Device IP List field. To clear the Device IP List
field, click the
link.
Device Label: Enter the device name for the devices you want to add. IMC supports fuzzy matching
for device labels. Therefore, you can enter the entire device label for the device you want to locate,
or you can enter just a portion of it. IMC displays all matches that contain the portion you enter.

Device Status: Select device status from the Device Status list.

Device Category: Select a device category from the Device Category list.

Device Series: Select a device series from the Device Series list.

Contact: Enter the contact name information by which you want to search. IMC supports fuzzy
matching for this field. Therefore, you can enter a partial string for the contact or the complete
string for the contact.
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

4.
Location: Enter the location information by which you want to search. IMC supports fuzzy matching
for this field. Therefore, you can enter a partial string for location or the complete string for
location.
Device Reachability: Select device reachability status from the Device Reachability list.
Click Query to begin your search.
The results of your search appear in the Devices Found field.
5.
Highlight the devices you want to select and click Add selected
list.
to add them to the selected devices
6.
To remove one or more devices, select them and click Remove selected
7.
Confirm that the devices you have found have been added.
8.
Click OK. Confirm that the devices now appear at the left of Select.
9.
Click OK.
.
The SOAP configuration settings in IMC must match the SOAP settings configured on the managed devices.
For information on configuring SOAP settings on the managed devices, refer to your vendor's
documentation.
If you select the Test connection to vManager/physical server option and add the devices, click OK. IMC
then accesses the specified device by using the defined SOAP parameters. If the access succeeds, the SOAP
Template is added to IMC; otherwise, the SOAP Template is not added to IMC.
The SOAP templates you have added now display as configuration options when configuring devices.
Modifying an SOAP template
To modify an SOAP template:
1.
Navigate to System→SOAP Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SOAP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SOAP templates in the SOAP Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→SOAP Template window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the SOAP Template List associated with the SOAP template you want to
3.
Select the protocol to match the SOAP configuration on the managed devices from the Protocol list.
Protocol options include http and https.
4.
Enter port number that is configured on managed devices in the Port field.
5.
Enter the root path that is configured on managed devices in the Root Path field. The default setting is
sdk.
6.
Modify username to match the username that is configured on managed devices in the Username
field.
7.
Modify the password to match the password that is configured on the managed devices in the
Password field.
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8.
If you want to test whether the configured SOAP Template can connect to a vManager/physical
server, click the Test connection to vManager/physical server checkbox, and the Select button
appears.
9.
Click the Select button to select a vManager/physical server.
10.
Add devices by using either the View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
If you select the Test connection to vManager/physical server option and add the devices, click OK.
IMC will then access the specified device by using the defined SOAP parameters. If the access
succeeds, the SOAP Template is added to IMC; otherwise, the SOAP Template is not added to IMC.
Deleting an SOAP template
To delete an SOAP template:
1.
Navigate to System→SOAP Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
SOAP Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all SOAP templates in the SOAP Template List displayed in the main pane of the
System→SOAP Template window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the SOAP Template List associated with the SOAP template you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected SOAP template.
PowerShell templates
With Virtual Network Manager deployed, the PowerShell Template appears in the System tab. IMC uses
PowerShell to enable secure remote access to managed Microsoft Virtual Machine Manager server.
The PowerShell template feature allows you to save PowerShell configuration settings in IMC, which can then
be applied when adding new virtual network devices to IMC, performing an auto discovery, or configuring
devices in individual or batch mode. PowerShell templates store IMC’s PowerShell configurations for devices
to support IMC's communication with the device. PowerShell templates do not configure the PowerShell
settings on the device itself.
Viewing the PowerShell template list
To view the PowerShell templates list:
1.
Navigate to System→PowerShell Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
PowerShell Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the
IMC displays all PowerShell templates in the main pane of the PowerShell Template List page.
PowerShell template list

Template Name: Contains the PowerShell template name.

User Name: Contains the user name.
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


Port: PowerShell monitor port.
Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify PowerShell Template page for the
associated template.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated template.
If the PowerShell template list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the PowerShell Template List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the PowerShell Template List.

Click
to page backward in the PowerShell Template List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the PowerShell Template List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
You can sort the PowerShell Template List by the Template Name, User Name, and Port fields. Click
the column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you
to toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
Adding a PowerShell template
To add a PowerShell template:
1.
Navigate to System→PowerShell Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
PowerShell Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the
IMC displays all PowerShell templates in the main pane of the PowerShell Template List page.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the following information in the Add PowerShell Template page.
4.
Enter a unique name for the PowerShell template name in the Template Name field.
The PowerShell configuration settings in IMC must match the PowerShell settings configured on the
managed devices. For information on configuring PowerShell settings on the managed devices, refer
to your vendor's documentation.
5.
Enter the username that is configured on managed devices in the Username field.
6.
Enter the password that is configured on the managed devices in the Password field.
7.
Enter the port number that is configured on managed devices in the Port field.
8.
If you want to test whether the configured PowerShell Template can connect to a vManager/physical
server, click the Test connection to vManager/physical server checkbox. The Select button appears.
9.
Click Select to select a vManager/physical server.
10.
Add devices by using either the View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
The PowerShell configuration settings in IMC must match the PowerShell settings configured on the managed
devices. For information on configuring PowerShell settings on the managed devices, refer to your vendor's
documentation.
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If you select the Test connection to vManager/physical server option and add the devices, click OK. IMC
then accesses the specified device by using the defined PowerShell parameters. If the access succeeds, the
PowerShell Template is added to IMC; otherwise, the PowerShell Template is not added to IMC.
The PowerShell templates you have added now appear as configuration options when configuring devices.
Modifying a PowerShell template
To modify a PowerShell template:
1.
Navigate to System→PowerShell Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
PowerShell Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the
IMC displays all PowerShell templates in the main pane of the PowerShell Templates List page.
2.
Click the Modify icon
you want to modify.
in the PowerShell Template List associated with the PowerShell template
3.
Modify username to match the username that is configured on managed devices in the Username
field.
4.
Modify the password to match the password that is configured on the managed devices in the
Password field.
5.
Enter port number that is configured on managed devices in the Port field.
6.
Click OK.
7.
If you select the Test connection to vManager/physical server option and add the devices, click OK.
IMC then accesses the specified device by using the defined PowerShell parameters. If the access succeeds,
the PowerShell Template is added to IMC; otherwise, the PowerShell Template is not added to IMC.
Deleting a PowerShell template
To delete a PowerShell template:
1.
Navigate to System→PowerShell Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
PowerShell Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the
IMC displays all PowerShell templates in the main pane of the PowerShell Templates List page.
2.
Click the Delete icon
you want to delete.
in the PowerShell Template List associated with the PowerShell template
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected PowerShell template.
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WMI templates
WMI refers to the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI), and is a type of Windows management
technology. With Virtual Network Manager deployed, the WMI Template appears in the System tab. IMC
uses WMI to enable secure remote access to managed Hyper-V physical servers.
The WMI template feature allows you to save WMI configuration settings in IMC, which can then be applied
when adding new virtual network devices to IMC, performing an auto discovery, or configuring devices in
individual or batch mode. WMI templates store IMC’s WMI configurations for devices to support
communication with the device. WMI templates do not configure the WMI settings on the device itself.
Viewing the WMI template list
To view the WMI templates list:
1.
Navigate to System→WMI Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
WMI Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all WMI templates in the main pane of the WMI Template List displayed page.
WMI template list

Template Name: Contains the WMI template name.

User Name: Contains the user name.

Impersonation Level can be Default, Anonymous, Identify, Impersonate, and Delegate.



Authentication Level can be Default, None, Connect, Call, Packet, Packetlntegrity, and
PacketPrivacy.
Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify WMI Template page for the associated
template.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated template.
If the WMI template list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the WMI Template List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the WMI Template List.

Click
to page backward in the WMI Template List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the WMI Template List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
You can sort the WMI Template List by the Template Name, User Name, Impersonation Level, and
Authentication Level fields. Click the column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label
is a toggle switch that allows you to toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
Adding a WMI template
To add a WMI template:
1.
Navigate to System→WMI Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
90
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
WMI Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all WMI templates in the main pane of the WMI Template List page.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the following information in the Add WMI Template page.
4.
Enter a unique name for the WMI template name in the Template Name field.
You cannot modify the name of a template once the template has been created. To modify the name,
you must first delete the template and then recreate it with a new name.
5.
Enter the username that is configured on managed devices in the Username field.
6.
Enter the password that is configured on the managed devices in the Password field.
7.
Select an impersonation level from the Impersonation Level list.
8.
Select an authentication level from the Authentication Level list.
9.
If you want to test whether the configured WMI parameters can connect to a vManager/physical
server, click the Test connection to vManager/physical server checkbox.
The Select button appears.
10.
Click the Select button to select vManager/physical server.
11.
Add devices by using either the View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
The WMI configuration settings in IMC must match the WMI settings configured on the managed devices.
For information on configuring WMI settings on the managed devices, refer to your vendor's documentation.
If you select Test connection to vManager/physical server option, IMC accesses the specified device by
using the configured WMI parameters. If the access succeeds, the WMI Template is added to IMC;
otherwise, the WMI Template is not added to IMC.
The WMI templates you have added now appear as configuration options when configuring devices.
Modifying a WMI template
To modify a WMI template:
1.
Navigate to System→WMI Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
WMI Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all WMI templates in the main pane of the WMI Template List page.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the WMI Template List associated with the WMI template you want to
3.
Modify username to match the username that is configured on managed devices in the Username
field.
4.
Modify the password to match the password that is configured on the managed devices in the
Password field.
5.
Select an impersonation level from the Impersonation Level list.
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6.
Select an authentication level from the Authentication Level list.
7.
Click the Test connection to vManager/physical server checkbox, if you want to test whether the
configured WMI template can connect to a vManager/physical server.
The Select button appears.
8.
Click the Select button to select a vManager/physical server.
9.
Add devices by using either the View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
If you select the Test connection to vManager/physical server option, IMC uses the configured WMI
parameters to access the specified device. If the access succeeds, the WMI template is updated; otherwise,
the WMI template is not updated.
Deleting a WMI template
To delete a WMI template:
1.
Navigate to System→WMI Template:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
WMI Template under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all WMI templates in the main pane of the WMI Template List page.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the WMI Template List associated with the WMI template you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected WMI template.
Configuring vendor and device information
Vendor and device specific information is used by IMC for Resource, Change, and Configuration
management functions and is integral to optimal IMC functioning. Vendor and device specific details are
also displayed in device details views.
IMC auto-populates vendor and device information when the information is available. For some third party
devices this information may not be available. If device information is not available, IMC cannot categorize
these devices into the router, switch, server, wireless or voice groups to which they should belong. In such
cases, IMC categorizes these devices as end stations. You can correct this by manually adding device vendor,
series and model information.
Viewing and configuring device vendor information
You can store vendor information for devices in the network infrastructure. This section explains the Device
Vendor List, which displays all entries in IMC for Device vendors, and how to add, modify, and delete device
vendor information.
Viewing the device vendor list
To view the device vendor list:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Vendor:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
92
c.
Click
Device Vendor under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device vendor information in the Device Vendor List displayed in the main pane
of the System→Device Vendor window.
Device vendor list

Vendor Name: Contains the vendor’s name.

Vendor Type: Identifies whether the vendor list entry is system or user-defined.

Phone Number: Contains the vendor’s phone number.

Vendor Contact: Contains the vendor’s contact name.

Description: Contains a description of the vendor.


Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify Device Vendor page for the associated
device vendor entry.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated device vendor entry.
You can sort the Device Vendor List by the Vendor Name and Vendor Type fields. Click the column
label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to toggle
between the various sort options specific to each field.
If the device vendor list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Device Vendor List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device Vendor List.

Click
to page backward in the Device Vendor List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device Vendor List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding a device vendor
To add a device vendor:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Vendor:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Vendor under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device vendor information in the Device Vendor List displayed in the main pane
of the System→Device Vendor window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the vendor’s name in the Vendor Name field.
4.
Enter the phone number for this vendor in the Phone Number field.
5.
Enter a brief description for this vendor in the Description field.
6.
Enter the name of your contact person for this vendor in the Vendor Contact field.
7.
Click Select Icon to select a vendor icon.
8.
Click OK.
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Modifying a device vendor
To modify a device vendor:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Vendor:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Vendor under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device vendor information in the Device Vendor List displayed in the main pane
of the System→Device Vendor window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the Device Vendor List associated with the vendor name you want to
3.
Modify the vendor’s name as needed in the Vendor Name field.
4.
Modify the phone number for this vendor as needed in the Phone Number field.
5.
Modify the description for this vendor as needed in the Description field.
6.
Modify the name of your contact person for this vendor as needed in the Vendor Contact field.
7.
Modify the vendor icon as needed in the Vendor Icon field.
8.
Click OK.
You can modify all device vendor settings for manually added vendors, but cannot modify the Vendor
Name and Icon settings for system-defined vendors.
Deleting a device vendor
To delete a device vendor:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Vendor:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Vendor under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device vendor information in the Device Vendor List displayed in the main pane
of the System→Device Vendor window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the Device Vendor List associated with the vendor name you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected device vendor.
Configuring device series
Device series information is a required field when creating a new device model, device model information is
used in IMC to categorize devices and device categorization is used in many IMC functions including
discovery, alarming and reporting. Therefore, managing device series information is an essential element of
IMC management and one that you should maintain for optimal use of IMC functions.
Viewing the device series list
To view the device series list:
94
1.
Navigate to System→Device Series:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Series under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device series information in the Device Series List displayed in the main pane of
the System→Device Series window.
Device Series List

Series Name: Contains the device series name.

Vendor: Contains the vendor’s name.

Series Type: Identifies whether the device series list entry is system or user-defined.

Description: Contains a description of the device series.


Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify Device Series page for the associated
device series entry.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated device series entry.
You can sort the Device Series List by the Series Name, Vendor, and Series Type fields. Click the
column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to
toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
If the device series list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Device Series List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device Series List.

Click
to page backward in the Device Series List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device Series List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding a device series
To add device series:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Series:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Series under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device series information in the Device Series List displayed in the main pane of
the System→Device Series window.
2.
Click Add.
Enter the following information in the Add Device Series page:
3.
Enter the name of the series in the Series Name field.
4.
Select the vendor for this device series from the Vendor list.
If the vendor does not exist, you can add it.
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5.
To add vendors, see "Adding a device vendor" (page 93).
6.
Enter a description of the device series the Description field.
7.
Click OK.
Modifying a device series
To modify a device series:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Series:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Series under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device series information in the Device Series List displayed in the main pane of
the System→Device Series window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the Device Series List associated with the device series you want to
3.
Modify the name for the series in the Series Name field as needed.
4.
Select the vendor for this device series from the Vendor list.
If the vendor does not exist, you can add it.
5.
To add vendors, see the previous section of this chapter on "Adding a device vendor" (page 93).
6.
Modify the description of the device series the Description field.
7.
Click OK.
Deleting a device series
To delete a device series:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Series:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Series under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device series information in the Device Series List displayed in the main pane of
the System→Device Series window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the Device Series List associated with the device series you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected device series.
Configuring device models
IMC uses device model information to categorize devices. These categories are used throughout IMC to
discover, manage and report on network resources. You can manage IMC’s categories by adding device
model information for devices in the network infrastructure.
In this section, we will explore the Device Model List that displays all devices models in IMC before
examining how to add, modify, and delete device models.
96
Viewing the device model list
To view the device model list:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Model:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Model under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device model information in the Device Model List displayed in the main pane of
the System→Device Model window.
Device model list

Model Name: Contains the device model name.

sysOID: Contains the sysOID or system Object ID for the device model.

Series: Identifies the Device Series family that the device model belongs to.

Category: Identifies IMC’s classification for the device model.

Type: Identifies whether the associated device model is system or user-defined.


Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify Device Model page for the associated
device model entry.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated device model entry.
You can sort the Device Model List by the Model Name, sysOID, Series, Category, and Type fields.
Click the column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that
allows you to toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
If the device model list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Device Model List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device Model List.

Click
to page backward in the Device Model List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device Model List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding a device model
To add a device model:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Model:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Model under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device model information in the Device Model List displayed in the main pane of
the System→Device Model window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the vendor’s name for the device model in the Model Name field.
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4.
Enter the system object ID in the sysOID field or use the Query Device feature in IMC to auto populate
the sysOID field.
There are two ways to query in the Query Device feature – By View or through Advanced query.
5.
To auto populate the sysOID field using the Query By View feature, see "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85). You can also auto populate the
sysOID field by using the Advanced query option.
To use the Query Device option, the device must already exist.
6.
To add devices, see "Adding devices in IMC" (page 154).
7.
Select the vendor name from the Vendor list.
If the vendor does not exist, you can add it.
8.
To add vendors, see "Adding a device vendor" (page 93).
9.
Select the device series from the Series list.
If the device series does not exist, you can add it.
10.
To add a device series, see "Adding a device series" (page 95).
11.
Select the device category from the Category list.
12.
Enter a brief description for this device model in the Description field.
13.
Click OK.
Modifying a device model
To modify a device model:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Model:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Model under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device model information in the Device Model List displayed in the main pane of
the System→Device Model window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the Device Model List associated with the device model you want to
3.
Modify the vendor’s name for the device model in the Model Name field.
4.
Modify the system object ID in the sysOID field or use the Query Device feature in IMC to auto populate
the sysOID field.
There are two ways to query in the Query Device feature – By View or through Advanced query.
5.
To auto populate the sysOID field using the Query By View feature, see "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
6.
To change the vendor name, select the vendor name from the Vendor list.
If the vendor does not exist, you can add it.
7.
To add vendors, see "Adding a device vendor" (page 93).
8.
To change the device series, select the device series from the Series list.
If the device series does not exist, you can add it.
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9.
To add a device series, see "Adding a device series" (page 95).
10.
To change the device category, select the device category from the Category list.
11.
Modify the description for this device model in the Description field.
12.
Click OK.
Deleting a device model
To delete a device model:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Model:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Model under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device model information in the Device Model List displayed in the main pane of
the System→Device Model window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the Device Model List associated with the device model you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected device model.
Configuring device categories
IMC divides devices into 14 categories, including Desktops, Switches, Printers, and Routers. You can define
other categories as needed.
Viewing the device category list
To view the device category list:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Category:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Category under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device category information in the Device Category List displayed in the main
pane of the System→Device Category window.
Device Category List

Category Name: Contains the device category name.

Type: Identifies whether the associated device category is system or user-defined.




Display Default: Identifies whether the device category is displayed by default under Device View
in the navigation tree.
Display Picture: Contains the picture of the associated device category.
Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify Device Category page for the associated
device series entry.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated device series entry.
99
You can sort the Device Category List by the Category Name, Type, Display Default fields. Click the
column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to
toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
If the device category list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Device Category List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device Category List.

Click
to page backward in the Device Category List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device Category List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding a device category
To add a device category:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Category:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Category under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device series information in the Device Category List displayed in the main pane
of the System→Device Category window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the category’s name for the device model in the Category Name field.
4.
Click the icon
5.
Click OK.
or the Select Icon button, and select an icon from the list.
Modifying a device category
To modify a device category:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Category:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Category under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device series information in the Device Category List displayed in the main pane
of the System→Device Category window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the Device Category List associated with the device category you want to
3.
Modify the category’s name for the device category in the Category Name field.
4.
Click the icon
5.
Click OK.
or the Select Icon button, and select an icon from the list.
Deleting a device category
To delete a device category:
100
1.
Navigate to System→Device Category:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Category under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device series information in the Device Category List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Device Category window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the Device Category List associated with the device category you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected device category.
Managing filters to filter interfaces
A filter is used by port groups to filter interfaces.
Viewing filter list
To view the filter list:
1.
Navigate to System→Filter List:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Filter under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays information about all filters in the Filter List in the main pane of the System→Filter List
window.
Filter List

Name: Contains the name of the associated filter.

Object: Contains the object to be filtered, which is Interface.

Type: Contains the type of the associated filter. Options include System-Defined and User-Defined.

Created by: Contains the name of the operator who created the associated filter.

Created at: Contains the time when the associated filter was created.

Description: Contains a description for the associated filter.

Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated filter.
You can sort the Filter List by the Name, Object, Type, Created by, and Created at fields. Click the
column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to
toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
The name you assign to a filter is used to identify the filter. Therefore, assigning a descriptive and
meaningful name to a filter aids you in navigating quickly and easily to filter the interface list.
If the filter list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:

Click
to page forward in the Filter List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Filter List.

Click
to page backward in the Filter List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Filter List.
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2.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding a filter
IMC does not offer the function of directly adding filters to the Filter List. Instead, you can save interface
query criteria as a filter when using the Advanced Query option.
To add a filter:
1.
Navigate to the Advanced Query page:
2.
Click the Advanced link located in the upper right corner of the IMC page.
3.
Click the radio button
4.
Enter the following information in the Advanced Query page:

Interface Alias—IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field. You can enter a partial or complete
name for the interface alias you want to locate in the Interface Alias field.

Interface Type—Select the interface type you want to search from the Interface Type list.

Speed—Select the interfaces speed from the Speed list.






5.
to the left of Query Interfaces to perform search for interfaces.
Interface IP—Enter the IP address of the interface you want to search for in the Interface IP field.
Select Fuzzy from the list located to the right of the Interface IP if you want to enter a partial IP
address. Select Exact from this list if you want IMC to search for an exact match for the IP address
you have entered.
MAC Address—Enter the MAC address of the interface you want to search for in the MAC Address
field. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field. You can enter a partial or complete MAC address
for the interfaces you want to locate.
Device Label—Enter the name of the device to which the interface belongs in the Device Label field.
IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field. Therefore, you can enter a partial or complete string for
the device name.
Device IP—Enter the IP address of the device to which the interface belongs in the Device IP field.
Select Fuzzy from the list located to the right of the Device IP if you want to enter a partial IP
address. Select Exact from this list if you want IMC to search for an exact match for the IP address
you have entered.
Management Status—Select the management status of the interfaces you want to search for from
the Management Status list.
Operational Status—Select the operational status of the interfaces you want to search for from the
Operational Status list.
Click Save as Filter to save a filter.
The Save as Filter dialog box appears.
6.
Enter the filter name in Name field.
7.
Enter the description for the associated filter in the Description field.
8.
Click OK.
Deleting a filter
To delete a filter:
1.
Navigate to System→Filter List:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
102
c.
Click
Filter under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays information about all filters in the Filter List in the main pane of the System→Filter List
window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
in the Filter List associated with the filter you want to delete.
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected filter.
Operator management: managing secure access to
IMC
Operator Management offers you powerful control over resources in the network infrastructure. Sound
network infrastructure security policy and practice should include securing IMC through effective use of the
IMC security features and functions found in Operator Management under the System tab.
Access and management rights to network resources granted to or rescinded from IMC operators through the
use of three features: Operator Groups, Device Groups, and Device Views. It is through the configuration of
the operator account itself that these three features converge to define the specific set of access and
management rights and restrictions for each operator.
Operator groups allow you to grant or restrict access and rights to IMC features and functions. You can
create custom operator groups and grant or restrict operator access to the following IMC functions: Resource
Manager, Alarm Management, Intelligent Configuration Center, Report Management, Performance
Management, Network Asset Management, Security Control Center, Data Analysis, Guest Access
Management, ACL Management, VLAN Management, Syslog Management, NE Management, and VNM
Management. Once groups are created, you can add operators to an operator group to grant or restrict their
access to these IMC features.
Custom views allow you to grant or restrict access to devices by creating custom views. Custom Views serve
two purposes: to grant or restrict access and management rights to a set of devices; and to provide operators
with a logical view of devices for quick and efficient access to managed devices. You create custom views
that group devices logically. These views become available through the Resource tab to operators when they
have been granted rights to them. You then grant or restrict operator access to one or more custom views
when configuring individual operator accounts.
Device groups give you a layer of refinement for granting or restricting operator access and rights to devices
managed by IMC. While Device Views allow you to group devices logically, device groups enable you to
group devices by device type or by any other logical grouping. You can create custom groups and add one
or more devices to a group. Once device groups are created, you can assign operators to a device group,
thus granting them access and rights to manage the devices in that group. Operators have access only to
those devices that are included in the device groups that they have been granted rights to. In other words,
operators do not have access and cannot even view devices that are not included in the groups that they
have been granted access to. Device Groups serve to grant access to devices only; they are not visible as
device groups in IMC features and functions.
Once you have created operator groups, custom views, and device groups and populated device views and
groups with devices, you are then ready to assign or restrict access and management rights to network
resources through the configuration of operator accounts. In operator accounts, you assign to each operator
membership in an operator group and access and management rights to device views and groups. Adding
an operator to the Administrator Group grants that operator rights to all devices, all device groups and all
views, without exception. Thus, to use views and device groups to manage rights and restrictions to IMC, you
must add operators to either the maintainer or the viewer group.
103
The sum of operator privileges and restrictions configured in add or modify operator account pages
determines ultimately what devices become visible to each operator in IMC through custom views or IMC’s
system defined views. The rights and restrictions in operator accounts also determine which performance
reports, alarms, and other IMC management and reporting views and features operators see as operators
only view information and features for devices over which they have rights.
In addition to access and rights management features discussed above, IMC offers other features to secure
access to IMC and the resources managed by it. You have three options for operator authentication to IMC:
local IMC password management, RADIUS or LDAP authentication. You can configure authentication
services via RADIUS or LDAP using the Authentication Server feature found under Operator Management.
You can control login access to IMC via IP address access control lists in the Login Control Template function
under Operator Management.
You can also set password strategies that apply to all operators in the Password Strategy function under
Operator Management.
Finally, IMC you apply these configurations individually when creating operator accounts.
Managing operator groups
In IMC, you can create custom defined operator groups that assign or restrict IMC service and component
level privileges to members of the operator groups. Once created, custom groups then appear as
configuration options when adding operators to IMC.
You can create custom operator groups and grant or restrict operator access to the following IMC functions:
Resource Management, Alarm Management, Intelligent Configuration Center, Report Management,
Performance Management, Network Asset Management, Security Control Center, Guest Access
Management, ACL Management, VLAN Management, Syslog Management, Data Analysis Management,
and Data Analyzer. Once groups are created, you can add operators to an operator group to grant or
restrict their access to these IMC features.
Securing IMC therefore begins with defining and implementing operator groups that map the roles and
responsibilities of individuals and groups within the organization to the services and components within
IMC.
Once you have identified the various groups within your support organization and their roles and
responsibilities and how they map to IMC services and components, you are ready to begin creating
operator groups.
Viewing the operator group list
To view the operator group list:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator Group.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator Group under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all operator groups in the Operator Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Operator Group window.
Operator group list

Group Name: Contains the operator group name.
104





Privilege: Contains privilege level for the associated group. There are three privilege levels in IMC:
ADMIN, Maintainer, and Viewer.
Description: Contains a description for the associated operator group.
Copy: Contains an icon for navigating to the Add Operator Group page for the associated device
series entry.
Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify Operator Group page for the associated
device series entry.
Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the associated device series entry.
You can sort the Operator Group List by the Group Name, Privilege, and Description fields. Click the column
label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to toggle
between the various sort options specific to each field.
If the operator group list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids appear.
2.

Click
to page forward in the Operator Group List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Operator Group List.

Click
to page backward in the Operator Group List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Operator Group List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding an operator group
To add an operator group:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator Group.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator Group under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all operator groups in the Operator Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Operator Group window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter a unique name for the group you want to create in the Group Name field.
4.
Select the group’s privilege level from the Privilege list.
Options include:


ADMIN: Operators with the ADMIN level privilege has access to all operations and resources
available in IMC. Only the admin account that is created during installation and operators who
have been assigned to the Administrator Group and therefore given the ADMIN privilege level
have control over the following IMC functions: operator management, device group management,
user group management, login control template management, password strategy management
and system parameter settings. Select this option if you want to grant access to all IMC features
and functions as well as all devices, users, and services managed by IMC to all operators that will
be members of this group.
Maintainer: Operators who have or will be assigned to the Maintainer group and therefore have
the Maintainer privilege level rights and control over all operations for devices, users, and services
within the groups and custom views assigned to the Maintainer Group. Select this option if you
105
want to grant access to IMC features and functions and devices, users, and services managed by
IMC to all operators that will be members of this group.

Viewer: Operators who have been or will be assigned to the Viewer group and therefore have a
Viewer privilege level have read-only access devices, users, and services within the groups and
views assigned to its Viewer Group. Select this option if you want to grant read-only access to IMC
features and managed resources to all operators of this group.
5.
Enter a description for the operator group in the Description field.
6.
Click the Expand ALL icon
to view all Operator Privileges.
This step grants or restricts access to IMC features for the Operator Group.
7.
Deselect any privileges you want to revoke for this operator group by clicking the checked box
to remove the check mark.
8.
Click OK to create the Operator Group.
You cannot modify the name of an operator group once it has been created.
Copying an Operator Group
To copy an operator group:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator Group.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator Group under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all operator groups in the Operator Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Operator Group window.
2.
Click the Copy icon
copy.
in the Operator Group List associated with the operator group you want to
3.
Modify the group name as needed in the Group Name field.
4.
Select the group’s privilege level from the Privilege list.
Options include:



ADMIN: Operators with the ADMIN level privilege has access to all operations and resources
available in IMC. Only the admin account that is created during installation and operators who
have been assigned to the Administrator Group and therefore given the ADMIN privilege level
have control over the following IMC functions: operator management, device group management,
user group management, login control template management, password strategy management
and system parameter settings. Select this option if you want to grant access to all IMC features
and functions as well as all devices, users, and services managed by IMC to all operators that will
be members of this group.
Maintainer: Operators who have or will be assigned to the Maintainer group and therefore have
the Maintainer privilege level rights and control over all operations for devices, users, and services
within the groups and custom views assigned to the Maintainer Group. Select this option if you
want to grant access to IMC features and functions and devices, users, and services managed by
IMC to all operators that will be members of this group.
Viewer: Operators who have been or will be assigned to the Viewer group and therefore have a
Viewer privilege level have read-only access devices, users, and services within the groups and
106
views assigned to its Viewer Group. Select this option if you want to grant read-only access to IMC
features and managed resources to all operators of this group.
5.
Modify the description as needed in the Description field.
6.
Click the Expand All icon
7.
Do one of the following:

to view all Operator Privileges.
Deselect any privileges you want to revoke for this operator group by clicking the checked box
to remove the check mark, or

8.
Select any privileges you want to add by clicking the check box
privilege.
to enable the associated
Click OK to create a copy of the operator group.
Modifying an operator group
To modify an operator group:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator Group.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator Group under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all operator groups in the Operator Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System→Operator Group window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
to modify.
in the Operator Group List associated with the operator group you want
3.
Select the group’s privilege level from the Privilege list.
Options include:



4.
ADMIN: Operators with the ADMIN level privilege has access to all operations and resources
available in IMC. Only the admin account that is created during installation and operators who
have been assigned to the Administrator Group and therefore given the ADMIN privilege level
have control over the following IMC functions: operator management, device group management,
user group management, login control template management, password strategy management
and system parameter settings. Select this option if you want to grant access to all IMC features
and functions as well as all devices, users, and services managed by IMC to all operators that will
be members of this group.
Maintainer: Operators who have or will be assigned to the Maintainer group and therefore have
the Maintainer privilege level rights and control over all operations for devices, users, and services
within the groups and custom views assigned to the Maintainer Group. Select this option if you
want to grant access to IMC features and functions and devices, users, and services managed by
IMC to all operators that will be members of this group.
Viewer: Operators who have been or will be assigned to the Viewer group and therefore have a
Viewer privilege level have read-only access devices, users, and services within the groups and
views assigned to its Viewer Group. Select this option if you want to grant read-only access to IMC
features and managed resources to all operators of this group.
Modify the description as needed in the Description field.
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5.
Click the Expand All icon
6.
Do one of the following:

to view all Operator Privileges.
Deselect any privileges you want to revoke for this operator group by clicking the checked box
to remove the check mark, or

7.
Select any privileges you want to add by clicking on the checkbox
to enable that privilege.
Click OK.
WARNING:
An operator group cannot be modified while members of the group are online. All members of a group
must be logged off before changes to the Operator Group can be completed. Administrators or operators
with ADMIN privileges can log users off using the Online Operators feature in IMC. For more information
on this feature, see "Managing online IMC operator access" (page 124).
Deleting an operator group
To delete an operator group:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator Group.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator Group under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all operator groups in the Operator Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System →Operator Group window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
delete.
in the Operator Group List associated with the operator group you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected operator group.
WARNING:
An operator group cannot be deleted while members of the group are online. All members of a group
must be logged off before any changes to the Operator Group can be completed. For more information
on logging operators off, see "Managing online IMC operator access" (page 124).
Securing IMC access via authentication services
To further secure access to IMC and to support unified username and password management, IMC supports
the use of login authentication services for both RADIUS and LDAP.
Configuring IMC to use RADIUS authentication services
Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can configure
RADIUS authentication services. To configure RADIUS authentication:
1.
Navigate to System→Authentication Server.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
108
c.
Click
left.
Authentication Server under Operator Management from the navigation system on the
The Authentication Server configuration page appears.
2.
Enter the following information in RADIUS Server portion of the Authentication Server page:


Primary Server: Enter the IP address or host name of the primary RADIUS Server.

Secondary Server: Enter the IP address or host name of the secondary RADIUS Server.


3.
Authentication Type: Select the RADIUS authentication type, PAP or CHAP from the list under
RADIUS Server. This choice must match the authentication type configured on the RADIUS server.
Authentication Port: Enter the port number used by the RADIUS server for authentication in the
field. The default port number is 1812.
Shared Secret: Enter the shared secret for authentication packets. What is configured here must
match what is configured on the RADIUS server.
Click OK to confirm the RADIUS service authentication configuration.
Modifying RADIUS authentication service configuration
To modify an existing RADIUS configuration:
1.
Navigate to System→Authentication Server.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
Authentication Server under Operator Management from the navigation system on the
The Authentication Server configuration page appears.
2.
Enter the following information in the Authentication Server page:


Primary Server: Modify the IP address or host name of the primary RADIUS Server.

Secondary Server: Modify the IP address or host name of the secondary RADIUS Server.


3.
Authentication Type: Modify the RADIUS authentication type, PAP or CHAP from the list under
RADIUS Server. This choice must match the authentication type configured on the RADIUS server.
Authentication Port: Modify the port number used by the RADIUS server for authentication in the
field. The default port number is 1812.
Shared Secret: Modify the shared secret for authentication packets. What is configured here must
match what is configured on the RADIUS server.
Click OK to confirm your modifications to the RADIUS service authentication configuration.
Configuring IMC to use LDAP authentication services
Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can configure
LDAP authentication services. To configure LDAP authentication:
1.
Navigate to System→Authentication Server.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
Authentication Server under Operator Management from the navigation system on the
109
The Authentication Server configuration page appears.
2.
Enter the following information in the Authentication Server page:








3.
LDAP Version: Select the LDAP version, 2 or 3 from the list. The option selected here must match the
configuration of the LDAP server.
Server Type: Select LDAP server type from the list. IMC supports Generic LDAP Services as well as
Microsoft Active Directory.
Server Address: Enter the IP address or host name of the LDAP Server in the field provided.
Server Port: Enter the port number used by the LDAP server for authentication in this field. The
default port number is 389.
Base DN: Enter the Base DN value to be used for communication with the LDAP server. The Base
DN must match what is configured on the LDAP authentication server.
Admin DN: Enter the Admin DN value to be used for communication with the LDAP server. The
Administrator DN must match what is configured on the LDAP authentication server.
Admin Password: Enter the Admin password to be used for communication with the LDAP server.
The admin password must match what is configured on the LDAP authentication server.
Username Attribute: Enter the username attribute to be used for obtaining user information from
the LDAP server. The username attribute must match what is configured on the LDAP authentication
server.
Click OK to confirm the LDAP service authentication configuration.
Modifying LDAP authentication service configuration
To modify an existing LDAP authentication service configuration:
1.
Navigate to System→Authentication Server.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
Authentication Server under Operator Management from the navigation system on the
The Authentication Server configuration page appears.
2.
Enter the following information in the Authentication Server page:







LDAP Version: Modify the LDAP version, by selecting V2 or V3 from the list. This must match the
configuration on the LDAP server.
Server Type: Modify the LDAP server type by selecting the type from the list. IMC supports Generic
LDAP Services as well as Microsoft Active Directory.
Server Address: Modify the IP address or host name of the LDAP Server in the field provided.
Server Port: Modify the port number used by the LDAP server for authentication in this field. The
default port number is 389.
Base DN: Modify the Base DN value to be used for communication with the LDAP server. The Base
DN must match what is configured on the LDAP authentication server.
Admin DN: Modify the Admin DN value to be used for communication with the LDAP server. The
Administrator DN must match what is configured on the LDAP authentication server.
Admin Password: Modify the Admin password to be used for communication with the LDAP server.
The admin password must match what is configured on the LDAP authentication server.
110

3.
Username Attribute: Modify the Username attribute to be used for obtaining user information from
the LDAP server. The username attribute must match what is configured on the LDAP authentication
server.
Click OK to confirm the LDAP service authentication configuration.
Securing IMC through operator login control templates
IMC extends the concept of access control to the desktop by enabling you to permit or deny operator access
to IMC based on individual IP addresses as well as IP address ranges. These login control templates can then
be applied to operator accounts to permit or deny IMC access to IMC based on the individual operator’s IP
address.
Viewing the login control template list
To view the login control template list:
1.
Navigate to System→Login Control Template.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
Login Control Template under Operator Management from the navigation system on the
The Login Control Template page appears.
Login control template list







Login Control Name: Contains the name assigned to the login control template.
Start IP: Contains the IP address that defines the first IP address in the range of IP addresses
controlled by this template.
End IP: Contains the IP address that defines the last IP address in the range of IP addresses
controlled by this template.
Action: Identifies what action is taken by the login control template. The two options for login
control templates are Permit and Deny.
Description: Contains a description for the associated login control template.
Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify page for the associated login control
template.
Delete: Contains an icon for navigating to the Delete page for the associated login control
template.
If the login control template list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids appear.
2.

Click
to page forward in the Login Control Template List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Login Control Template List.

Click
to page backward in the Login Control Template List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Login Control Template List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
111
Adding a login control template
Only you or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can manage Login
Control Templates. To add a login control template:
1.
Navigate to System→Login Control Template.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
Login Control Template under Operator Management from the navigation system on the
The Login Control Template page appears.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the following information in the Login Control Template window:
a. Enter the name of the login control template in the Login Control Name field.
b. Enter the first IP address in the address range you want to permit or deny access to in the Start IP
field. If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP
address fields.
c.
Enter the last IP address in the address range you want to permit or deny access to in the End IP
field. If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP
address fields.
d. Select the action you want to implement for this IP address or IP address range from the Action list.
Options include Permit, which enables IMC access from any IP address in the specified range, and
Deny, which prohibits IMC access from any IP address in the specified range.
e. Enter a description for this login control template in the Description field provided.
4.
Click OK.
Modifying a login control template
Changes to login control lists take effect the next time the operators affected by the template log in. To modify
a login control template:
1.
Navigate to System→Login Control Template.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
Login Control Template under Operator Management from the navigation system on the
The Login Control Template page appears.
2.
Click the Modify icon
in the Login Control Template List associated with the login control
template you want to modify.
Login Control Template names cannot be changed once the template has been created.
3.
Modify the first IP address in the address range as needed in the Start IP field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP address
fields.
4.
Modify the last IP address in the address range as needed in the End IP field.
112
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP address
fields.
5.
Select the action you want to implement for this IP address or IP address range from the Action list.
Options include Permit, which enables IMC access from any IP address in the specified range, and
Deny, which prohibits IMC access from any IP address in the specified range.
6.
Modify the description for this login control template in the Description field provided.
7.
Click OK.
Deleting a login control template
To delete a login control template:
1.
Navigate to System→Login Control.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
left.
Login Control Template under Operator Management from the navigation system on the
The Login Control Template page appears.
2.
Click the Delete icon
you want to delete.
in the Login Control Template list associated with the login control template
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected template.
WARNING:
Deleting a login control template does not affect operators who are already logged in.
Establishing IMC password strategies
IMC provides you with the ability to globally define password policies for IMC passwords when local or IMC
passwords are used to authenticate operators to IMC.
With IMC’s password strategy feature, you can apply minimum length, password complexity and expiration
to all passwords globally. Once applied, password strategies apply to all newly created operators of IMC,
effective immediately.
Password expiration policies do not apply to the IMC Administrator account that is created at installation.
Administrator passwords never expire.
Configuring a password strategy
To configure a password strategy:
1.
Navigate to System→Password Strategy.
2.
Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
3.
Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
4.
Click
Password Strategy under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Configure Password Strategy page appears.
5.
Enter the following information in the Configure Password Strategy page.
113
a. Select the desired password minimum length from the Min. Length list.
Options include passwords that have a length of 6, 8, or 10 characters as well as passwords that
cannot have zero length or Cannot Be Zero. The default setting is Cannot Be Zero.
b. Select the desired password complexity strategy from the Complexity list.
Options include 1) No Requirement, 2) Must Contain Letters and Numbers, 3) Must Contain
Special Characters, shown in Table 2 (page 114) and 4) Must Contain Letters, Numbers, and
Special Characters. The default setting is No Requirement.
c.
Validity Period: Select the length of time for which passwords are valid in the Validity Period list.
Options are Permanent, 30 days, 60 days, 90 days, and 12 Months. The default setting is
Permanent.
Click OK.
6.
Changes to password strategies do not affect operators who have established accounts prior to the
implementation of or changes to IMC password strategies. However, changes take effect immediately
for all newly created operators.
Table 2 Special characters
Character
Name
Character
Name
~
Tilde
'
Apostrophe or single quotation
!
Exclamation mark
@
At sign
#
Pound sign
$
Dollar sign
%
Percent sign
^
Caret
&
Ampersand
*
Asterisk
()
Parenthesis
=
Equal sign
+
Plus sign
|
Vertical bars
-
Hyphen
_
Underscore
Square brackets
{}
Braces
[]
:
Colon
;
Semicolon
\
Backslash
"
Double quotation
,
Comma
/
Forward slash
.
Dot
<>
Angle brackets
?
Question mark
Managing IMC operators
The individual operator account is where all of the features you have used to grant or restrict access to
operator accounts converge. These features include the creation of operator groups, custom views, and
device groups. Once these are created, you can grant or restrict access and management rights to network
resources using them when they configure individual operator accounts.
With operator accounts, you assign to each operator membership in an operator group and access and
management rights to device views and groups. Adding an operator to the administrator group grants that
operator rights to all devices, all device groups and all views, without exception. Thus, to use views and
114
device groups to manage rights and restrictions to IMC, you must add operators to either the maintainer or
the viewer group.
The sum of operator privileges and restrictions configured in add or modify operator account pages
determines ultimately what devices become visible to each operator in IMC through custom device views or
IMC’s system defined views. The rights and restrictions in operator accounts also determine which
performance reports, alarms, and other IMC management and reporting views and features operators see
as operators only view information and features for devices over which they have rights.
To summarize, once you
1.
have created the operator groups that grant or restrict access to IMC features that match the IMC
access requirements of your support organization;
2.
know which operators need rights to manage which network resources, users and services;
3.
have created the device groups and Level 1 custom views as needed.
You are ready to begin creating individual operator accounts. For more information on adding devices and
views, see "5 Resource management " (page 153).
Viewing the operator list
To view the operator list:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Operator page is displayed and a list of all operators is displayed on this page.

Login Name: Contains the IMC user ID or name of the operator.

Full Name: Contains the first and last name for the associated operator.

Authentication Type: Contains the method of authentication configured for the associated
operator. Possible values for this field include a local IMC password or Password, RADIUS, or
LDAP.

Operator Group: Identifies to which IMC operator group the associated operator belongs.

Description: Contains a description for the associated operator.

Modify: Contains an icon for navigating to the Modify page for the associated operator.

Delete: Contains an icon for navigating to the Delete page for the associated operator.
You can sort the Operator List by the Login Name, Full Name, Authentication Type, Operator Group,
and Description fields. Click the column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is
a toggle switch that allows you to toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
If the operator list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Operator List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Operator List.

Click
to page backward in the Operator List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Operator List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
115
Adding an administrator group operator
To add an IMC administrator group operator:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Operator page is displayed and a list of all operators is displayed on this page.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter a valid login name in the Login Name field.
Login name can include alphanumeric characters, underscores (_), and hyphens (-). Although spaces
are allowed, HP does not recommend the use of any spaces in a login name as this can cause
problems with LDAP and RADIUS authentication.
4.
Enter the operator’s first and last name in the Full Name field.
5.
Select the password authentication type from the Authentication Type list.
Options are: IMC local Password, RADIUS, and LDAP.
You must configure the IMC Authentication Service module for LDAP and RADIUS before operators can
authenticate using either one of these forms of authentication.
6.
If you are using IMC’s local password feature, enter the operator’s password in the Password field.
7.
If you are using IMC’s local password feature, re-enter the operator’s password in the Confirm
Password field.
The Idle Timeout (Minutes) option allows you to configure how long IMC sessions remain open and
active while not in use.
8.
Select Same as System Settings if you want to apply system wide settings to this operator account.
9.
Select Configure Individually.
The page updates to include a field to the right of the Idle Timeout list.
10.
Enter the idle timeout in minutes in this field.
11.
Select the Administrator Group from the Operator Group list.
12.
Select from the pre-defined IMC operator groups or configure your own.
To create and configure your own operator group, see "Adding an operator group" (page 105).
WARNING:
When assigning an operator to the Administrator Group only, you are assigning that operator all IMC
privileges to all services within IMC and to all devices groups and views. This does not apply when
creating operators that belong to the Maintainer or Viewer group as rights to views and groups can be
assigned in the individual operator account.
13.
Enter a brief description for this operator in the Description field.
14.
Select the Default Access Control Strategy you want to apply to this operator by clicking the
appropriate radio button
15.
.
If you want to apply a login control template or rule to this operator, click Add.
116
16.
If you have already created a login control template, click the radio button
Existing Templates.
to the left of Select from
17.
Select the login control template you wish to apply to this operator by clicking the radio button
the left of the Login Control Name you want to select.
18.
Click OK.
19.
If you have not already created a login control template, click the radio button
Manually Add to add an access control rule.
to
to the left of
For more information on creating a login control template, see "Securing IMC through operator login
control " (page 111).
20.
Enter the following information in the Add Access Control Rule dialog box:
a. Start IP: Enter the first IP address in address range you want to permit or deny access to in the field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP address
fields.
b. End IP: Enter the last IP address in address range you want to permit or deny access to in the field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP address
fields.
c.
Action: Select the action you want to implement for this IP address or IP address range, Permit or
Deny from the list.
d. Description: Enter a description for this login control template in the field provided.
21.
Click OK to complete the Login Control List configuration.
If you enter more than one login control into the Login Control List for an operator, the web page
updates to include a Change Priority field. This field allows you to define the order or priority for
execution of login control list entries.
Entries at the top of the list are treated with a higher priority than those below it.
22.
23.
To move a login control entry up or down in priority, do one of the following:

To move a login control entry up in priority, click the up arrow

To move it down, click the down arrow
associated with that entry, or
associated with that entry.
Click OK to accept the operator configuration.
You cannot change the logging name once you create the operator account.
Modifying an administrator group operator
To modify an IMC administrator group operator:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Operator page is displayed and a list of all operators is displayed on this page.
2.
Click the Modify icon
in the Operator list associated with the operator you want to modify.
You cannot change the login name once you create the operator account.
3.
Modify the operator’s first and last name in the Full Name field.
117
4.
Modify your selection for password authentication type from the Authentication Type list as needed.
Options are IMC local Password, RADIUS, or LDAP.
You must configure the IMC Authentication Service module for LDAP and RADIUS before operators
can authenticate using either one of these forms of authentication.
5.
If you are using IMC’s local password feature, modify the operator’s password in the Password field
as needed.
6.
If you are using IMC’s local password feature, re-enter the operator’s password in the Confirm
Password field.
7.
Modify the Idle Timeout (Minutes) option as needed.
8.
Select Same as System Settings if you want to apply system wide settings to this operator account.
9.
Select Configure Individually.
The page updates to include a field to the right of the Idle Timeout list. Enter the idle timeout in minutes
in this field.
10.
Modify the description for this operator in the Description field as needed.
11.
Select the Default Access Control Strategy you want to apply to this operator by clicking the
appropriate radio button.
12.
If you want to apply a login control template or rule to this operator, click Add.
13.
If you have already created a login control template, click the radio button
Existing Templates.
14.
Select the login control template you wish to apply to this operator by clicking the radio button
the left of the Login Control Name you want to select.
15.
Click OK.
16.
If you have not already created a login control template, click the radio button
Manually Add to add an access control rule.
to the left of Select from
to
to the left of
For more information on creating a login control template, see "Securing IMC through operator login
control templates" (page 111).
17.
Enter the following information in the Add Access Control Rule page:




18.
Start IP: Enter the first IP address in address range you want to permit or deny access to in the field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP
address fields.
End IP: Enter the last IP address in address range you want to permit or deny access to in the field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP
address fields.
Action: Select the action you want to implement for this IP address or IP address range, Permit or
Deny from the list.
Description: Enter a description for this login control template in the field provided.
Click OK to complete the Login Control List configuration.
If you enter more than one login control into the Login Control List for an operator, the web page
updates to include a Change Priority field. This field allows you to define the order or priority for
execution of login control list entries. Entries at the top of the list will be treated with a higher priority
than those below it.
19.
To change the priority of a login control entry, do one of the following:

To move a login control entry up in priority, click the up arrow
118
associated with that entry, or

20.
To move it down, click the down arrow
associated with that entry.
Click OK to accept your changes to the operator configuration.
Adding an IMC maintainer or viewer group operator
You can limit access to network resources managed by operators within IMC by assigning maintainer and
viewer roles to operators. Some of the features that you can limit access to with these roles are custom views,
location views and AP groups.
To limit operator access to custom and location views, the views must be created prior to the creation of the
operator account.
Alternatively, you can create the operator accounts first and then return to complete the operator
configuration after devices have been discovered, custom and location views created, and devices added to
these views.
To add a maintainer or viewer group operator:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Operator page is displayed and a list of all operators is displayed on this page.
2.
Click Add.
The Add Operator page appears.
3.
Enter a valid login name in the Login Name field.
Login name can include alphanumeric characters, underscores (_), and hyphens (-).
4.
Enter the operator’s first and last name in the Full Name field.
5.
Select the password authentication type from the Authentication Type list.
Options are IMC local Password, RADIUS, or LDAP. You must configure the IMC Authentication Server
module for LDAP and RADIUS before operators can authenticate using these methods of
authentication.
6.
If you have elected to use IMC’s local password feature by selecting Password from the Authentication
Type list, enter the operator’s password in the Password field.
7.
If you have elected to use IMC’s local password feature by selecting Password from the Authentication
Type, re-enter the operator’s password in the Confirm Password field.
The Idle Timeout option allows you to configure for how long IMC sessions remain open and active
while not in use.
8.
Select Same as System Settings if you want to apply system wide settings to this operator account.
9.
Select Configure Individually if you want to configure the Idle Timeout for this operator. Enter the idle
timeout in minutes for this operator in the field located to the right of the Idle Timeout list.
10.
Select the Maintainer or Viewer Group from the Operator Group list.
The Operator Group list displays all currently configured operator groups.
11.
Select from the pre-defined IMC operator groups or configure your own.
To create and configure your own operator group, see "Managing operator groups" (page 104) or
to configure this operator as a member of the Administrator Group, see "Adding an administrator
group operator" (page 116).
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A Maintainer has access to all operations except those reserved exclusively for administrators.
Maintainers also have access to maintainer specific resources and certain system level information
and resources.
A Viewer also has access to specific resources but has read-only access to system level information
and resources.
12.
Enter a brief description for this operator in the Description field.
13.
You can configure the device groups and user groups to which operators have access. If you want the
operator to have the ability to manage all device and user groups, click the Manage All Groups radio
button
14.
and skip to Step 18.
If you want the operator to manage only a subset of device and user groups that you choose, click the
Define Manageable Groups radio button
.
The page updates to display the list of Managed Device Groups and Managed User Groups.
15.
Click the checkboxes
next to the Managed Device Groups for which you want to grant the
operator access and control.
16.
Click the Expand All icon
17.
Click the checkboxes next to the Managed User Groups for which this operator has management
access and control.
18.
If you want the operator to have the ability to manage all Level 1 custom views, click the Manage All
to view all Managed User Groups.
Level 1 Custom Views radio button
19.
and skip to Step 23.
If you want the operator to manage only a subset of Level 1 Custom Views that you choose, click the
Define Manageable Level 1 Custom Views radio button
.
The page updates to display the list of Manageable Level 1 Custom Views.
20.
Click the checkboxes next to the Manageable Level 1 Custom Views to which you want to grant this
operator access and control.
21.
Select the Default Access Control Strategy you want to apply to this operator by clicking the
appropriate radio button
22.
, Permit to permit access to IMC or Deny to deny access to IMC.
Click Add if you want to use a Login Control Template to manage the operator’s access to IMC.
a. If you have already created a login control template, click the radio button
to the left of Select
from Existing Templates.
b. Select the login control template you want to apply to this operator by clicking the radio button
to the left of Login Control Name.
23.
Click OK. Skip now to Step 24.
a. If you have not already created a login control template, click the radio button
to Manually
Add manually create an access control rule.
24.
Enter the following information in the Add Access Control Rule page:
a. Enter the first IP address in address range you want to permit or deny access to in the Start IP field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP address
fields.
b. Enter the last IP address in address range you want to permit or deny access to in the End IP field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP address
fields.
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c.
Select the action you want to implement for this IP address or IP address range, Permit or Deny
from the Action list.
d. Enter a description for this login control template in the Description field provided.
e. Click OK to complete the access control rule configuration.
25.
Click the checkbox
to the right of Only NE Management could be used in the Network Element
User section if you want to restrict operator access to network element management only.
26.
If you want the operator to have the ability to manage all manageable Fit AP groups, click the Manage
all Fit AP groups radio button
and skip to Step 27.
a. If you want to select which fit AP groups the operator has access to and control over, click the
Specify manageable Fit AP groups radio button
.
b. Click the checkboxes
to the left of Manageable Fit AP Groups for which this operator has
management access and control.
27.
If you want the operator to have the ability to manage all Level 1 location views and therefore the
devices in these views, click the Manage all Level 1 Location Views radio button
.
a. If you want to select which Level 1 location views and the devices in them the operator has access
to and control over, click the Specify manageable Level 1 Location Views radio button
.
b. Click the checkboxes
to the left of Manageable Level 1 Location Views for which this operator
has management access and control.
28.
Click OK to accept the operator configuration.
You cannot change the login name once you create the operator account.
Modifying a maintainer or viewer group operator
To modify a maintainer or viewer group operator:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Operator page displays and a list of all operators displays on this page.
2.
Click the Modify icon
in the Operator list associated with the operator you want to modify.
You cannot modify the name of an operator once you have created it.
3.
Modify the operator’s first and last name in the Full Name field as needed.
4.
Modify the password authentication type by selecting the new setting from the Authentication Type list.
Options are IMC local Password, RADIUS, or LDAP. You must configure the IMC Authentication
Service module for LDAP and RADIUS before operators can authenticate using these methods of
authentication.
5.
If you have elected to use IMC’s local password feature by selecting Password from the Authentication
Type list, modify the operator’s password in the Password field.
6.
If you have elected to use IMC’s local password feature by selecting Password from the Authentication
Type, re-enter the operator’s new password in the Confirm Password field.
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7.
Modify the Idle Timeout setting as needed.
8.
Select Same as System Settings if you want to apply system wide settings to this operator account.
9.
Select Configure Individually if you want to configure the Idle Timeout for this operator.
10.
Enter the idle timeout in minutes for this operator in the field located to the right of the Idle Timeout list.
11.
Modify the operator group as needed, selecting either Maintainer Group or Viewer Group.
The Operator Group list displays all currently configured operator groups.
12.
Select from the pre-defined IMC operator groups or configure your own.
To create and configure your own operator group, see "Managing operator groups" (page 104). To
configure this operator as a member of the Administrator Group, see "Adding an administrator group
operator" (page 116).
A Maintainer has access to all operations except those reserved exclusively for administrators.
Maintainers also have access to maintainer specific resources and certain system level information
and resources.
A Viewer also has access to specific resources but has read-only access to system level information
and resources.
13.
Modify the description for this operator as needed in the Description field.
14.
Modify which device groups and user groups operators have access to in the Managed Groups
section.
15.
If you want the operator to have the ability to manage all device and user groups, click the Manage
All Groups radio button
16.
and skip to Step 11.
If you want the operator to manage only a subset of device and user groups that you choose, click the
Define Manageable Groups radio button
.
The page updates to display the list of Managed Device Groups and Managed User Groups.
17.
Do one of the following:





18.
Click the checkboxes
next to the Managed Device Groups for which you want to grant
operator access and control, or
Click the checked boxes
next to the Managed Device Groups for which you want to revoke
operator access and control, or
Click the Expand All icon
Click the checkboxes next to the Managed User Groups for which the operator has management
access and control, or
Click the checked boxes
next to the Managed User Groups for which you want to revoke
operator access and control.
If you want the operator to have the ability to manage all Level 1 custom views, click the Manage All
Level 1 Custom Views radio button
19.
to view all Managed User Groups, or
and skip to Step 21.
If you want the operator to manage only a subset of Level 1 Custom Views that you choose, click the
Define Manageable Level 1 Custom Views radio button
.
The page will update to display the list of Manageable Level 1 Custom Views.
20.
Click the checkboxes next to the Manageable Level 1 Custom Views to which you want to grant this
operator access and control.
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21.
Modify the Default Access Control Strategy setting as needed by clicking on the appropriate radio
button , Permit to permit access to IMC or Deny to deny access to IMC.
22.
Click Add if you want to use a Login Control Template to manage the operator’s access to IMC.
23.
If you have already created a login control template, click the radio button
Existing Templates.
24.
Select the login control template you want to apply to this operator by clicking on the radio button
to the left of Login Control Name.
25.
Click OK. Skip now to Step 28.
26.
If you have not already created a login control template, click the radio button
manually create an access control rule.
27.
Enter the following information in the Add Access Control Rule page:
to the left of Select from
to Manually Add
a. Enter the first IP address in address range you want to permit or deny access to in the Start IP field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP address
fields.
b. Enter the last IP address in address range you want to permit or deny access to in the End IP field.
If you are entering a single IP address, enter the same address in the Start IP and the End IP address
fields.
c.
Select the action you want to implement for this IP address or IP address range, Permit or Deny
from the Action list.
d. Enter a description for this login control template in the Description field provided.
e. Click OK to complete the access control rule configuration.
28.
Click the checkbox
to the left of Only NE Management could be used in the Network Element User
section if you want to restrict operator access to network element management only.
29.
If you want the operator to have the ability to manage all manageable Fit AP groups, click the Manage
all Fit AP groups radio button .
30.
If you want to select which fit AP groups the operator has access to and control over, click the Specify
manageable Fit AP groups radio button .
31.
Click the checkboxes
to the left of Manageable all Fit AP groups for which this operator has
management access and control.
32.
Click the checked boxes
next to the Manageable Fit AP Groups for which you want to revoke
operator access and control.
33.
If you want the operator to have the ability to manage all Level 1 location views and therefore the
devices in these views, click the Manage all Level 1 Location Views radio button
and skip to Step
36.
34.
If you want to select which Level 1 location views and the devices in them the operator has access to
and control over, click the Specify manageable Level 1 Location Views radio button .
35.
Do one of the following:


36.
Click the checkboxes
to the left of Manageable Level 1 Location Views for which this operator
has management access and control, or
Click the checked boxes
next to the Manageable Level 1 Location Views for which you want to
revoke operator access and control.
Click OK to accept the operator configuration.
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Deleting an IMC operator
To delete an IMC operator:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Operator page is displayed with a list of all operators.
2.
Click the Delete icon
in the Operator list associated with the operator you want to delete.
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the operator.
You cannot delete operators that are currently online nor can you ever delete the administrator account.
Modifying IMC passwords
Individual IMC operators manage their own passwords once the operator account has been established.
To change your password:
1.
Navigate to System→Modify Password:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Modify Password under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Modify Password page appears.
2.
Enter the old password for the account that you are currently logged in as in the Old Password field.
3.
Enter the new password for the account that you are currently logged in as in the New Password field.
4.
Re-enter the new password for the account you are currently logged in as in the Confirm New
Password field.
5.
Click OK.
Managing online IMC operator access
IMC offers you the ability to view which IMC operators are online, to log online operators off and also to
block operator access for specific IP addresses when necessary.
Viewing online operators
To view which operators are currently online:
1.
Navigate to System→Online Operators:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Online Operators under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Online Operators page displays with the list of online operators.
Online operator list
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
Login Name: Contains the IMC user ID or name of the operator.

Session ID: Contains the session ID number for the associated online operator.

Login Time: Contains the date and time stamp for the beginning of the operator’s session.

Login IP: Contains the IP address of the associated operator.
If the Operator list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids appear:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Online Operator list.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Online Operator list.

Click
to page backward in the Online Operator list.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Online Operator list.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can
manage online operators.
Logging off online operators
To log an online operator off:
1.
Navigate to System→Online Operators:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Online Operators under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Online Operators page is displayed with the list of online operators.
2.
Click the checkbox
3.
Click Log Off.
next to the operator’s login name that you want to log off.
Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can log
online operators off. Logging an operator off takes effect immediately.
Blocking online operators
Denying online operator access by blocking IP addresses creates a login control template for the operator
that is blocked. This login control template becomes part of the operator’s permanent configuration and
once blocked, the operator no longer has access to IMC unless the login control template is removed from
the operator account.
To deny current and future operator access to IMC by blocking an IP address or address range for an
operator:
1.
Navigate to System→Online Operators:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Online Operators under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Online Operators page is displayed with the list of online operators.
2.
Click the checkbox
3.
Click Block IP.
next to the operator’s login name that you want to block.
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Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can
block IP addresses.
Removing blocking from an operator account
To remove blocking by IP address:
1.
Navigate to System→Operator:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Operator Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Operator under Operator Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Operator page displays with a list of all operators.
2.
Click the Modify icon
address blocking for.
in the Operator list associated with the operator you want to remove IP
3.
Locate the Login Control List section of the operator configuration.
4.
Locate the login control entry with the starting and ending IP address that you want to unblock.
5.
Click the Delete icon
6.
Click OK to complete the changes to the operator configuration.
next to the login control list entry that you want to delete.
Group Management: managing resources using
groups in IMC
Group Management enables you to more simply and effectively organize and secure access and
management rights over network resources managed by IMC. It also enables you to grant or restrict access
to and management of network resources more easily by assigning operators rights by device, user, or
service groups.
A device can belong to one or more device groups. Note also that more than one operator can manage one
or more groups.
Device groups
Device groups allow you to organize network devices by logical groups that you define. Groups can consist
of devices of the same type, in the same location, or devices to be managed by the same operator or team
within the organization.
Device groups are one of the three features that IMC offers you for granting or restricting access to network
resources managed by IMC. Create custom device groups and then add devices to the groups. Then assign
operators rights to the device groups. This gives operators access and rights to manage only the devices in
the groups to which they have been granted management access.
Viewing device groups
To view the list of all device groups in IMC:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
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c.
Click
Device Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device groups in the Device Group List displayed in the main pane of the System
→Device Group window.
Device group

Group Name: Contains name for this device group. The Group name is an active link that
navigates you to the Device Group Details page. The Device Group Details page contains
information about the selected group including which operators have been granted privileges to
the selected group. It also includes a list of all devices that are part of the selected group.

Description: Contains a description of this device group.

Device List: Contains a link for the list of devices in the selected group.

Modify: Contains a link for modifying the selected device group.

Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the selected group.
If the Device Group List contains enough entries, the following navigational aids appear.
2.

Click
to page forward in the Device Group List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device Group List.

Click
to page backward in the Device Group List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device Group List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
To view all devices in IMC click the
Group List window.
All Devices link located in the far right corner of the Device
To view all devices in IMC that are not in a device group, click the
Ungrouped Devices link.
Viewing the device list
Device lists provide operators with a list of all devices in a device group.
To view the device list for a particular device group:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group→Group Name→Device List:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
2.
Click
Device Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
Click the Device List icon
for the Device Group you want to view devices for.
The page updates to display the Device List for the associated device group.
Device list


Status: Contains the current alarm status of the device.
Device Label: Contains the IMC name for this device. By default, the device name is the sysName
or the configured name on the device.

Device Category: Contains the device category as categorized by IMC.

Device Model: Contains the device model.

IP Address: Contains the IP address of the device.
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If the Device List contains enough entries, the following navigational aids appear.
3.

Click
to page forward in the Device List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device List.

Click
to page backward in the Device List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding a device group
To add a device group:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device groups in the Device Group List displayed in the main pane of the System→
Device Group window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the name for this device group in the Group Name field.
4.
Select an option from the Automatically Add New Devices list.
The options include None, All, and From Network Segment.
If you select None, newly added devices are not automatically added to the device group; if you select
All, newly added devices are automatically added to the device group; if you select From Network
Segment, newly added devices whose IP address fall into the specified address range are
automatically added to the device group.
If you select From Network Segment, go to Step 5; if you select None or All, go to Step 8.
5.
Enter the first IP address of the IP address range in the Start IP field.
6.
Enter the last IP address of the IP address range in the End IP field.
7.
Click Add to add the IP address range to the Network Segment list.
8.
Select an IP address range on the Network Segment list, and click Delete to delete the IP address
range.
9.
Enter a description for this device group in the Description field.
10.
To grant rights to this device group, click the checkbox
Operator list.
11.
Click OK.
next to the operator’s login name in the
Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can
configure a device group.
Modifying a device group
To modify a device group:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
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b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device groups in the Device Group List displayed in the main pane of the System
→Device Group window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
in the Device Group List associated with the device group you want to
The Modify Device Group page appears. You cannot modify the name of a device group once you
create it.
3.
Modify the description for this device group in the Description field.
4.
Do one of the following:


5.
To grant rights to this device group, click the checkbox
Operator list, or
To revoke rights, click the checked box
next to the operator’s login name in the
next to the operator’s name in the Operator list.
Click OK.
Deleting a device group
To delete a device group:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device groups in the Device Group List displayed in the main pane of the System
→Device Group window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
in the Device Group list associated with the device group you want to delete.
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected device group.
Once you have created device groups, the next step is to add devices to them.
Adding devices to a device group
To add devices to a device group:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device groups in the Device Group List displayed in the main pane of the System
→Device Group window.
2.
Click the Device List icon
you want to add devices to.
displayed in the Device List column associated with the device group
The Device List page appears.
3.
Click Add.
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4.
Select the devices you want to add to the device group. You can add devices by using either the View
or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View" (page 85) and "Adding devices by
Advanced query" (page 85).
Removing a device from a device group
To remove devices from a device group:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group.
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device groups in the Device Group List displayed in the main pane of the System
→Device Group window.
2.
Click the Device List
icon for the device group you want to remove devices from.
The Device List page appears.
3.
Click the Remove icon
associated with the device you want to remove from the group.
4.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected device.
Removing multiple devices from a device group
To remove multiple devices from a device group:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Device Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays all device groups in the Device Group List displayed in the main pane of the System
→Device Group window.
The Device Group List appears.
2.
Click the Device List
icon for the device group you want to remove devices from.
The Device List page appears.
3.
Click the checkbox to the left of the device names in the Device List for the devices you want to remove.
4.
Click Remove.
5.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected devices.
Viewing the ungrouped devices list
Devices that have not been added to a group will be displayed in the Ungrouped Devices list. From this list,
operators can add devices to groups, manage or unmanage devices, or delete them from IMC.
To view the ungrouped devices list:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group→Ungrouped Devices:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Device Group under Group Management on the left navigation tree.
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The Device Group List appears. This list displays all device groups.
2.
Click the
Ungrouped Devices link located in the far right corner of the Device Group List.
The Ungrouped Devices List appears. This list displays all devices that have not been added to a
group.
Ungrouped devices list


Status: Contains the current alarm status of the device.
Device Label: Contains the IMC name for this device. By default, the device name is the sysName
or the configured name on the device.

Device Category: Contains the device category as categorized by IMC.

Device Model: Contains the device model.

IP Address: Contains the IP address of the device.
If the ungrouped devices list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids appear.
3.

Click
to page forward in the Ungrouped Devices List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Ungrouped Devices List.

Click
to page backward in the Ungrouped Devices List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Ungrouped Devices List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding devices to groups in ungrouped devices
To add devices to groups the ungrouped devices list:
1.
Navigate to System→Device Group→Ungrouped Devices:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Device Group under Group Management on the left navigation tree.
d. The Device Group List appears.
This list displays all device groups.
2.
Click the
Ungrouped Devices link located in the far right corner of the Device Group List.
The Ungrouped Devices List appears. This list displays all devices that have not been added to a
group.
3.
Click the checkbox
to the left of the devices you want to add to a device group.
The Join Group page is displayed along with all device groups in the Target Device Groups section of
the Join Group page.
4.
Click the checkbox
5.
Click OK.
to the left of the groups you want to add the devices to.
The page updates with the results of the join group task.
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User groups
Network infrastructure users are considered resources on the network in much the same way as devices and
services are. Users require effective management to ensure that they have access to the network infrastructure
resources they need when they need them. Conversely, network administrators need to ensure the integrity
and security of the network infrastructure by ensuring that only valid users have access to network devices
and services.
Users groups within IMC simplify the administrator’s task by allowing the administrator to group users in
ways that meet the administrator’s and the organizations needs.
Administrators can group users by access requirements, by location, by logical organization grouping, or
more. And, administrators can create nested groups with multiple subgroups in much the same way that
directory and file structures are organized. Nested groups automatically inherit the permissions of the parent
group. Note however that a user can belong to one group only.
The best approach for managing user groups in IMC is to plan for and create user groups prior to adding
users to IMC.
Viewing the user group list
To add a user group:
1.
Navigate to System→User Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
User Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays the top-level user groups in the User Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System →User Group window.
User group list

Group Name: Contains the name of the user group.

Description: Contains a description for the associated user group.

User List: Contains an icon for accessing the User List for the associated user group.

Subgroups: Contains an icon for accessing the subgroups under this group.

Modify: Contains a link for modifying the selected user group.

Delete: Contains an icon for deleting the selected user group.
If the user group list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids appear:
2.

Click
to page forward in the User Group List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the User Group List.

Click
to page backward in the User Group List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the User Group List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Adding a user group
To add a user group:
1.
Navigate to System→User Group:
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a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
User Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays the top-level user groups in the User Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System →User Group window.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the name for this user group in the Group Name field.
4.
Enter a description for this user group in the Description field.
5.
Click the checkbox
Operators list.
6.
Click OK.
next to the operators to be granted rights to this user group from the
Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can
add, modify, or delete a user group.
Adding a user subgroup
You can create nested subgroups under groups in much the same way that directory and file structures are
organized. Note however that a user can belong to one group only.
To add a subgroup to a user group:
1.
Navigate to System→User Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
User Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays the top-level user groups in the User Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System→User Group window.
2.
From the User Group List, click the Subgroups icon
associated with the parent user group.
3.
Drill down into the various levels of subgroups until you reach the subgroup that contains the subgroup
you want to add a subgroup to.
4.
Click Add.
5.
Enter the name for this user group in the Group Name field.
6.
Enter a description for this user group in the Description field.
7.
Click the checkbox
Operators list.
next to the operators to be granted rights to this user group from the
You cannot revoke rights for operators that have been granted access to subfolders by rights they have
inherited from the parent folder.
Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can
add, modify, or delete user groups and subgroups.
8.
Click OK.
Modifying a user group
To modify a user group:
1.
Navigate to System→User Group:
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a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
User Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays the top-level user groups in the User Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System→User Group window.
2.
Click the Modify icon
in the User Group List associated with the user group you want to modify.
You cannot modify the name of a user group once the group has been created.
3.
Modify the description for this user group in the Description field as needed.
4.
Click the checkbox
Operators list.
5.
To revoke operator rights, click the checked box
Operators list.
6.
Click OK.
next to the operators to be granted rights to this user group from the
next to the operator’s login name from the
Modifying a user subgroup
To modify a user subgroup:
1.
Navigate to System→User Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
User Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays the top-level user groups in the User Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System→User Group window.
2.
From the User Group List, click the Subgroups icon
associated with the parent user group.
3.
Drill down into the various levels of subgroups until you reach the subgroup that contains the subgroup
you want to modify.
4.
Click the Modify icon
in the User Group List associated with the subgroup you want to modify.
You cannot modify the name of a user group once the group has been created.
5.
Modify the description for this user group in the Description field as needed.
6.
Click the checkbox
Operators list.
7.
To revoke operator rights, click the checked box
list.
8.
Click OK.
next to the operators to be granted rights to this user group from the
next to the operator’s name from the Operators
Deleting a user group
To delete a user group:
1.
Navigate to System→User Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
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c.
Click
User Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays the top-level user groups in the User Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System→User Group window.
2.
Click the Delete icon
in the User Group List associated with the user group you want to delete.
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the user group.
Deleting a user subgroup
To delete a user subgroup:
1.
Navigate to System→User Group:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Group Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
User Group under Group Management from the navigation system on the left.
IMC displays the top-level user groups in the User Group List displayed in the main pane of the
System →User Group window.
2.
From the User Group List, click the Subgroups icon
associated with the parent user group.
3.
Drill down into the various levels of subgroups until you reach the subgroup that contains the subgroup
you want to delete.
4.
Click the Delete icon
5.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the user subgroup.
in the User Group List associated with the user subgroup you want to delete.
Configuring IMC for alarm notifications
One of IMC’s powerful features is real time alarm or event management and notification. In this section, we
will cover the system settings that require review or configuration in order to meet your alarm notification and
management needs.
Mail server settings
IMC can send email notifications when problems arise in the network infrastructure, including when
problems arise in IMC. Before support teams can receive email notifications of such events from IMC, you
must first to configure the mail server settings.
Configuring IMC for email notification
You must configure the SMTP mail server settings for mail sent by IMC to be forwarded.
To configure SMTP mail server settings:
1.
Navigate to System→Mail Server Settings:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click
Mail Server Settings located in the lower right corner of the System Configuration
section of the System page.
The page updates to display the Mail Server Settings page.
2.
Enter the IP address or hostname of the SMTP server to which IMC mail will be forwarded in the Server
Address field.
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3.
Click the checkbox
SSL authentication.
to the left of Requires Security Connection (SSL) if the SMTP server requires
4.
Click the checkbox
authentication.
to the left of Requires Authentication if the SMTP server requires
5.
If you have selected requires authentication, then enter the information for username and password. If
you have not selected requires authentication, then skip these fields.
a. Enter the username of the sender’s mailbox in the Username field.
b. Enter the sender’s password in the Password field.
c.
Enter the email address of the sender in the Sender’s Mail Address field.
d. Click Test Mailbox to confirm that the configuration you have entered works properly.
6.
Click OK.
The authentication selection you make in IMC for SMTP mail server settings must match the
configuration of the receiving SMTP server.
Once you have configured the SMTP parameters, you are ready to begin configuring Mail Notification rules
by using the Alarm Notification feature that can be found on the left navigation tree under Alarm Settings,
which can be found under the Alarm tab. For more information on configuring alarm message notifications
via email, see "Managing email alarm notifications" (page 587).
SMSC settings
IMC also supports SMSC (Short Message Service Center) messaging for proactively alerting network
administrators and support teams when problems in the network infrastructure arise.
Configuring IMC for SMSC messaging
To configure SMSC settings:
1.
Navigate to System→SMSC Settings:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click
SMSC Settings located in the System Configuration section of the System page.
The page is updated to display the SMSC Settings page.
2.
Select the COM port from the list that will be used to send SMS messages from the Connect Using list.
3.
Select the baud rate from the Baudrate (bps) list to match the modem configuration that will be used for
SMS messaging.
4.
Enter the country code in the Country Code field.
5.
Enter the SMS phone number in the SMSC Number field. The contents of this field must be all digits.
6.
Click OK.
Once you have configured the SMSC parameters, you are ready to begin configuring SMS Notification rules
by using the Alarm Notification feature found on the left navigation tree under Alarm Settings, under the
Alarm tab. For more information on configuring alarm message notifications via SMS, see "Managing SMS
alarm notifications" (page 594).
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Integrating IMC alarms into other management systems
IMC offers the ability to integrate alarms generated by IMC into other management systems. This is done by
creating alarm rules for the events or conditions that you would like to forward to other management systems.
It is better to create alarm forwarding rules should be done after IMC has been configured with views, groups,
and after devices have been added to IMC.
For more information on creating rules for forwarding alarms from IMC to other management systems, see
"Managing alarm forwarding: Integrating with other management systems" (page 599).
IMC hierarchical alarm configuration
One architecture option that IMC offers is a hierarchical configuration where IMC servers are configured in
parent/child relationships. Part of this configuration includes configuring child IMC instances to forward
alarms of importance to parent IMC instances.
Configuring IMC for hierarchical alarm configuration
To configure IMC hierarchical alarm settings:
1.
Navigate to Alarm→Hierarchical IMC Alarm Settings:
a. Click the Alarm tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Alarm Settings from the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Hierarchical IMC Alarm Settings under Alarm Settings from the navigation tree on the left.
2.
Click the checkbox
to the right of Enable Alarming field to enable alarming.
3.
Enter the IP address of the IMC instance to which alarms will be forwarded in the Upper-Level IP field.
It is better to add a lower-level IMC to an upper-level IMC configuration than to add an upper-level
IMC to a lower-level IMC.
WARNING:
The Upper-Level IP address cannot be the IP address of the current IMC or any of its lower-level IMCs.
4.
Enter the TCP port number for the IMC service running on the IMC instance to which alarms will be
forwarded in the Upper-Level RxPort field.
5.
Enter the IP address of the IMC instance forwarding alarms in the Lower-Level IP field.
6.
Select All Devices or Selected Devices from the Interested Devices list.


All Devices: With this option, alarms for all devices are forwarded to the Upper Level IMC instance,
or
Selected Devices: With this option, alarms for only the selected devices are forwarded to the
upper-level IMC instance.
−

If you choose Selected Devices, you can select devices to forward alarms for. You can specify
which devices by specific device IP address, or devices grouped by views.
Device IP: Enter the IP address for the device you want to forward alarms for.
−
You can add multiple devices by clicking Add after entering the IP address in the Device IP field
for every device you want to add.
−
You can also add devices by using views or IMC’s Advanced query option. To do so, click
Select.
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The Select Devices dialog box appears.
7.
Add devices by using either the View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
8.
Select the configuration setting for this rule from the Interested Alarms list to select all conditions that
trigger alarms or only a specified subset of conditions that trigger alarms.


All Alarms: With this option, all alarms configured in IMC triggers an email notification to be sent
if the alarm condition is triggered, or
Selected Alarms: With this option, only the alarms you select in alarm notification triggers an email
notification if the alarm condition is triggered.
−
If you choose Selected Alarms, you can select which alarms generate email alarm notifications.
You can specify which conditions triggers email alarm notifications.
a. Click Select to configure which conditions to alarm on.
b. In the Select Alarm dialog box, locate the MIB that contains an object or condition that you want
to alarm on.
c.
To expand your view of the MIB, click the arrow key
condition that you want to alarm on.
d. Click the checkbox
e. Click the checked box
f.

next to the MIB that contains an object or
to select a MIB object that you want to add to this alarm rule.
to remove a MIB object from the alarm rule.
Scroll down to the bottom of the MIB list and click OK.
It may take a while for the Select Alarm dialog box to close. When it does, it updates the
Concerned Alarms field with the configured object or alarm condition.
−
You can click multiple checkboxes to select multiple objects or conditions forward alarms for.
Each alarm condition is listed in the Interested Alarms field below the list.
WARNING:
When you select multiple MIB objects or alarm conditions, the alarm conditions are evaluated and
performed as an AND operation. In other words, all of the conditions that you selected must be true for the
alarm notification rule to generate an email notification.
−
9.
Confirm that the MIB objects or conditions you have either added or removed have populated
the Interested Alarms field in the Hierarchical IMC Alarm Settings page.
Click OK.
Only administrators or operators who are members of a group with the ADMIN privilege level can
configure hierarchical alarm settings.
MIB management
Adding MIBs to IMC supports custom alarming and performance monitoring. To support this and other
SNMP administrative tasks, IMC includes an integrated SNMP MIB browser.
Adding a compiled MIB to IMC
For MIBs to be usable by IMC, they must first be compiled. IMC provides hundreds of standard and custom
or enterprise MIBS pre-compiled and pre-loaded into IMC.
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To add a compiled MIB to IMC:
1.
Navigate to System:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click the
MIB Management icon located under the Resource Management section of the
System page.
The dialog box for the SNMP MIB browser appears.
2.
Click the Load MIB Files icon
window.
located in the navigation bar at the top of the MIB browser
This displays the Load MIB Files dialog box.
3.
From the Compiled MIB File List, click the arrow
to expand the list of MIBs that are compiled but not
currently loaded into IMC from the Unloaded MIB Group navigation tree located in the bottom half of
the Load MIB Files dialog box.
This displays the compiled unloaded MIB groups.
4.
Click the arrow
of the Unloaded MIB Group that contains the compiled MIB you want to add.
5.
Highlight the MIBs from the Unloaded MIB Group in the Compiled MIB file list that you want to load.
6.
Do one of the following:

Click the
button to load them, or

Click the
button to load all of the displayed MIBs.
The total number of files in the MIB tree cannot exceed 40.
7.
Click Close.
Compiling a MIB in IMC
To compile a MIB in IMC:
1.
Navigate to System:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click the
MIB Management icon located under the Resource Management section of the
System page.
The dialog box for the SNMP MIB browser appears.
2.
Click the Load MIB Files icon
window.
located in the navigation bar at the top of the MIB browser
This displays the Load MIB Files dialog box.
3.
Click the Compile MIB Files icon
.
4.
Click Browser to select the MIB you want to compile.
5.
Locate the MIB file or the compressed MIB file you want to compile and click Open from the File Upload
dialog box.
IMC can automatically compile all MIB files from the compressed file.
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6.
Select the directory you want to store the compiled MIB in from the list of directories displayed in the
Compile MIB Files dialog box.
7.
Click Compile.
8.
Review the results of the compiling process in the Compile Results dialog box.
9.
Specifically, check the Total # of MIB files compiled and the In all # compilations succeeded entries.
If the compilation was not successful, fix the problems in the MIB file indicated by the Compile Results output
and repeat the steps listed above until the MIB compiles successfully.
Once you have successfully compiled the MIB you can load it into IMC following the steps provided in the
previous section, "Adding a compiled MIB to IMC. If the MIB does not compile, please contact the MIB
vendor for technical support. To expedite the issue, document the error message returned by the compile
process.
Removing a compiled MIB from IMC
To remove a compiled MIB from IMC:
1.
Navigate to System:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click the
MIB Management icon located under the Resource Management section of the
System page
The web interface for the SNMP MIB browser appears.
2.
Click the Load MIB Files icon
window.
located in the navigation bar at the top of the MIB browser
This displays the Load MIB Files dialog box.
3.
From the Compiled MIB file list, click the arrow
to expand the list of MIBs that are currently loaded
into IMC from the Loaded MIB Group navigation tree.
This displays the compiled loaded MIB groups.
4.
Click the arrow
5.
Highlight the MIBs from the Loaded MIB Group in the Loaded MIB file list that you want to unload.
6.
of the Loaded MIB Group that contains the compiled MIB you want to unload.

Click the
button to load the file you have highlighted, or

Click the
button to unload all of the displayed MIBs.
Click Close.
WARNING:
If you unload all MIBs, you need to manually reload them. The MIBs loaded by default at installation are
located in the Default folder of the Compile MIB Files dialog box.
140
Configuration center options
File transfer mode options
Operators can configure the default transfer mode used in IMC’s configuration and change management
tasks. Operators can choose FTP, TFTP, or SFTP as the default transfer method for all devices managed by
IMC.
Operators can also configure individual devices for a specific transfer mode using the Options features in the
Configuration Center.
To access and configure the transfer mode options for configuration and change management features in
IMC:
1.
Navigate to Service→Options:
a. Click the
Configuration Center icon located under the Resource and Configuration
Management section of the Service page.
b. Click
c.
2.
Options under Configuration Center on the left navigation tree.
On the Options page that appears, click the File Transfer Mode tab.
Click the radio button
to the left of the transfer mode you want to configure as the default in the
Default Transfer Mode section of the File Transfer Mode tab.
Options include:

TFTP: This option can be used for devices whose maximum file size limit is no more than 32 MB.

FTP: This option does not limit the maximum file size limit.
To use FTP, you must enable the FTP service on the managed device and configure the user name and
password for logging in to the FTP server.
The user name and password configured in IMC must match what is configured on the FTP server for the
managed device.
In addition, you must also set server\tmp under the IMC installation directory as the root directory of the
FTP service.
Set the FTP server to be accessed with its IP address and the loopback address 127.0.0.1.

SFTP: This option can be used for operators who prefer to use a secure transmission method. To
transfer files using SFTP, you must enable the SFTP server on the managed device and configure the
SSH parameters for the device in IMC.
To enable FTP transfer mode:
1.
Click the checkbox
to the left of Enable FTP Transfer Mode.
2.
In the FTP User Name field, enter the user name for the FTP account configured on the managed
devices that uses the Default Transfer Mode setting.
3.
In the FTP Password field, enter the password for the FTP account configured on the managed devices
that uses the Default Transfer Mode setting.
All devices that use the default transfer mode settings must have the same user name and passwords
as configured in Step 2 and Step 3.
141
IMC provides you with the ability to configure exceptions to the Default Transfer Mode configuration.
Using the Single Device Transfer Mode option, you can configure one or more devices to use a
different transfer mode configuration than the default. To use this feature, follow the steps below.
4.
Otherwise, click OK to complete your configuration of the Default Transfer Mode option for all devices
in IMC.
5.
Click Select Device to configure the selected devices with specific transfer mode configurations.
6.
You can add devices by using either the View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by
View" (page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
To set or cancel the transfer mode option for one or more devices:
1.
Click the checkbox
2.
Click Set Mode.
to the left of each device.
The Select Transfer Mode dialog box appears.
3.
Select the transfer mode you want to use for each of the selected devices from the Transfer Mode list.
4.
Click OK.
All devices that are not configured using the single device transfer mode adopt the default transfer
mode.
To remove the single device transfer mode option from one or more devices:
1.
Click the checkbox
to the left of the device in the device list, and then click Cancel Mode.
2.
Click OK to accept your default and device specific transfer mode options.
Backup policy options
Operators can configure the backup policy options for individual devices managed by IMC. Options include
Alarm Generation Mode and Max. Backup Configuration Files.
Setting the alarm generation mode
This option enables IMC to generate alarms or disables IMC from generating any alarm for individual
devices when their configurations to be backed up are different from the baseline configurations or last
configuration backups. To access and configure the Alarm Generation Mode option for individual devices in
IMC:
1.
Navigate to Service→Options:
a. Click the
Configuration Center icon located under the Resource and Configuration
Management section of the Service page.
b. Click
Options under Configuration Center on the left navigation tree.
The Options page appears.
2.
Click the Backup Policy tab.
3.
Click the radio button
4.
Do one of the following:


to the left of Alarm Generation Mode in the Set Type section.
If you do not want to configure one or more devices, skip to Step 6, or
If you want to configure one or more devices to use the Generate alarms if the configuration to be
backed up is different from the baseline backup policy, follow the steps below.
142
a. If you click the radio button
to the left of All devices except the selected ones will generate
alarms in the Generate alarms if the configuration to be backed up is different from the baseline
section, IMC generates alarms for all devices that are not listed when their configurations to be
backed up are different from the baseline configurations.
b. If you click the radio button
to the left of Only the selected devices will generate alarms in the
Generate alarms if the configuration to be backed up is different from the baseline section, IMC
generates alarms for all listed devices when their configurations to be backed up are different from
the baseline configurations.
c.
5.
Click Select Device to select devices for the backup policy.
Add devices by using either the View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
To cancel the backup policy option for one or more devices:
6.
Click the Delete icon
to the right of each device.
All the devices that are not configured separately with the special setting adopt the global backup
policy.
7.
Do one of the following:


If you do not want to configure one or more devices, skip to Step 9, or
If you want to configure one or more devices to use the Generate alarms if the configuration to be
backed up is different from the last backup policy, follow the steps below.
a. If you click the radio button
to the left of All devices except the selected ones will generate
alarms in the Generate alarms if the configuration to be backed up is different from the last
backup section, IMC generates alarms for all devices that are not listed when their configurations
to be backed up are different from the last configuration backups.
b. If you click the radio button
to the left of Only the selected devices will generate alarms in the
Generate alarms if the configuration to be backed up is different from the last backup section, IMC
generates alarms for all listed devices when their configurations to be backed up are different from
the last configuration backups.
c.
8.
Click Select Device to select devices for the backup policy.
Add devices by using either the View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
To cancel the backup policy option for one or more devices:
9.
Click the Delete icon
to the right of each device.
10.
Click OK to accept your default and device specific backup policy options.
Setting the max backup configuration files
This option specifies the maximum number of backed up configuration files that IMC retains. For example, if
you specify 5, IMC retains five running configuration files and five startup configuration files. The settings
take effect at the next backup of the device.
To access and configure the Max Backup Configuration Files option in IMC:
1.
Navigate to Service→Options:
a. Click the
Configuration Center icon located under the Resource and Configuration
Management section of the Service page.
b. Click
Options under Configuration Center on the left navigation tree.
143
The Options page is displayed, click the Backup Policy tab.
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of Max. Backup Configuration Files in the Set Type section.
3.
Enter a value in the field to the right of Max. Backup Configuration Files.
The value can be 0, or an integer ranging from 5 to 100. The value 0 indicates that the number of
backed up configuration files is not limited.
4.
Click OK.
IMC system settings and maintenance functions
To maintain the health and functioning of IMC, you may consider tasks that include configuring system
settings, exporting data to maintain the health and performance of IMC, understanding how operation log
files work, and customizing the IMC interface to meet your needs.
System settings
You can configure basic system settings to adjust basic IMC functioning and security.
Modifying system settings
To modify system settings:
1.
Navigate to System→System Settings:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click
System Settings located in the System Configuration section of the System page.
The page is updated to display the SMSC Settings page.
2.
Modify the configuration information displayed on the System Settings page.
Basic system settings
•
•
•
Operator Idle Timeout: This parameter allows the administrator to configure the default system-wide
setting for how long IMC waits before logging out an operator account that is no longer active. The
range is 1–9999999 minutes. The default setting is 30 minutes.

Enter the value in minutes for operator idle timeout.

Click OK.
Concurrent Logins with Same Operator Account: This parameter allows the administrator to configure
globally whether or not operators are allowed to have multiple, concurrent active sessions. The options
are Allow and Prohibit. The default is Allow.

Select Allow to permit multiple concurrent active sessions from the list.

Select Prohibit to deny multiple, concurrent active sessions.

Click OK.
Device Info Display: This parameter allows you to configure how device information is displayed: by IP
address, by Device Label or both.

Select Device Label (IP) if you want IMC to display both device label and IP address from the list.

Select Device Label Only if you want IMC to display only the device label.

Select IP Only if you want IMC to display the IP address only.

Click OK.
144
•
Interface Info Display: This parameter allows you to configure how interface information is displayed:
by Interface Description, by Interface Alias.

Select Interface Description if you want IMC to display interface description.

Select Interface Alias if you want IMC to display the interface alias.
•
Lifetime of Deleted Users: This parameter allows you to configure how long deleted users are retained
before they are permanently removed from the system. The range is 1–360 days. The default setting is
60 days.
1.
Enter the value in days to retain deleted users before permanently removing them from IMC.

Display Access Passwords: This parameter allows you to display or hide passwords (for example,
Telnet/SSH password), SNMP community strings, or SOAP parameters.
2.
Select Plain Text if you want the passwords to be displayed in clear or plain text.
3.
Select Ciphertext if you want the passwords to be hidden from view.
4.
Click OK.
Web manager configuration
•
Protocol: This parameter allows you to configure which communication protocol IMC uses for Web
access: HTTP or HTTPS. Changes to Web Manager configurations apply to devices added to IMC after
these configuration changes have been made. In addition, any Web Manager settings configured on
the device itself override this setting.
1.
Select HTTP or HTTPS from the Protocol list.

Port: This parameter allows you to configure which port IMC uses for HTTPs communications. The
default port for HTTP is 80.
2.
Enter the port number in the Port field.
3.
Click OK.
Ping Configuration
•
Retry (1–20): This parameter allows you to configure how many times, IMC sends a ping packet to the
managed device after issuing a timeout. The default value is 3.
•
Timeout (1–60 seconds): This parameter allows you to configure how long, in seconds, IMC waits to
receive a ping response from the ping request from the managed device before issuing a timeout. After
the final failed ping request, IMC sets the device in an alarm state. The default value is 2.
1.
Click OK.
NNMi Configuration
•
Server IP Address: This parameter allows you to configure the server IP address of NNMi for
communications with IMC.
•
Server Port: This parameter allows you to configure which port NNMi uses for communications with
IMC.
•
User Name: This parameter allows you to configure the username of NNMi for communications with
IMC.
•
Password: This parameter allows you to configure the password of NNMi for communications with
IMC.
•
Start a scheduled task to import devices from NNMi: This parameter allows you to select whether to
start a scheduled task to import devices from NNMi.
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If a task is scheduled to import devices from NNMi, IMC obtains and imports device information from the
NNMi server at the specified time.
1.
To schedule the task, open file client\conf\platAppContext.xml in the installation path, search the
platNNMiDeviceImportTrigger field, change the cronExpression attribute of the field, and restart IMC.
The attribute supports the following parameters: second, minute, hour, date of a month, month of a
year, and day of a week. An asterisk (*) means "all." A question mark (?) means "not set." By default,
the task is executed at 01:10 every day, which corresponds to the cronExpression value 0 10 1 * *
?.
2.
Click OK.
Device registration configuration
•
Email—Enters the Email address of the HP my.procurve.com website, so that you can register the device
with HP by Email and get technical support from HP.
•
Password—Enters login password of the Email box.
1.
Click OK.
Internet connection configuration
•
Connection Type: This parameter allows you to configure how IMC connects to the Internet.
1.
Select Direct Connect, HTTP Proxy, or SOCKS Proxy from the list.
2.
Select Direct Connect if IMC’s connection to the Internet is direct rather than through an Internet proxy
server.
If you are using a proxy server, whether it is an HTTP or SOCKS proxy, to provide access to the Internet, you
must enter the proxy server IP address and port number. If the proxy server requires authentication, you must
input the user name and password. The default is Direct Connect.
3.
Click OK.
Interface Up/Down alarm
•
Alarms for PC-connect links: This parameter allows you to select whether to filter interface UP/Down
alarms for the interfaces that connect to PCs.
•
Alarms for server-connected links: This parameter allows you to select whether to filter interface
UP/Down alarms for the interfaces that connect to servers or are located on servers.
•
Alarms for disconnected links: This parameter allows you to select whether to filter interface UP/Down
alarms for the interfaces that have no physical connections.
1.
Click OK.
Device label configuration
•
Device Label Type: This parameter allows you to select DNS Name or Sysname as the default label for
the device.
•
Update Existing Device Labels: This parameter allows you to select whether to update all device labels
by using the setting in the "Internet connection configuration" section.
•
Update Device Label When Sysname Changes: This parameter allows you to select whether to update
device labels when the devices' sysNames change. This parameter is available when you select
Sysname for the device label use in the "Internet connection configuration" section.
1.
Click OK.
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DNS server setting
•
DNS Server List: This parameter allows you to configure the DNS address. When inputting multiple
DNS addresses, separate them with semicolons (;).
1.
Click OK.
DismanPing configuration
•
Enable DismanPing: This parameter allows you to enable or disable the DismanPing feature in IMC’s
Network Topology. Enabling DismanPing can improve topology correctness. Not all devices support
the DismanPing feature. For more information about DismanPing feature, see the device configuration
manual.
External tool settings
•
SFTP Client: This parameter provides the complete directory of the executable SFTP client program on
the IMC server. It identifies the location of the SFTP client program. IMC uses the SFTP client program
to log in to the device and get or put files to the device. If this parameter is null, the default client
program ({IMC installation directory}/server/bin/psftp.exe for Windows and {IMC installation
directory}\server\bin\psftp for Linux) is used.
•
SSH Client: This parameter provides the complete directory of the executable SSH client program on the
IMC server. It identifies the location of the SSH client program. IMC uses the SSH client program to log
in to the device. If this parameter is null, the default client program ({IMC installation
directory}/server/bin/plink.exe for Windows and {IMC installation directory}\server\bin\plink for
Linux) is used.
1.
Click OK.
Data export
IMC stores event information in log files. Events turn to alarms, when there is a match in the content of a log
to a system or user defined alarm rule. IMC enables you to manage the size of its database by writing alarms
in the database to export logs and then storing exported data for a specified period of time.
Once events are exported, they are removed from the event logs and from IMC processing. This feature
enables you to manage the size and the performance of IMC’s database while also storing valuable data for
post-export analysis, if needed.
In addition to using Data Export to manage the size and performance of the IMC database, data from the
Data Export process can be used as an input to other non-IMC data analysis processes. For example, you
can import data exported by the Data Export process into a spreadsheet.
The base platform of IMC offers you the ability to export data from the following IMC services or log files:
•
SCC – Attack Alarm
•
Operation LogAlarm Export
•
Trap Export
•
Guest Access Log
Syslog, in addition, data can be exported either to HTML or CSV formats.
To export IMC event logs:
1.
Navigate to System→Data Export Settings:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
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b. Click
Data Export located in the System Configuration section of the System page.
The page is updated to display the Data Export Settings page.
2.
To select the IMC log file source, click the appropriate tab located at the top of the Data Export Settings
window.
3.
Configure the following Data Export parameters as needed.
Export triggers
To limit the export of the selected log file to a specific number of entries:
1.
Click the checkbox
to the left of By Quantity.
2.
Enter the number of entries you want to export in the Threshold field.
3.
To export all events with the exception of the last x number of entries, enter the number of entries you
want to exclude from export in the Export but the last field.
4.
Click the checkbox
to the left of By Time if you want to limit the export of the selected log file to a
specific number of days.
5.
Enter the number of days you want to export in the Threshold field.
6.
To export all events with the exception of the last x number of days, enter the number of days you want
to exclude from export in the Export but those in last field.
If you select the By Quantity and By Time check boxes (which is the default configuration), IMC
automatically uses the export criteria that contain more entries to export the data.
WARNING:
Modify the system time with caution. Modifying IMC’s system time may trigger a data export that removes
events from IMC and therefore may impair normal alarming of events.
Export settings
1.
Select the export file format you want to export from the Target File Type list.
2.
Enter the length of time you would like to save this file for in the Save File for field.
3.
If you want IMC to execute a command upon successful completion of the export, enter the command
in the Execute Command After Export field.
The command to be executed must be a batch file that does not invoke any GUI commands.
The path and file name for the exported file can be found in the Target File Path field.
4.
Click the Change Export Directory link on the upper right corner.
A popup dialog box appears.
5.
Enter the new file path in the Export Data to Field.
Make sure that the new file path already exists on the IMC master server.
6.
Click OK.
The new file path appears in the Target File Path field.
7.
To view information on the last successful export, refer to the Last Export field.
8.
To execute a data export immediately, click the Export Immediately link located to the far right of the
Data Export Settings window.
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Data export considerations
Data exports take effect only after the support IMC components have been installed and deployed. For
example, the alarm export function takes effect only after the basic network management components are
installed and deployed.
Alarm exporting removes the recovered and acknowledged alarms from IMC. It does not remove
unacknowledged or unrecovered alarms.
Events can be exported only when its corresponding alarms have been exported.
An example of the process for exporting By Quantity:
•
When the Threshold parameter is configured for 8000 entries and the Export but the last is configured
for 500 entries, when the number of entries reaches 8000, all but the most current 500 entries events
are exported.
An example of the process for exporting By Time:
•
When the Threshold parameter is configured for 60 days and the Export but those in last is configured
for 30, when the number of days reaches 60 days, events for all but the last 30 days are exported.
Data exports by default occur at 02:00:00 every morning. Make sure that the system server has adequate
resources at 02:00:00 to process exports. To modify the export time, contact HP Technical Support.
•
To begin data exporting immediately, click the Export Immediately link.
A command executed after the data export runs in the background service mode. Thus, you cannot open any
window with this command, which automatically exits once it has finished.
Log files
IMC writes valuable system level and operator level information to log files. One such file is the operation log,
which contains information about IMC operator activity.
Viewing the operation logs
To view operation logs:
1.
Navigate to System→Operation Log:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click
Operation Log located in the System Configuration section of the System page.
The Operation Log list is displayed in the main pane.


2.
Operator: Contains the name of the operator executing the operation documented in the log entry.
IP Address: Contains the IP address of the operator executing the operation documented in the log
entry.

Module Name: Contains the name of the IMC module that generated the log entry.

Operation Time: Contains the date and time stamp for the log entry.

Operation: Contains a description of the operation, action, results, or text for the log entry.

Result: Contains the result of the operation documented in the log entry.

Details: Contains a hyperlink to more details regarding he specific log entry.
Click the Details icon
to view details for a single operation log entry.
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If the operation log list contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
3.

Click
to page forward in the Operation Log.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Operation Log.

Click
to page backward in the Operation Log.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Operation Log.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items per
page you want to view.
Querying operation logs
To filter the operation log list:
1.
Navigate to System→Operation Log:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click
Operation Log located in the System Configuration section of the System page.
The Operation Log list is displayed in the main pane.
2.
Move the pointer over Query at the upper right corner of Operation Log list, and a search criteria
dialog box appears.
3.
Enter the following parameters in the dialog box:

Operator: The name of the operator executing the operation documented in the log entry.

IP Address: The IP address of the operator executing the operation documented in the log entry.

Module Name: The name of the IMC module that generated the log entry.

Result: The result of the operation documented in the log entry.



4.
Started at: A start date and time by which you want to filter the operation log list in the text box.
You can enter the date and time manually or you can enter it by clicking the calendar
icon
located to the right of the field. A popup calendar appears. Select the start date from the calendar.
Adjust the hour value as needed in the Started at field.
Ended at: An end date and time by which you want to filter the operation log list in the text box. You
can enter the date and time manually or you can enter it by clicking the calendar
icon located
to the right of the field. A popup calendar appears. Select the end date from the calendar. Adjust
the hour value as needed in the Ended at field.
Operation: Enter the description of the operation, action, results, or text for the log entry.
Click Query to submit your filter criteria.
The results are displayed in the main pane.
Data analysis management
Projects are the IMC processes that analyze and process data gathered by IMC. Using the Data Analysis
Management feature, you can view the projects or processes that are queued for processing. You can also
monitor and manage the status of all the projects that are active as well as any tasks running underneath
them. IMC lists data analysis projects by their project ID.
Managing the data analysis project list
To manage the data analysis project list:
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1.
Navigate to System→Data Analysis:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click
Data Analysis Project located in the Data Analysis section of the System page.
The page is updated to display the Data Analysis page. IMC lists all current processes or projects,
their project ID, the IP address of the server and the project status in the Project List.
The project status viewed may contain the following status values:

Waiting: The project is idle and the execution time has not been reached.

Executing: The project is in the process of executing.

Pausing: The project is in the process of pausing.

Paused: The project has been paused.

2.
Exception: An unrecoverable error occurred while the project was running. The project needs to be
re-initiated manually.
To pause, click the checked box
The checked box
next to the project ID you want to pause.
moves to the resume column until the project has been resumed.
You can also view individual tasks under projects by clicking on the Project ID. This displays the Task
List.
The Task List displays the task type, last execution time, last execution results and next execution time.
3.
Click Back to return to the Project List.
Deleting a project cannot be undone. However, deleted project can be added manually.
My Favorites
IMC offers you the ability to customize IMC by storing frequently used IMC pages as favorites. For more
information on this feature, see "Personalizing the IMC web interface" (page 66).
Configuring default monitor indices
IMC is configured to automatically poll all managed devices for specific system and performance metrics.
You can customize this list of metrics or indices by adding or removing indices from the list.
To configure the default monitor indices:
1.
Navigate to System→Default Monitoring Indices:
a. Click the System tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click
Default Monitor Indices located in the System Configuration section of the System page.
The page is updated to display the Default Monitoring Indices page.
2.
Click the checkbox
next to the monitor index you want to add to the Default Monitor Indices list in
the Select Index page.
3.
Click the checked box
next to the monitor index you want to remove from the Default Monitor
Indices list in the Select Index page.
4.
Click OK.
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Configuring network asset audit options
IMC enables you to add devices to network asset management when devices are added to IMC. In addition,
IMC enables you to configure how frequently automatic asset audit synchronization occurs.
To configure the network asset audit settings:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Network Assets:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Network Assets section of the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Options under Network Assets from the navigation system on the left.
The Options page appears.
2.
If you want to add all devices to the Network Asset Manager for asset auditing when you add devices
to IMC, click the radio button
to the left of Yes in the Add devices to network asset when adding it
to IMC platform.
3.
Click OK to accept the configuration change.
4.
To configure number of days between the automatic synchronization or polling for audit details:
5.
Enter the number in days in the Auto Synchronization Interval field. The default is 1.
6.
Click OK to accept the configuration change.
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5 Resource management
The Resource tab provides you with a portal for the device monitoring and management features of
IMC. From this portal, you can view and manage network resources including devices and IP
addresses.
IMC offers you a variety of options for viewing and managing devices through views that organize by
device type (Device View), IP address (IP View), topology (Network Topology) or the operator’s own
organization of devices using Custom Views. Each of these views offers the ability to manage multiple
devices from the device lists on these pages. In addition, each view offers drill down capabilities to
the Device Details page, which includes a multitude of monitoring and management features for the
selected device.
From the Device Details page, you can synchronize, refresh, manage or unmanage, or delete a
device. From this view, devices can be accessed remotely via Telnet, SSH, the Device Panel, or Web
Manager. You can also ping or traceroute to a device from the Device Details page that is accessed
from all views.
In addition, you can configure devices. Configuration options include modifying a device label,
system group attributes, SSH and Telnet settings, polling intervals, ping and Web Manager
parameters. You can add or cancel performance monitoring for a selected device.
From IMC, you can also manage devices including resetting or rebooting a device remotely, saving
device configuration, or system information. You can configure address binding, view hardware,
OSPF, and IPv6 information and view and configure Power over Ethernet configuration on switches.
In addition, you can view protocol information for routers and switches, view and modify VLAN,
RMON, and Spanning tree information on switches and IGMP Snooping configuration on wireless
devices.
You can also view and manage interfaces on devices from IMC. Interface management options
include managing and unmanaging interfaces, synchronizing, configuring management status and
speed, loopback testing and adding ports to and removing ports from VLANs.
IMC also offers you the ability to manage multiple devices from views and in batch mode. From views,
you can add, remove, delete, manage, unmanage, synchronize, and refresh devices. You can
configure SNMP, SSH, and Telnet settings as well as check these settings on multiple devices. You can
also configure polling intervals, save configurations, reboot devices, backup configurations, and
deploy software for multiple devices.
Using batch mode, you can configure SNMP, Telnet, and SSH settings, polling intervals and modify
login types. You can also check settings in batch mode for SNMP, Telnet, and SSH. You can save
device configurations, reboot devices, check and configure management status on interfaces,
implement PoE, configure trap destinations, Spanning Tree on switches and interfaces and configure
LACP on switches.
You can also track the usage of and allocate IP addresses in IMC, bind IP addresses to MAC address,
and bind MAC addresses to interfaces. You can search IMC in real time and historically for locations
of IP addresses to pinpoint the location of a user/device. You can track network assets, and perform
and configure asset auditing.
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Adding devices in IMC
The most basic network resource management task is to add a device. IMC offers you several
methods for adding devices in IMC. You can add devices manually. One or more devices can be
added through auto discovery. Finally, devices can be added by importing the device data directly
into IMC.
When you add a device, either manually, by import, or through auto discovery, IMC by default sets
their status as managed. Managed devices consume node licenses in IMC and a warning dialog box
appears. For a current license count, click the
About link in the upper right corner of IMC.
Adding devices manually to IMC
You can add devices manually, one at a time. IMC automatically manages a device once a device
has been added to IMC, whether it has been manually or automatically added.
Adding a device manually
To add a device manually:
1.
Navigate to Resources→Add Device:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Add Device under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
2.
Enter the node name or IP address of the network device you want to add in the Host Name/IP
address field. This field is required.
3.
Enter the name that is displayed on the IMC platform in the Device Label field.
4.
Enter a valid IP subnet mask for the device to be added in the Mask field.
5.
Select the device group to which you want to add this device from the Device Group list.
If you do not want to add the device to a device group, leave this option blank.
All devices that have not been added to a device group are displayed in the Ungrouped
Devices List. You can add devices to groups from the Ungrouped Devices List after they have
been added to IMC.
You must create device groups before you can add devices to them. Once you have created the
device groups, they appear in the Device Group list.
6.
Select the access method for this device from the Login Type list.
Options include Telnet, SSH, and None. The device to be added must be configured to support
the access or login type selected here.
7.
If you want IMC to process traps sent by this device for alarming and notification purposes,
verify that the checkbox to the left of Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from
supported devices is checked
.
154
WARNING:
If the Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices checkbox is not checked,
IMC does not process, display, or alarm on traps sent by this device.
8.
Do one of the following:

If the device to be added responds to ping requests for monitoring reachability, verify that
the checkbox

to the left of Support Ping Operation is checked, or
If the device does not respond to ping requests, verify that the checkbox is unchecked
.
9.
If you want to add the device even if it does not respond to ping requests, click the checkbox
to the left of Add the device regardless of the ping result.
10.
If you want IMC to use the Loopback address for the management of the discovered device,
check the box to the left of Use the loopback address as the management IP.
11.
To view and configure SNMP settings for this device, click the
12.
To configure the SNMP settings for this device, click the
Settings section.
SNMP Settings link.
Configure link located at the SNMP
The SNMP Parameters dialog box appears.
You can either enter the SNMP settings in this dialog box or you can select an existing SNMP
template that contains the SNMP settings for this device. SNMP templates are particularly
useful when SNMP configurations are standardized. For more information on creating SNMP
templates, see "SNMP templates" (page 74).
Editing SNMP settings manually
1.
To edit the SNMP parameters, verify that the radio button
Parameters is selected.





to the left of Edit SNMP
Parameter Type: Select the version of SNMP (v1 or v2c) that is configured on the device to
be added from the Parameter Type list. You can add devices that are configured with
SNMPv3 using SNMP templates only. Therefore, you must create an SNMP template with
the SNMPv3 parameters for this device before adding it.
Read-Only Community String: Enter the read-only community string for this device in the
Read-Only Community String field. This value must match the read only community string
that is configured on the device to be added.
Read-Write Community String: Enter the read-write community string for this device in the
Read-Write Community String field. This value must match the read-write community string
that is configured on the device to be added.
Timeout: Enter the SNMP timeout value (1–60 seconds) in the Timeout field. This parameter
determines how long IMC waits for an SNMP reply from the managed device before
declaring that the request has timed out. The default is 4.
Retries: Enter the number of SNMP retries (1–20) in the Retries field. The retries parameter
defines how many times the management system (IMC) sends SNMP retries in an attempt to
communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure. The default is 3.
155
Using existing SNMP template
To configure the SNMP settings for this device using an SNMP template:
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
3.
Click the radio button
to the left of the template you want to use.
4.
Click OK.
5.
Do one of the following:


To view and configure SNMP settings for this device, click the
To configure the SNMP settings for this device, click the
Telnet Settings section.
SNMP Settings link, or
Configure link located at the
The SNMP Parameters dialog box appears.
6.
Do one of the following:

Enter the SNMP settings in this dialog box, or

Select an existing Telnet template that contains the SNMP settings for this device.
SNMP templates are particularly useful when SNMP configurations are standardized. For
more information on creating SNMP templates, see "SSH templates" (page 80).
Editing Telnet parameters manually
1.
To edit the Telnet parameters manually, verify that the radio button
Parameters is selected.
2.
Do the following:
to the left of Edit Telnet
a. Authentication Mode: Select the mode that matches the Telnet authentication mode
configured on the managed devices from the Authentication Mode list.
b. Username: Enter the username configured on managed devices in the Username field, if
prompted.
c.
Password: Enter the password configured on the managed devices in the Password field, if
prompted.
d. Super Password: Enter the super password configured on the managed devices for the
Super Password, if prompted.
e. Timeout: Enter the Telnet timeout value configured on the managed device in the Timeout
field.
Valid range is 1–60 seconds.
Using an existing Telnet template
To configure the Telnet settings for this device using Telnet templates:
1.
Click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of the Telnet template you want to use.
3.
Click OK.
4.
Do one of the following:

To view and configure Telnet settings for this device, click the
156
Telnet Settings link.

To configure the Telnet settings for this device, click the
Telnet Settings section.
Configure link located at the
The Telnet Parameters dialog box appears.
5.
Do one of the following:

Enter the Telnet settings in this dialog box, or

Select an existing Telnet template that contains the SSH settings for this device.
Telnet templates are particularly useful when Telnet configurations are standardized. For
more information on creating Telnet templates, see "Telnet templates" (page 77).
Editing SSH settings manually
1.
To edit the SSH parameters, verify that the radio button
selected.
2.
Do the following:
to the left of Edit SSH Parameters is
a. Authentication Mode: Select the authentication mode that corresponds with the SSH
configuration mode on the managed devices.
The authentication mode selected must match the authentication mode configured on the
device.
b. User Name: Enter the username that is configured on the managed devices.
c.
Password: Enter the password that is configured on the managed devices, if prompted.
d. Private Key File: Select the local path and filename of the private key file that contains the
key that enables login, if prompted.
e. Private Key Password: Enter the private key password for the private key file, if prompted.
f.
Super Password: Enter the super password that is configured on the managed devices, if
prompted.
g. Port: Enter the TCP port for SSH configured on managed devices. The default TCP port is
22.
h. Timeout: Enter the SSH timeout value (1–120 seconds).
The timeout parameter defines how long the system waits for the device to respond in
seconds before declaring that the response has timed out. The default setting is 10 seconds.
i.
Retries: Enter the number of SSH retries (1–5).
The retries parameter defines how many times the management system (IMC) sends SSH
retries in an attempt to communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure.
The default setting is 3.
Using existing SSH templates
To configure the SSH settings for this device using SSH templates:
1.
Click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of the SSH template you want to use.
3.
Click OK to accept the SSH configuration.
4.
Click OK to add the device.
When you add a device, IMC automatically records your settings for the following parameters. When
you add another device, IMC uses your settings as the default settings.
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The parameters include:
•
Login Type
•
Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices
•
Support Ping Operation
•
Add the device regardless of the ping result
•
Use the loopback address as the management IP
WARNING:
IMC automatically manages all devices that you add to IMC. Check your license count before adding
devices to IMC to verify that you have enough licenses to manage all added devices.
Auto discovering devices
Auto discovering in IMC allows you to search the network and add all found devices to IMC using two
methods: basic and advanced. With the basic auto discovery method, you provide a start and end
IP address that directs the discovery process. In addition, you provide SNMP and Telnet settings that
support the addition of devices for these protocols. You have the option to run basic and advanced
discoveries immediately or at a scheduled date and time.
With advanced auto discoveries, you can search the network using routing tables. With this option,
you configure hop counts to determine how far IMC searches the infrastructure for new devices. In
routing based discoveries, you also provide a Seed IP to direct the starting point for the auto
discovery.
Another option for auto discovery of network devices is an ARP-based auto discovery. ARP-based
auto discoveries search ARP tables to discover new devices. As with routing based discoveries, you
also configure hop counts to determine how far IMC searches the infrastructure for new devices. In
ARP-based discoveries, you also provide a Seed IP to direct the starting point for the auto discovery.
A third option is the IPsec VPN-based auto discovery method. With this option, IMC queries IPsec
devices for new devices, again using hop counts to limit how far IMC searches the infrastructure.
Seed IP addresses are also required for this method.
You can use the network segment-based advanced method for auto discovering new devices. With
this method, you configure IMC with IP address segments, which IMC then searches for new devices.
With this method, hop count and Seed IP addresses are not required.
Adding devices through basic auto discovery
The device to be added must be configured to support the access or login type selected here. HP
recommends configuring default monitor indices before performing an auto discovery. Monitor
indices gather the metrics that IMC uses to measure performance of managed devices. Monitor
indices are also used to generate alarms when they exceed configured thresholds. By configuring the
default monitor indices first, IMC applies them to devices found in the discovery process. For more
information, see "Configuring default monitor indices" (page 151).
To add devices to IMC using the basic auto discovery method:
1.
Navigate to Resources→Auto Discovery:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
158
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
2.
Click
Auto Discovery under Resource Management from the navigation system on the left.
3.
Confirm that you are in Basic mode.
The main section of the page title should read Auto Discovery (Basic).
4.
If the dialog box does not have this title and your breadcrumb trail is Resource →Auto
Discovery (Advanced), then click
page.
Go to Basic to navigate to the Auto Discovery (Basic)
Go to Basic can be found in the far right corner of the Auto Discovery page.
5.
Enter the first IP address of the IP address range you want to search devices for in the Start IP
field.
6.
Enter the last IP address of the IP address range you want to search devices for in the End IP
field.
7.
Click Add to add the IP address range.
8.
Configure the device group you want to add the discovered devices to by selecting it from the
Device Group list.
You must create the device groups before using them in the auto discovery process. For more
information on creating device groups, see "Adding a device group" (page 128).
9.
If you want to receive SNMP traps from the discovered devices that support SNMP trap
generation, verify that the checkbox
to the left of Automatically register to receive SNMP
traps from supported devices is checked.
WARNING:
If the Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices checkbox is not checked,
IMC does not process, display, or alarm on traps sent by the discovered devices.
10.
Enter the SNMP v1 read community string in the SNMP Read Community string field.
11.
Enter the SNMP v1 write community string in the SNMP Write Community string field.
The SNMP read and write community string configuration you enter here must match the SNMP
configuration settings on the devices to be discovered and managed. Refer to each vendor’s
manual for information on setting the SNMP configuration parameters for each device type.
In the basic auto discovery mode, only SNMP v1 is supported.
12.
Select the Telnet authentication mode that corresponds with the Telnet authentication mode
configured on the managed devices from the Telnet Authentication Mode list.
13.
Do the following:
a. Telnet Username: Enter the username configured on managed devices in the Telnet
Username field, if prompted.
b. Telnet Password: Enter the password configured on the managed devices in the Telnet
Password field, if prompted.
c.
14.
Telnet Super Password: Enter the super password configured on the managed devices for
the Telnet Super Password, if prompted.
If you want IMC to perform scheduled auto discoveries, select the frequency with which you
want IMC to perform scheduled auto discoveries from the Schedule list.
159
Options include Never, Hour, Day, Week, and Month.
15.
Select Never if you want IMC to perform the auto discovery immediately rather than on a
scheduled basis.
IMC runs the auto discovery when you have completed the configuration and clicked on Auto
Discovery.
16.
If you choose to schedule an auto discovery for hour, you only need to enter the discover time.
17.
If you choose to schedule an auto discovery for day, week, or month, enter the start date you
want to begin the scheduled auto discovery in the Start Date field.
You can also use the calendar function
populate the field.
to the right of the Start Date field to select and auto
18.
Select the hour and minute from the lists located to the right of the Discover Time field.
19.
Click Save Only if you want IMC to save the auto discovery configuration and perform the auto
discovery according to the schedule you have defined.
You can review summary results for all discoveries, including scheduled discoveries in the
Discovery Report that is found under Resource Statistics Report.
For more information on accessing reports in IMC, see "My real time reports" (page 849).
20.
Click Auto Discovery if you want to begin the auto discovery immediately.
21.
If you clicked Auto Discovery, the Auto Discovery Running window is displayed along with
details of the auto discovery process.
While the auto discovery is running, IMC displays a rotating icon
22.
Click
.
Stop if you want to cancel the auto discovery process.
Once IMC has completed the auto discovery, IMC displays a status and summary of the auto
discovery process at the top of the Auto Discovery Running window.
When completed, IMC displays a list of all discovered devices and the results in the Auto
Discovery Running list.
23.
Review the results of the discovery process.
You can also review the results of the auto discovery process by clicking the
View Report
link located below the Auto Discovery Running title bar, once the auto discovery process has
completed.
The report is displayed in an Intelligent Analysis Report Viewer window.
Printing the report to PDF
To print the auto discovery report to PDF:
1.
Click the print icon
located on the toolbar on the top of the report.
2.
Select the desired page range from Page Range.
3.
Click Export.
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Exporting the report
To export the auto discovery report:
1.
Click the export icon
located on the toolbar on the top of the report.
2.
Select the desired export file format from the File Format list.
Options include Crystal Reports (RPT), Adobe Acrobat (PDF), Microsoft Excel (97-2003),
Microsoft Excel (97-2003) Data-Only, Microsoft Word (97-2003) – Editable, Rich Text Format
(RTF), and Comma Separated Values (CSV).
3.
Click Export.
Advanced auto discovery: routing-based, ARP-based, or IPsec VPN-based, PPP-based
The following section describes the advanced method for auto discovering devices using four of the
five advanced discovery methods: routing-based, ARP-based, IPsec VPN-based or PPP-based. With
each of these methods, you configure hop counts to determine how far IMC searches the
infrastructure for new devices. In these discovery methods, you also provide one or more seed IP
addresses to direct the starting points for the auto discovery.
HP recommends configuring default monitor indices before performing an auto discovery. Monitor
indices gather the metrics that IMC uses to measure performance of managed devices. Monitor
indices are also used to generate alarms when they exceed configured thresholds. By configuring the
default monitor indices first, IMC applies them to devices found in the discovery process. For more
information, see "Configuring default monitor indices" (page 151).
1.
Navigate to Resources→Auto Discovery:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
2.
Click
left.
Auto Discovery under Resource Management from the navigation system on the
Confirm that you are in Advanced mode.
The dialog box title should read Select Auto Discovery Mode and the breadcrumb trail should
read Resource →Auto Discovery (Advanced).
If not, then click
3.
Go to Advanced located on the far right of the Auto Discovery page.
Select any one of the first three auto discovery options you want to use by clicking on the radio
button to the left of the discovery mode.
Options include:




Routing-Based: This option searches the routing tables of all reachable routers for
manageable network devices.
ARP-Based: This option searches the Address Resolution Protocol or ARP tables for
manageable network devices.
IPsec VPN-Based: This option searches IPsec VPN devices for manageable network
devices.
Network Segment-Based: This option searches for manageable devices by the specified IP
address range.
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
4.
PPP-Based: This option searches the Peer-to-Peer Protocol for manageable network devices.
Click Next.

Hop Count: The Hop Count parameter defines the maximum number of network node hops
IMC traverses in the discovery process.
WARNING:
The larger the hop count, the more the discovery process consumes system and network resources,
including bandwidth, and the longer the discovery process takes. Exercise the hop count configuration
parameter with caution.
5.
To configure the hop count, select the hop count number from the Hop Count list.

Login Type: This option defines how IMC logs into the discovered device.
Options include Telnet, SSH, and None.
6.
Select login type from the Login Type list.
The discovered devices must be configured to support the login type you select.
7.
Loopback Address as Manager IP: To select the Loopback address for the management of the
discovered device, click the checkbox
to the left of Loopback Address as Manager IP.
Discover Non-SNMP Devices: IMC can manage devices that do not support SNMP.
8.
If you do not want IMC to manage these devices, click the checkbox to the left of Discover
Non-SNMP Devices.
The Discover Non-SNMP Devices option is not available for IPsec VPN-Based auto discovery.
Scan one by one in the Segment: This option configures IMC to discover every device in the
configured network segment. This option does not appear if you select the IPsec VPN-based or
ARP-based auto discovery option. This is a very time consuming method for auto discovery, as
IMC pings every IP address in the segment serially and adds only the devices that respond to
the ping request.
9.
To select the auto discovery option described above, click the checkbox
one by one in the Segment.
to the left of Scan
10.
Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices: If you want IMC to
receive and process traps from discovered devices, verify that the checkbox to the left of
Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices is checked
.
WARNING:
If the Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices checkbox is not checked,
IMC does not process, display, or alarm on traps sent by the discovered devices.

11.
Seed IP: A seed IP address in an auto discovery serves as a starting point for the discovery
process.
Select, as the seed IP address, the device that enables IMC to discover as many devices to be
managed as possible.
Typically, routers and layer three switches are the most logical choice for routing and ARP
based discoveries. For IPsec VPN-Based discoveries, options for the Seed IP include VPN
gateways and routers supporting VPN.
162
12.
Enter the IP address of the device to serve as a seed device for auto discovery purposes in the
Seed IP field.
13.
Click Add.
You can add more than one IP address to serve as seed IP devices by clicking Add after
entering the IP address in the Seed IP field.
14.
Select the device group you want to add the discovered and managed devices to from the
Device Group n list.
You can choose not to add devices to any device group. If you choose this option, the discovered
devices are not added to any group. You must create the device groups before using them in the auto
discovery process. For more information on creating device groups, see "Adding a device group"
(page 128).
15.
To configure the SNMP settings, click the configure icon
Settings (Required).
located to the right of SNMP
The SNMP Parameters dialog box appears.
16.
Do one of the following:

Enter the SNMP settings in this dialog box, or

Use an SNMP template that contains the SNMP settings for this device.
SNMP templates are particularly useful when SNMP configurations are standardized. For
more information on creating SNMP templates, see "SNMP templates" (page 74).
Editing SNMP settings manually
1.
To edit the SNMP parameters, verify that the radio button
Parameters is selected.
2.
Do the following:
to the left of Edit SNMP
a. Parameter Type: Select the version of SNMP (v1 or v2c) that is configured on the device to
be added from the Parameter Type list.
You can only add devices that are configured with SNMPv3 using SNMP templates.
Therefore, you must create an SNMP template with the SNMPv3 parameters for this device
before adding this device. For more information, see "SNMP templates" (page 74).
b. Read-Only Community String: Enter the read-only community string for this device in the
Read-Only Community String field. This value must match the read only community string
that is configured on the device to be added.
c.
Read-Write Community String: Enter the read-write community string for this device in the
Read-Write Community String field. This value must match the read-write community string
that is configured on the device to be added.
d. Timeout: Enter the SNMP timeout value (1–60 seconds) in the Timeout field. This parameter
determines how long IMC waits for an SNMP reply from the managed device before
declaring that the request has timed out. The default is 4.
e. Retries: Enter the number of SNMP retries (1–20) in the Retries field. The retries parameter
defines how many times the management system (IMC) sends SNMP retries in an attempt to
communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure. The default is 3.
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Using existing SNMP template
To configure the SNMP settings for this device using an SNMP template:
1.
Click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of the SNMP template you want to use.
3.
Click OK.
4.
To configure the Telnet settings, click the configure icon
section.
located at the Telnet Parameters
The Telnet Parameters dialog box appears.
5.
Do one of the following:

Enter the Telnet settings in this dialog box, or

Create a Telnet template that contains the Telnet settings for this device.
Telnet templates are particularly useful when Telnet configurations are standardized. For
more information on creating Telnet templates, see "Telnet templates" (page 77).
Editing Telnet settings manually
1.
To edit the Telnet parameters manually, verify that the radio button
Parameters is selected.
2.
Do the following:
to the left of Edit Telnet
a. Authentication Mode: Select the mode that corresponds with the Telnet authentication mode
configured on the managed devices from the Authentication Mode list.
b. Username: Enter the username configured on managed devices in the Username field, if
prompted.
c.
Password: Enter the password configured on the managed devices in the Password field, if
prompted.
d. Super Password: Enter the super password configured on the managed devices for the
Super Password, if prompted.
e. Timeout: Enter the Telnet timeout value (1–60 seconds). The timeout parameter defines how
long the system waits for the device to respond in seconds.
Using existing Telnet template
1.
To configure the Telnet settings for this device using Telnet templates, click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
3.
Click OK.
4.
To configure the telnet settings, click the configure icon
Parameters.
to the left of the Telnet template you want to use.
located to the right of Telnet
The Telnet Parameters dialog box appears.
5.
Do one of the following:

Enter the Telnet settings in this dialog box, or

Create an Telnet template that contains the SSH settings for this device.
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Telnet templates are particularly useful when Telnet configurations are standardized. For more
information on creating Telnet templates, see "SSH templates" (page 80).
Editing SSH settings manually
1.
To edit the SSH parameters, verify that the radio button
selected.
2.
Do the following:
to the left of Edit SSH Parameters is
a. Authentication Mode: Select the authentication mode that corresponds with the SSH
configuration mode on the managed devices from the list.
b. User Name: Enter the username that is configured on managed devices.
c.
Password: If prompted, enter the password that is configured on the managed devices.
d. A password is optional if the Private Key File option is selected.
e. Private Key File: Select the path and filename of the private key file that contains the key that
enables login, if prompted.
f.
Private Key Password: Enter the private key password for the private key file, if prompted.
g. Super Password: Enter the super password that is configured on the managed devices.
h. Port: Enter the TCP port for SSH configured on managed devices. The default TCP port is
22.
i.
Timeout: Enter the SSH timeout value (1–120 seconds). The timeout parameter defines how
long the system waits for the device to respond in seconds before declaring that the
response has timed out. The default setting is 10 seconds.
j.
Retries: Enter the number of SSH retries (1–5). The retries parameter defines how many
times the management system (IMC) sends SSH retries in an attempt to communicate with
the managed device before reporting a failure. The default setting is 3.
Using existing SSH templates
1.
To configure the SSH settings for this device using SSH templates, click the radio button
the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
3.
Click OK to accept the SSH configuration.
to
to the left of the SSH template you want to use.
The filter settings offer you flexibility in determining which subnets and devices to either include
in or exclude from the auto discovery process.
4.
Enter the IP address subnet range and the subnet mask you want to filter by in the Subnet IP
field.
5.
Masks can be entered using either CIDR or dotted decimal notation.
For example, a valid network/subnet mask entry using CIDR notation would be
192.168.1.0/24
where /24 represents the number of bits allocated to the network portion of the address and
implying that the remaining bits are allocated to the host portion.
Alternatively, a valid network/subnet mask using dotted decimal notation would be
192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0
6.
Do one of the following:
165


Click the radio button
list, or
to the left of Yes if you want IMC to include devices in the subnet
Click the radio button
list.
to the left of No if you want IMC to exclude devices in the subnet
You can add more than one IP address/subnet range by clicking Add after entering the IP
address range in the Subnet IP field.
7.
If you want IMC to perform scheduled auto discoveries, select the frequency with which you
want IMC to perform scheduled auto discoveries from the Schedule list.
Options include Never, Hour, Day, Week, and Month. Select Never if you want IMC to perform
the auto discovery immediately rather than on a scheduled basis. IMC runs the auto discovery
when you have completed the configuration and clicked Auto Discovery.
8.
Do one of the following:


Choose to schedule an auto discovery for hour by entering the discover time.
Choose to schedule an auto discovery for a specific day, week, or month, enter the start
date you want to begin the scheduled auto discovery in the Start Date field.
You can also use the calendar function
auto populate the field.
to the right of the Start Date field to select and
Select the hour and minutes from the lists located to the right of the Discover Time field.
9.
Click Save Only if you want IMC to save the auto discovery configuration and perform the auto
discovery according to the schedule you have defined.
10.
Click Auto Discovery if you want to begin the auto discovery immediately.
If you clicked Auto Discovery, the Auto Discovery Running window is displayed along with
details of the auto discovery process.
While the auto discovery is running, IMC displays a rotating icon
11.
Click
.
Stop if you want to cancel the auto discovery process.
Once IMC has completed the auto discovery, it displays a status and summary of the auto
discovery process at the top of the Auto Discovery Running window as well as a list of all
discovered devices and the results in the Auto Discovery Running list.
12.
Review the results of the discovery process.
You can also review the results of the auto discovery process by clicking the
link located below the Auto Discovery Running title bar.
The report is displayed in an Intelligent Analysis Report Viewer window.
Printing the report to PDF
To print the report to PDF:
1.
Click the print icon located on the toolbar on the top of the report.
2.
Select the desired page range from Page Range.
3.
Click Export.
Exporting the report
To export the report:
166
View Report
1.
Click the export icon located on the toolbar on the top of the report.
2.
Select the desired export file format from the File Format list.
Options include Crystal Reports (RPT), Adobe Acrobat (PDF), Microsoft Excel (97-2003),
Microsoft Excel (97-2003) Data-Only, Microsoft Word (97-2003) – Editable, Rich Text Format
(RTF), and Comma Separated Values (CSV).
3.
Click Export.
You can also review the results of the most recent auto discovery by clicking on the link
Latest Result from the Resource→Auto Discovery page.
Advanced Auto Discovery: network segment based discovery method
You can also use the network segment based advanced method for auto discovering new devices.
With this method, you configure IMC with one or more IP address segments, which IMC then
searches for new devices. With this method, hop count and Seed IP addresses are not required. HP
recommends configuring default monitor indices before performing an auto discovery. Monitor
indices gather the metrics that IMC uses to measure performance of managed devices. Monitor
indices are also used to generate alarms when they exceed configured thresholds. By configuring the
default monitor indices first, IMC applies them to devices found in the discovery process. For more
information, see "Configuring default monitor indices" (page 151).
To add devices to IMC using Advanced Auto Discovery method:
1.
Navigate to Resources→Auto Discovery:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
2.
Click
left.
Auto Discovery under Resource Management from the navigation system on the
Confirm that you are in advanced mode.
The dialog box title should be Select Auto Discovery Mode and the breadcrumb trail should be
Resource→Auto Discovery (Advanced). If not, then click
Go to Advanced located to the far
right of the Auto Discovery page.
3.
Select the auto discovery mode, Network Segment-Based discovery mode.
4.
Click Next.
5.
Enter the first IP address of the IP address range you want to search for new devices in this auto
discovery in the Start IP field.
6.
Enter the last IP address of the IP address range you want to search for new devices in this auto
discovery in the End IP field.
7.
Click Add to add the IP address range to the Configured Segment Address list.
You can add more than one IP Segment to the list by repeating steps 3-4 for each segment you
want to add.
Importing network segment addresses
You can also import the list of network segment addresses. To do so, the import file format must
conform to the following rules:
167
•
Import file must be a text file.
•
Import file size must not exceed 5 MB.
•
Start IP address and End IP address must be separated by "-"
•
Every network segment address must be a newline.
The examples below are valid entries for an import file:
10.9.1.1-10.9.128.1
10.1.1.1-10.1.255.1
1.
Once you have created the import file, click Import located to the right of the Configured
Segment Address list.
2.
Click Browse to locate your import file.
3.
Click OK to accept the selected import file.
4.
Confirm that the entries in your import file have been added to the Configured Segment
Address list.
Login Type: This option defines how IMC logs into the discovered device.
Options include Telnet, SSH, and None. Select login type from the Login Type list. The
discovered devices must be configured to support the login type you select.
5.
Use the loopback address as the management IP: If you want IMC to use the Loopback address
for the management of the discovered device, click the checkbox
Address as Manager IP.
6.
Discover Non-SNMP Devices: IMC can manage devices that do not support SNMP. If you want
IMC to manage these devices, click the checkbox
7.
to the left of Loopback
to the left of Discover Non-SNMP Devices.
Scan one by one in the Segment: This option configures IMC to discover every device in the
configured network segment. However, this is a very time consuming option for auto discovery
as IMC pings every IP address in the segment serially and then add the devices that respond to
the ping request. If you want this auto discovery option, click the checkbox
one by one in the Segment.
8.
to the left of Scan
Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices: If you want IMC to
receive and process traps from discovered devices, verify that the checkbox to the left of
Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices is checked
.
WARNING:
If the Automatically register to receive SNMP traps from supported devices checkbox is not checked,
IMC does not process, display, or alarm on traps sent by the discovered devices.
9.
Select the device group you want to add the discovered and managed devices to from the
Device Group list.
You can choose not to add devices to any device group. If you choose this option, the
discovered devices are not added to any group. You must create the device groups before
using them in the auto discovery process. For more information, see "Adding a device group"
(page 128).
10.
To configure the SNMP settings, click the configure icon
(Required) section.
168
located at SNMP Settings
The SNMP Parameters dialog box appears.
You can either enter the SNMP settings in this dialog box or you can use an SNMP template that
contains the SNMP settings for this device. SNMP templates are particularly useful when SNMP
configurations are standardized. For more information on creating SNMP templates, see "SNMP
templates" (page 74).
Editing SNMP settings manually
1.
To edit the SNMP parameters, verify that the radio button
Parameters is selected.
2.
Do the following:
to the left of Edit SNMP
a. Parameter Type: Select the version of SNMP (v1 or v2c) that is configured on the device to
be added from the Parameter Type list.
You can only add devices that are configured with SNMPv3 using SNMP templates.
Therefore, you must create an SNMP template with the SNMPv3 parameters for this device
before adding this device. For more information on creating SNMP templates, see "SNMP
templates" (page 73).
b. Read-Only Community String: Enter the read-only community string for this device in the
Read-Only Community String field. This value must match the read only community string
that is configured on the device to be added.
c.
Read-Write Community String: Enter the read-write community string for this device in the
Read-Write Community String field. This value must match the read only community string
that is configured on the device to be added.
d. Timeout: Enter the SNMP timeout value (1–60 seconds) in the Timeout field. This parameter
determines how long IMC waits for an SNMP reply from the managed device before
declaring that the request has timed out. The default is 4.
e. Retries: Enter the number of SNMP retries (1–20) in the Retries field. The retries parameter
defines how many times the management system (IMC) sends SNMP retries in an attempt to
communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure. The default is 3.
Using existing SNMP template
1.
To configure the SNMP settings for this device using an SNMP template, click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
3.
Click OK.
4.
To configure the SNMP settings, click the configure icon
section. The SNMP Parameters dialog box appears.
5.
Do one of the following:
to the left of the SNMP template you want to use.
located at the Telnet Parameters

Enter the SNMP settings in this dialog box, or

Create a SNMP template that contains the Telnet settings for this device.
SNMP templates are particularly useful when SNMP configurations are standardized. For
more information on creating SNMP templates, see "SSH templates" (page 80).
169
Editing Telnet settings manually
1.
To edit the Telnet parameters manually, verify that the radio button
Parameters is selected.
2.
Do the following:
to the left of Edit Telnet
a. Authentication Mode: Select the mode that corresponds with the Telnet authentication mode
configured on the managed devices from the Authentication Mode list.
b. Username: Enter the username configured on managed devices in the Username field, if
prompted.
c.
Password: Enter the password configured on the managed devices in the Password field, if
prompted.
d. Super Password: Enter the super password configured on the managed devices for the
Super Password, if prompted.
e. Timeout: Enter the Telnet timeout value configured on the managed device in the Timeout
field.
Valid range is 1–60 seconds.
Using existing Telnet template
1.
To configure the Telnet settings for this device using Telnet templates, click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of the Telnet template you want to use.
3.
Click OK.
4.
To configure the Telnet settings, click the configure icon
section.
5.
The Telnet Parameters dialog box appears.
6.
Do one of the following:
located at the Telnet Parameters

Enter the Telnet settings in this dialog box, or

Create a Telnet template that contains the Telnet settings for this device.
Telnet templates are particularly useful when Telnet configurations are standardized. For more
information on creating Telnet templates, refer see "Telnet templates" (page 77).
Editing SSH settings manually
1.
To edit the SSH parameters, verify that the radio button
selected.
2.
Do the following:
to the left of Edit SSH Parameters is
a. Authentication Mode: Select the authentication mode that corresponds with the SSH
configuration mode on the managed devices from the list.
b. User Name: Enter the username that is configured on managed devices.
c.
Password: If prompted, enter the password that is configured on the managed devices.
d. Private Key File: Enter the path and filename of the private key file that contains the key that
enables login, if prompted.
e. Private Key Password: Enter the private key password for the private key file, if prompted.
170
f.
Super Password: Enter the super password that is configured on the managed devices.
g. Port: Enter the TCP port for SSH configured on managed devices. The default TCP port is
22.
h. Timeout: Enter the SSH timeout value (1–120 seconds).
The timeout parameter defines how long the system waits for the device to respond in
seconds before declaring that the response has timed out. The default setting is 10 seconds.
i.
Retries: Enter the number of SSH retries (1–5).
The retries parameter defines how many times the management system (IMC) sends SSH
retries in an attempt to communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure.
The default setting is 3.
Using existing SSH template
1.
To configure the SSH settings for this device using SSH templates, click the radio button
the left of Select an Existing Template.
to
2.
Click the radio button
3.
Click OK to accept the SSH configuration.
4.
The filter settings offer you flexibility in determining which subnets and devices to either include
in or exclude from the auto discovery process.
5.
Enter the IP address subnet range and the subnet mask you want to filter by in the Subnet IP
field.
to the left of the SSH template you want to use.
Masks can be entered using either CIDR or dotted decimal notation.
For example, a valid network/subnet mask entry using CIDR notation would be
192.168.1.0/24
where /24 represents the bits allocated to the network portion of the address and implying the
remaining bits allocated to the host portion.
Alternatively, a valid network/subnet mask using dotted decimal notation would be
192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0
6.
Do one of the following:
Click the radio button
to the left of Yes if you want IMC’s discovery to include devices
captured by the subnet list, or
Click the radio button
to the left of No if you want IMC’s discovery to exclude devices
captured by the subnet list.
You can add more than one IP address/subnet range by clicking Add after entering the IP
address range in the Subnet IP field.
7.
If you want IMC to perform scheduled auto discoveries, select the frequency with which you
want IMC to perform scheduled auto discoveries from the Schedule list.
Options include Never, Hour, Day, Week, and Month. Select Never if you do not want IMC to
perform automatic auto discoveries.
If you choose to schedule an auto discovery for hour, you only need to enter the discover time.
If you choose to schedule an auto discovery for a specific day, week, or month, enter the start
date you want to begin the scheduled auto discovery in the Start Date field.
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You can also use the calendar function
to the right of the Start Date field to select and auto
populate the field. Select the hour and minutes from the lists located to the right of the Discover
Time field.
8.
Click Save Only if you want IMC to save the auto discovery configuration and perform the auto
discovery according to the schedule you have defined.
9.
Click Auto Discovery if you want to begin the auto discovery immediately.
If you clicked Auto Discovery, the Auto Discovery Running window is displayed along with
details of the auto discovery process.
While the auto discovery is running, IMC displays a rotating icon
10.
Click
.
Stop if you want to cancel the auto discovery process.
Once IMC has completed the auto discovery, it displays a status and summary of the auto
discovery process at the top of the Auto Discovery Running window as well as a list of all
discovered devices and the results in the Auto Discovery running list.
11.
Review the results of the discovery process.
You can also review the results of the auto discovery process by clicking the
link located below the Auto Discovery Running title bar.
View Report
The report is displayed in an Intelligent Analysis Report Viewer window.
Printing the report to PDF
To print the report to PDF:
1.
Click the print icon located on the toolbar on the top of the report.
2.
Select the desired page range from Page Range.
3.
Click Export.
Exporting the report
To export the report:
1.
Click the export icon located on the toolbar on the top of the report.
2.
Select the desired export file format from the File Format list. Options include Crystal Reports
(RPT), Adobe Acrobat (PDF), Microsoft Excel (97-2003), Microsoft Excel (97-2003) Data-Only,
Microsoft Word (97-2003) – Editable, Rich Text Format (RTF), and Comma Separated Values
(CSV).
3.
Click Export.
You can also review the results of the most recent auto discovery by clicking on the link
Latest Result from the Resource →Auto Discovery page.
Adding devices by importing device information
IMC supports the import and export of devices and information. You can quickly and easily import
the devices you want IMC to manage by using a well-defined file format or from NNMi.
In addition, you can also export device information into a CSV format for easy import into other
management or reporting systems.
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This section describes the import process as a quick and easy way to quickly manage only those
devices you want to manage with IMC.
Importing devices into IMC
To add devices to IMC via importing device information:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Import/Export Device:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
Click
Import/Export Device under Resource Management from the navigation system
on the left.
2.
Click the Import tab in the Resource→Import/Export Device window.
3.
In the Input File field, enter the file name you want to use to import devices or click Browse to
browse for the file on your local computer.
You must create a valid import file prior to importing devices. This section describes all possible
columns that can be used in a valid data import file and the rules for constructing a valid import
file using these column definitions.
The field definitions for all possible columns in an import file are listed in Table 3 (page 173):
Table 3 Import file column definitions
Column label
Column contents/requirements
DeviceIp
This field contains the device IP address, which must conform to standard
dotted decimal IP address formatting.
This field is required.
DeviceName
Device name, a string of up to 64 characters.
This field is optional.
SnmpParaVersion
This field contains the SNMP version. Possible values include:
Note: If the SnmpParaVersion
field is 3, an SNMPv3 template
is created.
2 = represents SNMPv2c.
SnmpParaRead
1 = SNMPv1, which is the default
3 = represents SNMPv3.
This field is optional.
This field contains the SNMP read-only community name, a string of up to 32
characters. The default is public.
This field is optional.
SnmpParaWrite
This field contains the SNMP write community name, a string of up to 32
characters. The default is private.
This field is optional.
SnmpParaContextName
This field contains the SNMPv3 context name, a string of up to 32 characters.
This field is optional.
173
Column label
Column contents/requirements
SnmpParaSecurityUser
This field contains the SNMPv3 user name, a string of up to 32 characters.
Two users with the same name are considered as belonging to the same
SNMPv3 template. This field is applicable to only SNMPv3.
This field is optional.
This field contains the security mode. This value must match the
SnmpParaAuthScheme and SnmpParaPrivScheme values.
SnmpParaSecuMode
1 = no authentication and no encryption
2 = authentication but no encryption
3 = authentication and encryption
This field is optional.
This field contains the Authentication mode.
1 = none
SnmpParaAuthScheme
2 = MD5
3 = sha
This field is optional.
SnmpParaAuthPassword
This field contains the authentication password, a string of up to 32
characters.
This field is optional.
This field contains the encryption mode.
1 = none
2 = DES
SnmpParaPrivScheme
19 = AES128
20 = AES192
21 = AES256
This field is optional.
SnmpParaPrivPassword
SnmpParaTimeOut
SnmpParaRetry
This field contains the encryption password, a string of up to 32 characters.
This field is optional.
This field contains the timeout value in seconds, which is 4 by default.
This field is optional.
This field contains the number of retries, which is 3 by default.
This field is optional.
This field identifies whether or not the device responds to ping requests. The
field is 0 by default.
PingDevType
1 = the discovered device responds to Ping requests.
0 = the discovered device does not respond to Ping requests.
This field is optional.
Import file format requirements
The requirements for a device import file are:
174
•
The extension of an import file must be CSV.
•
The first line or row of an import file must contain the following text only:
[DEF]
•
The second line or row of an import file must contain at least one or more of the column labels
separated by commas. Column labels with null values must also be separated by commas.
•
Only the first column label, DeviceIP, is required. All other columns are optional.
•
You must specify ONLY those columns in the second line or row that contain values in the device
entry rows (line 3 and beyond) of the data import file. If, for example, you do not intend to
include in your data import file, the public and private community strings for the devices you
want to import, then do not include these column labels (SNMPParaRead and SnmpParaWrite)
in the second line of your import file.
For example, a valid entry for the second line of an import file that includes some but not all
column labels is provided below.
DeviceIp, DeviceName, SnmpParaVersion, SnmpParaRead, SnmpParaWrite,,,,,,,,
SnmpParaTimeOut, PingDevType.
•
The third line or row of an import file must contain the first entry for a device you want to add to
IMC with field values (including fields with null values) separated by commas. All subsequent
rows must follow the same conventions as the third line or row.
•
The third line or row must contain values only for the columns specified in line two of the data
import file. In other words, if you did not specify a column label in line two, then you cannot
specify the value in the third and all subsequent rows.
A valid entry for lines 3 and 4 of an import file for the line 2 example provided above would
be:
DeviceIp,DeviceName,SnmpParaVersion,SnmpParaRead,SnmpParaWrite,,,,,,,,SnmpParaT
imeOut,,PingDevType
192.168.0.1,router1,1,public,private,,,,,,,,3,,0
192.168.0.2,switch1,2,public,private,,,,,,,,3,,0
Notice that these two lines have values for only those columns that were specified in line two.
Here is a complete, sample import file using the examples provided above that use some but
not all of the column definitions possible for data import.
[DEF]
DeviceIp,DeviceName,SnmpParaVersion,SnmpParaRead,SnmpParaWrite,,,,,,,,SnmpParaT
imeOut,,PingDevType
192.168.0.1,router1,1,public,private,,,,,,,,3,,0
192.168.0.2,switch1,2,public,private,,,,,,,,3,,0
4.
Click Import to begin the import process.
The page is updated with the results of the device import.
5.
Review the results found on the Device Import Results page to verify that all the devices have
been imported successfully.
Exporting device information
To export device information from IMC:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Import/Export Device:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
175
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click
Import/Export Device under Resource Management from the navigation system
on the left.
2.
To export devices, click the Export tab in the Resource → Import/Export Device window.
3.
Click Export to begin the export process.
4.
To view and save the results of your export, click Device Export Result link located below the
Download File portion of the Resource→Export Result page.
Follow the instructions to complete the process of saving the export results.
Importing devices from NNMi
To import device information to IMC via NNMi:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Import/Export Device:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Resource Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
2.
Click
Import/Export Device under Resource Management from the navigation system
on the left.
To import devices from NNMi, click the Import Devices from NNMi tab in the Resource→
Import/Export Device window.
3.
Enter the parameters of NNMi.

4.
Server IP Address: Allows you to configure the server IP address of NNMi for
communications with IMC.

Server Port: Allows you to configure which port NNMi uses for communicates with IMC.

User Name: Allows you to configure the username of NNMi for communicates with IMC.

Password: Allows you to configure the password of NNMi for communicates with IMC.
Click Import to begin the import process.
The page is updated with device information imported from NNMi.
5.
Review the results found on the Device Import Results page to verify that the devices have been
imported successfully.
IMC supports importing devices from NNMi 9.00 or higher.
The passwords and private keys of the devices are not imported into IMC. You must configure
them after the devices are imported.
Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology
Views
IMC offers you a variety of options for viewing network resources and for drilling down into the
features used to manage them. IMC provides you with a graphical representation of the physical
network in the Topology view. Table views of the network are provided in the Device View, IP View
and Custom View. Each of these three view types offer you a real time snapshot of the status of
176
devices in the network infrastructure. Also, all views offer drilldown capabilities to devices within the
groups and ultimately to the device details for an individual device. The Device Details page provides
you with access to IMC’s network device management features.
Viewing devices via the Device View
In the Device View, you can easily locate network resources by device type – Routers, Switches,
Servers, Security, Storage, Wireless, Voice, Desktops and Others. IMC classifies devices that respond
to ICMP requests but not SNMP requests as "Desktop" devices. IMC classifies as "Other" devices that
respond to both ICMP and SNMP but do not conform to any of IMC’s device classifications. IMC
organizes devices into the Device View groupings by using the information stored in the Device
Category field.
This view, like all IMC views, offers you a real time snapshot of the status of devices in the network
infrastructure through color-coded icons that match the highest severity or alarm level for devices in
the view. Also, all views offer you high-level groupings of devices with drilldown capabilities to
devices within the groups and ultimately to the device details for an individual device. From the Device
Details page, you can access IMC’s powerful management features that enable quick and easy
access to network resources as well as the ability to manage them.
Accessing the Device View
To access the Device View:
1.
Navigate to Resource→View Management→View-<Device Type>:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
2.
Click Device View under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
Click the category of device view you want to access.
The Device List for the device category you choose appears.
To view all device groups under Devices View, you may need to click the expand icon






.
Click
Routers under Devices View from the navigation tree on the left for a summary
view of all routers.
Click
Switches under Devices View from the navigation tree on the left for a summary
view of all switches.
Click
Servers under Devices View from the navigation tree on the left for a summary
view of all servers.
Click
Security under Devices View from the navigation tree on the left for a summary
view of all security devices.
Click
Voice under Devices View from the navigation tree on the left for a summary view
of all voice devices.
Click
Desktops under Devices View from the navigation tree on the left for a summary
view of all desktop devices.
177
•
Click
Others under Devices View from the navigation tree on the left for a summary view of
all devices that were not classified by the categories listed above.
Each category of device in the Device View is followed by a number that is enclosed with
square brackets []. This number represents the number of devices in that category.
The status of a Device View depends on the status of the devices in it. The color of the group
icon represents the highest severity or alarm setting of all devices in the category. The icon of
a device view is grayed out if there is no device in the view.
The device status in a router view reflects the severest status among all layer 3 interfaces of the
router that have an IP address. For example, if any of the layer 3 interfaces is DOWN, the layer
3 interface status of the router is DOWN. Any disabled or unknown interface is blocked out for
status calculation.
The device status in a switch view reflects the severest status among all interfaces of the switch.
For example, if any of the interfaces is DOWN, the interface status shown in the list is DOWN.
Any disabled or unknown interface is blocked out for status calculation.
IMC displays all Device View entries in the Device List displayed in the main pane of the Device
View window.
The following list contains all of the fields that are displayed for all device categories. The list
of each of the device categories may contain some or all of these fields:


Status: Contains the most current status of the device. Status is determined by the highest
severity or alarm level for the device, when the device has one or more current alarms that
has not been cleared or recovered.
Device Label: Contains the IMC name for the device, which, by default, is the name
assigned to it by IMC in its device configuration. If a device is configured with a sysName,
the sysName is used as the Device Label unless the Device Label is manually configured.
This field also contains the IP address. The contents of the device label field serve as an
active link for drilling down into the Device Details page. This offers you convenient access
to device management features for the selected device.
You can modify the device label from the Device Details page. This changes IMC’s name
or label for the device in IMC only. It does not change the name of the device on the device
itself.


Device Category: Contains the device type, such as router, switch, and server.
Online Users: Displayed for switches or routers only, contain a list of all online users who
are currently authenticated and accessing the network through this device. Contains users
only when the UAM module is installed and in use.

Contains information on the model of the device.

IP Address: Contains the IP address of the device.


Interface List: Contains a link that displays a list of all interfaces on the device. This field
appears on the Device List of the View-<Device Type> page, but does not appear on the
Device List-ALL of the Device View page. This list includes interface status as well as a link
to view and take action on specific interfaces. For more information on the Interface Details
page, see "Interface details" (page 268).
Operation: Contains an icon that displays links to operational tasks for the associated
device.
178
You can sort the device list by a column by clicking the column label. Click the column label to
sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to toggle
between the various sort options specific to each field.
If the Device List contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:
3.

Click
to page forward in the Device List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device List.

Click
to page backward in the Device List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items
per page you want to view.
IMC enables you and you to manage multiple devices via the Device View. This includes
deleting, synchronizing, managing and unmanaging devices. For information on managing
multiple devices through these views, see "Managing multiple devices using batch operations"
(page 276).
Viewing devices via the IP View
The IP View offers you a view of network resources by the IP address ranges found in the discovery
process or added manually.
This view, like all IMC views, offers you a real time snapshot of the status of devices in the network
infrastructure through color-coded icons that match the highest severity or alarm level for devices in
the view.
Also, all views offer you high-level groupings of devices with drilldown capabilities to devices within
the groups and ultimately to the device details for an individual device. From the Device Details page,
you can access IMC’s powerful management features that enable quick and easy access to network
resources as well as the ability to manage them.
Accessing the IP View
To access the IP View:
1.
Navigate to Resource→View-IP View:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click IP View under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
2.
To view all IP subnets under IP View, you may need to click the expand icon
IP View.
3.
Click the
to the left of
IP address subnet view you want to view devices for.
The Device List for the IP subnet you choose appears.
Each IP address subnet in the IP View is followed by a number that is enclosed with square
brackets ([]). This value represents the number of devices in that subnet.
IMC displays all IP View entries, including subnets and individual devices in the IP View Device
List displayed in the main page of the IP View window.
179
Device List contents






Status: Contains the most current status of the group. Status is determined by the highest
severity or alarm level for a device in the group, when the device has one or more current
alarms that has not been cleared or recovered. Group icons with the color gray indicate
that there are no managed devices in the view.
Device Label: Contains the IMC name for the device, which, by default, is the name
assigned to it by IMC in its device configuration. This field also contains the IP address. The
device label serves as an active link for drilling down into an IP address subnet Device List
or into the Device Details page of an individual device.
Device Category: Contains the IMC device category for the associated device.
Device Model: Contains device model information. If the device is managed for reachability
using ICMP only and thus no device model information is available, this field contains
"ICMP."
IP Address: Contains the IP address of the device.
Operation: Contains an icon that displays links to operational tasks for the associated
device.
You can sort the IP View List by every field with the exception of the Operation fields. Click the
column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows
you to toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
The status of an IP View or IP subnet depends on the status of the devices in it. The color of the
group icon represents the highest severity or alarm setting of all devices in the IP subnet. The
icon of an IP view or subnet is grayed out if there is no device in the view.
If the Device List contains enough entries, the following navigational aids are displayed:

Click
to page forward in the Device List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device List.

Click
to page backward in the Device List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device List.
4.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items
per page you want to view.
5.
Do one of the following:


To hide empty IP subnets, click the hide empty subnets icon
tree on the left, or
on the IP View navigation
To display empty edge subnets, click the display empty edge subnets icon
the IP View navigation tree on the left.
located on
IMC enables you and you to manage multiple devices via the IP View. This includes deleting,
synchronizing, managing and unmanaging devices. For information on managing multiple
devices through these views, see "Managing multiple devices using batch operations" (page
276).
180
Viewing devices via the Network Topology
Network Topology provides you with a graphical view of the health and status of network
connectivity and devices, allowing you to quickly and easily locate, monitor, modify, and manage
network devices directly from this graphical representation of the network.
In addition to the standard drilldown capabilities of all views, the Network Topology offers special
navigation capabilities accessed via left and right mouse clicks, allowing you to monitor network
devices and gain quick access to the device management features of IMC, respectively. For more
information on these capabilities, see "Topology Maps" (page 50).
Accessing the network topology
To access the network topology:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
Navigating the network topology interface
Upon a successful auto discovery, IMC automatically generates topology maps and organizes
discovered devices into topology views based on the groupings found. The groupings are navigated
using the topology navigation system located on the left of the Network Topology map. To expand the
groupings displayed on the left navigation system, click the expand icon .
The created topology groupings include:
•
Custom Topology: Contains topology views for the custom views that the operator has
management rights to and contains the custom views that you have been granted access to as
well as any custom views that have been created.
•
IP Topology: Contains topology views of devices grouped by IP address.
•
Data Center Topology: Contains user-defined views created by the administrator or operator.
The Data Center Topology contains any custom data center maps that include floor plans and
graphical representations of data centers down to individual racks and the devices in them.
•
VNM Topology: Contains a view of the virtual network devices, including physical servers, hosts
and vSwitches on each physical server, and how they are connected.
•
Access Service Topology: Contains user access information that is generated by the add-on User
Access Manager (UAM) module.
•
MPLS VPN: Contains MPLS information that is generated by the add-on MPLS VPN Manager
(MVM) module.
•
WSM Service Topology: Contains wireless service information that is generated by the add-on
Wireless Service Manager (WSM) module.
The navigation tree on the left allows you to move quickly to the particular view displayed in the
navigation tree.
For example, clicking one of the custom views you have created opens a new tab in the main pane
and displays all of the device icons for the devices in the selected Custom Topology.
181
Clicking one of the IP Topology opens a new tab in the main pane and displays all of the devices in
the selected IP Topology group.
Topology map toolbar
The Topology Maps interface includes several menu options that support the use and customization of
topology maps. These toolbar options are described below.
•
Displays the network in its original proportion.
•
Enables you to zoom in on the topology view.
•
Enables you to zoom out on the topology view.
•
Enables you to fit the contents of the topology view into the window.
•
Enables you to magnify the contents on the topology view. To exit magnify mode, click o
the icon again.
•
Provides a separate bird’s eye view window of the topology map.
•
Enables you to grab and move one or multiple objects in the topology view within the
confines of the pane. Click the icon to switch to the
Pointer Tool, which allows you to move
the entire topology view within the confines of the pane.
•
•
•
•
•
Enables you to browse and load a background image into the topology view. You can
import a Google Map as the background image.
Enables you remove a background image from the topology view.
Allows you to save topology view settings.
Expands the topology view to full screen. To exit full screen mode, right-click the topology
view and select Exit Full Screen from the shortcut menu.
Enables you to save the current topology view as an image (.png) file.
•
Enables you to organize icons according to a pre-defined structure to the topology view.
Options for organizing topology views include union length, tree, star, ring or grid.
•
Navigates you to the Resource→Add Device dialog box for adding device to IMC. For
more information on adding a device in IMC, see "Adding devices manually to IMC" (page
154).
•
Allows you to add a cloud icon to the topology view.
•
Enables you to add a note on the topology view.
•
Allows you to add a link on the topology view.
182
•
Allows you to browse, add, and query links on the topology.
•
Allows you to select a vManager to view the topology.
•
Offers you the ability to search and retrieve devices in the topology view by IP address or
by IMC label. In data center view, you can locate a device in the rack topology according to its
asset number.
•
Displays a legend for the topology view.
•
Enables you to back to the upper-level topology.
•
Allows you to select an MST instance.
•
Allows you to view the MSTP Region Details.
•
Displays a list on the right of all VLANs. Selecting a VLAN from this list filters the topology
view to highlight only those devices that are members of the selected VLAN.
•
Allows you to have a data center topology map automatically built. For more information
on automatically building data center topology maps in IMC, see "Automatically building data
center topology maps" (page 194).
•
Displays the Traffic Topology. The Traffic Topology feature applies only to the current
topology. For more information on the traffic topology, see "Viewing traffic with traffic topology"
(page 199).
•
Allows you to customize the topology view by defining the tree and grid layout, save,
display and color options.
Left & right mouse clicks: Monitoring & management
Topology maps have special left and right-click mouse features. The left mouse click supports device
monitoring options while the right mouse click supports device management options.
Device and link monitoring via the left mouse click
To display information about a node or link, left-click the selected node or link on the topology map.
The information displayed varies based on the node or link type selected.
To select a node or link, click the node or link using the left mouse button. Some of the information
displayed provides links that allow you to drill down into IMC features or perform certain actions..
•
Device Label: This field contains the IMC name for the device that is assigned during the
configuration. If the device has a sysName at the time of configuration, this name becomes the
Device Label.
The device label serves as an active link for drilling down into the Device Details page, which
provides convenient access to device management features. The Device Details page loads in the
browser instance that originally launched the topology maps, not in the browser instance that
has the topology maps loaded.
•
IP Address: Contains the management IP address of the device.
183
•
Mask: Contains the mask of the management IP address.
•
Device Status: Contains the most current status of the device. Status is determined by the highest
severity or alarm level for the device, when a device has more than one current alarm that has
not been cleared or recovered. Gray device icons indicate the device is unmanaged.
•
SysName: Contains the name that is configured on the device.
•
Vendor: Contains the device vendor’s name.
•
Unrecovered Alarms: Contains the number of unrecovered alarms by type. Click the alarm level
to drill down to the All Alarms view for this device. The All Alarms page loads in the browser
instance that originally launched the topology maps, not in the browser instance that has the
topology maps loaded. For more information on viewing alarms from the All Alarms view, see
"Browsing all alarms" (page 580).
•
Performance Metrics: IMC also displays performance metrics via the left mouse click. The value
displayed serves as a hyperlink for viewing a performance report for the last hour for the
selected metric.
For links, the left mouse click includes the following:
•
Link Name: Contains a name for the link if one is available. Otherwise, a device label displays.
•
Link Type: Contains information about the link type.
•
Left Node: Contains the device label for the device that is located on the left of the link as
represented in the topology map.
•
Left Interface: Contains the interface name for the device that connects on the left in the topology
map.
•
Left Interface Alias: Contains the interface alias for the device that connects on the left in the
topology map.
•
Right Node: Contains the device label for the device that is located on the right of the link as
represented in the topology map.
•
Right Interface: Contains the interface name for the device that connects on the right in the
topology map.
•
Right Interface Alias: Contains the interface alias for the device that connects on the right in the
topology map.
•
Link Speed: Contains the speed of the link in bits per second.
Device management via the right mouse click
A right mouse click with a node selected on the topology map displays a list of management options
that can be used to manage the selected node or link and a right mouse click with nothing selected
displays a menu for map configuration.
The right mouse click on a device includes one or more of the following management options,
depending on the view and device model:
•
Create Subview: Allows you to create logical subviews of devices that are displayed on the
topology map for all users of the topology map. For more information on creating subviews, see
"Customizing topology maps" (page 187).
•
Open Web-Based NMS: Allows you to launch the Web Manager interface for the selected
device directly from the topology map. Selecting this option opens the Web Manager in a new
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browser window that can be accessed via the tabs located at the top of the main pane. From this
window, you can manage the selected device. For more information on the Web Manager, see
"Open web manager" (page 218).
•
Open Device Panel: Allows you to launch the Device Panel interface for the selected device
directly from the topology map. Selecting this option opens the Device Panel in a new pane in
the topology window that can be accessed via the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
From this window, you can manage the selected device. For more information on the Device
Panel, see "Open device panel" (page 221).
•
Copy: Allows you to copy a device.
•
Device Information: Opens the Device Details page for the selected device. The Device Details
page loads in the browser instance that originally launched the topology maps, not in the
browser instance that has the topology maps loaded. For more information on the Device
Details page, see "Managing one device via device details" (page 212).
•
Neighbor Topology: Enables you to view a portion of the network from the perspective of the
selected device. When prompted, select the number of hops you want to include. IMC opens a
new pane in the topology window for this map, which can be accessed via the tabs located at
the top of the main pane. From this window, you have access to the monitoring features
available using the left mouse click only.
•
Spanning Tree: Enables you to view Spanning Tree information for the selected device. Basic
Spanning Tree information as well as instance level information is provided in this feature. For
more information on configuring Spanning Tree for devices that support it, see "Managing
MSTP options for routers and switches" (page 263).
•
Tools-Ping: Enables you to launch a ping request sent from the IMC server to the selected device
and launched from the topology map. IMC opens a new browser window for the ping operation
and the results of the ping operation display in the new browser instance.
•
Tools-Telnet: Enables you to launch a telnet session for the selected device directly from the
topology map that prompts you for the application on the local computer that supports Telnet.
•
Tools-Traceroute: Enables you to launch a traceroute request sent from the IMC server to the
selected device and launched from the topology map. IMC opens a new browser window for
the Traceroute operation and the results of the traceroute operation display in the new browser
instance.
•
Tools-SSH: Enables you to launch an SSH session for the selected device directly from the
topology map that prompts you for the application on the local computer that supports SSH.
•
Delete: Enables you to delete devices from IMC, removing the selected device from all views and
all data associated with the device during the next scheduled Data Export, which by default is
2:00am daily.
•
WARNING:
Once a device is deleted, it cannot be recovered. Use this feature with caution.
•
Delete from Subview: Enables you to remove the selected device from its current subview and
return it to the parent view. Note that deleting the last device from the subview removes the
subview from the topology view. This option appears only on the device that belongs to a
subview.
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•
Delete Device from This View: Enables you to remove the selected device from the current view
if the device is not a member of any subview.
•
Modify Label: Enables you to change IMC’s name for the selected device from the topology
map. Note that changing the Device Label in IMC does not change the device name or
sysName on the device itself.
•
Synchronize: Enables you to update IMC views with current data for the selected device.
•
Unmanage/Manage: Acts as a toggle switch, enabling you to unmanage or manage the
selected device in IMC. During discovery, IMC adds all discovered devices to the IMC database
and configures them to be managed. Managed devices contain features that are available for
monitoring and managing the devices. Each device, managed or unmanaged, requires a node
license.
•
Lock/Unlock: Enables you to fix the position of a particular device on the topology map,
rendering it unmovable until the device is unlocked. This feature is also a toggle switch that
enables you to either lock or unlock the selected device.
•
Root Alarms: Opens the Current Alarms page for the selected device, enabling you to view the
current alarms for the selected device. The Current Alarms page loads in the browser instance
that originally launched the topology maps, not in the browser instance that has the topology
maps loaded. For more information on the Current Alarms page, see "Browsing root alarms"
(page 575).
•
Performance at a Glance: Launches the performance reporting feature of IMC and displays the
most current data for the selected device. In this window, you can also configure a date and time
window for viewing performance data for the selected device. The performance reports page
loads in the browser instance that originally launched the topology maps, not in the browser
instance that has the topology maps loaded. For more information on the At a Glance page, see
"Performance at a glance" (page 230). The Performance at a Glance option on the right mouse
click menu is available only if monitoring instances have been created for the selected device.
•
Configuration Center: Launches the Configuration Center module for the selected device,
enabling you to launch configuration management tasks from the topology view. The
Configuration Management page loads in the browser instance that originally launched the
topology maps, not in the browser instance that has the topology maps loaded. For more
information on Configuration Management, see "7 Configuration and change management"
(page 403).
•
MIB Management: Launches the MIB management module for the selected device, enabling you
to launch MIB browser tools from the topology view. The MIB Management page loads in the
browser instance that originally launched the topology maps, not in the browser instance that
the topology maps loaded. For more information on MIB Management, see "MIB management"
(page 138).
•
Open Wireless Topology: For wireless devices, opens a new page in the main pane of the
topology window and displays the wireless devices with the same monitoring and management
features as the network topology view. The wireless topology page can be accessed through
tabs located at the top of the main pane of the topology page.
•
Add Device to Cabinet: Creates custom maps through the Data Center Topology that depict data
centers down to wiring closets and racks and the devices housed in them. This feature enables
you to quickly and easily add the selected device to an existing cabinet. Note that this option is
only available if the selected device has not yet been added to a cabinet. For more information
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on customizing Data Center topology maps, see "Managing data center topology maps" (page
190).
•
Cabinet Location: If a device has been added to a cabinet in the data center topology map, the
Cabinet Location option becomes available on the right mouse click menu of the device. This
feature launches a Rack Topology page displaying the rack with the selected device
highlighted. The Rack Topology page can be accessed through tabs located at the top of the
main pane of the topology page.
•
Open Stack Topology: If the device is a stack device, the Open Stack Topology option becomes
available on the right mouse click menu of the device. This feature launches a Stack Topology
page displaying the internal structure of the stack with the selected stack device. The Stack
Topology page can be accessed through tabs located at the top of the main pane of the
topology page. For more information on the stack topology, see "Managing stack devices with
the stack topology" (page 197).
Link management via the right mouse click
A right mouse click with a link selected on the topology map displays a list of management options
that can be applied to the selected link and a right mouse click with nothing selected will display a
menu for map configuration.
The right mouse click on the selected link includes one or more of the following management options
for links:
•
Link Information: Provides you with detailed information on the selected link, including basic
information as well as information about the interfaces on either side of the link. Information
includes link name, status, device information, operational and administrative status of each
interface, IP address and subnet information and more. On the Left/Right Interface tab, you can
view MP interfaces and PoE interfaces.
•
Modify Link Name: Applies a label or name in IMC for the selected link.
•
Modify Interface: Modifies the interface on either side of the selected link.
•
Delete Link: Deletes the link.
•
Copy: Copies a link.
Customizing topology maps
You can customize the topology maps. Options for customizing topology maps include creating
subviews, adding clouds, adding devices, setting default topology views, configuring device and link
labels and creating views of multiple levels which are not restricted.
Custom topology management via the right mouse click
The right mouse click menu allows you to re-load custom views, add custom views, add custom views,
and set the default topology. The menu contains the following options:
•
Reload: Refreshes the current topology view.
•
Add View: Allows you to add a custom view.
To add a custom view:
1.
Right-click a blank area in the Custom Topology, and select Add View from the shortcut menu.
The Add View window appears.
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2.
Enter the view name.
3.
Select an upper-level view for the custom view in the Up Level View list.
4.
Specify whether to automatically add the newly added devices to the view.
The options in the Automatically Add New Devices list include:

None: Not automatically adding the newly added devices to the view.

All: Automatically adding every newly added device to the view.

From Network Segment: Automatically adding newly added devices whose IP addresses
are on the specified IP network segment to the view.
5.
Click the
check box to the left of Add all devices of the current system to add all devices in
IMC to the view. Clear the check box to add the specified devices to the view.
6.
Click Add to enter the Select Devices window.
7.
Add devices using either the By View or the Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by
View" (page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
8.
Highlight the devices you want to select and do one of the following:

To add them to the Selected Devices list, click Add selected

To select all of the devices displayed in the Devices Found list, click Add all

To remove one or more, select them and click Remove selected

To remove all of the selected devices, click Remove all
9.
Confirm that the devices you have found have been added.
10.
Click OK.
11.
To delete devices, select from the following options:


, or
, or
, or
.
Make sure that the devices to be deleted are on the list, select the devices to be deleted, and
click Delete to delete the devices from the list, or
If you select the From Network Segment option of the Automatically Add New Devices list,
you can specify an IP address segment, so that the newly added devices whose IP
addresses are on the specified IP network segment are automatically added to the view.
a. Click Add to enter the Adding IP window.
b. Enter the start IP address in the Start IP field.
c.
Enter the end IP address in the End IP field.
d. Click OK.
12.
Make sure that the start IP address and end IP address are displayed on the IP address list.
13.
Select the IP address segment to be deleted, and click Delete to delete the selected IP address
segment.
14.
Click OK.


Set Default Topology View: Enables you to define which topology view loads when an
operator selects the Network Topology link located on the navigation tree on the left of
IMC’s web interface. By default, the Custom View is loaded.
Zoom: Enables you to zoom in or out of the topology view or to fit the contents of the
topology map into the current window.
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Topology map options
Right click your mouse on the topology background to access menus for using and customizing
topology maps. The options for customizing topology maps include:
•
Create Subview: Enables you to create logical device views. From the Create Subview dialog
box, you can add devices to the subview using the View or Advanced query feature.
•
Add Cloud: Enables you to add a cloud icon to the topology view.
•
Add Note: Enables you to add a note for a topology view.
•
Add Device: Enables you launch the Add Device page found under the Resource tab,
Resource→Add Device. Using the Add Device feature, you can add devices to IMC. The Add
Device page loads in the browser instance that originally launched the topology maps, not in
the browser instance that has the topology maps loaded. For more information on using the Add
Device feature, see "Adding devices manually to IMC" (page 154).
•
Add Device to This View: Enables you to add one or more devices to this view.
•
Modify View: Enables you to modify this view. This feature also enables you to modify the
upper-level view of this view.
•
Add Link: Enables you to add a link.
•
Link Management: Provides a shortcut to the link management. This feature enables you to view
all links in the view, and add, query, or delete a link. For other link management operations, see
"Link management via the right mouse click" (page 187).
•
Find: Launches a simple dialog box that enables you to search IMC for a device by IP address
or device label. The results display in the Find Result dialog box in a tabular format.
•
Paste: Enables you to paste the copied device nodes or links to the specified custom topology.
This feature applies to only device nodes and links. Before pasting a link to a custom topology,
you should copy the devices at both ends of the link to the custom topology. This feature is not
available for IP topologies and Layer 2 topologies. In a custom topology, you can paste the
copied device nodes or links to a subview.
•
Reload: Refreshes the current topology view.
•
Path Topology: Enables you to trace a path between any two devices by entering their IP
addresses. The results of the path topology view displays in a new page in the main pane of the
topology page. This view can be accessed through the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
•
Set Default Topology View: Enables you to define which topology loads when an operator
selects the Network Topology link located on the navigation tree on the left of IMC’s web
interface. By default, the Custom View is loaded.
•
Device Label: Allows you to decide which label is used to denote the various devices displayed
on a topology map. Options include Show IP, Show Label, Show SysName, Show Vendor,
Show Device Type, and No Label.
•
Link Label: Allows you to decide which label is used to denote the various links displayed on a
topology map. Options include Show Name, Show Type, Show Node (Device Name), Show
Interface, Show Interface Alias, and No Label.
•
Hand: Enables you to grab and move the topology view within the confines of the pane. To exit
this mode, select Pointer Tool from the menu.
•
Zoom: Enables you to zoom in or out of the topology view or to fit the contents of the topology
map into the current window.
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Managing data center topology maps
Data center topology maps enable you to create realistic maps of the data center down to the
individual racks and cabinets and the devices that populate them. Upon installation, the Data Center
Topology map is a blank page that allows you customize the options that are available via right
mouse clicks. You can create nested maps up to four layers deep (data center, building room, and
cabinet or rack) displaying the physical layout of the data centers in the organization. For example,
one or more buildings can be nested in the top level data center topology map, one or more rooms
can be nested in a building, one or more wiring cabinets or racks can be nested in a room, and one
or more devices can be added to the racks and cabinets as they actually exist in the data center. You
can locate a device in the room topology according to its asset number. You can manually configure
data center topology maps or have them automatically built.
Manually configuring data center topology maps
IMC provides a high-level data center topology map, which is a blank page upon which you can
create a visual representation of your data center. On the data center page, you can add clouds,
buildings or rooms.
You cannot add wiring cabinets or devices to the data center view. You must first create a building or
room. You can only add wiring cabinets to rooms and devices to wiring cabinets. The following
section describes the various data center map levels and their menu options.
Data center topology maps
There are many options for customizing the top-level map of the data center topology. You can create
multi-level nested maps representing the physical layout of the data centers in your organization, add
one or more clouds, or add one or more buildings to the data center map, however adding buildings
to topology maps are optional. You can add one or more rooms to the data center map.
To access the data center topology map:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
A new browser instance opens and an icon labeled Custom Topology displays in the main
pane of the page. A navigation system displays on the left.
4.
Double click Data Center Topology under Topology.
A new page for the Data Center Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the
main pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
You can access data center topology configuration options through right mouse clicks. Data center
map menu options include:

Find: This feature enables you to locate a device in the rack topology.
a. To locate the device, right-click the Data Center Topology map.
b. Select Find from the shortcut menu.
The Find window appears.
c.
Input the partial or full asset number of the device you want to find.
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d. Click Find.
The matched devices are displayed on the Find Result window.
e. Click a device name to see the location of the device in the chassis topology.

Reload: This option refreshes the page after you have made changes to it. Once you have
added a building or room to the data center map, click Reload to view and access the
cloud, building, or room containers you have added.
Add data centers
This option enables you to add one or more data center to the data center topology map.
To add a Data Center:
1.
Right-click the data center topology map.
2.
Select Add Data Center from the shortcut menu.
3.
Enter a name for the data center.
4.
Select the layer.
5.
Click OK.
6.
Select Reload from the right mouse click menu to refresh the data center map.
Add room
This option enables you to add one or more rooms to the data center topology map.
To add a room:
1.
Right-click the data center topology map.
2.
Select Add Room from the shortcut menu.
3.
Enter a name for the room.
4.
Select the background.
5.
Click OK.
6.
Select Reload from the right mouse click menu to refresh the data center map.
Add cloud
This option enables you to add one or more clouds to connect to data centers. The clouds represent the external
networks.
To add a cloud:
1.
Right-click the data center topology map.
2.
Select Add Cloud from the shortcut menu.
3.
Enter a name for the cloud.
4.
Click OK.
5.
Select Reload from the right mouse click menu to refresh the data center map.

Set Default Topology View: Enables you to make this the view that is loaded when you click
network topology view from Resource→View Management→Network Topology.
191



Hand: Enables you to grab and move the topology view within the confines of the pane. To
exit this mode, select Pointer from the menu.
Zoom: Enables you to zoom in or out of the topology view or to fit the contents of the
topology map into the current window.
Adjust Background: Enables you to adjust background of the topology.
Add building topology maps
You can add one or more rooms to a building topology map; however, you cannot add wiring
cabinets or devices to the building map. You must create buildings first, then rooms and add wiring
cabinets to rooms. While rooms are required to add wiring cabinets, buildings are optional. You can
add rooms directly to the data center topology map.
To access a building map:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
A new browser instance opens and an icon labeled Custom Topology displays in the main
pane of the page. A navigation system displays on the left.
4.
Double click Data Center Topology under Topology.
A new page for the Data Center Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the
main pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
5.
To access a data center, do one of the following:

Double click the icon for the map you want to access, or

Right-click the data center icon and select Expand from the shortcut menu.
A view of the data center expands in the existing page. Use the tabs at the top of the page
to navigate between data center map options.
6.
To close to a data center icon, right-click the data center icon and select Collapse from the
shortcut menu.
The data center topology map also has right mouse click menu for configuring the data center map. Menu
options for the data center map are:
•
Rename: Renames the data center.
•
Delete: Enables you to delete the current data center from the data center map. After you select
Delete, right-click on Reload from the data center map to view the updated data center map.
•
Automatically Build DC Topology: Enables you to have a data center topology map
automatically built for the building. For more information on automatically building data center
topology maps in IMC, see "Automatically building data center topology maps" (page 194).
•
Expand/Collapse: Toggles to either expand or collapse the selected building icon.
Access room topology maps
A room represents a small-scale data center. You can add one or more rooms to data centers or
directly to data center topology maps. Room topology maps serve as containers for the wiring
192
cabinets that house managed devices. You can add one or more racks or cabinets to room topology
maps.
To access a room topology map:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
A new browser instance opens and an icon labeled Custom Topology displays in the main
pane of the page. A navigation system displays on the left.
4.
Double click Data Center Topology under Topology.
A new page for the Data Center Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the
main pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
5.
To access a room, do one of the following:

Double click a room icon from a data center map, or

Right-click the room icon and select Open from the shortcut menu.
A new page for the room map displays in the main pane.
6.
Use the tabs located at the top of the page to navigate between topology maps.
A toolbar is located to the left of the room topology map, including the zoom in and zoom out
tools and the
7.
Click the
Edit Room icon.
Edit Room icon to enter the object library.
You can edit and add the objects as needed, and save frequently used objects in an object
template, which allows you to quickly add those objects to the room topology maps.
The room topology map also has right mouse click menu for configuring the room map. Menu options
for the room map are:
•
Reload: Refreshes the page after you have made changes to it. Once you have added a room
to the map, click Reload to view and access the new rooms.
•
Modify: Enables you to modify basic information about the room topology map, including the
name, rows, columns, colors, floor grid stroke and floor deep.
•
Object Template: Enables you to manage object template.
Access wiring cabinet
Wiring cabinet or rack topology maps contain graphical representations of the managed network
devices. In rack topology maps you can add one or more devices, cabinet supports, and objects to
the selected wiring cabinet.
To access a wiring cabinet map:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
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A new browser instance opens and an icon labeled Custom Topology displays in the main
pane of the page. A navigation system displays on the left.
4.
Double click Data Center Topology under Topology.
A new page for the Data Center Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the
main pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
5.
To access a wiring cabinet, do one of the following:

Double click the room icon that contains the wiring cabinet icon you want to access, or

Right-click the room icon and select Open from the shortcut menu.
A new page for the room map displays in the main pane.
6.
Use the tabs located at the top of the page to navigate between topology maps:

Double click the cabinet icon you want to access, or

Right-click the wiring cabinet icon and select Open from the shortcut menu.
A new page for the wiring cabinet map displays in the main pane.
7.
Use the tabs located at the top of the page to navigate between topology maps.
The rack topology map also has right mouse click menu for configuring the map. Menu options for the map are:
•
Reload: Refreshes the page after you have made changes to it. Once you have added a device
to the wiring topology map, click Reload to view your changes.
•
Add Device to Cabinet: Add a new device to the wiring cabinet. You can add devices using
either the By View or the Advanced query. Method. See "Adding devices by View" (page 85)
and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
8.
Click OK.
9.
Right-click the rack and select Reload from the shortcut menu to update the map:

Add Supports: Add a new supports to the wiring cabinet.

Add Object: Adds a new object to the wiring cabinet.
a. From the Add Object dialog box, enter the dimensions of the object.
b. Click OK.
c.


Select Reload from the right mouse click menu to update the map.
Rename: Enables you to rename the rack.
Zoom: Enables you to zoom in or out of the topology view or to fit the contents of the
topology map into the current window.
Automatically building data center topology maps
You can create nested maps up to four layers, which display the physical layout of the data centers in
the organization and have the cabinets automatically populated with the devices managed by IMC.
To automatically build Data Center Topology maps:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
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A new browser instance opens and an icon labeled Custom Topology displays in the main
pane of the page. A navigation system displays on the left.
4.
Double click Data Center Topology under Topology.
A new page for the Data Center Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the
main pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
5.
Click the
icon in the topology map toolbar.
The Automatically Build a Data Center Topology dialog box appears. The dialog box includes
an Automatically Build a Data Center Topology list:


IP Address: Contains the IP address of the device.

Height (U): Contains the height of the device, in units.

Data Center: Contains the data center where the device is located.

6.
Device Label: Contains the device name in IMC. By default, the device name is the
sysName of the device in IMC.
Layer: Contains the layer where the device is located in the data center. A data center can
contain up to five layers.

Room: Contains the room where the device is located.

Cabinet: Contains the cabinet where the device is installed.
Click the Select Devices button located at the up right of the dialog box.
The Select Devices dialog box appears. You can add devices using either the By View or the
Advanced query method. See "Adding devices by View" (page 85) and "Adding devices by
Advanced query" (page 85).
7.
Click the Height (U) field for the associated device to modify the device height.
The total height of all devices cannot exceed the capability of the cabinet.
8.
Click the Data Center field for the associated device to configure the data center where the
device is located.
9.
Do one of the following:


If the data center already exists, click the
button located at the right of the Data Center
field to select the data center name from the list, or
If the data center does not exist, enter the data center name in the Data Center field. The
data center is automatically created when the data center topology map is automatically
built.
10.
Click the Layer field for the associated device to configure the layer where the device is
located.
11.
Select the layer where the device is located.
12.
Click the Room field for the associated device to configure the room where the device is
located.
13.
Do one of the following:


If the room already exists, click the
the room from the list, or
button located at the right of the Room field to select
If the room does not exist, enter the room name in the Room field. The room is automatically
created when the data center topology map is automatically built.
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14.
Click the Cabinet field for the associated device to configure the cabinet or rack where the
device is installed.
15.
Do one of the following:


16.
If the cabinet already exists, click the
select the cabinet from the list, or
button located at the right of the Cabinet field to
If the cabinet does not exist, enter the cabinet name in the Cabinet field. The cabinet is
automatically created when the data center topology map is automatically built.
Click OK.
The data center topology map is automatically built and the cabinets are automatically
populated with devices.
Managing devices from the data center topology maps
The network topology maps also enable you to manage devices directly from the topology view. From
the topology devices, you can view and perform management functions including viewing device
information and performing actions such as ping, trace route and initiating Telnet or SSH sessions to
the selected devices. To manage devices from the Data Center Topology map:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
4.
Double click Data Center Topology under Topology.
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
A new page for the Data Center Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the
main pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
5.
To access a wiring cabinet, do one of the following:

Double click the room icon that contains the wiring cabinet icon you want to access, or

Right-click the room icon and select Open from the shortcut menu.
A new page for the room map displays in the main pane.
6.
Use the tabs located at the top of the page to navigate between topology maps.
7.
Do one of the following:

Double click the cabinet icon you want to access, or

Right-click the wiring cabinet icon and select Open from the shortcut menu.
A new page for the wiring cabinet map displays in the main pane.
8.
Use the tabs located at the top of the page to navigate between topology maps.
9.
Select the device that you want to manage by clicking on it.
10.
Right-click the device you have selected.
The management menu appears. Menu options are:



Configuration: Enables you to configure the device specifications for the rack topology
map. Enter the device dimensions in the Configuration dialog box.
Delete: Enables you to delete the selected device from the wiring cabinet.
Topology Location: Provides you with a list of other maps that the selected device can be
found on.
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11.
To access the device on another map or view, click the Owner entry in the Find Result table for
the associated device.
A new tab in the current browser opens and the view with the selected device appears.







Open Web-Based NMS: Allows you to launch the Web Manager interface for the selected
device directly from the topology map. Selecting this option opens the Web Manager in a
new browser instance that can be accessed via the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
From this window, you can manage more fully the selected device. For more information on
the Web Manager, see "Open web manager" (page 218).
Open Device Panel: Allows you to launch the Device Panel interface for the selected device
directly from the topology map. Selecting this option opens the Device Panel in a new pane
in the topology window that can be accessed via the tabs located at the top of the main
pane, allowing you to more fully manage the selected device. For more information on the
Device Panel, see "Open device panel" (page 221).
Device Information: Opens the Device Details page for the selected device. The Device
Details page loads in the browser instance that originally launched the topology maps, not
in the browser instance that has the topology maps loaded. For more information on the
Device Details page, see "Managing one device via device details" (page 212).
Tools-Ping: Enables you to launch a ping request from the IMC server to the selected device
from the topology map. IMC opens a new browser instance can be accessed via the tabs
located at the top of the main pane.
Tools-Telnet: Enables you to launch a telnet session for the selected device directly from the
topology map. You are prompted for the application on the local computer that supports
telnet.
Tools-Traceroute: Enables you to launch a traceroute request from the IMC server to the
selected device from the topology map. IMC opens a new browser instance that can be
accessed via the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
Tools-SSH: Enables you to launch an SSH session for the selected device directly from the
topology map. You are prompted for the application on the local computer that supports
SSH.
Managing stack devices with the stack topology
The stack topology enables you to manage stack devices directly from the topology view, by allowing
you to view the stack members, link status among stack members, and link status among stack
members and external devices, and delete invalid stack members.
To view stack devices from the stack topology:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
4.
Double click any custom topology under Custom Topology or IP topology under IP Topology.
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
A new page for the Custom Topology or IP Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple
pages in the main pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main
pane.
5.
To access the stack topology, do one of the following:
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

Right-click the stack device icon
menu, or
and select Open Stack Topology from the shortcut
Double click the stack device icon.
A new page for the stack topology displays in the main pane.
6.
Use the tabs located at the top of the page to navigate between topology maps.
7.
Select the tab located at the top of the page for the stack topology you want to display.
The stack device icon expands as a rectangle. From this rectangle you can view the internal
structure of the stack.
The device marked with the
icon is the master device of the stack, and the other devices are
all subordinate devices. The links among the stack members show the internal structure of the
stack. The links among the stack members and external devices show how the stack is
connected to external devices.
8.
Double click the rectangle to collapse the stack device to a stack device icon.
9.
Click a rectangle, stack member, or stack link.
The stack topology displays information about the selected stack device, stack member, or
stack link.
For the stack device, the left mouse click includes the following:

Device label: Contains the IMC name for the stack device, which, by default, is the name
assigned to it by IMC in its device configuration. If the stack device is configured with a
sysName, IMC uses this as the Device Label unless a Device Label has been manually
configured. The stack device label serves as an active link for drilling down into the Device
Details page, which offers you convenient access to device management features.

IP Address: Contains the management IP address of the stack device.

Mask: Contains the mask of the management IP address.

Device Status: Contains the most current status of the stack device. Status is determined by
the highest severity or alarm level for the stack device, when a stack device has more than
one current alarm that has not been cleared or recovered.

Sysname: Contains the name that is configured on the stack device.

Vendor: Contains the stack device vendor’s name.
For the stack member and stack link, the left mouse click includes the following:

Device label: Contains the device label of the stack member.

Stack Member ID: Contains the stack member ID.

Stack Member Role: Contains the role of the stack member, which can be Master or Slave.

Link Name: Contains the name for the stack link.

Line Type: Contains information about the stack link type.



Left Node: Contains the device label for the stack member device that is located on the left
of the link as represented in the stack topology map.
Left Physical Interface: Contains the physical interface name for the device that connects on
the left in the stack topology map.
Left Logical Interface: Contains the logical interface name for the device that connects on
the left in the stack topology map.
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



Right Node: Contains the device label for the stack member device that is located on the
right of the link as represented in the stack topology map.
Right Physical Interface: Contains the physical interface name for the device that connects
on the right in the stack topology map.
Right Logical Interface: Contains the logical interface name for the device that connects on
the right in the stack topology map.
Link Speed: Contains the speed of the stack link in bits per second.
Deleting invalid stack members from the stack topology
To delete invalid stack members from the stack topology:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
4.
Double click either Custom Topology or IP Topology under Topology.
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
A new page for the Custom Topology or IP Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages
in the main pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
5.
To access the stack topology, do one of the following:


Right-click the stack device icon
menu, or
and select Open Stack Topology from the shortcut
Double click the stack device icon.
A new page for the stack topology displays in the main pane.
6.
Use the tabs located at the top of the page to navigate between topology maps.
7.
Select the tab located at the top of the page for the stack topology you want to display.
The stack device icon expands as a rectangle. From this rectangle you can view the internal
topology of the stack device. A device marked with the
icon is an invalid stack member.
8.
To delete an invalid stack member, right-click the invalid stack member in the stack topology
map and select Delete Stack Member from the shortcut menu.
9.
Click OK.
Viewing traffic with traffic topology
The traffic topology enables you to view the traffic conditions of links of the specified type in the
custom topology.
To view the traffic from the traffic topology:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
4.
Double click any custom topology under Custom Topology.
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
A new page for the Custom Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the main
pane can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
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5.
Click the





icon. The following menus appear:
Traffic Topology Index: Allows you to decide which index will denote the traffic of the link
on a topology map.
Link Type of Traffic Topology: Allows you to decide which type of the link displays the traffic
on a topology map. Options include All links, Core links, Links to servers, and Link to PCs.
Core links refer to links connecting network devices. Links to servers refer to links
connecting network devices to servers. Links to PCs refer to links connecting network
devices to PCs.
Show: Identifies the link traffic load status by color. This option is available when No Index
is not selected for Traffic Topology Index. The Show feature provides the Traffic Labels and
Traffic load options.
Traffic labels: Displays the values of the indexes selected in Traffic Topology Index over
links, and displays the values in different background colors according to the level-1 and
level-2 thresholds set in the global indexes. If the traffic over a link is normal, the
background color of the index values is the same as the background color of the traffic
topology.
Traffic load: Displays links in different colors according to their traffic load conditions. The
system has pre-defined traffic ranges for each index in the Traffic Topology Index. After you
select an index in the Traffic Topology Index, the topology displays the links in different
colors according to the traffic ranges of these links.
6.
Customize the traffic range thresholds and their corresponding colors in the Traffic load
parameters.
7.
Add a file userDefined.xml in directory:
IMC\client\conf\perf\trafficTop
a. Configure the traffic range thresholds and their corresponding colors in the file
userDefined.xml.
For example, task id=1 corresponds to the index Interface Transmitting Rate. By setting the min
and max parameters for the region parameter and setting rgb-r, rgb-g, and rgb-b values for
the color_value parameter, you can set different colors for different threshold ranges.
For more information, see the system-defined configuration file systemDefined.xml. IMC
preferentially uses the configurations in the file userDefined.xml. At the same time, do not
modify the configurations in the system-defined configuration file systemDefined.xml.
The traffic topology feature applies only to the current topology.
If you enable the traffic topology, the message box located at the bottom of the current topology
will prompt you to start to monitor traffic on topology links.
Viewing the virtual network with VNM topology maps
You can view the virtual network with VNM topology maps. Options for VNM topology maps include
displaying or hiding the storage devices, and viewing the physical servers managed by a specific
vManager.
To display/hide the storage devices:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
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3.
Click
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
4.
Double click VNM Topology under Topology.
A new page for the VNM Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the main pane
can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
5.
Right click with nothing selected on the VNM topology to display a menu containing the
Display/Hide Storage Devices option.
6.
Select this option, to display or hide the storage devices.
Viewing the physical servers managed by a specific vManager
You can select a vManager and view the physical servers it manages. When you use this feature, the
physical servers managed by the vManager you select are highlighted, whereas all physical servers
managed by other vManager are grayed out.
To view the physical servers managed by a specific vManager:
1.
Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
2.
Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
3.
Click
4.
Double click VNM Topology under Topology.
Network Topology under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
A new page for the VNM Topology displays in the main pane. Multiple pages in the main pane
can be navigated using the tabs located at the top of the main pane.
5.
Click the
menu.
vManager Topology icon and select the vManager you want to view in the popup
The vManagers are sorted by IP address and device label.
6.
Click the
vManager Topology icon and select the Exit option in the popup menu to cancel
viewing the physical servers.
Viewing devices with custom views
Custom views offer you the ability to create their own views based on groups of devices they define.
Like all IMC views, custom views offer you a real time snapshot of the status of devices in the network
infrastructure through color-coded icons that match the highest severity or alarm level for devices in
the view.
Unlike Device, IP, or custom views enable you to grant and revoke management rights for devices in
custom views. First, you create custom views and add devices to them. Then, you grants access to the
custom groups in the individual operator accounts.
When considering how to organize devices into custom groups and subviews, consider first the rights
and privileges you want to grant to or restrict you from. Also, consider how the logical grouping of
devices can support an effect rights management policy. For more information on the relationship of
custom views and operator rights, see "Operator management: managing secure access to IMC"
(page 103).
You can organize one or more views according to the IMC security needs and viewing requirements
of their organization. Custom views can be organized by geography, or location, buildings,
organizational groupings, just to name a few. Devices can belong to more than one custom view.
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As all IMC views do, custom views offer drilldown to the device details for an individual device. From
the Device Details page, you can access management features that offer you quick and easy access
to network resources as well as the ability to manage them.
Accessing Custom Views
To access custom views
1.
Navigate to Resource→Custom View.
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
2.
Click Custom View on the navigation tree on the left. The list of custom views is displayed
in the Custom View List. This list is empty if no custom views have been created.
Click the view name you want to access. The Device List/Topology for the custom view you
choose appears.
Device List







Status: Contains the most current status of the device. Device icons that are gray are not
managed.
Device List: Contains the name of a device in the view. The contents of this field serve as an
active link for drilling down into the Device Details page, which offers you convenient
access to device management features.
Category: Contains the IMC device category for the associated device.
Model: Contains device model information. If the device is managed for reachability using
ICMP only no device model information is available and the field contains "ICMP."
IP Address: Contains the IP address of the device.
Interface List: Contains a link to the list of interfaces for the selected device. This list provides
access to the Interface Details page for each interface.
Operation: Contains an icon
device.
that displays links to operational tasks for the associated
You can sort the Device List by the Status, Device List, Category, Model, or IP Address fields by
clicking the column label to sort the list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch
that allows you to toggle between the various sort options specific to each field.
If the Device List contains multiple entries, following navigational aids may appear:
3.

Click
to page forward in the Device List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Device List.

Click
to page backward in the Device List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Device List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items
per page you want to view.
You can only view the custom views and devices to which they have been granted management
access.
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The color of a device icon represents the severity or alarm level for the most severe alarm condition for
that device.
IMC enables you to manage multiple devices via the custom view, including deleting, synchronizing,
managing and unmanaging devices. For information on managing multiple devices through these
views, see "Managing multiple devices from the device list" (page 299).
Topology
A topology map of the custom view is located on the Topology tab, from which you can view the
network diagram and perform certain operations on the topology map of the custom view. For more
information on operating the topology map, see "Viewing devices via the Network Topology" (page
181).
Managing custom views
Custom views offer administrators the ability to create views based on groups of devices you define.
Unlike other IMC device views, custom views enable you to grant and revoke management rights to
operators based on custom views. First, you must create the custom views, add devices to them, and
then grant access to the custom groups in the individual operator accounts.
It is important to also consider the rights and privileges you want to grant or restrict to you and how
the logical grouping of devices can support an effect rights management policy. For more information
on the relationship of custom views and operator rights, see "Operator management: managing
secure access to IMC" (page 103).
You can create one or more custom views based on the IMC security needs and viewing requirements
of their organization.
Creating custom views
To create a custom view:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Custom View.
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Custom View on the navigation tree on the left. The list of custom views is displayed
in the Custom View List. This list is empty if no custom views have been created.
2.
Click Add.
3.
Enter the name for the custom view you want to add in the View Name field.
4.
Click the
link to the right of the Upper-Level View field.
The window for selecting a view appears.
5.
Select an upper-level view for the new view, and click OK.
The selected view appears at the right of the Upper-Level View field.
6.
Select an option from the Automatically Add New Devices list.
If you select the From Network Segment option, the following options appear:
a. Enter the start IP address in the Start IP field.
b. Enter the end IP address in the End IP field.
c.
Do one of the following:
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−
Click Add to add the network segment to the Network Segment field and the new
devices on the network segment are automatically added to the view, or
−
Click Delete to delete one or more IP address segments.
7.
In the Device List, select whether to Add all devices of the current system.
8.
If this option is selected, the Device List is hidden, all devices managed by IMC are added to the
view, and you directly go to Step 10.
9.
If the Add all devices of the current system option is not selected in Step 5, you can click Add
in the Device List to select devices you want to add to the view.
10.
Add devices using either By View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
11.
Click OK to create the custom view.
Modifying Custom Views
To modify a custom view:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Custom View.
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Custom View on the navigation tree on the left. The list of custom views is displayed
in the Custom View List.
2.
Click the Modify icon
associated with the custom view you want to modify.
3.
Modify the name for the custom view in the View Name field.
4.
Click the
link to the right of the Upper-Level View field.
The window for selecting a view appears.
5.
Select an upper-level view for the new view, and click OK.
The selected view appears at the right of the Upper-Level View field.
6.
Reselect an option from the Automatically Add New Devices list.
7.
If you select the From Network Segment option, the following options appear:
a. Enter the start IP address in the Start IP field.
b. Enter the end IP address in the End IP field.
c.
8.
Do one of the following:
−
Click Add to add the network segment to the Network Segment field and the new
devices on the network segment are automatically added to the view, or
−
Click Delete to delete one or more IP Address segments.
In the Device List, select whether to Add all devices of the current system.
If this option is selected, the Device List is hidden, all devices managed by IMC are added to the
view, and you directly go to Step 10.
9.
If the Add all devices of the current system option is not selected in Step 5, you can click Add
in the Device List to select devices you want to add to the view.
10.
Add devices using either By View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
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11.
Click OK to modify the custom view.
Deleting custom views
To delete a custom view:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Custom View.
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Custom View on the navigation tree on the left. The list of custom views is displayed
in the Custom View List.
2.
Click the Delete icon
associated with the custom view you want to delete.
3.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the custom view.
WARNING:
All the devices in the view are removed from the deleted views but are deleted from IMC.
Adding Devices to Custom Views
Once you have created the custom views, you are ready to add devices.
To add devices to custom views:
1.
Navigate to the Device List for a custom view.
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Custom View on the navigation tree on the left.
This displays the Custom View List in the main pane of the Custom View page.
2.
To add devices to a Level 1 view, click the View Name link for the custom view you want to add
devices to.
3.
Click Add.
4.
Add devices using either By View or Advanced query option. See "Adding devices by View"
(page 85) and "Adding devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
Removing devices from custom views
To remove devices from custom views:
1.
Navigate to the Device List for a custom view.
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click Custom View on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
This displays the Custom View List in the main pane of the Custom View page.
2.
To remove devices from a view, click the View Name link for the custom view you want to delete
devices from.
3.
Click the Operation icon
view.
4.
Select
associated with the device you want to remove from the custom
Delete from the Operation menu to remove the device.
Removing a device removes it from the custom view but it does not remove or delete the device
from IMC.
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5.
Do one of the following:


Confirm removal of the device from the custom view, or
Remove one or more devices from the Device List by clicking the checkboxes
to the devices you want to remove from the custom view and click Remove.
to the left
Now that you have created custom views and have added devices to them, the next step is to grant
or restrict access to these views and the devices in them by configuring each operator account.
Operator accounts that are included in the Administrator Group have administrator privileges to all
custom views. These privileges cannot be revoked. Therefore, to effectively use custom views to restrict
access and management rights to devices in them, you must also configure the operators to have
membership in an operator group that does not have ADMIN privileges. For more information on
configuring operator groups and individual operator accounts, see "Operator management:
managing secure access to IMC" (page 103).
Viewing device interfaces with port groups
IMC offers you a variety of options for viewing network resources and for drilling down into the
features used to manage them. IMC provides you with the ability to manage port groups. To facilitate
viewing interface status, administrators can group several concerned interfaces or important
interfaces (such as the device interfaces that connect to a mail server, or core layer device interfaces)
together as a port group.
The Port Group also offers drilldown capabilities to the device and interface details page. The Device
Details page provides you with access to IMC’s network device management features. The Interface
Details page provides you with access to IMC’s interface management features.
Managing port groups
The Port Group feature provides you with the ability to query, add, modify, and delete port groups
and to grant and revoke management rights to operators. You can create one or more port groups
based on the administrators’ jobs and port functions. In addition, port groups offer you the ability to
drill down to port groups’ details.
Querying port group list
IMC enables you to filter port groups by a partial or complete port group name, by interface status,
or by interface alias and then displays only those port groups that match the search or filter criteria.
To filter the Port Group List:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Port Group List:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Port Group under View Management from the navigation system on the left. The Port
Group List displays in the main pane of the Port Group List page.
Port group list

2.
Expand/Collapse icon: Contains the expand/collapse icon for the associated port group.
Click the
icon to expand the associated port group to view the interface list.
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3.
Click
icon to collapse the associated port group.

Port Group Name: Contains the port group name.

Total Number: Contains the number of the interfaces in the associated port group.

Interface Status: Contains the most current status statistic of the interfaces in the associated
port group. The interface statuses include:
Down
Up
Unknown
Blocked
Unmanaged
Each interface status icon is attached with the number of interfaces in the port group that are
in that status.



4.
Created by: Contains the name of the operator who created the associated port group.
Actions: Contains the Modify
and Delete
icons that link to modify and the delete
port group. For more information on modifying and deleting port groups, see "Modifying a
port" (page 209) and "Deleting a port group" (page 210).
Description: Contains the description for the associated port group.
Move the pointer over Query Groups at the upper right corner of the Port Group List, and a
search criteria dialog box appears.
a. Enter the following search criteria in the dialog box:
Group Name: Enter the port group name you want to search for. Select Fuzzy from the list
located to the right of the Group Name if you want to enter a partial IP address. Select Exact
from this list if you want IMC to search for an exact match for the port group name you have
entered.
Created by: Enter the name of the operator who created the port group for which you want
to search. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field, allowing you to enter a partial or
complete string for the operator name.
Interface Status: Select the status of the interfaces in the port group you want to search for
from the Interface Status list.
Interface Description: Enter the description of the port group you want to search for in the
Interface Description field. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field, allowing you to enter
a partial or complete string for the interface description.
Interface Alias: Enter the interface alias that is contained in the port group you want to
search for in the Interface Alias field. IMC supports fuzzy matching for this field, allowing
you to enter a partial or complete name for the interface alias.
b. Click Query.
The results display in the main pane of the Port Group List page.
Viewing the interface list of a port group
To view the interface list of a port group:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Port Group List:
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a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Port Group under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Port Group List displays in the main pane of the Port Group List page.
2.
Click the expand
icon located to the left of the name of the port group for which you want
to view the interface list.
The interface list of the port group appears.
Interface list of the port group

Interface Status: Contains the most current status of the interfaces in the associated port
group. The interface statuses:
Down
Up
Unknown
Blocked
Unmanaged

Interface: Contains the interface name, which serves as a link for navigating to the Interface
Details page. For more information on the Interface Details page, see "Interface details
page" (page 269).

Interface Index: Contains a unique index of the associated interface.

Interface Type: Contains the type of the associated interface.

Device Label: Contains the name of the device where the interface is located, serving as a
link for navigating to the Device Details page. For more information on the Device Details
page, see "Managing one device via device details" (page 212).

Interface IP: Contains the IP address of the associated interface.

Mac Address: Contains the MAC address of the associated interface.

Speed (bps): Contains the speed of the associated interface, in bits per second.






Rx (bps): Contains the average receive rate of the day on the associated interface, in bits
per second.
Tx (bps): Contains the average transmit rate of the day on the associated interface, in bits
per second.
Rx Util (%): Contains the average receive bandwidth usage of the day on the associated
interface, in percent.
Tx Util (%): Contains the average transmit bandwidth usage of the day on the associated
interface, in percent.
Rx Dis (%): Contains the average inbound packet loss rate of the day on the associated
interface, in percent.
Tx Dis (%): Contains the average outbound packet loss rate of the day on the associated
interface, in percent.
You can sort the interface list by the Interface Status, Interface, Interface Type, Device Label,
Interface IP, Mac Address, and Speed (bps) fields by clicking the column label to sort the list by
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the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to toggle between the
various sort options specific to each field.
Customizing Columns for the Interface List
To customize columns for the interface list:
1.
Click the Customize Columns link located in the upper right corner of the Port Group List, the
Customize Columns dialog box appears.
2.
Click the checkbox
3.
Click OK.
to the left of the Columns Name you want to display.
You cannot hide the following columns of the interface list: Interface Status, Interface, and
Device Label.
4.
Select the filter from the Filter list located in the upper left corner of the interface list to filter the
interface list. The interface refreshes to display the interfaces that match the filter conditions.
Adding a port
To add a port group:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Port Group List:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Port Group under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Port Group List displays in the main pane of the Port Group List page.
2.
Click Add to add a port group.
The Add Port Group page appears.
3.
Enter the port group name in the Group Name field.
4.
Select the operator groups to access to the port group.
5.
Click the checkbox
6.
Enter a description for this port group in the Description field.
7.
Click Add to select interfaces you want to add to the port group.
to the left of the operator group name you want to select.
The Select Interfaces dialog box appears.
8.
Add interfaces using either the View or Advanced query option. Adding interfaces uses the
same process as adding devices. See "Adding devices by View" (page 85) and "Adding
devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
9.
Click OK to create a port group.
Modifying a port
To modify a port group:
1.
Navigate to Resource→Port Group List.
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Port Group under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Port Group List displays in the main pane of the Port Group List page.
209
2.
Click Modify
modify.
icon located at the right of the Action field for the port group you want to
The Modify Port Group page appears.
3.
Modify the port group name in the Group Name field.
4.
Do one of the following:


To change access to this port group, click the checkboxes
groups you want to grant access to, or
To remove operator groups, click the checked boxes
you want to revoke access for.
to the left of the operator
to the left of the operator groups
5.
Modify the description for this port group in the Description field.
6.
Click Add to select the device interfaces to a port group.
7.
The Select Interfaces dialog box appears.
8.
Add interfaces using either the View or Advanced query option. Adding interfaces uses the
same process as adding devices. See "Adding devices by View" (page 85) and "Adding
devices by Advanced query" (page 85).
9.
Do one of the following;


10.
To delete the selected interfaces from a port group lick
Select Interfaces list, or
icon in the delete field of the
To delete all interfaces from a port group, click Remove All button in the upper of the Select
Interfaces list.
Click OK to accept you change to this port group.
Deleting a port group
To delete a port group
1.
Navigate to Resource→Port Group List.
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Port Group under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Port Group List displays in the main pane of the Port Group List page.
2.
Click Delete
delete.
icon located at the right of the Action field for the port group you want to
3.
Click OK to confirm the deletion of the port group.
Deleting a port group does not remove the interfaces of this port group from IMC.
Searching for devices in IMC
You can use the Basic or the Advanced query feature to locate devices in IMC.
210
Searching for a device using the basic search feature
To perform a basic device search:
1.
To search for a device, select the Query Devices icon
of most IMC pages to the left of the Advanced query link.
2.
Enter your search criterion.
3.
Click Go.
, located in the upper right corner
Searching for a device using the advanced search feature
To perform a search using the Advanced link
1.
Navigate to Advanced Query.
a. Click the Advanced link located in the upper right corner of the IMC page.
2.
Click the radio button
3.
Enter one or more of the following search criteria in the Advanced Query dialog box:


4.

Device IP: Enter a partial or complete IP address for the device you want to search for in the
Device IP field.
Select Fuzzy from the list located to the right of the Device IP address if your IP address
search criterion is not exact, or
Select Exact from this list if you want IMC to search for an exact match for the IP address you
have entered.
Continue making selections in the following fields:


MAC: Enter the MAC address of the device you want to search for in the MAC field.
Bridge MAC: Enter the MAC address for the bridge device that you want to query for in the
Bridge Mac field.

Device Category: Select the device category from the Device Category list.

Device Status: Select the device status from the Device Status list.

Device Series: Select the device series from the Device Series list.

Contact: Enter the contact information for the devices you want to search for.

Location: Enter the location of the device you want to search for in the Location field.

6.
Device Label: Enter the device name in the Device Label field.
Do one of the following:

5.
to the left of Query Devices to perform a device search.
Device Reachability: Select the reachability status of the device from the Device Reachability
list.
Click Query.
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Managing one device via device details
IMC offers you a rich set of monitoring and management features for network devices. You have the
option to manage one device at a time or multiple devices. IMC’s feature set for managing one
device includes the ability to synchronize and refresh views, manage, unmanage, and delete devices
from IMC, launch Telnet, SSH, Device Panel and Web Manager sessions for the selected device,
perform ping and Traceroute tests.
You can also configure the selected device from the Device Details page including configuring the
device label, system group attributes, IMC’s SNMP, SSH, and Telnet settings for the selected device,
modifying status and configuration polling intervals, ping parameters and ACL settings.
In addition, you can both monitor and manage switches for PoE, RMON, VLAN and Spanning Tree
configurations. You can configure and view performance information for a selected device as well as
launch configuration management functions including backing up device configurations. You can
also view protocol management information for OSPF, IGMP, and IPv6.
All of these options are available through the Device Details page of a selected device.
Accessing the device details page
There are many ways to access the Device Details page, the most common of which is through the
Device List. The Device List is displayed in each of the following views – Device View, IP View, and the
Custom View. The Device Label column in the Device List contains a link that navigates you to the
Device Details page for the selected device. For information on accessing the Device List displayed in
these views, see "Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing
devices with custom views" (page 201).
In addition, the Device Details page can be accessed by using a right mouse click on a selected
device in the Network Topology. For information on viewing Device Details from the Network
Topology view, see "Viewing devices via the Network Topology" (page 181).
Navigation instructions for accessing the Device Details page from the Device View for all devices are
provided below.
1.
Navigate to Resource→Devices View:
a. Click the Resource tab from the tabular navigation system on the top.
b. Click View Management on the navigation tree on the left.
c.
Click Device View under View Management from the navigation system on the left.
The Device List – All displays all devices in IMC.
2.
Locate the device you want to view the details for.
3.
Click the link in the Device Label column in the Device List for the device.
The Device Details page appears.
Device details page
The Device Details page has features and resources that provide you with quick and easy access to
important device information as well as links to device configuration options.
The Device Details section of the Device Details page presents basic device information as well as
several options for device configuration.
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Device details section contents & configuration options

Device Label: Contains the IMC name for the device. By default, IMC uses the system name
or sysName of the device if it has been configured.
4.
To modify the device label, click the
field.
Modify link located to the right of the Device Label
5.
Delete the existing Device Label value and enter the new device label.
6.
Click OK.
Modifying the device label changes IMC's name or label for the device in IMC only. It does not
change the name of the device on the device itself.

Device Status: Contains the most current status for the device. Status is determined by the
highest severity or alarm level for the device, when a device has more than one current
alarm that has not been cleared or recovered. Device icons with the color gray denote that
the device is unmanaged.

IP Address: Contains the IP address of the device.

Mask: Contains the IP address subnet mask for the associated device.

sysOID: Contains the system Object ID for this device.

Device Model: Contains information on the model of the device.

Device Category: Contains IMC‘s category of the device.
7.
To modify the Device Category, click the
Category field.
8.
Reselect a device category.
9.
Click OK.

Modify link located to the right of the Device
System Name: Contains the name of the device as configured on the device.
10.
To modify the System Name, click the
field.
11.
Delete the existing system name value and enter the new system name.
12.
Click OK.

Modify link located to the right of the System Name
Contact: Contains contact information for this device.
13.
To modify the contact information, click the
field.
14.
Delete the existing contact information and enter the new contact information.
15.
Click OK.

Modify link located to the right of the Contact
Location: Contains the location of the device.
16.
To modify the location information, Click the
Location field.
17.
Delete the existing Location value and enter the new location.
18.
Click OK.
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Modify link located to the right of the



Runtime: Contains the SysUpTime or system up time for this device.
Last Poll: Contains the date and time stamp for IMC’s last status poll for the associated
device.
Login Type: Contains the access method for the device.
19.
To modify the login type, click on the
field.
Modify link located to the right of the Login Type
20.
Select the new login type or access method from the Login Type list.
The device must also be configured to support this login type.
21.
Click OK.


Interfaces: This field contains the number of interfaces and a link that displays a list of all
interfaces on the device. This list includes interface status as well as a link to view and take
action on specific interfaces. For more information on the Interface Details page, see
"Interface details" (page 268). This list contains all of the fields displayed, including those
fields that IMC is unable to gather information for. IN these cases, the field is blank or
contains the value "unknown."
System Description: Contains the system description as defined by the vendor.
Service monitoring
From the Device Details page, you can configure IMC to perform TCP and UDP port checks to validate
that a service on the selected device is listening and responding to queries on that port. This form of
monitoring validates basic service availability. By default, Telnet, FTP, SMTP, DNS, HTTP, and TFTP
are configured but not enabled at installation. In addition to these standard service monitors, user
defined service monitors can be added. Once configured, you can view real time status of services
running on a selected device, also from the Device Details page.
You configure service monitors from the Device Details page of a selected device. In addition, IMC
displays the results of this service monitoring in the Service Monitoring tab found in the lower portion
of the Device Details page.
Viewing monitored services
To view real time service monitoring for an individual device navigate to the Device Details page for
the selected device:
1.
From the Device Details page, click the Service Monitoring tab located below the Device Details
section.
2.
To view all of the monitored services, click the Monitoring Service link located just below the
Service Monitoring tab.
IMC displays all service monitoring entries in a table located under the Service Monitoring
tab.
Monitoring service list fields and explanations

Service Name: Contains the name of the service being monitored.

Service Port: Contains the TCP or UDP port number that is being monitored.

Service Type: Identifies which IP transmission protocol is being monitored, TCP or UDP.

Service Status: Contains the last known status of this service, based on IMC’s last poll.
Status of a service can be running, stopped, or unknown.
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Configuring monitored services
To configure IMC to perform service monitoring:
1.
From the Device Details page, click on the Service Monitoring tab located below the Device
Details section.
2.
Click the
3.
Click the checkbox
for.
4.
Do one of the following:


Customize link located to the right of Monitoring Information.
to the left of the Service Name you want to enable service monitoring
If you have selected a system defined service (Telnet, FTP, SMTP, DNS, HTTP, or TFTP), skip
to Step 6, or
If you want to monitor a service that is not one of the system-defined services displayed in
the Service Name field, click one of the checkboxes
contains "CustomService_1-5", or

to the left of one of the fields that
If you are monitoring a custom or user defined service, first delete the CustomService_#
value in the field associated with the checkbox you checked in Step 3.
5.
Enter the service name for the service you want to monitor.
6.
Enter the TCP or UDP port number for the service that is being used by the monitored service on
the selected device in the Service Port field.
7.
Select the transmission protocol that is being used by this service on the managed device from
the Service Type list.
8.
Click OK.
It may take a few minutes for IMC to execute the service monitoring poll and update the Monitor
Information field with the status of this service. Use your browser’s refresh or reload option to refresh
the Service Monitoring table. The Service Port number and Service Type or transmission protocol must
match what is configured on and being used by the service being monitored on the managed device.
Alarms
From the Device Details page, you can view the 10 most recent alarms that have not been cleared or
recovered along with a graph that summarizes alarms that have not been cleared or recovered. The
alarms list also provides you with drilldown capabilities to alarm details.
Scroll down to the section of the Device Details page titled Recent 10 unrecovered alarms to view the
most recent unrecovered alarms from the Device Details page.
IMC displays the 10 most recent, unrecovered alarms in a table that contains the fields listed below.



Level: Contains the current severity or alarm level status for the associated alarm.
Description: Contains a description of the event or condition that is being alarmed on. The
Description field contains a hyperlink for drilling down into the Alarm Details for the
selected alarm. For more information on the Alarm Details page and actions that you can
take from this page, see "Alarm actions in the alarm details page" (page 569).
Alarm At: Contains the date and time stamp for the associated alarm.
215
1.
For a view of all alarms for the selected device, click the
corner of the table.
More link located in the right
The All Alarms table appears, filtered by the selected device’s IP address. For more information
on the All Alarms page, see "Browsing all alarms" (page 580).
Alarm summary graph
The Device Details page also includes a graph that summarizes all alarms except the Info alarms for
the selected device. This graph contains active links on the graph itself for drilling down into alarms
by severity or alarm level.
Performance monitor
From the Device Details page, you can access the Performance Monitor. This feature provides you
with a quick snapshot of the performance metrics for the selected device from which can view the most
current performance statistics as well as generate historical reports for the same metrics.
Scroll down to the section of the Device Details page titled Performance Monitor to view the most
recent performance metrics.
IMC displays performance metrics in a table that contains the fields listed below.

Monitor Index: Contains the performance metric that the device is being monitored for.

Monitored Value: Contains the most recent polled value for the performance metric.

Operation: This field contains the Start/Stop Monitor option.
To view historical data for the performance monitors listed in the Performance Monitor table:
1.
From the Device Details page, click the Details link located to the far right of the Performance
Monitor.
IMC displays reports for the current day for all performance metrics listed in the Performance
Monitor table.
2.
Use the scroll bar to view all displayed reports.
Right navigation tree
The Device Details page contains many options for configuring one device. The navigation tree
located on the right side of the Device Details page contains configuration options for the selected
device. The sections of the right navigation tree include Action, Configure, Performance Monitor,
Configuration Center, VLAN Management, Device Management, RMON Management, and Protocol
Management.
The right navigation tree is context sensitive and configuration options on this tree vary as the device
type changes.
Actions – For all devices
The Action menu options enable you to apply management and configuration options to the selected
device from the convenience of the navigation tree located on the right of the Device Details section,
including the ability to synchronize and refresh the current Device Details page, to manage and
unmanage the selected device, and delete the device from IMC.
In addition, you can establish a remote session with the selected device using Telnet or SSH from the
Device Details page, launch the Web Manager or Device Panel for remote management of the
selected device, and execute Ping and Traceroute tests from the IMC server to the selected device.
216
Synchronize
Synchronize allows you to update IMC views with current data for the selected device update the
current page with any updated information. Information in the device details section of the page as
well as changes to Telnet or SNMP parameters are updated.
To synchronize the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Synchronize link located under the Action section of the right navigation tree on
the selected device’s Device Details page. For information on navigating to a device’s Device
Details page, see "Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The top of the Device Details page updates to reflect the initiation of the synchronization
process.
2.
Refresh this page using the Refresh option on the right navigation tree to view any updates to
device data.
To synchronize more than one device, see "Managing multiple devices from the device list"
(page 299).
Refresh
Refresh allows you to reload the current Device Details page and capture any updates to the device
details or other dynamic data found on this page. This feature is particularly useful when you use the
Synchronize option to query the selected device for updated information.
To refresh the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Refresh link located under the Action section of right navigation tree on the
selected device’s Device Details page. For information on navigating to a device’s Device
Details page, see "Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
To refresh more than one device, see "Managing multiple devices from the device list" (page
299).
Manage/Unmanage
The process of discovering devices in IMC is separate and distinct from the process of managing them.
During discovery, IMC add all discovered devices to the IMC database. You should determine which
devices should be actively managed. Managing devices means that IMC features for monitoring and
managing the device are available for the managed device. Managed devices consume node
licenses.
From the Action menu, you can manage or unmanage the selected device. The Manage/Unmanage
link is a toggle switch between these two states. If the right navigation tree menu option displays the
Manage option, this means that the device is currently unmanaged. Conversely, if the right
navigation tree menu option displays the
currently managed.
Unmanage option, this means that the device is
To manage or unmanage the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Unmanage link located under the Action section of the right navigation tree on the
selected device’s Device Details page to unmanage a device.
217
2.
Click the
Manage link located under the Action section of the right navigation tree on the
selected device’s Device Details page to manage a device. For information on navigating to a
device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views"
(page 176).
The top of the Device Details page updates to reflect the completion status of the Manage or
Unmanage task.
3.
Refresh this page using the Refresh option on the right navigation tree to view any updates to
device data.
To manage or unmanage more than one device, see "Managing multiple devices from the
device list" (page 299).
Delete
With the Delete option, you can permanently delete the selected device from IMC along with all
associated data for this device. When you delete a device all associated data is purged from IMC
immediately.
To delete the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Delete link located under the Action section of the selected device’s Device
Details page. For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing
devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected device.
To delete more than one device, see, "Managing multiple devices from the device list" (page
299).
WARNING:
Once a device has been deleted, it cannot be restored. Proceed with caution.
Telnet
Operators can launch a Telnet session to the selected device from the Device Details page, offering
them quick and centralized access to managed devices.
To telnet to the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Telnet link located under the Action section of the selected device’s Device Details
page. For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices
with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
Follow your operating system instructions for loading the appropriate Telnet application to be
used to establish a Telnet session with the selected device.
WARNING:
To use this feature, you must have an operating system or application that supports Telnet on the computer
you use to access IMC.
Open web manager
218
Operators can open a Web Manager session to manage the selected device from the Device Details
page, providing you quick web access to managed devices.
To use Web Manager to access and manage the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Open Web Manager link located under the Action section of the right navigation
tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The Web Manager interface appears.
2.
Enter your Web Manager User Name and Password.
3.
Click OK.
Web Service must be supported and enabled on the device for this feature to function properly.
Ping
Operators can execute a Ping test from the IMC server to the selected device from the Device Details
page, providing them with the ability to test the reachability of a managed device from the IMC
server.
To ping the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Ping link located under the Action section of the selected device’s Device Details
page. For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices
with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The Ping dialog box appears.
2.
Select the Ping packet size in bytes from the Buffer Size list.
3.
Select the number of Ping packets you want IMC to send to the selected device from the
Number list.
4.
Click OK to accept your changes and begin the Ping test.
5.
View the results of your Ping test in the Ping dialog box.
6.
Click OK to close the Ping test dialog box.
Traceroute
You can perform a Traceroute from the IMC server to the selected device from the Device Details page,
which provides you the ability test the reachability of a managed device from the IMC server and to
troubleshoot if and where connectivity problems might be.
To perform a Traceroute to the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
TraceRoute link located under the Action section of the right navigation tree on the
selected device’s Device Details page. For information on navigating to a device’s Device
Details page, see "Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The Traceroute dialog box appears.
2.
View the results of your Traceroute in the Traceroute dialog box.
3.
Click OK to close the Traceroute dialog box.
219
View topology
You can view the position of the device in a topology and the network structure.
To view the topology of a device:
1.
Click the
View Topology link located under the Action section of the right navigation tree
on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The Select Topology dialog box appears.
2.
Select a topology from the Topology List.
3.
Click OK.
MIB management
The MIB Management option offers operators with the ability to view, edit, and manage the MIB file
of the device.
To launch MIB Management for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
MIB Management link located under the Action section of the selected device’s
Device Details page. For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see
"Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
Load the MIB file and view MIB information.
For more information on MIB Management, see "MIB management" (page 138).
Telnet/SSH proxy
With the Telnet/SSH proxy feature, you can use a browser to remotely access and manage devices
through SSH or Telnet on any client without installing a Telnet/SSH tool. This feature uses the IMC
server as a proxy, and uses a browser on a client to access devices, sends configuration commands,
and displays output through Telnet/SSH.
To use the Telnet/SSH proxy to access and manage a device:
1.
Click the
Telnet/SSH link located under the Action section of the selected device’s Device
Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The Telnet/SSH Proxy window appears.
2.
Do one of the following:

Click the
button on the upper part of the window to connect to the selected device and
the client displays the connection status information, or

Click the
button to disconnect from the device, or

Click the
button to set the connection protocol parameters, or
If you use the Telnet protocol, you can modify the Telnet listening port, which is 23 by
default. If you use the SSH protocol, you can modify the login information, including User
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Name, Password, and Port. The Telnet/SSH proxy automatically selects Telnet or SSH for
login according to the login method configured on the device. By default, Telnet is used.

Click the
button to clear all output displayed on the client.
When you use the SSH protocol for connecting to a device, the username+password
authentication is supported, and the key file authentication is not supported.
3.
Enter commands in the field on the lower part of the Telnet/SSH Proxy window to interact with
the device.
4.
After you type the commands, click the
the commands to the device.
button to the right of the field or press Enter to send
Open device panel
The Device Panel provides you with a graphical view of HP, 3Com and H3C devices with the ability
to monitor and manage the device from the graphical view.
To access the graphical device panel for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Open Device Panel link located under the Action section of the selected device’s
Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The Device Panel for the selected device displays in a new browser window, providing you with a real
time graphical rendering of the selected device. From the Device Panel, you can configure the
selected device as well as view configuration and other information.
Device panel navigation aids

Pointing to a component of the device displays component information.

A left click a port to select the port.


A right-click the chassis to display the Chassis Menu for viewing device information or
configuration options. Information on the Chassis Menu can be found in the following
section titled Device Panel Chassis Menu.
A right-click a port from the device panel to display the Port Menu for viewing port
information or configuration options. Information on the Port Menu can be found in the
following section titled Device Panel Port Menu.
Device panel chassis menu
The Device Panel Chassis menu can be accessed by right-clicking the chassis itself from the Device
Panel. This section provides an overview of the information and configuration options of the Chassis
Menu.
•
Device Information:
From this menu option, you can:


View some or all of information in the following areas depending on the device type
selected.
Configure the selected device.
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
•
Protocol Management: From this menu option, you can view information in the following areas
(the areas vary with the device model):



•
Perform Port Mode Switch, Port Aggregation, Reset Device, Save Device Configuration,
Mpu Switch, Port Mirror, Address Binding, Environment Monitor, RMON, Config Interface
802.1X Status and RADIUS Server Configuration.
OSPF: OSPF Attribute, Area Information, Stub Area Information, LSDB Information,
Extended LSDB Information, OSPF Interface, Interface ToS Metric, Peer Information, Virtual
Link Interface and Virtual Link Peer.
MSTP: Global MSTP, MSTI, and Port MSTP.
IGMP Snooping: IGMP Snooping Status, Aging Time of Router Port (second), Maximum
Response Time of Query (second), and Aging Time of multicast Port (second).
Real-time Performance Monitor: From this menu option, you can view performance information
and configure the selected device in the Device Realtime Monitor area.
Device panel port menu
The Device Panel Port Menu can be accessed by right-clicking a port from the Device Panel, providing
an overview of the information and configuration options of the Port Menu.
Port Management: From this menu option, you can view information and configure Port Information,
Loopback Test, and Add Port to VLAN.

Realtime Performance Monitor: From this menu option, you can view performance
information and configure the selected device in the Port Realtime Monitor area.
SSH
You can launch an SSH session to the selected device from the Device Details page, providing quick
and centralized access to managed devices.
To SSH to the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
SSH link located under the Action section of the selected device’s Device Details
page. For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices
with Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
Follow the Tools Configuration dialog box for instructions on downloading and installing an
SSH application used to establish an SSH session with the selected device, or browse your
local machine for an application that supports SSH.
3.
Follow the applications instructions for configuring and establishing an SSH sessions to the
selected device. To use this feature, you must have an operating system or application that
supports SSH on the computer you use to access IMC.
Actions - For switches
IMC offers the IP/MAC Learning Query service under the Actions section of the right navigation tree
of the Device Details page which provides you with quick query the IP/MAC Learned information.
1.
Click the
IP/MAC Learning Query link located under the Action section of the selected
device’s Device Details page.
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For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
Enter the Learned IP address in the Learned IP Address field.
3.
Enter the Learned MAC address in the Learned MAC Address field.
4.
Click Query.
The results of your query display in the IP/MAC Learning List.
IP/MAC learning list





Switch IP: Contains the IP address of the selected switch which serves as a link for drilling
down to the associated device’s Device Details page.
Interface Description: Contains the interface description of the associated interface on the
selected switch which serves as a link for drilling down to the associated interface’s
Interface Details page.
VLAN ID: Contains the VLAN ID to which the associated interface belongs.
Learned IP Address: Contains the learned IP address associated with the interface listed in
the Interface Description field.
Learned MAC Address: Contains the learned MAC address associated with interface listed
in the Interface Description field.
If the IP/MAC Learning List contains multiple entries, the following navigational aids may appear:

Click
to page forward in the IP/MAC Learning List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the IP/MAC Learning List.

Click
to page backward in the IP/MAC Learning List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the IP/MAC Learning List.
5.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, and 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many
items per page you want to view.
6.
For IP/MAC Learning lists that have more than one page, click 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10…
from the bottom right side of the main pane to jump to a particular page of the IP MAC Learning
list.
You can sort the IP/MAC Learning List by most fields by clicking on the column label to sort the
list by the selected field. The column label is a toggle switch that allows you to toggle between
the various sort options specific to each field.
7.
Click Reset when you have finished your query to clear the IP/MAC Learning List.
Configure - For all devices
Using the Configure features found in the Device Details right navigation tree, you can modify a
device label and system group attributes including system name, location, and contact, modify
SNMP, Telnet, and SSH settings and modify status and configuration polling intervals as well as ping
and Web Manager parameters.
Modify device label
The Device Label is the IMC name for the selected device. By default, IMC takes the system name or
sysName of a device if the system name has been configured on it. However, you can change the
name of the device in IMC for the device without changing the name on the device itself.
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To modify the device label of the selected device from the Device Details page:
Click the
Modify Device Label link located under the Configure section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
1.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The Modify device label dialog box appears.
2.
Delete the existing device label name from the Device Label field and enter the new device
name.
3.
Click OK.
Modify system group attributes
You can also change other attributes of a device including its system name or sysName, its contact
information, and the device’s location. This option is not available for desktop devices.
To modify the system group attributes of the selected device from the Device Details page:
Click the
Modify System Group Attributes link located under the Configure section of the
right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page. For information on
navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with Device, IP, and
Topology Views" (page 176).
1.
The modify System Group Attributes dialog box appears.
2.
Delete the existing system name in the System Name field and enter the new system name.
3.
Delete the existing contact information in the Contact field and enter the new system name.
4.
Delete the existing location information in the Location field and enter the new system name.
5.
Click OK.
In addition to numbers, letters, and spaces, the characters in Table 4 (page 224) are valid
entries for the System Name, Contact, and Location fields.
Table 4 Valid Characters for Naming
Character
Name
Character
Name
~
Tilde
'
Apostrophe or single quotation
!
Exclamation mark
@
At sign
#
Pound sign
$
Dollar sign
%
Percent sign
^
Caret
&
Ampersand
*
Asterisk
()
Parenthesis
=
Equal sign
+
Plus sign
|
Vertical bars
-
Hyphen
_
Underscore
Square brackets
{}
Braces
[]
:
Colon
;
224
Semicolon
Character
Name
Character
Name
\
Backslash
"
Double quotation
,
Comma
/
Forward slash
.
Dot
<>
Angle brackets
?
Question mark
Modify SNMP settings
You can also modify IMC’s SNMP settings for the selected device. Modifying the SNMP settings
changes the device’s SNMP settings but does not change the SNMP settings on the managed device.
To modify IMC’s SNMP settings for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Modify SNMP Settings link located under the Configure section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The modify SNMP Parameters dialog box appears.
2.
Do one of the following:

To edit IMC’s configuration of the device’s SNMP parameters, verify that the radio button
to the left of Edit SNMP Parameters is selected, or

3.
4.
To edit IMC’s configuration using templates, skip down to "Using existing SNMP template"
(page 156).
Select the version of SNMP (v1 or v2c) that is configured on the device to be added from the
Parameter Type list:

Enter the read-only community string in the Read-Only Community String field, or

Enter the read-write community string in the Read-Write Community String field.
Enter the SNMP timeout value (1–60 seconds) in the Timeout field.
This parameter determines how long IMC waits for an SNMP reply from the managed device
before declaring that the request has timed out. The default is 4.
5.
Enter the number of SNMP retries (1–20) in the Retries field.
The retries parameter defines how many times the management system (IMC) sends SNMP
retries in an attempt to communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure. The
default is 3.
6.
Click OK.
Using existing SNMP templates
To use existing SNMP templates:
1.
To apply the SNMP settings of an existing SNMP template to this device, do one of the
following:

Click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template, or

Click the radio button
to the left of the SNMP template you want to use.
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2.
Click OK. For more information on creating SNMP templates, see "SNMP templates" (page
74).
Modify Telnet settings
To modify Telnet settings for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Modify Telnet Settings link located under the Configure section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The modify Telnet Parameters dialog box appears.
2.
Do one of the following:


To edit IMC’s configuration using templates, skip down to "Using an existing Telnet
template" (page 156), or
To edit the Telnet parameters manually, verify that the radio button
Telnet Parameters is selected.
3.
Select the Telnet authentication mode from the Authentication Mode list.
4.
Enter the username in the Username field, if prompted.
5.
Enter the password in the Password field, if prompted.
6.
Enter the super password in the Super Password field, if prompted.
7.
Enter the Telnet timeout value (1–60 seconds) in the Timeout field.
to the left of Edit
The timeout parameter defines how long the system waits for the device to respond in seconds.
The authentication mode selected must match what is configured on the device.
8.
Click OK.
Using existing Telnet templates
To configure the Telnet settings for this device using an existing Telnet template:
1.
Click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of the Telnet template you want to use.
3.
Click OK. For more information on creating Telnet templates, see "Telnet templates" (page 77).
Modify SSH Settings
To modify SSH settings for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Modify SSH Settings link located under the Configure section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The modify SSH Parameters dialog box appears.
2.
Do one of the following:
To edit IMC’s configuration using templates, skip down to "Using existing SSH templates"
(page 165), or
226
To edit the SSH parameters, verify that the radio button
selected.
3.
to the left of Edit SSH Parameters is
Select the authentication mode from the Authentication Mode list.
The authentication mode selected must match what is configured on the device.
4.
Enter username in the User Name field.
5.
Enter the password in the Password field, if prompted.
6.
Enter the path and filename of the private key file that contains the key that enables login, if
prompted.
7.
Enter the private key password for the private key file, if prompted.
8.
Enter the TCP port for SSH in the Port field. The default TCP port is 22.
9.
Enter the SSH timeout value (1–120 seconds).
The timeout parameter defines how long the system waits for the device to respond in seconds
before declaring that the response has timed out. The default setting is 10 seconds.
10.
Enter the number of SSH retries (1–5).
The retries parameter defines how many times the management system (IMC) sends SSH retries
in an attempt to communicate with the managed device before reporting a failure. The default
setting is 3.
11.
Click OK to accept the SSH configuration.
Using existing SSH templates
To configure the SSH settings for this device using SSH templates:
1.
Click the radio button
to the left of Select SSH Parameters.
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of the SSH template you want to use.
3.
Click OK to accept the SSH configuration. For more information on creating SSH templates, see
"SSH templates" (page 80).
Modify SOAP Settings
When IMC's add-on Virtual Network Manger (VNM) module is installed and in use, you can modify
the SOAP settings IMC uses to remotely access the selected device.
To modify SOAP settings for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Modify SOAP Settings link located under the Configure section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The modify SOAP Parameters dialog box appears.
2.
Do one of the following:


To edit IMC’s configuration using templates, skip down to "Using existing SOAP Templates"
(page 228), or
To edit the SOAP parameters, verify that the radio button
Parameters is selected.
227
to the left of Edit SOAP
3.
Select the access URL protocol from the Protocol list.
4.
Enter the port number in the Port field.
5.
Enter access URL root path in the Root Path field.
6.
Enter the user name in the Username field.
7.
Enter the password in the Password field.
8.
Click the checkbox
to the left of the Test connection to vManager/physical server, if you
want to do the testing.
9.
Click OK to accept the SOAP configuration.
Using existing SOAP Templates
To configure the SOAP settings for this device using SOAP templates:
1.
Click the radio button
to the left of Select an Existing Template.
2.
Click the radio button
to the left of the SOAP template you want to use.
3.
Click OK to accept the SOAP configuration. For more information on creating SOAP templates,
see "SOAP templates" (page 83).
Modify poll interval
You can also modify the polling interval settings for status and configuration polling for the selected
device. Modifying the status or configuration polling interval influences directly how quickly IMC
detects problems with status or configuration; setting long polling intervals delays the amount of time
it takes IMC to detect a problem in the infrastructure and settings short polling intervals increases the
resource demand on IMC.
To modify polling interval settings for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the Modify Poll Interval link located under the Configure section of the right navigation
tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The modify Poll Interval dialog box appears. The Configuration Poll Interval is the parameter
that determines how long IMC waits before polling managed devices for any configuration
changes.
2.
Enter the configuration polling interval in minutes in the Configuration Poll Interval field.
The range is 5–1500 minutes and the default is 120 minutes. Like most management systems,
IMC uses ping to query devices for their status or reachability. The Status Poll Interval is the
parameter that determines how long IMC waits before sending ping requests to the managed
device to determine its reachability status.
3.
Enter the status-polling interval in minutes in the Status Poll Interval field.
The range is 30–600 seconds and the default is 60 seconds.
4.
Click OK to accept the polling interval configuration.
Modify ping parameters
228
You can disable the status polling for devices and therefore eliminate alarms and reporting for those
devices that are configured not to respond to ping requests.
To disable status polling using ping for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Modify Ping Parameters link located under the Configure section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The modify Ping Parameters dialog box appears.
2.
Uncheck the check marked box
to the left of Support Ping Operation if you want to disable
status polling for the selected device.
3.
Click OK.
Modify web manager parameters
To modify the communication parameters for Web Manager
1.
Click the
Modify Web Manager Parameters link located under the Configure section of the
right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
The modify Web Manager Parameters dialog box appears.
2.
Select the protocol that is used by Web Manager from the Protocol list.
3.
Enter the port number for Web Manager in the Port field.
4.
Click OK.
If you do not make a selection from the Protocol list and therefore the selection for Protocol is
blank, IMC uses the global setting found under the System tab and the port value assigned is
ignored.
Configure – For specific device types
IMC offers quick access to the ACL Management service module from the Device Details page. The
ACL Configure link, which can be found under Configure on the right navigation tree for routers,
redirects you to the ACL Management service module found under the Service tab. For more
information on the ACL management features of IMC, see "10 Access control list management"
(page 645).
Performance monitoring
In the Performance Monitor section of the right navigation tree of the Device Details page, you can
quickly access performance reports for the selected device. In addition, you can refresh monitor
instances as well as delete performance data and cancel configured monitor instances.
By default, IMC provides two monitors for all devices: Average Unreachability and Average
Response Time as measured by ping requests and responses for devices that support ping monitoring.
By default, four monitors are created for managed network devices, such as routers, switches, and
wireless devices, which support these metrics. These four monitors are: Average CPU Utilization,
Average Memory Utilization, Average Unreachability, and Average Response Time.
229
For devices that support neither, the Add Monitor link appears when there is no performance monitor
instance configured for the selected device.
Add Monitor
The
Add Monitor link appears under Performance Monitor on the right navigation tree only if
there are no performance monitors already configured for the selected device. The
Add Monitor
link is a shortcut to the Performance Management→Monitoring Settings-Add Monitor menu option
located on the left navigation tree under the Resource tab. For more information on adding monitors,
see "9 Performance management" (page 607).
Cancel Monitor
Once monitors have been created for the selected device, the Cancel Monitor option appears on the
right navigation tree. From this menu option, you can remove or cancel all monitoring instances for
the selected device.
To cancel all monitor instances from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Cancel Monitor link located under the Performance Monitor section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page. For information on navigating to
a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views"
(page 176).
All monitors are removed and the Results page appears.
2.
Refer to the Result field of the Results table for details on the results of the monitoring operation.
In addition, all links under the Performance Monitor section of the right navigation tree are
replaced with the
Add Monitor link.
WARNING:
Clicking the Cancel Monitors removes all monitoring instances for the selected device without warning;
use this feature with caution.
Performance at a glance
To view the most current and historical data for the performance monitor instances configured for this
device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Performance at a Glance link located under the Performance Monitor section of
the right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
IMC displays reports for the current day for all monitors instances for the selected device. Use
the scroll bar on the right to view all reports.
Refresh monitor instance
To refresh the data for the monitor instances for this device from the Device Details page:
230
1.
Click the
Refresh Monitor Instance link located under the Performance Monitor section of
the right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
Click OK to perform you operation.
Delete performance data
To delete performance data for the monitor instances for this device without deleting the monitoring
instances from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Delete Performance Data link located under the Performance Monitor section of
the right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the performance data.
Device real-time monitor
To add a Realtime Monitor for this device:
1.
Click the
Device Realtime Monitor link located under the Performance Monitor section of
the right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176).
2.
Click Select Index to select one or more monitor indexes.
3.
Click OK.
Configuration center
IMC provides you with the ability to launch configuration management tasks for the selected device
directly from the Device Details page. From the Device Details page, you can, with one click, back up
the configuration of the selected device and configure the automated backup attributes for the
selected device.
Backup configuration files
To backup device configuration from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Backup Configuration File link located under the Configuration Center section of
the right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
2.
View the results of the backup task in the Configuration File Backup Result page that display
upon completion of the backup request.
Set auto backup attribute
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The
Set Auto Backup Attribute link is a shortcut to the Auto Backup Plan feature of the
Configuration Center service module. For more information on adding monitors, see "Automatic
device configuration backups" (page 475).
Device default startup configuration
You can specify the default startup software, primary configuration file, and secondary configuration
file for a device.
1.
Click the
Device Default Startup Configuration link located under the Configuration Center
section of the right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
The Device Default Startup Configuration window appears.
2.
Set the default startup software. Select Image.
Valid options include Primary and Secondary.
3.
Do one of the following:

To configure the device to start with the primary startup software, select Primary, or

To configure the device to start with the secondary startup software, select Secondary.
The Startup Configuration File list shows all configurations files on the device:

File Name: Contains the name of the configuration file.

Active: Identifies the configuration file that is currently in use with an icon

Primary: Identifies the primary configuration file with an icon
.
. If the file is not the
primary configuration file of the device, this field contains a
Configure link. You can click
the link to configure the file as the primary configuration file. Note that the process takes
some time.

Secondary: Identifies the secondary configuration file with an icon
. If the file is not the
secondary configuration file of the device, this field contains a
Configure link. You can
click the link to configure the file as the secondary configuration file. The process takes some
time.


4.
Copy: Contains an icon
that copies the configuration file. After you rename the copied
configuration file, it appears on the Startup Configuration File list.
Delete: Contains an icon
for deleting the configuration file.
Click Close.
Device Management
The options displayed in this section of the right navigation tree vary based upon the selected device
being viewed in the Device Details page.
Basic options under Device Management include the ability to reset a device and save device
configuration.
From the Device Management menu option, you can also view system information including the IP
Address Table, the Address Translation Table, the IP Routing Table and the TCP Connection Table.
232
You can also view address binding including MAC-Port Binding Management, Global MAC Address
Learning Configuration and Port MAC Address Learning Management.
You can also view device hardware information including module, port, power, and fan information.
IPv6 information is also available from the Device Management menu. This option enables you to
view the following: IPv6 Address Translation Table, IPv6 Interface Table, IPv6 Address Table, IPv6
Routing Table, IPv6 Address Prefix Table, IPv6 UDP Table, and IPv6 TCP Table.
Finally, port aggregation information is also available from the Device Management menu. From this
menu, you can configure or remove port aggregation for the selected device.
Resetting a device
You can reset routers, switches, and wireless devices by using the
Reset Device option located in
the Device Management section of the right navigation tree of the Device Details page.
To reset the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Reset Device link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Reset Device dialog box appears.
2.
Do one of the following:


Click the check marked box
to the left of Save device’s current configuration if you want
reboot the device without saving its current configuration, or
Leave the checkbox checked if you want to save the device’s current configuration.
3.
Click Reset.
4.
Verify that the device reset was successful by checking the Reset Device dialog box for reset
results.
5.
Click Close to close the Reset Device dialog box.
Saving configuration
You can save the configuration of routers, switches, and wireless devices by using the
Save
Configuration option located in the Device Management section of the right navigation tree of the
Device Details page.
To save the configuration of the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Save Configuration link located under the Device Management section of the
right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
2.
Click OK to confirm your request to save the configuration for the selected device.
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Environment monitor
To view or modify the environment information for the selected card, or reset the card:
1.
Click the
Environment Monitor link located under the Device Management section of the
right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Environment Monitor page appears.
Environment monitor list

Frame No.: Contains the frame No.

Slot No.: Contains the slot No. that specifies the slot where the board resides.

Type: Contains the type of the board.

Status: Indicates the state is normal, upper indicates that the temperature exceeds the upper
threshold, and lower indicates the temperature is under the lower threshold.

Value(cent.): Contains the temperature of the board.

Upper Limit(cent.): Contains the upper threshold for the board temperature.

Lower Limit(cent.): Contains the lower threshold for the board temperature.


Modify: Contains the link for modifying the environment parameters, including upper limit,
lower limit and critical limit.
Reset: Contains a link to reset the card and the Save device’s current configuration option.
If the Environment lists multiple entries, the following navigational aids may appear:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Environment list.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Environment list.

Click
to page backward in the Environment list.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Environment list.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, and 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many
items per page you want to view.
Switch MPU
To switch the active/standby MPUs for the selected device and view MPU information:
1.
Click the
Switch MPU link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The MPU Switch page appears, including the Last MPU Switch Date, Last MPU Switch Time,
and MPU Switch Times options.
2.
Click Switch to switch the active/standby MPUs.
234
System information
To view the system information for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
System Information link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
2.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The IP Address Table page appears. Four tables of system information are displayed: IP
Address Table, Address Translation Table, IP Routing Table, and TCP Connection Table.
3.
To access any one of these tables, click the tabs located at the top of the page.
4.
Click Close to close the page.
Mirror group
You can add, edit, and delete mirror groups for devices.
Displaying mirror group information
1.
Click the
Mirror Group link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Mirror Group (MG) page appears.
Mirror Group (MG) list

MG ID: Contains the MG ID.

MG Type: Contains the MG type.

MG Status: Contains the MG status.

MG Mirror: Contains a link to edit the MG mirror.

MG Reflector: Contains a link to edit the MG reflector.

MG VLAN ID: Contains a link to edit the MG VLAN ID.
If the Mirror Group (MG) List contains multiple entries, the following navigational aids may appear:
2.

Click
to page forward in the Mirror Group (MG) List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the Mirror Group (MG) List.

Click
to page backward in the Mirror Group (MG) List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the Mirror Group (MG) List.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, and 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many
items per page you want to view.
235
Adding a mirror group
1.
Click the
Mirror Group link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Mirror Group (MG) page appears.
2.
Click Add to add a mirror group.
3.
Enter the MG ID in the MG ID field.
4.
Select the MG type from the MG Type list.
5.
Click OK to add the mirror group.
Editing a mirror group
After you add a mirror group, you need to configure the MG mirrors, MG reflectors, or MG VLAN IDs
for the mirror group.
Configuring MG mirrors
1.
Click the
Mirror Group link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Mirror Group (MG) page appears.
2.
Click the MG Mirror icon
you want to configure.
The MG Mirror page appears.
MG mirror list

MG ID: Contains the MG ID.

MG Mirror: Contains the MG mirror.

MG Mirror Direction: Contains the MG mirror direction.
If the MG Mirror List contains multiple entries, the following navigational aids may appear:

Click
to page forward in the MG Mirror List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the MG Mirror List.

Click
to page backward in the MG Mirror List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the MG Mirror List.
3.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, and 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many
items per page you want to view.
4.
Click Add to add an MG mirror.
5.
Select the MG ID in the MG ID list.
6.
Select the MG mirror in the MG Mirror list.
236
7.
Select the MG mirror direction in the MG Direction list.
8.
Do one of the following:
9.

Click OK to add the MG mirror, or

Select one or more MG mirrors you want to delete and click Delete.
Click Return to return to the Mirror Group (MG) page.
Configuring MG monitors
1.
Click the
Mirror Group link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Mirror Group (MG) page appears.
2.
Click the MG Monitor icon
you want to configure.
The MG Monitor page appears.
MG monitor list

MG ID: Contains the MG ID.

MG Monitor: Contains the MG monitor.
If the MG Monitor List contains multiple entries, the following navigational aids may appear:

Click
to page forward in the MG Monitor List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the MG Monitor List.

Click
to page backward in the MG Monitor List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the MG Monitor List.
3.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items
per page you want to view.
4.
Click Add to add an MG monitor.
5.
Select the MG ID in the MG ID list.
6.
Select the MG monitor in the MG Monitor list.
7.
Do one of the following:
8.

Click OK to add the MG monitor, or

Select one or more MG monitors you want to delete and click Delete.
Click Return to return to the Mirror Group (MG) page.
Configuring MG reflectors
You can configure this option only when the remoteSource option is selected as the MG type. To
configure the MG reflector:
1.
Click the
Mirror Group link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
237
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Mirror Group (MG) page appears.
2.
Click the MG Reflector icon
you want to configure.
The MG Reflector page appears.
MG reflector list fields and explanations

MG ID: Contains the MG ID.

MG Reflector: Contains the MG reflector.
If the MG Monitor List contains multiple entries, the following navigational aids may appear:

Click
to page forward in the MG Reflector List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the MG Reflector List.

Click
to page backward in the MG Reflector List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the MG Reflector List.
3.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items
per page you want to view.
4.
Click Add to add an MG reflector.
5.
Select the MG ID in the MG ID list.
6.
Select the MG reflector in the MG Reflector list.
7.
Do one of the following:
8.

Click OK to add the MG reflector, or

Select one or more MG reflectors you want to delete and click Delete.
Click Return to return to the Mirror Group (MG) page.
Setting the MG VLAN ID
You can configure this option only when the remoteSource or remoteDestination option is selected as
the MG type. To set the MG VLAN ID:
1.
Click the
Mirror Group link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Mirror Group (MG) page appears.
2.
Click the MG VLAN ID icon
you want to set.
The MG VLAN ID page appears.
MG VLAN ID list

MG ID: Contains the MG ID.

MG VLAN ID: Contains the MG VLAN ID.
238
If the MG VLAN ID List contains multiple entries, the following navigational aids may appear:

Click
to page forward in the MG VLAN ID List.

Click
to page forward to the end of the MG VLAN ID r List.

Click
to page backward in the MG VLAN ID List.

Click
to page backward to the front of the MG VLAN ID List.
3.
Click 8, 15, 50, 100, or 200 from the right side of the main pane to configure how many items
per page you want to view.
4.
Click Add to add an MG VLAN ID.
5.
Select the MG ID in the MG ID list.
6.
Select the MG VLAN ID in the MG VLAN ID list.
7.
Do one of the following:
8.

Click OK to add the MG VLAN ID, or

Select one or more MG VLAN IDs you want to delete and click Delete.
Click Return to return to the Mirror Group (MG) page.
Deleting mirror groups
1.
Click the
Mirror Group link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Mirror Group (MG) page appears.
2.
Click the checkboxes
to the left of the MG ID you want to delete.
3.
Click Delete.
4.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected items.
Address binding
You can both view and configure port to MAC address binding for devices by using the
Address
Binding option located in the Device Management section of the right navigation tree of the Device
Details page.
To view and configure MAC address binding for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Address Binding link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page. For information on navigating to
a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with Device, IP, and Topology Views"
(page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page 201).
The MAC-Port Binding Management page appears. Three types of MAC address information
tables and configuration options are displayed: MAC-Port Binding Management, Global MAC
Address Learning Configuration, and Port MAC Address Learning Management.
2.
To access any one of these configuration windows, click the tabs located at the top of the page.
239
The title bar of the window changes to reflect the tab’s title and IMC displays all MAC-Port
Binding Management entries in the list displayed under the MAC-Port Binding Management
tab.
MAC-Port Binding Management Table

VLAN ID: Contains the VLAN ID to which the associated MAC address belongs.

MAC Address: Contains the MAC address.

Port: Contains the interface description.

MAC Address Entry Type: Contains information on how the address was acquired.

Modify: Contains a link for modifying the associated MAC address.
To bind a MAC address-port
1.
Click the
Address Binding link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The MAC-Port Binding Management page appears.
2.
Click Add from the MAC-Port Binding Management table.
3.
Select the VLAN to which this port belongs from the VLAN ID list.
4.
Enter the MAC address you want to bind to this port in the MAC Address field.
The format IMC accepts for MAC addresses is ####-####-#### where # is the hexadecimal
value of the MAC address.
5.
Select the port you want to bind to the MAC address to in the Port field.
6.
Select the type of MAC address from the MAC Address Entry Type field.
7.
Click OK to accept your configuration.
8.
Click Close.
To modify a MAC address-port binding configuration
1.
Click the
Address Binding link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The MAC-Port Binding Management page appears.
2.
Click the Modify icon
modify.
associated with the MAC-Port binding configuration you want to
3.
Select the type of MAC address from the MAC Address Entry Type field.
4.
Click OK to accept your configuration.
5.
Click Close.
240
To delete a MAC-port binding
1.
Click the
Address Binding link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The MAC-Port Binding Management page appears.
2.
From the MAC-Port Binding Management table, click on the checkboxes
MAC-Port binding configuration you want to delete.
3.
Click Delete.
4.
Click OK to confirm deletion of the selected items.
to the left of the
To configure the global MAC address learning configuration
1.
Click the
Address Binding link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The MAC-Port Binding Management page appears.
2.
Click the Global MAC Address Learning Configuration tab.
3.
Enter the MAC address aging time in seconds in the MAC Address Aging Time field.
Valid range is 10–1000000. The value -1 entered in this field indicates no limit to MAC
address aging.
4.
Click OK.
To modify a port MAC address learning management
1.
Click the
Address Binding link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The MAC-Port Binding Management page appears.
2.
Click the Port MAC Address Learning Management tab.
3.
Click the Modify icon
4.
Enter the maximum learnable MAC address in the Max Learnable MAC Addresses field.
associated with interface you want to modify.
Valid range is 1–262144. The value –1 entered in this field denotes no limit.
5.
Click OK to accept your configuration.
Hardware information
241
From the
Hardware Information link under Device Management, you can view information about
selected routers, switches, and wireless devices. The information provided in this view may vary by
device type but most network device types provide Device Information, Module Information, Port
Information, Power Information, and Fan Information.
To view hardware information for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
Hardware Information link located under the Device Management section of the
right navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The Hardware Information page appears.
2.
Use the Device Information, Module Information, Port Information, Power Information, and
Fan Information tabs located at the top of the Device Information page to navigate to the
information page you wish you view.
3.
Click Close when you have finished viewing the hardware information for the selected device.
IPv6 information
From the
IPv6 Information link under Device Management, you can view IPv6 information for
selected routers, switches, and wireless devices. The information provided in this view includes IPv6
Address Translation Table, IPv6 Interface Table, IPv6 Address Table, IPv6 Routing Table, IPv6
Address Prefix Table, IPv6 UDP Table, and IPv6 TCP Table.
To view IPv6 information for the selected device from the Device Details page:
1.
Click the
IPv6 Information link located under the Device Management section of the right
navigation tree on the selected device’s Device Details page.
For information on navigating to a device’s Device Details page, see "Viewing devices with
Device, IP, and Topology Views" (page 176) and "Viewing devices with custom views" (page
201).
The IPv6 Information page appears.
2.
Use the IPv6 Address Translation Table, IPv6 Interface Table, IPv6 Address Table, IPv6 Routing
Table, IPv6 Address Prefix Table, IPv6 UDP Table, and IPv6 TCP Table tabs located at the top of
the IPv6 Information page to navigate to the information page you wish you view.
3.
Click Close when you have finished viewing the IPv6 information for the selected device.
Port mode switch
This feature enables you to switch the port mode. The options include Bridge Mode and Route mode.
To switch the port mode:
1.
Click the
Port Mode Switch link located under the