Gigabit TAP Probe User Guide

Gigabit TAP Probe User Guide
Gigabit TAP Probe User Guide
Document Number: GTAPUG
Rev. 10.x, 02/2014
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Contents
Section number
Title
Page
Chapter 1
Introducing CodeWarrior Gigabit TAP probe
1.1
What is Gigabit TAP probe?...........................................................................................................................................9
1.1.1
Product highlights.............................................................................................................................................. 11
1.1.2
Gigabit TAP probe benefits............................................................................................................................... 12
1.2
Identifying components.................................................................................................................................................. 12
1.3
Operating requirements...................................................................................................................................................13
1.4
1.3.1
Target power requirements................................................................................................................................ 13
1.3.2
Standard electrostatic precautions......................................................................................................................14
1.3.3
Electrical requirements...................................................................................................................................... 14
1.3.3.1
Connecting power supply cable......................................................................................................... 15
1.3.3.2
Cycling power to system....................................................................................................................15
1.3.4
Operating temperature........................................................................................................................................16
1.3.5
Target system requirements............................................................................................................................... 16
Related documentation....................................................................................................................................................16
Chapter 2
Connecting to network
2.1
Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to network.................................................................................................................... 17
2.1.1
2.2
2.3
Connecting to twisted pair interface.................................................................................................................. 17
Customizing Gigabit TAP probe.................................................................................................................................... 19
2.2.1
Establishing serial communication with Gigabit TAP probe.............................................................................19
2.2.2
Customizing Gigabit TAP probe network settings............................................................................................ 21
Testing network communication.....................................................................................................................................21
2.3.1
Verifying communication.................................................................................................................................. 21
Chapter 3
Connecting to target system
3.1
Debug port connector information..................................................................................................................................23
3.2
Connecting to target JTAG/COP connector................................................................................................................... 24
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Connecting probe tip directly to debug port connector......................................................................................24
3.2.2
Connecting probe tip to target system JTAG connector.................................................................................... 24
3.2.3
Connecting JTAG header using extension cable............................................................................................... 26
Connecting flexible probe tip extension cable with JTAG header.................................................... 26
Connecting to target aurora nexus connector..................................................................................................................27
3.3.1
3.4
Page
3.2.1
3.2.3.1
3.3
Title
Connecting aurora nexus cable.......................................................................................................................... 27
Connecting to target system serial port...........................................................................................................................28
3.4.1
Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to target system............................................................................................... 28
3.4.1.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
Connecting serial cable between Gigabit TAP probe and serial port of target system......................29
Configuring target serial port............................................................................................................................. 29
3.4.2.1
Configuring Gigabit TAP probe serial port....................................................................................... 29
3.4.2.2
Restoring target serial port to default settings................................................................................... 30
Accessing target serial port................................................................................................................................ 30
3.4.3.1
Telnet to target serial port.................................................................................................................. 30
Chapter 4
Using Gigabit TAP probe
4.1
Debugging with Gigabit TAP system............................................................................................................................. 33
4.1.1
4.2
Starting Gigabit TAP probe............................................................................................................................... 33
Accessing Gigabit TAP probe remotely......................................................................................................................... 34
4.2.1
Remotely accessing setup utility........................................................................................................................34
4.2.2
Connecting to your target's serial port remotely................................................................................................ 34
Chapter 5
Hardware specifications
5.1
LEDs on Gigabit TAP probe...........................................................................................................................................35
5.1.1
Heartbeat indicator............................................................................................................................................. 36
5.1.2
Run/Pause indicator........................................................................................................................................... 36
5.1.3
Target power indicator....................................................................................................................................... 37
5.1.4
Active indicator..................................................................................................................................................37
5.1.5
Measure indicator...............................................................................................................................................37
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5.2
5.3
5.4
Title
Page
5.1.6
RJ-45 Ethernet connector with Link and Activity indicators............................................................................ 37
5.1.7
Gigabit TAP probe status indicators.................................................................................................................. 38
Host connectors on Gigabit TAP probe.......................................................................................................................... 39
5.2.1
Reset button........................................................................................................................................................40
5.2.2
Power connector.................................................................................................................................................40
5.2.3
RJ-45 Ethernet connector...................................................................................................................................40
5.2.4
Config USB connector....................................................................................................................................... 40
Target connectors on Gigabit TAP probe....................................................................................................................... 40
5.3.1
Trigger in connector ..........................................................................................................................................41
5.3.2
Trigger out connector ........................................................................................................................................41
5.3.3
Aurora Nexus connector ................................................................................................................................... 41
5.3.4
RJ-25 target serial connector..............................................................................................................................42
5.3.5
Run control probe tip cable connector............................................................................................................... 42
5.3.6
Debug port connector.........................................................................................................................................42
Gigabit TAP probe specifications...................................................................................................................................43
5.4.1
Electrical characteristics.................................................................................................................................... 43
5.4.2
Physical characteristics...................................................................................................................................... 43
Chapter 6
JTAG/COP connector information
Chapter 7
OnCE connector information
Chapter 8
Aurora high speed trace daughtercard information
8.1
General specifications.....................................................................................................................................................53
8.1.1
Simplex operation.............................................................................................................................................. 53
8.1.2
Duplex operation................................................................................................................................................54
8.1.3
Electrical specifications..................................................................................................................................... 55
8.1.4
AC coupling....................................................................................................................................................... 55
8.1.5
JTAG and optional signaling............................................................................................................................. 56
8.1.5.1
TCK, TMS, TRST, TDI, and TDO signals........................................................................................ 56
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Section number
8.2
Title
Page
8.1.5.2
VIO (Vsense) signal...........................................................................................................................56
8.1.5.3
Reset signal........................................................................................................................................ 56
8.1.5.4
Vendor IO 0-5 signals........................................................................................................................ 57
8.1.5.5
Recommended termination................................................................................................................ 57
Mechanical specification................................................................................................................................................ 57
8.2.1
Cables.................................................................................................................................................................58
8.2.2
Connectors......................................................................................................................................................... 58
8.2.3
PCB design and routing consideration...............................................................................................................60
8.2.4
Trigger signals....................................................................................................................................................60
Chapter 9
Setting up standalone PC Ethernet
9.1
System requirements.......................................................................................................................................................63
9.2
Tutorial: Standalone Network for Ethernet setup........................................................................................................... 64
9.3
9.2.1
Installing and configuring TCP/IP software...................................................................................................... 64
9.2.2
Creating Windows hosts file.............................................................................................................................. 67
9.2.3
Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to host computer..............................................................................................68
Configuring the Gigabit TAP probe............................................................................................................................... 69
9.3.1
Starting setup utility........................................................................................................................................... 69
9.3.2
Storing IP address and netmask in flash EPROM..............................................................................................69
Chapter 10
Gigabit TAP probe setup utility commands
10.1 Connecting to Gigabit TAP probe setup utility.............................................................................................................. 71
10.2 Gigabit TAP probe setup utility commands and variables............................................................................................. 72
10.2.1 Commands to configure communications..........................................................................................................72
10.2.1.1 netparam.............................................................................................................................................72
10.2.1.2 tgtty.................................................................................................................................................... 74
10.2.2 Commands to troubleshoot communication...................................................................................................... 75
10.2.2.1 arp.......................................................................................................................................................75
10.2.2.2 host..................................................................................................................................................... 75
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10.2.2.3 netstat................................................................................................................................................. 76
10.2.2.4 ping.....................................................................................................................................................76
10.2.2.5 route................................................................................................................................................... 77
Chapter 11
Network administration
11.1 Gigabit TAP probe network ports...................................................................................................................................79
11.2 Configuring Gigabit TAP probe using netparam............................................................................................................80
11.2.1 Configuring dynamic IP Address.......................................................................................................................80
11.2.2 Configuring static IP Address............................................................................................................................ 80
11.2.3 Static routing...................................................................................................................................................... 81
11.2.3.1 Specify default gateway or static route table (optional).................................................................... 82
11.2.4 Changing existing route entry............................................................................................................................ 82
11.2.5 Entering static routes..........................................................................................................................................83
11.2.5.1 Static route example...........................................................................................................................83
11.3 Using CCS to search for Gigabit TAP probes................................................................................................................ 85
11.3.1 Sample output.................................................................................................................................................... 86
Chapter 12
Gigabit TAP probe firmware (Core)
12.1 Gigabit TAP probe internal software overview.............................................................................................................. 87
12.1.1 Boot loader......................................................................................................................................................... 87
12.1.2 Fallback boot loader...........................................................................................................................................87
12.1.3 Operating System............................................................................................................................................... 88
12.1.4 Shell software.....................................................................................................................................................88
12.2 Reprogramming Gigabit TAP probe firmware images...................................................................................................88
12.2.1 Reprogramming firmware through Gigabit port................................................................................................ 88
Chapter 13
Troubleshooting
13.1 Troubleshooting communications problems...................................................................................................................91
13.1.1 Verify network communication......................................................................................................................... 92
13.1.2 View network connections.................................................................................................................................92
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Title
Page
13.2 Troubleshooting power problems................................................................................................................................... 93
13.3 Troubleshooting overheating problems.......................................................................................................................... 93
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Chapter 1
Introducing CodeWarrior Gigabit TAP probe
The CodeWarrior is a tool that helps you develop and debug software on Freescale
PowerPC processors.
This chapter contains the following sections:
•
•
•
•
What is Gigabit TAP probe?
Identifying components
Operating requirements
Related documentation
CAUTION
The Gigabit TAP probe contains components that are subject to
damage from electrostatic discharge. Whenever you are using,
handling, or transporting the Gigabit TAP probe, or connecting
to or disconnecting from a target system, always use proper
anti-static protection measures, including static-free bench pads
and grounded wrist straps.
1.1 What is Gigabit TAP probe?
The Gigabit TAP probe uses advanced emulation technology to provide control of and
visibility into your target system. Combined with a host debugger, the Gigabit TAP probe
speeds the debugging process by letting you interactively control and examine the state of
your target system. The Gigabit TAP is available in two configurations: the basic Gigabit
TAP, and the.
The basic Gigabit TAP probe system is composed of two parts:
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What is Gigabit TAP probe?
• The Gigabit TAP probe as shown in figure Figure 1-1, which provides visibility into
and control of your target system using a and connects to your host computer through
a , or .
• A target system JTAG/COP probe tip, which is designed to provide a physical and
electrical interface to the target system processor that you want to gain visibility into.
Figure 1-1. Gigabit TAP probe
The Gigabit TAP + Trace probe includes two additional components to enable high speed
trace collection and downloads as shown in figure Figure 1-2 :
• An (internal) provides logic, buffers, and connectors for high speed trace collection
and downloads.
• A target system Aurora Nexus cable, which is used to connect the probe to the high
speed Aurora Nexus port of the target.
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Chapter 1 Introducing CodeWarrior Gigabit TAP probe
Figure 1-2. Gigabit TAP + Trace
1.1.1 Product highlights
The Gigabit TAP probe has these features:
• Supports PowerPC™ processors
• Supports all CPU core speeds
• Lets you control and debug software running in-target, with minimal intrusion into
target system operation
• Lets you debug code in cache, ROM, RAM, and flash memory
• Provides high performance:
• Split-second single-step execution
• Gigabit TAP probe is capable of JTAG download speeds greater than 1 MB per
second from host to the target system
• Gigabit TAP probe + Trace is capable of Aurora download speeds of 6 MB per
second
NOTE
The actual download speed depends on the target
system processor, the debug port's clock frequency, the
network speed, and the debugger.
• Supports 10/100/1000BaseT Ethernet network connection
• Supports telnet access to your target system's serial port, allowing you to interact
with your target system's serial port over the network
• Supports both big and little endian byte-order
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Identifying components
• Automatically supports target system signal levels from 1.2V to 3.3V
• Software debug capabilities including:
• Control instruction execution
• Display and modify target system memory
• Examine and modify any processor registers
• Run to breakpoints in ROM, RAM, or flash memory
• Single-step through source and assembly language code views
• Step into, over, or out of functions
• Collect and analyze real-time data and execution trace
1.1.2 Gigabit TAP probe benefits
The Gigabit TAP probe provides these key benefits:
• Visibility: The Gigabit TAP probe makes it possible for you to observe registers and
the current state of target system memory. You can halt program execution at
predefined states and examine the data for a particular program state.
• Control: You can conveniently control the state of the target system by downloading
code, manually modifying processor registers and memory, single-stepping through
the code, or setting breakpoints.
• Trace: Gigabit TAP probes equipped with a trace module (Gigabit TAP + Trace)
enable collection of 4 GB of real-time target execution and data trace.
1.2 Identifying components
Before you begin, check that these components are present:
• External power supply with four interchangeable plugs
• The Gigabit TAP probe should include the following and :
• One standard debug port (JTAG/COP) probe tip cable assembly
• One flexible probe tip extension cable
• One RJ-45 cable
• One RJ-25 cables
• One 9-pin and one 25-pin cable adapters
• One type A/B USB cable
• The Gigabit TAP + Trace probe should also include:
• Aurora Nexus connector on the probe
• Trigger OUT/IN connectors on the probe
• One 70-pin Aurora Nexus cable
• Gigabit TAP Probe User Guide (this manual)
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Chapter 1 Introducing CodeWarrior Gigabit TAP probe
1.3 Operating requirements
Before setting up the system, you should make sure that the operating environment is
prepared.
1.3.1 Target power requirements
Several configurations are possible for providing power to the system. The preferred
configuration is for all target DC power supplies to use a 3-wire AC input with an earth
(safety) ground and with the earth ground isolated from the DC return. Table 1-1 shows
various and the results of using each.
Table 1-1. Target system device power supply configurations
AC Input
Isolation
Result
Preferred configuration
3-wire system with earth
(safety) wire
AC earth is isolated from DC
return.Target system DC is
fully isolated and is floating.
Normal operation
Acceptable configuration
2-wire system with no earth
(safety) wire
AC return is isolated from DC Normal operation
return. Target system DC is
fully isolated and is floating.
Acceptable configuration
3-wire system with earth
(safety) wire
AC earth is tied to DC return.
Target system DC is not
isolated and is floating.
Prohibited configuration
2-wire system with no earth
(safety) wire
AC return is tied to DC return. Configuration may result in
Target system DC is not
unstable operation of DC
isolated and is not floating.
signals and AC hum.A safety
hazard may result from power
supply or target system failure
where DC voltage is
connected to AC return.
Configuration may result in
unstable operation of DC
signals.
CAUTION
Do not use 2-wire AC input with the AC neutral tied to the DC
return (Figure 1-3) on any power supply in the system. A
failure in a power supply or target system where DC voltage
becomes connected to AC neutral may result in personal injury
and damage to the equipment.
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Operating requirements
Figure 1-3. Prohibited target power supply connection
CAUTION
Good grounding practices should be observed when connecting
digital grounds to earth ground, since ground loops may induce
sufficient currents to cause irregular operation of the combined
system. Under no circumstances, the third wire prong on any
power cord be removed or disconnected.
1.3.2 Standard electrostatic precautions
This instrument contains static-sensitive components that are subject to damage from .
Use standard ESD precautions when transporting, handling, or using the Gigabit TAP
probe and the target system, when connecting/disconnecting the probe and the target
system, and when removing the cover of the instrument.
We recommend the use of the following precautions:
• Use wrist straps or heel bands with a 1 Mohm resistor connected to ground.
• On the work surface and floor, use static conductive mats with a 1 Mohm resistor
connected to ground.
• Keep high static-producing items, such as non-ESD-approved plastics, tape and
packaging foam away from the probe and the target system.
The above precautions should be considered as minimum requirements for a staticcontrolled environment.
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Chapter 1 Introducing CodeWarrior Gigabit TAP probe
1.3.3 Electrical requirements
The Gigabit TAP probe is powered from the external power supply provided with your
unit. It can use line voltages of 100-240 VAC (50/60 Hz). The Gigabit TAP probe tip
draws less than 50 mA from the target system.
We recommend that you use a surge protector between the power supply and AC power.
1.3.3.1 Connecting power supply cable
Connect the power supply connector to the POWER connector on the Gigabit TAP probe
as shown in figure below.
CAUTION
Connect only the provided power supply to the Gigabit TAP
probe. Other power supplies may look similar, but can damage
the probe if the supply specifications differ from the required
specifications.
Figure 1-4. Gigabit TAP probe with power cable attached
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Related documentation
1.3.3.2 Cycling power to system
When you need to apply or cycle power to the Gigabit TAP probe, connect or disconnect
the power cable from the power source or from the probe. After you have connected the
probe to your target system, use the following sequence for applying or removing the
power:
1.3.4 Operating temperature
The Gigabit TAP probe can operate in a temperature range of 0 to 40 °C (32 to 104 ºF).
NOTE
C is for celsius and F is for Fahrenheit
1.3.5 Target system requirements
The Gigabit TAP probe automatically supports target system signal levels from 1.2V to
3.3V.
NOTE
In the case of PowerPC targets with a Qack signal, for the
Gigabit TAP probe to properly stop and restart the target,
theQack signal must be pulled low. The Gigabit TAP probe
pulls this signal low through the probe tip.
1.4 Related documentation
This manual describes the procedures for unpacking the Gigabit TAP probe, connecting
the external power supply, setting up Ethernet communication, and connecting the
Gigabit TAP probe to your target system.
The CodeWarrior documentation explains how to install and configure the CodeWarrior
IDE and debugger.
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Chapter 2
Connecting to network
This chapter explains how to connect the Gigabit TAP probe to an existing .
The Gigabit TAP probe is an Ethernet host device that may be configured for TCP/IP
using to acquire its IP configuration (the default method) or through a static IP
configuration.
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to network
• Customizing Gigabit TAP probe
• Testing network communication
CAUTION
The probe contains electronic components that are sensitive to
electrostatic discharge. Always use anti-static procedures while
handling the probe components.
2.1 Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to network
The Gigabit TAP probe's default operation is to acquire its network configuration
automatically using DHCP, and optionally, attempt to register its hostname with a name
server.
The factory assigned host name is FSLXXYYZZ where XXYYZZ is the last three octets
of the MAC address, provided on a label on the bottom side of the probe. For example, if
the probe's MAC address is 00:04:9f:00:77:31, the host name will be FSL007731. The
Gigabit TAP probe can connect directly to a network using twisted pair cables.
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Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to network
2.1.1 Connecting to twisted pair interface
1. Plug one end of the supplied (p/n 600-75499) into the RJ-45 connector of the Gigabit
TAP probe as shown in Figure 2-1.
2. Connect the other end of the RJ-45 cable into the RJ-45 connector of your twisted
pair network or host computer.
NOTE
To connect to a thinwire or thickwire network, use a
converter hub that accepts the twisted pair
(10/100/1000BaseT) cable from the Gigabit TAP probe and
converts to the thinwire (10Base2) or thickwire (10Base5)
cable from your network.
Figure 2-1. Gigabit TAP probe with an RJ-45 cable attached
NOTE
When you configure the debugger for the hardware
connection, you will need to specify the Gigabit TAP probe
IP address or hostname. The CCS findcc utility is used to
search any probe on the local subnet. See Using CCS to
search for Gigabit TAP probes section for more
information.
NOTE
Depending on the type and complexity of your network,
your network administrator may need to update network
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Chapter 2 Connecting to network
server tables so that the network accesses the Gigabit TAP
probe correctly. Updating network server tables requires
both a detailed knowledge of Ethernet address resolution
and network routing with write access permission to the
server tables. See Network administration section for more
information on network administration.
2.2 Customizing Gigabit TAP probe
If you cannot use DHCP, you must configure the probe for your network using static IP
address resolution.
As shipped, the Gigabit TAP probe acquires its network configuration automatically
using DHCP. To manually configure the network settings of the Gigabit TAP probe for
your network, connect a terminal to the probe configuration port and use the probe onboard setup utility netparam to change the probe network settings. The probe netparam
utility lets you select and modify network parameters that are saved in probe memory.
Use netparam to configure the probe to match your and .
If the probe is able to communicate with hosts on other subnets, you will need to
configure the probe for one of the following routing options:
• Default gateways
• tables
2.2.1 Establishing serial communication with Gigabit TAP probe
1. Connect one end of the USB cable (P/N 600-76787) to a on your host computer.
2. Connect the other end of the USB cable to the USB connector of the Gigabit TAP
probe, labeled as shown in figure Figure 2-2.
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Customizing Gigabit TAP probe
Figure 2-2. Gigabit TAP Probe with USB Cable Attached
3. Identify the serial port device assigned to the Gigabit TAP. On Windows, click Start
> Control Panel >Adminstrative Tools > Computer Management > Device
Manager > Ports and then select USB serial port from the ports list. On Linux, the
device file is located at: /dev/ttyUSB0.
NOTE
On Windows, you may need a driver before you can access
the CONFIG port. The CodeWarrior installer will install
this driver.
4. Set your terminal or terminal communication software (for example, Windows
HyperTerminal) as follows:
• 115200 baud
• 8 data bits
• 1 stop bit
• no parity
• hardware handshaking disabled
• disabled
• Turn on power to the Gigabit TAP probe. If the power is already on, then cycle
power to the probe.
• When prompted, press Enter . The login banner should be displayed and the
core> command-line prompt appears.
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Chapter 2 Connecting to network
2.2.2 Customizing Gigabit TAP probe network settings
You need to have write permissions to the network database or the assistance of your
network system administrator.
1. Change the Gigabit TAP probe network settings.
a. At the core> prompt, enter the netparam command to view the current settings.
b. For network setup, see netparam section for syntax and options. For more
information on installing the Gigabit TAP probe on a network, see Network
Administration section.
c. At the core> prompt, enter the netparam commands and required parameters.
2. At the core> prompt, enter reset to reboot the Gigabit TAP probe to activate the new
network settings.
Example: Assign a Static IP Address and Hostname to the Gigabit TAP Probe
If the Gigabit TAP probe has a static IP address of 195.121.1.2 and a hostname of lab01,
enter the following commands:
core> netparam bootconfig static:lab01
core> netparam static_ip_address 195.121.1.2
core> reset
The netparam utility copies its settings into non-volatile memory on the probe. Follow
these rules while using netparam utility:
• Each time you enter a netparam command, wait for the core> prompt to re-appear
before entering the next command. The prompt indicates that the parameter change
has been logged.
• When you have finished entering all settings, type reset at the core> prompt. When
the probe restarts, it will use the new netparam parameters.
2.3 Testing network communication
You can use the ping command to ensure that the Gigabit TAP probe can communicate
with the host.
2.3.1 Verifying communication
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Testing network communication
At a host command prompt, type the following:
ping hostname | ip_address
where hostname is the name and ip_address is the IP address assigned to the Gigabit TAP
probe.
If no output is displayed on the screen, check the following:
• The physical connections are tight.
• The Gigabit TAP probe address and netmask in the hosts file match those in Gigabit
TAP probe flash.
• The netmask used for the Gigabit TAP probe and for the are appropriate to the class
of the IP address.
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Chapter 3
Connecting to target system
To run your software using the Gigabit TAP probe, you must have working target system
hardware, prototype hardware, or an evaluation board.
This chapter explains how to connect a Gigabit TAP probe to the target system.
This chapter contains the following sections:
•
•
•
•
Debug port connector information
Connecting to target JTAG/COP connector
Connecting to target aurora nexus connector
Connecting to target system serial port
CAUTION
The Gigabit TAP probe contains components that are subject to
damage from electrostatic discharge. Whenever you are using,
handling, or transporting the Gigabit TAP probe, or connecting
to or disconnecting from a target system, always use proper
anti-static protection measures, including static-free bench pads
and grounded wrist straps.
3.1 Debug port connector information
The Gigabit TAP probe offers debugging capabilities without modifying any target
system code or any special I/O port in the target system for communication with a
monitor.
Target system connections can be made using any one of the debug ports (JTAG/COP
or ). The basic Gigabit TAP probe connects to the target system in any of the following
ways:
• Connect to the JTAG header on the target system directly with the probe tip.
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Connecting to target JTAG/COP connector
• Connect to the JTAG header on the target system using a flexible extension cable.
Use it when more clearance is required.
• Connect to the Aurora Nexus socket on the target system directly with the Aurora
Nexus cable.
The extension cable is provided with your Gigabit TAP probe. A 70-pin Aurora Nexus
cable is provided with the Gigabit TAP + Trace probe. A 22-pin Aurora Nexus cable is
also available and can be ordered separately.
JTAG/COP connector information chapter describes the debug port connector
specifications.
3.2 Connecting to target JTAG/COP connector
You can connect the Gigabit TAP probe to the target system in one of three ways. The
three methods are explained in the following sections:
• Connecting probe tip directly to debug port connector
• Connecting probe tip to target system JTAG connector
• Connecting JTAG header using extension cable
CAUTION
Failure to connect the Gigabit TAP probe tip connector to the
target system may damage the Gigabit TAP probe or target
system. Verify all connections before applying power.
3.2.1 Connecting probe tip directly to debug port connector
If your target system has debug port connectors, you can directly connect the probe tip
and/or trace cables on the Gigabit TAP probe to one of the target system debug port
connectors.
3.2.2 Connecting probe tip to target system JTAG connector
1. Turn off the power to the target system and the Gigabit TAP probe.
2. Make sure all the pins of the probe tip or trace cable are properly aligned with the
debug port connector on the target system. Use mechanical keying and the label on
the probe tip as a guide. The Gigabit TAP probe JTAG/COP connector is shown in
figure Figure 3-1.
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Chapter 3 Connecting to target system
Figure 3-1. Gigabit TAP probe PPC JTAG/COP probe tip
3. Connect the probe tip 50-pin ribbon cable to the RUN CONTROL connector on the
Gigabit TAP probe as shown in the figure Figure 3-2.
4. Gently (but firmly) press the probe tip onto the target system debug port header.
Make sure that you properly align the Gigabit TAP multi-pin socket connector with
the multi-pin header on your target system.
NOTE
Ensure that pin 1 of the probe tip is connected to the pin 1
of the header.
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Connecting to target JTAG/COP connector
Figure 3-2. Gigabit TAP probe with PPC-JTAG probe tip
3.2.3 Connecting JTAG header using extension cable
Use the supplied cable to connect the Gigabit TAP probe to your target system if there is
not enough clearance for the standard probe tip to fit onto the target system .
3.2.3.1 Connecting flexible probe tip extension cable with JTAG
header
1. Turn off the power to the target system and the Gigabit TAP probe.
2. Attach the multi-pin header end of the flexible probe tip extension cable to the JTAG
socket of the Gigabit TAP probe tip as shown in Figure 3-3.
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Chapter 3 Connecting to target system
Figure 3-3. Flexible probe tip extension cable attached to JTAG/COP header
The red stripe on the cable identifies pin 1. The pin assignment of the cable is
identical to that of the probe tip socket.
3. Connect the other end of the flexible probe tip extension cable to the debug port
header on your target system.
3.3 Connecting to target aurora nexus connector
You can connect the Gigabit TAP + Trace probe to the target system with the Aurora
Nexus cable.
3.3.1 Connecting aurora nexus cable
1. Turn off the power to the target system and the Gigabit TAP + Trace probe.
2. Connect the Aurora Nexus cable to the AURORA NEXUS connector on the Gigabit
TAP + Trace probe as shown in figure Figure 3-4.
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Connecting to target system serial port
Figure 3-4. Gigabit TAP + Trace probe with aurora nexus cable
3.4 Connecting to target system serial port
Many target system boards have a built-in serial port. A console interface connection to
the serial port of the target system lets you query and configure the state of your target
system.
The Gigabit TAP probe provides a serial port which can be configured to access the serial
port of the target system. This is useful if you need to access the serial port of a remotely
located target system over Ethernet from the host system.
The following sections explain how to access the serial port of the target system:
• Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to target system
• Configuring target serial port
• Accessing target serial port
3.4.1 Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to target system
An RJ-25 cable (P/N 600-76822) is provided with the Gigabit TAP probe to connect to
the serial port of your target system.
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Chapter 3 Connecting to target system
3.4.1.1 Connecting serial cable between Gigabit TAP probe and serial
port of target system
1. Connect one end of the RJ-25 cable, and the appropriate adapter, to the serial port on
your target system board.
2. Connect the other end of the RJ-25 cable to the Gigabit TAP probe RJ-25 serial
connector, labeled TARGET SERIAL.
3.4.2 Configuring target serial port
Table 3-1 table shows the default settings of the Gigabit TAP Target Serial port.
Table 3-1. Gigabit TAP probe target serial port default settings
For this option...
Select...
Baud rate
9600
Data bits
data8
Stop bits
stop1
Parity
noparity
Hardware flow control
nortscts
XON/XOFF flow control
noxon
Target echo feature
echo
If the Gigabit TAP probe Target Serial port settings do not match the serial port settings
of your target system, use the following steps:
3.4.2.1 Configuring Gigabit TAP probe serial port
1. Make sure network communications have already been configured correctly. For
more information, see Connecting to network topic or Setting up standalone PC
ethernet topic.
2. Connect to the Gigabit TAP probe internal setup utility. For more information, see
Connecting to Gigabit TAP probe setup utility topic.
3. When the core> prompt appears on the terminal, enter the tgtty command to configure
the Gigabit TAP probe Target Serial port. The syntax is:
tgtty [9600|19200|38400|57600|115200] [data8|data5|data6|data7] [stop1|
stop2] [noparity|oddparity|evenparity|lowparity|highparity] [rtscts|nortscts]
noxon] [echo|noecho]
[xon|
For example:
tgtty 19200 data8 stop2 noparity nortscts noxon echo
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Connecting to target system serial port
4. Verify the Target Serial port configuration at the core> prompt by entering the tgtty
command by itself:
tgtty
3.4.2.2 Restoring target serial port to default settings
1. Make sure network communications has already been configured correctly. For more
information, see Connecting to network chapter or Setting up standalone PC ethernet
appendix.
2. Connect to the CodeWarrior TAP probe internal setup utility. For more information,
see Connecting to Gigabit TAP probe setup utility section.
3. When the core> prompt appears on the terminal, use the tgtty command to reset the
Target Serial port to the default settings: tgtty default
3.4.3 Accessing target serial port
You can use telnet to connect to the Gigabit TAP probe Target Serial port and access the
serial port of your target system remotely over Ethernet.
3.4.3.1 Telnet to target serial port
1. Make sure that you have physically connected the Gigabit TAP probe RJ-25 cable to
your target system (for more information, see Connecting the Gigabit TAP Probe to
the Target System topic).
2. Verify the serial port settings (see Configuring target serial port topic).
3. Start a telnet session and connect to the Gigabit TAP probe Target Serial port:
telnet {hostname | ip_address}1082
Use the host name or IP address of the probe. For static IP, the host name must be the
same one you entered into the hosts database file; see Connecting to network topic or
Setting up standalone PC ethernet topic. To identify the IP address of any probe on
the subnet, see Using CCS to search for Gigabit TAP probes topic. The Target Serial
port number of the Gigabit TAP probe is 1082.
4. You should now have access to the serial port of your target system. You can use this
connection in the same manner as if your host computer were connected directly to
the serial port of your target system.
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Chapter 3 Connecting to target system
NOTE
If you have not already installed it, you can now install the
CodeWarrior software. Refer to the Targeting manual for
information on how to configure the debugger and run a
confidence test.
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Connecting to target system serial port
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Chapter 4
Using Gigabit TAP probe
This chapter provides system startup procedures and explains how the Gigabit TAP probe
is accessed remotely.
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Debugging with Gigabit TAP system
• Accessing Ethernet TAP probe remotely
4.1 Debugging with Gigabit TAP system
This section explains how to start debugging with the Gigabit TAP probe.
Before starting debug with the Gigabit TAP probe, make sure you have:
• Connected the Gigabit TAP probe to your network .
• Connected the Gigabit TAP probe to the target system.
• Installed the debugger software and properly configure it to communicate with the
Gigabit TAP probe.
4.1.1 Starting Gigabit TAP probe
1. Apply power to the Gigabit TAP probe.
2. Apply power to the target system.
NOTE
The Gigabit TAP probe draws power from the external
power supply. The Gigabit TAP probe tip draws less than
50 mA from the target in order to detect target power.
3. Start the debugger.
4. Configure the debugger for the Gigabit TAP connection.
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Accessing Gigabit TAP probe remotely
LEDs are provided to indicate the status of the Gigabit TAP probe. For information on
the , see Ethernet TAP probe specifications topic.
You are now ready to begin your debug session. For information on using the debugger,
see Targeting Users Guide .
4.2 Accessing Gigabit TAP probe remotely
You can remotely access the internal setup utility and the Target Serial port of the
Gigabit TAP probe after you connect the probe to your network.
If the host computer is not physically located near the Gigabit TAP probe, remote access
is useful when you need to:
• reconfigure communications
• use the serial port of your target system
• reset the Gigabit TAP probe through your Ethernet connection
4.2.1 Remotely accessing setup utility
Open a telnet session and connect to the Gigabit TAP probe by entering the command:
telnet hostname | ip_address
Use the host name or IP address of the probe. For static IP, the host name must be the
same one you entered into the hosts database file; see Connecting to network topic or
Setting up standalone PC Ethernet topic. To identify the IP address of any probe on the
subnet, see Using CCS to search for Gigabit TAP probes topic.
The login banner is displayed, followed by the core> command-line prompt.
4.2.2 Connecting to your target's serial port remotely
Make sure the Gigabit TAP probe Target Serial port is physically connected to your
target's serial port, and it has been configured correctly. For more information, see
Accessing target serial port topic.
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Chapter 5
Hardware specifications
This chapter provides hardware specifications for the Gigabit TAP probe.
This chapter contains the following sections:
•
•
•
•
LEDs on Gigabit TAP probe
Host connectors on Gigabit TAP probe
Target connectors on Gigabit TAP probe
Gigabit TAP probe specifications
5.1 LEDs on Gigabit TAP probe
Figure 5-1 and Figure 5-2 show the various LEDs of the Gigabit TAP and Gigabit TAP +
Trace probes.
Figure 5-1. Gigabit TAP Probe - top view
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LEDs on Gigabit TAP probe
Figure 5-2. Gigabit TAP + Trace Probe - top view
5.1.1 Heartbeat indicator
The (labeled HEARTBEAT) indicates the status of communication between the Gigabit
TAP probe and the network as follows:
• The LED is red until the Gigabit TAP probe boot code starts running.
• The LED flashes orange (1 Hz) during configuration of the network interface.
• The LED flashes green (1 Hz) after network interface has been successfully
configured. During firmware updates, the LED flashes green at a higher frequency
(5Hz).
NOTE
Do not remove power, unplug the network, or press the
reset button during firmware updates.
• The LED is unlit if the Gigabit TAP probe is not powered on.
• The LED flashes red if the Gigabit TAP probe is overheating.
5.1.2 Run/Pause indicator
The status LED (labeled ) indicates the state of the target as follows:
•
•
•
•
The LED is green when the target is in run mode.
The LED is red when the target is in pause mode.
The LED is orange when the target is in mixed mode.
The LED is initially unlit and remains so until the debugger is connected to the
Gigabit TAP probe.
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Chapter 5 Hardware specifications
5.1.3 Target power indicator
The target power LED (labeled TARGET POWER) indicates whether the Gigabit TAP
probe detects target power.
• The LED is green when target power is detected.
• The LED is unlit when no target power is detected.
NOTE
In Gigabit TAP + Trace systems, this LED is shared by the
run control and Aurora Nexus cables and will light up if
target power is detected on either cable.
5.1.4 Active indicator
The active (labeled ACTIVE) indicates the status of the Aurora Nexus interface.
•
•
•
•
The LED is unlit if the Aurora Nexus link is down.
The LED is red if the Aurora Nexus lanes are up but the channel is not up.
The LED is green if the Aurora Nexus lanes are up and the channel is also up.
The LED is orange if the Aurora Nexus lanes are up and the channel is also up but
errors are occurring.
5.1.5 Measure indicator
The measure LED (labeled MEASURE) indicates the flow of data across the Aurora
Nexus channel and in and out of the trace buffer.
• The LED is unlit if the the unit is idle.
• The LED flashes red if there is data flow on the Aurora Nexus channel, sending or
receiving.
• The LED flashes green if the trace buffer is being read.
• The LED flashes orange if there is data flow on the Aurora Nexus channel and also
the trace buffer is being read.
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LEDs on Gigabit TAP probe
5.1.6 RJ-45 Ethernet connector with Link and Activity indicators
The Gigabit TAP probe interface consists of an RJ-45 connector and a built-in twisted
pair MAU that connects directly to 10/100/1000BaseT twisted pair networks. See
Connecting to network topic or Setting up standalone PC Ethernet topic for more
information on connecting to an network.
The Gigabit TAP probe link and activity indicators are integrated into the RJ-45 Gigabit
TAP probe connector. The yellow indicator is turned on when the Gigabit TAP probe is
connected to any network, and flickers when data is being transferred across the network.
The green indicator is turned on when the Gigabit TAP probe is connected to a
1000BaseT network, and flickers when data is being transferred across the network.
5.1.7 Gigabit TAP probe status indicators
The Gigabit TAP probe uses LEDs to indicate its status.
Table 5-1. Gigabit TAP probe status indicators
LED
HEARTBEAT
RUN/PAUSE
Location
Top
Top
Activity
Description
Off
Gigabit TAP probe is not
powered on.
Solid red
Gigabit TAP probe is
executing the BootLoader or
has failed to boot.
Orange heartbeat
Gigabit TAP probe Operating
System running and network
interface is initializing.
Green heartbeat
Gigabit TAP probe Operating
System running and network
interface successfully
configured.
Red heartbeat
Gigabit TAP is overheating.
Remove airflow obstructions,
and contact Customer
Support if the problem
persists.
Off
Debugger is not connected to
Gigabit TAP probe.
Solid red
Gigabit TAP probe is in pause
mode.
Solid green
Gigabit TAP probe is in run
mode.
Solid orange
Gigabit TAP probe in mixed
mode.
Table continues on the next page...
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Chapter 5 Hardware specifications
Table 5-1. Gigabit TAP probe status indicators (continued)
LED
TARGET POWER
ACTIVE
MEASURE
ACTIVITY
LINK
Location
Top
Top
Top
Ethernet Connector
Ethernet Connector
Activity
Description
Off
Target system power is not
detected.
Solid green
Target system power is
detected.
Off
Aurora Nexus link is down.
Solid red
Aurora Nexus lanes are up
but the channel is not up.
Solid green
Aurora Nexus lanes are up
and the channel is also up.
Solid orange
Aurora Nexus lanes are up
and the channel is also up but
errors are occurring.
Off
Gigabit TAP is idle.
red
Data flow on the Aurora
Nexus channel.
green
Trace buffer is being read.
orange
Data flow on the Aurora
Nexus channel and also the
trace buffer is being read.
Off
Ethernet is not transmitting or
receiving data.
Green heartbeat
Ethernet is transmitting or
receiving.
Off
Ethernet is not linked.
Solid Orange
Ethernet is linked.
5.2 Host connectors on Gigabit TAP probe
This figure shows the host connectors of the Gigabit TAP and Gigabit TAP + Trace
probes.
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Target connectors on Gigabit TAP probe
Figure 5-3. Gigabit TAP and Gigabit TAP + Trace probes - host end view
5.2.1 Reset button
The reset button is used to reboot the Gigabit TAP probe.
5.2.2 Power connector
The Power connector on the Gigabit TAP probe is used to connect the DC power supply
cable.
5.2.3 RJ-45 Ethernet connector
The Ethernet connector on the Gigabit TAP probe is used to connect to an
10/100/1000BaseT Ethernet.
5.2.4 Config USB connector
The Config USB port on the Gigabit TAP probe acts as a virtual serial device which
supports at 115200 baud. The Config USB port is used for configuring network
communication, entering routing tables, and for diagnostics.
5.3 Target connectors on Gigabit TAP probe
Figure 5-4 and Figure 5-5 shows the target connectors of the Gigabit TAP and Gigabit
TAP + Trace probes.
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Chapter 5 Hardware specifications
Figure 5-4. Gigabit TAP probe - target end view
Figure 5-5. Gigabit TAP + Trace probe - target end view
5.3.1 Trigger in connector
The TRIGGER IN port on the Gigabit TAP + Trace probe is a 3.5mm stereo socket, with
a trigger input channel on pin 3 (right), and an trigger output channel on pin 2 (left).
5.3.2 Trigger out connector
The TRIGGER OUT port on the Gigabit TAP + Trace probe is a 3.5mm stereo socket,
with a trigger output channel on pin 3 (right), and an trigger input channel on pin 2 (left).
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Target connectors on Gigabit TAP probe
5.3.3 Aurora Nexus connector
The Aurora Nexus cable is connected to the AURORA Nexus socket on the Gigabit TAP
+ Trace probes.
5.3.4 RJ-25 target serial connector
The Gigabit TAP probe provides a target serial port which can be configured to access
your target's serial port. This is particularly useful if your host computer is not near your
target and you need to access your target's serial port remotely over your network.
Figure below shows the pinout definition of the Target serial port.
Table 5-2. Pinout definition of the Target Serial port
Pin
Signal
1
Ready To Send (RTS)
2
Ground
3
Receive Data (RxD)
4
Transmit Data (TxD)
5
Ground
6
Clear To Send (CTS)
Pin 1 is on the right side as you look at the RJ-11 socket (locking tab on the bottom).
5.3.5 Run control probe tip cable connector
The probe tip ribbon cable is connected to the 50-pin connector on the Gigabit TAP
probe.
5.3.6 Debug port connector
The debug port socket is on the end of the tip and is used to connect the Gigabit TAP
probe to a debug port header on your target system.
NOTE
Ensure that Pin 1 of the probe tip is connected to the Pin 1 of
the header.
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Chapter 5 Hardware specifications
5.4 Gigabit TAP probe specifications
The dimensions of both Gigabit TAP and Gigabit TAP + Trace probes are same. The
figure Figure 5-6 shows the dimensions of the Gigabit TAP + Trace probe.
Figure 5-6. Gigabit TAP + Trace probe dimensions
5.4.1 Electrical characteristics
The Gigabit TAP probe affects the load on only those signals that are connected to the
debug port connector. Loading depends on the method used to connect the Gigabit TAP
probe to the target system. See Connecting to target system topic for a description of each
connection method.
The Gigabit TAP probe affects the target processor and target electrical characteristics.
Caution should be taken in designing the target to accommodate the small signal delays
associated with in-circuit emulator or other test equipment.
The Gigabit TAP probe automatically supports target signal levels from 1.2V to 3.3V.
5.4.2 Physical characteristics
The Gigabit TAP probe is designed to accommodate a trace expansion card, so the
overall system may be too large to physically fit in all target systems.
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Gigabit TAP probe specifications
If you are unable to connect to the debug port on your target system, or if your target
system does not have a debug port connector, see Connecting JTAG header using
extension cable topic.
The Table 5-3 table shows the physical characteristics of the Gigabit TAP probe.
Table 5-3. Gigabit TAP probe - physical characteristics
Physical Characteristics
Power Consumption
Gigabit TAP probe power consumption from external power
supply
5A @ 12V maximum
Gigabit TAP probe power consumption from target
Less than 50 mA to detect target power
Environmental Requirements
Operating temperature
0 to 40 ×C (32 to 104 ×F)
Storage temperature
-40 to 70 ×C (-40 to 158 ×F)
Humidity
5% to 95% relative humidity, non-condensing
Physical
Gigabit TAP probe dimensions
8.473" x 6.2" x 2.661" (21.52 cm x 15.74 cm x 6.75 cm)
Aurora Nexus cable dimensions
See Aurora high speed trace daughtercard information topic
Run Control probe tip enclosure dimensions (excluding
connector)
approx. 2.25" x 1.75" x 0.625" (5.72 cm x 4.44 cm x 1.59 cm)
Run Control target socket dimensions
Height (out of probe tip enclosure; above board)
0.28" (0.71 cm)
Thickness
0.20" (0.51 cm)
Pin-to-pin spacing
0.1" (0.25 cm)
JTAG/COP width
0.8" (2.0 cm)
Black and gray cable
approximately 16.0" x 1.25" x 0.126" (40.64 cm x 3.18 cm x
0.32 cm)
Figure 5-7. Target connector dimensions
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Chapter 6
JTAG/COP connector information
The CodeWarrior Gigabit TAP JTAG/COP probe has a 16-pin connector which
automatically supports target system signal levels from 1.2V to 3.3V.
Figure 6-1 shows the pin assignments of the probe JTAG/COP connector.
Table 6-1 lists JTAG/COP signal names, direction, pin numbers, descriptions, and drive
capabilities for the probe JTAG/COP connector.
Table 6-2 provides a general description of each JTAG/COP signal and the operational
requirements.
NOTE
All JTAG/COP signals must meet accepted standards for
JTAG/COP signal design. To ensure proper and stable
operation between the Gigabit TAP probe and the target
system, the JTAG/COP signals must meet the requirements
listed in Table 6-2.
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Figure 6-1. Gigabit TAP probe for JTAG/COP connector pin assignments
Table 6-1. Gigabit TAP probe for JTAG/COP signal directions
JTAG/COP pin
Signal mnemonic
Signal direction
Description
1
TDO
From target system
17pF load
2
QACK
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
100Ohm pull-down
3
TDI
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
50mA driver
4
TRST
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
50mA driver1
5
HALTED
From target system
17pF load
6
TGT PWR
From target system
2MOhm pull-down, plus
0.01µF load
7
TCK
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
50mA driver
8
CKSI
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
50mA driver
9
TMS
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
50mA driver
10
No Connect
- n/a -
11
SRST
Bi-directional
12
No Connect
- n/a -
13
HRST
Bi-directional
14
No Connect
- n/a -
Open-drain. 100Ohm to
ground when asserted by
Gigabit TAP probe, 22pF load
when not asserted1
Open-drain. 100Ohm to
ground when asserted by
Gigabit TAP probe, 22pF load
when not asserted1
Table continues on the next page...
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Chapter 6 JTAG/COP connector information
Table 6-1. Gigabit TAP probe for JTAG/COP signal directions (continued)
JTAG/COP pin
Signal mnemonic
Signal direction
15
CKSO
From target system
16
GND
- n/a -
Description
17pF load 1
1. 14.7KOhm pull-up to buffered TGT PWR.
Table 6-2. Gigabit TAP probe for JTAG/COP signal recommendations and requirements
JTAG/COP pin
Signal mnemonic
Requirement
1
TDO
Must be wired to the target system
processor. TDO is an output from the
target system processor and an input to
the Gigabit TAP probe. The TDO trace
run should be kept short and maintain a
"two-signal-width" spacing from any
other parallel dynamic signal trace. TDO
should have a series termination resistor
located near the target system
processor.
2
QACK
May be wired to the target system
processor. QACK is an input to most
PowerPC processors and must remain
low while the Gigabit TAP probe is
connected to the target system. The
Gigabit TAP probe connects this signal
internally to the JTAG/COP GND pin
(16) through a 100Ohm resistor.
3
TDI
Must be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe drives
the TDI output with up to 50mA. The TDI
trace should be kept short and maintain
a "two-signal-width" spacing from any
other parallel dynamic signal trace. TDI
should have an RC termination option at
the processor.
4
TRST
Must be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe drives
the TRST output with up to 50mA. To
gain control of the processor, the Gigabit
TAP probe negates TRST approximately
250 milliseconds before negation of
HRST. This allows the Gigabit TAP
probe to issue COP commands through
the JTAG/COP interface and gain
control of the processor upon negation
of HRST. The TRST trace run should be
kept short and maintain a "two-signalwidth" spacing from any other parallel
dynamic signal trace.
5
HALTED
Need not be wired to the target system.
The Gigabit TAP probe does not
currently use this signal.
Table continues on the next page...
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Table 6-2. Gigabit TAP probe for JTAG/COP signal recommendations and requirements
(continued)
JTAG/COP pin
Signal mnemonic
Requirement
6
TGT PWR
Must be wired to the target system. The
Gigabit TAP probe uses this signal to
determine if power is applied to the
target system. This signal is also used
as a voltage reference for the signals
driven by the Gigabit TAP probe (CKSI,
TRST, TCK, TMS, TDI). TGT PWR (pin
6) should be connected to the target
system Vcc through a pull-up resistor.
The Gigabit TAP will draw less than 50
µA from this signal, so a weak pull-up is
sufficient (1KOhm).
7
TCK
Must be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe drives
the TCK output with up to 50mA. The
TCK trace run should be kept as short
as possible and maintain a "two-signalwidth" spacing from any other parallel
dynamic signal trace.
8
CKSI
Need not be wired to the target system.
The Gigabit TAP probe does not
currently use this signal.
9
TMS
Must be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe drives
the TMS output with up to 50mA. TMS
should be kept as short as possible and
maintain a "two-signal-width" spacing
from any other parallel dynamic signal
trace. TMS should have a termination
option at the processor.
10
No Connect
Not required for emulation
11
SRST
May be wired to the target system
processor. During reset, the Gigabit TAP
probe drives SRST to ground through a
100Ohm resistor.
12
No Connect
Not required for emulation
13
HRST
Must be wired to the target system
processor. During reset, the Gigabit TAP
probe drives HRST to ground through a
100Ohm resistor.
14
No Connect
Not required for emulation
15
CKSO
Should be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe
senses CKSO to determine if the
processor halted execution in a
checkstop state.
16
GND
Must be wired to the target system. GND
is connected directly to the ground inside
the Gigabit TAP probe.
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Chapter 7
OnCE connector information
The CodeWarrior Gigabit TAP OnCE probe has a 14-pin connector which automatically
supports target system signal levels from 1.2V to 3.3V.
Figure 7-1 shows the pin assignments of the probe OnCE connector.
Table 7-1 lists OnCE signal names, direction, pin numbers, descriptions, and drive
capabilities for the probe OnCE connector.
Table 7-2 provides a general description of each OnCE signal and the operational
requirements.
NOTE
All OnCE signals must meet accepted standards for OnCE
signal design. To ensure proper and stable operation between
the Gigabit TAP probe and the target system, the OnCE signals
must meet the requirements listed in Table 7-2.
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Figure 7-1. Gigabit TAP probe OnCE connector pin assignments
Table 7-1. Gigabit TAP probe OnCE signal directions
OnCE pin
Signal mnemonic
Signal direction
Description
1
TDI
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
24mA driver
2
GND
- n/a -
3
TDO
From target system
4
GND
- n/a -
5
TCK
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
6
GND
- n/a -
7
Reserved
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
8
No-Connect/Key
- n/a -
9
RESET
Bi-directional
Open-drain. 100Ohm to
ground when asserted by
Ethernet TAP probe, 11pF
load when not asserted 1
10
TMS
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
24mA driver
11
VDD
From target system
2MOhm pull-down, plus
0.01uF load
12
Reserved
Bi-directional
Open-drain, 100Ohm to
ground when asserted by
Gigabit TAP probe, 11pF load
when not asserted 1
13
Reserved
Bi-directional
Open-drain, 100Ohm to
ground when asserted by
Ethernet TAP probe, 11pF
load when not asserted 1
14
TRST
From Gigabit TAP probe
connector
24mA driver
100KOhm pull-down, plus 7pF
load
24mA driver
24mA driver
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Chapter 7 OnCE connector information
1 14.7KOhm pull-up to buffered VDD.
Table 7-2. Gigabit TAP probe OnCE signal recommendations and requirements
OnCE pin
Signal mnemonic
Requirement
1
TDI
Must be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe drives
the TDI output with up to 24 mA. The
TDI trace should be kept short and
maintain a "two-signal-width" spacing
from any other parallel dynamic signal
trace. TDI should have an RC
termination option at the processor.
2
GND
Must be wired to the target system. GND
is connected directly to the ground inside
the Gigabit TAP probe.
3
TDO
Must be wired to the target system
processor. TDO is an output from the
target system processor and input to the
Gigabit TAP probe. The TDO trace run
should be kept short and maintain a
"two-signal-width" spacing from any
other parallel dynamic signal trace. TDO
should have a series termination resistor
located near the target system
processor.
4
GND
Must be wired to the target system. GND
is connected directly to the ground inside
the Gigabit TAP probe.
5
TCK
Must be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe drives
the TCK output with up to 24 mA. The
TCK trace run should be kept as short
as possible and maintain a "two-signalwidth" spacing from any other parallel
dynamic signal trace.
6
GND
Must be wired to the target system. GND
is connected directly to the ground inside
the Gigabit TAP probe.
7
Reserved
Not required for emulation.
8
No-Connect/Key
Not required for emulation. Pin 8 should
be clipped on the target system OnCE
header.
9
RESET
Must be wired to the target system
processor. During reset, the Gigabit TAP
probe drives RESET to ground through a
100Ohm resistor.
10
TMS
Must be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe drives
the TCK output with up to 24mA. The
TCK trace run should be kept as short
Table continues on the next page...
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Table 7-2. Gigabit TAP probe OnCE signal recommendations and requirements (continued)
OnCE pin
Signal mnemonic
Requirement
as possible and maintain a "two-signalwidth" spacing from any other parallel
dynamic signal trace.
11
VDD
Must be wired to the target system. The
Gigabit TAP probe uses this signal to
determine if power is applied to the
target system. This signal is also used
as a voltage reference for the signals
driven by the Gigabit TAP probe (TDI,
TCK, TMS, RESET, and TRST).
12
Reserved
Not required for emulation.
13
Reserved
Not required for emulation.
14
TRST
Must be wired to the target system
processor. The Gigabit TAP probe drives
the TRST output with up to 24 mA. The
TRST trace run should be kept short and
maintain a "two-signal-width" spacing
from any other parallel dynamic signal
trace.
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Chapter 8
Aurora high speed trace daughtercard information
This chapter provides information on the CodeWarrior Gigabit TAP Aurora/JTAG probe.
It supports high speed serial trace and JTAG interfaces as specified by the Power.org™
Standard for Physical Connection. The connection provides two lanes of high speed serial
trace, two lanes of high speed serial download capability, a standard JTAG connection,
and from four to six vendor specific I/O signals troubleshooting information.
This chapter contains the following sections:
• General specifications
• Mechanical specification
8.1 General specifications
This section describes the general sepcifications.
8.1.1 Simplex operation
The probe can receive two lanes of high speed trace data from the SoC. Any combination
of lanes and speeds may be configured to support the bandwidth requirement of the SoC.
An optional back channel may be used to support UFC (User Flow Control) between the
probe and the SoC as specified by the appropriate Power.Org and Nexus specifications.
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General specifications
Figure 8-1. Simplex operation
8.1.2 Duplex operation
The DCU receives up to eight lanes of high speed trace data from the SoC. An additional
two lanes may be configured to transmit data to the SoC from the probe. This
configuration is useful in supporting UFC (User Flow Control) between the probe and the
SoC.
Figure 8-2. Duplex operation
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Chapter 8 Aurora high speed trace daughtercard information
8.1.3 Electrical specifications
This section describes the electrical requirements for the implementation of protocol. The
line rate of the recovered clock should match the line rate of the receiver within 350ppm.
Due to the tight tolerances of the clocks between the target SoC and the Data Collection
Unit, some DCU implementations might support only a subset of the permissible bit
rates. These signals should not be routed to multiple connectors to maintain signal
integrity.
Figure below details the electrical characteristics required for simplex and duplex
operation.
Table 8-1. Aurora electrical characteristics
Parameter
HSSTP Phy
Serial protocol
CML Interface that complies with XAUI
Supported bit rates
2.5, 3.0, 3.125 Gb/s
Topologies supported
Point-to-Point (multiple lanes)
Physical bit error rate
<10E-13
Line code
NRZ
Data encoding
8B/10B, 64B/66B
Number of lanes
two Transmit two Receive
Channel Configuration
Simplex or Duplex
Clock tolerance
50ppm
Signal
Characteristic impedance
100 ohm differential
Coupling
AC coupled on Rx side
Total jitter @3.125 Gb/s
0.35 UI
Deterministic jitter @3.125 Gb/s
0.19 UI
Transmit signal level
1600mVp-p max 400mVp-p min
8.1.4 AC coupling
The Aurora lanes should be AC coupled. AC coupling isolates the common modes of the
two devices and is the preferred configuration in hot-plug applications. The capacitor
prevents DC current from flowing between the connected devices. The unit receiving
these signals should have the responsibility to couple these signals. A 0.01mF XR7
capacitor in a 0402 package or smaller is recommended. When a signal meets the pads of
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General specifications
capacitor, a discontinuity in impedance and capacitance to the plane occurs. The PCB
designer should take this discontinuity into consideration and make the adjustments as
needed.
8.1.5 JTAG and optional signaling
The connector contains standard JTAG signals and signals that are specific to the SOC
implementation. Any signal with an OUT direction is an output from the target to the
development tool.
Figure below displays the list of signals that can be placed on the connector with the
serial lanes.
Figure 8-3. JTAG and optional signals
8.1.5.1 TCK, TMS, TRST, TDI, and TDO signals
The following signal definitions are defined in IEEE STD 1149.1™-1990. Refer to this
document for signal definitions and their usage.
8.1.5.2 VIO (Vsense) signal
The VIO (Vsense) signal is used to establish the signaling levels of the debug interface of
the target system. The current drawn from this pin is limited to a few nano amps and does
not supply logic functions or power.
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Chapter 8 Aurora high speed trace daughtercard information
8.1.5.3 Reset signal
The Reset signal causes the target to enter into a defined reset state or signals the
occurrence of a reset on the target. The full intent of the Reset signal may be defined
differently for each device so the device documentation should be referred to determine
the behavior of this signal. The tool and target should use an open-drain output driver for
this pin.
8.1.5.4 Vendor IO 0-5 signals
These signals are input and output SoC specific signals. The Gigabit TAP automatically
configure these signals as input or output based on the type of SoC it is connecting to.
These signals are not required by the standard for operation, but improve the control
between the test tool and SoC. For the definition of these signals, refer to the hardware
reference manual for specific SoC.
8.1.5.5 Recommended termination
It is recommended that the signals having Target value in the Location field as shown in
figure are connected to pull-ups on the target to prevent floating signals when the tool is
not connected or powered on. The voltage to which the signals are pulled up is the I/O
voltage of the target signals.
Table 8-2. JTAG and optional signals
Signal name
Pull-up
VIO (sense)
Series termination
1 KOhms
Location
Target
TCK
10 KOhms
Target
TMS
10 KOhms
Target
TRST
10 KOhms
Target
TDI
10 KOhms
Target
TDO
10 KOhms
Test Tool
Reset
10 KOhms
Target
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8.2 Mechanical specification
The Power.Org and Nexus specifications provide a wide range of connector and pinout
options. The sections below describe the connectors and pinouts currently supported by
the Gigabit TAP, but additional options may become available later. Contact your
Freescale FAE or Sales person to determine those that are currently supported with the
Gigabit TAP and recommended for your application.
8.2.1 Cables
Freescale currently supports two cables listed in the Table 8-3, but note that the 22-pin
cable must be purchased separately from Samtec.
Table 8-3. 70-pin and 22-pin duplex cables
70-pin duplex cable
22-pin duplex cable
Freescale Part Number
CWH-GTT-ACBL-YE
N/A
Samtec Part Number
HDR-141762-02
HDR-141490-02
Pin Count
70
22
Target Transmit Lanes
8
2
Target Receive Lanes
4
2
Aurora Reference Clock Pins
Yes
No
Vendor I/O Pins
6
4
Cable Length
18"
18"
PCB Keepout Dimensions
1.786"x0.326"
1.030"x0.326"
Included with Gigabit TAP
Yes
No
All Aurora cables use a common 62-pin connector to attach to the Gigabit TAP's Aurora
Trace socket. This socket is keyed so that the cable cannot be plugged in upside-down.
8.2.2 Connectors
The Power.org and Nexus specifications define both simplex and duplex variations of the
70-pin connector, but the Gigabit TAP + Trace currently only has cables available for the
duplex configuration. This pinout is shown in figure below.
Table 8-4. 70-pin Duplex Aurora Pinout - Samtec Part Number: ASP-135029-01
Latch
GND
GND
Latch
1
TX0+
VIO (V sense)
2
3
TX0-
TCK
4
Table continues on the next page...
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Table 8-4. 70-pin Duplex Aurora Pinout - Samtec Part Number: ASP-135029-01 (continued)
5
GND
TMS
6
7
TX1+
TDI
8
9
TX1-
TDO
1
11
GND
TRST
12
13
RX0+
Vendor I/O 0
14
15
RX0-
Vendor I/O 1
16
17
GND
Vendor I/O 2
18
19
RX1+
Vendor I/O 3
20
21
RX1-
/RESET
22
23
GND
GND
24
25
TX2+
CLK+
26
27
TX2-
CLK-
28
29
GND
GND
30
31
TX3+
Vendor I/O 4
32
33
TX3-
Vendor I/O 5
34
35
GND
GND
36
37
RX2+
N/C
38
39
RX2-
N/C
40
41
GND
GND
42
43
RX3+
N/C
44
45
RX3-
N/C
46
47
GND
GND
48
49
TX4+
N/C
50
51
TX4-
N/C
52
53
GND
GND
54
55
TX5+
N/C
56
57
TX5-
N/C
58
59
GND
GND
60
61
TX6+
N/C
62
63
TX6-
N/C
64
65
GND
GND
66
67
TX7+
N/C
68
69
TX7-
N/C
70
Latch
GND
GND
Latch
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Mechanical specification
The Power.org and Nexus specifications define both simplex and duplex variations of the
22-pin connector, but the Gigabit TAP + Trace currently only has cables available for the
Duplex configuration. This pinout is shown in figure below.
Table 8-5. 22-pin Duplex Aurora Pinout - Samtec Part Number: ASP-137969-01
Latch
GND
GND
Latch
1
TX0+
VIO (V sense)
2
3
TX0-
TCK
4
5
GND
TMS
6
7
TX1+
TDI
8
9
TX1-
TDo
10
11
GND
TRST
12
13
RX0+
Vendor I/O 0
14
15
RX0-
Vendor I/O 1
16
17
GND
Vendor I/O 2
18
19
RX1+
Vendor I/O 3
20
21
RX1-
/RESET
22
Latch
GND
GND
Latch
8.2.3 PCB design and routing consideration
Routing of the Aurora lane traces are extremely critical. Sharp corners and vias can make
narrow eye patterns that affect the performance of the Aurora lanes. To achieve
maximum performance, it is critical that care be taken in routing the lanes and the JTAG
single-ended signals. To achieve optimal JTAG interface, good performance layout and
routing practices should be observed. When routing the JTAG signals on a target board, it
is recommended that they should be routed directly to the SoC using minimal vias and
have a minimum of twice the distance to the plane spacing. These signals should have an
impedance of 50ohm ±10%. If multiple components are attached to the JTAG scan chain,
the performance of the bus must be considered. Additional loading may require a reduced
JTAG bus speed for reliable operation or buffering of the TMS, TCK, and TDI signals to
all the devices on the chain.
NOTE
Consult the appropriate Xilinx documentation for Aurora
specific layout and routing.
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8.2.4 Trigger signals
When driven by a match in the hardware event system, the trigger-out signal will pulse.
Table below explains the trigger signal characteristics.
Table 8-6. Trigger signal characteristics
Trigger inputs
VIH
2.3V minimum
VIL
0.9V maximum
Trigger outputs
VOH
2.3V minimum
VOL
0.6V maximum
Polarity
Programmable for both inputs and
outputs
Pulse Duration
10ns minimum for both inputs and
outputs
Time between signals
TBD for both inputs and outputs
Time from detection of event trigger
TBD for both inputs and outputs
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Chapter 9
Setting up standalone PC Ethernet
This chapter covers installation of a direct TCP/IP Ethernet standalone connection
between a and the Gigabit TAP probe. Use it only if you do not want to connect your
probe to an existing multi-user network.
You may decide to have a standalone network for:
•
•
•
•
Target system access security
Immunity from network outages
Faster communication if main network has high-traffic
Simpler connection with fewer variables to cause problems
This chapter contains the following sections:
•
•
•
•
•
System requirements
Tutorial: Standalone network for Ethernet setup
Installing and configuring TCP/IP software
Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to host computer
Configuring Gigabit TAP probe
CAUTION
The Gigabit TAP probe contains components that are subject to
damage from electrostatic discharge. Whenever you are using,
handling, or transporting the Gigabit TAP probe, or connecting
to or disconnecting from a target system, always use proper
anti-static protection measures, including static-free bench pads
and grounded wrist straps.
9.1 System requirements
A typical standalone network configuration requires:
• A two-node network between a non-networked PC and the Gigabit TAP probe.
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Tutorial: Standalone Network for Ethernet setup
• A networked PC with a second Ethernet Network Interface Card (NIC) connected to
the Gigabit TAP probe; Standalone TCP/IP network configuration shows the
standalone configuration.
Figure 9-1. Standalone TCP/IP network configuration
• A PC with Microsoft® Windows operating system installed on it.
9.2 Tutorial: Standalone Network for Ethernet setup
If your PC is already configured for networking, skip the tutorial section and see
Configuring Gigabit TAP probe section.
The steps required to set up a standalone network are covered in the following sections:
• Installing and configuring TCP/IP software
• Creating Windows hosts file
• Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to host computer
9.2.1 Installing and configuring TCP/IP software
Microsoft provides support for TCP/IP protocol with Windows. If your host PC does not
already have TCP/IP protocol installed, you need to add it.
If you are installing a second Ethernet adapter to dedicate to the Gigabit TAP probe, you
need to install a second instance of TCP/IP. In both instances, you bind the adapter to the
TCP/IP protocol stack.
To install and configure TCP/IP, you need to have the following:
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Chapter 9 Setting up standalone PC Ethernet
• The Windows CD
• A name for the Gigabit TAP probe and for the Ethernet Network Interface Card
(NIC). If you want other users to have access to the Gigabit TAP probe over the
network, refer to the Connecting to network chapter.
To add TCP/IP protocol to the host PC:
1. Add TCP/IP to the host PC.
a. Select Start > Settings > Control Panel
The Control Panel window appears.
b. In the Control Panel window, double-click the Network Connections icon.
The Network Connections window appears.
c. Right-click the connection name for which you want to install the TCP/IP
protocol.
A context menu appears.
d. From the context menu, select Properties.
The properties dialog appears.
e. Click the General tab.
The General page appears.
f. Select the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) checkbox.
g. Click Install.
The Select Network Component Type dialog appears.
h. In the Select Network Component Type dialog, select Protocol.
i. Click Add.
The Select Network Protocol dialog appears.
j. In the Network Protocol box, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).
k. Click OK.
The Select Network Protocol dialog closes.
l. In the properties dialog, click OK.
The TCP/IP protocol is added to the host PC.
2. Configure TCP/IP to recognize the Ethernet Network Interface Card (NIC) used to
connect to the Gigabit TAP probe.
a. Select Start > Settings > Control Panel.
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The Control Panel window appears.
b. In the Control Panel window, double-click the Network Connections icon.
The Network Connections window appears.
c. Right-click the connection name for which you want to install the TCP/IP
protocol.
The context menu appears.
d. From the context menu, select Properties.
The network connection properties dialog appears.
e. Click the General tab.
The General page of the properties dialog appears.
f. From the General page, select the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol item.
g. Click Properties.
The Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog appears.
h. Select Use the following IP address option button.
The IP address text boxes associated with this selected option appear.
3. Specify an IP address and .
If the PC is already on an existing network, assign the second adapter an IP and
netmask inconsistent with your network topology (for example, use if LAN is Class
B). This allows the PC to easily resolve communication with the LAN versus the
Gigabit TAP probe. Valid possible internal- use IP addresses for each class are:
Table 9-1. IP Addresses for each
Class
Class
IP Address
Subnet Mask
A
10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
255.0.0.0
B
172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255
255.255.0.0
C
192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255
255.255.255.0
If the PC is to remain standalone, use the address and listed below. These addresses
simplify the configuration.
Address: 192.168.1.1
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
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4. Confirm your settings, and close the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties
window.
5. When prompted, restart Windows.
If not prompted, restart Windows manually.
NOTE
Unless you want to password protect access, click Cancel
when asked for a network password.
9.2.2 Creating Windows hosts file
In the following procedure, you create a hosts database that identifies your PC host and
the Gigabit TAP probe. The hosts file associates IP addresses and host names of both
devices.
A sample hosts file is installed in your Windows directory when you add the Microsoft
TCP/IP protocol. If your PC has previously been set up with network communication, a
hosts database may already exist. Before creating a new hosts database, it is a good idea
to make backup copies of any hosts file or sample hosts file.
To create a hosts database:
1. Go to the directory where the hosts file is located. Windows hosts files are located in
the %system root%\system32\drivers\etc directory.
NOTE
If you have trouble locating this file, use Windows Find to
search for "hosts." If you have a dual-boot system, be sure
to edit the hosts file appropriate to the operating system
under which you are installing Gigabit TAP probe.
2. Make a backup copy of any existing hosts file.
Name the backup files something other than hosts, such as hosts.bak.
3. Use any text editor, open a new text file and name it hosts (without an extension) or
open the existing hosts file.
4. In the hosts file, add an entry for the Ethernet Network Interface Card (NIC) used by
the Gigabit TAP probe.
Use the IP address you assigned during TCP/IP configuration and assign the unique
name.
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List the IP address first, followed by the name you assigned to the adapter. For
reference, you can click the Network icon in the Control panel and view the
properties for the appropriate TCP/IP connection.
The following example illustrates a hosts file for a PC in which two adapters are
installed:
Figure 9-2. Host Name
5. Add an entry for your Gigabit TAP probe.
In a standalone configuration, use the suggested IP address (192.168.1.2) to simplify
configuration. Otherwise, use an address class-consistent with the IP assigned to the
NIC that will be connected to the Gigabit TAP probe.
You can assign any unique host name to the Gigabit TAP probe.
Figure 9-3. Unique host name
6. Save the hosts file as text in the correct directory, and exit the editor. Its name should
not include a file extension.
Figure 9-4. Host file
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9.2.3 Connecting Gigabit TAP probe to host computer
The Gigabit TAP probe has a built-in twisted pair interface that connects directly to
networks that use the twisted pair (10/100/1000BaseT) cables. A twisted pair crossover
cable has been provided to connect the RJ-45 connector of the Gigabit TAP probe to the
installed in your PC.
9.3 Configuring the Gigabit TAP probe
Before you can use the to communicate with the Gigabit TAP probe, you must store the
IP address and netmask in the Gigabit TAP probe's flash using the probe's internal setup
utility.
NOTE
For more information on all the commands available from the
Gigabit TAP probe's internal setup utility, see Gigabit TAP
probe setup utility commands and variables section.
9.3.1 Starting setup utility
To access the internal of the Gigabit TAP probe, connect a terminal emulator (such as
Windows® HyperTerminal) and configure it. For more information, see Customizing
Gigabit TAP probe section.
9.3.2 Storing IP address and netmask in flash EPROM
When the core> prompt appears on the terminal, you can use the netparam command to
configure the Gigabit TAP probe's network parameters.
To store the IP address and in flash EPROM:
1. Set the Gigabit TAP probe for static IP address mode using the following command
at the core> prompt:
netparam bootconfig static
2. Enter the Gigabit TAP probe's IP address and netmask at the core> prompt. For
example:
netparam static_ip_address 192.168.1.2:255.255.0.0
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NOTE
The IP address you enter must match the IP address you
specified for the Gigabit TAP probe in the hosts file
(192.168.1.2 is the suggested IP address). The netmask must
match the netmask you specified when you configured your
PC (255.255.0.0 is the suggested netmask).
3. Remove the USB cable from the port. It is not required for normal Ethernet TAP
probe operation.
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Chapter 10
Gigabit TAP probe setup utility commands
This chapter explains how to access the Gigabit TAP probe internal setup utility. It
describes all available setup utility commands and arguments.
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Connecting to Gigabit TAP probe setup utility
• Gigabit TAP probe setup utility commands and variables
NOTE
The commands described in this chapter are for reference only.
For detailed procedures on using these commands, see
applicable chapter that covers the topic of interest.
10.1 Connecting to Gigabit TAP probe setup utility
There are two methods for accessing the Gigabit TAP probe internal setup utility:
• Connect to the Gigabit TAP probe USB port. Use this method if the Gigabit TAP
probe is not connected to your network. For more information, see Customizing
Gigabit TAP probe section.
• Telnet to the Gigabit TAP probe through an existing Ethernet connection.
Use this method if the Gigabit TAP probe is currently connected to your network.
is the Internet standard protocol for remote logins. Most TCP/IP networks provide a
telnet program that you can use to login across the network to another machine. Note
that if you lose your Ethernet connection by improperly configuring the Gigabit TAP
probe from a telnet session, then you will have to connect to the serial port to reestablish network communications.
To connect to the setup utility using the telnet port:
1. Open a telnet session and connect to the Gigabit TAP probe.
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telnet hostname
Use the hostname that you entered into the hosts database file, as described in
Connecting to network chapter or Setting up standalone PC Ethernet chapter.
2. After the login banner is displayed, the core> command-line prompt appears.
NOTE
Use the help command at the core> prompt for a list of all
the internal Gigabit TAP probe commands available. Or
use help and the command name for a brief description of
the command and a list of the command's arguments.
10.2 Gigabit TAP probe setup utility commands and
variables
The Gigabit TAP probe internal setup utility commands are configuration and
troubleshooting commands.
10.2.1 Commands to configure communications
The following internal setup utility commands are used to configure the Gigabit TAP
probe for network communication (netparam), and to communicate with your target
system's serial port (tgtty).
10.2.1.1 netparam
The netparam command displays or sets non-volatile networking parameters stored in the
flash EPROM of Gigabit TAP probe. Entered without options, it displays all current
settings. To change parameters, specify one or more options. To activate new settings, the
unit must be rebooted. For more information on netparam command, refer to the
Configuring the Gigabit TAP Probe Using netparam section.
Syntax
netparam [add_host host ip_address]
[add_route host gateway hop_# ]
[bootconfig {static | dhcp }[:host]]
[delete_host host]
[delete_route host]
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[static_ip_address address[:mask]]
[static_dns_server address]
Table 10-1. Netparam Parameters
Field
Description
<null>
Reports the current configuration
add_host host ip_address
Adds a hostname-address pair to the static host table. Table
entries are automatically entered into the system on reset.
host - Name to associate with the address
ip_addressip_address - IP address to use for host,
specified in dotted-decimal notation
add_route host gateway hop_#
Adds a route to Gigabit TAP probe static route table. Table
entries are automatically entered into the system on reset. If
the specified parameters are invalid for the operating network,
they are not stored. host - Destination IP address of host or
host network, specified in dotted-decimal notation. Default is a
valid entry for host, and equivalent to 0.0.0.0. gateway Gateway IP address for probe, specified in dotted-decimal
notation hop_# - Decimal number of gateway hops between
Gigabit TAP probe and destination host or network
bootconfig {static | dhcp }[:host]
Sets the IP address resolution protocol. It determines the boot
method of Gigabit TAP probe. Use bootconfig to connect
to the network either by DHCP or by storing the IP address in
the flash EPROM of Gigabit TAP probe.
When using DHCP, you can specify the host name that you
would like the probe to try to register with a name server
when it acquires its network configuration.
The factory assigned host name is FSLXXYYZZ, where
XXYYZZ is the last three octets of the Gigabit MAC address,
provided on a label on the bottom side of the probe. For
example, if the probe's Gigabit MAC address is
00:00:f6:00:77:31, the default host name will be
FSL007731. static - Use IP address stored in Gigabit TAP
probe dhcp - Use the network DHCP protocol to resolve IP
address, netmask, and default gateway (default) :host Host name for the Gigabit TAP probe. If dhcp is specified, the
probe will attempt to register this host name with the DHCP
server. There should be no white space before :host. The
ccs findcc search utility will report the host name of the
probe for both the dhcp and static options
delete_host host
Deletes a hostname-address pair from the static host table.
host - Destination IP address of host or host network
delete_route host
Deletes a route from the static route table host - Destination
IP address of host or host network
static_ip_address address[:mask]
Sets the Gigabit TAP probe IP address and optional netmask
address - IP address in dotted-decimal format (for example,
128.8.1.1). When entering the IP address by itself (without
also entering the netmask), the Gigabit TAP probe uses the
standard netmask assigned to that IP address. mask Netmask in dotted-decimal format (for example.,
Table continues on the next page...
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Table 10-1. Netparam Parameters (continued)
Field
Description
255.255.0.0). If subnetting is required, you must store the
netmask by entering it on the same command line,
immediately following the IP address.
Sets the DNS server to use static bootconfig address - IP
address in dotted-decimal format (e.g. 128.1.1). The DNS
server at this address will be used for domain name resolution
when bootconfig is set to static.
static_dns_server address
10.2.1.2 tgtty
The tgtty command configures the target system serial port settings.
Syntax
tgtty
[default]
[9600 | 19200 | 38400 | 57600 | 115200]
[data8 | data5 | data6 | data7]
[stop1 | stop2]
[noparity|oddparity|evenparity|lowparity|highparity]
[<rtscts | nortscts>]
[noxon | xon]
[echo | noecho]
Options
Options can be combined in one statement. Without options, the tgtty command displays
the current settings.
The target system serial port's default settings are:
9600 data8 stop1 noparity nortscts echo
Table 10-2. Default Target Settings
Default
Set the default target system serial settings
[9600 | 19200 | 38400 | 57600 | 115200]
Choose a baud rate
[data8 | data5 | data6 | data7]
Specify data bits
[stop1 | stop2]
Specify stop bits
[noparity | oddparity | evenparity |lowparity Define parity
| highparity]
[<rtscts | nortscts>]
Enable or disable hardware flow control
[noxon | xon]
Enable or disable XON/XOFF flow control
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Table 10-2. Default Target Settings (continued)
Default
Set the default target system serial settings
Enable or disable target system echo feature
[echo | noecho]
10.2.2 Commands to troubleshoot communication
The following commands are used to troubleshoot problems connecting to your network.
The procedures for troubleshooting communication are covered in Troubleshooting
chapter.
NOTE
In this manual, commonly used options for these commands are
described.
10.2.2.1 arp
Use the arp command to edit the table by assigning hostnames to specific Ethernet
addresses. Without options, it displays the current arp table.
Syntax
arp [-s hostname ethernet_address | -d hostname]
Table 10-3. ARP - Options
Field
Description
-s hostname ethernet_address
Assign a hostname alias to an Ethernet address in the arp
table
-d hostname
Delete a hostname alias from the arp table
10.2.2.2 host
Use the host command to edit the host table by assigning hostnames to specific IP addresses
without permanently storing the routing tables in the flash EPROM of the Gigabit TAP
probe. Without options, it displays the current host table.
Syntax
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host [add hostname ip_address | delete hostname ip_address]
Table 10-4. Host - Options
Field
Description
add hostname ip_address
Assign a hostname alias to an IP address in the host table.
delete hostname ip_address
Delete a hostname alias from the host table.
10.2.2.3 netstat
Displays network information and statistics.
Syntax
netstat -a --inet | -i | -s | -r
Table 10-5. Netsat - Options
Field
Description
-a --inet
Display network connections
-i
Display device status
-s
Display protocol statistics
-r
Display route table
10.2.2.4 ping
Use the ping command to verify that the Gigabit TAP probe is connected to your network.
Syntax
ping [-s size] [-c cnt][hostname | ip_address]
Table 10-6. Ping - Options
Field
Description
hostname
Use the hostname stored in Gigabit TAP probe host table
(see the host command).
ip_address
Use the IP address of the host you are trying to reach.
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Table 10-6. Ping - Options (continued)
Field
Description
size
The size, in bytes, to use for request packets.
cnt
The number of packets to send.
10.2.2.5 route
Use the route command to test network routing without permanently storing the routing
tables in the Gigabit TAP probe flash EPROM. Without options, it displays the current
route table or default gateway.
Syntax
route [add destination gateway | delete destination]
Table 10-7. Route - Options
Field
Description
add destination gateway
Add a dynamic route to the route table.
delete destination
Delete a dynamic route from the route table.
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Chapter 11
Network administration
This chapter guides the network administrators in installing a Gigabit TAP probe. The
Gigabit TAP probe is a Gigabit host device that may be configured for TCP/IP using
DHCP to acquire its IP configuration (the default method) or through a static IP
configuration.
This chapter explains the following:
• Gigabit TAP probe network ports
• Configuring Gigabit TAP probe using netparam
• Using CCS to search for Gigabit TAP probes
11.1 Gigabit TAP probe network ports
Software uses several network ports to communicate with a Gigabit TAP. In case, the
Gigabit TAP and host software are on the same network, you do not need to be aware of
these ports. However, in case where a Gigabit TAP is located in a protected network, an
administrator will need to provide access to these ports if you want to connect to the
Gigabit TAP from another network. Figure below lists the ports used by the Gigabit TAP
and a brief description of each port and describes various network ports of the Gigabit
TAP probe.
Table 11-1. Gigabit TAP network ports
Port Number
Description
23
Telnet access to configuration console
1082
Telnet access to target serial port
1085
Used by CodeWarrior for trace collection
1086
Used by CodeWarrior for trace collection
1087
Used for firmware updates and by CodeWarrior to initialize the Gigabit
TAP
41474
Used by CodeWarrior to control the Gigabit TAP
53099
Used by CodeWarrior to check Gigabit TAP status
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11.2 Configuring Gigabit TAP probe using netparam
Use the netparam command to select the network parameters:
• Address resolution protocol
• Static address resolution data
• Static routing tables
CAUTION
netparam writes its settings into non-volatile flash memory
on the Gigabit TAP probe. Each time you enter a netparam
command, wait for the core> prompt to re-appear before
entering the next command.
11.2.1 Configuring dynamic IP Address
To configure a dynamic IP address:
1. Connect to the Gigabit TAP probe internal setup utility, as explained in Connecting
to the Gigabit TAP Probe Setup Utility section.
2. At the core> prompt, use netparam to specify the protocol appropriate to your network:
netparam bootconfig dhcp[:hostname]
DHCP is the default setting. If you specify a hostname for the Gigabit TAP probe, the
probe will attempt to register the host name with the DHCP server, which may then
update any name servers on the network.
11.2.2 Configuring static IP Address
If you do not have a DHCP server on your network or you prefer to manually configure
your network settings, the Gigabit TAP probe is capable of storing its IP address and
netmask in flash memory. When bootconfig is set to static, the Gigabit TAP probe uses
this stored information to resolve its own IP and netmask requests.
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NOTE
Because this is a simple proven way to add a Gigabit TAP
probe to any TCP/IP network, we strongly recommend using it
if you have any network communication problems.
To enter the IP and optional netmask in flash:
1. Have your network administrator assign an unused IP (Internet Protocol) address and
host name to the probe.
2. Enter the name/address pair into the hosts database file. Windows hosts files are
typically located in the %system_root%\system32\drivers\etc\ directory.
The following is an example of probe entries in a hosts file:
Figure 11-1. Host File
NOTE
You should create or update the hosts file on the network
server or on each local workstation that needs access to the
probe.
3. At the core> prompt, use netparam to set and store the IP address and netmask
(subnetting only) in the Gigabit TAP probe flash EPROM.
netparam static_ip_address nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn [:mmm.mmm.mmm.mmm]
where nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn represents the IP address and mmm.mmm.mmm.mmm represents the
subnetting mask.
11.2.3 Static routing
The simplest networks consist of one or more subnets. Routers forward network traffic
from one point on the network to another across these subnets.
If the Gigabit TAP probe uses DHCP to automatically acquire its network settings, it is
most likely that a default gateway setting was acquired and the probe will be accessible
on other subnets.
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However, when using a static IP configuration or where the DHCP configuration is
incomplete, you may have to provide additional routing information, including:
• Store a default gateway in flash memory
• Load static routing tables into flash memory
11.2.3.1 Specify default gateway or static route table (optional)
If you are using a static IP configuration or your DHCP configuration does not specify a
default gateway, you can manually enter the IP address of the default gateway to use.
This gateway must be accessible on your local subnet.
To specify a default gateway:
A default gateway entry must specify the IP address of the first gateway that the network
traffic from probe crosses. This gateway must be aware of the network's complete route
table. Use the following netparam syntax:
netparam add_route 0.0.0.0 gateway_ip 1
For gateway_ip, provide the IP address of the router or gateway in dot notation. The default
value is 0.0.0.0.
11.2.4 Changing existing route entry
NOTE
When entered in the Gigabit TAP probe, static routes are not
updated automatically. You must update these routes if changes
in network topology affect the static routes.
Before entering static routes, make a map of all gateway paths between the Gigabit TAP
probe, as starting point, and each workstation that must have access to it.
To change an existing routing entry:
1. At the core> prompt, delete the existing routing entry:
netparam delete_route host_ip
2. Enter the new route as described above:
netparam add_route host_ipgateway_iphop_#
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NOTE
host_ip can identify an individual workstation or a network
serving multiple hosts. The gateway_ip is the first gateway
the probe traffic crosses when communicating with the
destination workstation. The hop_# is the decimal number of
gateways between the probe and the destination
workstation.
11.2.5 Entering static routes
NOTE
When entered in the Gigabit TAP probe, static routes are not
updated automatically. You must update these routes if changes
in network topology affect the static routes.
Before entering static routes, make a map of all gateway paths between the Gigabit TAP
probe, as starting point, and each workstation must have access to it.
To enter a static route or default gateway:
1. At the core> prompt, use the netparam command to enter the first host/gateway pair:
netparam add_route host_ipgateway_iphop_#
Wait for the core> prompt between each netparam entry.
NOTE
host_ip can identify an individual host or a network serving
multiple hosts. The gateway_ip is the first gateway the
Gigabit TAP probe crosses when communicating with the
destination host. The hop_# is the decimal number of
gateways between the Gigabit TAP probe and the
destination host. The netparam command is described in
Gigabit TAP probe setup utility commands section.
2. Add routes until all destination hosts or networks are defined.
3. When the core> prompt returns, reset the Gigabit TAP probe by cycling power, or by
entering the reset command.
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11.2.5.1 Static route example
Figure 11-2 shows three class "C" networks joined together by a single IP router, making
each Gigabit TAP probe accessible from three workstations (elmer, tweety, and brutus).
No static routing information is required to make a Gigabit TAP probe accessible from a
workstation local to it on a network. For example, the Gigabit TAP probe goofy on
network 198.9.230.0 communicates directly with workstation elmer.
When static routing is used, a routing entry is required on a Gigabit TAP probe for each
workstation on a non-local network that accesses it. The Gigabit TAP probe goofy
requires two entries, for workstation tweety on network 198.9.231.0 and workstation
brutus on network 198.9.232.0.
Each static route entry is made using a netparam command and consists of a network
address and a host address. The netparam commands for the static route entries for Gigabit
TAP probe goofy are:
netparam add_route 198.9.231.0 198.9.230.1 1
netparam add_route 198.9.232.0 198.9.230.1 1
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Figure 11-2. Three Class C Networks Connected by a Single Router
Each of the three Gigabit TAP probe hosts must have a static route entry for each remote
workstation that accesses it.
11.3 Using CCS to search for Gigabit TAP probes
The console provides a findcc command line utility which searches for all the
CodeWarrior probes on the local subnet of each network interface of the host and lists the
probes' IP addresses, as well as other information. It uses mDNS multicast packets to
discover Gigabit TAP devices. Multicast packets are typically limited to the local subnet
and typically are not routed or passed through VPNs.
If your Gigabit TAP probe acquires its IP address using DHCP, but is not able to register
its host name on the network, you will need the probe's IP address. To find the probe's
address, perform the following steps:
1. Launch CCS and open the CCS Command window. The procedure is slightly
different on Windows and Linux/Solaris host machines.
• For Windows, run the command:
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CodeWarrior_Installation\ccs\bin\ccs.exe
This will launch CCS and add a CCS icon (see Figure 11-3) to your taskbar.
Double-click that icon in the taskbar to open the Command window.
• For Linux/Solaris, run the command:
CodeWarrior_Installation/ccs/bin/ccs
This will launch CCS and open the Command window automatically.
Figure 11-3. CCS icon
2. The command takes the following arguments when searching for Gigabit TAP
probes:
findcc gtaps [-quiet|-verbose]
11.3.1 Sample output
% findcc gtaps
gtap1 (192.168.0.3): Gigabit TAP
Aurora Nexus Daughter Card
LVDS PowerPC JTAG/COP Probe Tip
Boot Loader v1.0.0
Operating System v1.0.0
%
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Chapter 12
Gigabit TAP probe firmware (Core)
This chapter explains the methods for reprogramming the core image stored in the flash
EPROM of the Gigabit TAP probe. Before reprogramming the flash EPROM, make sure
you have already configured the Gigabit TAP probe network communication.
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Gigabit TAP probe internal software overview
• Reprogramming Gigabit TAP probe firmware images
12.1 Gigabit TAP probe internal software overview
The Gigabit TAP Boot Loader image performs hardware initialization and starts up the
Operating System.
12.1.1 Boot loader
When the Gigabit TAP first powers up, it executes the Boot Loader. This occurs while
the heartbeat LED is solid red. The Boot Loader is not generally visible to the user and
should rarely require reprogramming or updating. If an update is required, follow the
instructions in Reprogramming firmware through Gigabit port section.
12.1.2 Fallback boot loader
The Gigabit TAP Fallback Boot Loader image can be used to recover a probe if the
primary Boot Loader becomes corrupted. The procedure for enabling the Fallback Boot
Loader requires opening the case to access switches, and should only be performed after
consulting with Freescale Technical Support.
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12.1.3 Operating System
The Gigabit TAP probe Operating System image provides tools for configuring and
testing network communication, for re-loading the probe software, and the underlying
software framework required to work with the debugger.
When the Gigabit TAP probe finishes executing the Boot Loader, it loads the Operating
System. This is indicated by the core> prompt in the Gigabit TAP probe's setup utility,
and by flashing a Orange or Green heartbeat LED. To reprogram the operating system
image stored in the Gigabit TAP probe flash EPROM, see Reprogramming Gigabit TAP
probe firmware images section.
12.1.4 Shell software
The Gigabit TAP probe shell software is transparent to the user, and the application that
tells the probe how to control the target system. It recognizes the specific target system
processor and debug port interface, and carries out the instructions of the debugger. The
shell software is not stored in flash, and therefore does not require reprogramming.
12.2 Reprogramming Gigabit TAP probe firmware images
At some point you may be required to reprogram the Gigabit TAP probe firmware images
stored in its flash EPROM. Typically this occurs when you are installing an update to
existing software, and the release letter specifies a later version of probe Boot Loader or
Operating System software. The firmware is distributed in two images:
•
•
contains the Boot Loader
gtap_os.gp contains the Operating System
gtap_bl.gp
A flash file loader (UPDATEGTAP) utility is included with the debugger software. UPDATEGTAP
provides the ability to reprogram the Gigabit TAP probe firmware images stored in its
flash EPROM.
12.2.1 Reprogramming firmware through Gigabit port
In order to use the following instructions, the Gigabit TAP probe communications must
already be configured (see Connecting to network chapter or Setting up standalone PC
Ethernet chapter.)
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To reprogram the firmware image:
1. Launch CCS and open the CCS command window. For information on launching
CCS, refer to the Using CCS to Search For Gigabit TAP Probes section.
2. In the CCS Command window, enter the command:
updategtap {hostname | ip_address}
3. As it executes, UPDATEGTAP reports its progress. When the process is complete,
UPDATEGTAP reports:
All updates completed successfully.
CAUTION
Do nothing to disrupt operation while running the
UPDATEGTAP command. The heartbeat LED will flash at a
faster frequency while the update is in progress, and the probe
will automatically reboot when the update is complete. Power
failures, network disruptions, and Gigabit TAP probe resets
during an update and can create a non-working state that may
require factory repair.
These procedures must be performed on each Gigabit TAP probe that you plan to use
with the current version of debugger.
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Chapter 13
Troubleshooting
This chapter provides Gigabit TAP probe troubleshooting information.
This chapter contains the following sections:
• Troubleshooting communications problems
• Troubleshooting power problems
• Troubleshooting overheating problems
13.1 Troubleshooting communications problems
This section explains how to troubleshoot communication problems between the
debugger and the Gigabit TAP probe.
If the debugger is unable to communicate with the Gigabit TAP probe:
• Check the cable and connections between the network cable and the Gigabit TAP
probe.
The Gigabit TAP probe connects directly to networks that use twisted pair
(10/100/1000BaseT) cables.
• Make sure communication was configured correctly for your network.
• Make sure the Gigabit TAP probe is receiving power.
See Gigabit TAP probe status indicators section for a description of the status LEDs.
• Make sure the Gigabit TAP probe is running the operating system software.
For more information on loading the operating system software, see Gigabit TAP
probe firmware (Core) chapter.
• Use the communication troubleshooting utilities of Gigabit TAP probe to verify that
it is recognized on your network, or to help diagnose problems connecting to your
network.
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To troubleshoot communication, see Verify network communication section.
To list all the CodeWarrior probes on your local subnets, use the CCS findcc host
utility. see Using CCS to search for Gigabit TAP probes section.
• Make sure the debugger is set up correctly for Ethernet communication with the
Gigabit TAP probe.
If all the settings are correct and the debugger cannot communicate with the Gigabit
TAP probe, contact Customer Support for assistance.
13.1.1 Verify network communication
If you want to verify that Gigabit TAP is up and running on your network, enter the ping
command at the core> prompt of the Gigabit TAP probe.
To verify network communication:
1. Connect to the Gigabit TAP probe internal setup utility, as explained in Connecting
to Gigabit TAP probe setup utility section.
2. Verify communication by entering this command at the core> prompt:
ping ipaddress | hostname
For example, to ping a hostname, named my_tap at IP address 128.9.230.61, enter the
command as follows:
ping 128.9.230.61
- or ping my_tap
NOTE
When establishing communication, you will have to ping
the IP address that was used during the setup process, as the
Gigabit TAP probe may not automatically recognize the
hostname. To ping a hostname, the Gigabit TAP probe
internal host table must first be updated.
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Chapter 13 Troubleshooting
13.1.2 View network connections
If you want to check your network configuration and activity, use netstat command. This
command displays all the network statistics on active connections such as their current
status, all hosts that are connected, and which programs are running. You can also see
information about the routing table and even get statistics on your network interfaces.
To run the netstat command:
1. Connect to the internal setup utility of Gigabit TAP probe.
2. At the core> prompt, enter the netstat command using this syntax:
netstat -s
The output of this command will show you whether any data is being sent or received
over the network. For description of the netstat options, see netstat section.
13.2 Troubleshooting power problems
If the Gigabit TAP probe behaves erratically, check the connections to the external power
supply.
The LED labeled HEARTBEAT indicates whether the Gigabit TAP probe is receiving
power. If this LED is not lit, check the connections to the external power supply.
13.3 Troubleshooting overheating problems
The following problems indicate the cause of overheating of Gigabit TAP probe:
• Excessive fan noise: The Gigabit TAP have cooling fans which keep critical
components from overheating. These fans generally run quietly, but will run faster
and louder if the Gigabit TAP is getting too hot.
• Red heartbeat LED: The Gigabit TAP monitors the temperature of several key
components, and will change the color of the heartbeat LED to red if these
components get close to overheating.
• Unexpected shutdown or reset: If the Gigabit TAP detects that components are
reaching their maximum rated operating temperature, it will automatically go into an
overtemperature shutdown. When this occurs, the Gigabit TAP will power off all
components (including LEDs, USB, Serial, and network), and run the fans at
maximum speed until the system cools off.
If you encounter any of the above problems, follow these steps to resolve your problem:
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Troubleshooting overheating problems
1. Check for air flow obstructions. The Gigabit TAP has air vents on both sides which
should be kept clear of obstructions and dust. If any of these air vents are blocked,
the Gigabit TAP will not be able to adequately cool itself.
2. Check the ambient temperature. The Gigabit TAP is designed to operate at ambient
temperatures up to 40 degrees Celcius. If the ambient temperature exceeds 40
degrees Celcius, the Gigabit TAP may overheat.
NOTE
Be careful not to position the Gigabit TAP near the heat
exhaust of other hardware or equipment. Doing so, it may
cause the Gigabit TAP to use air that is warmer than the
ambient room temperature.
3. Check that the fans are clean and spinning smoothly. Checking the fans will require
opening the Gigabit TAP case, and this should only be done after contacting
technical support.
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Index
Index
J
(10/100/1000BaseT) 17
JTAG/COP interface 10
JTAG header 26
JTAG Header 26
JTAG probe 42
1000BaseT Ethernet link 10
100BaseT 10
10BaseT 10
L
A
LED 37
LED indicators 34
AC/DC configurations 13
adapters 12
arp 75
Aurora Nexus 23
Aurora Nexus Connector 42
Aurora Nexus daughtercard 10
N
netmask 66, 69
network address resolution 19
C
O
cables 12
CCS 85
Class C 66
CONFIG 19, 70
Connecting to network 17
Connecting to the Target System 23
Operating Requirements 13
Operating Temperature 16
P
PCB 60
PC host 63
ping 76
Product Highlights 11
D
DC cable 15
DHCP 17
R
E
Electrical requirements 15
electrostatic discharge (ESD) 14
EPROM 69
Ethernet Network Interface Card (NIC) 22, 69
RJ-45 cable 18
route 77
routing protocols 19
RS-232 communication protocol 40
RUN/PAUSE 36
F
S
findcc 86
flexible probe tip extension 26
Gigabit TAP + Trace 9
Gigabit TAP probe 9
SERDES 60
Serial Communication with the Gigabit TAP Probe
19
setup utility 69
Standard Electrostatic Precautions 14
Static routing 19
Status Indicators 38
Subnet mask 66
H
T
Heartbeat LED 36
HSSTP 55, 56, 60
Target Power Requirements 13
Target System Requirements 16
G
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95
Index
TCP/IP network 17
TCP/IP protocol 69
TELNET 71
Testing Network Communication 21
tgtty 74
U
USB port 19
V
VendorIO 56
Verifying Communication 21
X
XON/XOFF flow control 20
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How to Reach Us:
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Web Support:
freescale.com/support
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© 2009–2016 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Document Number GTAPUG
Revision 10.x, 02/2014
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