hamtronics® ap-3 autopatch module: instruction manual

hamtronics® ap-3 autopatch module: instruction manual
HAMTRONICS® AP-3 AUTOPATCH MODULE: INSTRUCTION MANUAL
FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION.
The Autopatch Module is used
with the DTMF Decoder/Controller
Module to provide the following
functions:
repeater
autopatch,
reverse autopatch, primary phone
line remote control of repeater, phone
line monitor of repeater receiver, and
secondary remote control through
repeater receiver.
The Autopatch Module can be
interfaced directly with any touchtone
tele phone line. It is registered with
the FCC under part 68.
HOW IT WORKS.
Refer to the schematic diagram
and the repeater block diagram during the following discussions.
Phone Line Interface.
The phone line is connected to E1E2. Relay K1 completes a path to dc
load resistors R6/R7 and to isolation
transformer T1 via high voltage
capacitor C5. When the phone patch
relay is activated, the dc current
drawn by R6/R7 "seizes" the phone
line, and T1 couples audio in and out
of the line. When the phone line is
"on-hook", any incoming ac ringing
voltage is coupled through capa citors
C6 and C99 to opto-coupler U2. When
the opto-coupler senses a ringing
voltage on the line, it trips timer U3.
Audio Paths.
When the autopatch is enabled,
relay K1 connects the telephone line
to isolation transformer T1 through dc
blocking capacitor C5. Phone line
audio is amplified in two successive
op-amp stages. The repeat phone line
level is set by potentiometer R8. U1D also acts as a switch: audio passes
only when the autopatch is enabled
HOW TO CONTACT US —
Hamtronics, Inc.
65 Moul Rd; Hilton NY 14468-9535
Phone: 716-392-9430
http://www.hamtronics.com
email: jv@hamtronics.com
and the receiver squelch is closed.
Therefore, the radio station using the
repeater has control over what parts
of
the
incoming
telephone
conversation goes out over the air:
any time the radio operator keys his
microphone, the receiver squelch
cuts off the telephone audio at U1-D.
C10 prevents switching clicks from
occurring when a dc signal is applied
through R12 or R13.
The 220 pf
capacitors at various input and output
terminals of the board are to bypass
vhf/uhf rf energy.
Audio from the repeater receiver
enters at E7. Some of this audio is
applied through R16 and mixer U1-C
and E9 to the transmit audio input
circuit on the COR board. Because of
the squelch action in the receiver,
audio is present only when a station
is heard on the re ceiver.
Thus,
receiver audio does not interfere with
audio coming from the telephone line.
Q5 acts as a switch to mute the
audio at the input of U1-C whenever
the DTMF Decoder/Controller Board
applies a signal indicating that tones
are being received. This prevents
tones from being repeated on the
transmitte r. Capacitor C15 works in
conjunction with a diode on the TD-2
DTMF De coder/Controller Board to
provide a fast-attack/slow-release
time constant for the mute switch.
Receiver audio is applied through
potentiometer R1 to line driver Q4,
which amplifies the signal and drives
the telephone line through isolation
transformer T1. Bias for the stage is
switched on by Q2 only when the receiver squelch is open. Because U1D is off during this condition, the
amplified audio from Q4 is blocked
from the input of U1-C through this
second path. (The high gain needed
in U1-D for the weak phone audio
would cause distortion of the receiver
audio if allowed to take the same path
as the phone audio.)
VR1/VR2 is a pair of back-to-back
zener diodes to absorb the inductive
surge when Q4 is switched off, thus
preventing transistor damage. C8 is
a bypass for low frequency rf which
may be present on the telephone line.
DTMF tones from either the phone
line or the receiver are applied to the
DTMF De coder/Controller Module
through E8.
Logic Circuits.
When
the
DTMF
De coder/Controller Board applies a
ground signal to E13, two things
happen. First, switch Q1 turns on,
thereby applying a positive signal to
the COR input on the COR Board.
This
turns
on
the
repeater
transmitter.
Second, the ground
signal at E13 is applied to or-gate U1A, which energizes relay K1 through
switch U1-B. R32, CR3, and C26 in
the line to U1-A provide a time delay
of about one second between the time
the DTMF Board commands the
autopatch to turn on and the time the
relay actually energizes.
This
prevents the tail end of the last digit
in the sequence which energizes the
autopatch from being applied to the
tele phone line and thereby being
construed by the telephone exchange
as the first digit in the telephone
number.
The phone patch relay also can be
activated by timer U3. If someone
calls in on the phone line, optocoupler U2 detects the ringing
voltage, and U3 activates the relay for
about 60 seconds. This is sufficient
time to give a tone command or listen
to the repeater re ceiver to hear what
is on the input frequency. During the
60 seconds, a tone command may be
given to turn the re peater or the
autopatch on or off or to perform any
other function which the DTMF Board
is programmed to do. If the autopatch
is turned on, of course, then it stays
on even after the 60 second period
elapses.
The COR Module keying output at
E12 is activated by Q1 whenever the
autopatch is turned on, as previously
described. It also is activated by Q2
and Q3 via or-gate CR2 whenever the
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 1 -
receiver squelch is open. This is the
manner in which the COR line is
activated when the autopatch is off,
during basic repeater operation. Q2
also switches bias to Q4, and Q3
switches
bias
to
mute
U1-D,
whenever the receiver squelch is
open.
(COS = carrier operated
switch).
CONSTRUCTION.
Assembly is fairly simple. Refer to
the parts list and the component location diagram during construction.
Caution: The pc board uses platedthrough holes for easy construction. Soldering need be done only on underside
of board. However, because it is more
difficult to unsolder plated-through
boards, be sure parts are in the correct
place before soldering. Be careful not to
interchange parts which look similar,
e.g., resistors with similar color codes.
Be sure to observe polarity on
transistors,
diodes,
electrolytic
capacitors, and ic's.
Note that the pc board was designed
for a relay which is no longer available.
Therefore,
some
adaptations
are
necessary to use another style of relay.
a. Orient board as shown in the
component location diagram. Be sure
the proper side is up.
b. Locate relay K1, which is blue
and has four leads. Cut four one inch
lengths of #22 bus wire, and wrap the
ends around the relay leads as shown.
Tack solder bus wires to relay leads.
Be careful not to stress the relay
leads and break them.
c. Lay the relay down on the pc
board, and solder the bus wires to the
pads on the board as shown. Note
that the old relay had two rows of five
large pads for its connections. The
bus wires from the new relay connect
to four of those pads. Make sure you
use the correct ones.
d. Find R33 and C99 from the
parts list and install them on the
board as follows. Note that the board
was originally designed for R33 to be
installed horizontally between two
pads, as you might surmise from the
original
parts
location
drawing.
However, it is necessary to connect
C99 in series with R33 in order to use
the new relay. Therefore, the lead of
R33 closest to the relay no longer
connects directly to the board. See
the detail to the left of the drawing.
The leads of C99 are bent so that one
goes down into the board where R33
originally connected. Do not trim the
lead off. Instead, bend the C99 lead
under the board and use it as a
jumper to connect to the second pad
from the right of the row of five
original relay pads, as shown in the
drawing. Solder the lead at both pads.
Install R33 on an angle as shown,
with one lead tack soldered to the top
lead of C99, as shown in the detail.
e. Install R28, and solder to the
board.
Then, install C27, tack
soldering its leads to the leads of R28.
Observe polarity.
f. Install zener diodes VR1 and
VR2 vertically with cathode bands up,
as shown in the detail. Tack solder
the upper leads together.
g. Install the ic socket for U1 as
shown. The socket has a prominent
notch in one end. Install the socket
to match the notch shown on the
diagram. Plug the 3301 ic into the
socket, being careful that no pins
bend over.
h. Solder ic's U2 and U3 directly to
the board, orienting as shown.
i. Install transformer T1, and
solder leads.
j. Install potentiometers R1 and
R8, checking parts list for proper
values.
k. Install all other resistors and
diodes according to diagram and parts
list.
Bodies of vertical parts are
indicated as circles on the diagram.
Observe polarity on diodes. Note that
switching diodes may not be marked
except with a band. The zener diodes
are marked with their part number,
and they should be installed as shown
in the detai l with the cathode bands
up and the cathode leads tack soldered together.
l. Install all other capacitors,
observing polarity on electrolytic
types.
m. Install transistors, orienting as
shown.
TABLE 1. CONNECTIONS BETWEEN
MODULES WHEN AP-3 IS USED WITH
COR-4.
SIGNAL
RCVR TD-2
AP-3 COR
Rcvr Audio
E2*
E7
AP Audio Out
E9
E12
Rcvr COS
E4*
E11
AP COR Out
E12
E14
DTMF Rpt Inhibit
"H"
E16
DTMF Tones
"1"
E8
DTMF Mute
"3"
E10
AP-ON Command
"4"
E13
*Note: Inside receiver enclosure, E2 and
E4 on the receiver module are connected to
feedthru capacitors C2 and C1, respectively.
TABLE 2. CONNECTIONS BETWEEN
MODULES WHEN AP-3 IS USED WITH
COR-3.
SIGNAL
RCVR TD-2
AP-3 COR
Rcvr Audio
E2*
E7
AP Audio Out
E9
E6
Rcvr COS
E4*
E11
AP COR Out
"H"
E12
E7
DTMF Tones
"1"
E8
DTMF Mute
"3"
E10
AP-ON Command
"4"
E13
n. Check over construction to be
sure all parts are installed in proper
places and with correct polarity on
diodes and electrolytic capacitors.
Check all solder connections for bad
joints, solder splashes, etc.
OPTION FOR NO REVERSE
AUTOPATCH.
If you wish to prevent any reverse
autopatch
or
calling
into
the
Autopatch for control purposes, for
example, be cause you are using the
family telephone line and you need to
have normal tele phone operation,
disconnect R33 to disable the ring
detector. If you want to selectively
disable this function only at certain
times, use a front panel switch in
series with the resistor.
INSTALLATION.
To simplify matters, we will
discuss the normal installation in a
Hamtronics repeater system first;
then we will go into variations when
using other equipment and options.
It is assumed that you are using
our
COR-4
module.
An
interconnection block diagram and
wiring table are supplied for use with
that module. If you are using our
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 2 -
earlier COR-2 or COR-3 modules, a
table is also supplied for those
interconnections.
a. Attach the Autopatch module
with standoffs in the four corner
holes. It is recommended that the
module be shielded from high level rf;
however,
in
a
repeater,
the
transmitter already is shielded, so
this requires no extra attention.
b. Use hookup wire for all connections, and neatly bundle with other
cabling. Table 1 lists the connections
between
modules
to
add
the
Autopatch and DTMF Decoder/Controller Modules to the basic repeater
configuration using the COR-4 board.
Note: If you are connecting the
Autopatch in an existing repeater, be
sure that you disconnect the original
audio and cos connections to the COR
board
before
connecting
the
Autopatch.
We have had some
customers mistakenly leave the old
connections direct from the receiver
to the COR board, and this causes
incorrect operation which is difficult
to diagnose.
The audio and COS
signals from the receiver to the COR
Board are processed through the Autopatch Board; so they would not be
connected directly to the COR Board
when an Autopatch is in the system.
c.
Connect E1 and E2 with a
twisted pair to two spare terminals on
rear of repeater. These will be used
for connection to the phone line when
wiring is completed. Tip and ring
polarity may be interchanged; the
Autopatch phone line input is nonpolarized.
d. The ground plane on the pc
board is already grounded if mounted
to metal chassis. If not, be sure to
connect power and signal ground to a
solder lug added under one of the
mounting screws.
e. Connect E3 to source of filtered
and regulated +13.6Vdc. If you are
using the COR-4 module, the B+
should be obtained from E4. Do not
apply power yet.
f. Solder pads E5 and E6 at the left
side of the relay provide normallyopen relay contacts to operate the
motor of a tape recorder for logging, to
activate the AP-2 Timing Board in a
simplex autopatch system, or to
perform any other auxiliary switching
function you may wish to have. They
normally are not connected in a basic
repeater setup.
g. E7 should be connected to the
audio output feedthru capacitor on
the re peater receiver enclosure,
which is connected to the E2
"speaker" output of the receiver
board.
E9 should be connected to
audio input: terminal E12 on the
COR-4 module (or terminal E6 on the
COR-2 or COR-3 module). The receiver
would
normally
connect
directly to the COR module if the
Autopatch was not used.
h. Connect E8 to terminal 1 of the
TD-2 DTMF Decoder/Controller Module. This provides DTMF tones to the
TD-2 Board.
i. Connect E10 to terminal 3 of
the TD-2 DTMF Decoder/Controller
Module. This is the mute output of
the TD-2 Board, which mutes the
repeater when tones are present.
j. Connect E11 to the COS output
feedthru capacitor of the receiver
enclosure. Inside the enclosure, this
feedthru capacitor is connected to E4
on the re ceiver. (The COS output of
the receiver would normally be
connected directly to the COR Board if
the Autopatch was not installed.)
k. Connect E12 to COS input E14
on the COR-4 module (or E7 on the
COR-2 or COR-3 Module).
l. Connect terminal "H" of the TD2 DTMF Decoder/Controller Module to
E16 on the COR-4 module (or E7 on
the COR-2 or COR-3 Module). Terminal "H" inhibits the COR Board from
keying the transmitter when the
repeater is turned off by tone
command.
m. Connect E13 to terminal 4 of
the TD-2 DTMF Decoder/Controller
Module.
OPTIONS.
a. If you would like to have a front
panel control to inhibit phone patch
operation at times while leaving
other functions intact, connect a
SPST switch in series with the AP-ON
line
from
the
DTMF
Decoder/Controller Module to E13 on
the Autopatch Module.
When the
switch is open, the patch cannot be
brought up by anyone on the air or on
the phone.
b. If a DTMF Module other than
our model TD-2 is used, it is unlikely
that a tone mute signal will be
available for pin E10. In that case,
just leave E10 disconnected.
c. If another receiver is used, it
must provide 1.5V p-p audio (the
equivalent of 50 mW of audio into an
8 ohm speaker). It must also provide
a COS signal of at least +4Vdc when
the re ceiver squelch is open and
ground (less than 1V) when the
squelch is closed.
d. If a different COR Module is
used, it must have a high impedance
(greater than 10K audio input
impedance) and operate with 1.5V p-p
audio level at full modulation. The
COR control input should be the
equivalent of a transistor baseemitter junction or a CMOS input,
with hi = COR-on and lo = COR-off.
e.
If a different DTMF De coder/Controller Module is used, it must
operate with 2V p-p max. tone input
level; and the autopatch control
output must be ground = on and open
= off.
If it is also to inhibit the
repeater COR as a second function, it
must have ground = off and open = on
for that function.
CAUTION: Phone lines are notori ous collectors of static charges from
lightning, etc., and high enough
charges can damage any electronic
circuitry.
The phone company
normally puts lightning arrestors on
the service line at the house, but
these are primarily carbon fuses to
prevent fires. If you are in an area
with frequent lightning strikes, you
may need to install a gas discharge
device or similar protector on the
phone line and connect to a good
ground.
These are avai lable from
telephone supply companies. In any
case, be sure to have a good safety
ground for the chassis.
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 3 -
SYSTEM ADJUSTMENTS.
Following is a first-time, fire up
and system audio level adjustment
procedure. It is assumed that all the
other modules, including the DTMF
Decoder/Controller,
have
already
been
aligned
or
tested
and
programmed and that the system was
working before the Autopatch was
installed. Otherwise, troubleshooting
can be complicated.
When Autopatch is used in a
repeater, the repeater audio is adjusted
differently.
Therefore, the following
audio
setup
instructions
take
precedence over any in manuals for
other modules.
It is assumed that the AP-3 is installed in a Hamtronics repeater or
used with Hamtronics modules to
make a re peater.
If not, the
instructions below can be adapted for
your particular system.
Note that when power is first
applied, the circuit which answers a
phone call for reverse autopatch may
latch up and require a one minute
wait for it to turn off the telephone
line relay. This is normal and should
not be a concern.
a. Obtain a 1000 Hz test signal on
the receiver with 3 kHz deviation.
Set the RPT VOL control (receiver
volume control) for midrange to get a
moderately strong audio signal for the
transmitter. On the exciter, set the
mic. gain control fully clockwise, and
adjust the deviation limiter control to
limit at about 5.5 kHz deviation so it
isn't quite limiting in normal
operation. This sets up the limiter to
be used with telephone audio only.
b. Connect an oscilloscope or ac
voltmeter to the audio output feedthru
capacitor (center ft cap) on the rear of
the receiver enclosure, and adjust
the RPT VOL control (receiver volume
control) for 1.5 V peak-to-peak (p-p).
Set the exciter mic. gain control
for 3 kHz deviation out of the
transmitter (3 kHz at receiver and 3
kHz on transmitter). This sets up the
deviation
for
normal
repeater
operation without autopatch.
c. Temporarily connect a ground
to E13 to bring up the patch and get a
dial tone. (This should provide audio
which
normally
would
be
the
maximum level ever to be applied to
the transmitter.)
With dial tone
present, adjust phone repeat level
control R8 on the Autopatch Module
for 5 kHz deviation. This sets up the
audio gain for telephone audio going
out over the transmitter. If the dial
tone times out at the central office,
release and remake the ground
connection to E13 to get a fresh dial
tone.
d. Disconnect the phone line from
the input terminals, and connect a
scope or ac voltmeter across the
phone
line
terminals
of
the
Autopatch.
Set the input to the
receiver for a 1000 Hz tone at 5 kHz
deviation. With E13 still grounded,
adjust line drive level control R1 for
2V p-p across the Autopatch phone
line terminals. This sets the audio
applied to the phone line to about -3
dBm with full receiver audio. Re move
ground from E13.
This completes the adjustments. Following is a discussion of what the
affects are of each adjustment in case
you prefer different settings.
The repeater receiver has crystal
filters which limit the input deviation
to the receiver; so it is not necessary
to use the transmitter limiter for
normal repeat operation. However,
the limiter is needed to prevent high
deviation levels on tele phone audio,
since the level on phone lines varies
so much. Indeed, it is desirable to
run into limiting occasion ally with
telephone audio in order to get some
compression to compensate for some
weaker
telephone
connections,
thereby bringing up the average tele phone audio level. So, a good compromise is to run the limiter for hard
limiting at about 5.5 kHz deviation so
that no limiting occurs with a normal
5 kHz receiver input.
You may want to experiment a
little with the setting of phone repeat
level control R8. You want to be able
to comfortably hear weaker phone
audio but not have the ordinary local
calls be so strong that they are too
loud. The limiter in the transmitter
will prevent over-deviation on the
louder phone calls, but if the gain is
set too high, the audio on the louder
calls may be running into limiting
most of the time and sound too loud.
After using the autopatch for a time,
you may want to turn R8 up or down a
little. Since R8 does not affect the
setting of the limiter in the transmitter, you can tweak it easily without
needing test equipment.
The phone company normally does
not like to have a level higher than
about -3 dBm applied to their lines in
order to prevent crosstalk to other
phone lines. This translates to about
2 V p-p.
In order to measure the phone
line level with a scope, it is necessary
to disconnect the phone line and
measure across the terminals of the
Autopatch because you don't want to
ground one side of the phone line.
This may cause a small inaccuracy
due to the removal of the load
impedance
from
the
Autopatch
terminals, but not enough to worry
about. If you have a battery operated
ac voltmeter, it may be connected
across the phone line, but since it
measures rms voltage instead of true
peak-to-peak, you must use a single tone sine wave for the test and
calculate p-p voltage by multiplying
the rms voltage by 2.8.
If the line level is set too high,
cross talk results. If too low, your
DTMF tones may not be strong
enough to break the dial tone or dial
reliably.
Another factor to consider is that
the DTMF Decoder/Controller Board
may not decode some or all the digits
properly if the level applied to it is too
high or too low. This level is affected
by the setting of the line drive level
with R1 on the Autopatch Board. The
decoder chip has a fairly wide
dynamic
range
of
tone
level
acceptance; however, tones from the
receiver will be relatively strong
compared to the weaker telephone
tones, so you don't want to crowd
either end of the dynamic range. It
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 4 -
may be necessary to readjust R1
slightly if a problem occurs operating
reliably with either the phone
company central office tone decoders
or the DTMF Decoder/Controller
Board.
Another factor affecting reliable
operation of tone decoders is twist,
which is the relative levels of the
high and low tones in any digit.
Modern tone decoder chips used in
the DTMF Board and the telco central
office tolerate about 10 dB of twist. (It
is common practice to run the high
tones just a little stronger than the
low tones in driving the phone line to
compensate for the greater attenuation of high tones on long phone
lines.)
SYSTEM CHECKOUT.
After alignment, you may want to
perform the following procedure to
verify that everything functions
properly.
a. Try operating the repeater with
the autopatch turned off, and verify
that the transmitter deviation is
about the same as the receiver input
deviation.
b. Try the various tone codes to
e nsure that the DTMF Decoder/Controller responds normally to control
codes transmitted over the air. Refer
to instruction manual for that module
for operating procedure.
c. Dial up phone line from an outside phone. Listen on the phone to
hear the repeater receiver.
Try
turning the re peater on and off with
the proper DTMF digits sent from the
telephone.
Do not turn on the
autopatch function; just listen to the
receiver, and verify that the one minute timer disconnects the phone
line in about one minute.
d. Dial up phone line again from
an outside phone.
Enable the
autopatch with the proper tone code
sent from the telephone. Talk into
the phone and verify that the audio
sounds good through the repeater.
The transmitter deviation should be
no greater than 5.5 kHz with full
audio (shouting into the phone).
e. Bring up the patch through the
repeater re ceiver, and try dialing an
outside call from a mobile station.
See
Operating
Instructions
for
complete procedure.
OPERATION.
Note: Before reading this section,
refer to DTMF Decoder/Controller Instruction Manual Operating Procedures.
Also note that when power is first
applied, the circuit which answers a
phone call for reverse autopatch may
latch up and require a one minute
wait for it to turn off the telephone
line relay. This is normal and should
not be a concern.
How to Make an Autopatch Call
from a Mobile Station.
Key the transmitter, and send the
digits on the tone pad required to activate the autopatch. Be careful not to
hold the last digit too long, because
any tones present when the phone
line is connected will be counted by
the phone exchange as a digit
entered as a phone number. There is
a one-second delay before the phone
line is connected to minimize this
possibility.
The repeater audio is muted for a
few seconds each time a DTMF digit
is re ceived; so there is a short delay
after the last digit of the command
sequence be fore you will hear audio
again if you unkey your microphone.
The complete se quence of digits
required to bring up the patch must
be sent within 5 seconds, or the
decoder circuit resets and you must
start over.
After bringing up the patch,
release the transmitter keyline, and
listen for dial tone. If you don't hear
it, try again. If you hear the phone
line noise but no dial tone, knock
down the patch and bring it up again
to get a dial tone. After you get a dial
tone, key the transmitter and dial the
desired phone number.
Then, release transmitter and listen for
ringing.
When the called party answers,
you can talk to him merely by
pressing push-to-talk button when it
is your turn to speak. Be sure to
inform the party you call that he is on
the air, and explain any rules you
think he should understand. Note
that you can block anything the party
on the phone says over the air merely
by keying your transmitter. Although
the repeater carrier stays on the air,
the audio is muted anytime the re ceiver squelch is open. This allows
you to censor the other party.
The Autopatch will stay up until
you release it by sending the required
digit sequence. When the repeater
carrier drops, you know you have
successfully knocked down the patch.
The repeater time-out timer will
shut down the carrier if the patch is
held too long. To reset repeater timeout timer, someone must send
required tone se quence to turn off the
autopatch. Then, normal operation
can resume.
How to Control the Repeater.
The repeater may be enabled or
disabled by sending the required
repeater control digit sequence,
either through the repeater receiver
or via telephone call into the
autopatch line from a touch-tone
phone. If power to the repeater is
turned off for any reason, when power
is resumed, the DTMF De coder/Controller Module automatically
e nables the repeater and turns off the
autopatch.
Anyone with the proper phone
number and codes can call into the
autopatch line from any telephone
and receive access for one minute,
during which time he can listen to
the repeater receiver (whether the
transmitter is enabled or not). This
is handy for a controlling ham to
check on interference before bringing
up the repeater transmitter after a
shut-down. During the one minute
period, the person on the phone also
has access to the tone de coders so he
can punch in tones to turn the
repeater on or off or bring up the
autopatch.
Reverse Autopatch.
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
A party calling in to the autopatch
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 5 -
line can access the patch, just as the
mobile radio operator can, if he/she
knows the control code sequence to
bring up the autopatch. He has 60
seconds to monitor the repeater, and
if not busy, to dial the required digit
sequence for autopatch access. He
can then call the party he wishes to
speak to by call letters just as if he
was using a radio.
If the party
addressed on the air does not respond,
the calling party must knock down
the patch by sending the required
digit sequence to turn it off.
Note that the repeater trustee is
responsible to see that current FCC
requirements regarding licensing of
such reverse autopatch users is
observed. Since the calling party has
control of the repeater carrier, legally,
he may be re quired to hold a valid
license.
Other Rules and Regulations.
It is beyond the scope of this
discussion to address all the legal
problems
involved
in
autopatch
systems. The re peater trustee must
be aware of current regulations.
For example, any business use of
the autopatch is prohibited for any
reason by the "amateur" status of the
repeater. Re peater trustees should
investigate
and
list
all
such
requirements for users be fore the
autopatch is made accessible for
general use.
FCC Registration.
This device has been granted a
registration number by the Federal
Communications Commission, under
part 68 rules and regulations for
direct connection to the telephone
lines. In order to comply with these
FCC rules, the following instructions
must be carefully read and applicable
portions followed completely. By law,
these instructions must be provided
to you.
1. This equipment complies with
part 68 of the FCC rules. A label is
provided below, which must be cut out
and attached to the outside of the
equipment in which this module is
installed.
This label contains the
FCC registration number and ringer
equivalence number (REN).
If
requested, this information must be
provided to the telephone company.
2. The ringer equivalence code
(REN) is used to determine the
quantity of devices which may be
connected to the telephone line may
result in the de vice not ringing in
response to an incoming call.
In
most, but not all areas, the sum of the
REN's should not exceed five (5.0). To
be certain of the number of devices
that may be connected to the line, as
determined by the total REN's, contact
the telephone company to determine
the maximum REN for the calling
are a.
3. If this equipment, causes harm
to the telephone network, the
telephone company will notify you in
advance. But if advance notice is not
practical, the telephone company will
notify the customer as soon as
possible. Also, you will be advised of
your right to file a complaint with the
FCC if you believe it is necessary.
4. The telephone company may
make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures that
could affect the operation of the
equipment.
If this happens, the
telephone
company
will
provide
advance notice in order for you to
make the necessary modifications in
order to maintain uninterrupted
service.
5. If trouble is experienced with
this module, it must be repaired
promptly. If the trouble is causing
harm to the telephone network, the
telephone company may request you
remove the equipment from the
network until the problem is resolved.
If any questions on how to repair the
module, please consult factory for any
additional
troubleshooting
information you may need or to make
arrangements for factory service .
6. This equipment must not be
used on telephone company provided
public coin service. Connection to
party lines is subject to state tariffs;
contact your state public utility
commission for information.
TROUBLESHOOTING.
If you have trouble, check each
stage, and trace signals through the
circuit path. Following are charts of
dc voltages and audio signal levels at
key points. Voltages are typical but
may
vary
considerably
without
necessarily indicating a problem.
When troubleshooting a unit
which has just been built, be sure to
check for solder splashes, bad solder
joints, parts mixed up, etc. It is easy
to have something like that happen
during construction.
Note that the sensitivity of the
ring detector circuit has been set to
operate reliably with most telephone
central offices. If you have a problem
with the autopatch relay turning on
due to transient pulses on the phone
line when no ringing signal actually
occurred, the sensitivity may be
reduced by reducing the value of R25.
Likewise, if the ring de tector doesn't
answer the phone quickly enough,
you may need to increase the value of
R25.
The time delay of timer U3 may be
adjusted by changing the value of
R27. Larger values make the delay
longer, and smaller values make the
delay shorter.
DC TEST VOLTAGES REFERENCED TO
GROUND.
XSTR CONDITION EM BASE COLL
Q1
AP on
13.6
12.4
13.2
AP off
13.6
13.6
0.03
Q2
Squelch Open
0
0.65
0.13
Sq Closed
0
0
13.6
Q3
Squelch Open
13.6
12.6
Sq Closed 13.6 13.4
0.05
Q4
Squelch Open
8.3
7.5
Sq Closed 13.6 13.6
0
Q5
Tones Present
0
0.65
0.06
Tones Absent
0
0*
* Indicates voltage charge may be held by
capacitor and discharge slowly.
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
COMPLIES WITH PART 68, FCC RULES
FCC Registration # 2T7USA-75643-OT-E
MFR Model AP-3 AUTOPATCH MODULE
Ringer Equivalence 1.6A, 4.7B
Made In USA
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 6 -
U1 pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
U3 off
0.03
0
0.09 13.0 0.12
U3 running 0.07 0.7 12.2 2.3 0.9
AP off
0.03
- 0.55 0.09 13.0 0.12
AP on
0.07
0* 12.2 2.3 0.9
* Indicates voltage charge may be held by
capacitor and discharge slowly.
U1 pin
All conditions
U1 pin
7
0
8
13
0
9
10
14
13.6
11
12
Tones present 0.06 12.2 Tones absent
0.55 6.2 Sq open or AP off - 12.2 0.05 0.55
Sq closed & AP on - 7.4 0.55 0.07
U3 Pin
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Running
0(momentary)
13.0
13.6
9.0
0 to 9
0 to 9
13.6
Off
13.0
0
13.6
9.0
0
0
13.6
TYPICAL AUDIO LEVELS WITH STANDARD
SETUP & FULL DEVIATION INPUT ON
RECEIVER (SQUELCH OPEN, AUTOPATCH
ON.
Test Point
Typical
Signal Level
E7 (Audio in from Rcvr)
1.5 V p-p
E8 (Tones to DTMF Board)
2.2 V p-p
E9/U1-9 (Xmit AF to COR Board)
1.5 V p-p
Q4 Base
50 mV p-p
Across Phone Line Terminals
(Phone Line Disconnected)
2 V p-p
TYPICAL AUDIO LEVELS WITH LOUD 1 KHZ
TEST TONE COMING IN ON PHONE LINE
(SQUELCH CLOSED, AUTOPATCH ON).
Test Point
Typical
Signal Level
E8 (Across T1 Secondary)
1 V p-p
U1-11
50 mV p-p
U1-10
2 V p-p*
U1-9/E9
6 V p-p*
* Varies with setting of Phone Repeat Level
Control R8
PARTS LIST.
Ref #
Value (marking)
C1
.001 uf (102, 1nM, or 1nK)
C2
1 uf electrolytic
C3
47 uF electrolytic
C4
Not used
C5
1 uF, 250V metalized
polyester capacitor
C6-C7
.001 uf (102, 1nM, or 1nK)
C8-C9
.01 uf disc (103)
C10
0.15 uf mylar (red)
C11
.01 uf disc (103)
C12
33 pf
C13
47 uF electrolytic
C14
.001 uf (102, 1nM, or 1nK)
C15
C16
C17
C18-C20
C21
C22
C23-C24
C25
C26
C99
CR1-CR4
K1
Q1
Q2
Q3-Q4
Q5
R1
R2
R3-R4
R5
R6-R7
R8
R9
R10
R11
R12
R13
R14
R15
R16-R17
R18
R19
R20
R21
R22
R23
R24
R25
R26
R27
R28
R29
R30
R31
R32
R33
T1
2.2 uF electrolytic
.001 uf (102, 1nM, or 1nK)
1 uF electrolytic
.001 uf (102, 1nM, or 1nK)
47 uF electrolytic
not used
.01 uf disc (103)
47 uF electrolytic
1 uF electrolytic
0.15uF mylar (red)
1N4148 switching diode
Reed relay (blue)
2N3906 or 2N4126
2N3904 or 2N4124
2N3906 or 2N4126
2N3904 or 2N4124
1k pot (102)
10k
15k
180 ohms
470 ohms
1k pot (102)
330k
2 meg
150k
100K
1 meg
47k
150k
1 meg
100k
150k
47k
150k
100k
27k
10k
1 meg
270 ohms
1 meg
47k
510k
150k
180 ohms
1 meg
3.3k
600 ohm transformer
#56118-005
U1
3301 quad norton op-amp
(can substitute 3401)
U2
4N33 optocoupler
U3
555 timer
VR1-VR2 1N5239B zener diode,
9.1V
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 7 -
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 8 -
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 9 -
©1998 Hamtronics, Inc.; Hilton NY; USA. All rights reserved. Hamtronics is a registered trademark.
Revised: 11/27/01
- Page 10 -
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