Microsoft Outlook 2013 Step by Step Chapter 7

Microsoft Outlook 2013 Step by Step Chapter 7
Microsoft Outlook 2013 Step by Step
Chapter 7 - Organize Your Inbox
Working with Conversation view
Conversation view is an alternative arrangement of messages grouped by subject. All the messages with the same
subject appear together in your Inbox (or other message folder) under one conversation header.
Until you expand the conversation header, the entire conversation takes up only as much space in your Inbox as a single
message would.
The conversation header provides information about the messages within the conversation, including the number of
unread messages and whether one or more messages includes an attachment, is categorized, or is flagged for follow up.
When you receive a message that is part of a conversation, the entire conversation moves to the top of your Inbox and
the new message appears when you click the conversation header. When a conversation includes unread messages, a
blue vertical line appears to the left of the header and the conversation subject is in bold blue font, just as an unread
message would appear. When you have multiple unread messages, the number is indicated in parentheses following the
subject. The senders of the unread messages are listed below the subject.
Tip Conversation view is not turned on by default in Outlook 2013. You can turn it on by selecting the Show As
Conversations check box in the Messages group on the View tab, or by clicking the header at the top of the message
list and then clicking Show As Conversations to place a check mark next to the menu option.
When an email conversation involves more than two people, particularly if it is addressed to a large distribution list, it
frequently happens that more than one person responds to the same message, and other people respond to each of
those messages. Multiple conversations emerge from the primary conversation in a process that you might think of as
branches growing out from a tree—each can split into additional branches that are farther and farther from the trunk
(the original message). A conversation that contains multiple branches is called a split conversation.
Viewing conversations
You can display differing levels of messages within a conversation, as follows:
•
Click the conversation header or the Expand Conversation button to the left of the conversation header once to
display the most recent message in the Reading Pane and to display all the unique messages in the
conversation—the most recent message in each thread—in the message list. Reading only these messages will
give you all the information that exists in the conversation.
When a conversation is expanded to display only unique messages, the conversation header displays recent
participants and the subject.
•
Click the Expand Conversation button again to expand the conversation to display all messages in the
conversation, including messages from your Sent Items folder. (If you click the conversation header a second
time, Outlook clears the Reading Pane.)
Larger View
When the conversation is fully expanded, the conversation header displays only the subject.
Conversation view settings
As with other features of Outlook 2013, you can modify the way Conversation view displays messages to suit the way
you work. You make changes to Conversation view by turning features on and off on the Conversation Settings menu in
the Messages group on the View tab.
Conversation view settings include:
•
Show Messages from Other Folders By default, Conversation view displays messages stored in any folder,
including sent messages that are stored in the Sent Items folder. (Within the expanded conversation, sent
messages are indicated by italic font.) You can turn off this setting to display only messages from the current
folder.
•
Show Senders Above the Subject By default, when a conversation is collapsed, the conversation header displays
the names of all the conversation participants above the conversation subject; when the conversation is fully
expanded, the conversation header displays only the subject. This setting reverses the order of the information
in the conversation header; the names of the conversation participants are displayed above the conversation
subject. In some cases, such as when Outlook displays a message on the second line, the subject might not be
visible at all.
Turning off the Show Senders Above The Subject setting emphasizes the conversation subject.
•
Always Expand Conversations This setting causes Outlook to display all messages in a conversation when you
click the Expand Conversation button or conversation header once.
•
Use Classic Indented View This setting causes Outlook to indent older messages within individual message
threads to show the progression of the thread. This setting is not as effective as the default for displaying split
conversations because a message might be at the root of multiple branches but can appear only once in the
message list.
Tip In Outlook 2010, unique and redundant messages were indicated by dots of different colors and sizes, and
individual message threads were connected by the dots. Outlook 2013 does not use this same system of
visual thread indicators; you must independently differentiate between the indent levels.
Managing conversations
Although the most apparent function of conversations is the grouping of related messages, its greatest usefulness is as a
message-management tool. It can be especially handy for Outlook users within large organizations that use distribution
lists to disseminate information to a large group of people. When hundreds of message recipients use the Reply All
function to respond to a message, your Inbox can quickly become cluttered. Outlook tracks conversations by subject and
provides tools for managing conversations, regardless of whether you display the messages in Conversation view.
With Conversation view, you can manage all the messages within a conversation as a group. You can do this by clicking
the conversation header to effectively select all the messages in the conversation (they won't appear selected, but, for
example, moving the conversation header to another folder moves all the individual messages in the conversation) and
then applying your action. Or you can use these very useful conversation-management tools:
•
Ignore Conversation This command moves the selected conversation and any related messages you receive in
the future directly to the Deleted Items folder.
Keyboard Shortcut
Press Ctrl+Del to ignore the currently active conversation. For more information about
keyboard shortcuts, see "Keyboard shortcuts" at the end of this book.
Tip Be cautious when using the Ignore Conversation command. Outlook identifies conversations based on
message subjects. If you receive unrelated messages in the future that have the same message subject as a
conversation that you've chosen to ignore, you won't receive those messages.
•
Clean Up Conversation This command deletes redundant messages—messages whose text is wholly contained
within later messages—from a conversation. By default, Outlook doesn't clean up categorized, flagged, or
digitally signed messages. You can modify conversation clean-up settings on the Mail page of the Outlook
Options dialog box.
See Also
For information about modifying mail settings, see "Configuring Office and Outlook options" in
Chapter 11, "Customize Outlook."
Troubleshooting Conversation view
As with many features, Conversation view has its fans and its detractors. Many Outlook users appreciate the efficiency
and space-savings of the automatically grouped messages; others worry that this feature might hide individual messages
that they haven't yet read. Because Conversation view displays only unique messages until you fully expand the
conversation, a specific message that you're looking for might not be immediately visible. If this happens, you can turn
off Conversation view (by clearing the Show In Conversations check box in the Conversation group on the View tab) and
then use one of the following methods to locate the message you want to find:
•
Sort the messages by subject, and then type the first few letters of the message subject to scroll those messages
to the top of the message list.
•
Enter the subject into the Search box at the top of the message list and then specify any other criteria (such as
the sender or date) of the message that you're looking for to narrow the results.
After using either of these methods to display a set of messages, visually scan the messages to locate the one you're
looking for.
Arranging messages in different ways
As the number of messages in your Inbox increases, it can be challenging to keep track of them. You can arrange, group,
and sort messages in Outlook to help you quickly determine which are the most important, decide which can be deleted,
and locate any that need an immediate response.
See Also
For information about the available message folder views, see "Viewing messages and message
attachments" in Chapter 3, "Send and receive email messages."
You can view a message list in Compact view, Single view, or Preview view. Regardless of the view you're displaying, you
can arrange messages and conversations within the message list by choosing a standard arrangement from the Arrange
By menu in the Arrangement group on the View tab.
The Arrange By menu provides a variety of options for arranging your messages.
Alternatively, you can click the current arrangement in the message list header, and then click the arrangement or
option you want.
The menu displayed when you click the message list header is the same as the Arrange By menu, with the addition of the
Show As Conversations command.
By default, Outlook displays messages arranged by date, from newest to oldest. Alternatively, you can arrange items by
any of the following attributes:
•
Account Messages are grouped by the email account to which they were sent. This is useful if you receive
messages for more than one email account in your Inbox (for example, if you receive messages sent to your
POP3 account within your Exchange account mailbox).
•
Attachments Messages are grouped by whether they have attachments and secondarily by date received.
•
Categories Messages are arranged by the category you assign them to. Messages without a category appear
first. Messages assigned to multiple categories appear in each of those category groups.
•
Flag: Start Date or Due Date Unflagged messages and messages without specific schedules appear first.
Messages that you've added to your task list with specific start or due dates are grouped by date.
•
From Messages appear in alphabetical order by the message sender's display name. If you receive messages
from a person who uses two different email accounts, or who sends messages from two different email clients
(for example, from Outlook and from Windows Mail), the messages will not necessarily be grouped together.
•
Importance Messages are grouped by priority: High (indicated by a red exclamation point), Normal (the default),
or Low (indicated by a blue downward-pointing arrow).
•
To Messages are grouped alphabetically by the primary recipients (the addresses or names on the To line). The
group name exactly reflects the order in which addresses appear on the To line. Therefore, a message addressed
to Bart Duncan; Lukas Keller is not grouped with a message addressed to Lukas Keller; Bart Duncan.
•
Size Messages are grouped by size of the message, including any attachments. Groups include Huge (1–5 MB),
Very Large (500 KB–1 MB), Large (100–500 KB), Medium (25–100 KB), Small (10–25 KB), and Tiny (less than 10
KB). This feature is useful if you work for an organization that limits the size of your Inbox, because you can
easily locate large messages and delete them or move them to a personal folder.
•
Subject Messages are arranged alphabetically by their subjects and then by date. This is similar to arranging by
conversation except that the messages aren't threaded.
•
Type Items in your Inbox (or other folder) are grouped by the type of item—for example, messages, encrypted
messages, message receipts, meeting requests and meeting request responses, tasks, Microsoft InfoPath forms,
and server notifications.
After arranging the items in your message list, you can change the sort order of the arrangement by clicking the sort
order indicator that appears to the right of the message list header.
Two options that affect the way messages appear within an arrangement are conversations and grouping. Grouping,
which is turned on by default, gathers messages that fit within specific arrangement categories under arrangementspecific headings so that you can manage common messages as one. For example, when messages are arranged by date,
they are grouped by date: groups include each day of the current week, Last Week, Two Weeks Ago, Three Weeks Ago,
Last Month, and Older. Each group has a header. You can expand or collapse an individual group by clicking the arrow to
the left of the group name in the header. You can collapse the group containing the currently selected item by pressing
the Left Arrow key, and you can expand a selected group by pressing the Right Arrow key. You can expand or collapse all
groups by choosing a command from the Expand/Collapse list in the Arrangement group on the View tab.
Regardless of the view and arrangement you choose, you can sort messages by any visible column simply by clicking its
column heading (and reverse the sort order by clicking the column heading a second time). You can change the
displayed columns from the Show Columns dialog box, which you display by clicking the Add Columns button in the
Arrangement group on the View tab.
You can control the information shown in the message list and display up to 20 lines of a message in Compact view.
Outlook displays the selected columns in the order shown in the list on the right side of the Show Columns dialog box. If
displaying all the columns requires more space than is available, only some of the columns will be visible. If necessary,
you can change the number of lines shown to accommodate more columns. However, you are likely to find that one of
the standard views fits your needs.
In a list view, you can control the arrangement, sorting, grouping, visible columns, and other settings from the shortcut
menu that appears when you right-click any column header.
In this exercise, you'll change the arrangement, sort order, and grouping of messages, and filter the Inbox to display only
specific messages. Then you'll restore the default settings.
Set Up You don't need any specific practice files to complete this exercise; just use the messages in your Inbox. Display
your Inbox, and then follow the steps.
1. On the View tab, in the Arrangement group, click the Arrange By button, and then in the list, click From to
rearrange and group the messages in your Inbox alphabetically by sender.
The Sort Order indicator changes to match the selected arrangement.
2. In the message list header, click A to Z to reverse the order of the messages. The sort order indicator label
changes to Z to A.
3. In the message list header, click By From, and then in the list, click Subject to rearrange and group the messages
by subject, in alphabetical order.
4. In the Arrangement group, on the Expand/Collapse menu, click Collapse All Groups to hide the messages and
display only the message subjects.
Collapsing groups of messages displays only the group headers.
5. On the Home tab, in the Find group, click the Filter Email button to display a list of message attributes by which
you can quickly filter the current folder contents.
The options shown in the Filter Email list are also present on the Search tool tab.
6. In the Filter Email list, click Unread to activate the search feature and apply the specified filter. (If you have no
unread messages in your Inbox, it appears to be empty.) Notice that the selected arrangement, by subject, is still
in effect.
Larger View
The Search box and Search tool tab indicate the applied filter.
Tip The quickest way to display only unread messages is to click Unread at the top of the message list. This
convenient filter is new in Outlook 2013. When you use this method to filter a folder, the word Unread is
blue and the word All is black. If you are unable to locate a message that you've read, ensure that All is
selected at the top of the message list.
7. On the Search tab, in the Close group, click the Close Search button to remove the filter and return to the
previous arrangement.
8. Experiment with the available arrangement, sorting, and grouping options.
9. On the View tab, in the Current View group, click the Reset View button, and then click Yes in the Microsoft
Outlook dialog box to return the message list to its original arrangement: grouped by date.
Clean Up Arrange your Inbox content in the way that works best for you. Retain the default view settings before
continuing, if you want them to match those shown in the rest of this book.
Marking messages as read or unread
When a new message arrives in your Inbox, a blue vertical line and bold blue header text indicate that you haven't yet
opened the message—its status is unread. When you open a message in a message window or preview it for a certain
length of time in the Reading Pane, its status changes to read. The header is no longer bold, and its icon depicts an open
envelope.
You might want to change the status of a message from read to unread, to remind you to revisit it, or from unread to
read, if you know from the message subject that you don't need to take action on it.
You can manually change the status of a message by using these methods:
•
Point to the message in the message list, and then click the wide blue vertical bar that appears at the left edge
of the message.
•
Click a message in the message list or select multiple messages, and then on the Home tab, in the Tags group,
click the Unread/Read button.
•
Right-click a message or one of a group of selected messages in the message list, and then click Mark as Read or
Mark as Unread.
•
Right-click a folder in the Folder Pane, and then click Mark All as Read. (There is no option to mark the folder
contents as unread.)
Keyboard Shortcuts
Press Ctrl+Q to mark a message as read. Press Ctrl+U to mark a message as unread.
Organizing items by using color categories
To help you more easily locate Outlook items associated with a specific subject, project, person, or other attribute, you
can create a category specific to that attribute and assign the category to any related items. You can assign a category to
any type of Outlook item, such as a message, an appointment, a contact record, or a note. For example, you might
assign contact records for customers to a Customers category, or contact records, messages, and meetings associated
with a specific project to a category named for the project.
Outlook uses color categories, which combine named categories with color bars to provide an immediate visual cue
when you view messages in your Inbox, appointments on your calendar, and other information. Depending on the view
of the Outlook items, the category might be indicated by a simple colored block or a large colored bar.
Category bars include the category name.
Tip You can locate, sort, and filter Outlook items by category. For information, see "Quickly locating messages" later in
this chapter.
Outlook 2013 comes with six preconfigured color categories that are associated only with the color names. You can
rename these six categories and create new categories. Each category can have the following elements:
•
Name The category name can be one simple word or a long, descriptive phrase. The first 32 characters of the
category name are visible in the Color Categories dialog box, but pointing to a truncated name displays the
entire name in a ScreenTip.
•
Shortcut key You can assign any of the 11 available keyboard shortcut combinations (Ctrl+F2 through Ctrl+F12)
to the individual color categories.
•
Color You can assign any of the 25 available colors to a category, or you can choose not to assign a color and to
rely only on the name to distinguish between categories. When you assign a category that doesn't have an
associated color to an Outlook item, the color block or color bar is shown as white. You can assign one color to
multiple color categories.
If you don't rename a standard color category before assigning it for the first time, Outlook gives you the option of
renaming the category the first time you use it.
Outlook users with Exchange, IMAP, or POP accounts can designate one category as the Quick Click category. Outlook
assigns the Quick Click category by default when you simply click the category block or column associated with an item.
(Category blocks appear in the message header in Single view and Preview view.) Until you select a Quick Click category,
clicking the blank category blocks has no effect. You can set or change the Quick Click category by clicking Set Quick Click
on any one of the Categorize menus and then making your selection in the Set Quick Click dialog box that appears.
You can personalize categories and apply them with one click or by using a keyboard shortcut.
Tip You can also set the Quick Click category from the Advanced page of the Outlook Options dialog box. For more
information, see "Configuring Office and Outlook options" in Chapter 11, "Customize Outlook."
You can apply color categories to a selected item or items by using any of these methods:
•
In any mail or contact folder, click the Categorize button in the Tags group on the Home tab, and then in the list,
click the category you want.
•
In any calendar, click the Categorize button in the Tags group on the tool tab (such as Appointment or Meeting)
that appears for the selected item, and then click the category you want.
•
In any message list, click the blank block in the Categories column to assign the Quick Click category.
•
In any folder, right-click an item or a selection of items, point to Categorize, and then click the category you
want.
You can assign an unlimited number of categories to a message, but only the three most recently assigned appear in the
message list. The colors representing all the assigned categories appear in the Reading Pane.
To quickly view the items assigned to a specific category, you can group items by category or include the category in a
search. In a list view of any module, you can sort and filter by category. On the To-Do Bar, you can arrange flagged
messages and tasks by category.
Tip You can instruct Outlook to automatically assign a category to an incoming message that meets specific criteria by
creating a rule. For more information, see "Creating rules to process messages" in Chapter 12, "Manage email
settings."
In this exercise, you'll change the name and color of an existing category, assign a shortcut key to a category, and create
categories. Then you'll categorize a message, and experiment with organizing your Inbox contents by using categories.
Set Up You need the SBS series of messages you created in Chapter 3. If you have not already created these messages,
you can do so now, or you can substitute any messages in your Inbox. Display your Inbox, and then follow the steps.
1. In the message list, click the SBS Tradeshow Schedule message.
2. On the Home tab, in the Tags group, click the Categorize button to display the available categories in the
Categorize list. Notice that you can remove all categories from a selected message or group of messages by
clicking Clear All Categories.
If you haven't yet worked with categories, only the six standard categories, named by color, are available.
3. In the Categorize list, click All Categories to open the Color Categories dialog box in which you can select,
modify, and create categories.
You can rename any of the standard color categories or create new color categories.
4. In the Color Categories dialog box, with the Blue Category name (not its check box) selected, click the Rename
button, enter Management, and then press Enter (don't click OK) to change the category name. (If you have
already renamed the standard categories, you can either create or rename a different category.)
Tip The category order doesn't immediately change, but the next time you display the categories in a list or
dialog box, they will be in alphabetical order.
5. With the Management category still selected, click the Color arrow, and then in the lower-right corner of the
color palette, click the Dark Maroon swatch to change the color associated with the Management category.
6. Select the Orange Category name, and then repeat step 4 to change the category name to Travel Required.
7. In the Color Categories dialog box, click the New button to open the Add New Category dialog box.
8. In the Name box, enter Marketing. In the color palette, click the Dark Green swatch. Then click the Shortcut Key
list to display the keyboard shortcuts reserved for color categories.
Assign keyboard shortcuts to categories that you use frequently, to save time.
9. In the Shortcut Key list, click Ctrl+F2. Then in the Add New Category dialog box, click OK to add the new
category to the list of color categories. Notice that its check box is selected, indicating that it has been assigned
to the currently selected message.
10. In the Color Categories dialog box, click the Green Category name (not its check box), click Delete, and then in
the Microsoft Outlook dialog box confirming that you want to delete the category, click Yes.
Keyboard Shortcut
Press Alt+D to delete the selected category from the Color Categories dialog box.
11. In the Color Categories dialog box, click OK to assign the new Marketing category to the SBS Tradeshow
Schedule message. A dark green category block appears in the message header, and the associated category bar
appears at the top of the message in the Reading Pane.
12. Right-click the SBS Tradeshow Schedule message header, click Categorize, and then click Travel Required to
assign a second category to the message. Notice that the Categorize menu displays the current color category
options in alphabetical order.
13. In the message list, click the SBS First Draft message, and then press Ctrl+F2 to assign the Marketing category to
the selected message.
14. Click either of the SBS First Draft response messages. On the Home tab, in the Tags group, click the Categorize
button and then, in the list, click Management to assign the Management category to the selected message.
Tip If you have Conversation view turned on, the conversation header displays the two color category blocks
assigned to the individual messages in the conversation.
15. On the View tab, in the Arrangement group, click Arranged By, and then click Categories to arrange the
messages by category, beginning with the uncategorized messages (None), followed by the categorized
messages in alphabetical order by category.
16. In the message list header, click A to Z to reverse the sort order so that the categorized messages appear at the
top of the list.
Messages that have multiple categories assigned appear in each of the category groups.
Clean Up Reset the view before continuing to the next exercise. Retain the SBS series of messages for use in later
exercises.
Recording information by using Outlook notes
You can store miscellaneous information such as reminders, passwords, account numbers, and processes by saving them
in electronic notes. Because your notes are available to you from wherever you access Outlook, this can be a very
convenient way of retaining information you might need later. And because you're less likely to accidentally delete a
note than a message, it is safer than sending information to yourself in an email message.
You can categorize notes and organize them in folders.
Tip The first time you access the Notes module, you must do so from the Folder List in the Folder Pane or by clicking
Ctrl+5. Thereafter, you can also access it by clicking the ellipsis at the end of the Navigation Bar and then clicking
Notes.
You can enter only text into a note; you can't format the text or include graphic elements. Notes do support hyperlinks;
if you enter a website address and then press Enter, the website address will change to blue underlined text to indicate
that it is a hyperlink. You can click the hyperlink to open the website or page in your default web browser.
Although notes are a type of Outlook item, they don't appear in the same type of windows as messages, appointments,
contact records, and tasks. Instead, they appear in the form of "sticky notes." By default, note icons and sticky note
representations are a pale yellow color, like the color of standard paper sticky notes. When you assign a category to a
note, the note color changes to the category color.
You can view, sort, and organize notes in the same way you do other Outlook items. The standard views include Icons,
Notes List, and Last 7 Days.
As with other Outlook items, if you're looking for a specific piece of information in a note, you can quickly locate it by
entering a search word or phrase in the Search Notes box at the top of the content area.
To store information in a note:
1. Display the Notes module.
2. On the Home tab, in the New group, click the New Note button to display a new note. The current date and
time appear at the bottom.
3. Enter the subject or title of the note, press Enter, and then enter the information you want to store into the
note. The first line of the note becomes its subject.
4. To save and close the note, click the Close button in the upper-right corner to display the note in the content
area. Only the subject is visible. You can access the stored information by opening the note.
Organizing messages in folders
After you read and respond to messages, you might want to keep some for future reference. You can certainly choose to
retain them all in your Inbox if you want, but as the number of messages in your Inbox increases to the thousands and
even tens of thousands, it might quickly become overwhelming. (Yes, faithful reader, it happens to the best of us!) To
keep your Inbox content low and avoid an accumulation of unrelated messages, you can organize messages into folders.
For example, you can keep messages that require action on your part in your Inbox and move messages that you want to
retain for future reference into other folders.
Tip Because the Outlook Search function provides the option of searching within all folders containing items of a
particular type, you can easily locate a message that's been moved to a folder without having to remember which
folder it's in. For more information, see "Quickly locating messages" later in this chapter.
Popular personal-organization experts advocate various folder structures (for paper folders and email message folders)
as an important part of an organizational system. You can apply any of these ideas when you create folders in Outlook,
or you can use any other structure that works for you. For example, you might create folders that designate the level of
action required, create a folder for each project you're working on, or create a folder to store all messages from a
specific person, such as your manager, regardless of the message subject.
When you create a folder by clicking the New Folder button on the Folder tab of any module, you specify the location of
the folder within your existing Outlook folder structure and the type of items you want the folder to contain. You can
create folders to contain the following types of items:
•
Calendar items
•
Contact items
•
InfoPath Form items
•
Journal items
•
Mail and Post items
•
Note items
•
Task items
The selection you make governs the folder icon that precedes its name in the Folder Pane, the folder window layout, the
ribbon tabs and commands available in the folder, and the content of the Folder Pane when displaying the folder.
You can move messages to folders manually, or if your organization is running Exchange, you can have the email system
move them for you. You can automatically move messages to another folder by creating a rule—for example, you can
automatically move all messages received from your manager to a separate folder. You can also set up different rules
that go into effect when you're away from the office.
See Also
For information about automatically moving messages, see "Creating rules to process messages" in Chapter
12, "Manage email settings."
In this exercise, you'll create a folder and then use different methods to move messages to the folder.
Set Up You need the SBS series of messages you worked with in the previous exercise. If you have not already created
these messages, you can do so now, or you can substitute any messages in your Inbox. Display your Inbox, and then
follow the steps.
1. On the Folder tab, in the New group, click the New Folder button to open the Create New Folder dialog box.
Keyboard Shortcut
Press Ctrl+Shift+E to open the Create New Folder dialog box.
2.
3. The default settings in the Create New Folder dialog box match the active module at the time you create the
folder.
Troubleshooting
If your default data file (the file in which your messages are stored) is a personal folder on
your hard disk, the first item in the Select Where To Place The Folder box is Personal
Folders.
4. In the Name box, enter SBS Messages. In the Select where to place the folder box, click your mailbox (at the
very top of the list). Then, with Mail and Post Items selected in the Folder contains list, click OK to create the
folder.
Tip The name of this folder begins with SBS so that you can easily differentiate it from other folders in your
mailbox.
5.
6. The new folder appears in the Folder Pane at the same level as your Inbox, rather than as a subfolder.
7. In the message list, locate the SBS First Draft, RE: SBS First Draft, and FW: SBS First Draft messages.
8. Drag the SBS First Draft message from the message list to the SBS Messages folder in the Folder Pane to move
the message.
9. Click the RE: SBS First Draft message to select it. Then on the Home tab, in the Move group, click the Move
button to display a menu of folders and options.
Larger View
The Move list automatically includes folders that you create.
10. On the Move menu, click SBS Messages to move the selected message from the Inbox to the SBS Messages
folder.
11. Right-click the FW: SBS First Draft message, click Move, and then click SBS Messages to remove the
conversation from the Inbox.
Tip When Conversation view is turned on, moving the last message of a conversation from a folder removes the
conversation from that folder.
12. In the Folder Pane, click the SBS Messages folder to display its contents.
13. Click or right-click the message list header, click Show as Conversations, and then click This Folder to arrange
only these messages as a conversation.
Clean Up Retain the SBS Messages folder and its contents for use in later exercises.
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Managing messages by using Quick Steps
Outlook 2013 includes many features designed to increase the efficiency with which you perform tasks. With the Quick
Steps feature available in the Mail module, you can perform multiple processes on one or more email messages with
only one click. For example, you can reply to an email message and delete the original message, or you can flag a
message for follow-up and move it to a specific folder.
Quick Steps are available from the Quick Steps group on the Home tab of the Mail module, and from the shortcut menu
that appears when you right-click a message or group of messages.
Larger View
Outlook provides standard Quick Steps that perform common functions.
Tip If you connect to multiple accounts, the Quick Steps in each Mail module are specific to that account. Only the Quick
Steps that can be performed on the selected message or messages will be shown as available.
You can use the built-in Quick Steps, or create your own, to accomplish as many as 12 tasks at once.
A default Outlook installation includes these five Quick Steps:
•
Move To Moves the selected message to a folder that you specify the first time you use the Quick Step and
marks the message as read. After you specify the folder, the Quick Step name changes to include the folder
name.
•
To Manager Forwards the selected message to a person or people you specify the first time you use the Quick
Step. You can edit the Quick Step to include Cc and Bcc recipients, a specific message subject, a follow-up flag, a
level of importance, and specific message text, and to send the message one minute after you click the Quick
Step command.
•
Team Email Creates a message to a person or people you specify the first time you use the Quick Step. You can
edit the Quick Step to include Cc and Bcc recipients, a specific message subject, a follow-up flag, a level of
importance, and specific message text, and to send the message one minute after you click the Quick Step
command.
•
Done Moves the selected message to a folder that you specify the first time you use the Quick Step, marks the
message as read, and marks the message as complete.
•
Reply & Delete Creates a response to the original message sender and immediately deletes the original.
Troubleshooting
The Reply & Delete Quick Step deletes the original message before you send the reply. If
you close the response message composition window without sending it, the original
message will no longer be in your Inbox. If you want to respond to the original message,
you first need to retrieve it from your Deleted Items folder.
For each of the built-in Quick Steps, you can change its name; edit, add, and remove actions; and specify tooltip text that
appears when you point to the Quick Step in the Quick Steps gallery. You can assign shortcut keys (Ctrl+Shift+1 through
Ctrl+Shift+9) to up to nine Quick Steps.
Tip You can create new Quick Steps to simplify the performance of many types of message-management actions. For
more information, see "Creating and managing Quick Steps" in Chapter 12, "Manage email settings."
In this exercise, you will set up and use a built-in Quick Step.
Set Up Use the SBS Tradeshow Schedule message you worked with earlier in this chapter and the SBS Messages folder
you created in the previous exercise. If you did not create these practice files, you can do so now or substitute any
message and folder in your Inbox. Display your Inbox, locate the SBS Tradeshow Schedule message, and then follow the
steps.
1. On the Home tab, in the Quick Steps gallery, click Move to: ?. Because you haven't yet configured a destination
folder for this Quick Step, the First Time Setup dialog box opens.
Larger View
Some generic Quick Steps require that you supply information the first time you use them.
2. In the Move to folder list, click SBS Messages. (If that folder doesn't appear in the list, click Other Folder. Then
in the Select Folder dialog box, click the SBS Messages folder and click OK.) The name of the Quick Step in the
Name box changes from Move To: ? to SBS Messages.
3. In the First Time Setup dialog box, click the Options button to open the Edit Quick Step dialog box. The built-in
Quick Step contains two actions (Move to folder and Mark as read). You can modify the existing actions and add
actions to the Quick Step.
The built-in Move To Quick Step includes two actions.
4. In the Tooltip text box, select the existing text and then enter Move and mark as read.
5. In the Edit Quick Step dialog box, click Save to change the name of the Quick Step in the Quick Step gallery from
Move To: ? to SBS Messages.
6. In the message list, click the SBS Tradeshow Schedule message to select it.
7. In the Quick Steps gallery, point to SBS Messages to display the custom tooltip below the ribbon.
You can supply custom tooltip text for any Quick Step.
8. In the Quick Steps gallery, click SBS Messages to remove the selected message from the message list.
9. In the Folder Pane, click the SBS Messages folder to verify that Outlook moved the message to the designated
folder.
The categories and follow-up flag of the moved message are intact.
Clean Up Retain the SBS Messages folder and its contents for use in later exercises.
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Quickly locating messages
The Outlook Search feature is based on the search technology that is built into the Windows operating system. Using the
Windows Search technology, you can find any file on your computer that contains a specified search term—whether in a
file or folder name; in document or workbook content; in an email message within Outlook; in a message attachment; in
a picture, music, or video file; or other types of content. (As a matter of fact, if you prefer to do so, you can conduct all
of your Outlook searches from the Windows Start menu.)
You can use the Search feature to locate specific terms in any Outlook item. Although you can search for items in the
Calendar, People, Tasks, and Notes modules, you most often use it to locate messages in your Inbox and other mail
folders. The Search feature can locate search terms in a message or in a file attached to a message. As you enter a
search term in the Search box located at the top of the content area in any module, Outlook filters the items to show
only those items in the module that contain the search term and highlights the search term in the list of results.
Outlook first displays up to 30 "recent results." Clicking the More link at the bottom of the list or the Include Older
Results button in the Results group on the Search tool tab displays additional results within the selected search scope.
You can narrow the results by expanding the search term or by specifying other search criteria, such as the sender, the
recipient (whether the message was addressed or only copied to you), a category assigned to the item, or whether the
message contains attachments.
The Search tool tab appears when you activate the Search box in any Outlook module. You can enter search terms into
the Search box and refine your search by using the commands on the Search tool tab.
The Search tool tab appears when you click in a Search box or filter the contents of a folder.
When searching any folder, you can use the commands on the Search tool tab to set the scope of the search and to
more closely define the search specifications. You can also return to the results of previous searches.
The buttons available in the Scope and Refine groups vary based on the type of folder you're searching. The Scope group
always offers the options of the current folder, all subfolders, all folders of the current type, and all Outlook items. The
commands in the Refine group change to reflect common properties of items stored in the current folder type. The most
common properties are shown as buttons in the Refine group; additional properties are available for selection from the
More list.
You can search for an item based on any property.
When you click a button in the Refine group or a property in the More list, that property appears in the Search box with
a placeholder for you to specify the value you're looking for. As you define the criteria for a search, Outlook filters out all
messages that don't match, which makes it easier to find what you're looking for. And here's the neat thing: Outlook
searches not only the content of the email message header and the message itself, but also the content of message
attachments. So if the search term you're looking for is in a Microsoft Word document attached to a message, the
message is included in the search results.
Tip If your organization uses public folders (a feature of Exchange) you can use these same tools to search a public
folder, but the content isn't filtered instantly; you must press Enter or click the Search button to get the same results
as you would in a standard account folder.
Using Search Folders
A Search Folder displays all the messages in your mailbox that match a specific set of search criteria, no matter which
folders the messages are actually stored in. When you create a Search Folder, it becomes part of your mailbox and is
kept up to date. The Search Folder module is located in the Folder Pane, within your top-level mailbox, at the same level
as the Inbox.
By default, Outlook 2013 includes one standard Search Folder: Unread Mail. (If your environment includes Microsoft
Lync you might also have Search Folders for Missed Calls and Missed Conversations.) If you want quick access to
messages that fit a specific set of criteria, you can create a custom Search Folder. To do so, follow these steps:
1. Display any mail folder.
2. On the Folder tab, in the New group, click New Search Folder to open the New Search Folder dialog box.
Keyboard Shortcut
Press Ctrl+Shift+P to open the New Search Folder dialog box.
3. Larger View
4.
5. Search Folder categories include Reading Mail, Mail From People And Lists, Organizing Mail, and Custom.
6. In the New Search Folder dialog box, select the type of Search Folder you want to create, and then click OK. You
can choose from the standard options presented or click Create a Custom Search Folder to specify other search
options.
You can make changes to the contents of an existing Search Folder by right-clicking the folder and then clicking
Customize This Search Folder.
Outlook automatically keeps Search Folder contents up to date. The names of folders containing unread or flagged items
are bold, with the number of unread items after the folder name. The names of folders whose contents are not up to
date are italic. To update a Search Folder, click the folder name.
Each message in your mailbox is stored in only one folder (such as your Inbox), but it might appear in multiple Search
Folders. Changing or deleting a message in a Search Folder changes or deletes the message in the folder in which it is
stored.
Deleting messages
When you delete a message, contact record, or any other item, Outlook temporarily moves it to the Deleted Items
folder of your mailbox. You can open the folder from the Folder Pane, view items that have been deleted but not
purged, and restore items (undelete them) by moving them to other folders.
Keyboard Shortcut
Press Shift+Delete to permanently delete a message from a message list without first moving it
to the Deleted Items folder.
By default, Outlook does not permanently delete items until you purge them from the Deleted Items folder. You can
empty the entire Deleted Items folder manually or automatically, or you can permanently delete individual items from
it.
To manually empty the Deleted Items folder, right-click the Deleted Items folder in the Folder Pane, and then click
Empty Folder. To automatically empty the Deleted Items folder each time you exit Outlook, select the Empty Deleted
Items Folder When Exiting Outlook check box on the Advanced page of the Outlook Options dialog box.
In this exercise, you'll use the Search feature to locate a specific message in your Inbox.
Set Up Use the series of messages and the SBS Messages folder you worked with earlier in this chapter. If you didn't
create those practice files, you can do so at this time or substitute messages and a folder of your own. Display your
Inbox and the Reading Pane, and then follow the steps.
1. In the Search box at the top of the message list, enter the. As you enter the text, the Search tool tab appears on
the ribbon, and options for refining your search appear below the Search box.
Keyboard Shortcut
Press F3 or Ctrl+E to move the cursor to the Search box.
2. Larger View
3.
4. Selecting an option other than Keyword enters the alternative search criterion (and term) in the Search box.
5. Outlook filters the messages in your Inbox to include only those that contain the word the, and highlights all
occurrences of the word in the message list and in the active message.
6. Larger View
7.
8. Initial search results include only messages contained in the Inbox folder and not in any of its subfolders or any
other mailbox folders.
9. In the lower-left corner of the program window, the status bar displays the number of messages included in the
search results.
10. On the Search tab, in the Refine group, click the Subject button to add the subject criterion to the Search box
and prompt you to enter keywords that should appear in the Subject field of all search results.
You replace the placeholder with the words you want to find in the subject field.
11. With keywords highlighted, enter SBS to instantly update the search results to display only the messages in your
Inbox that contain the word the and have SBS somewhere in the Subject field.
If you've followed along with all the exercises in this chapter, it's likely that the current search returns no results.
12. On the Search tab, in the Scope group, click the All Mailboxes button to display all the sent, received, and
copied messages created in previous exercises.
Keyboard Shortcut
Press Ctrl+Alt+Z to expand a search to include subfolders. Press Ctrl+Alt+A to expand a
search to include all items of the current type.
13. In the message list header, click By Date, and then click Folder to identify the search results by location.
14. In the Options group, click the Recent Searches button so you can view your recent searches and use the same
search again at another time.
Clicking a previous set of search criteria reruns that search against your current items.
15. Experiment with locating information by specifying criteria. When you finish, click the Close Search button to
remove the filter and redisplay the Inbox message list.
Keyboard Shortcut
Press Esc to clear the search results.
Clean Up Retain the SBS Messages folder and its contents for use in later exercises.
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Printing messages
Although electronic communications certainly have less environmental impact than paper-based communications, you
might at times want or need to print an email message—for example, if you want to take a hard copy of it to a meeting
for reference, or if you keep a physical file of important messages or complimentary feedback. You can print the
message exactly as it appears in your Inbox or embellish it with page headers and footers. Outlook prints the message as
shown on the screen, including font and paragraph formats.
In this exercise, you'll preview a message as it will appear when printed, add a page header, and then print the message.
Important
To fully complete this exercise, you must have a printer installed. If you don't have a printer installed, you
can perform all steps of the exercise other than printing.
Set Up You need the SBS Tradeshow Schedule message you worked with earlier in this chapter. If you did not create
that message, you can do so now, or you can substitute any message in your Inbox. Open the SBS Tradeshow Schedule
message, and then follow the steps.
1. In the message window, display the Print page of the Backstage view.
Larger View
The Print page displays a preview of the message as it will be printed with the current settings.
The right pane displays the message as it will appear when printed, if you click the Print button without changing
the settings shown in the center pane. If necessary, you can adjust the following settings:
o
Printer Select an installed printer or add a new one.
o
Print Options Change the default printing options in the Print dialog box before printing. You can also
change an existing print style (the way the message is presented on the printed page) or create a new
one.
o
Settings Choose from the existing print styles available for the selected message or other Outlook item.
The default print style is Memo style, which prints your name, the message header information, and
then the message content.
2. Click the Print Options button to open the Print dialog box and display your default printer settings, which you
can change before printing. Clicking OK prints the message with the current settings.
3.
You can print the contents of any attachments with the message.
4. In the Print dialog box, click Page Setup to open the Page Setup: Memo Style dialog box. You can change the
font, paper size, page margins, header, and footer from this dialog box.
5. On the Format page of the dialog box, click the Font button to the right of the Title setting. In the Font dialog
box that opens, click Impact in the Font list, click Oblique in the Font style list, and then click OK.
6. Click the Font button to the right of the Fields setting. In the Font dialog box, click Impact in the Font list, and
then click OK.
7. In the Page Setup: Memo Style dialog box, click OK, and then in the Print dialog box, click Preview.
8. In the lower-right corner of the Print page of the Backstage view, click the Actual Size button to display the
message at 100 percent of its size. The right pane of the Print page displays the message as it will appear when
printed, with the header text in the selected font. Notice that the Print Options button is shaded to indicate that
the options have been modified.
You can preview the message at its full size.
Tip If a message will be longer than one page when printed with the current settings, you can click the Multiple
Pages button to preview all pages of the message at the same time. You might find this useful when, for
example, you want to check page breaks or scan a document for a particular element.
9. Click Print Options, click Page Setup, and then in the Page Setup: Memo Style dialog box, click the Paper tab to
display the available options.
10.
In addition to choosing the paper size, you can select the number of pages that will be printed on each sheet of
paper, and set the page margins and the orientation.
11. Click the Header/Footer tab.
12. In the Header area, enter For Your Information in the center box, and then click the Font button above the box.
In the Font dialog box, in the Size area, click 16, and then click OK. The text you entered doesn't reflect the font
size change, but the Header box to the left of the Font button indicates the current font selection.
13. In the Footer section, select the default text (the page number) that appears in the center box. Then in the
AutoText box that appears near the bottom of the Page Setup dialog box, click the User Name button (labeled
with a person's profile) to print the previously specified text at the top of the page and your name (or user
name, if different) at the bottom.
14. In the Page Setup dialog box, click OK, and then in the Print dialog box, click Print to print the message,
including your custom header and footer, to the active printer.
Clean Up If you don't want to retain the custom header and footer as part of the standard message printing template,
remove them from the Memo Style. Then close the SBS Tradeshow Schedule message.
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