MAXPRO6015+ v1 - Broadcast Concepts

MAXPRO6015+ v1 - Broadcast Concepts
MAXPRO6015+ v1
High performance FM radio exciter and the perfect pallet driver
Also covers MAX PRO 6025+ & 6050+
Manual
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1
IMPORTANT NOTE
Upon receiving your order inspect the packaging material and unit for apparent
damage. Any damage should be reported immediately so we can make a claim with
the shipping company. Take photos, if you can, they can be used as a proof.
IMPORTANT!: If you want to connect an amplifier to this exciter please first make
sure that output power is set correctly and does not exceed maximum
recommended input power of the amplifier. See appendix for additional tips on
driving amplifiers.
Study local regulations and ensure you are operating in compliance.
Never ever operate any exciter/transmitter or amplifier without a properly tuned
load/antenna!
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2
T
ABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCING THE MAX PRO 6000+ FM EXCITER SERIES (V4.0) ...................................................... 6
WHAT MAKES THIS FM EXCITER SO GREAT? ........................................................................................................ 6
HOW IS MAXPRO6000+ V1 SERIES BETTER THAN THE RECENT MAXPRO5000+? ............................................. 6
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS:................................................................................................................................ 6
MAXPRO6000 SERIES + KEY FEATURES .............................................................................................................. 7
THANK YOU FOR PURCHASING MAX PRO 6000+ SERIES FM EXCITER ................................................................ 7
MAXPRO6015/25/50 RF AND LCD BOARD LAYOUT .................................................................................. 8
RF BOARD LAYOUTS ............................................................................................................................................. 8
LCD MODULE LAYOUT ....................................................................................................................................... 10
RF AND LCD MODULE DRILL TEMPLATE/CUTOUT .............................................................................................. 11
WHAT’S UNDER THE HOOD? ....................................................................................................................... 14
BEFORE YOU START ...................................................................................................................................... 16
ANTENNA ........................................................................................................................................................... 16
SO WHAT IS THIS SWR (VSWR) EVERYONE TALKS ABOUT? .................................................................................. 17
COAXIAL CABLE ................................................................................................................................................. 17
BNC CONNECTOR ............................................................................................................................................... 17
MAINS POWER SUPPLY AND MAINS POWER CABLE .............................................................................................. 17
AUDIO SOURCE WITH MIXER, MICROPHONE ETC ................................................................................................. 18
ENCLOSURE AND COOLING FOR MAX PRO 6000+ SERIES EXCITERS ................................................................. 18
STEREO ENCODER FOR STEREO OPERATION ........................................................................................................ 18
WIRING EVERYTHING TOGETHER ........................................................................................................... 19
WIRING THINGS UP AND FIRST POWER-UP ........................................................................................................... 19
USING THE MAX PRO 5000+ SERIES EXCITER ....................................................................................... 21
LCD CONTROL MODULE ..................................................................................................................................... 21
LCD CONTROL MODULE MENU SYSTEM.............................................................................................................. 21
CHANGING FREQUENCY ...................................................................................................................................... 21
<RF POWER> ................................................................................................................................................... 21
<STEREO MODE> ........................................................................................................................................... 21
<VIEW SELECT> ............................................................................................................................................. 22
<TREBLE> AND <BASS> ................................................................................................................................. 22
COMPRESSOR SETTINGS ..................................................................................................................................... 22
<LCD CONTRAST> ......................................................................................................................................... 23
LEFT AND RIGHT CHANNEL VOLUME (ONLY WITH DSP STEREO ENCODERS) ....................................................... 23
<PLL STEP>...................................................................................................................................................... 24
<FIRMWARE VER> ......................................................................................................................................... 24
<CURRENT ALARM> ..................................................................................................................................... 24
<TEMP ALARM> ............................................................................................................................................. 24
<SWR ALARM> ............................................................................................................................................... 24
<U AMP ALARM> ........................................................................................................................................... 24
<BAND SELECT> ............................................................................................................................................ 24
<RF AMP CONTROL> ..................................................................................................................................... 24
<RF POWER ALC> .......................................................................................................................................... 24
WINDOWS CONTROL PROGRAM - CYBERMAXFM+ ............................................................................ 25
SOFTWARE INSTALLATION AND COMMUNICATION SETUP .............................................................. 25
COM PORT SETUP .......................................................................................................................................... 25
COMMUNICATION TEST TOOL ............................................................................................................................. 25
AUTOSCAN ......................................................................................................................................................... 25
FM TX MAIN TAB – TRANSMITTER SETUP ........................................................................................................... 26
FM TRANSMITTER TYPE ...................................................................................................................................... 26
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FM TRANSMITTER FREQUENCY........................................................................................................................... 26
TRANSMITTER OUTPUT POWER ........................................................................................................................... 26
STEREO/MONO ................................................................................................................................................... 26
AUDIO INPUT LEVEL ........................................................................................................................................... 26
BASS AND TREBLE .............................................................................................................................................. 26
AUDIO COMPRESSOR SETTINGS (ONLY WITH DSP STEREO ENCODERS) .............................................................. 26
FM TX ALARMS ................................................................................................................................................. 27
READ TX ............................................................................................................................................................ 27
AUTO READ TX .................................................................................................................................................. 27
PI, PTY... (RDS SETTINGS) ................................................................................................................................ 27
PI CODE .............................................................................................................................................................. 28
TP/TA FLAG ....................................................................................................................................................... 28
PROGRAM TYPE PTY .......................................................................................................................................... 28
MUSIC/SPEECH ................................................................................................................................................... 28
AF - ALTERNATIVE FREQUENCIES ...................................................................................................................... 28
PS0 ..................................................................................................................................................................... 28
PS ....................................................................................................................................................................... 29
MORE INFORMATION ABOUT PS FEATURE .......................................................................................................... 29
PS1 ..................................................................................................................................................................... 29
PS2 ..................................................................................................................................................................... 29
TIME, MSG... .................................................................................................................................................... 30
COMPUTER TIME AND DATE ................................................................................................................................ 30
EXTERNAL SWITCHABLE MESSAGES ................................................................................................................... 30
AUTO PS, RT... ................................................................................................................................................. 30
AUTO UPDATE PS FROM TXT FILE ....................................................................................................................... 31
AUTO UPDATE RT FROM TXT FILE ...................................................................................................................... 31
ABOUT ................................................................................................................................................................ 31
FIRMWARE VERSION ........................................................................................................................................... 31
COMMON CONTROLS .......................................................................................................................................... 32
MOVE TO TRAY ................................................................................................................................................... 32
PREVIEW............................................................................................................................................................. 32
RDS ACTIVE ....................................................................................................................................................... 32
SEND SETTINGS ................................................................................................................................................... 32
SHUT DOWN TX AT EXIT ..................................................................................................................................... 32
SEND SETTINGS AT START ................................................................................................................................... 32
AUDIO HISTOGRAM ............................................................................................................................................. 32
STATUS WINDOW ................................................................................................................................................ 32
SCHEDULER ........................................................................................................................................................ 33
ENABLE .............................................................................................................................................................. 33
ADD... ................................................................................................................................................................. 33
EDIT ................................................................................................................................................................... 33
REMOVE ............................................................................................................................................................. 33
ADD SCHEME DIALOG ......................................................................................................................................... 34
ADD OR MODIFY................................................................................................................................................. 34
CLOSE OR CANCEL ............................................................................................................................................. 34
TROUBLESHOOTING ..................................................................................................................................... 35
LIMITING MAXIMUM ADJUSTABLE POWER FOR DRIVING PALLETS .......................................... 38
STEP1 – ESTABLISH NEEDED DRIVE POWER ......................................................................................................... 38
STEP2 - SET MAXIMUM OUTPUT POWER TO 4W ................................................................................................... 38
STEP3 – REDUCE 4W DOWN TO THE NEEDED 3.5W WITH ATTENUATOR (OPTIONAL, BUT RECOMMENDED)......... 38
STEP4 – VERIFY PERFORMANCE BEFORE CONNECTING THE PALLET .................................................................... 39
STEP5 – WIRING UP THE PALLET AND FIRST POWER UP ........................................................................................ 39
STEP6 – FIRST POWER UP AND SETUP .................................................................................................................. 39
STEP7 – CHECK THE ALC AND SET IT TO PREVENT OVERDRIVING ...................................................................... 39
STEP8 – RF POWER ALC (SOFTWARE POWER LIMIT) ....................................................................................... 39
APPENDIX A: DIY ANTENNA AND IMPROVEMENT TIPS .................................................................... 40
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SIMPLE GP ANTENNA DESIGN ............................................................................................................................. 40
SOME MORE IMPROVEMENT TIPS......................................................................................................................... 40
APPENDIX B: CONNECTING STEREO ENCODER ................................................................................... 41
APPENDIX C: ADDING AN AMPLIFIER – COMPLETE FM TRANSMITTER BLOCK BY BLOCK 42
APPENDIX D: DIGIAMP CONNECTOR PIN OUT ..................................................................................... 45
APPENDIX E: GENERAL TIPS FOR SETTING UP TRANSMITTERS ................................................... 46
TYPICAL FM TRANSMITTER SETUPS ................................................................................................................... 46
TYPICAL FM BROADCASTING ANTENNA SETUPS ................................................................................................. 47
WIRING ANTENNAS IN MULTI-BAY CONFIGURATIONS ......................................................................................... 48
APPENDIX F – USING WIRELESS AUDIO LINKS ..................................................................................... 49
APPENDIX G – IO BOARD AND PC REMOTE CONTROL ..................................................................... 50
SOFTWARE INSTALLATION .................................................................................................................................. 50
USING EXISTING COM PORT ............................................................................................................................... 51
INSTALLING USB DRIVER (ONLY FOR USB IO BOARD) ...................................................................................... 51
CONFIGURING USB DRIVER ................................................................................................................................ 51
SETTING UP COM PORT IN CYBERMAXFM+ PROGRAM ....................................................................................... 52
APPENDIX H – SETTING UP REMOTE CONTROL VIA ETHERNET ................................................... 53
SOFTWARE INSTALLATION .................................................................................................................................. 53
APPENDIX I: COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL EXPLANATION .......................................................... 56
BAUD RATE AND COM PORT .............................................................................................................................. 56
PS (RDS PARAMETERS) ...................................................................................................................................... 56
RT (RDS PARAMETERS) ..................................................................................................................................... 57
FORMAT DESCRIPTIONS FOR THE OTHER SUPPORTED PARAMETERS: ................................................................... 58
APPENDIX J – WARRANTY AND LEGAL INFO ........................................................................................ 62
IMPORTANT NOTICE! ........................................................................................................................................... 62
WARRANTY AND SERVICING! ............................................................................................................................. 62
LEGAL INFO ........................................................................................................................................................ 62
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY ................................................................................................................................... 62
ALSO AVAILABLE FROM WWW.PCS-ELECTRONICS.COM................................................................ 63
REVISIONS AND ERRATA ............................................................................................................................. 64
INDEX.................................................................................................................................................................. 64
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5
Chapter
1
Introducing the MAX PRO 6000+ FM exciter series (v4.0)
Next generation of FM exciters with new Qsonic III VCO/PLL and up to 50W of power
D
esigned either as a perfect pallet driver or a stand-alone FM exciter, MAX PRO 6000+ series brings up to 50W
of very clean RF power, updated Qsonic III double-speed PLL/VCO subsystem with impressive audio
performance and excellent bass plus several brand new hot features.
What makes this FM exciter so great?
MAX PRO 6015/6025/6050+ displays a number of useful parameters on the LCD display: transmitted power, reflected
power, temperature, voltage, frequency, current consumption, audio modulation level, amplifier voltage, amplifier power and
swr, and amplifier temperature and power consumption. The new Qsonic III VCO/PLL subsystem is protected by a metal
shield for even better performance. Power and all other parameters can be controlled with keys on the LCD module or
remotely via RS232/USB interface. Let us not forget about the power output, 50W is more than enough to drive any big
amplifier out there on the market. Of course this unit is completely no-tune, directly supports our stereo encoders (SE2000,
SE5000DSP+ & SE6000 series), and offers impeccable performance 24/7/365. Even as a stand-alone unit this exciter
doubles as an excellent community radio station and can easily cover a small city with suitable antenna.
How is MAXPRO6000+ v1 series better than the recent MAXPRO5000+?
- Some MAXPRO6000+ models work from 48V (25W and 50W models)
- MAXPRO6000+ series has better spurious output (cleaner signal with reduced spurs)
- 25W and 50W models now have high performance ceramic LDMOS output stage, ensuring reliability and better cooling
- Heatsinks in 25W and 50W models have been improved to handle the heat better
- Two VU headers now available so you can either monitor drive power or external power from external directional couplers
- DIP switch mode without LCD display for low cost installations (power is set precisely with jumpers)
- New GSM remote control module with Android app, can be controlled via SMS as well (e-mail for details)
- Removed the slightly microphonic drain coil
- Comes also with new LCD with rotary encoder. This new LCD offers password protection and other cool features.
- Improved Qsonic III VCO/PLL subsystem
- New power connector of appropriate power rating (the old barrel type was underpowered at 25/40W).
- Same compact size in all models unlike MAXPRO 5050 which was bigger.
Technical specifications:
- RF output power at 15V DC: 0 to 15W (MAXPRO6015)
- RF output power at 48V DC: 0-20W typ, 25W max (MAXPRO6025)
- RF output power at 48V DC: 0-50W (MAXPRO6050)
- Output connector: BNC, 50 Ohms (MAXPRO6015 old plastic BNC, MAXPRO6025/50 new all-metal BNC)
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- Frequency range: 87.5-108MHz
- PLL steps: 100 KHz
- Frequency stability: +/- 20Hz, input for TCXO (external high precision clock)
- Spurious/Harmonic rejection: Harmonics: >50dB, Spurious: >-75dB
- Power supply (15W): 11-15V or car battery (2.5A max for 15W)
- Power supply (25/50W model): 48V [email protected], 48V [email protected]
- Power connector: 2.1mm power socket (center +) or 2-pin power socket (MAXPRO6015/25/50
- Quartz locked PLL frequency control, ultra stable & clean output
- No expensive test equipment required
- Audio performance: Flat sensitivity across FM band, less than 0.1% distortion, 20Hz-75 KHz
- RF output ruggedness: SWR protection
- Polarity protection, temp protection
- Over-current protection
- Pre-emphasis, 50uS, 75uS or none selectable
- Audio Input Impedance: 1Kohm, unbalanced, 2 - pin jumper and solder posts
- Audio Input Level: 0 dB
- S/N ratio: >90 dB
- PC Board Size (15W/25W/50W): 100x125mm (see page 11 for drilling template)
- RF monitor output: Yes, solder pads, -30dB
MAXPRO6000 series + key features
- Displays frequency, power, audio level, reflected power, temperature, exciter voltage, amplifier voltage and amplifier current
(depends on used filter) on the LCD.
- Extreme VCO isolation and RF field immunity (our innovative design)
- SWR and TEMP protection with adjustable sensitivity
- Adjustable software power limit when driving external amplifier (up to 9900W, ask if you need more)
- Four power range jumpers which let you set output power range from 0-1W, 0-2W, 0-3W, 0-4W etc all the way to the full
0-15W (25W/50W). If your pallet requires 4W simply set the power range to 0-4W for precise and convenient drive.
- High power (up to 50W)
- True wideband no-tune operation, constant power across entire FM band
- Flat audio response, excellent bass
- Directly supports our SE5000 DSP+, SE2000 and SE6000+ stereo encoders via LCD MENU system
- RF control board with directional couplers and SWR protection is available
Thank you for purchasing MAX PRO 6000+ series FM exciter
We hope you will enjoy it as much as we do and remember to tell your friends about it. Please feel free to leave your
comments at our website or post your experience in our forum. From all of us we wish you happy broadcasting!
Your PCS Electronics team
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Chapter
2
MAXPRO6015/25/50 RF and LCD board layout
RF board layouts
Fig. 1: MAX PRO 6015 v1 RF board layout
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Ref.
Function
A
Connect ON/OFF switch here, but you can also just install a jumper. A LED diode can also be connected as
shown on the image, series resistor for the diode is on board and is not necessary.
C
You can connect external TCXO (thermally stabilized reference oscillator). Frequency needs to be 16MHz, TTL.
You will probably have to remove nearby quartz crystal, if you want to use this input. Contact us, if you get stuck.
D
DIP switch, can be used to set frequency when you want to save by not using LCD module.
E
Pre-emphasis. Use this jumper to set pre-emphasis. This can either be 50uS (EU and most of the world) or 75uS
(USA). If you plan to connect stereo encoder to the MAXPRO6000+ board, place the jumper in position None
(bottom - this disables pre-emphasis).
F
VU bargraph meter. Connect the 5-pin jumper to VU meter here. If connected here it will show SWR and PWR
from external power meter.
G
Audio input sensitivity adjustment.
H
Audio input – audio coaxial cable or 2-pin header.
I
Digiamp connector enables easy control of RF amplifiers. This greatly simplifies the process of building FM
transmitters. You can read more about this connector in appendix. The flat cable is non-crossed type.
J
Internal power meter accuracy adjustment. If the internal power display on the LCD is a bit off you can correct its
accuracy with this trimmer. You have to “reboot” to verify the setting as the power detector has some DC offset
which is measured once when the unit powers up.
K
RF monitor output. This output contains a small sample of output signal, suitable for monitoring RF signal
quality with instruments such as frequency meter, frequency analyzer or modulation monitor.
L
VU bargraph meter. Connect the 5-pin jumper to VU meter here. If connected here it will show SWR and PWR
from internal power meter. The remaining 3 pins from VU meter connect to stereo encoder.
M
Soldering posts for a small 12V fan. Output stage appreciates a bit of air flow, it does not have to be substantial
for 15W. As long as the air slowly moves a bit it'll be more than enough for 15W unit. Use better fans for 25W
and 50W models.
N
Maxlink connector for easy connection with the SE2000, SE5000 or SE6000 stereo encoders. This lets you
connect and control both units from the same LCD control units. Our Cyber Max FM+ units use this
arrangement. This connection is now almost completely solder-free; simply plug the connector in and connect
MPX out to audio input of the exciter. Flat cable that runs between the units also carries supply voltage and
stereo/mono switch for the stereo encoder.
O
LCD control unit, attach your LCD control module here. Flat cable used is crossed.
P
Power supply connector, if barrel type than center is positive. DO NOT use more than 15V for 6015. Use 48V
for 6025 and 6050.
Q
Do not touch unless you understand what this is. Lets you fine-tune the reference frequency. You can use this
trimmer to set the frequency to exactly 100.000KHz if it’s slightly off (for example if frequency meter shows
100.002KHz).
R
RF output connection. BNC jack. Use a properly matched FM band antenna. The range and success of your
transmissions will depend primarily upon the quality and position of your antenna.
S
15W - 2.5A fast fuse. Always replace with this type for continued protection against short-circuit.
T
You can connect coaxial cable going to the pallet/amplifier here. RG-178 is recommended.
V
Not used yet, placeholder for the future.
X
Remote stand-by, you can put unit in standby by closing/shorting these two pins. The power will go to zero
immediately.
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Y
Greatly increases sensitivity of external power and SWR meter, great when your directional couplers are not
sensitive enough to produce proper reading.
1
Power range jumper J12, use to set output power range to 0-1W,0-2W, 0-3W, 0-4W or any other range all the way
to 0-15W. Setting is binary, that is if you place 1W and 8W jumpers the power range will be 1+8=9W (0-9W). No
jumpers = full power 0-15W
Table 1: Description of various elements of the MAX PRO 6015+ v1 FM exciter board
LCD module layout
LCD control module is pretty simple and self-explanatory, but let us have a quick look, note you can disable keys by
soldering over the “Lock Keys” solder bridge:
Fig. 2: LCD module layout, front and back
Fig 3: Installing display board into an enclosure, side view
At the time of writing we were in the final design stages for our new LCD display module which has rotate encoder instead
of the keys. It is identical in almost every aspect but two:
- It supports SE6000 DSP+ which the regular display does not
- It supports password protection
- It offers more reliable remote control due to precise UART
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Reference
Function
1, F
UP key
2, G
DOWN key
3, H
MENU key
4, B
POWER indicator LED. Illuminated whenever you turn on the exciter.
5, C
ERROR indicator LED. This LED is activated when RF output stage is NOT active. For example,
whenever if temperature protection is activated, this LED illuminates and RF power is reduced.
Important: This LED is also illuminated whenever you change frequency as the control unit turns RF
power off until adjustments are finished and VCO is locked. In such case this does not signal a problem
with temperature or SWR.
6,7
Mounting screws, M2.5 metric screw is to be used here.
8
LCD module, with backlight
A
14-pin connector for flat cable going to the RF board
D
Microcontroller with software
E
Connections to the IO board (RS232 or USB)
Table 2: Description of various elements of the LCD display module
RF and LCD module drill template/cutout
LCD control module is pretty simple and self-explanatory, but let us have a quick look;
Fig. 4: LCD module cutout and holes, all measurements in mm
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Fig. 5: RF module drill template for MAXPRO6015, all measurements in mm, all holes are for M3 metric screws. Board is 10mm above the enclosure due to
heat sink running under the entire length of the board. Definitely use metal distancer under the pink hole as it also serves to cool the driver stage. Note several
holes under MAXPRO6025+ and MAXPRO6050+ are slightly different (see next page).
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Fig. 6: RF module drill template for MAXPRO6025 and 6050, all measurements in mm, all holes are for M3 metric screws. Board is 10mm above the
enclosure due to heat sink running under the entire length of the board. Definitely use metal distancer under the pink hole as it also serves to cool the driver
stage.
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Chapter
3
What’s under the hood?
The block diagram of the MAXPRO5000+ series exciter is shown below. It is simplified as the actual block diagram would
be too complex for this manual. Only the basic building blocks of the exciter are shown and briefly explained one by one.
Fig. 7: Block diagram of the MAXPRO6000+ series FM exciter
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14
Reference
Function
1
Pre-emphasis is standard part of FM audio broadcasting. It helps minimize noise in received audio.
2
VCO/PLL system generates transmitter frequency and makes sure it is stable.
3
Buffer amplifies VCO signal to 1-2W.
4
Output stage additionally amplifies signal to full 15W.
5
Output filter with power and SWR meter ensures clean signal and provides signals for the power/SWR
meter.
6
The microcontroller is a small computer which coordinates all of the functions of the transmitter.
7
LCD module makes it possible to monitor and set many of the parameters of this product.
8
Power/SWR meter selection circuitry, this is handled via software (LCD selection) in MAXPRO60xx+.
You have to enter menu system and select whether you want to measure internal or external power/swr.
9
Output power control circuitry controls output power.
10
The microcontroller also provides control signal for a small fan which can be used to cool the unit.
MAXLINK
This is a 6-pin connector, designed for easy connectivity with stereo encoders. You can read more about
stereo encoders at the back of this document.
DIGIAMP
This is a 14-pin connector, designed for controlling RF amplifiers. You can read more about connecting
and controlling amplifiers at the back of this document.
Table 5: Description of various blocks of the MAX PRO 6000+ series block diagram
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15
Chapter
4
Before you start
It is recommended that you read this section before you power your unit up for the first time. Let us clear up some basics
you should know about. You will also find some useful tips in our guides and forum at http://www.pcs-electronics.com.
Here is what you need to get your TV transmitter on the air:
Antenna
Preferred type of antenna is affected by several factors, but mostly by desired radiation pattern, space available and your
budget. If you are located in the middle of the area you want to cover you'll need an omni-directional antenna which
transmits equally in all directions. If you are located at the edge of your desired coverage area you can beam the signal into
the target area with a directional antenna. Directional antennas are also practical for point-to-point communications.
Another thing to consider is that directional antennas usually have much higher gain than omni-directional antennas since
the power which is radiated in all directions with omni antenna is concentrated mainly into one direction with directional
antenna. Antennas with more gain thus have narrower beam. A compromise is usually made depending on budget and
space available, higher gain antennas are often bigger and often more expensive.
Once you’ve chosen and installed your antenna there is another thing to consider. You can read more about it in the next
section (So what is this SWR everyone talks about). Before powering up your transmitter on the air you should tune your
antenna to get minimal SWR. This is typically done by adjusting the position of the antenna and any adjustable pieces. Aim
for 2:1 or less. Use low power into the antenna when tuning it up and making adjustments. If you were using full power and
a bit of the antenna came off in your hand the VSWR could be so bad as to blow the final transistor. For the same reason
check the DC continuity of the antenna with an ohmmeter before plugging it in, to be sure it's what it's meant to be, either a
short circuit or an open one, depending on the antenna type. For instructions regarding construction of antennas please see
our website: http://www.pcs-electronics.com (guides section - antennas).
Antenna is a crucial part of the system so take special care. It is usually a good idea to place antenna away from your
transmitter, power supply and audio system. Also any transmitter should be in a metal case which shields circuitry from the
radiation of the antenna. If you cannot meet these requirements, you could experience feedback and other RF problems. We
cannot guarantee proper operation of any transmitter/amplifier unless suitable antenna system is used and transmitters are in
ventilated metal enclosure! This applies to any transmitter. Interestingly, strong RF field can make CD players and other
digital devices go bezerk. Try placing antenna next to yours and see what happens. Most of the modern audio gear is not RF
shielded – reducing costs is unfortunately the mantra today. This is why keeping antenna away from audio gear is a good
idea.
If you are going to place your antenna outside, on your roof, please take care of the grounding. This should be done to
prevent lightning hazard and should be done by a company specializing in lightning protection. You can read more about
lightning protection in the book recommended below or many of the websites (Google up “lightning protection ham radio”
for example) .
I hope this basic introduction will not scare you too much, it should be sufficient for the time being although we encourage
you to explore this exciting subject further with the help of a book such as the ARRL Antenna Book:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0872598047/mightyspiraterad
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So what is this swr (vswr) everyone talks about?
SWR is a measure of how well two devices are impedance matched to each other. Typical radio/TV transmission equipment
is designed for 50 ohm load impedance, so we usually use 50 ohm cables and build or buy antennas that are specified for 50
ohm. While most cables have flat impedance over frequency (they measure 50 ohm at all frequencies you are likely to use)
the same is not true of the antennas.
A 1.0:1 VSWR is a perfect match. That means the load impedance is exactly 50 ohms. A 2.0:1 VSWR is obtained when the
load impedance is either 25 ohms or 100 ohms.
Because most transmitters will deliver full power with a load VSWR of up to 2.0:1, this value is usually considered the limit
for acceptable operation. Many prefer to keep their VSWR below that however, but for all practical purposes, it is
unnecessary to spend time or money trying to get much below a VSWR of 1.5:1. The benefits will be hard to measure and
even harder to notice.
On the other hand, coaxial cable losses increase rapidly, for a given frequency of operation, when the antenna VSWR
exceeds 2.0:1. This can even, in some extreme cases, result in the coaxial cable burning, even when running 100 W. Using a
higher grade of cable will definitely improve things, but even high quality coaxial cable becomes very lossy when VSWR
exceeds 3.0:1 at higher HF frequencies (or VHF and higher).
Coaxial cable
Coaxial cable is an electrical cable consisting of a round, insulated conducting wire surrounded by a round, conducting
sheath, usually surrounded by a final insulating layer. The cable is designed to carry a high-frequency or broadband signal,
usually at radio frequencies. Coaxial Cabling is a two conductor closed transmission medium that is often used for the
transmission of RF energy. It yields excellent performance at high frequencies and superior EMI control/shielding when
compared to other types of copper cabling. Coaxial cabling is commonly found in broadcast and networking systems. Most
coaxial cables have a characteristic impedance of either 50 or 75 ohms. The RF industry uses standard type-names for coaxial
cables. The U.S military uses the RG-# or RG-#/U format (probably for "radio grade, universal", but other interpretations
exist).
The common RG-58 from Radio Shack is NOT the best you can do and can eat a lot of your effective power out! Use it
only for short runs. BELDEN makes terrific coaxial cable in various qualities and with very low loss (measured in
dB’s…decibels). 3 dB loss = 1/4 of your signal strength - either lost or gained. Watch out for the correct impedance; RG58,
RG213, H-500 and H-155 have 50 Ohms, RG-59 and RG-6 have 75 Ohms. Most antennas and transmitters including ours
are 50 ohm. Check our website for good coax. Don't buy more than you need to make the long run to your antenna and
don't make up a few "jumpers" to go between your exciter, VSWR meter and your antenna as all you'll do is create higher
SWR and more line losses. H-155 or H500 are good choices! RG-142 with Teflon is recommended for wiring inside
cabinets, for baluns, Wilkinson couplers and everywhere where resistance to heat is required as insulation won’t melt during
soldering or operation.
BNC connector
A connector comes between coaxial cable and your transmitter. It’s a standard VHF RF connector for low power
applications, just like the one used for older Ethernet networks. You might get it along with your antenna. Try to find a good
quality BNC connector as PC type usually uses cheap plastic instead of Teflon. The good ones are usually easily recognized
by higher prices. Another reliable method is a test with soldering iron; Teflon won’t melt while plastic will. BNC to N or
BNC to SO239 converters are available and will make it possible to connect N or PL259 (CB type or UHF) connector
directly.
Mains power supply and mains power cable
Do not underestimate the importance of mains power supply, despite abundance of all kinds of cheap units available today
they unfortunately do not always meet requirements. What you need is a well stabilized DC 15V mains power supply that
can supply at least 5 amps of continuous current without overheating, introducing buzzing, dropping the voltage down to
12V or lower (a classic case) or acting up in other way. Whenever in doubt please buy our mains power supply. One final
note, our units are set for 15V and if you use less this may lower your output power a bit. The lower the supply voltage the
lower the power. You can compensate for this by slightly increasing output stage bias current.
If you ordered and received our mains power supply (which is recommended) you’ll notice the mains cable is not included,
but can be obtained in any radio/computer/hardware shop at the cost of about 1 US$. It is the type used in your PC for
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17
mains power. Since these cables vary from country to country and we had trouble getting the exact type locally we decided
against including them, especially since finding them is so easy locally.
Audio source with mixer, microphone etc
You need some kind of audio source to drive your transmitter. This will typically be either a computer (just plug the cable
into your sound card outputs, a mixer and a variety of audio sources, such as a microphone, CD player, DAT player, tape
deck, gramophone, MP3 player etc.
Enclosure and cooling for MAX PRO 6000+ series exciters
Use metal (preferably aluminum) for your enclosures and allow some free space for future add-ons (stereo encoders etc.) and
heat dissipation, also make ventilation holes at the top and/or back of the enclosure. Fix the PCB and heat-sink with all
screws tightly. Read again, ALL screws. Make sure they make a good contact with the metal enclosure and if there is paint
remember to remove it under the distancers. Use metal distancers, not plastic. Flat cable should be wired away RF sections
or if you are not sure where that is move it away from the board in general. A fan is needed, 40x40x25mm will run quietly,
you can connect it to the provided pads which also regulate fan speed according to output power. Make sure you tightly
screw the RF board to the enclosure as this is how the output transistor dissipates its heat! Since 50W is quite a lot
of power it is important that you follow these guidelines. If you still experience instability, make sure there are metal shields
between compartments in your enclosure. You can also sand off the black anodizing off the heat sink where the heat sink
meets the enclosure and board to ensure better contact. Anodizing creates isolating layer. You can remove that also for the
top heat sink where it meets the board.
Stereo encoder for stereo operation
If you want to transmit in stereo, you also need a stereo encoder. The cool thing about MAXPRO60XX+ is that it directly
supports SE6000+, SE2000 or SE5000 DSP+ stereo encoder. This makes it possible to set all audio parameters easily via
LCD control module. SE5000 DSP+ comes with excellent DSP filters and 19 KHz notch. When using other units look for
good stereo separation, 19 KHz notch filters, a limiter and balanced inputs, if possible. Balanced inputs are an instant cure
for most noise problems and this is why all professional installations usually take advantage of balanced inputs. Of course
you can use any stereo encoder out there.
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Chapter
5
Wiring everything together
Wiring things up and first power-up
Wiring the MAXPRO60xx+ is easy, just make sure you read the previous chapter and setup enclosure, antenna and coaxial
cable correctly. Then proceed with the following:
- Install MAXPRO6015/25/50+ in a suitable enclosure and provide a small cooling fan which will blow across the board. If
you have stereo encoder, you can install it in the same enclosure, but a metal separating/shielding wall is needed.
- Connect LCD module via flat cable
- Set the power limit jumper (J12) into the lowest position (1W), this will prevent any damage due to high SWR.
- If you don’t have artificial load (dummy load) erect antenna tower and install antenna securely. Make sure your antenna is
well away from any metal objects. Ensure your antenna tower is grounded securely. Connect one end of your 50ohm coaxial
cable to the antenna. If you have SWR analyzer you can now verify SWR of your antenna. If your antenna is already tuned
connect the other end of coaxial cable to the antenna connector (BNC) at the back of the transmitter. If you have
SWR/POWER meter, you can wire that inline between antenna and transmitter as well. Make sure the SWR meter supports
the frequency band required (87-108MHz).
- Ensure all connectors are firmly secured and antenna is mounted securely.
- While making sure power switch is off connect mains power cable into the mains power supply and connect mains power
supply into the back of the exciter.
- Inspect all cables quickly again and make sure everything is secure.
- Turn on a radio receiver and set it to your intended transmitter frequency.
- Flip the POWER switch and wait for the unit to turn on. Enter the menu system by pressing the bottom key (Menu)
repeatedly and look for the <RF power> menu item. Now set desired output power with the UP/DOWN keys. For tuning
and testing use around 25-50% of full power. Press Menu again to exit back to main display. Now you can use the
UP/DOWN keys to set the desired frequency of operation. Wait a few seconds for the red LED diode to turn off. Your
radio should now mute since you did not connect any audio sources yet.
- You can now connect audio sources of choice and verify audio performance. You should not sound louder than other
stations, in fact unless you have an expensive high performance software or hardware sound processor you should sound
quieter than other stations. Remember, if you’re using stereo encoder you do not need pre-emphasis so set it to none.
- Observe SWR and output power. If everything seems ok you can enter <RF power> menu again and increase power to
full. Remove or reposition the power limit jumper (J12) if more power is desired.
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Fig. 9: Setting up MAX PRO 60XX+
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Chapter
6
Using the MAX PRO 5000+ series exciter
LCD control module
Basically there are three push-buttons available for the menu system; UP, DOWN and MENU. By pushing UP or
DOWN you get a shift of frequency in corresponding direction. Hold any of these keys for a few seconds and the jumps
will increase to 500 KHz. The new frequency is saved automatically. The third button (MENU) gives you an option to
select and setup many of the options and DSP functions of this unit. Note that for most users setting frequency and power
are the two important/useful settings, leave the rest alone at default.
LCD control module menu system
The UP and DOWN keys are used to change parameter values. In normal mode the LCD simply shows the frequency and
power or whatever view you select. Menu key can be used to enter the menu mode, repeatedly pressing this key brings up
the following menus: <RF POWER>, <STEREO MODE>, <VIEW SELECT>, <TREBLE>, <BASS>,
<COMPRESSION>, <THRESHOLD>, <ATTACK>, <DECAY>, <INTEGRATION>, <LCD CONTRAST>,
<RIGHT CH VOL>, <LEFT CH VOL>, <PLL STEP>, <FIRMWARE VER>, <CURRENT ALARM>, <TEMP
ALARM>, <SWR ALARM>, <U AMP ALARM>, <BAND SELECT>, <RF AMP CONTROL> and <RF POWER
ALC>. Pressing the UP or DOWN key selects the desired parameter and allows you to modify its value. Another press on
the MENU key and you’re back to the normal mode. Note that all these settings except power and frequency are already set
as they should be so changing them should not be necessary and is not recommended.
Changing frequency
Simply press the UP/DOWN button to change frequency. Depending on PLL STEP setting your frequency will go down in
50/100/200KHz steps. If you keep pressing a key for a while the PLL STEP switches to fast tuning mode and jumps in 500
KHz steps.
Note: UP/DOWN keys change frequency also when you have set a view type which does not show frequency, such as
UPTIME.
<RF POWER>
This setting allows you to set output power. Select desired power with the UP/DOWN keys and press MENU key to exit
the menu system and return to normal operation. Selected power is displayed on the LCD as a line of bars. Think of this
setting as an accelerator (gas) pedal in your car. Think of the power in watts that is shown on the LCD as the speed meter in
your car. Depending on the road going uphill or downhill speed meter will show different values even if your accelerator
pedal is fixed in the same position. If you go downhill your speed will be greater with same amount of gas pedal. Likewise
here your supply voltage can affect the actual output power slightly.
<STEREO MODE>
You can set your transmitter to MONO or STEREO here. This only works when you connect stereo encoder to the MAX
PRO 5000+ with MAXLINK cable (6-pin flat cable).
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<VIEW SELECT>
MAX PRO 5000+ is capable of displaying a number of various parameters. Since the LCD real-estate is limited to 2x16
characters we prepared a number of pre-programmed views that only show a selected number of parameters. At the time of
writing these views were available:
- [Freq+Mode+Pwr] – This view shows frequency, mono/stereo mode and output power
- [Fr+Ie+Te+Ue] – This view shows frequency, Exciter output stage current, exciter temperature and exciter supply voltage
- [Po+Pr+Uamp+Ta] – This view shows output power, reflected power, amplifier supply voltage and amplifier temperature
- [Po+Pr+Uamp+Ia] – This view shows output power, reflected power, amplifier supply voltage and amplifier current
- [Audio Level] – This view shows audio level bar graph. For this to work you the W solder bridge on the LCD module
needs to be closed-soldered.
- [Uptime D:H:M] – This view shows how long the transmitter has been operating without mains power going out. It is
sometimes useful in diagnosing mains power failures.
- [Auto Scroll]D – This is the default view, it shows each of the above listed views for a short while and then moves on to
the next in an endless loop. This way you can see all the relevant parameters without having to go through the menu system
to change the view type; you just have to wait a few seconds for the view to change.
<TREBLE> and <BASS>
This option allows you to set the amount of TREBLE and BASS in your audio. Recommended values are marked with (D).
Fig. 10: Setting treble
Compressor Settings
A number of MENU settings control the operation of the compressor. Let’s assume that the audio signal enters the
transmitter at some low level. Compressor does nothing to the signal until at one point as the input signal increases the signal
reaches the compression threshold. Digital signal processor starts compressing the signal beyond that point. The higher the
compression ratio the higher the compression. For example, compression ratio of 1:∞ would in effect be a limiter.
Fig. 11: Explanation of the compressor settings
Fig. 12: Setting the compression level
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Fig. 13: Setting the compression threshold
Fig. 14: Setting the attack time, this is the time between the input signal and the actual response of the compressor
Fig. 15: Setting the decay time, this is the time the compressor needs to respond after the input signal falls back to normal level (below threshold).
Fig. 16: Setting the integration interval, this is the time the DSP evaluates the signal to establish whether it should respond or not
Integration interval determines the energy needed to trip the compressor. In simple words; it determines how long the audio
needs to be loud for the compressor to respond by reducing the gain. This is not to be confused with attack time. Attack
time of 50ms means the compressor will respond in 50ms after the signal spike is detected, regardless of duration of that
spike, even if it is just a very short event. With longer integration interval, on the other hand, compressor only responds if a
long spike or a substantial number of spikes are detected (meaning more signal energy).
<LCD CONTRAST>
Select for the best visibility. Contrast is slightly affected by ambient temperature and you can adapt it to your needs here.
Fig. 17: Changing contrast
Left and right channel volume (only with DSP stereo encoders)
This option allows you to precisely adjust the input sensitivity of both audio channels. This is very useful when your audio source has either too
high or too low output level.
Fig. 18: Changing right input channel gain
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<PLL STEP>
Frequency can normally be adjusted in smallest steps of 50 KHz or larger steps of 100 KHz. We recommend you to select
100 KHz as this lets you change frequency fast and there is rarely need for fine tuning. However, you can enter this menu
and select a PLL step of 5 KHz for example and take advantage of these small steps.
<FIRMWARE VER>
This option allows you to display current LCD module firmware version. At the time of writing firmware version was
[MP6015+ V4.1]
<CURRENT ALARM>
You can set the sensitivity of amplifier current alarm here. We recommend you set these according to your amplifier. This
alarm only works if you use PCS LPF 6000 or PCS LPF 5000 filters with current sensor. Current meter accuracy is not very
high at this time.
<TEMP ALARM>
You can set the sensitivity of temperature alarm here. We recommend you set these to 70-80 degrees Celsius. A properly
installed unit with a tiny fan will typically run at 55 degrees C at maximum output power. This alarm applies to externally
sensed temperature (PCS LPF 6000/7000 or ControlMini2), if you are using external PWR/SWR METER.
<SWR ALARM>
You can set the sensitivity of software driven SWR alarm here.
<U AMP ALARM>
You can set the sensitivity of amplifier supply voltage alarm here. We recommend you set these according to your amplifier.
Usually this is around 50V. This alarm only works if you use PCS LPF 5000/6000/7000 filters with voltage sensor.
<BAND SELECT>
MAXPRO5000+ exciters support FM band, if you want us to modify design for another frequency please let us know:
- [87.5-108MHz]D – This is default band, used in most of the world. MAXPRO5000+ series exciter works perfectly across
the entire band.
<RF AMP CONTROL>
This menu option lets you choose how the MAX PRO 5000+ controls the amplifier. Please leave this setting at default value
“(D) No amplifier”. Modern amplifiers can be nicely controlled just by varying drive power so this is not needed.
- [No amplifier]D – Default option, you will not be using an amplifier
- [Controlmini1] – Basically mode A for the system described in appendix D
- [ControlMini2] – Basically mode B for the system described in appendix D
<RF POWER ALC>
This menu option is useful for situations where MAX PRO 5000 drives a pallet or other FM amplifier. It is possible to set a
limit power level (for example 500W) and exciter will reduce its output power if needed to prevent overdriving. This is a very
useful feature when you are for example building a 500W, 1000W or stronger FM transmitter; it ensures constant power
across the band without overdriving. This is disabled by default to prevent tinkering with the settings by unauthorized
personnel, you can enable it by soldering a particular bridge on the LCD module.
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Chapter
7
WINDOWS CONTROL PROGRAM - CYBERMAXFM+
SOFTWARE INSTALLATION AND COMMUNICATION SETUP
Software installation and setting up connection via serial COM port or USB port are described in Appendix I.
COM PORT SETUP
Select correct COM port here. Usually this would be COM1. Baud rate is selected automatically according to the selected
FM transmitter type. All recent models of MAX PRO 5000 series exciters use CYBERMAXFM+ v4.
Fig. 19: COM port setup.
Communication test tool
Use this feature to find correct settings easily. Try different settings and check them by clicking the button.
Fig. 20: Communication was successful
Fig. 21: Wrong COM port
Autoscan
Use this feature to find correct settings even more easily. Just click it and wait to program find the connected transmitter by
itself.
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FM TX main tab – transmitter setup
Fig. 22: FM transmitter setup
Main FM transmitter parameters are presented in this dialog, they are described below:
FM transmitter type
Select your FM transmitter type, this would be version 4 for all recent MAX PRO 5000 series exciter. Older units may have
to be set to v3.
FM transmitter frequency
Set the frequency by 0.5 or 0.05MHz steps.
Transmitter output power
Set the desired output power.
Stereo/Mono
Select stereo mode here.
Audio input level
Select audio gain for left and right channel separately.
Bass and Treble
Select boost level for Bass and Treble.
Audio Compressor Settings (only with DSP stereo encoders)
These are settings which control the operation of the compressor. This only works if you are using SE5000 or SE6000 DSP
stereo processor. Compressor settings are described here.
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FM TX alarms
Fig. 23: Setting up alarms
In this tab you can observe several operating parameters including alarms. Threshold values of alarms can be set, too.
Read TX
Click this button to get the current status of your hardware.
Auto read TX
Check this box to activate automatic continuous hardware status reading.
PI, PTY... (RDS settings)
Fig. 24: Setting up RDS
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PI code
This information consists of a code enabling the receiver to distinguish between countries, areas in which the same
programme is transmitted, and the identification of the programme itself. The code is not intended for direct display and is
assigned to each individual radio programme, to enable it to be distinguished from all other programmes. One important
application of this information would be to enable the receiver to search automatically for an alternative frequency in case of
bad reception of the programme to which the receiver is tuned; the criteria for the change-over to the new frequency would
be the presence of a better signal having the same Programme Identification code.
TP/TA flag
TP is a flag to indicate that the tuned program carries traffic announcements. The TP flag must only be set on programs
which dynamically switch on the TA identification during traffic announcements. The signal shall be taken into account
during automatic search tuning, so I recommend turning this flag on even though you don't transmit any traffic
announcements.
Program type PTY
This is an identification number to be transmitted with each program item and which is intended to specify the current
Program type within 31 possibilities. This code could be used for search tuning. The code will, moreover, enable suitable
receivers and recorders to be pre-set to respond only to program items of the desired type. The last number, i.e. 31, is
reserved for an alarm identification which is intended to switch on the audio signal when a receiver is operated in a waiting
reception mode.
Music/Speech
This is a two-state signal to provide information on whether music or speech is being broadcast. The signal would permit
receivers to be equipped with two separate volume controls, one for music and one for speech, so that the listener could
adjust the balance between them to suit his individual listening habits.
AF - Alternative Frequencies
The list of alternative frequencies gives information on the various transmitters broadcasting the same program in the same
or adjacent reception areas. This facility is particularly useful in the case of car and portable radios. When the PI code
indicates local coverage-area, i.e. only one frequency is used, AF list may contain this frequency.
PS0
Fig. 25: Setting up RDS – PS fields
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PS
This is the label of the program service consisting of not more than eight alphanumeric characters, which is displayed by
RDS receivers in order to inform the listener what program service is being broadcast by the station to which the receiver is
tuned. If you want to use just one PS setting please set delay for all others to 0. You can select delay for each of the PS labels.
Note that setting a 0 disables associated PI. Labels will start at the start of the list once they reach the last defined PS label
(they run in a loop). Do not exaggerate; fast changing PI labels can compromise driver safety!
More information about PS feature
This is the most interesting feature for 99% of customers out there so we will dedicate a bit more time to it. RDS standard
provides for an 8-character PS string which is used to identify radio station and is displayed by RDS-enabled radio receivers.
Some countries prohibit changing this text dynamically, but others don't. Whatever your decision may be, RDSMAX
supports either static or dynamic PS. It is best to check with the local authorities before setting up the RDS encoder.
The mechanism for handling dynamic (or static) PS text is best demonstrated by the following example:
Imagine a train traveling in a round trip involving 100 train stations. The train starts on station 00 (PS00) and goes through
stations 01, 02…. until it passes through station 99 and finally returns to station 00. Every time a train stops at the station it
sends the message back to the headquarters (PS text shown on RDS receiver). The amount of time the train stays at the
station (delay - PD00 to PD99) varies and can be from 0 minutes (train does not stop) to 9 minutes. I hope this little analogy
has illustrated the process. You have 100 8-character strings (PS00 to PS99) which are displayed one after the other until the
entire loop repeats itself. You can define how long each of these strings is displayed, the parameter which defines this is PD
(PD00 to PD99).
Example: If you wish to just have one static PS, set all delays to 0 and set just PD00 to 1. Then set PS00 to desired states PS,
which will be displayed indefinitely.
PS1
Fig. 26: Setting up RDS – More PS fields, there are too many to fit on one page
PS2
Fig. 27: Setting up RDS – More PS fields, there are too many to fit on one page
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TIME, MSG...
Fig. 28: Setting up time and external messages
Computer time and date
Select to Synchronize RDS RTC (Real Time Clock) with current PC clock.
External switchable messages
To activate these messages attach 8 switches to header J10 (EXTMSG). These switches must be going to ground from each
of the 8 pins and are activated when you ground the corresponding pin. Message is scrolled, if larger than 8 characters.
AUTO PS, RT...
Fig. 29: Setting up automatic PS and RT updating
Auto PS and RT update is another hugely popular feature. Basically you can take the song title from Winamp or another
program via text file. Winamp must be setup to write its song info into a text file; this is done with TitleSpy plug-in. Most
other playback programs can easily be setup to write song info into a text file. You can use this info to update PS or RT text.
PS text is limited to 8 characters so the entire song title can either be scrolled or split into 8-character blocks. You can set the
speed of scrolling on the panel above. You can also insert DATE at the end of the scrolling block. A really popular and nifty
feature indeed. This feature requires your PC to be connected to the RDS encoder at all times during music playback.
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Auto update PS from txt file
This mode makes it possible to have the PS updated automatically. A number of very useful features make this mode
extremely useful. It is possible to insert time, date or song name from external file. This external file can be updated via
Winamp or any other program. If you want to collect data from Winamp (MP3 ID tag, song name) please use winamp plugin called VtitleSpy. This little program is usually packaged into installation file; you will find it in the installation folder where
you installed the program. Run the exe file and configure it to output winamp song info into your text file and then set
CyberMaxFM+ program to read song name from that file. Also make sure you setup VtitleSpy plug-in to limit song name to
64 characters.
Auto update RT from txt file
This is another popular feature, RDS allows for 64-character text string to be displayed on the receiver. However this feature
is rarely used as you need to press a button to display it (PS is always displayed by default). Another "nail in RTs' coffin" is
the fact that typical receiver only displays a maximum of 8-characters at a time meaning the message needs to be scrolled.
However popular or unpopular it may be, we support it. The field at the top (RT) shows the currently active RT message
The auto update RT field makes it possible to collect the RT from any text file. In order to pick RT from a text file select the
text file with the browse button and enable auto update by selecting the Yes option. CyberMaxFM+ will check the file once
every second and update the encoder automatically if it detects any changes of the text file. If you want to collect data from
Winamp (MP3 ID tag, song name) please use winamp plug-in called VtitleSpy. This little program is usually packaged into
installation file; you will find it in the installation folder where you installed the program. Run the exe file and configure it to
output winamp song info into your text file and then set CyberMaxFM+ program to read song name from that file. Also
make sure you setup VtitleSpy plug-in to limit song name to 64 characters.
About
Fig. 30: About…
Firmware version
This is the firmware version of your FM transmitter board. For this to display you need to read data from the transmitter at
least once (Read TX or Auto read TX).
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Common controls
These are common controls belonging to all program tabs.
Move to tray
Click Move to tray to move this program into taskbar. Check To tray at start checkbox to
start the program minimized in system tray.
Preview
This window shows PS and RT preview. Select desired preview type by clicking appropriate
radio button.
RDS active
Check this box to activate or deactivate RDS altogether.
Send settings
Fig. 31: Common controls
Send TX settings and Send RT and PS buttons may change their appearance and
accessibility according to currently active tab. Use Send settings to send parameter values +
PS00 and RT to RDS encoder. Use Send RT and PS to send all PS and RT parameters to
RDS encoder.
Shut down TX at exit
Check this box to automatically reduce transmitting power to 0 when exiting the program.
Send settings at start
Check this box to automatically send TX settings at starting the program. This may come handy when Shutdown TX at exit is
activated to automatically raise TX power when next time starting the program.
Audio histogram
Every time the transmitter status is read, a new audio level value is added at the histogram. Status may be read manually (by
clicking Read TX button) or automatically (by checking Auto TX read checkbox). Levels above 80% are marked in red color.
Status window
Some communication activities can be observed here.
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Scheduler
Fig. 32: Scheduler
Built-in scheduler allows to user determine automatic switching of transmitting power and frequency according to predefined
scheme. Schemes can be defined on daily or weekly basis. To accomplish this task the PC must be connected to the
transmitter and the program must be running all the time!
Up to 20 controlling lines can be entered into list box. Each line defines transmitting power, frequency and switching time.
Put a tick at the beginning of each line to make that line active. There can be many lines active if desired. It is recommended
to be careful while entering lines not to make time-overlapping lines active at the same time.
Example: if you define a line on daily basis and at the same time another weekly based line is active the results may be
unpredictable. You can always enter many lines and then decide which of them should be momentarily active by putting
ticks into checkboxes.
Enable
Check this box to make the scheduler active in general.
Add...
Click Add... button to open Add form to add a new line into list box.
Edit
Select desired line first, then click Edit to open Edit form.
Remove
Select desired line first, then click Remove to delete it.
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Add scheme dialog
Fig. 33: Scheduler, adding scheme
Add scheme dialog lets you enter the following parameters:
Transmitter frequency, transmitter power and repetition mode which can be either Daily or Weekly. Daily repetition mode
switches every day at the same time. To make sense, at least two daily based lines should be active at the same time. Weekly
repetition mode allows individual selection for each day in the week.
Add or Modify
Click this button to accept changes. In the case of adding lines more lines can be entered subsequently.
Close or Cancel
Click this button to finish adding lines or to cancel editing.
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34
Chapter
8
Troubleshooting
We hope you’ll never get to this step. We all know bad things happen but do not despair! MAX PRO 5000+ series exciters
are protected with a fuse, SWR and TEMP protection. Fuse is the first thing to check. Make sure your coaxial cable leading
to the transmitter or antenna is not shorted or open. Next check the troubleshooting table on the next page. If you have
problems you cannot solve yourself, please see our website for contact information and support resources in our forum.
Fig 34: So, do you think you can handle it? We think you sure can!
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35
PROBLEM DESCRIPTION
POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
Everything appears normal, but
there is no RF power
1. Wait a few more seconds, MAX PRO 5000 series exciters need about 10 seconds
to get their power to full
2. Maybe one of the alarms was triggered and power was reduced, try to power off
and power back on, whenever an alarm is triggered power may be reduced until you
power off and back on
RF output power is too low
1. Check the power limit jumper J12
2. Maybe one of the alarms was triggered and power was reduced, try to power off
and power back on, whenever an alarm is triggered power may be reduced until you
power off and back on
3. Find out which alarm was triggered, maybe your unit is over-heating or your
antenna (SWR) may be way off. Let the unit cool off and ensure proper cooling in
the future. Perhaps you adjusted TEMP ALARM or another alarm too low, set it
slightly higher.
4. Exciter may not give full 15W/25W/40W when you use a supply voltage of less
than 15V. Please note 50W model requires 24-28V and will not work well with 15V
only.
LCD display keeps showing
TEMP/SWR error warning
1. Unit is probably over-heating or your antenna is faulty. Let the unit cool off and
ensure proper cooling in the future. Perhaps you adjusted TEMP ALARM too low,
set it slightly higher.
2. It is very likely that your antenna is not working correctly, check cable and check
SWR. You may need to adjust SWR ALARM slightly higher (but first make sure
your antenna and cable are OK).
Audio too quiet/loud
1. Open or close the modulation trimmer on MAX PRO 5000+ series exciter board
a little bit.
2. Increase or decrease level on your audio source a little bit, start using software or
hardware compressor
Audio too loud
Close the modulation trimmer on MAX PRO 5000+ exciter board a little bit.
Audio without any treble
Set pre-emphasis to either 50uS or 75uS. If you’re using stereo model, enable preemphasis there (see manual for stereo encoder module , SE5000, SE2000 or
SE6000).
Unit blows fuses and draws
excessive current
You have managed the impossible: You have burned the output transistor. You've
probably tried to squeeze out more output power by using higher supply voltage
above 15V or even changing the bias current. It is time to order a replacement final
transistor and get the soldering iron. Next time think twice about doing these things.
Power supply is blinking
Probably the same thing as above. Blinking power supply means its protection is
shutting it off and back on, probably due to excessive current draw caused by
burned final.
Audio distortion on high peaks,
for example on “s” sound.
Your audio input level is slightly too high, reduce input audio level slightly at your
audio source. Use some kind of compressor to remove over-modulation peaks.
There is HUM in audio
- Move antenna as far away from the transmitter and audio gear as possible
- Use balanced audio inputs (XLR audio connectors) rather than RCA (for your
stereo encoder, SE5000 and SE2000 have XLR inputs)
- Make sure SWR is low
- Did you miss the part about metal enclosure? Put your unit in enclosure!!
Brought to you by PCS Electronics, www.pcs-electronics.com
36
- Keep audio cables short and away from antenna and RF coaxial cable
- Form a coil from coaxial cable going to the antenna, make a few turns. This stops
RF currents that might be flowing on the outer braid of the coaxial cable. This
usually happens when you connect unbalanced cable to balanced antenna without
proper BALUN (balanced-unbalanced converter) resulting in coaxial cable
becoming part of the antenna and radiating RF energy as well…causing hum.
The audio level bar graph does not
move with audio
Look at the LCD module and look at the “W” solder bridge. This bridge should be
soldered over for this function to work. If it is not please solder this.
Output power less than expected
Verify position of the J12 power limit jumpers. A jumper installed there will limit
maximum power to 2W, 5W or 8W. If you want full power please remove the
jumper.
Output power less than expected
If unit is overheating it will start reducing output power, make sure it is sufficiently
cooled! Reduced power will return only after you power off and on the unit (or
change power setting).
Table 6: Troubleshooting MAX PRO 5000+ series FM exciter
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37
Chapter
9
Limiting maximum adjustable power for driving pallets
MAX PRO 6015 (6025 and 6040 are usually too strong for driving RF amplifiers) has been developed as a pallet driver and it
is ideal for this task. Of course for most situations 15W will be too much and you will want to limit maximum output power
of this FM transmitter to a lower value and at the same time prevent accidental setting of higher power via LCD module.
This is especially important when you use this exciter to drive an amplifier. Most amplifiers will not appreciate over-driving
the input and will eventually be damaged by excessive power on the input. There are scenarios and ways to limit output
power, they are described below with their advantages and disadvantages. You should PERFORM THESE
ADJUSTMENTS BEFORE CONNECTING AMPLIFIER as otherwise it may be too late, a short burst of full power
before you turn the power off or adjust the trimmer may kill the amplifier. A very good design practice is also to use an
attenuator (just a small 1-3dB) between exciter and amplifier, remember amplifiers input impedance can be a long way from
prescribed 50 ohms and attenuator nicely equalizes that out.
Step1 – establish needed drive power
Check the datasheet/specs of your amplifier, it will state how much drive power is needed. For the purpose of simplicity let
us assume that the datasheet asks for 3.2W of drive power. Since there is some variation from pallet to pallet and we want to
have a tiny bit of headroom also for the attenuator lets set output power to 4W.
Step2 - set maximum output power to 4W
Look for power limit jumper J12, it is located close to the telemetry connector. Set J12 to 4W, this will limit output power to
about 4W. Thanks to the new design of the MAXPRO6015+ this output power is flat across the entire FM band, this is a
great advantage compared to our 3000+ and 4000+ series exciters.
Step3 – reduce 4W down to the needed 3.5W with attenuator (optional, but recommended)
As already mentioned before a very good design practice is to use an attenuator (just a small 1-2dB) between exciter and
amplifier, remember amplifiers input impedance can be a long way from prescribed 50 ohms and attenuator nicely equalizes
that out. We are going to use such an attenuator to bring 4W down to around 3.2W.
Fig 35: Attenuator
Loss in dB
R1 ohms
R2 ohms
1
870
5.8
2
436
11.6
Table 7: Resistor values for required attenuation
Input power (Pin) for 3.2W output power (Pout)
4W
5.12W
It seems 1dB will be just perfect. You can use 2x820ohm 2W resistors and 1x5.6ohm 2W resistor. Use regular carbon 2W
resistors (not! wire-wound), they will work well for this purpose at 100MHz, just keep the leads very short.
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38
Step4 – verify performance before connecting the pallet
Now you should have about 3.2W at the output of the attenuator, it is recommended that you now measure this output
power to verify performance before you power-up the pallet. Don’t worry if you get slightly more, we will focus on that later.
You should worry about getting a lot more than 3.2W as that would mean something is not as it should be and excessive
drive power could damage the pallet. After you're done with verification set power down to zero via LCD module and
power off the exciter.
Step5 – wiring up the pallet and first power up
Make sure your exciter's output is set to zero and everything is powered off. Now connect the pallet, the filter and directional
couplers (swr/pwr meters). We recommend PCS LPF 6000 or PCS LPF 7000, they can be easily connected to Digiamp.
You can also use your own directional coupler, connect it to J8. Wire everything and verify it carefully to make sure there are
no shorts. Make sure dummy load is connected for the test and wire power meter inline so you can monitor the power
output. Set the sensitivity trimmers for SWR and PWR on the filters to maximum. Set ALC trimmer to zero (turn it towards
digiamp connector).
Step6 – first power up and setup
Power up the entire setup and slowly increase drive power while observing the output power from the pallet on the power
meter, also monitor temperature. Be careful never to exceed power rating of the pallet. A 500W pallet shouldn’t be pushed
beyond 500W. Setup the SWR and PWR trimmers on the filters so that the power shown on the LCD is the same as on the
power meter. If you are getting SWR alarms you may need to reduce SWR trimmer.
Step7 – check the ALC and set it to prevent overdriving
Make sure that ALC (automatic level control) is not limiting your power, you can do so by turning it carefully. Set the ALC
trimmer to start limiting a bit below your target power level, for example in a 500W setup you can set it to start limiting
around 480W. If you still can’t reach full power you need slightly more drive, look at the attenuator and reduce R2 a little.
You can do that by connecting another resistor in parallel, for example 10 ohms.
Step8 – RF POWER ALC (software power limit)
We have included a very important new feature in MAX PRO 5000 series exciters, we call it RF POWER ALC, and it is
basically a software power limit. There is a menu option with this name and it lets you select the maximum power allowed.
For example, you can set it to a number of pre-defined values, such as 50W, 300W, 500W, 1000W etc. This menu option is
usually locked, to unlock it look at the LCD module board and solder a bridge across “Free”. You will now be able to enter
and change the RF POWER ALC setting. After changing this value please remove the solder bridge, accidental or malicious
change will allow the exciter to overdrive the amplifier which will probably result in damage.
How does it work? It relies on the accurate power signal from directional coupler. After start-up the exciter will increase its
drive slowly until the amplifier reaches for example 500W. As soon as power limit is reached the exciter will stop increasing
its drive. This ensures 500W across the band without any over-driving problems. Obviously this only works well when the
directional couplers are setup properly and power readout needs to be calibrated correctly with trimmers such as the PWR
trimmer on the PCS LPF 5000/6000/7000 filter.
PERFORM STEPS 1-4 BEFORE CONNECTING AMPLIFIER/PALLET!
ALWAYS MAKE SURE OUTPUT POWER OF THE EXCITER DOES NOT EXCEED AMPLIFIER INPUT
POWER!
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39
Appendix
A
Appendix A: DIY antenna and improvement tips
Simple GP antenna design
You can build an inexpensive 1/4 wave antenna from 1 so-239 chassis mount RF connector and 5 - 3' bronze welding rods,
cut to the proper length. Here is how it looks:
If you have a SWR meter,
leave a bit longer radiator
and adjust it later by
cutting
to
achieve
minimum SWR.
Fig. 36: »Do it yourself« GP antenna
Most designs on the web don't compensate for the fact
that GP antennas are not wideband antennas. Here is a
Freq/element length chart for this simple GP antenna, all
element lengths are in millimeters:
Frequency
108MHZ
104MHz
100MHz
90MHz
Radiator - B
660mm
684mm
713mm
792mm
Radials - A
693mm
720mm
749mm
819mm
For other antenna designs check our web site here: http://www.pcs-electronics.com/guide_antenna.php
Some more improvement tips
Think about purchasing SWR meter to tune and align your antenna. A good antenna system is extremely important and can
make up for a lot of power. For a suitable SWR meter check:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/cn101l-daiwa-power-meter-p-347.html
If you can’t get much range with your homebrew antenna, have a look at these:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/antennas-c-38.html
Still not enough range? Well, how about a 750W amplifier?
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/750w-digital-amplifier-19inch-rack-p-1295.html
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40
Appendix
B
Appendix B: Connecting stereo encoder
You will almost certainly want to upgrade to stereo capability at some point. Using our stereo encoders is a great idea as you
can control all parameters through the same LCD unit used for FM exciter. Since the introduction of the new MaxLink
interconnect system this is really easy to do, you do not have to fiddle with wires and soldering iron anymore. The
MaxLinkTM is a 6-wire flat cable interconnect system that is simply plugged into appropriate connector on the stereo encoder
board and the other end into connector on FM exciter board. See fig. 19 below for wiring directions. You don’t even have to
wire a separate supply (12V) wire to the stereo encoder as the MaxLink cable delivers supply voltage as well. You still have to
connect audio cable (MPX out to audio input of the FM exciter), but that is really easy to do. It is best to use shielded
microphone cable.
Remember to set the following:
Set the Auto/LCD jumper (J10) on the SE5000 board to LCD (Remove it).
Remove the STEREO/MONO jumper as this is now controlled via FM exciter’s LCD module. If stereo mode LED is
illuminated, you are in STEREO mode.
Disable pre-emphasis in the MAX PRO 5000+ series exciter board (jumper in position “None”). Pre-emphasis is now
handled by stereo encoder(se5000 or other), you can set it there either to 50uS or 75uS.
Set the audio level (P1) on MAX PRO 5000+ series exciter so that the stereo indicator on the radio just turns on, than
increase it slightly more (make sure you are in stereo mode when you do this alignment).
Fig. 37: Connecting stereo encoder to FM exciter.
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41
Appendix
C
Appendix C: Adding an amplifier – complete fm transmitter
block by block
Now that you’ve connected stereo encoder and already have nice stereo sound, it may be time to increase your power
output. How about adding an external amplifier? Some of you will say, sure, but will the nice power/swr meter built into
MAX PRO 5000+ know how to measure power with this amplifier added and will it show it properly on the LCD display?
The good news is that we have a solution for this. Not only does the MAX PRO 5000+ have ability to read power/swr with
external amplifier installed, it can also read amplifier temperature and amplifier supply voltage. To top this off, swr and
temperature protection still works just like before.
Fig. 38: Connecting an external amplifier module – Complete FM transmitter, block diagram
Diagram above explains the entire FM transmitter system, with mains power supply (1), DCDC converter (2), stereo
encoder (3), FM exciter (4), FM amplifier pallet (5), output filter (6), ControlMini board (7), interconnect system (8 &9) and
cooling fans. I will briefly explain each of the above subsystems:
1.) MAINS POWER SUPPLY: Provides power for the entire transmitter. Usually accepts mains voltage, from 110 to 240V,
and outputs 24 or 48V DC. Exact power rating depends on the power consumption of the entire transmitter. A 300W
transmitter usually consumes around 500W of power. A 1000W transmitter typically consumes around 1500W of power. An
engineer should also consider safety margin and use a power supply that can provide 20-30% more power than needed.
Voltage rating for mains power supply depends primarily on the type of amplifier used. Most pallets accept 24-28 or 48-50V.
You can find all kinds of mains power supplies here at our website:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/transmitter-accesories-mains-power-supply-c-71_74.html
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42
2.) Stereo encoders and FM exciters typically operate from 12V DC stabilized voltage. Since at the moment we only have 24
or 48V inside our system shown in diagram above and we don’t want to use another big 110-240V/12V mains power supply
we are going to use own small DCDC converter. This conveniently converts any voltage from 17-50V down into 12-15V.
Exact voltage can be adjusted with a trimmer. Another convenient bonus point for this tiny DC/DC converter is that it also
provides power for fans (10). And you will need fans to cool the exciter, mains power supply and amplifier. Moreover, you
can set temperature at which the fans start working or you can have fans work continuously.
You can find our DCDC converter with fan controller here at our website:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/2048v-dcdc-converter-p-1549.html
3.) Stereo encoders, we covered this in detail above. You can find our stereo encoders here:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/stereo-encoders-c-36.html
4.) Our FM exciters, at the moment MAX PRO 5000+ series, support all the mentioned functions. Make sure to limit the
maximum output power of the exciter in order not to damage the amplifier. The procedure is described in Chapter 7 of
this manual. By limiting the maximum output power the LCD module still works, but its adjustment range is decreased to go
from 0 to 2W for example or from 0 to 4W. Another very important advice is to use an attenuator between exciter and
amplifier. Amplifiers almost always have input impedance that does not match 50 ohms across the entire FM band. By using
1-3dB attenuator this can be brought closer to 50 ohms. Our attenuators are available here, but you can also construct your
own from regular resistors, you can contact us for a schematic diagram:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/mounted-attenuators-p-1105.html
BEFORE CONNECTING AMPLIFIER ALWAYS MAKE SURE THAT EXCITER OUTPUT POWER
DOES NOT EXCEED MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE INPUT POWER OF THE AMPLIFIER!
LIMIT MAXIMUM OUTPUT POWER OF THE EXCITER, PROCEDURE IS DESCRIBED IN CHAPTER
7 IN THIS MANUAL!
5.) FM amplifier. This is typically a pallet amplifier such as any of these on our website, they all come with ControlMini2
included. Also make sure to include a heat sink with pallets as they require one. It is often a good idea to insert a small
attenuator between exciter and amplifier.
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/amplifiers-pallet-amplifiers-c-41_109.html
You can also use any of these here; these already contain filters and heat sink so your work is easier:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/amplifiers-complete-amplifier-modules-c-41_111.html
Amplifiers can have input impedance that does not match 50 ohms across the entire FM band. By using 1-3dB attenuator
this can be brought closer to 50 ohms.
6.) Low pass filter for FM band. You can use any of these here, but make sure they are strong enough to handle the power
level of the amplifier (note that complete amplifiers with heat sink and low pass filter do not require extra filter):
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/transmitter-accesories-filters-transmitters-c-71_73.html
However, for best results use our filters with built-in DIGIAMP interface, such as PCS LPF 6000. Using this filter simplifies
installation as most of the necessary signals are provided via DIGIAMP interface, also everything under 6 and 7 is than
combined into one unit (PCS LPF 6000).
7.) ControlMini2 board. Use only if your filter does not have DIGIAMP interface. It is better and easier to use DIGIAMP.
This board is connected to the MAX PRO 5000+ via flat cable (8 – DIGAMP-10). It makes it possible for MAX PRO
5000+ to read POWER and SWR of the amplifier module. There is also a solder post for temperature sensor and amplifier
supply voltage. The board contains directional couplers for power and swr, SWR protection and ALC system. For better
description look at the next appendix. We are now shipping these boards and 10 cm long flat cable with all our FM
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43
amplifiers (pallets and complete amplifier modules). This board can take about 500-750W of power maximum. However,
when used with complete amplifier modules you can use them up to 2KW of RF power.
8.) MAXLINK flat cable connects stereo encoder with the FM exciter, it enables control and supplies 12-15V DC for the
stereo encoder. You can purchase this cable along with stereo encoder here:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/se5000-stereo-encoder-p-1274.html
9.) DIGAMP-10 flat cable connects MAX PRO 5000+ FM exciter with ControlMini2, it makes it possible for MAX PRO
5000+ to read power, swr, temperature and voltage of the amplifier module, you receive this cable along with ControlMini2
whenever you buy any of our pallets or complete FM amplifier modules:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/fm-amplifiers-c-41.html
10.) Fans are very important, they ensure proper cooling of your amplifier, mains power supply and exciter. Usual fans that
you can buy in local shops are often not strong enough and can fail far too soon. We carry a line of professional fans with
higher reliability and very high airflow, you can order them here:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/amplifiers-amplifier-accesories-c-41_112.html
11.) You will need to place all these items in a nice enclosure. Aluminum works well and is not too heavy. Keeping it
conductive is an advantage (most types of anodizing make aluminum’s surface non-conductive). We carry a line of
professional rack enclosures, designed so that the above mentioned items fit perfectly. Now you can build your FM
transmitter yourself, all the way up to 2000W:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/rack-cabinets-boxes-c-93.html
Finally, we recommend that you use Teflon coaxial cable for all internal coaxial connections. The reason is primarily that
Teflon does not melt while soldering or use. You can be sure no short will form between the center and shield, either
immediately at soldering or with time, if the cable is under a lot of thermal stress (coax can warm up nicely already in a 300W
transmitter). Insulation in RG58 or similar lossy cheap coaxial cables can literally melt and cause a short between the center
and shield already at moderate power levels around 300W. You can buy suitable Teflon coaxial cable here (I suggest RG188
for low power and RG142, RG316, R303 for higher power levels):
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/semirigid-25ohm-other-special-coaxial-cable-p-1275.html
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44
Appendix
D
Appendix D: DIGIAMP connector pin out
MAXPRO 60XX+ can read a variety of parameters from the amplifier. These parameters are shown based on signals
received from the amplifier via DIGIAMP connector. Below is the pin out of the max pro 60XX+ DIGIAMP connector:
Fig. 41: DIGIAMP pin out
Below is explanation of internal wiring for our PCS LPF 6000 filter, it shows how directional coupler is wired and how ALC
is wired. You can use this to construct your own ALC circuit with another directional coupler.
TEMP sensor is a 10K NTC resistor, connected to ground. There is also 12K resistor going from this NTC resistor to +5V.
Fig. 42: DIGIAMP wiring for power and ALC
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45
Appendix
D
Appendix E: General tips for setting up transmitters
Typical FM transmitter setups
Below are several of the typical broadcasting systems that can be encountered worldwide.
Fig. 43: Typical broadcasting systems
Let’s look at system A first. It consists of audio source (mixer, microphones, CD players and a PC), FM exciter with
integrated RDS and stereo encoder (such as our CyberMaxFM+ units from 15W-300W) and antenna. Note antenna in this
system is located in the same location as the transmitter and studio, typically it would be placed on a small tower or a pole at
the top of the building with studio. Disadvantage of this system is that you have to keep studio, transmitter and antenna
close. Now you usually can’t place studio on the top of a mountain for practical reasons so this limits your range. This is a
typical small community radio with output powers of up to 300-500W.
System B is very similar to system A, but operators have decided to add an additional amplifier to boost the range. Such
stations can go into kilowatts, but they are starting to hit another speed limit. Since the studio is typically located in a town,
high RF powers aren’t desirable due to interference with other services and safety regulations. So range is still limited
compared to system C stations.
System C is radically different in one respect. Antenna and transmitter are no longer located at the same place with the
studio. To accomplish this two audio channels are first combined with stereo processor. Resulting MPX signal is than passed
to the STL wireless link transmitter (STL=Studio Transmitter Link). Up in the mountains is a STL wireless link receiver that
receives the signal from the studio and passes I to the exciter. In this case exciter does not need to be stereo anymore since
composite MPX signal is passed to its MPX input (all mono transmitters have this input). Such exciters can than optionally
drive big amplifiers with powers going into tens of KW with maximum range.
You can check our amplifiers here: http://www.pcs-electronics.com/fm-amplifiers-c-41.html
You can check our wireless STL links here: http://www.pcs-electronics.com/wireless-audio-links-c-42.html
Brought to you by PCS Electronics, www.pcs-electronics.com
46
Typical FM broadcasting antenna setups
Below are several of the typical broadcasting antenna systems that can be encountered worldwide.
Fig. 44: Typical antenna setups
Let’s look at system A first. It’s a simple vertical dipole antenna, mounted on a pole. The gain of this antenna is 0dBd and if
we assume that the coaxial cable does not have any losses the ERP of this system equals transmitter power. For example, a
1KW transmitter with this antenna system and perfect coaxial cable (losses=0) would have ERP of 1000W. Radiation
pattern of this system is more-less omni-directional but since the metal pole holding the antenna blocks the signal there is a
null of signal exactly on the opposite side of the pole.
System B has two simple dipole antennas mounted on a pole. The gain of this antenna is slightly less than 3dBd (due to
losses in harness – splitter). If we assume that the coaxial cable does not have any losses the ERP of this system equals
double transmitter power. For example, a 1KW transmitter with this antenna system and perfect coaxial cable (losses=0)
would have ERP of 2000W. Note the antennas are mounted on the opposite sides of the pole to help make radiation pattern
as omni-directional as possible.
System C has four simple vertical dipole antennas mounted on a pole. One of the antennas is behind the pole and is not
visible. Note the antennas are mounted at an angle of 90 degrees between each other to help make radiation pattern as omnidirectional as possible. The gain of this antenna is slightly less than 6dBd (due to losses in harness – splitter). If we assume
that the coaxial cable does not have any losses the ERP of this system equals 4x transmitter’s power. For example, a 1KW
transmitter with this antenna system and perfect coaxial cable (losses=0) would have ERP of 4000W.
System C has theoretically double the range of the System A although in practice it takes 4-6x increase of power to double
the range. 4x increase of power is equal to 6dB of gain. And you get 3dB of gain by doubling the number of dipoles. So to
upgrade system C to 9dBd you’d need 8 dipoles. And for 12dBd you’d need 16 dipoles. 16 dipoles would in theory increase
your range 4x compared to a single dipole. In practice there would be some losses in combining so many dipoles. You can
use circular dipoles in very similar configurations.
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47
Wiring antennas in multi-bay configurations
We have observed typical multi-dipole (called multi-bay) antenna configurations on the previous page. However there are
some things to keep in mind.
Fig. 45: Wiring multi-bay antennas
Look at the diagram above. This is a simple system with two dipole antennas and a 2-way coaxial splitter (harness). This
splitter is made from sections of coaxial cable with such impedance and length which ensure perfect match at specific
frequency. Do not attempt to assemble from regular 50-ohm coaxial cable. What is important here is that the two sections of
coaxial cable going from antenna to the splitter should be of exact equal length. These two sections are shown in black. The
same rule applies for system with more dipoles. It is also possible to have cables of different lengths, but you have to know
velocity factor of the cable so we have omitted this for simplicity reasons. If you want more info please contact our technical
staff.
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48
Appendix
F
Appendix F – Using wireless audio links
If you are going to place your transmitter up in the mountains, you may prefer to keep your stereo/RDS encoder in your
studio and stream MPX signal up to the transmitter. For example this could be because you want to have easy access to your
stereo/RDS encoder so you can change parameters, if needed. Here is what your system would look like for MPX wireless
studio-transmitter link:
Fig. 46: Using external stereo/rds processor with wireless link
It is important that you set the pre-emphasis on the MAX PRO 60XX+ board to Off (None). If you get stuck or need our
advice please contact our technical department.
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49
Appendix
G
Appendix G – IO board and PC remote control
Software installation
Download the latest CyberMaxFM+ setup file from our website. You can find it here:
electronics.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=2505
http://www.pcs-
Once you have the setup file run it and install the program on your computer. This process is very straight-forward and
should only take a few minutes. Wait for the installation to complete and click Finish when done.
Fig. 47: Setup is about to start
Fig. 48: CyberMaxFM+ remote control software
As you can see this program lets you control all the parameters of your FM transmitter including RDS parameters. It also lets
you read all of the available information, such as output power, temperature, frequency, uptime etc. (you cannot read the
RDS data, we are working on adding this functionality at some time in the future).
Once the installation is done you are ready to start the program. But before you do please establish physical connection
between the transmitter and the PC, configure the COM port and take a note of the COM port used.
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50
Using existing COM port
If you want to use the RS232 cable to connect to the transmitter board, connect the RS232 IO board and connect the RS232
cable to your computer. In this case the COM port to be used will usually be COM1 or COM2. Please note that our
CyberMaxFM transmitters usually ship with only USB port active so to use RS232 you will have to open the cover and
switch to RS232 internally. 99% of people nowadays prefer USB so this is not really a problem. Modern computers don’t
even have COM ports.
Installing USB driver (only for USB IO board)
Download the USB COM port driver, you can find it here:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=2505
Now run the setup file. Wait for the following screen (or very similar) to appear and select the installation directory (best left
alone at default location). Click Install and wait for the installation to finish.
Fig. 49: Installing USB driver
Configuring USB driver
In Windows go to Start > Settings > Control Panel > System > Hardware tab > Device Manager (This can vary depending
on your Windows version). You should have something like this on your screen at this point:
Fig. 50: Configuring Com port for USB driver
Take note of the COM port number here, you will need it later to configure the COM port inside CyberMaxFM+ windows
control program. If you wish to change this port right click on the PCS USB-COM port and select Properties. Now select
the Port settings tab and click Advanced. Note you can set the COM port number as you wish:
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51
Fig. 51: Configuring Com port for USB driver
Setting up com port in CyberMaxFM+ program
The only setup required is minimal. Start the CyberMaxFM+ program, the icon should now be on the desktop. Now click
File and Setup. The following window will open. You can set COM port manually or you can use the Autoscan feature.
Make sure to set FM Transmitter type correctly (4.0 for new versions of MAXPRO5000 series) and make sure the exciter
board is turned on! A short guide for manual settings: read above and make note of the used COM port. If you are using
USB it will usually be COM5, when using RS232 it will usually be COM1 or 2. You can use Communication test tool to
verify the selected COM port.
Fig. 52: Set COM port to 1 or 2 for RS232 IO board
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52
Appendix
H
Appendix H – Setting up remote control via Ethernet
Software installation
Download the latest EthernetVirtualPort.exe from our website. You can find it here:
http://www.pcs-electronics.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=2268
Once you have the driver run the setup file and install the program on your computer. This process is very straight-forward
and should only take a few minutes. Wait for the installation to complete and then start the program.
Connect the MAXPRO5000 series exciter or CYBERMAXFM+ FM transmitter (which contains this exciter board) to your
network via Ethernet cable (cable not included). The Ethernet adapter is setup to accept IP from your router’s DHCP
server. It is possible to setup Ethernet adapter with fixed IP or to login directly to ADSL modem. If you need MAC address
of the Ethernet adapter open the cover of the unit and look at the Ethernet adapter, the MAC address is shown on the
adapter. Now create and configure a connection between the PC and CYBERMAXFM+ as shown below. Note the IP will
differ, but make sure the port is set to 5005!
Fig. 53: Setting up Ethernet connection for CYBERMAXFM+, screen 1
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53
Fig. 54: Setting up Ethernet connection for CYBERMAXFM+, screen 2
Fig. 55: Setting up Ethernet connection for CYBERMAXFM+, screen 3
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54
Fig. 56: Setting up Ethernet connection for CYBERMAXFM+, screen 4
Fig. 57: Setting up Ethernet connection for CYBERMAXFM+, overview
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Appendix
I
Appendix I: Communication protocol explanation
If you are one of the many interested in developing your own remote control application, look no further. The entire
protocol will be explained here in detail. If you want our sample VB application do drop us an email and explain what you
are trying to do, we will probably be able to supply with the source code.
Baud rate and COM port
Communication with CyberMaxFM+ uses RS232 serial protocol even when used with USB. Supported speed is 9600 baud.
A simple VB code would look like this:
MSComm1.Settings = "9600,N,8,1"
MSComm1.InputLen = 0
MSComm1.PortOpen = True
General Command Format
This is the format of a typical command sent to the RDSMAX encoder:
<StartByte>Command<EndCommandByte>Value<EndByte>
<StartByte>: Signals start of new incoming command/parameter
The hey/binary value of this byte is 0x00 (0b00000000).
VB basic example: MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
Command: Command/parameter that you wish to send to the encoder
Simply send the command/parameter in ASCII form.
VB basic example: MSComm1.Output = "TA"
<EndCommandByte>: Signals end of the new incoming command, tells encoder to expect incoming
command/parameter value
The hey/binary value of this byte is 0x01 (0b00000001).
VB basic example: MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) ‘End Command start of value(1)
Value: Command/parameter value that you wish to send to the encoder
The method varies a bit from parameter to parameter, but usually you can simply send the command/parameter
value in ASCII form. Check each parameter individually for correct setting.
VB basic example: MSComm1.Output = "1" 'sets TA to ON
<EndByte>: Signals the end of complete incoming command including command/parameter value, it tells encoder
to process the received data
VB basic example: MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) ‘End Command and value
PS (RDS parameters)
This is the most interesting feature for 99% of customers out there so we will dedicate a bit more time to it. RDS
standard provides for a 8-character PS string which is used to identify radio station and is displayed by RDS-enabled
radio receivers. Some countries prohibit changing this text dynamically, but others don’t. Whatever your decision
may be, RDSMAX supports either static or dynamic PS. It is best to check with the local authorities before setting
up the RDS encoder.
The mechanism for handling dynamic (or static) PS text is best demonstrated by the following example:
Imagine a train traveling in a round trip involving 100 train stations. The train starts on station 00 (PS00) and goes
through stations 01, 02…. until it passes through station 99 and finally returns to station 00. Every time a train stops
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56
at the station it sends the message back to the headquarters (PS text shown on RDS receiver). The amount of time
the train stays at the station (delay – PD00 to PD99) varies and can be from 0 minutes (train does not stop) to 9
minutes. I hope this little analogy has illustrated the process. You have 100 8-character strings (PS00 to PS99) which
are displayed one after the other until the entire loop repeats itself. You can define how long each of these strings is
displayed; the parameter which defines this is PD (PD00 to PD99).
Example: If you wish to just have one static PS, set all delays to 0 and set just PD00 to 1. Then set PS00 to desired
static PS which will be displayed indefinitely.
General Command Format
This is the format of a PS00 command, which sets PS00 to **TEST**:
<StartByte>PS00<EndCommandByte>**TEST**<EndByte>
VB basic example:
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "PS00"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) ‘End Command start of value(1)
MSComm1.Output = "**TEST**"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) ‘End Command and value
This is the format of a PD00 command, which sets PD00 to 5:
<StartByte>PD00<EndCommandByte>5<EndByte>
VB basic example:
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "PD00"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) ‘End Command start of value(1)
MSComm1.Output = "5"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) ‘End Command and value
It is recommended to put a short delay of 10ms after sending of each data packet. So the example above becomes:
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
Sleep 10
MSComm1.Output = "PD00"
Sleep 10
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) ‘End Command start of value(1)
Sleep 10
MSComm1.Output = "5"
Sleep 10
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) ‘End Command and value
Sleep 10
RT (RDS parameters)
This is another popular feature, RDS allows for 64-character text string to be displayed on the receiver. However this
feature is rarely used as you need to press a button to display it (PS is always displayed by default). Another “nail in
RTs' coffin" is the fact that typical receiver only displays a maximum of 8-characters at a time meaning the message
needs to be scrolled. However popular or unpopular it may be, we support it.
General Command Format
This is the format of a PS00 command, which sets PS00 to **TEST**:
<StartByte>RT<EndCommandByte>**THIS IS A TEST OF RADIO TEXT FEATURE**<EndByte>
VB basic example:
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "RT"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) ‘End Command start of value(1)
MSComm1.Output = "**THIS IS A TEST OF RADIO TEXT FEATURE**"
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MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) ‘End Command and value
Format descriptions for the other supported parameters:
‘Sending TP (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "TP"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(TP)
temp = LTrim(temp)
MSComm1.Output = temp
'Sending STEREO/MONO status (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FS"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(TXStereo)
temp = LTrim(temp)
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending RDS active (PWR) (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "PWR" 'Program reference, lower byte of PI
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
If Check1.Value = 1 Then
temp = "1"
'turn RDS on
Else
temp = "0"
'turn RDS off
End If
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finished transmission
'Sending CCAC (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "CCAC" 'Program reference, lower byte of PI
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(CountryCode * 16 + AreaCoverage)
temp = LTrim(temp)
If Len(temp) = 2 Then temp = "0" & temp
If Len(temp) = 1 Then temp = "00" & temp
If Len(temp) = 0 Then temp = "000"
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finished transmission
'Sending ProgReference (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "PREF" 'Program reference, lower byte of PI
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(ProgramReference)
temp = LTrim(temp)
If Len(temp) = 2 Then temp = "0" & temp
If Len(temp) = 1 Then temp = "00" & temp
If Len(temp) = 0 Then temp = "000"
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finished transmission
'Sending PTY (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "PTY"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(PTY)
temp = LTrim(temp)
If Len(temp) = 1 Then temp = "0" & temp
If Len(temp) = 0 Then temp = "00"
MSComm1.Output = temp
'Sending TP (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "TP"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(TP)
temp = LTrim(temp)
MSComm1.Output = temp
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'Sending TA (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "TA"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(TA)
temp = LTrim(temp)
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending MS (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "MS"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(MS)
temp = LTrim(temp)
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending Did0 (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "Did0"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Str$(DId0)
temp = LTrim(temp)
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending AF0 (af number) (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "AF0"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Chr$(AFNum + 224 + 4)
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending AF1 (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "AF1"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Chr$(AF1 + 4)
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending RT (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "RT"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = RT & Chr$(13) & Chr$(13) & String(64, Chr(13))
If Len(temp) > 64 Then temp = Left(temp, 64)
MSComm1.Output = temp 'RT
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Send PS (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "PS00"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = “your text”
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending ECC (RDS parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "ECC"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Chr$(ECC + 4)
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending RF POWER status (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FO"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
If Option25(13).Value = True Then
temp = Chr$((Int(TXPower / 100 * 34)) + 4)
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59
Else
temp = Chr$((Int(TXPower / 100 * 44)) + 4)
End If
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending Frequency (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FF"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = Chr$((Int(TXFrequency / 5) - Int(Int(TXFrequency / 5) / 128) * 128) + 4) 'low part of freq
temp = temp & Chr$((Int(Int(TXFrequency / 5) / 128)) + 4) 'high part of freq
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings – Treble (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDT"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(Treble + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings – Bass (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDB"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(Bass + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings – Attack (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDA"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(Attack + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings – Decay (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDD"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(Decay + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings - Threshold
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDH"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(Threshold + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings – Compression (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDC"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(Compression + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings – Integration (FM transmitter parameter)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDI"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(Integration + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings - LeftGain
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDGL"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(LeftGain + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending DSP settings - RightGain
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FDGR"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
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MSComm1.Output = Chr$(RightGain + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending settings - TEMP alarm
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FAT"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(TEMPAlarm + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending settings - SWR alarm
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FAS"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(SWRAlarm + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending settings - Uamp alarm
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FAU"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(UampAlarm + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending settings - Iamp alarm
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FAC"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(IampAlarm + 4)
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
'Sending Store command, commits changes
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(0) 'Start (0)
MSComm1.Output = "FW"
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(1) 'End command and start of data (1)
temp = 0
MSComm1.Output = temp
MSComm1.Output = Chr$(2) 'Finish command
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Appendix
J
Appendix J – Warranty and legal info
Important notice!
Please remember to turn off the transmitter/amplifier when not in use! This goes especially for high powered
transmitters. Remember that anything you broadcast through the transmitter can be heard by anyone tuning in to that
frequency. Although it is unlikely certain weather conditions may allow the signal to go further than your immediate listening
area so please don't broadcast anything you don't mind anyone else hearing.
Warranty and servicing!
Within one (1) year of receiving your order, if any product proves to be defective; please contact us via e-mail or our
feedback form. Please DO NOT ship the product back to us without contacting us first and receiving return instructions.
After we receive the defective merchandise, we will test it if need be, and we will ship back to you a non-defective
replacement product. Please note that this doesn't cover final RF transistor as it can be damaged by using defective or poorly
matched antenna. An exception is as well any mishandling or abuse by the customer. If the product is defective, you will
receive a replacement. If you choose to return the defective item, rather than replace it, we will charge a 20% restocking fee
and your original shipping and handling charges will not be refunded. The return of the product is at your expense. We
believe that this is a fair policy because lower overhead results in lower prices for all of our customers.
Legal info
It may be illegal to operate this device in your county. Please consult local authorities before using our products! PCS
Elektronik d.o.o. is not responsible for any damage to your PC arising from use of this product and will not be held
responsible for any violation of local laws pertaining to the use of this product. It is entirely your responsibility that you make
sure you operate in accordance with local laws and/or regulations.
Limitation of liability
To the law, in no event shall PCS Elektronik d.o.o. or its suppliers be liable for any special, incidental, indirect, or
consequential damages whatsoever (including, without limitation, damages for loss of business profits, business interruption,
loss of business information, or any other pecuniary loss) arising out of the use of or inability to use the PRODUCT, even if
PCS Elektronik d.o.o. has been advised of the possibility of such damages. In any case, PCS Elektronik d.o.o.´s entire
liability under any provision of this agreement shall be limited to the greater of the amount actually paid by you for the
PRODUCT or U.S. $5.00; because some states and jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability, the
above limitation may not apply to you.
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62
Also available from www.pcs-electronics.com
We also carry a big range of:
- FM transmitters in assembled and KIT form
- TV transmitters in assembled and KIT form, VHF and UHF
- AM transmitters with extremely clear modulation (PWM design)
- Various accessories for professional and hobby FM radio stations
- A large assortment of hard to obtain RF components (RF transistors; MRF, 2SC, coils, silver plated wire, coaxial cable,
capacitors, quartz crystals and many others)
- PC based FM transmitters (PCI MAX pc based FM transmitter turns your PC into a radio station)
- A large number of beginners guides to get you started
- A large selection of free schematics is as well available at our website.
If you can’t get much range with your homebrew antenna, have a look at these: http://www.pcs-electronics.com
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63
Revisions and errata
V1.0 (May,2011): Release version
V2.0 (Jan,2014): Major update
Please report any errors you see in this manual, you will be helping us and many other users out there. Thank you!
Index
A
L
adjusting ............................................................... 16
Antenna ................................................................ 16
LCD module layout .............................................. 10
Lock Keys ............................................................ 10
B
M
beam ..................................................................... 16
block diagram....................................................... 14
mains cable........................................................... 17
mains power supply ............................................. 17
MAX PRO 6015/6025/6050+ ................................ 6
menu system......................................................... 21
metal case ............................................................. 16
module drill template ......................................12, 13
C
Coaxial cable ........................................................ 17
D
O
directional antenna ............................................... 16
omni-directional antenna ...................................... 16
E
P
Ethernet ................................................................ 53
perfect match ........................................................ 17
F
R
feedback ............................................................... 16
final transistor ...................................................... 16
radiation pattern ................................................... 16
RF board layout...................................................... 8
RF shielded .......................................................... 16
RG-58................................................................... 17
G
gain....................................................................... 16
grounding ............................................................. 16
S
H
H-500 ................................................................... 17
short circuit .......................................................... 16
SWR ................................................................16, 17
K
T
key features ............................................................ 7
Technical specifications ......................................... 6
Troubleshooting ................................................... 35
tune....................................................................... 16
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