2.0.1.1 Chapter 2: Configure a Network Operating System Every

2.0.1.1 Chapter 2: Configure a Network Operating System Every
2.0.1.1 Chapter 2: Configure a Network Operating System
Every computer
requires an operating
system to function,
including computerbased network
devices such as
switches, routers,
access points, and
firewalls. These
network devices use
an operating system
called a network
operating system.
2.0.1.2 Class Activity - It Is Just an Operating System
2.1.1.1 Operating Systems
All end devices and network
devices require an operating
system (OS). As shown in
Figure 1, the portion of the
OS that interacts directly
with computer hardware is
known as the kernel. The
portion that interfaces with
applications and the user is
known as the shell. The user
can interact with the shell
using a command-line
interface (CLI) or a graphical
user interface (GUI).
2.1.1.2 Purpose of OS
Network operating systems are similar to a
PC operating system. Through a GUI, a PC
operating system enables a user to:

Use a mouse to make selections and run
programs

Enter text and text-based commands

View output on a monitor
A CLI-based network operating system like
the Cisco IOS on a switch or router enables
a network technician to:

Use a keyboard to run CLI-based
network programs

Use a keyboard to enter text and textbased commands

View output on a monitor
2.1.2.1 Access Methods
2.1.2.2 Terminal Emulation Programs
There are a number of excellent
terminal emulation programs available
for connecting to a networking device
either by a serial connection over a
console port or by a SSH/Telnet
connection. Some of these include:

PuTTY

Tera Term

SecureCRT

OS X Terminal
2.1.2.3 Activity - Accessing Devices
2.1.3.1 Cisco IOS Modes of Operation
Click Play in the figure to view a video demonstration of how to establish a console connection with a switch.
2.1.3.2 Primary Command Modes
2.1.3.3 Configuration Command Modes
2.1.3.4 Navigate Between IOS Modes
Various commands are used to move in and out of command prompts. To move
from user EXEC mode to privileged EXEC mode, use the enable command. Use
the disable privileged EXEC mode command to return to user EXEC mode.
2.1.4.1 Basic IOS Command Structure
A Cisco IOS device supports many commands. Each IOS command has a
specific format or syntax and can only be executed in the appropriate mode. The
general syntax for a command is the command followed by any appropriate
keywords and arguments.
2.1.4.2 IOS Command Syntax
The following examples demonstrate conventions used to document and use IOS commands.

ping ip-address - The command is ping and the user-defined argument is the ip-address of the
destination device. For example, ping 10.10.10.5.

traceroute ip-address - The command is traceroute and the user-defined argument is the ipaddress of the destination device. For example, traceroute 192.168.254.254.
2.1.4.3 IOS Help Features
To access context-sensitive help, simply enter a question mark, ?, at the CLI.
2.1.4.4 Hotkeys and Shortcuts
2.1.4.5 Video Demonstration – Hotkeys and Shortcuts
2.1.4.6 Packet Tracer - Navigating the IOS
2.1.4.7 Lab - Establishing a Console Session with Tera Term
In this lab, you will complete the
following objectives:



Part 1: Access a Cisco Switch
through the Serial Console Port
Part 2: Display and Configure
Basic Device Settings
Part 3: (Optional) Access a Cisco
Router Using a Mini-USB Console
Cable
2.2.1.1 Device Names
2.2.1.2 Configure Hostnames
2.2.2.1 Secure Device Access
2.2.2.2 Configure Passwords
2.2.2.3 Encrypt Passwords
2.2.2.4 Banner Messages
2.2.2.5 Syntax Checker - Limiting Access to a Switch
2.2.3.1 Save the Running Configuration File
2.2.3.2 Alter the Running Configuration
2.2.3.3 Capture Configuration to a Text File
2.2.3.4 Packet Tracer - Configuring Initial Switch Settings
2.3.1.1 IP Addresses
2.3.1.2 Interfaces and Ports
2.3.2.1 Manual IP Address Configuration for End Devices
2.3.2.2 Automatic IP Address Configuration for End Devices
2.3.2.3 Switch Virtual Interface Configuration
2.3.2.4 Syntax Checker - Configuring a Switch Virtual Interface
2.3.2.5 Packet Tracer - Implementing Basic Connectivity
2.3.3.1 Interface Addressing Verification
2.3.3.2 End-to-End Connectivity Test
The ping command can be used to test connectivity to another device on the
network or a website on the Internet.
2.3.3.3 Lab - Building a Simple Network
In this lab, you will
complete the following
objectives:



Part 1: Set Up the Network
Topology (Ethernet only)
Part 2: Configure PC Hosts
Part 3: Configure and Verify
Basic Switch Settings
2.3.3.4 Lab - Configuring a Switch Management Address
In this lab, you will complete the
following objectives:


Part 1: Configure a Basic Network
Device
Part 2: Verify and Test Network
Connectivity
2.4.1.1 Class Activity - Tutor Me
2.4.1.2 Packet Tracer - Skills Integration Challenge
2.4.1.3 Chapter 2: Configure a Network Operating System
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