Section 5. Flash Programming

Section 5. Flash Programming
Section 5. Flash Programming
HIGHLIGHTS
This section of the manual contains the following topics:
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
5.13
Introduction................................................................................................................ 5-2
Control Registers ....................................................................................................... 5-3
Run-Time Self-Programming (RTSP) Operation ..................................................... 5-10
Lock-Out Feature..................................................................................................... 5-11
Word Programming Sequence ................................................................................ 5-13
Row Programming Sequence.................................................................................. 5-14
Page Erase Sequence............................................................................................. 5-15
Program Flash Memory Erase Sequence ............................................................... 5-15
Operation in Power-Saving and Debug Modes ....................................................... 5-16
Effects of Various Resets......................................................................................... 5-16
Interrupts.................................................................................................................. 5-17
Related Application Notes ....................................................................................... 5-18
Revision History....................................................................................................... 5-19
5
Flash
Programming
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-1
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
Note:
This family reference manual section is meant to serve as a complement to device
data sheets. Depending on the device variant, this manual section may not apply to
all PIC32 devices.
Please consult the note at the beginning of the “Flash Programming” chapter in
the current device data sheet to check whether this document supports the device
you are using.
Device data sheets and family reference manual sections are available for
download from the Microchip Worldwide Web site at: http://www.microchip.com
5.1
INTRODUCTION
This section describes techniques for programming the Flash memory. PIC32 devices contain
internal Flash memory for executing user code. There are three methods by which the user can
program this memory:
• Run-Time Self-Programming (RTSP) – performed by the user’s software
• In-Circuit Serial Programming™ (ICSP™) – performed using a serial data connection to the
device, which allows much faster programming than RTSP
• Enhanced Joint Test Action Group Programming (EJTAG) – performed by an
EJTAG-capable programmer, using the EJTAG port of the device
RTSP techniques are described in this chapter. The ICSP and EJTAG methods are described in
the “PIC32MX Flash Programming Specification” (DS61145), which is available for download
from the Microchip web site (www.microchip.com).
DS61121F-page 5-2
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
5.2
CONTROL REGISTERS
Flash program and erase operations are controlled using the following Non-Volatile Memory
(NVM) control registers:
•
•
•
•
•
NVMCON: Programming Control Register
NVMKEY: Programming Unlock Register
NVMADDR: Flash Address Register
NVMDATA: Flash Program Data Register
NVMSRCADDR: Source Data Address Register
Table 5-1 provides a brief summary of all of the Flash-programming-related registers.
Corresponding registers appear after the summary, followed by a detailed description.
Table 5-1:
Flash Controller SFR Summary
Name
NVMCON(1)
NVMKEY
NVMADDR
NVMDATA
(1)
Bit
31/23/15/7
Bit
30/22/14/6
Bit
29/21/13/5
Bit
28/20/12/4
Bit
27/19/11/3
Bit
26/18/10/2
Bit
25/17/9/1
Bit
24/16/8/0
31:24
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
23:16
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
15:8
WR
WREN
WRERR
LVDERR
LVDSTAT
—
—
—
7:0
—
—
—
—
31:24
NVMKEY<31:24>
23:16
NVMKEY<23:16>
15:8
NVMKEY<15:8>
7:0
NVMKEY<7:0>
31:24
NVMADDR<31:24>
23:16
NVMADDR<23:16>
15:8
NVMADDR<15:8>
7:0
NVMADDR<7:0>
31:24
NVMDATA<31:24>
23:16
NVMDATA<23:16>
15:8
NVMDATA<15:8>
7:0
NVMDATA<7:0>
NVMSRCADDR 31:24
NVMSRCADDR<31:24>
23:16
NVMSRCADDR<23:16>
15:8
NVMSRCADDR<15:8>
7:0
NVMSRCADDR<7:0>
Legend:
Note 1:
NVMOP<3:0>
— = unimplemented, read as ‘0’.
This register has an associated Clear, Set, and Invert register at an offset of 0x4, 0x8, and 0xC bytes, respectively. These registers have
the same name with CLR, SET, or INV appended to the end of the register name (e.g., NVMCONCLR). Writing a ‘1’ to any bit position in
these registers will clear, set, or invert valid bits in the associated register. Reads from these registers should be ignored.
5
Flash
Programming
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-3
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
5.2.1
NVMCON Register
The NVMCON register is the control register for Flash program/erase operations. This register
selects whether an erase or program operation can be performed and is used to start the
program or erase cycle.
The NVMCON register is shown in Register 5-1. The lower byte of NVMCON configures the type
of NVM operation that will be performed. A summary of the NVMCON setup values for various
program and erase operations is given in Table 5-2.
Table 5-2:
Register 5-1:
U-0
NVMCON Register Values
Operation
NVMCON Value
Page Erase
0x8004
Program Word
0x8001
Program Row
0x8003
No Operation (NOP)
0x8000
NVMCON: Programming Control Register
U-0
U-0
U-0
—
—
—
—
U-0
U-0
U-0
U-0
—
—
—
—
bit 31
bit 24
U-0
U-0
U-0
U-0
U-0
U-0
U-0
U-0
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
bit 23
bit 16
HC, R/W-0
R/W-0
HS, R-0
HS, R-0
HS, HC, R-0
U-0
U-0
U-0
WR
WREN(1)
WRERR(2)
LVDERR(2)
LVDSTAT(2)
—
—
—
bit 15
bit 8
U-0
U-0
U-0
U-0
—
—
—
—
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMOP<3:0>
bit 7
bit 0
Legend:
HS = Set by Hardware
HC = Cleared by Hardware
R = Readable bit
W = Writable bit
U = Unimplemented bit, read as ‘0’
-n = Value at POR
‘1’ = Bit is set
‘0’ = Bit is cleared
x = Bit is unknown
bit 31-16
Unimplemented: Read as ‘0’
bit 15
WR: Write Control bit
This bit is writable when WREN = 1 and the unlock sequence is followed.
1 = Initiate a Flash operation. Hardware clears this bit when the operation completes.
0 = Flash operation complete or inactive
bit 14
WREN: Write Enable bit(1)
1 = Enable writes to the WR bit and enables the Low-Voltage Detect (LVD) circuit
0 = Disable writes to the WR bit and disables LVD circuit
Note 1:
2:
This bit is reset by a device Reset.
This bit is cleared by setting NVMOP<3:0> = 0000, and initiating a Flash operation (i.e., WR).
DS61121F-page 5-4
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
Register 5-1:
bit 13
NVMCON: Programming Control Register (Continued)
WRERR: Write Error bit(2)
This bit is read-only and is automatically set by hardware.
1 = Program or erase sequence did not complete successfully
0 = Program or erase sequence completed normally
bit 12
LVDERR: Low-Voltage Detect Error bit (LVD circuit must be enabled)(2)
This bit is read-only and is automatically set by hardware.
1 = Low-voltage detected (possible data corruption, if WRERR is set)
0 = Voltage level is acceptable for programming
bit 11
LVDSTAT: Low-Voltage Detect Status bit (LVD circuit must be enabled)(2)
This bit is read-only and is automatically set, and cleared by hardware
1 = Low-voltage event active
0 = Low-voltage event NOT active
bit 10-4
Unimplemented: Read as ‘0’
bit 3-0
NVMOP<3:0>: NVM Operation bits
These bits are writable when WREN = 0.
1111 = Reserved
•
•
•
0111 = Reserved
0110 = No operation
0101 = Program Flash (PFM) erase operation: erases PFM, if all pages are not write-protected
0100 = Page erase operation: erases page selected by NVMADDR, if it is not write-protected
0011 = Row program operation: programs row selected by NVMADDR, if it is not write-protected
0010 = No operation
0001 = Word program operation: programs word selected by NVMADDR, if it is not write-protected
0000 = No operation
Note 1:
2:
This bit is reset by a device Reset.
This bit is cleared by setting NVMOP<3:0> = 0000, and initiating a Flash operation (i.e., WR).
5
Flash
Programming
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-5
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
5.2.2
NVMKEY Register
NVMKEY is a write-only register that is used to prevent accidental writes/erasures of Flash or
EEPROM memory. To start a programming or an erase sequence, the following steps must be
taken in the exact order shown:
1.
2.
Write 0xAA996655 to NVMKEY.
Write 0x556699AA to NVMKEY.
After this sequence, only the next transaction on the peripheral bus is allowed to write the
NVMCON register. In most cases, the user will simply need to set the WR bit in the NVMCON
register to start the program or erase cycle. Interrupts should be disabled during the unlock
sequence.
Register 5-2:
W-0
NVMKEY: Programming Unlock Register
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
NVMKEY<31:24>
bit 31
bit 24
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
NVMKEY<23:16>
bit 23
bit 16
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
NVMKEY<15:8>
bit 15
bit 8
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
W-0
NVMKEY<7:0>
bit 7
bit 0
Legend:
R = Readable bit
W = Writable bit
U = Unimplemented bit, read as ‘0’
-n = Value at POR
‘1’ = Bit is set
‘0’ = Bit is cleared
bit 31-0
Note:
x = Bit is unknown
NVMKEY<31:0>: Unlock Register bits
These bits are write-only, and read as ‘0’ on any read
This register is used as part of the unlock sequence to prevent inadvertent writes to the PFM.
DS61121F-page 5-6
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
5.2.3
NVMADDR Register
The NVM Address register selects the row for Flash memory writes, the address location for word
writes, and the page address for Flash memory erase operations.
Note:
Register 5-3:
R/W-0
The NVM Address register must be loaded with the physical address of the Flash
memory and not the virtual address.
NVMADDR: Flash Address Register
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMADDR<31:24>
bit 31
bit 24
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMADDR<23:16>
bit 23
bit 16
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMADDR<15:8>
bit 15
bit 8
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R-0
R-0
NVMADDR<7:0>
bit 7
bit 0
Legend:
R = Readable bit
W = Writable bit
U = Unimplemented bit, read as ‘0’
-n = Value at POR
‘1’ = Bit is set
‘0’ = Bit is cleared
bit 31-0
x = Bit is unknown
NVMADDR<31:0>: Flash Address bits
Bulk/Chip/PFM Erase: Address is ignored
Page Erase: Address identifies the page to erase
Row Program: Address identifies the row to program
Word Program: Address identifies the word to program
5
Flash
Programming
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-7
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
5.2.4
NVMDATA Register
The NVM Data register holds the data to be programmed during Flash Word program operations.
Register 5-4:
R/W-0
NVMDATA: Flash Program Data Register
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMDATA<31:24>
bit 31
bit 24
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMDATA<23:16>
bit 23
bit 16
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMDATA<15:8>
bit 15
bit 8
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMDATA<7:0>
bit 7
bit 0
Legend:
R = Readable bit
W = Writable bit
U = Unimplemented bit, read as ‘0’
-n = Value at POR
‘1’ = Bit is set
‘0’ = Bit is cleared
bit 31-0
Note:
x = Bit is unknown
NVMDATA<31:0>: Flash Programming Data bits
The bits in this register are only reset by a Power-on Reset (POR).
DS61121F-page 5-8
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
5.2.5
NVMSRCADDR Register
The NVM Source Address register selects the source data buffer address in SRAM for
performing row programming operations.
Note:
Register 5-5:
R/W-0
The address must be word-aligned.
NVMSRCADDR: Source Data Address Register
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMSRCADDR<31:24>
bit 31
bit 24
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMSRCADDR<23:16>
bit 23
bit 16
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
NVMSRCADDR<15:8>
bit 15
bit 8
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R/W-0
R-0
R-0
NVMSRCADDR<7:0>
bit 7
bit 0
Legend:
R = Readable bit
W = Writable bit
U = Unimplemented bit, read as ‘0’
-n = Value at POR
‘1’ = Bit is set
‘0’ = Bit is cleared
bit 31-0
x = Bit is unknown
NVMSRCADDR<31:0>: Source Data Address bits
The system physical address of the data to be programmed into the Flash when the NVMOP<3:0> bits
(NVMCON<3:0>) are set to perform row programming.
5
Flash
Programming
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-9
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
5.3
RUN-TIME SELF-PROGRAMMING (RTSP) OPERATION
Run-Time Self-Programming (RTSP) allows the user code to modify Flash program memory
contents. The device Flash memory is divided into two logical Flash partitions: the program Flash
memory (PFM), and the boot Flash memory (BFM). The last page in boot Flash memory contains
the debug page, which is reserved for use by the debugger tool while debugging.
The program Flash array for the PIC32 device is built up of a series of rows to form a page. Refer
to the “Flash Program Memory” chapter of the specific device data sheet to determine the row
and page sizes. For example, a row may contain 128 32-bit instruction words or 512 bytes. A
group of 8 rows compose a page; which, therefore, contains 8 × 512 = 4096 bytes or 1024
instruction words. A page of Flash is the smallest unit of memory that can be erased at a single
time. The program Flash array can be programmed in one of two ways:
• Row programming, with 128 instruction words at a time
• Word programming, with 1 instruction word at a time
Performing an RTSP operation while executing (fetching) instructions from program Flash
memory, the CPU stalls (waits) until the programming operation is finished. The CPU will not
execute any instruction, or respond to interrupts, during this time. If any interrupts occur during
the programming cycle, they remain pending until the cycle completes.
Performing an RTSP operation while executing (fetching) instructions from RAM memory, the
CPU can continue to execute instructions and respond to interrupts during the programming
operation. Any executable code scheduled to execute during the RTSP operation must be placed
in RAM memory. This includes the relevant interrupt vector, and the interrupt service routine
instructions.
Note:
DS61121F-page 5-10
A minimum VDD requirement for Flash erase and write operations is required. Refer
to the “Electrical Characteristics” chapter in the specific device data sheet for
more information.
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
5.4
LOCK-OUT FEATURE
5.4.1
NVMWREN
A number of mechanisms exists within the device to ensure that inadvertent writes to program
Flash do not occur. The WREN bit (NVMCON<14>) should be zero, unless the software intends
to write to the program Flash. When WREN = 1, the Flash write control bit, WR (NVMCON<15>),
is writable and the Flash LVD circuit is enabled.
5.4.2
NVMKEY
In addition to the write protection provided by the WREN bit, an unlock sequence needs to be
performed before the WR bit (NVMCOM<15>) can be set. If the WR bit is not set on the next
peripheral bus transaction (read or write), WR is locked and the unlock sequence must be
restarted.
5.4.3
Unlock Sequence
To unlock Flash operations, perform steps 4 through 8 in order. If sequence is not followed, WR
is not set.
1.
Suspend or disable all initiators that can access the Peripheral Bus and interrupt the
unlock sequence, e.g., DMA and interrupts.
2. Set WREN bit (NVMCON<14>) to allow writes to WR and set NVMOP<3:0> bit
(NVMCON<3:0>) to the desired operation with a single store instruction.
3. Wait for LVD to start-up.
4. Load 0xAA996655 to CPU register X.
5. Load 0x556699AA to CPU register Y.
6. Load 0x00008000 to CPU register Z.
7. Store CPU register X to NVMKEY.
8. Store CPU register Y to NVMKEY.
9. Store CPU register Z to NVMCONSET.
10. Wait for WR bit (NVMCON<15>) to be cleared.
11. Clear the WREN bit (NVMCON<14>).
12. Check the WRERR (NVMCON<13>) and LVDERR (NVMCON<12>) bits to ensure that
the program/erase sequence completed successfully.
When the WR bit is set, the program/erase sequence starts and the CPU is unable to execute
from Flash memory for the duration of the sequence.
5
Flash
Programming
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-11
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
Example 5-1:
Unlock Example
unsigned int NVMUnlock (unsigned int nvmop)
{
unsigned int status;
// Suspend or Disable all Interrupts
asm volatile (“di %0” : “=r” (status));
// Enable Flash Write/Erase Operations and Select
// Flash operation to perform
NVMCON = nvmop;
// Write Keys
NVMKEY = 0xAA996655;
NVMKEY = 0x556699AA;
// Start the operation using the Set Register
NVMCONSET = 0x8000;
// Wait for operation to complete
while (NVMCON & 0x8000);
// Restore Interrupts
if (status & 0x00000001)
asm volatile (“ei”);
else
asm volatile (“di”);
// Disable NVM write enable
NVMCONCLR = 0x0004000;
// Return WRERR and LVDERR Error Status Bits
return (NVMCON & 0x3000);
}
DS61121F-page 5-12
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
5.5
WORD PROGRAMMING SEQUENCE
The smallest block of data that can be programmed in a single operation is one 32-bit word. The
data to be programmed must be written to the NVMDATA register, and the address of the word
must be loaded into the NVMADDR register before the programming sequence is initiated. The
instruction word at the location pointed to by the NVMADDR register is then programmed.
A program sequence comprises the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
Write 32-bit data to be programmed to the NVMDATA register.
Load the NVMADDR register with the address to be programmed.
Run the unlock sequence using the Word Program command (see Section 5.4.3 “Unlock
Sequence”).
The program sequence completes, and the WR bit (NVMCON<15>) is cleared by hardware.
Example 5-2:
Word Program Example
unsigned int NVMWriteWord (void* address, unsigned int data)
{
unsigned int res;
// Load data into NVMDATA register
NVMDATA = data;
// Load address to program into NVMADDR register
NVMADDR = (unsigned int) address;
// Unlock and Write Word
res = NVMUnlock (0x4001);
// Return Result
return res;
}
5
Flash
Programming
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-13
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
5.6
ROW PROGRAMMING SEQUENCE
The largest block of data that can be programmed is 1 row, which equals to 512 bytes of data
(refer to the “Flash Program Memory” chapter in the specific device data sheet to determine
the row size). The row of data must first be loaded into a buffer in SRAM. The NVMADDR register
then points to the Flash address where the Flash controller will start programming the row of
data.
Note:
The Flash controller ignores the sub-row address bits and always starts
programming at the beginning of a row.
A row program sequence comprises the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Write the entire row of data to be programmed into system SRAM. The source address
must be word-aligned.
Set the NVMADDR register with the start address of the Flash row to be programmed.
Set the NVMSRCADDR register with the physical source address from step 1.
Run the unlock sequence using the Row Program command (see 5.4.3 “Unlock
Sequence”).
The program sequence completes, and the WR bit (NVMCON<15>) is cleared by
hardware.
Example 5-3:
Row Program Example
unsigned int NVMWriteRow (void* address, void* data)
{
unsigned int res;
// Set NVMADDR to Start Address of row to program
NVMADDR = (unsigned int) address;
// Set NVMSRCADDR to the SRAM data buffer Address
NVMSRCADDR = (unsigned int) data;
// Unlock and Write Row
res = NVMUnlock(0x4003);
// Return Result
return res;
}
DS61121F-page 5-14
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
5.7
PAGE ERASE SEQUENCE
A page erase performs an erase of a single page of either PFM or BFM. Refer to the specific
device data sheet for the page size. The page to be erased is selected using the NVMADDR
register.
Note:
The lower bits of the address are ignored in page selection.
A page of Flash can only be erased if its associated page write protection is not enabled.
• All BFM pages are affected by the Boot write protection Configuration bit
• PFM pages are affected by the Program Flash write protection Configuration bits
If in Mission mode, the application must not be executing from the erased page.
A page erase sequence comprises the following steps:
1.
2.
Set the NVMADDR register with the address of the page to be erased.
Run the unlock sequence using the desired Erase command (see 5.4.3 “Unlock
Sequence”).
The erase sequence completes and the WR bit (NVMCON<15>) is cleared by hardware.
3.
Example 5-4:
Page Erase Example
unsigned int NVMErasePage(void* address)
{
unsigned int res;
// Set NVMADDR to the Start Address of page to erase
NVMADDR = (unsigned int) address;
// Unlock and Erase Page
res = NVMUnlock(0x4004);
// Return Result
return res;
}
5.8
PROGRAM FLASH MEMORY ERASE SEQUENCE
It is possible to erase the entire PFM area. This mode leaves the boot Flash intact and is intended
to be used by a field-upgradeable device.
The program Flash can be erased if all pages in the program Flash are not write-protected.
Note:
The application must not be executing from the PFM address range.
A PFM erase sequence comprises the following steps:
1.
Run the unlock sequence using the program Flash memory erase command (see
5.4.3 “Unlock Sequence”).
The erase sequence completes and the WR bit (NVMCON<15>) is cleared by hardware.
2.
Example 5-5:
Program Flash Erase Example
5
unsigned int NVMErasePFM(void)
{
unsigned int res;
Flash
Programming
// Unlock and Erase Program Flash
res = NVMUnlock(0x4005);
// Return Result
return res;
}
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-15
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
5.9
OPERATION IN POWER-SAVING AND DEBUG MODES
5.9.1
Operation in Sleep Mode
When a PIC32 device enters Sleep mode, the system clock is disabled. The Flash controller
does not function in Sleep mode. If entry into Sleep mode occurs while an NVM operation is in
progress, the device will not go into Sleep mode until the NVM operation is complete.
5.9.2
Operation in Idle Mode
Idle mode has no effect on the Flash controller module when a programming operation is active.
The CPU continues to be stalled until the programming operation completes.
5.9.3
Operation in Debug Mode
The Flash controller does not provide debug freeze capability, and therefore, has no effect on the
Flash controller module when a programming operation is active. The CPU continues to be
stalled until the programming operation completes. Interrupting the normal programming
sequence could cause the device to latch-up. The only exception to this is the NVMKEY unlock
sequence, which is suspended when in Debug mode, allowing the user to single-step through
the unlock sequence.
5.10
EFFECTS OF VARIOUS RESETS
5.10.1
Device Reset
Only the NVMCON bits for WREN and LVDSTAT are reset on a device Reset. All other SFR bits
are only reset by a POR; however, the state of the NVMKEY is reset by a device Reset.
5.10.2
Power-on Reset
All Flash controller registers are forced to their reset states upon a POR.
5.10.3
Watchdog Timer Reset
All Flash controller registers are unchanged upon a Watchdog Timer Reset.
DS61121F-page 5-16
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
5.11
INTERRUPTS
The Flash controller can generate an interrupt reflecting the events that occur during the
programming operations. The following interrupt can be generated:
• Flash Control Event Interrupt (FCEIF)
The interrupt flag must be cleared in software.The Flash controller is enabled as a source of
interrupt via the following bit:
• Flash Controller Interrupt Enable (FCEIE)
The interrupt priority-level bits and interrupt subpriority-level bits must also be configured:
• FCEIP
• FCEIS
Refer to Section 8. “Interrupts” (DS61108) in the “PIC32 Family Reference Manual” for details.
5.11.1
Interrupt Configuration
The Flash controller module has a dedicated interrupt flag bit, FCEIF, and a corresponding
interrupt enable/mask bit, FCEIE.
These two bits determine the source of an interrupt and enable or disable an individual interrupt
source. All the interrupt sources for a specific Flash controller module share one interrupt vector.
In addition, the FCEIF bit will be set without regard to the state of the corresponding enable bit,
and the FCEIF bit can be polled by software if desired.
The FCEIE bit is used to define the behavior of the Vector Interrupt Controller (VIC) when a
corresponding FCEIF bit is set. When the corresponding FCEIE bit is clear, the VIC module does
not generate a CPU interrupt for the event. If the FCEIE bit is set, the VIC module will generate
an interrupt to the CPU when the corresponding FCEIF bit is set (subject to the priority and
subpriority as outlined in the following paragraphs).
It is the responsibility of the user’s software routine that services a particular interrupt to clear the
appropriate Interrupt Flag bit before the service routine is complete.
The priority of the Flash Controller module can be set independently with the FCEIP<2:0> bits.
This priority defines the priority group to which the interrupt source is assigned. The priority
groups range from a value of 7 (the highest priority), to a value of 0, which does not generate an
interrupt. An interrupt being serviced is preempted by an interrupt in a higher priority group.
The subpriority bits allow setting the priority of a interrupt source within a priority group. The
values of the subpriority, FCEIS<1:0>, range from 3 (the highest priority), to 0 the lowest priority.
An interrupt with the same priority group but having a higher subpriority value, does not preempt
a lower subpriority interrupt that is in progress.
The priority group and subpriority bits allow more than one interrupt source to share the same
priority and subpriority. If simultaneous interrupts occur in this configuration, the natural order of
the interrupt sources within a priority/subpriority group pair determine the interrupt generated.
The natural priority is based on the vector numbers of the interrupt sources. The lower the vector
number, the higher the natural priority of the interrupt. Any interrupts that are overridden by
natural order generate their respective interrupts based on priority, subpriority, and natural order,
after the interrupt flag for the current interrupt is cleared.
After an enabled interrupt is generated, the CPU jumps to the vector assigned to that interrupt.
The vector number for the interrupt is the same as the natural order number. Then, the CPU
begins executing code at the vector address. The user’s code at this vector address should
perform any application-specific operations, clear the FCEIF interrupt flag, and then exit.
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-17
5
Flash
Programming
For more information on interrupts and the vector address table details, refer to Section 8.
“Interrupts” (DS61108) in the “PIC32 Family Reference Manual” and the “Interrupt
Controller” chapter of the specific device data sheet.
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
5.12
RELATED APPLICATION NOTES
This section lists application notes that are related to this section of the manual. These
application notes may not be written specifically for the PIC32 device family, but the concepts are
pertinent and could be used with modification and possible limitations. The current application
notes related to Flash Programming include the following:
Title
Application Note #
No related application notes at this time.
Note:
DS61121F-page 5-18
N/A
Please visit the Microchip web site (www.microchip.com) for additional application
notes and code examples for the PIC32 family of devices.
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Section 5. Flash Programming
5.13
REVISION HISTORY
Revision A (September 2007)
This is the initial released version of this document.
Revision B (October 2007)
Updated document to remove Confidential status.
Revision C (April 2008)
Revised status to Preliminary; Revised U-0 to r-x.
Revision D (June 2008)
Revised Register 5-1, bit 14 NVMWREN; Add footnote 1 to Registers 5-12 through 5-14; Add
note to Section 5.3; Revise Section 5.4.1; Revised Example 5-1; Change Reserved bits “Maintain
as” to “Write”.
Revision E (December 2010)
This revision includes the following updates:
• Minor updates to the text and formatting have been incorporated throughout the document
• Added Notes 1, 2 and 3, which describe the Clear, Set and Invert registers to the following:
- Table 5-1: Flash Controller SFR Summary
- Register 5-1: NVMCON: Programming Control Register(1,2,3)
- Register 5-3: NVMADDR: Flash Address Register(1,2,3)
• Removed all Clear, Set and Invert register descriptions
• Removed all Interrupt register references
• Renamed the following NVMCON register bit names were changed throughout the
document:
- NVMWR was renamed to WR
- NVMWREN was renamed to WREN
- NVMERR was renamed to WRERR
• Updated the third paragraph and added a new (fourth) paragraph to 5.3 “Run-Time Self-Programming (RTSP) Operation”
• Updated the unlock Flash operations sequence by adding a new step 3 (see 5.4.3 “Unlock
Sequence”)
• Updated the code in the Unlock Example (see Example 5-1)
• Removed Table 5-3
Revision F (July 2012)
This revision includes the following updates:
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS61121F-page 5-19
5
Flash
Programming
• Updated Note 1 and removed Notes 2 and 3 from the Flash Controller SFR Register
Summary (see Table 5-1)
• Updated NVMCON (see Register 5-1)
• Removed Notes 1, 2, and 3 from NVMADDR (see Register 5-3)
• Updated the second paragraph of 5.3 “Run-Time Self-Programming (RTSP) Operation”
• Updated the first paragraph of 5.6 “Row Programming Sequence”
• Updated the first paragraph of 5.7 “Page Erase Sequence”
• Minor updates to the text and formatting have been incorporated throughout the document
PIC32 Family Reference Manual
NOTES:
DS61121F-page 5-20
© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Note the following details of the code protection feature on Microchip devices:
•
Microchip products meet the specification contained in their particular Microchip Data Sheet.
•
Microchip believes that its family of products is one of the most secure families of its kind on the market today, when used in the
intended manner and under normal conditions.
•
There are dishonest and possibly illegal methods used to breach the code protection feature. All of these methods, to our
knowledge, require using the Microchip products in a manner outside the operating specifications contained in Microchip’s Data
Sheets. Most likely, the person doing so is engaged in theft of intellectual property.
•
Microchip is willing to work with the customer who is concerned about the integrity of their code.
•
Neither Microchip nor any other semiconductor manufacturer can guarantee the security of their code. Code protection does not
mean that we are guaranteeing the product as “unbreakable.”
Code protection is constantly evolving. We at Microchip are committed to continuously improving the code protection features of our
products. Attempts to break Microchip’s code protection feature may be a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If such acts
allow unauthorized access to your software or other copyrighted work, you may have a right to sue for relief under that Act.
Information contained in this publication regarding device
applications and the like is provided only for your convenience
and may be superseded by updates. It is your responsibility to
ensure that your application meets with your specifications.
MICROCHIP MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR
WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND WHETHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, WRITTEN OR ORAL, STATUTORY OR
OTHERWISE, RELATED TO THE INFORMATION,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ITS CONDITION,
QUALITY, PERFORMANCE, MERCHANTABILITY OR
FITNESS FOR PURPOSE. Microchip disclaims all liability
arising from this information and its use. Use of Microchip
devices in life support and/or safety applications is entirely at
the buyer’s risk, and the buyer agrees to defend, indemnify and
hold harmless Microchip from any and all damages, claims,
suits, or expenses resulting from such use. No licenses are
conveyed, implicitly or otherwise, under any Microchip
intellectual property rights.
Trademarks
The Microchip name and logo, the Microchip logo, dsPIC,
KEELOQ, KEELOQ logo, MPLAB, PIC, PICmicro, PICSTART,
PIC32 logo, rfPIC and UNI/O are registered trademarks of
Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other
countries.
FilterLab, Hampshire, HI-TECH C, Linear Active Thermistor,
MXDEV, MXLAB, SEEVAL and The Embedded Control
Solutions Company are registered trademarks of Microchip
Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A.
Analog-for-the-Digital Age, Application Maestro, chipKIT,
chipKIT logo, CodeGuard, dsPICDEM, dsPICDEM.net,
dsPICworks, dsSPEAK, ECAN, ECONOMONITOR,
FanSense, HI-TIDE, In-Circuit Serial Programming, ICSP,
Mindi, MiWi, MPASM, MPLAB Certified logo, MPLIB,
MPLINK, mTouch, Omniscient Code Generation, PICC,
PICC-18, PICDEM, PICDEM.net, PICkit, PICtail, REAL ICE,
rfLAB, Select Mode, Total Endurance, TSHARC,
UniWinDriver, WiperLock and ZENA are trademarks of
Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other
countries.
SQTP is a service mark of Microchip Technology Incorporated
in the U.S.A.
All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their
respective companies.
© 2007-2012, Microchip Technology Incorporated, Printed in
the U.S.A., All Rights Reserved.
Printed on recycled paper.
ISBN: 978-1-62076-464-0
QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CERTIFIED BY DNV == ISO/TS 16949 == © 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
Microchip received ISO/TS-16949:2009 certification for its worldwide
headquarters, design and wafer fabrication facilities in Chandler and
Tempe, Arizona; Gresham, Oregon and design centers in California
and India. The Company’s quality system processes and procedures
are for its PIC® MCUs and dsPIC® DSCs, KEELOQ® code hopping
devices, Serial EEPROMs, microperipherals, nonvolatile memory and
analog products. In addition, Microchip’s quality system for the design
and manufacture of development systems is ISO 9001:2000 certified.
DS61121F-page 5-21
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© 2007-2012 Microchip Technology Inc.
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