FMW Enterprise
Getting Started with
FMW Enterprise
for Oracle!, Microsoft" SQL Server!
Resouce Allocation Concepts Software Inc.
Notices
Information in this document is subject to change without notice
and does not represent a commitment on the part of RAC
Software, Inc. The software in this document is furnished under
a license or nondisclosure agreement. The software may only be
used or copied in accordance with the terms of the agreement. It
is against the law to copy this software or related documentation
on any medium except as is specifically allowed in the license or
nondisclosure agreement. No part of this manual may be
reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic or manual, including photocopying, recording, or
information storage or retrievel systems, for any purpose without
the express written permission of RAC Software, Inc.
#1999-2000 RAC Software Inc. All rights reserved.
Unless otherwise noted, all names of companies, organizations,
street addresses and persons contained herein are part of a
completely fictitious scenario and are designed solely to
document the use of the FMW Enterprise family of products.
Microsoft is a registered trademark, and Excel, SQL Server,
Windows, Window 95, Windows 98 and Windows NT are
trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation. Oracle is a trademark
of the Oracle Corporation.
Contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1: Introduction ..................................................................... 1
Welcome.................................................................................................. 2
What is FMW Enterprise? ........................................................................ 3
How do I find out more quickly?............................................................... 4
Technical environment............................................................................. 5
Chapter 2: Installing FMW Enterprise .............................................. 7
Overview.................................................................................................. 8
Technical Prerequisites ........................................................................... 8
When using an Oracle database................................................. 8
When using an MS-SQL Server database.................................. 9
Performing the Server installation.......................................................... 11
Starting the server installation................................................... 11
Setting up an Oracle installation ............................................... 13
Setting up an MS-SQL Server installation ................................ 15
Performing the Client installation ........................................................... 17
Chapter 3: Using the Setup Wizard to create an application....... 21
What is the Setup Wizard? .................................................................... 22
Starting the Setup Wizard ...................................................................... 22
Selecting budgeting categories.............................................................. 24
Specifying timelines ............................................................................... 25
Defining elements .................................................................................. 26
Generating the application..................................................................... 28
Exploring the generated application....................................................... 29
Navigating with the Function / Object Map ............................... 30
Editing a budget ........................................................................ 31
Modeling data ........................................................................... 35
Exploring other options for creating and changing budgets ...... 38
Executing reports ...................................................................... 38
What’s next? .......................................................................................... 43
Chapter 4: Extending the model..................................................... 45
Building blocks....................................................................................... 46
Elements................................................................................................ 47
Hierarchies............................................................................................. 50
Calendars, Classes and Editing Views .................................................. 57
Versions................................................................................................. 70
Reports .................................................................................................. 74
Copying and changing an existing report.................................. 74
Contents
Report design components ....................................................... 84
Creating a new report ............................................................... 93
Other components ............................................................................... 105
Memos .................................................................................... 105
Process Monitor ...................................................................... 106
Conclusion .............................................................................. 107
Chapter 5: Advanced features and tools ..................................... 109
Introduction .......................................................................................... 110
Access Administrator ........................................................................... 110
Functions ................................................................................ 111
Profiles.................................................................................... 112
Users and Object security....................................................... 112
Element security .................................................................... 114
Logins ..................................................................................... 116
Data transformations ........................................................................... 116
Reforecasts............................................................................. 116
Add-ins................................................................................................. 119
Allocations ........................................................................................... 119
Interfaces ............................................................................................. 123
Tools .................................................................................................... 124
FMW Scheduler ...................................................................... 124
FMW Report Distributor .......................................................... 128
FMW OLAP Server ................................................................. 133
FMW Report Viewer................................................................ 133
Distributed Processing......................................................................... 134
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 1.
Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of FMW Enterprise and the applications for which it
can be used. It also deals briefly with the technical environment required to operate the
software and concludes with some details on how to get support and assistance.
1
Chapter 1 Introduction
2
Welcome
Welcome to FMW Enterprise. Getting Started with FMW Enterprise is intended
for new users who are just beginning to explore the possibilities of the software.
This guide is presented as an extended tutorial. If you follow it in a logical
sequence it will take you through a simple setup of a budgeting and reporting
application and give you the background to begin configuring the software to
meet the requirements of your own application, with the minimum investment of
time and effort. This guide is not, and is not intended to be, a
comprehensive reference to all FMW Enterprise’s features and
functionality.
Other documents available on the FMW Enterprise installation CD are:
Release Notes
Details the functionality and changes in new releases of FMW
Enterprise.
Installing FMW Client and Server
Guide on how to install FMW Enterprise Client and Server components.
Much of the information is already contained in this book, but contains
additional information on performing such tasks as upgrading from a
previous version.
Database Configuration and Tuning Guide
Contains some useful tips on optimizing the performance of FMW
Enterprise in Oracle and MS-SQL Server environments.
Installing FMW Extended Security
FMW Extended security provides role-based security on FMW Enterprise
database objects (e.g. tables, procedures) so that access to these
objects can be restricted to FMW Enterprise applications only.
Installing FMW Mobile-Distributed Option
Deals with installing the Mobile-Distributed option.
Demo System Walkthrough
If your database administrator installs the demo database, this document
is intended to assist you in exploring the demo application.
FMW User Guide
A comprehensive guide to all functionality contained in the FMW
Enterprise Client application.
Chapter 1 Introduction
3
FMW Mobile-Distributed Option
The FMW Mobile-Distributed option allows FMW Enterprise to be
deployed in a fully or partially distributed mode. This is useful for
example where you have mobile (laptop) users who wish to work on a
portion of the database offline and then load the results back to the
central database. This capability uses the Personal Oracle 8 or MS-SQL
Server 7.0 Desktop technologies for local (usually laptop) Windows
95/98 systems.
FMW OLAP Server
The OLAP Server allows you to easily generate cubes for an OLAP
system from the FMW Enterprise database for multi-dimensional
analysis. Currently the Cognos PowerPlay" product is supported.
FMW Report Distributor
FMW Report Distributor allows FMW Enterprise scheduled reports or
report files to be distributed via a file server or a MAPI-compliant e-mail
system to individual recipients.
FMW Report Viewer
FMW Report Viewer allows FMW Enterprise report files (.fmw) to be
viewed without a connection to a database.
FMW Scheduler
FMW Scheduler allows many FMW Enterprise operations (e.g. reporting,
interfacing, allocations etc.) to be scheduled to automatically execute in
an unattended mode.
As well as the resources and documentation supplied with the FMW Enterprise
install set, RAC Software offers several options for support, implementation
assistance and upgrades. Please contact us in order to find out details about
which options would suit your requirements.
Phone:
Fax:
e-mail:
web:
(905) 848-6555
(905) 279-0050
support@racsoft.com
www.racsoft.com
What is FMW Enterprise?
FMW Enterprise is a sophisticated and flexible financial budgeting, planning,
forecasting, consolidation and reporting tool. It has been designed with the most
up-to-date 32-bit and Client/Server technologies available and is supported by
professional training and implementation services.
Chapter 1 Introduction
This software is designed to operate co-operatively with established financial,
human resource, payroll and distribution systems or in a standalone mode. It
has its own database and data structures, and includes interface features
allowing it to exchange data with external systems.
FMW Enterprise is a highly flexible and high performance enterprise tool,
particularly suited to multi-participant budgeting, planning and reporting
applications in the following areas:
!
Expenditure and revenue budgeting and variance reporting.
!
Short and long term planning for capital projects or jobs.
!
Detailed salary planning at the employee / position level.
!
Product / brand planning, reforecasting, and variance reporting.
!
Consolidations.
FMW Enterprise is built around a dynamic, flexible and multi-dimensional data
warehouse, which can be used to maintain financial, statistical and textual data.
Powerful graphical modeling tools are provided to build budgets and forecasts,
including easy and automatic reference to historical trends.
How do I find out more quickly?
To install and view a demonstration of a small budgeting and reporting
application implemented in FMW Enterprise, please use the FMW Enterprise
installation CD. The first option on the browser menu installs and executes a
demo, which includes some background material and a set of animated screen
sequences.
4
Chapter 1 Introduction
5
This guide is presented in the form of an extended tutorial, and we suggest that
the best way to explore the capabilities of FMW Enterprise is to work though the
tutorial. However, if instead you wish to go a little further in exploring this demo
application in an actual database, get your database administrator to install FMW
Enterprise with the demo database option (see Chapter 2 for installation
instructions). This will then allow you to log on to this application and use and
modify it at will. In the Documentation section on the CD there is a document
which will help you to navigate this demo database. It is strongly suggested that
you use this initially until you are comfortable with the application.
Once you have completed exploring the demo database you can reinitialize it
and set up your own database by using the Setup Wizard found under the Help
Menu. This tool allows you to do a rapid setup without having to understand all
the nuances of the software.
Alternatively, once you have done some further research into how FMW
Enterprise can be used to model various scenarios, you can set up your own
application directly within FMW Enterprise.
Technical environment
FMW Enterprise is a client / server application. For its server components it is
currently implemented on either Oracle$ 7.3.X or 8.X or Microsoft" SQL
Server$ 6.5 or 7.0 relational database management systems. Client
components require Microsoft" Windows 95, 98 or NT".
If your organization does not, and is not prepared to support these technologies,
FMW Enterprise will not be of immediate interest to you. However we do plan to
extend support to other database systems, and if the application is of interest to
you should stay tuned.
Chapter 1 Introduction
6
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
Chapter 2.
Installing FMW Enterprise
This chapter provides detailed instructions on how to install the client and server
components of FMW Enterprise. You will need the assistance of your database
administrator to perform the server installation.
7
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
8
Overview
This chapter describes installing FMW Enterprise for the first time. If you are
performing an upgrade to an existing system please refer to the document on the
Installation CD entitled Installing FMW Client and Server.
Note: You will need the assistance of your database administrator in order to
install the server and possibly the client components of the system. Accordingly
this chapter is written for the person performing this function in your organization.
Technical Prerequisites
When using an Oracle database
The following needs to be in place before performing an install for an Oracle
database.
!
An Oracle database, either versions 7.3X or 8.X must be available. Various
flavors of these database systems are supported, including Personal Oracle
8 and Oracle 8i.
!
The workstation from which the install is being done must have the Oracle
client (SQL*Net) software installed as well as a valid Oracle service pointing
to the target database instance. You should validate this connection prior to
proceeding with the installation. The workstation must be running either
Windows 95, 98 or NT4.0. Two Oracle utilities are used for the installation,
sqlplus.exe and imp73 or imp80.exe. These should be available on the path
of the workstation from which the install is being performed.
!
The Oracle ODBC driver v 8.00.XX should be installed if you wish to execute
the FMW Enterprise client from this workstation. This is usually available
with the Oracle8 client software but for your convenience is included in our
install set under ODBC drivers. FMW Enterprise will also work with the
Oracle 7 drivers but you cannot use our install to create data sources for
Oracle 7 drivers – this must be done manually through the Control Panel |
ODBC32 manager. Either driver (v7.XX or v8.XX) works against either
database.
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
9
!
If you performing an initial install you must have a user/schema set up into
which the FMW Enterprise objects will be placed. This user must have the
CONNECT, DBA and IMP_FULL_DATABASE privileges. Usually this user is
called FMW, although this is not a requirement.
!
The default tablespace in the install for tables and indexes is called FMW.
However if this tablespace is not available the objects will be placed on the
user’s default tablespace. It is a good idea from a performance perspective
to move the indexes to a separate tablespace after the install, particularly if
the index tablespace can be placed on a separate drive to that holding the
tables. Please see Oracle documentation for instructions on how to perform
this operation.
!
Ensure that at least two (2) and preferably five (5) background process
queues are available. This can be done by ensuring the following line is in
the initXXX.ora parameter file –
job_queue_processes = 5
!
Your database should have at least 30MB available for FMW Enterprise
database objects. However most production databases require in the order
of 70 – 800MB.
!
Review the Database Configuration and Tuning Guide in our documentation
library for further information on configuring and tuning the Oracle database
for FMW Enterprise.
!
You need the following information when performing an FMW Enterprise
installation for Oracle.
- password for the Oracle SYS user
- user name and password for the user/schema where the FMW
Enterprise objects will be placed.
- a drive mapping to the location on the fileserver where the FMW
Enterprise client programs are or will be installed (unless you will be
installing a full set of programs on your local machine which is not
normally the recommended approach).
- an Oracle service name pointing to the target database instance.
When using an MS-SQL Server database
The following needs to be in place before performing an install for an MS-SQL
Server database.
!
The workstation from which the install is being done must have the SQL
Server client software installed. The workstation must be running either
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
10
Windows 95, 98 or NT4.0. Two SQL Server utilities are used for the
installation, isql.exe and bcp.exe. These should be available on the path of
the workstation from where the installation is being performed.
!
The SQL Server ODBC driver v 3.50.XX should be installed if you wish to
execute the client software from this workstation. This is usually available
with the SQL Server client software but for your convenience is included in
our install set under ODBC drivers.
!
A valid SQL Server server, either version 6.5 or 7.X must be available. You
should validate your connection to this SQL Server server prior to proceeding
with the installation.
!
You must have a database set up into which the FMW Enterprise objects will
be placed. The database should have at least 30MB available for FMW
Enterprise objects. However most production databases require in the order
of 70 – 800MB.
!
Review the Database Configuration and Tuning Guide in our documentation
library for further information on configuring and tuning the SQL Server
database for FMW.
!
You need the following information when performing an FMW Enterprise
installation for MS-SQL Server.
- the password for the sa user
- name of the server where the target database is located.
- name of the database into which FMW Enterprise objects will be
placed.
- a drive mapping to the location on the fileserver where the FMW
Enterprise client programs are or will be installed (unless you will be
installing a full set of programs on your local machine which is not
normally the recommended approach).
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
11
Performing the Server installation
Starting the server installation
Insert the FMW Enterprise Installation CD into the computer from where you will
be performing the installation. If your computer has auto-start set up for the CD
you will see the FMW Browser appear after a few seconds. Alternatively invoke
the program called Install.exe from the root directory of the CD. Either way you
will see the following screen.
Usually we would recommend reading the Install Instructions before proceeding
but since they are largely a repeat of this guide you can skip this step and move
on to the menu item entitled FMW Enterprise Install. When the blue button to
the left of this item appears click once. Two further options will appear below,
entitled Client and Server Install and Distributed / Mobile option. Click once
on the Client and Server Install item.
You will encounter a series of dialogs, which are common to most installs. Pay
special attention to the License Agreement. If you cannot agree with these
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
12
terms, then exit from the installation. Assuming you can agree, continue until you
arrive at the dialog pictured below.
This dialog lists the main installation options. We will encounter it again when
performing the Client install. Select the Server Installation option and click
Next. The following dialog appears
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
13
This dialog allows you to specify which type of database you are targeting for
FMW Enterprise. Select the appropriate one.
Setting up an Oracle installation
If you chose Oracle as your target database the dialog below appears.
Input the required parameters. The SYS password refers to the password for the
predefined Oracle SYS user. The FMW User Name and associated password is
the schema / user where the FMW database objects will be placed. This user
should already be established (as described in the Prerequisites section) before
getting to this point. Usually this schema is called FMW but this is not a
requirement. The database / service must be a valid string which identifies the
Oracle database instance which is being targeted. This must have been
previously established and tested using an Oracle tool such as SQL*Net Easy
Configuration. Make sure you specify the correct Oracle version that you are
targeting (7.3.X or 8.X).
Two options are available when installing the FMW Enterprise database. These
are as follows:
!
Initialized database: This installs a database which is essentially empty
(in fact a few tables are populated with some basic information required
to invoke FMW Enterprise). Your application can then be configured in
this database.
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
!
14
Demo database: This database contains a small demonstration
application. If you simply wish to experiment with a small pre-configured
application before thinking about implementing your own requirements
you might choose to install this database.
We assume here that you will choose the Initialized Database option.
The next parameter is the number of concurrent user licenses that your
organization has acquired. If you have an unlimited number of licenses enter
999 in the edit box.
Next specify whether you wish to create public synonyms for the FMW Enterprise
objects. If you choose to create public synonyms for the objects installed this will
allow other users apart from the FMW user to access these objects. If there is
only one schema containing FMW Enterprise database objects in the database
instance (usually the case) you should always create these synonyms. If you
have two FMW schemas in a single instance (for example a demo and
production schema) you need to create public synonyms for one of them only.
This means that the schema that does not have public synonyms can be
accessed only by logging in under the user/schema name.
Once you are satisfied that you have set up the installation parameters correctly
click Next. The installation will then begin. You will see a series of command
windows appearing.
Important: Depending on the speed of your, server the installation could take
up to an hour. Do not be tempted to manually close the installation windows that
appear. They will automatically close when the installation is complete.
When the installation is completed a report will appear in a text document
indicating whether any errors were encountered during the installation.
The easiest way to check whether the installation was successful is to get a
report on the number of objects installed in the database. Using a tool such as
SQL Plus, log in as the FMW user and execute the following query.
select object_type, status, count(*) from
user_objects where object_name like 'FMW%'
group by object_type, status
This should produce the following result.
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
OBJECT_TYPE
------------INDEX
PROCEDURE
TABLE
VIEW
4 rows selected.
STATUS
-----VALID
VALID
VALID
VALID
15
COUNT(*)
------------182
372
240
5
Setting up an MS-SQL Server installation
If you chose MS-SQL Server as your target database the following dialog will
appear.
Input the required parameters. The sa password is the password for the
predefined SQL Server sa (system administrator) user. The Server parameter is
the name of the NT server where the FMW Enterprise database resides. The
Database is the name of the database into which the FMW Enterprise database
objects will be installed. Specify the correct SQL Server version (6.5 or 7.X)
which is being targeted for the FMW Enterprise installation.
Two options are available when installing the FMW Enterprise database. These
are as follows:
!
Initialized database: This installs a database which is essentially empty
(in fact a few tables are populated with some basic information required
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
16
to invoke FMW Enterprise). Your application can then be configured in
this database.
!
Demo database: This database contains a small demonstration
application. If you simply wish to experiment with a small pre-configured
application before thinking about implementing your own requirements
you might choose to install this database.
We assume here that you will choose the Initialized Database option.
The next parameter is the number of concurrent user licenses that your
organization has acquired. If you have an unlimited number of licenses enter
999 in the edit box.
Once you are satisfied that you have set up the installation parameters correctly
click Next. The installation will then begin. You will see a series of command
windows appearing.
Important Depending on the speed of you server the installation could take up
to an hour. Do not be tempted to manually close the installation windows that
appear. They will automatically close when the installation is complete.
When the installation is completed a report will appear in a text document
indicating whether any errors were encountered during the installation.
The easiest way to check whether the installation was successful is to get a
report on the number of objects installed in the database. Using a tool such as
isql, log into the database where FMW Enterprise objects reside and execute the
following query.
select type, count(*) from sysobjects where name like
'FMW%' group by type
This should produce the following result.
type
---F
P
U
V
----------9
371
108
5
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
Performing the Client installation
After performing the server installation you will be returned to the FMW
Enterprise Installation Browser. Move on to the menu item entitled FMW
Enterprise Install (the same one that you used to do the Server installation).
When the blue button to the left of this item appears, click once. Two further
options will appear below, entitled Client and Server Install and Distributed /
Mobile option. Click once on the Client and Server Install item.
Click through the dialogs until you get to the dialog entitled Setup Types.
Select the first item entitled Install Client (Local or File Server). Click Next.
The next dialog asks you to specify a folder where the client software
(executables, dlls and other files) will be placed.
17
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
18
Note: By default the installation will place the client software files on your local
drive under the Programs directory. However we recommend that as few copies
of the client software as possible be installed, which means the preferred method
is to install one copy of the client software on a file server which can be accessed
by all FMW Enterprise users. This makes maintenance and upgrades to new
versions much easier to manage.
Click the Next button. The following dialog will appear.
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
19
This allows you to specify which FMW Enterprise client components to install.
Choose the FMW Administrator option. This will install all available components.
Click Next. A dialog will appear allowing you to create an ODBC data source.
Note: An appropriate ODBC driver must have been previously installed on the
client workstation from which the FMW Enterprise application will be accessed.
Please refer to the Prerequisites section above for details.
Assuming that you will be accessing the FMW Enterprise application from the
same client computer from which you are doing this installation you should set up
a data source for the database that you are accessing. Alternatively you can set
up an ODBC data source using the ODBC32 application in the Control Panel.
Choose the correct database and click Next.
The next two dialogs allow you to specify the group under which the FMW icons
will be placed and summarizes the installation information that you have
provided. Click through these. The client software will then be installed.
If you have chosen to create an ODBC data source through this installation
process, one of the following dialogs will appear, depending on the database.
Chapter 2 Installing FMW Enterprise
20
Complete the parameters required to access the database where FMW
Enterprise is located. Click next and the data source will be created.
Once the installation is completed the FMW Enterprise Client icons will appear in
your start menu and are ready for use.
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
Chapter 3.
21
Using the Setup Wizard to create
an application
This chapter provides guidance on how to use the FMW Setup Wizard to create a basic
budgeting and reporting application, which can then be further refined. Because FMW
Enterprise is such a large and functional system, this chapter unfortunately only
scratches the surface of what you could do with the application. However the purpose of
this chapter is to help you get started quickly and easily.
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
22
What is the Setup Wizard?
A common problem with sophisticated applications such as FMW Enterprise is
the considerable amount of time and expertise that can be required in order to
configure the system to get to the point where it produces a usable result. The
Setup Wizard eliminates some of these obstacles, by automatically configuring
an application, which can be used immediately without extensive knowledge of
the FMW Enterprise software.
Note: While the Setup Wizard will help you generate a usable application quickly,
in most cases a considerable amount of refinement will need to occur before the
application is fully ready for production use. Thus the wizard should be looked
upon as an initial prototyping tool, rather than expecting to use it fulfil all of your
configuration requirements.
For the purposes of this guide, we will take you through a particular setup
sequence. We suggest that initially you do not make too many changes to the
default implementation options, so that it is easier for you to follow the examples
provided. However once you have been through this default setup you can
invoke the Setup Wizard again and specify parameters that are more appropriate
to your requirements. This can be done as often as required.
Starting the Setup Wizard
Invoke the FMW Client application from the Start menu.
A logon dialog will appear. You will need to have a valid user id and password
available to log into the Oracle or SQL Server database where FMW Enterprise
resides. In addition a valid ODBC data source will need to be available (see
previous chapter on Installation for further details).
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
23
Select a valid data source referencing your FMW database from the combo box
at the top of this dialog. Key in your user name and password and click OK.
At this point, assuming your data source references a properly installed FMW
Enterprise database, you will be logged on. What happens next depends on
whether your database administrator installed the initialized or the demo
database. If the initialized database was installed (as suggested), the first dialog
of the Setup Wizard will automatically appear. If the demo database was
installed or if you have already been through the Setup Wizard once, you will be
logged in to the application without the Setup Wizard appearing. In this case, to
access the Setup Wizard use the Help | Setup Wizard menu option.
Either way the following page will appear.
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
This page simply introduces you to the application. Once you have read the
introduction click the Next button. The Budgeting Categories dialog appears.
Selecting budgeting categories
This dialog is used to define the types of budgeting that your organization will
perform. For the purposes of the simplified setup it is assumed that your
budgeting application will fall into one or more of the following categories.
24
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
25
!
Operating budgets are usually used to budget for such expense and
revenue items as sales, salaries, travel and utilities. The wizard sets this
up as a simple period-by-period dollar budgeting method. Most
frequently this is done at a department / account level, possibly with a
build up of some account amounts by line items. Of course FMW
Enterprise is capable of modeling many other scenarios, but you would
need to bypass the wizard and set these up within FMW Enterprise to
implement these.
!
Capital budgeting in this context refers to a job or project-based, multiyear capital plan of the type often used by public sector organizations.
Examples of these are budgeting for the construction of a wastewater
treatment plant or a road repair project. This can also be used to set up,
for example, a multi-year project or job budget for a construction
company.
!
Salary Allocations provides a methodology for budgeting payroll costs
at an employee or position level and then splitting salary and benefit
amounts between several departments or cost centers and accounts and
then posting the results to the Operating budget. The wizard sets up a
simple methodology for performing this function. Once again FMW
Enterprise is capable of modeling much more sophisticated scenarios
should they be required.
The majority of budgeting applications fit into one or more of these categories.
However, because FMW Enterprise is extremely flexible, it is used for many
other types of applications that do not conform to these categories. In these
cases the Setup Wizard would not be an appropriate configuration tool.
For the purposes of this exercise leave all three categories selected and click the
next button.
Specifying timelines
The next page that appears allows you to specify timelines.
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
26
While FMW Enterprise allows up to 400 periods for budgeting purposes, as well
as multiple years, usually Operating type budgets are performed over a 12 or 13
period calendar and Capital budgets usually have a 1 to 10 year horizon. In the
case of an Operating budget, this dialog allow you to specify your starting month
(beginning of the fiscal year). Naturally this might or might not conform to the
calendar year.
If you wish to change the defaults to something closer to those used by your
organization, please feel free to do so here. Click the Next button.
Defining elements
In FMW Enterprise, elements are items that will be combined to form line items.
These could be for example Accounts, Departments, Cost Centers, Projects,
Jobs, Employee / Position codes, Product codes etc.
The next dialog allows you to define up to seven elements (in FMW Enterprise
itself you can define an unlimited number of elements) and attach these elements
to each Budgeting Category.
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
27
It is assumed for the purposes of this simplified setup that there will always be an
element called Account, and it will be used in each category. This is a Natural
Account type and thus each item will be classified as an Asset, Liability,
Revenue, Expense or Equity type.
Note: For the purposes of being able to follow the sample setup described in this
guide we suggest that initially you do not make too many changes to the defaults.
Once you have been through one Wizard iteration, you can return and create
your own elements.
For example, if each line of your Capital Budget is defined by a Job, Phase and
Account (rather than by a Project, Component and Account as set up in the
default) you would key in each of these elements (overriding or removing the
default elements where necessary).
The checkboxes to the right of the element list specify which elements are used
in each of the Operating, Capital and Salary Allocation budget categories. If for
example Salary Allocations are keyed by Position within Department and
Account you would have an element for Position and Department with a
checkbox checked opposite these elements in the Salary column.
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For each of the elements, at least one and preferably more samples should be
supplied. To do this click on the gray button to the right of each element. If you
have a segmented account (which can be considered to be one element) use a
'–' as a separator. For example:
4-001
5-230
Product Sales
Travel Costs
Revenue
Expense
Note: If your planning elements fall naturally into segments (for example Cost
Center and Account) where each segment has a unique meaning regardless of
which other segments it is combined with, set up each segment as a separate
element. If however, the segment is only unique within a combination (e.g.
Account 5100 means something different in combination with Cost Center 610 as
opposed to 410) this is an indication that this should be set up as a single multi segmented element, which defines the combination.
If you have a variable length element, provide an example of both the shortest
and longest element items.
Once you have completed specifying the elements and provided samples for
each, click the Next button.
Generating the application
When you click the Finish button FMW will generate your application for you
based on the information you have supplied. If you leave the Generate Data
button clicked, some sample data will be generated for you. This process will
take several seconds.
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Note: The FMW Enterprise database will be totally re-initialized by this process.
If you have done some setup or input some data that you are not willing to lose,
please Cancel here.
The application that is generated for you can of course be further enhanced and
extended within FMW Enterprise. If you wish to use the Wizard again it is
available under the Help menu.
Exploring the generated application
Once the Setup Wizard has completed processing, you will find yourself in the
FMW Client application. This main application window will look as follows:
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Navigating with the Function / Object Map
The Function / Object Map you see to the left of the main application window is
the main instrument that you will use to navigate your application. Nearly all the
objects and functions available to you are represented in a hierarchical Explorertype diagram. To expand a node of the Map click the ‘+ ‘ sign next to the node
that you wish to expand.
Each node also has a set of actions associated with it. To access these click the
right mouse button over the node. A tear off menu listing the available actions
will appear. The available actions will vary depending on the node.
Most tasks in FMW are performed through the Map. The Map is fully integrated
with the FMW Access Management system. This means that, depending on the
type of access granted to individual users, each user will see different functions
and objects in the Map. The advantage of this is that a fully customized view of a
single large database can be presented to each user. If you have arrived at this
point via the Setup Wizard it means your user id has been established as an
FMW Administrator, with unlimited access, so you will see and be able to
manipulate all objects and functions without restriction.
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Editing a budget
Now we know how to navigate through the system, let’s explore some common
actions that are likely to be performed by users. To start with we will look at
editing a budget.
From the Map expand the Versions node, until you see the Budget version under
the Financial group.
Note: A version in FMW Enterprise is simply a repository for a set of data. Some
default versions have been set up by the Wizard but of course later you can set
up as many versions as you need and name them in a way that is meaningful to
your application.
Either double-click on the Budget node or bring up the menu of available actions
by clicking the right mouse button over the node, and select the Balances option.
The following editing window appears.
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At the top of the window there are three combo boxes. These determine which
data is selected for editing and how it is presented.
Note: depending on what you specified in the Setup Wizard for Elements and
Budget Categories the content of these combo boxes might differ from those
shown here. Hopefully, as suggested above, you have not made too many
changes to the defaults, at least initially, so your setup should be similar to that
shown here.
The leftmost combo box lists the Editing views or profiles available. An editing
view determines how data is selected and presented for editing. Some defaults
have been set up here, but later you can set up other editing views as required.
Select the view called Operating by Department.
The center combo box lists the available years. There should be demo data for
the current year, so if it is not already selected, select the current year.
The rightmost combo box now contains the selection criteria for the data. The
Operating by Department editing view determines that a list of departments
appears in this combo box. Select department 001 and after a second or two
data should appear in the grid. This is some random demo data that has been
generated by the Wizard.
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At the simplest level, you can change budget numbers as with a spreadsheet by
typing into cells. These changes are committed to the database once you click
the Save button on the button bar.
Here are some other actions that you can perform.
To insert a new line, position the cursor over an element (in the above
example the Account) on the left of the spreadsheet and click the ‘ + ‘ button
on the button bar at the top of the screen. A popup box will appear with a list of
accounts.
Note: In this example you might not be able to add another account to the
department because all available accounts are already present. We will add
some more accounts later, which will then allow us to insert a new account into
this department’s budget.
To delete a line, position the cursor over an account on the left of the
spreadsheet and click on the ‘ x ’ button (delete button) on the button bar.
To assist the user in entering data, a total amount can be entered into a
column and then spread evenly over the periods simply by clicking on the
spread button. Note there are other modeling options available.
Click the save button to update the database with any changes made.
To attach a note to an element within a line item click the button on the far
left of the line item. An editing window will appear in which text can be entered.
Similarly a note can be attached to the element on which the data selection is
based.
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To undo the last operation performed use this button.
A right button click over the title (blue) area will bring up a small edit box in which
a combination description can be entered. A combination description is a
description, limited to 256 characters, that is related to the whole key making up
the line item (rather than a specific element of the key). These descriptions can
be displayed on the editing screen (see editing view) or in a column on a report.
Each line appearing at the balance level may be further analyzed into line
items, to provides details of how the balance is made up.
As an example first zero all cells related to the Travel line (for now simply type in
zeros, even although we will later show you an easier way to do this). Then click
the button shown above to the left of the Travel account line.
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A window will appear. Click on the ‘ + ‘ button on the toolbar to create a
new line item (at first there will be space for the first line item without doing
this). Enter a description, attach a predefined code (currently there will only be
one predefined code called <General> ) and enter the amounts. Click on the
Save button to commit the changes in the database. Close the window to work
on the top level lines.
Click the save button to commit to the database any changes made.
Note: Amounts entered as a line item add to any amounts already entered in
the top level line.
Modeling data
Now that we have seen how to do some basic editing let’s look at some other
ways to manipulate data. Data can be modeled using a variety of modeling
options. To access the modeling options, select a range of cells containing
numbers that you wish to model from the editing spreadsheet, and do a right
button click (must click over a numeric area of the spreadsheet).
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Select a modeling option to be applied to the selected cells. The available
options are:
Zero Values : this will zero all the selected cells.
Increment / Decrement Amount : All selected cells are incremented or
decremented by a specified amount;
Increment / Decrement Percentage : All selected cells are incremented or
decremented by a specified percentage. In the case of a compound percentage a
starting value is supplied for the first column and it is compounded for each
subsequent column.
Spread Even: The amounts in each selected row are spread evenly over the
selected cells.
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Spread Comparative: This allows the selected rows to be allocated in
accordance with the patterning of another key, for example a prior years actual or
some other base (e.g. a key representing a salary spread).
Since we do not have much data in the system on which to pattern, let’s just use
this capability to manipulate our Seasonal Salaries line graphically. Highlight all
the cells on this line and do a right button click over the January cell. Select the
Spread | Comparative option from the tear off menu.
The following dialog will appear.
At this point if we wanted to pattern the spread on another key (for example 1998
Actuals) we would change the key here. However let’s simply leave the key as is
for now.
Click to the Bar Graph tab.
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A graphical view of the key selected on the pervious tab appears. In this case it
is the 1999 Budget Seasonal Salaries line. This pattern can be modified by
clicking near the top of a bar and dragging it up or down.
When you are satisfied with the spread click the OK button and the pattern will be
applied to the numbers on the spreadsheet.
Click the save button to update the database with any changes made using
the modeling functions.
Exploring other options for creating and changing budgets
We would encourage you to experiment with the other editing views that have
been established by the Setup Wizard to see what they do. Further information
on Versions, Editing Views and Modeling can be found in Chapters 8 and 9 of the
FMW Enterprise User Guide which is included in the documentation library on
the Installation CD.
Executing reports
Apart from creating and editing budgets your users will likely want to produce
reports to present, summarize and analyze their data. FMW Enterprise includes
a powerful and intuitive report generator. The Setup Wizard sets up a very
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
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simple example of a report, which runs against the Operating budget. Later on
we will create a report of our own but for now let’s execute the existing report.
From the Map expand the Reports node until you see an icon for a report called
Operating by Organization. Either double-click this node or do a right button click
and select the Execute option from the tear-off menu.
A dialog with a list box appears. Even though this may not look like it now, this
list box contains an Organization hierarchy (tree). We only currently have one
node in the tree (apart from the very top node), called Corporation. We will
extend this tree later to include some other levels and nodes.
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Choose the Corporation node and click the OK button. Wait a few seconds for
the report to appear (the swimming fish means the report is still extracting data
from the database).
Note: The first time you execute a report it might take a little longer than you
would expect because the database needs to compile some procedures and do
some data buffering – this should speed up subsequently.
A report viewing window, as shown above, appears. At the top of the report
there is a drop down combo. This contains page selections. This happens to be
a single page report so this combo box is grayed and the single page
(Corporation) is shown. If this was a multi-page report we would be able to
select different pages for viewing by using this combo box.
There are also three buttons highlighted. We will look at these buttons in
conjunction with the actions that can be taken on a viewed report.
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Once a report is displayed there are a number of things we can do. These are.
Drill down. If a report has drill down levels defined on a row, you can
expand the row to a lower level. Move the cursor over the report rows. If
the icon depicting the pair of binoculars appears it means there is a lower level.
Double click the row and the row will expand. Up to seven drill down levels are
possible, although the sample report has only one drill down level.
Print. To print the report, click the Print button on the button bar or
choose the File | Print option from the menu. If this is a multi-page report
of course you can print all or some of the pages.
Load to MS-Excel. If you are a Microsoft Excel user and have Excel
loaded on your computer you can load the report to Excel automatically by
clicking this button.
Note: If the drill downs are not expanded or there are no drilldowns, then the row
formulas for subtotals and totals will be carried over to Excel. If there are
expanded drill downs they will not. Also note that the Excel interface is a oneway interface, from FMW Enterprise to Excel. You cannot change numbers in
Excel and feed them back into FMW Enterprise.
Save as a file. The report can be saved as a .fmw file or a .xlw (Excel
workbook) file for later reference or exchange with other users. The FMW
Report Distributor module can also be used to split a large report file by recipient
and either deliver subsets of the file via a file server or e-mail subsets to other
users.
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E-mail. If you have a MAPI compliant e-mail system you can e-mail the report to
an e-mail address. The recipient would need to have the FMW Report Viewer
module installed in order to view the report.
Re-extract the report, perhaps using different selection criteria.
Enter report design mode in order to change or modify the report design.
This assumes we have security to do so. We will deal with developing and
modifying reports in more detail later.
Chapter 3 Using Setup Wizard to create an application
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What’s next?
We have now reviewed some basic functionality of FMW Enterprise and how to
use it. Hopefully you have a feel for how the system operates. In the next
chapter we will look more closely at, and extend this model to show you some
other features and capabilities, as well as a look at what the Setup Wizard
actually did in terms of establishing FMW Enterprise structures.
At this point you could either:
!
Continue with the next chapter.
!
Return to the Setup Wizard and try some different scenarios and see
how they impact the model. To re-access the Wizard, use the Setup
Wizard item under the Help Menu.
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Chapter 4 Extending the model
Chapter 4.
45
Extending the model
This chapter examines the model set up using the Setup Wizard in more depth
and demonstrates how to extend it. This is designed to help the user further
understand how FMW Enterprise operates and how applications are configured.
When this chapter is completed the user should have an understanding of the
fundamental building blocks of an FMW Enterprise application. A decision can
then be made on whether the Setup Wizard will be an appropriate starting point
for configuring the organization’s application, or whether the application is
complex enough that it should rather be built from within FMW Enterprise.
Chapter 4 Extending the model
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Building blocks
FMW Enterprise is a highly configurable application, capable of modeling many
different application scenarios. There are five basic building blocks to
configuring the FMW Enterprise database in order to develop the data structures
you need for your application. These are called Calendars, Elements, Classes,
Hierarchies and Versions. These components can be established and modified
within FMW Enterprise. The first four can be accessed under the Data
Definitions node on the Map, and Versions appear just above the Data
Definitions node.
By utilizing the Setup Wizard a number of these components have been
automatically created for you. However as you become more experienced with
FMW Enterprise or wish to configure applications that go beyond the capabilities
of the Setup Wizard, you will need to create and manipulate some of these
components directly.
What we will do in this chapter is further examine the components that the Setup
Wizard established and look at how these can be modified and extended.
Of course there is much more to a fully functional application that these basic
components. We will need to create reports, interface to source systems
(General Ledgers and Human Resource systems are two typical examples),
create special data manipulation logic via Add-ins, and depending on the
complexity of your application set up other operations and functions. Some of
these other aspects of FMW Enterprise are dealt with further in this guide and
other documents in the documentation library, but understanding the basics of an
FMW Enterprise application is where we need to begin.
Chapter 4 Extending the model
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Elements
An element is any item that will be used in the making up of a key for entering
lines (or rows) of data. Elements could include such things as accounts,
responsibility centers, employee positions, products or any other entity that you
use in your application. As many elements as required for an application can be
defined. Once defined, elements are then combined through Class definitions
into keys. These keys conceptually define “rows” of data. For example, for a
particular budgeting category, a row of data might be keyed by a combination of
account and responsibility center.
Now take a look at the elements that Setup Wizard created. If you open the Map
as follows, and assuming you used the defaults in the wizard, you should see the
following five elements.
Double click on the Account node and a list of existing accounts (from the
samples supplied in the Setup Wizard) will appear. Move to the bottom of the list
and key in another couple of accounts.
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Ignore the Security column for now. Since the Account has been designated as
a Natural Account, there is a column where the account type is specified. When
completed click the Save button on the button bar. Note the button to the left of
each account, which if clicked allows you to capture a note related to each
account (by year). This note is more often used for elements such as projects or
departments to document things such as departmental mandates or project
justifications / explanations. This text note is also accessible through the editing
views, and can be output on reports attached to the appropriate element.
Note: in cases where the element, such as the account, is maintained in an
external system such as a General Ledger, which is interfaced to FMW
Enterprise, the interface is usually set up to automatically synchronize the GL
chart with FMW Enterprise. This means that you would not have to input new
accounts or changes in FMW Enterprise, as they would be automatically
synchronized with the source system. In other cases FMW Enterprise is the
system which initiates the new or changed accounts, which are then fed back via
an interface to the external system.
Now close the window listing the accounts and do a right button click over the
Account node in the Map and select Properties from the tear-off menu.
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This dialog defines the properties of the Account element. You can use the Help
button to find out the meaning behind each field.
Have a look at some of the other elements and see how they are defined. If you
want to set up a completely new element do a right button click over the Element
node and select New from the tear-off menu.
Remember that any new element items established is simply a list. It needs to
be attached to a key definition in a Class (see below) before being used to
capture data.
If you would like further details on elements please refer to section 05 of the
FMW User Guide.
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Hierarchies
Hierarchies are roll ups of elements defined in a tree-like fashion. They are used
extensively in reporting and for various data selection operations throughout
FMW Enterprise. As many hierarchies as required may be established and at
any time. For example if part way through a year you need to look at the impact
of a reorganization, you could simply create a new hierarchy reflecting the new
organization, and use this for reporting, without impacting either the data or the
“official” organizational hierarchy.
There is a many-to-many relationship between elements and hierarchies. This
means that a single element can be rolled up through multiple hierarchies and a
single hierarchy can be used to roll up multiple elements.
The Setup Wizard has created one default hierarchy for us called Organization
(on the theory that most organizations will have at least a hierarchy reflecting
their organizational structure). To access this hierarchy, expand the Hierarchy
node and double click on the Organization node.
Element List
At the top of the window is a drop down combo box listing all our elements. We
need to select a relevant element that we wish to use the tree to roll up, in this
case Department. Now expand the organization node by clicking the + sign to its
left. A node called Corporation appears. Click on the + sign next to the
Corporation node and you will see our three Department elements rolling up into
the Corporation node.
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This is not a very useful tree as is, so let’s modify it. Ignoring the Corporation
node for now, right button click on the Organization node, add some nodes
representing Divisions as shown below. Then add some other nodes below
division using the same technique.
Drag and drop the department from the Corporation node onto the new nodes as
shown above. Now delete the Corporation node (not needed) by doing a right
button click over it and selecting Delete from the tear-off menu. When satisfied
click the Save button on the button bar to save changes made, and close the
window.
Note: One restriction in FMW Enterprise is that a node in a hierarchy cannot
contain both a lower level node and elements as child nodes.
If you want to change the title of a non-element (green) node, then double click
on it and the title can be changed in place via a edit control which appears
directly over the existing title.
There are some other things we need to know about hierarchies such as how to
reorder nodes, but at this point let’s see what impact changing this hierarchy has
had on other parts of the system.
First run the sample report the Setup Wizard created (if you do not remember
how to do this refer back to chapter 3). When you execute the report from the
Map the selection dialog should now look like this.
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Select the tree nodes shown and click the OK button. When the report appears
you will see that there is now one page for each selection made.
Page selections
Use the page selections combo box to flip between the pages, and also look now
at what appears on the drill down levels. When you have finished, close the
report window.
Next we should look at how this tree can also be used to select data for editing.
Under the Versions node on the Map, open the nodes until you see the version
called Budget. Double click on this node.
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In the window that appears, use the combo boxes at the top to select the
Operating by Organization editing view, the current year, and then have a look at
the rightmost combo box. If you drop this down you will see a representation of
our organization tree. Select the Controllers node and take a look at the result.
You will see we now have a cascading arrangement for the data, with accounts
being listed within departments.
Since we have now added some new accounts when looking at elements,
let’s see how we can add a line to department 003 (Financial Services).
Place your cursor over account 5-1300 (under department 003) and then click
the ‘+’ button on the button bar. You should see the following popup dialog.
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Double click on 5-1500 (Consulting Services). This will add the row to the
budget. At this point you can either add line items to build up the account or
put values directly into the cells at the account level, or do a combination of
both. When you have finished experimenting with this close the window.
Now we need to return to the hierarchy and look more closely at the relationship
between elements and the hierarchy, in particular what happens when we add a
new element such as a new department, or when a new element is automatically
added to FMW Enterprise through an interface.
From the Map, expand the Data Definitions node and then the Elements node.
Double click on the Department node under Elements. Add a new department to
the list as we did earlier (in the illustration below we have added 004
Purchasing).
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Now look at the Organization hierarchy. Close the department window and open
the Organization hierarchy window. Be sure to select the Department
element from the combo box at the top of the hierarchy window. Expand
the tree so it looks like the illustration below.
What you will see is that our new department has ended up being attached to a
special node called Unallocated Element Items. Drag it from this node and drop
onto the Controllers node as shown by the arrow. Purchasing now reports to the
Controllers Division. Close the Organization hierarchy window.
Note: There is a 100% correspondence between every element and every
hierarchy – i.e. every element will appear in every tree, either on the Unallocated
Element Node or on a valid node. This makes it very easy to maintain the
integrity of the system – you never have to wonder whether a hierarchy is
attached to the correct elements. Just look at the Unallocated Elements Node
and if the element is not there it is somewhere else in the tree.
There is just one more concept that you need to be aware of when dealing with
hierarchies which is that of named levels.
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You will notice that we have gotten along quite well so far without attaching
names to specific levels of our hierarchy. However there are times where it is
useful to be able to refer to a specific level of a hierarchy, particularly in reporting.
To attach names to levels of our Organization hierarchy, do a right button click on
the Organization node in the Map and select Properties from the tear-off menu.
We have named the first level (under Organization node) as Division and the
second level as Unit.
Note: There is no requirement to name levels in a hierarchy and in addition
naming levels does not imply that the every branch of the hierarchy must have
the same number of levels.
We would encourage you to explore hierarchies some more here as they are
very important structures in the FMW Enterprise model. If you are so inclined,
create some other hierarchies from scratch that might be relevant to you and
make sure that you are comfortable with manipulating hierarchies.
If you would like further details on hierarchies please refer to section 07 of the
FMW User Guide.
Chapter 4 Extending the model
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Calendars, Classes and Editing Views
This brings us to perhaps the conceptually most difficult, but also one of most
vital, parts of understanding how FMW Enterprise is configured.
In essence, an FMW Enterprise class defines a template for how data will be
arranged and stored in the database. Multiple classes can be created to handle
different types of data. A class definition essentially defines a two-dimensional
row-column matrix for storing data. It can be viewed conceptually (this is NOT a
screen shot) as follows:
A variety of attributes can be applied to rows and columns. For example, a
column can be a calculated column, or it can be populated via a lookup against
another FMW Enterprise class. You can specify the currency symbol, number of
decimals, and whether the column is updateable on-line or not.
Note: It is very important that class designs are carefully thought through prior to
implementation. This required that you have a clear understanding of how data
will be captured as well as your reporting requirements. Once a class has been
established and data has been captured into it, the class definition is essentially
locked in, although there are some attributes that can be changed even after
data has been captured.
Every class must be attached to a calendar, which means that at least some of
the class columns are defined by the calendar. A calendar in FMW Enterprise
terms is simply a set of ‘buckets’ which can have a roll-up structure
superimposed on it for reporting purposes.
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If you open the Map under Data Definitions | Calendars you will see that the
Setup Wizard has defined several calendars for us. Double click on the calendar
called Fiscal Year.
You will see a calendar defined in a tree like structure. This tree may be
manipulated in a similar way to a hierarchy. In this case ‘buckets’ (lowest level
calendar elements) are simply months which rollup into quarters, semi-annuals
etc. However the lowest level of the calendar can define anything that is useful
to you and can contain up to 400 items.
Note: Once a calendar has been attached to a class the number of lowest level
items (in the above example, months) cannot be changed. However rollups can
be changed dynamically at any time as can titles of any calendar nodes.
In addition note that the year does not usually appear in the calendar, because
FMW Enterprise has a separate entity for year. In spite of this there are some
instance where year in fact does appear in a calendar. The reasons for this will
become clearer further on.
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Now let’s turn our attention to the classes that have been established by the
Setup Wizard. If you expand the Class node under Data Definitions from the
Map, you will see the following:
Essentially the Setup Wizard has configured three classes, which correspond to
the Budgeting Categories that you selected in the Wizard. There is also a fourth
class (Salary Data) which we will deal with later.
Double-click on the Operating class to bring up the Class definition tabbed
dialog. On the first tab you will see the following.
This dialog establishes the elements for defining a row for the Operating class
(which naturally enough is used to store Operating data, which may be YTD
Actuals (usually fed from the GL), Budgets, Reforecasts etc.). It specifies that
each row (key) of Operating data must be identified by a combination of the
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Department and Account elements. We can define a row by a combination of up
to 10 elements.
Important: The class key should be defined by only the minimum number of
elements that together make up a unique identifier for a row. Avoid if possible
using elements to signify rollups, even if this is the way your GL or other source
system works. Items which are present purely for roll-up purposes should more
properly be represented in Hierarchies. It is rare that FMW Enterprise class keys
contains more that 4 elements.
Now click to the Columns tab.
The first thing to observe is that the Fiscal Year calendar which we examined
earlier has been attached to this class and in fact when we look at the calendar
we will see that it defines most of the columns. Next, scroll over to column 13.
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This is a non-calendar column and has been set up as a calculated column,
which is the sum of columns 1 to 12. In addition, note that the Updateable Online flag is switched off which means that a user cannot directly key data into this
column.
Note also the other attributes that are available for a column, namely the
currency symbol and number of decimals. Both of these attributes control the
input and display of numbers entered into these columns.
When establishing a class you always need to attach a calendar, which defines a
set of columns. Then you can insert non-calendar columns as required. For this
calendar the Insert and Delete buttons are grayed because there is already data
entered against this class so the column definition is locked in.
You will notice one other important button on this dialog called Lookups. This
expands the dialog and allows you to define lookup criteria for columns. A
column with lookup criteria defined means that the column can automatically be
populated from another source (an external system or from within FMW
Enterprise) rather then having to either key in the data or have it calculate from
other columns. This is frequently used for things such as pay rates, unit prices
etc. We will return to lookups when dealing with our Salary Allocation class,
which includes a practical example of how lookups are used.
Skip over the next tab (Class-Version relationships - we will return to this later) to
the tab entitled Editing Views. If not already selected, select the Operating by
Organization editing view in the combo box on the top left of the dialog.
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An editing view is a user-definable set of parameters, which determine how data
is presented for editing. A single class can (and usually does) have multiple
editing views. Editing views can be created, modified or deleted at any time.
When you edited budget data you used an editing view. Let’s look at the
relationship between the edit window (with which you should now be familiar) and
the editing view definition.
Important: Do not confuse an editing view with a Report. FMW Enterprise has
a sophisticated report generator, which has many more formatting and display
options. Editing views are solely for the purpose of presenting data for editing.
Looking at each component of the editing view in turn:
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!
Editing view title
The title under which the editing view definition is created shows up
in the first drop down combo box in the editing window.
!
Selection
This determines what appears in the third drop down combo box in
the editing window. In this example we have decided to select by the
Organization hierarchy. This means that on the editing screen we
are presented with a representation of our organization hierarchy,
and once we select a node of that hierarchy it will present all data
rolling up into that node.
If we also specified a level (just below Organization), only hierarchy
nodes at that level will be available in the selection drop down box.
The other alternative to a selection based on a hierarchy is a
selection based on an element (such as a Department). In this case,
the selection drop down box in the editing window would contain a
list of elements.
Note: In the case of a selection based on elements, only the
elements accessible to the logged on user, as defined in the Access
Manager (we will deal with security and access restrictions later on),
would appear in the selection drop down box. If, for example a
selection was based on an element called Department, although the
database might contain 1000 departments, only five of them might
be accessible to the user. In this case he would only see five
elements in the drop down box.
!
Display Order
This determines which class key elements and in which order they
will be displayed in the editing window. In the above example, the
department is displayed first with the attached accounts cascading
within each department. If we wished, for example, to have
departments displayed within each account we would simple reverse
the display order of the elements.
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Column Attributes
The first two attributes can be used to hide specific class columns
from display at either the balance level (main editing window) or the
line item level or both. In the example below we have a class
defined where the first three columns (Unit, Unit cost, Total) are only
relevant at the line item level, not at the balance level, so they are
hidden at the balance level but displayed at the line item level.
The S/Total attribute allows us to eliminate automatic sub-totaling on
certain columns where it might not be relevant. The C/Fwd attribute
allows us to determine if a number entered at the line item level
automatically is incremented into the balance (top) level or not.
!
Limit data selection
This allows you to limit, by ranges of elements, data appearing in an
editing view. For example we might want a specific view to show
only expense accounts, excluding revenue, asset accounts etc.
!
Comparatives, Additional Relationships
These specify either comparative data (e.g. Prior Year Actuals) or
additional relationships from other hierarchies should be displayed
on the view.
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Now that we understand the basics of how data is stored (classes) and displayed
for editing (editing views) we should turn our attention to some of the other
classes and editing views set up by the Setup Wizard. Use the Map to look at
the calendar called Multi-year and the Capital class.
In this case the calendar defines a series of buckets which relate to years, rather
than months. It is assumed by the Setup Wizard that capital expenditure are
planned in a multi-year fashion. In the case of this class, the key (row) is
identified by a combination of Project, Component and Account.
Please look at this class and its related editing views a little more closely, and
further explore how the data is displayed for editing purposes.
The Salary Allocation class has some other interesting features that we should
examine. Firstly, some house keeping is required. We want to use the
Organization hierarchy to select employees (as well as departments). Call up the
Organization hierarchy, and attach it to the Employee element. Drag the three
employee records from the Unallocated node onto Controllers, as show below
and save the changes.
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Next access the budget version and use the Salary Alloc. by Organization view to
access all employees under the Controllers node.
The idea behind this view is to allow an individual employee’s salary and benefit
costs to be allocated to multiple departments / accounts, based on a FTE (full
time equivalent) factor. We could just as easily have used some other allocation
method, for example percentages, or positions instead of employees.
Note The model set up by the Setup Wizard is in fact fairly simplistic. FMW
Enterprise if often used to model significantly more complex and detailed
requirements, such as a detailed employee benefits calculation, rather than the
one shown here which is based on a simple percentage by employee.
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The first two columns of this class are lookup columns. This means that the data
is automatically retrieved from a master table in FMW Enterprise, as rows are
inserted into this editing view. The third column is input by the user (FTE), and
the final three columns are calculated based on information in the other columns.
Change the FTE column and take a look at how the numbers dynamically
recalculate. Also see what happens when you insert a new account or
department. You might notice that the first two columns have inappropriate
subtotals which we can remove by adjusting the editing view.
Now let’s focus on the classes and editing views that were set up to create this
model. First open the Salary Allocation class.
This class is keyed by Employee, Department and Account. This means that
each row in the class must be identified by a combination of these three
elements. On the class columns dialog click the Lookups button (top right) to
reveal the lookups section of the dialog.
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The first two columns of the class (Annual salary per employee and benefits
percentage) are automatically populated from another class containing this data.
To look at how data in this lookup class is organized, open the Salary Data
version as illustrated below.
This class / version contains salary data keyed by employee. Please explore
how this class (also called Salary Data) has been set up.
Note This is a simple example of how lookups can be used. Using these
techniques, classes can be set up to perform a variety of modeling functions,
including lookups of such things as standard costs, prices etc.
There is one other aspect of this salary budgeting model we should examine
before moving on, and that is an FMW Enterprise Add-in that has been
developed to summarize and post the results from the Salary budget into the
Operating budget.
An Add-in in a piece of customized business logic that is usually specific
to a particular application or customer. Add-ins are a very important part
of the FMW Enterprise functionality. Because budgeting and planning
applications of any complexity usually require some customized logic, we
provide a simple interface (API) where this custom logic can be developed
by a customer, and easily hooked into FMW Enterprise, without requiring
any modification to the base system.
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Return to the Salary allocation view as show below.
On the control bar in the window you will see this button. Click it and you
will be presented with a list of available Add-in functions (in this case there
is only one). Double click on the add-in called Post Salaries to Operating. Once
the add-in is completed (should be virtually instantaneous) we can have a look at
our operating budget and we will see the data has been summarized and posted.
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This is one example (and a relatively trivial one at that) of an Add-in. There are
several other places in FMW Enterprise (e.g. Interfaces to other third party
systems) where add-ins are employed. By using add-ins, FMW Enterprise can
be transformed into a highly specialized application platform, without in any way
modifying the base system. Some examples include specialized revenue
calculations, employee benefits calculations and depreciation calculations.
If you would like further details on classes, calendars and editing views please
refer to sections 04, 06 and 09 of the FMW User Guide.
Versions
We have been using versions all along in order to access our data. As you might
have gathered, a version is simply a repository for a collection of data. Typically,
versions are defined for such things as YTD Actuals (usually populated from the
General Ledger), various budget versions, reforecasts, and masterfile data
(standard costs, prices, salary data, floor space etc.). As many versions as
required can be established.
Note a single version can contain data for more that once Class. Remember, a
class simply defines a format or template for data. This means that a single
version can contain multiple data formats. In addition a single version can
contain data for multiple years. There is no need to set up a new version for a
new year.
Several example of how data within a version is accessed have been dealt with
above, but there are some other aspects of Versions that we should look at.
From the Map, do a right button click over the Budget version, and select
Properties.
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A tabbed dialog appears. The first tab defines Version-Class relationships. This
is used to control which class(es) of data can be stored in which versions. In this
example the Budget version is allowed to contain data from all established
classes except Salary Data.
Now click on the other tab called Version-Class-Year controls.
This dialog is used to apply some other controls to a Version-Class-Year
combination. Under Update Methods there are two options. The Balances
method refers to the editing method we have been demonstrating in the above
section. If we unchecked this option the data could still be viewed using the
spreadsheet interface, but would not be editable (except by those users who are
defined as FMW Enterprise Administrators).
The second update method is Journal Entry. Although we have not covered this
in this guide, FMW Enterprise includes a Journal Entry system. This is often
used for budget transfers. A typical scenario as to how these update methods
would be used in where a budget is open to users to update with either method
during the budget development phase, but once the budget is approved, only the
Journal Entry method is allowed. This ensures that all budget adjustments which
increase one area are offset by a corresponding decrease in another area.
In addition to the Update Methods controls, specific class columns can be locked
and a version can be locked against being manipulated by certain functions
available within FMW Enterprise. An example of applying locks to columns might
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be where we have a version representing a first quarter reforecast, where the
first three months’ data are Actuals. We might wish to restrict our users to
updating only the data in the final 9 months.
Note the controls described here are system-wide controls. A much finer level of
control over with lines (e.g. accounts, departments) within a version are
updateable by, or even visible to, specific users is available through the Access
Manager.
Data can easily be copied from one version to another. Let’s implement a simple
scenario whereby we wish to set up a second version of our budget called
Management Budget. Initially, we will copy the Budget as is into the
Management Budget. We will then lock our Budget version to further updates,
but allow users to make adjustments to the Management Budget.
First create the Management Budget version. Do a right button click on the
Financial Group on the Map (under Versions) and select New. Then complete
the two wizard-style dialogs as shown above.
Once the Save button is clicked the version will be created and will appear under
the Financial group in the Map. The new version is created but contains no data.
To copy data from the Budget version to the Management Budget, click on the
Budget version and drag and drop over the Management Budget version.
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A dialog appears, which allows you to specify parameters for the copy. Looking
at this dialog you will notice that the areas specifying the Copy From and Copy
To parameters have already been completed by the drag and drop operation. In
the section below this we are able to select specific subsets of data to be copied,
either in terms of a hierarchy node or a range of key elements. For this exercise,
leave the rest of the dialog as is and click the OK button.
The copy function is an example of one where the operation is performed on a
background thread, which means that once the operation is submitted the user
can continue with other tasks while this process is running. The process monitor
window appears, which reports the status of the operation.
Because we do not have very much data, this copy operation should not take
more that a few seconds to complete. Once completed you can enter the
Management Budget version as demonstrated above and have a look at the
data.
The final thing to do here is to lock the Budget version against further updates.
Right button click on the Budget version and select Properties. Click on the
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Version-Class-Year tab and uncheck the Balances and Journal entry checkboxes
under the Update Methods sections.
Note because you are probably set up as an FMW Administrator this action
would not prevent you from editing the Budget version. However regular users
would no longer be able to edit the budget.
If you would like further details on versions please refer to section 08 of the FMW
User Guide.
Reports
FMW Enterprise includes a powerful report generator. The Setup Wizard created
a simple report sample. In this section we will.
! Make a copy of this sample report
! Make some changes to the copied report
! Analyze the components of the report design in detail
! Create another report from scratch
Copying and changing an existing report
To copy the report, open the Reports node on the Map. Then open the Budget
reports group. Right button click on the Operating by Organization report and
select the Copy item from the tear-off menu.
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In the Copy Report dialog, change the report name to Quarterly Operating
Budget and click the OK button. The copied report will appear in the Map.
Execute the new report by double clicking on its icon from the Map.
75
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Select the nodes as shown above from the Organization tree and click OK. The
report will execute (this might take 20 seconds or so) and the results will appear
in a report viewing window.
Now let’s list the changes we want to make.
!
We will separate the expenses and revenues row sections and give each
a subtotal. In addition we will display the revenue line(s) as positive
numbers.
!
We will change the column configuration to be quarters instead of
months.
!
In the header area we will change the title of the report and the
positioning and appearance of some of the header items.
Click on the design button at the top of the report. This will take us into the
report layout manager, from where we can effect these changes. The
layout manager is a graphical representation of the report components, which
can be manipulated in order to give us the required result.
We will adjust the row configuration first (although there is no requirement that
you change components in any particular order). You will notice that two logical
rows are defined in this report, namely a logical row called All Accounts and
another one for the row total.
The All Accounts row is defined as a detail type row. This means that although
it appears in the layout manager as one row, it explodes into multiple rows (in
this case accounts) in the report. This means that report rows can be set up as
groups or ranges of elements (in this case accounts) rather that setting up each
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row individually. This has major advantages from a maintenance perspective.
The TOTAL row is a calculated row and will appear on the report as in the layout
manager.
We will want to define the following rows.
Revenue Accounts (details)
Revenue Total (calculated)
Blank line (to separate revenue and expenses)
Expense Accounts (details)
Expense Total (calculated)
Blank Line
Total Revenue less Expenses
The easiest way to create the rows is to duplicate the first row and then modify it.
Highlight the All Accounts row by clicking the gray area to the left of the row
(just like in a spreadsheet when you wish to highlight a whole row). Click
the ‘+’ button on the button bar four times and the first row will be
duplicated.
Highlight the first row again and do a right button click. Select the Properties
item from the tear off menu.
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In the row definition dialog, change the row caption to “Revenue Accounts”. In
the Row Data Limitations area, limit the accounts appearing in this row to those
starting with a 4, by using the wildcard character, as illustrated. Click the OK
button. An underlying dialog will appear. Click the Close button and you will
return to the layout manager.
Highlight the second row on the layout manager, do a right button click again and
select Properties from the tear-off menu. We will make this row a calculated row,
representing the total of all revenue accounts appearing in the first row.
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Change the row definition as illustrated above and click OK on this dialog and
Close on the next dialog to get back to the layout manager. The next row will be
a blank line to separate the revenue and expense sections. Highlight the third
row as before, do a right button click and select Properties.
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Change the row definition as illustrated above and click OK on this dialog and
close on the next dialog to get back to the layout manager.
Change the other rows as follows:
Row 4: Change caption to Expense Accounts
Change Row Data Limitations to a wildcard of 5* (all accounts
starting with 5)
Row 5: Change caption to Total Expenses
Change type to Calculated
Change calculation string to R4 (total of all account appearing in
row 4)
Row 6: No changes required (blank line)
Row 7: Total – change calculation to R2-R5
At this point let’s execute the report again by clicking on the Report button
just above the report display window. The result should be as follows.
Note you will notice that the revenue line now displays as positive, even though
internally natural account credit values (revenue, liabilities) are stored as
negatives. This display occurs because the report recognized that this row
consists of revenue accounts only. However you need to be careful when using
calculations which refer to a row where the display has been reversed, because
the calculation needs to take into account that the number is a negative, even
though it is displayed as positive.
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One other thing we need on the row definition is to somehow highlight the total
expenses and total revenues rows so that they stand out from the other rows.
We could put overscores or underscores, but for now let’s simply change the font
for these rows to bold.
Click the design button to return to the report layout manager.
Highlight each total row in turn (as we did before) and click the
Bold button on the Button bar. Then click the report button to return to the report.
These rows should now be displayed in bold.
Now we will deal with changing the columns from monthly to quarterly. Click the
design button to return to the layout manager. First we will delete all the columns
except the last five (which we will adjust to look at 4 quarters and a total). To
delete a column, highlight the whole column (in a similar fashion to how we
highlighted the row, by clicking on the gray area just above the column) and do a
right button click. From the tear off menu select the Delete option. The column
will disappear. We need to delete the columns one by one. The result should be
as follows.
Now highlight the first column, do a right button click, and select Properties from
the tear-off menu.
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From the Column definitions dialog (illustrated above) change the Period box
(circled) to Qtr 1. You will recognize this as a roll-up level from the Fiscal Year
calendar that we examined earlier. Then click the Replace button (right hand
side of the dialog). At this point we could go back to the layout manager and
repeat the process. However, instead of doing this, stay on this dialog, and
simply select the next column (currently called October) from the listbox on the
right hand side of the dialog, change the period to Qtr 2 and click replace.
Repeat this for the next two columns (changing to Qtr 3 and Qtr 4), remembering
to click Replace each time.
When the quarterly columns are defined click on the Total column. You will notice
that this is defined as a calculated column (instead of a data column) and the
calculation string is defined as c1..c4, which means the sum of columns 1 to 4.
Click the Close button and return to the layout manager. Now execute the report
again by clicking the Report button on the button bar immediately above the
report window and examine the result.
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Click back into design mode. We will now adjust the header area to something
more appropriate.
To change the position of a header component, click on the
component (such as a title). It should become outlined with a black
box. Simply drag into the required position, or use the alignment buttons to
reposition.
To change the contents of a text type header component (such as the report title)
double click on it and it will become outlined in red. You can then edit the text.
While in this mode also use a right button click to access a menu with formatting
options for the font and background colors.
To add a heading component do a right button click over the area where you
wish the component to appear, and select the appropriate type from the tear-off
menu.
Using these techniques adjust the header area to look as follows.
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Once the header area is adjusted to your satisfaction, execute the report
again by clicking the report button on the button bar.
Hopefully this exercise has given you an idea for how reports are developed and
adjusted in FMW Enterprise. Now we will back up a little, and look at the report
definition of this report in more depth, before developing a report from scratch in
the next section.
Report design components
Click back to the layout manager (you should know how to do this by now!).
From the button bar just above the report, click on the Report Definitions
button (top left). This will bring up a series of tabbed dialogs describing all
the report characteristics. You have seen a number of these dialogs
before, but we will look at them more closely in relation to this report. We will not
look at every possible option on each dialog because this is beyond the
scope of this guide, but we will look at the most important.
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FMW Enterprise reports are fundamentally defined in three dimensions, namely
the Page, Row and Column. In addition we can also apply certain special
formatting options at the Cell (intersection of row/column) level. Having executed
reports several times you should be familiar with how pages, rows and columns
appear on a report.
On the Page definition tab the most important section relates to how the page
break is defined. If you recall, when we executed this report, a selection box
popped up containing our Organization hierarchy. This allowed us to select one
or more nodes of the hierarchy, which in turn appeared as one or more logical
pages in the report. The term “logical page” is used here because when the
report is printed of course if a single logical page is too long for the physical page
it will continue on a second printed page.
The reason the report has this page characteristic is because we have defined
the report page break as being the Organization hierarchy. If for example we
wanted to see a different logical page for each Department, we would select
Element / Department as our page break option. The last option for page breaks
is None. This is used where the report essentially consists of a single logical
page, such as a corporate balance sheet.
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The next area, called Selection, defines whether we see a pop-up selection box
for the pages at run time or not. Because we have Select at Run-time clicked,
every time we run the report we are able to specify a different page selection. If
the report were always to be run against the same selection we can pre-define
the page selection by using the Select Now option and then specifying the pages
by using the Select… button.
Now click to the Rows tab.
This dialog is used to define the overall characteristics of the row and the drilldown levels. On the left of the dialog is a list of available elements and hierarchy
levels. These are moved, using the Add>> and <<Remove buttons, to the list in
the middle of the dialog to define the row and drill down characteristics.
In this report the row element is Account (first item in the list) with a drill down to
Department (a red plus sign identifies a drill down).
Important Each report has one, and only one, element or hierarchy level
defining the row. All individual rows are then defined as groupings of these
element or hierarchy levels. Up to six drill-downs using other elements and
hierarchy levels can then be defined.
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In this case both the main row and the drill down are defined in terms of elements
rather than hierarchy levels. We will look further on at an example of how we can
use hierarchy levels to define rows and drill downs as well.
Another important section on this dialog is the Drill-down Options. This
determines how the drill downs appear. Because we have the “Produce totals for
drill downs” options selected, each drill down level will have its own subtotals.
The “Expand drill downs on startup” option, if selected, would automatically
reveal all drill down levels on the report when it is executed, as opposed to
having the user drill-down on each row as required. The “Drill down to item level”
refers to the line items that we created when dealing with editing the Operating
budget (see the Editing the Budget section in Chapter 3). If this option is
checked there will be an additional drill down level for line items, which will
appear below any other defined drilldowns.
Now let’s look at the individual row definitions, which appear in the listbox on the
right of this dialog. We accessed these previously by highlighting a row from the
layout manager, but we can also access a row definition from this dialog by doing
a right button click over the appropriate row in the listbox. Bring up the definition
for the row entitled revenue accounts.
You should be somewhat familiar with this dialog from the previous exercise, but
we need to explain a couple of other aspects of the row definition.
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Note It is important to remember that this dialog is essentially used to define a
grouping or subset of the main element or hierarchy level (in this case the
Account element) used by the overall row definition, as selected on the previous
dialog.
Under the row display options it should be clear as to what a Caption Only /Blank
Line and Calculated row are used for. The difference between a Details and
Consolidated row type bears some further explanation. If we consider this row
definition as an example, it includes all revenue accounts (as defined by the
wildcard in the Row Data Limitations section). If we assume that there are five
revenue accounts that fall within this range, choosing the Details option here
would display all five accounts on the report, each as a separate line. If we
instead chose the Consolidated option, the five revenue accounts would be
summed, and displayed as a single line on the report.
Related to the Display options are the Row Caption options. The first option will
force the caption from the edit box to be displayed on each line created for this
report row. The second options will display both the element id and description
(for example 4-1000 License Revenue), while the third option would display the
description only (e.g. License Revenue). Which Caption options are available
will depend on the Row Display option selected.
The section at the top right of the dialog is used for formatting purposes, for
example to put a line under a subtotal. The other options should be reasonably
self-evident.
The Row Data Limitations section of the dialog is used to define a range or group
of row elements that are to appear within this logical row. This can be
expressed as a wildcard arrangement (use * to mask multiple characters or ? to
mask a single character) or as a from-to range or ranges. Multiple wildcard
strings or ranges within a single row definition can be specified.
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Close this dialog by clicking OK. Click to the Columns tab.
On the right of this dialog is a list with the columns that have been defined from
the report. To select the definition for a column simply click on it in the listbox.
Previously we accessed the column definition by highlighting a column from the
layout manager and then selecting Properties from the tear-off menu. This
brought us to exactly the same point.
In the Column Caption section we define the headings that will appear on top of
the columns. There are three lines available. In any one of the lines we can key
in a heading or we can drop down the combo box list to give us one of the three
variable headings, namely <Year>, <Column> or <Version>. The advantage of
using a variable is that the year or month, for example, might be varied by a runtime selection, and the selected month or year will then automatically appear in
the column header.
Under the Column Type area we can specify which type of column this is. We
have seen the two major types, namely Data and Calculated columns, in our
earlier example. The combination description type allows us to define a column
to display a combination description. If you do not remember what a combination
description is please refer to the previous section on editing a budget, where we
dealt with an example of a combination description.
The final column type is an Additional Relationship column. This allows us to
display a relationship from a hierarchy. This is used typically when we have two
or more hierarchies rolling up the same element, and while one hierarchy is used
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in the report to define pages and / or rows, we need to display some relationships
out of the other. For example if our department element is rollup up into an
Organization hierarchy as well as a Responsibility hierarchy, we might wish to
drive the report off the Organization hierarchy but display the Responsibility in a
column opposite the department. If we define a column as being an Additional
Relationship type, the hierarchy and level to be displayed must be defined in the
area at the bottom of the dialog called Additional Relationships. Below is a
simple example, where the last column is defined as an Additional Relationship
type.
If the column is a Data type, the Data selections area is used to define the source
of the data. The source is defined primarily in terms of a Class, Version and
Year. The year can be specified as <Current>, which means that it will default to
the system-defined current period, which can also be overridden at run-time by
the person executing the report.
The data column also needs to define a Period. This is any node on the
Calendar used for the Class, for example if could be a month (April) or a Quarter
(Qtr 2) where a standard calendar is used. The YTD switch can then be used to
specify whether the data displayed should be cumulative to the period specified,
or simply for the period specified only. The period can also be specified as
<Current> and this works the same way as described above for the Year.
An important aspect of column definitions is Column Limitations. The Data
Selection obviously limits the data displayed in a column to the Class-VersionYear-Period specified but we may also wish to further limit the data by either
using an element range or a hierarchy node range. This is useful in a variety of
situations, but one example is where we wish to create a cross-tab type report,
where for example each column displays a different department. Each column
would then be limited to a department or range of departments.
In the case of a Calculated column we need to define a calculation string or
formula. The notation C1+C2… etc, should be used, where Cx represents
column x. +,-, *, / and () are valid operators as well as the .. operator, for
example C1..C7 will sum columns 1 through 7.
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Finally, we can also control the number of decimals displayed and the format of
the numbers displayed, by changing the options on the bottom right of the dialog.
Next click to the Cells tab. Cell exceptions allow us to define some formatting
characteristics based on the value found in a column / row intersection.
In this example, for the Total columns, and for all rows, if the value is less than
zero, we will display the value in red. Have a look at some of the other options
available by dropping down the Action combo box. This capability can be used
for exception reporting, for example we might choose to display only rows where
the Variance % (in a column) is greater that 12%.
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Finally, click to the Setup tab. This defines some overall report characteristics.
Apart from the report name and group, the other characteristics are as follows.
!
Display Natural Account Credits as positive: This means that if a
report row consists entirely of revenue or liability accounts, it will
automatically be displayed as positive, even though credit amounts are
stored as negative numbers in the database.
!
Negatives as (). All negative numbers will be displayed in brackets as
opposed to using a leading negative (-) sign.
!
Grid: These will switch parts of the grid on or off.
!
Rounding: These options will round the report as selected.
This brings us to the end of our tour of an existing report. Hopefully this gives
you an idea of how a report is defined, and how these report definitions can be
manipulated to view your data in virtually any way you wish. Next we will create
a new report completely from scratch
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Creating a new report
In this section we will step you through the process of creating a completely new
report, rather than modifying an existing report as we have done so far. Firstly
let’s start by looking at the result we want to achieve, which is illustrated below.
This report has the Account as the page dimension (i.e. a different account will
be displayed on each page. At the row level, we have Division (a level of the
Organization tree) as the top level row, with a drill down to Unit (the second level
of the tree) and then a drill down to Department (an element). The columns
consist of year-to-date budget and actual with a variance and variance
percentage.
Firstly, some housekeeping is needed. We need to create some data in the
Actual version so that something shows in the Actual column of the report.
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Note Usually the Actuals version is updated via an interface to the General
Ledger. However for demonstration purpose we will simply copy some data from
the Budget to the Actual, although this is obviously not something you would do
in practice.
Copy data from the budget to the actual version (we explained in detail how to do
version copies earlier in this guide) by dragging the Budget icon (under versions)
and dropping it on top of the Actuals icon.
In the resulting dialog put in the parameters as illustrated below (put in 90% at
the bottom right, as a copy factor, which will copy each line to the target version
at 90% of the source version).
Click OK and the data will be copied. Next let’s change our system-wide current
period from January to June. Under the Administration menu item on the main
menu, choose System Tasks.
Chapter 4 Extending the model
This will bring up a dialog as follows.
Click on the Periods radio button and make sure the Fiscal Year calendar is
selected. Then click June. Click Apply and OK to exit the dialog.
Note Once the current period is changed, it impacts all reports driven off the
current period of that calendar, throughout the system. However, the current
period may be overridden by a user when generating a report.
95
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Now we are ready to start defining the report. On the report icon of the Map, do
a right button click and select New from the tear-off menu.
This will bring up to a series of report definition dialogs, which should by now be
fairly familiar, arranged in a wizard format. Complete the Page dialog as follows.
The Page break is defined by the Account element. Under Selection we specify
that we wish to select the Pages (i.e. Accounts) at run-time. On the bottom right,
under Page Title, we specify that we wish to display as a page header both the
Account number and description. Click next which will bring us to the Rows
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dialog. Here we will define the overall row characteristics, as well as individual
rows.
In the left hand list box in the Rows and Drill-downs section, all available
elements and hierarchy levels appear. Select in turn Organization.Division,
Organization.Unit and Department, and click the Add button to move them into
the other box. This defines our row (top item) and drill down (items with red plus
sign) levels. Next, under drill-down options click the Produce Totals for Drilldown checkbox, which means that when we expand a drill-down on the report
each level will be sub-totaled.
Now that we have defined the overall row and drill down characteristics we need
to define actual rows, either as groupings of divisions or as calculated rows. Click
the New Row button on the right of the dialog.
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Complete the dialog as shown. Be careful to get all the attributes set correctly.
This row will contain all available divisions (i.e. we will not limit it in any way).
Each division will be displayed as a separate line on the report (Details type row).
Be careful to select the Caption option shown. Click the OK button to return to
the main Rows dialog. At this point we will only define one row (we could
continue adding rows here, or we can add other rows later from the layout
manager, as we will do here) and will move on to the Columns dialog by clicking
Next.
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Complete this dialog as shown. When the Column Type, Data Selections and
Column Caption Options are completed, click the New button (right of the dialog)
to add the column. We could continue adding columns here, but instead we will
continue to the next dialog and add further columns from the layout manager.
Click the Next button. This will bring us to the Cell Exceptions dialog (not
illustrated here). We will not use this dialog here. Click Next again.
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This will bring us to the final dialog in this series. Complete as shown, and click
the Layout button. This will bring us to the layout manager.
We will use the layout manager to complete our report. Firstly we need to add
three columns. Highlight the first (data) column (1999 Budget June) and
click the green + button on the button bar three times.
This will replicate the existing column. We can then edit each new column in
turn, by highlighting it, and doing a right button click, and selecting Properties
from the tear off menu.
Hint: To highlight a column, use the small gray area just above the column. The
column will turn black.
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When the Columns dialog appears, change the parameters as required, and
don’t forget to click the Replace button. The dialogs for each of the three
columns are shown below.
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On the last column please note the changes to the Formatting section.
On returning to layout manager, it should look as follows.
Now let’s add a blank row and a row for the total. Just as we replicated the
columns, highlight the All divisions row (by clicking the gray area to the left of this
row) and click the green ‘+’ sign on the main button bar twice. Then highlight
each of the two new rows in turn, do a right button click, and select Properties
from the tear-off menu. In the dialogs that appear, change as follows.
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Note when you exit from these dialogs you will be returned to the Rows dialog,
not the Layout manager. Simply click Close on the Rows dialog to return to the
layout manager.
Now that the columns and rows are defined let’s create some headings. To
place a heading in the header area, do a right button click and select one of the
options from the tear off menu. To change the format of a header (e.g. font,
background color), click it, and then do a right button click to get a menu of
options. To edit a text header double click it.
The following illustrates some different header types.
Now we are ready to execute the report. Click the Extract button at the top of
the layout manager window, and the selection box will appear.
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The report selection list displays the accounts because this is what we specified
as being how our Page dimension is defined. Note at the top of the dialog the
current period and year appears, which can be overridden here for the purposes
of this report iteration.
Click the OK button and after a few seconds the report should appear. Drill down
on the rows to reveal each subsequent level. Use the combo box at the top to
switch between pages.
Hopefully you are now sufficiently familiar with the report design mechanism to
switch back and forth between the report mode and the design mode and make
any other adjustments or changes that you require.
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Other components
Before wrapping up this extended tutorial, we will cover a couple of other
components of the FMW Enterprise system, namely Memos and the Process
Monitor.
Memos
Memos are on-line documents that are created in the FMW Enterprise database
and made available to all authorized FMW Enterprise users. They are typically
used for communicating budget instructions, budget schedules and various types
of procedures.
To create a memo do a right button click on the Memos icon on the Map and
select New from the tear-off menu.
An editing window will appear. This is a rich-text editor similar to the Wordpad
editor in Windows. Use the various buttons on the button bar to copy, paste,
print, change font characteristics, delete, undo, search etc. Text can be copied in
from a word processor through the clipboard. Extended font capabilities are
available under the Edit | Font menu item.
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When completed click the Save button on the button bar. The following
dialog will appear.
Provide a Memo title and either key in a group name, or select an existing memo
group from the drop-down combo box, entitled Memo Group. Click OK to save
the memo to the database, and it will appear in the Map under the group you
specified.
This memo will now be available to all FMW Enterprise users (unless access has
been restricted through the Access Manager). When it first appears in a user’s
Map, the icon representing the memo will not contain the red check mark. When
the memo is opened and read by the user, the red check mark will appear on the
icon, and if there are several memos, memos which have been opened by the
user will drop to the bottom of this list.
Process Monitor
FMW Enterprise makes extensive use of multi-threading. This means that when
a process requires more than a few seconds to execute, it is put on a
background thread, which frees up the workstation so that the user can continue
with other tasks. This means for example that a user can run multiple reports at
the same time. Some processes that are executed on background threads
include reports, copies, reforecasts, allocations and add-in routines.
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In order to track the progress of background processes that are executing, FMW
Enterprise includes a Process Monitor. You have seen this several times during
the course of this tutorial, because at times it is automatically invoked. However
to manually invoke the process monitor, double click the Processes icon on the
Map.
The above window will appear. Listed are both completed and running
processes. You can monitor the status of a particular process by referring to the
Status column for the particular process being monitored.
Note if your user id is set up as an FMW Enterprise system administrator you will
see in the process monitor not only your own processes but every other users’
processes as well. This is a useful means for an administrator to monitor overall
activity in the system.
This monitor list can get long and should be regularly cleaned up by
deleting old process records. To do this, highlight the rows you want to
delete and click the red ‘X’ button from the button bar.
Conclusion
We hope that this tutorial has provided you with the background you need to
understand how FMW Enterprise may be adapted to meet your application’s
requirements. In the next section we will introduce a number of other FMW
Enterprise capabilities, which can even further extend the usefulness of your
application.
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Chapter 5 Advanced features and tools
Chapter 5.
109
Advanced features and tools
This chapter provides a brief introduction to some other FMW Enterprise capabilities and
tools. It is not intended to be a comprehensive guide to using these features, but where
appropriate the user is referred to other FMW Enterprise documentation.
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Introduction
In previous sections you have seen how the FMW Enterprise data warehouse is
configured and how data is input, edited and reported. Apart from these basic
capabilities, FMW Enterprise includes a variety of other tools and functions,
which allow you to extend and automate your application to a truly remarkable
degree. This chapter provides an introduction to the most important of these
capabilities. While this is by no means a comprehensive reference, you should
have an awareness of what these features are and how they might be applied in
your application.
Access Administrator
The access administrator allows an FMW Enterprise system administrator to
customize views for individual users and completely control access to the FMW
Enterprise database, by granting access by user to objects and functions in the
FMW database. The access that a user has to the database determines the
items that will be seen in the users’ Map or in selection lists. For example if a
user has no access to a specific report it will not appear on his Map. If a user
has no access to an element item such as a department it will not appear in any
selection list. This means that each user’s view of the FMW Enterprise
database can be fully customized so that it appears to be a “private” database.
In general the following access attributes are applied to objects and elements.
!
None : The user will have no access to the object and will not see
the object in the Map or on any pick list.
!
View: The user will have view access to the object but will not be
able to change it in any way.
!
Modify: The user will be able to modify the object but will not be able
to delete it or add new sub-objects.
!
Add: The user can view, modify and add new objects for the object
type.
!
Unlimited: The user has unlimited rights to an object, including the
right to delete it.
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The functions to administer access are only available to users who are defined
as FMW Enterprise system administrators, and are accessed through the
Administration | Access Administration menu item.
When this option is chosen a series of tabbed dialogs is presented. These are
used to administer access.
Functions
Each FMW Enterprise function has a default security attribute associated with it.
These default security attributes are used as the initial values when building a
new Security Profile (next dialog). The functions are preset and cannot be
changed.
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Profiles
A profile contains a set of security attributes for object types / functions within
FMW Enterprise. Users attached to the profile will then inherit the rights
specified in the profile. These rights can be further modified on a per user basis.
Key in a profile name in the combo box at the top or select an existing profile
from the combo box. Make the necessary changes against each object type.
Click Apply or OK and the profile will be modified (if existing) or created.
Users and Object security
When an object is added to the FMW Enterprise database (e.g. a new report ) a
security record for each user, defining the type of access that the user has to the
object, is automatically created. The rights granted on the object are initially
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determined by referencing the Profile to which the user is attached. Also, when a
user is initially established in FMW Enterprise he needs to be attached to a
profile.
Note Before a user can be defined as an FMW Enterprise user and given rights
to objects, the user needs to have been established by your database
administrator in the database management system.
A list of database users is contained in the combo box on the top left of the
dialog. To access the object rights for an existing user or to set up a new user,
select the user from this drop down list. If this user is not yet defined to FMW
Enterprise (i.e. the user has not been attached to a profile) the Profiles combo
box on the right of the dialog will display <New Value> and there will be no
object security records displayed in the bottom of the dialog. Either select a
profile from the Profiles combo to which this user is to be attached, or
alternatively click the Copy button and select a user whose security you wish to
duplicate for the new user. The object security records for the user will be
created based on the existing objects in the system and the profile security
attributes for each object type.
Determine whether the user will be an FMW Enterprise System Administrator or
not by adjusting the Yes/No control. Only a user defined as an Administrator will
be able to use the Access Administration functions and the System Tasks
functions.
Override the security attributes initially defined by the profile for each object, as
required. Click the Apply button to save adjustments.
This dialog can also be used to change the profile to which a user is attached.
Simply select an existing user and select a new profile for the existing user.
An alternative view of this is available on the next tab whereby an object can be
selected and all users are listed.
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Element security
Element security refers to access rights to individual element items, for example
cost centers, products, projects or departments, by a user.
One convenient way of creating element security for a user or users is by
referencing a hierarchy (tree) which already defines an element roll-up. This
allows you to define security at a higher level, rather than on an element-byelement basis. Use the Elements from Tree (hierarchy) tab to do this.
In the above example the two users specified will be given Modify access to all
Department element items which roll up into the Finance node of the
Organization tree. In addition they will have None (No) access to any
departments not rolling up into this node.
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Element security can also be defined for a user on an item-by-item basis, by
using the Elements by User and Elements by Id tabs.
From the combo boxes at the top of the dialog, select the User/Element
combination for which you need to adjust security.
For each user security can be applied at an element item level. For example a
database might have 1000 departments defined. However an individual user
may only have an interest in only 5 of them. In this case he would possibly be
given Unlimited access to the 5 and no access (None) to all the others. Click the
Apply button to apply the changes.
An alternative view of element items is also available where a specific element
item can be selected and all user security for that element item listed.
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Logins
All currently logged on users are listed on this dialog. This allows you to monitor
who is currently logged on to FMW Enterprise.
Data transformations
Reforecasts
The reforecast facility allows the creation of reforecast data by combining a Base
version and a version containing To date (usually year-to-date) amounts. The
results are placed in a Reforecast version. Two calculation alternatives are
provided:
Default method In this method the reforecast is simply the base amount with
the amounts up to the To Date period replaced by the To Date amounts example
Base
YTD
Ref.
J
$10
$15
$15
F
20
25
25
M
30
20
20
A
30
10
10
M
40
J
20
J
20
A
20
S
25
O
45
N
55
D
10
40
20
20
20
25
45
55
10
TOT
325
70
305
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Proportional method In this method the reforecast will always equal the To
Date amounts up to the Period specified in the dialog. The remaining periods are
calculated in proportion to the base version amounts, so that the final forecast
total = X% x the base total version amount. - example
(100%, p4)
J
Base $10
YTD
$15
Ref.
$15
F
20
25
25
M
30
20
20
A
30
10
10
M
40
J
20
J
20
A
20
S
25
O
45
N
55
D
10
43
22
22
22
27
49
59
11
To create a reforecast select the Reforecast icon in the Map (under Operations)
and do a right button mouse click. Select the New option.
TOT
325
70
325
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To create the parameters for a reforecast, which can then be re-executed at any
time, complete the dialog as follows:
!
Name : Provide a name for this reforecast.
!
Class : Choose the Class of data for which this reforecast will be run.
!
Base Version/Year : This is usually a budget or previous reforecast
version.
!
To Date Version/Year : This is usually the version containing YTD
Actuals imported from the General Ledger.
!
Reforecast Version/Year : This is where the reforecast data will be
created.
!
Clear Existing : Select this option if you wish all existing data to be
cleared from the Reforecast version/year prior to doing the reforecast.
!
Proportional Method and Percentage : If you wish to use the
Proportional method (see above) check this option and specify a target
percentage.
!
To Date period : Select the period up to which the to date amounts are
to be used. For example a first quarter reforecast using March YTD
actuals (assuming a Year starting in January) would specify March here.
!
Hierarchy : The data to be reforecast can be limited to that rolling up
into a specific node of a hierarchy. If this is how you wish to limit the
data click the checkbox and select the hierarchy and the node.
!
Key element ranges : Data to be reforecast can also be limited by
ranges of key elements. If you wish to limit the data by an element range
turn the checkbox opposite the element off and enter a from-to range for
the element.
Click OK or Apply to save the reforecast for later execution. It will appear in the
map under the Operations | Reforecasts item.
To execute a reforecast, double click the icon representing the reforecast on the
Map. It will be executed on a background thread and its progress can be
monitored via the process monitor. Alternatively, a reforecast can be executed
through FMW Scheduler.
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Add-ins
It is often necessary to execute business logic within FMW Enterprise that is
specific to your requirements and cannot be supplied using the generalized FMW
Enterprise facilities. In order to do this, FMW Enterprise contains an Add-in
capability, which allows you to add custom logic to the system without having to
modify the base system.
There are 4 types of add-ins:
!
Custom These are add-ins which perform some kind of data
transformation (e.g. a specialized revenue calculation, a depreciation
calculation etc. ). In the tutorial, a custom add-in to post salary details to
the Operating budget, was created.
!
Import This is an add-in which is executed as part of the import
capability. It is used to transform data from a source system (often a
General Ledger) into a format that FMW Enterprise can read.
!
Export This is an add-in which is executed as part of the export
capability. It is used to transform data extracted from FMW Enterprise
into a format readable by a destination system.
!
Lookup This supplies specialized logic to populate an FMW Enterprise
column in an editing view. An example of this might be a lookup of pay
rates from a HR system in a salary budgeting application.
These add-ins are either developed internally in accordance with specifications
issued by RAC Software or by RAC Software on your behalf. These functions
must be developed as either stored procedures or DLL’s and registered in FMW
under the Add-In section under System Tasks (see Administration menu items)
by your system administrator.
Allocations
An allocation is used to allocate amounts based on a “pool” of data to other lines.
It is used most commonly for applications such as allocating overheads to
revenue streams.
To create an allocation, select the Allocation icon in the Map (under Operations)
and do a right button mouse click. Select the New option.
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A wizard - style series of dialogs will appear. The first dialog defines the pool of
data which will form the source (base or pool) for the allocation.
Complete this dialog as follows.
!
Version/Class/Year : Choose a Version/Class/Year combination for the
source data. Then limit the data selection by using a hierarchy node or a
set of key ranges.
!
Hierarchy : The data to be included in the source can be limited to that
rolling up into a specific node of a hierarchy. If this is how you wish to
limit the data click the checkbox and select the hierarchy and the node.
!
Key element ranges : Data to be included in the source can also be
limited by ranges of key elements. If you wish to limit the data by an
element range turn the checkbox opposite the element off and enter a
from-to range for the element.
Click the Next button to bring up the next dialog which is used to define how the
allocation source amount will be allocated to line items.
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Complete this dialog as follows:
!
Target Version/Year : Select the target version/year where the
allocation results will be generated.
!
Defining the allocation lines (% or amount based) : Each line is
defined by a class key (input each key segment, or alternatively, doing a
right button click in the segment cell will bring up a pick list), whether the
allocation result will be added to an existing value for the key specified
and a percentage of the source pool that will be allocated to this key
(line).
If the % area is clicked (above the column), a static $ amount can be
used instead of a percentage. In this case the allocation source pool
amount will be ignored.
!
Defining the allocation lines (lookup) : Click the Lookup button on the
dialog. The Version/Class/Year where the lookup factors are stored
must be specified. The line items are defined the same as for
percentage based calculations (above) except that instead of a
percentage a lookup element is specified as well as a period-by-period
specification.
For example we could have a two allocation lines defined as follows:
Chapter 5 Advanced features and tools
Account
5100
5100
Cost Center
1000
2000
122
Lookup Element Id
1000
2000
We might have a lookup class/version storing floor space by cost center
as follows
Center
1000
2000
Total
Floor Space
5200.23
1000.55
6200.78
If the source pool worked out to be $10000 it would be allocated to line 1
as follows
10000 x (5200.23/6200.78)
and line 2 as
10000 x (1000.23/6200.78)
Note : Only classes made up of a single key element can be used as lookup
classes.
Click the Next button to bring up the final dialog in the series, which is used to
Name the allocation and provide some additional parameters.
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Complete this dialog as follows:
!
Allocation : Name of the allocation set
!
Allocation Group : Which allocation group the allocation should be
included in. Either select an existing group or key in the name of a
new one.
!
Run Order : When the whole allocation group is executed as a
single stream this specifies the relative order within the group that
this allocation will be executed.
!
Description : A text explanation of what the allocation set does.
!
From Period/To Period : Period range for the allocation. Any
periods outside this range will be not be updated by the allocation.
Click the Apply or Finish button here to save the allocation set definition. It will
appear in the Map under Operations | Allocations | [Allocation Group].
To execute an allocation, double click the icon representing the allocation on the
Map. It will be executed on a background thread and its progress can be
monitored via the process monitor. To execute the whole allocation group,
double click on the group icon. This will execute the allocations in the run order
specified within each allocation. Alternatively, an allocation or set of allocations
can be executed through FMW Scheduler.
Interfaces
FMW Enterprise includes interfaces to exchange data with external systems.
These import and export capabilities are combined with Add-ins (see above) to
format the data as required.
The most common interface is an import of YTD Actuals from the General Ledger
system into FMW Enterprise for variance report purposes.
Interfaces can be run on line or executed automatically on FMW Scheduler
(discussed below).
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Tools
FMW Scheduler
FMW Scheduler allows most FMW Functions and Objects (for example Reports,
Imports, Exports, Allocations etc.) to be automatically run on an unattended
schedule. When a schedule is established it is submitted to the server for
processing. There is no requirement for the client workstation to remain
connected to the server.
Multiple schedules may be established, each independent of the other in terms of
when schedule execution occurs. Care should be taken to schedule processes
so that they do not conflict with each other or with other processes that might be
set up to be run on the same server, for example overnight backups and other
maintenance. In addition, schedules requiring significant processing resources
should be scheduled to run at off-peak hours so as not to interfere with on-line
processing.
Multiple objects / functions can be established within each schedule. These will
process sequentially in the order that they appear in the schedule.
Two methods are available for accessing FMW Scheduler. The first is directly
through the FMW Client application. This is available only if you are set up as an
FMW system administrator. Click the Scheduler button located on the right of the
message bar at the bottom of the FMW Client screen. This will invoke FMW
Scheduler and automatically sign you on to the database with which you have
already established a connection through the client.
A second way of invoking FMW Scheduler is via a shortcut to the executable
fmwesched.exe. This is automatically set up when you install the FMW client
software with the Administrator option.
Warning FMW Scheduler bypasses some FMW security rules. Usually FMW
Scheduler should only be made available to an FMW system administrator.
Once signed in to FMW Scheduler select the File | New menu item to create a
new schedule. A dialog appears. In the dialog, provide an identification for the
schedule, for example Daily Reports.
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Now insert objects into the scheduler by clicking the Insert button. Insert objects
in the order that you wish them to process.
In the line that appears when the Insert button is clicked select an object
category (e.g. Reports) in column 1 and an object name in column 2.
Depending on the object category certain other options become available. For a
number of objects (e.g. Imports, Reforecasts, Exports, Add-in Routines etc.), a
Version/Class/Year combination is specified when the object is established in
FMW Client. If these fields are left blank on the schedule, when the object is
processed it will process against the pre-established Version/Class/Year.
Alternatively any of these parameters may be over-ridden for the purposes of this
schedule. In many cases we might schedule the same object (e.g. an Import)
multiple times on the same schedule, using different parameters for each
instance of the object (e.g. the same import being run for several different years).
A stored procedure can also be scheduled to run directly from the scheduler.
This may be an FMW stored procedure or any other procedure available to the
user. Select Procedure in the first column and in the last column type in the
name of the procedure with its parameters. An FMW procedure which is often
scheduled (Oracle only) is a maintenance procedure
fmw_maint_clear_work_tables which clears and truncates Oracle worktables
used by FMW. Also if we wish to analyze an Oracle schema automatically we
can schedule procedure dbms_utility.analyze_schema(‘FMW’,’COMPUTE’)
Reports can be scheduled as with other objects. However there are some
special considerations that apply to scheduled reports.
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When a report is run on-line the user is usually presented at run time with a pick
list to select pages (elements or tree nodes) for which the report will be run. In
addition once the report is run the output is returned directly to the client
workstation where it can be disposed of as required (viewed and discarded,
printed, saved as a file, transferred to Excel, e-mailed etc.). In the case of a
scheduled report these user actions are not available.
Page selections are resolved as follows. In the case of a report which has the
page selections predetermined (e.g. the page specification is set up as Select
Now), there is no problem. This established page selection is used. In the case
of a report which has run time selections specified, the scheduler refers to the
User name (7th column of the scheduled report) which is specified for the report,
and reads the element security for that user in order to get the page selections
for which the report will be run.
For example let’s assume we have a report called Monthly Variance Analysis
which uses an element called Cost Center as the page specification. This report
is placed on the Scheduler against a user called JOHN. When this runs (even if
submitted by another user) it will only run for Cost Centers to which JOHN has at
least View access. In the case of a report which uses hierarchy nodes to
determine the page, it will determine which nodes relate to elements to which the
user has access, and run the report only for those nodes.
As can be deduced from the above we could schedule a single report multiple
times in the same schedule, each time against a different user. Each user would
then be able to retrieve his section of the report (see section below on viewing
scheduled reports). However another and possibly more efficient way to achieve
this splitting effect is to schedule the report once against a user who has access
to all the page elements. The output can then be passed through the FMW
Report Distributor module to split the report by user and deliver it to each user,
either via e-mail or by saving the split piece as a file into a private directory
accessible to that user.
One other parameter is available for scheduled reports and that is the Override
Previous button (red checkbox) in the 6th column. If this is checked it means that
the latest iteration of a report’s output (for the user) stored in the database will
replace the previous iteration. If this button is not checked, every iteration of the
report will be stored separately until manually deleted.
Once the objects have been inserted into the schedule, click on the tab labeled
Frequency to define the times when the schedule will be run. The schedule will
be run based on the time and date of the first run. For example if today in June
16, 1999 and you wish a schedule to run at 11pm from today onwards, define the
start date as June 16,1999 and the time as 23.00 (24 hour clock). Then choose
the Daily option with the interval being 1 day. Clicking the OK button will submit
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the schedule. The dialog will close and the schedule will appear in the main
window of FMW Scheduler. To re-access the details of this schedule click on the
row and use the File | Open menu option.
Once a scheduled report has been executed the output can be retrieved from the
database by using the File | Open Scheduled Reports menu option. This option
is available in both FMW Client and FMW Report Distributor. Once the report is
opened it is as though the user had run it on line and it can be disposed of as
required.
In the case of a system administrator all reports scheduled against any user may
be retrieved. In the case of others users only reports scheduled against their
user id’s may be accessed.
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The status of other processed objects (as well as the timing and success or
failure of the schedule as a whole) will be reported in the process monitor, in the
same way as if the object had been executed on-line.
FMW Report Distributor
FMW Report Distributor allows a user to distribute reports created in FMW. A
distributed report can either be a saved report that has been previously run or a
report scheduled through the FMW Scheduler module. For each saved /
scheduled report a distribution profile can be created which defines the user,
report pages and method of distribution. A report can be distributed by
specifying a file name and location or by specifying the recipient’s e-mail
address.
You may distribute reports to any user defined as an FMW user. Each user can
receive any or all pages of the distributed report. If a report is being saved to a
file name and location, it can be stored on any drive and folder, either local or
network that you have write access to. When e-mailing a distributed report, you
can specify any e-mail address either internal to your organization or external.
For someone to view a distributed report they must have access to the FMW
Client or the FMW Report Viewer modules. Distributed reports behave exactly
the same as any other saved FMW report.
Two methods are available for accessing FMW Report Distributor. The first is
directly through the FMW Client application. This is available only if you are set
up as an FMW system administrator. Click the Report Distributor button located
on the right of the message bar at the bottom of the FMW Client screen. This will
invoke FMW Report Distributor and automatically sign you on to the database
with which you have already established a connection through the client.
A second way of invoking FMW Report Distributor is via a shortcut to the
executable fmwrdist.exe. This is automatically set up when you install the FMW
client software with the Administrator option.
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Report distribution profiles are automatically assigned and stored against a
saved or scheduled report. To begin the process of creating a report distribution
profile open a saved or scheduled report.
There are two methods for opening a saved report. You can click on the File
Open button or select File / Open Saved Report from the menu line. Both
processes open the standard Windows Open dialogue. The default drive and
folder (as set-up in the FMW Client for Saved Reports) will be used and all files
with an ‘.FMW’ extension (ex. ABC.FMW) will be displayed. Select the report and
click the Open button or double click the report to want to distribute. If a profile
already exists for this report it will be retrieved.
To open a scheduled report select File / Open Scheduled Report from the menu
line. The Scheduled Reports dialogue will appear showing a list of scheduled
reports, date and time run and the user assigned to the scheduled report. Select
the report and click the Open button or double click the report to want to
distribute. If a profile already exists for this report it will be retrieved.
Once a saved or scheduled report is opened the FMW Report Distributor will
display a list of all FMW Enterprise users. To specify that a user is to receive all
or any portion of the report, click the check box to the left of the user name.
Then click on the face button to view the pages of the report. If the report has
been defined as using a hierarchy for the page selection, then a list of hierarchy
node descriptions will appear. If the report has been defined as using an
element for the page selection than a list of elements and element descriptions
will appear. If the report was defined with no page selections than a single entry
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titled ‘NONE’ will appear. When a report with no page selection is distributed the
report in total will be sent.
Use the Include/Exclude All button to select that all or no pages go to the
recipient. This button operates as a toggle switching between select all and
select none. To select individual pages click on the check box under the Include
column beside the page(s) for the recipient. Clicking on the check box when it’s
already on will exclude the page. If the recipient is to receive a majority of the
pages of the report, click the Include All button and then selectively exclude
individual pages. Continue this process for all users for which the report is to be
distributed.
For each user you define as being a recipient, the entry under Output File will
open up. There are two methods for specifying the distributed report file name.
The first method allows you to type in the drive / folder / filename directly into
Output File field. There is no pre-edit of the entry therefore you can specify the
distributed report to go to a network drive you are not currently attached to.
The second method is to click the Folder button to the right of the user name.
This brings up the standard Windows File Save dialog. The default drive and
folder (as set-up in the FMW Client for Saved Reports) will be used and all files
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with an ‘FMW’ extension (e.g. department_report.fmw) will be displayed. You
can overwrite an existing report or type in a new name in the File Name field and
click the Save button. The drive / folder / filename will appear in Output File field.
Do not use the same drive / folder / filename for multiple users. If you do, the
content of the file will be the distribution to the last user on the list using that
filename.
Invalid drive / folder / filename will be validated at the time the report is
distributed.
For each user you define as being a recipient, the entry under E-mail Address
will open up. Type in the e-mail address of the recipient, if required (you do not
need to specify an e-mail address). Optionally you can specify a note that will be
included in the e-mailing of the report. To specify a note, select Edit / E-mail
Note from the menu line. Type in the note you want to appear in the e-mail and
click the OK button. This note is common for all e-mail recipients of this report.
To save the report distribution profile you can either click the Save button on the
button bar or select File / Save Profiles from the menu line. If you exit FMW
Report Distributor without saving the profile you will be asked to either save or
cancel the profile you’ve been working on.
To delete the report distribution profile you can either click the Delete button on
the button bar or select Edit / Delete Report Profile from the menu line.
To run the FMW Report Distributor on-line you can either click the Execute
button on the button bar or select Edit / Distribute Report from the menu line.
The distributor will display the status of the execution and any error messages. If
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132
an error occurs in creating a file for a user, the Output File field will highlight in
red.
You can run the FMW Report Distributor in batch mode in two methods, either
through the DOS Command line or as a DOS Batch (‘.BAT’) file. The syntax is
the same for both.
start/w fmwrdist.exe –daaaaa –ubbbbb –pccccc (–fddddd or –seeee)
start/w
fmwrdist.exe
= begins the command processor with wait option
= FMW Report Distributor program – if not on the path you will
need to supply a pathname.
-daaaaa
= -d is the ODBC datasource parameter where aaaaa is the
datasource name. NOTE: no spaces are allowed in the
datasource name.
-ubbbbb
name
= -u is the user name parameter where bbbbb is the FMW User
-pccccc
password
= -p is the password parameter where ccccc is the FMW User
-fddddd
= -f is the filename parameter where ddddd is the filename of
the saved report
-seeeee
= -s is the schedule parameter where eeeee is the name of the
scheduled report
The –f and –s parameters are mutually exclusive. Only one can be used in a
single command. You can create batch files that can run more than one
distribution profile.
Examples:
Distributing a Saved Report
start/w fmwrdist –dFMW_DATASOURCE -uUSER -pPSWRD fC:\RPTS\DAN.FMW
Distributing Scheduled Reports
start/w fmwrdist –dFMW_DATASOURCE -uUSER -pPSWRD –SIncome
Statement
start/w fmwrdist –dFMW_DATASOURCE -uUSER -pPSWRD –SBalance Sheet
start/w fmwrdist –dFMW_DATASOURCE -uUSER -pPSWRD –SSales Analysis
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133
FMW OLAP Server
FMW OLAP Server allows data to easily be extracted from FMW in a manner
convenient for manipulation with an OLAP tool. The only OLAP tool currently
supported is Cognos’ PowerPlay", a powerful multi-dimensional, graphical
analysis tool. Other OLAP tools will be supported in future releases.
If you wish to use this capability please refer to the document called FMW OLAP
Server.doc in the FMW Enterprise documentation set.
FMW Report Viewer
FMW Report Viewer is a tool to view FMW reports that have been saved in a
.fmw file. If associated with the .fmw file extension (which it is automatically if
installed with the FMW Installer) this application will be automatically invoked
when a file with a .fmw extension is double clicked in Windows Explorer.
FMW Report Viewer is distributed royalty-free, so it is a convenient way to
distribute and view reports electronically throughout your organization. In
addition FMW Report Viewer does not require a connection to a database.
FMW reports (.fmw files) can be accessed either via the File | Open menu option
or by double clicking on a .fmw file in Windows Explorer.
Transfer to MS-Excel
Page Selections
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134
Once the report is loaded the following actions are available.
!
Report can be viewed and discarded.
% Full drill downs are available. If there is a drill down on a line the
cursor will change to a pair of binoculars. Double click to drill down
or up. Also use the View | Expand-Contract all menu item to do full
expands or contacts.
% One page at a time is displayed. Use the combo box at the top of
the report display to switch between pages.
!
Report can be printed. (File | Print or Print button)
!
Report can be saved under another file name (File | Save As…)
!
Report can be transferred to Excel (use the Excel button on the second
button bar)
!
Report can be e-mailed (File | Send to…)
!
Report can be copied to the clipboard as text (Edit | Copy or Copy
button)
Multiple reports can be open simultaneously in a single instance of FMW Report
Viewer. Multiple instances of the FMW Report Viewer application can also exist.
Distributed Processing
FMW is usually operated in a centralized mode, which means that a single
database is accessed in a real-time mode by multiple connected users. However
it is sometimes convenient to operate FMW in a distributed mode for the
following reasons.
Mobile users might not be able to be connected to the central database on a
continuous basis. A mobile user might wish to download his section of the
database, work on it, and later upload the results back to the central (parent)
database.
This option also allows multiple FMW databases to be maintained for different
parts of an organization, with selective consolidation occurring at various
intervals. This can be a multi-level arrangement where parent databases in turn
feed other parent databases.
Chapter 5 Advanced features and tools
For further details, please refer to two documents, FMW Module-Distributed
Option and Installing FMW Mobile - Distributed Option.doc in the FMW
Enterprise documentation set.
135
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136
Index
A
access administrator ∙ 110
access attributes ∙ 110
access management ∙ 30
add-ins ∙ 61, 119
additional Relationship ∙ 64, 89
allocations ∙ 119
applications ∙ 4
currency ∙ 61
current period ∙ 95
custom add-ins∙ 119
D
background process queues (Oracle) ∙ 9
background processes ∙ 107
bar Graph ∙ 37
browser ∙ 4,11
budgeting categories ∙ 24
building blocks ∙ 46
business logic (add-ins) ∙ 68
data warehouse ∙ 4
database administrator ∙ 8
decimals ∙ 61, 91
delete ∙ 33
demo database ∙ 5, 14, 16
demonstration (FMW Enterprise)∙ 4
design (reports) ∙ 76
design mode (reports) ∙ 42
detail type row ∙ 76
display order (editing view)∙ 63
distributed processing ∙ 134
documents ∙ 2, 46, 105, 135
drag and drop (hierarchies) ∙ 51
drill downs (reports) ∙ 41, 86
drill-down options ∙ 87
C
E
calculated column ∙ 6, 901
calculated row ∙ 77, 88
calendars ∙ 57
capital budgeting ∙ 25
caption only / blank line ∙ 88
cell exceptions ∙ 91,99
class ∙ 47, 57
class key ∙ 60
classes ∙ 57
client / server ∙ 5
client installation ∙ 17
column attributes ∙ 64
column caption ∙ 89
column definitions dialog ∙ 82
column limitations ∙ 90
column yype ∙ 89
columns ∙ 60
combination description ∙ 34
comparatives ∙ 64
concurrent user licenses ∙ 14, 16
consolidated ∙ 88
copy ∙ 72
editing a budget ∙ 31
editing Views ∙ 32, 53, 57, 61
element security ∙ 114
elements ∙ 26, 47
e-mail ∙ 42
export (interface) ∙ 119
extending the model ∙ 45
external systems ∙ 123
extract (report data) ∙ 103
B
F
FMW OLAP Server ∙ 133
FMW Report Distributor ∙ 128
FMW Report Viewer ∙ 133
FMW Scheduler ∙ 123, 124
Function / Object Map ∙ 30
Functions (security access)∙ 111
Index
G
General Ledger ∙ 48, 94, 123
Grid (report) ∙ 92
modeling ∙ 35
MS-Excel ∙ 41
multi-threading ∙ 106
N
H
header area ∙ 83
headings ∙ 103
hierarchies ∙ 39,50
named levels ∙ 55
natural account ∙ 27, 48, 92
negatives as () ∙ 92
non-calendar column ∙ 61
notes ∙ 33
I
O
imports ∙ 119
increment / decrement amount ∙ 36
increment / decrement percentage ∙ 36
initialized database ∙ 13, 16
insert ∙ 33
installing FMW Enterprise ∙ 7
interfaces ∙ 94, 123
object security ∙ 112
ODBC ∙ 8, 10, 19
operating budgets ∙ 25
Oracle ∙ 5, 8, 13
J
page ∙ 85
page definition ∙ 85
page dialog ∙ 96
page selections ∙ 40, 52
period ∙ 90
print ∙ 41
privileges ∙ 9
process monitor ∙ 106
profiles ∙ 112
public synonyms (Oracle) ∙ 14
journal entry ∙ 71
L
layout manager ∙ 76, 100
levels ∙ 56
license agreement ∙ 11
limit data selection ∙ 64
line items ∙ 35, 54
locks (versions) ∙ 71
logins ∙ 22, 116
lookup columns ∙ 61, 68, 119
M
map ∙ 30
mask ∙ 88
memos ∙ 105
Microsoft" Sql Server ∙ 5, 9, 15
mobile users ∙ 134
P
R
reforecasts ∙ 116
reports ∙ 38, 74
rounding ∙ 92
row caption ∙ 88
row data limitations ∙ 88
row definition ∙ 78
Index
S
tuning, performance ∙ 9, 10
salary allocations ∙ 25, 61, 67
salary data ∙ 68
save as a file ∙ 41
select at run-time ∙ 86
selection ∙ 32, 52, 63
server installation ∙ 11, 12
setup wizard ∙ 5, 21
spread ∙ 33
spread comparative ∙ 37
spread even ∙ 36
Sql*Net (Oracle) ∙ 8
subtotals (editing views)∙ 67
support (for FMW Enterprise)∙ 1, 3, 5
system administrator ∙ 107, 113
U
T
tablespace ∙ 9
timelines ∙ 25
training ∙ 3
unallocated element items ∙ 55
undo ∙ 34
update methods ∙ 71
upgrade ∙ 8
users ∙ 112
V
version-class ∙ 71
version-class-year controls ∙ 71
versions ∙ 31, 70
Z
zero values ∙ 36
Index
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