Transfer Switch Communications

Transfer Switch Communications
Transfer Switch Communications
Technical Data
Table of Contents
General Description ........................................................................... 2
Physical Connections ........................................................................ 2
Protocol ........................................................................................... 2
Answers to Some Frequently Asked Questions .................................... 3
Further Reading ................................................................................ 4
Applications ..................................................................................... 4
ATC 400/600/800 Direct Connect - CONI ...................................................................................... 5
ATC 400/600/800 Direct Connect - MINT ...................................................................................... 6
ATC 400/600/800 Direct Connect - Modbus MINT (mMINT) ............................................................ 7
ATC 400/600/800 Direct Connect - PMCOM5 ................................................................................ 9
ATC 400/600/800 Modem to MINT ............................................................................................. 10
ATC 400/600/800 Modem to PMCOM5 ....................................................................................... 12
ATC 400/600/800 Ethernet 10BASE-T ......................................................................................... 14
ATC 400/600/800 Ethernet Fiber 10BASE-FL Multi-mode .............................................................. 15
Soft Load / Peaker Modem Connect - Modbus / RS-232 ................................................................ 16
Soft Load / Peaker Modbus Addresses ......................................................................................... 18
Transfer Switch Communications
TD1502TE
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Technical Data
Page 2
Effective: February 2002
General Description
Media
The purpose of a communication network is to move data
from one place to another. This Technical Data will
describe the variety of methods for moving data from
Automatic Transfer Switch equipment to remote devices
such as computers, modems, and operator interface
terminals.
How the network is physically connected together. Data is
typically transmitted over (listed in increasing cost):
■
■
Physical Connections
An important consideration for moving data from one
point to another deals with the physical characteristics of
the network. These characteristics are divided into topics
including topology, media, and physical signaling issues.
■
Topology
Defines how devices are connected to each other.
Typically we have two main types of connections.
■
■
■
Point to Point
■
Straight wires - An example is telephone cable (26
gauge, 4 conductor)
Twisted Shielded Pair (TSP) - Two conductor, twisted
wire with a metal shield around it. The wire is twisted
and shielded to help prevent electrical noise from
getting onto the wire or from the communication wire
into other circuits. (Noise is undesirable as it can
change the 1’s to 0’s in a message, altering the meaning
of the message.)
2 TSP - Two twisted shield pair of wires in a single cable
used for networks that have separate transmit receive
requirements or that send duplicate signals down 2
cables to check for data corruption.
Coax cable - A single conductor surrounded by a
plastic material, a shield, and an outside coating.
Fiber Optic Cable - A thin glass or plastic tube used to
conduct light signals.
Air - No physical wires.
Physical Signaling
A type of connection where two stations communicate
over a dedicated link. RS-232 connections always use the
point-to-point topology. Advantages include low cost and
simple connections. Disadvantages include the complexity and cost of adding additional nodes.
■
Bus
Energy
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Power Factor
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Up
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Step
The signal level and type used to transmits the 1’s and 0’s
on a network. Examples include:
■ Voltage level - Different voltage levels mean a 1 or a 0
(i.e. +12V=1, -12V=0).
■ Impedance - Different impedances signify 1 or 0.
■ Frequency - Different frequency levels (FSK- FM radio
is an example) or amplitudes of the frequency (ASK- AM
radio…) corresponds to a 1 or a 0.
■ Light - Presence or absence of light signify a 1 or 0.
The physical specification contributes to cost, how many
devices are supported on the network, the distance the
network will cover, the reliability of the data, and the
availability of the data. A point-to-point network, over
existing spare telephone lines, using voltage signals may
be inexpensive for data from one device. However, it will
become expensive if you communicate to more than one
device (one wire to each device) and the data is not very
reliable as electrical noise can corrupt the data easily.
IQ 1000 II
Protocol
CH DEVICES
Multiple devices connected on a common wire.
Advantages include reduced wiring and ease of installation. Disadvantages include loss of communication to
mutiple devices during a wire break.
Once the data moves from one place to another, a format
must be defined such that both ends of the network
understand what the various combinations of 1’s and 0’s
mean. The meaning of those 1 and 0 combinations is
termed the “protocol”. The protocol consists of:
Bit Rate
A Bit Rate defines how fast data is transmitted, designated
in bits per second. While not technically correct, common
usage equates the term “baud” with bits per second (i.e.
9600 baud = 9600 bits per second or approximately 0.02
seconds to transmit 200 bits). Baud (from Jean-MauriceEmile Baudot, the French inventor of the teletype) technically means the number of signal transitions per second.
Since modern modulation schemes encode multiple bits
into one signal transition, baud and bit rate are not equivalent. Also, since baud defines the number of signal
transitions per second, it is a measure of a rate, where rate
means number of occurrences per second. Therefore, the
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TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
common usage of the phrase “baud rate” is incorrect.
The word “rate” is redundant as it would be translated
as “signalling rate.” Unfortunately, the incorrect phrase
“baud rate” is commonly used and most telecommunications professionals will not question your use of that
phrase.
Technical Data
Access method or bus arbitration
protocol that the network will use, you must select the
hardware and software that will operate with such a
network. Close analysis is required despite the physical
specification being identical; two devices may not talk
because of different protocols. A common question
asked is “if both computers have an RS-232 port, why
won’t they communicate?” As we have read above, there
are many details that must be met first.
Decides when a device sends data. There are several
methods:
Answers to Some Frequently Asked Questions
■
■
Master - slave
A single device (i.e. a personal computer) controls
and manages the communications on the network. It
asks for information from devices (slaves) on its
network and gives information to the slaves. The key
disadvantage is that it is expensive to add additional
masters to the network.
Peer to peer
Each of the devices on a network can talk directly to
any other device on the network. The communication
is managed in a couple of ways. One method is a
token, or permission to speak, which is passed
around the network to each device in turn. The node
with the token tells what it has to say and asks what
it needs to know. It then passes the token to the next
device. Another method is multiple access collision
detection. In that method, a given device checks for
network activity if it needs information or needs to
send information. If no other node is heard, it
transmits to the network. If another device is talking,
it waits until the first device is done. If two devices
talk at once, both devices realize it, stop talking, and
then wait a different and predetermined amount of
time before starting again. Each device on the
network has a different amount of wait time, depending on its priority and the amount of time since it last
spoke. This minimizes the likelihood of a reoccurrence of the collision.
Message Structure
The message structure defines size, how messages are
organized, and what messages mean. Each 1 or a 0 is a
single bit. A message can consist of any number of
bits. The position of the bit, as well as its value (0,1), is
important and defined by the protocol. Messages
contain overhead information necessary to determine
where the message came from, the type of message it
is, the intended destination of the message, error
detection, and start/stop designation, in addition to the
data that is being transferred. The amount of overhead
varies by protocol and has a significant impact on the
throughput of a network (i.e. a protocol that defines a 25
bit message that requires 1 start, 1 stop bit, a 5 bit
address, 5 bits error detection, 1 bit for data message
indication, leaves only 12 bits for data. To transfer 96
bits of data, requires 200 bits to be transmitted.).
Summary
Protocol typically affects throughput of a network and its
connectivity. Once you have defined the physical
characteristics of the communication network and the
TD1502TE
Why not develop one physical layer and protocol
that all companies will use for communications?
Efforts have been made to standardize communications
since the early 1970’s. Most end user customers want
that and Eaton Corporation supports that philosophy. The
issue is, however, that no communication specification
meets all application needs. As a result, agreement on
that one protocol/physical characteristic has been illusive.
Some of the selection characteristics for a network are as
follows:
■ # of devices supported
■ Length and flexibility of data line routing
■ Noise immunity
■ Throughput of data vs. data requirements
■ Data structure (small, medium, or large data messages)
■ Electrical isolation/withstand
■ Connectivity (the ability for one system or network to
talk to another)
■ Installed cost
Eventually, there will probably be multiple lower level
networks in a plant, all doing what they do best for their
application, with a gateway (a method of connecting
different networks together) to other networks that need
to access its information.
What is an open protocol vs. a proprietary protocol?
A proprietary protocol is one in which a company elects
to keep its protocol and physical characteristics secret
and to maintain control of all interfaces. Open systems
are a matter of degrees. On one end of the spectrum, a
company may develop gateways to its system. On the
other end, a protocol/physical layer is made available to
everyone, hardware can be manufactured by anyone, and
the protocol characteristics are such that each company’s
products will communicate exactly like any others. For
example, the INCOM protocol used on some IQ Transfer
Switch products is an open protocol in that the protocol is
published and support software is given to third party
companies to develop both hardware and software
interfaces. The physical layer is less open, in that communication chip availability is controlled by the CutlerHammer business. However, that chip is sold to third
parties, and communication card interfaces are available.
DeviceNetTM is open from a protocol standpoint, and
more open from a physical layer, in that the “chip” is sold
by multiple vendors. Modbus is a protocol that is used by
IQ Transfer products (using the Modbus MINT converter
or Modbus Gateway), as well as the Soft-Load Transfer
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Page 3
Technical Data
Page 4
Effective: February 2002
Switch and the Peaking Switch. Modbus is supported by
hundreds of third party vendors.
What are some communication standards sanctioned by independent governing bodies?
Currently, there are no standards groups that “sanction”
both the physical and protocol specifications. ANSI/EIA
(American National Standards Institute / Electronic
Industries Alliance) has developed several physical layer
standards - RS 232, RS 422, RS 485. Even nodes that use
the same protocol (e.g. Modbus), may have other aspects
that prevent communications. For example, Modbus
does not define what data is stored in a particular
“register” within a node. Neither does it define what is
stored in that register (bit data, integer data, floating
point number, etc.). For communications to occur with
any meaning, the Modbus master must know these two
aspects. Note that since the protocol has not been
standardized, almost all manufacturers that have implemented one of those standards have also developed their
own aspects (register mapping, data type/format) therefore few truly “communicate” with each other
without some additional configuration on either the
master or slave end. Protocols such as INCOM and
DeviceNet completely define all aspects of the communications network and so make interconnecting nodes of
those types easier. IEC, NEMA, IEEE, ISA, etc. are all
investigating standards for both physical and protocols,
but are far away from sanctioning any one protocol and
physical standard.
and still offer effective noise immunity and allow up to 10,000
feet of cable. The message structure is also extremely
efficient in an effort to keep throughput high at 9600 baud.
Each data message consists only of data asked for, minimizing the number of bits required to be transmitted and
maximizing throughput.
The Cutler-Hammer Soft-Load Closed Transition transfer
switches and Peaking Switches include both Modbus (RS-232
and RS-485) and Lonworks (FT-10) communications. RS-232
supports a 50 foot point-to-point connection. RS-485 supports up to 4000 feet of cabling between the furthest nodes
and supports multi-dropping up to 32 RS-485 devices on one
twisted shielded pair.
Lonworks FT-10 running at 78 kbps (as implemented on the
Cutler-Hammer Soft-Load and Peaking Switches) uses a
twisted shielded pair and supports up to 32 devices with up to
500 meters of cable between any two nodes.
Further Reading
■
■
■
INCOM
Search www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com; in the first search
box, labeled “For Documents,” click in the text box
and type IMPACC
Modbus
Search www.modbus.org
Lonworks
Search www.echelon.com
Applications
What affects throughput?
Throughput is affected by both physical and protocol
characteristics. The number of devices talked to, the
media/physical signal used, the bus arbitration method
(master slave or peer to peer), the amount of data each
device sends back, the amount of useful data sent back
(i.e. if all you want is energy, but you have to get all
information, a lot more bits will be sent), and the bit rate
all determine throughput. In addition, noise immunity is
affected. Usually, the higher the bit rate, the lower the
noise immunity for a given number of devices and
distance.
The remaining pages document certain details on connecting
Cutler-Hammer Transfer Switch (and other) equipment to
communications systems. Those solutions are broadly
divided into “so-called” passive control and active control
transfer switch equipment.
Passive Control (INCOM/Modbus)
■ ATC400 / 600 / 800
Active Control (Modbus/Lonworks)
■ Soft Load Closed Transition
■ Peaking Switch
What affects noise immunity?
Typically the selection of physical signaling, type of
media, and bit rate (in that order), affect noise-withstand .
Light over fiber cable or frequency shift keying (FSK) are
the most noise immune. Likewise, the lower the bit rate,
the better the noise rejection. Error detection tolerates
noisy communication by rejecting the message, and
asking for a new transmission (slowing throughput).
What are the physical & protocol layers of CutlerHammer ATS?
For the ATC-400, 600 and 800, each includes the capability
to connect to the Cutler-Hammer INCOM network. This
network uses a bus topology over a twisted shielded pair
of wires using the frequency (FSK) signaling method.
This physical layer was chosen to keep installed costs low
by connecting up to 1000 devices on a “bus,” allowing
that cable to be run in tray with, or next to, power cables
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TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
Technical Data
ATC 400/600/800 Direct Connect - CONI
Phoenix Contact
UMK-SE 11,25-1
RJ-11 to
twisted pair adapter
Belden 9463 (8500' max) or CutlerHammer IMPCABLE (10000' max)
Ω
IN 1
IP 2
Shield 3
RJ-11
IPONI
IPONI
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
RJ-11 telephone patch cord
RJ-11
plugs into
CONI card
100 Ω terminator resistor
(connected at the end of
the cable)
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
100 Ohm Terminator Resistor
Components Required
CONI
An ISA bus card for a Windows PC that permits the
computer to directly connect with the INCOM twisted
pair network. When the CONI (Computer Operated
Network Interface) card is connected as shown (at the
end of the line), move the red DIP switch on the CONI
(marked Termination) to the “ON” position. If the CONI
is installed in the middle of the line, move the Termination DIP switch to “OFF” and install a second 100 ohm
termination resistor at the other end of the line.
Minimizes reflections by absorbing excess energy that
has been transmitted onto the twisted pair cable. 1/4
watt, carbon, 5% recommended. Do not use wirewound
resistors.
Phoenix Contact UMK Terminal Block
Ships with the CONI. Used to interconnect a stripped
pair of wires to the RJ-11 jack on the CONI card.
Software: PowerPort
Standard telephone patch cord available from any
electronics store. Included with the CONI card.
PowerPort is a program that connects a Windows based
PC with a device that uses the INCOM protocol. For a
free download, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and
in the first search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in
the text box and type PowerPort.
Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE
Software: PowerNetTM
To minimize communications problems, use this
specified twisted shielded pair. The INCOM cabling
standard permits taps from the main cable up to 200
feet long. Each tap may have up to 64 nodes. For more
information, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and in
the first search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in
the text box and type 00017513.PDF. Note that the
shield connection is grounded only at the Phoenix
Contact terminal block. All other shield connections are
tied together but left ungrounded.
PowerNet is a more powerful Windows based software
suite that permits multiple simultaneous connections
with up to 1000 IQ devices. Features include alarm
logging, trending, reporting, programming and monitoring of all connected IQ devices
RJ-11 Cable
IPONI
The INCOM Product Operated Network Interface
translates the low level data signals obtained from the
IQ device into a robust signal that can be transmitted for
8,500 feet using Belden 9463 or up to 10000 feet using
IMPCABLE.
TD1502TE
Ordering Instructions
Ordering a transfer switch with option 48A causes the
switch to be supplied with an IPONI mounted. The
switch is then ready for connection to customer
supplied Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE pulled by the
contractor to the switch. The customer will be responsible for purchasing the CONI (order by description from
your transfer switch representative) and the PowerPort
or PowerNet software.
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Page 5
Technical Data
Page 6
Effective: February 2002
ATC 400/600/800 Direct Connect - MINT
MINT
INCOM to RS-232 Adapter
RS-232
Port
100 Ω terminator resistor
(connected at the end of
the cable)
Belden 9463 (8500' max) or CutlerHammer IMPCABLE (10000' max)
DB-25 Male
Ω
IPONI
Plugs into
COM1 or 2
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
Components Required
Master INCOM Network Translator connects an RS-232
based device (e.g. computer serial port port, modem,
PLC) to the INCOM network. The MINT supports bit
rates of 1200, 2400, 9600 and 19200 bps. Also supports
INCOM data rates of 9600 and 1200 baud.
AT Modem Cable
Standard “straight-through” 25-pin male to 9-pin female
cable. The RS-232 port only requires 3 wires for
operation, although the MINT can be configured for
RTS/CTS hardware handshaking to support half-duplex
(2-wire) modems.
Data In ←
2
Data Out →
3
JP
102
7
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
IPONI
MINT
Cable
9-pin
female
Cable
25-pin
male
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
"AT Modem Cable"
Modem
25-pin
female
IPONI
2
2
3
3
7
5
Computer
9-pin
male
2
→ Data In
3
← Data Out
5
Signal Common
The INCOM Product Operated Network Interface translates
low level data signals obtained from the IQ device into a
robust signal that can be transmitted for 8,500 feet using
Belden 9463 or up to 10,000 feet using IMPCABLE.
100 Ohm Terminator Resistor
Minimizes reflections by absorbing excess energy that has
been transmitted onto the twisted pair cable (1/4 watt, carbon,
5% recommended). Do not use wirewound resistors.
Software: PowerPort
PowerPort is a program that connects a Windows based PC
with a device that uses the INCOM protocol. For a free
download, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and in the
first search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in the text box
and type PowerPort.
Software: PowerNet
PowerNet is a more powerful Windows based software suite
that permits multiple simultaneous connections with up to
1000 IQ devices. Features include alarm logging, trending,
reporting, programming and monitoring of all connected IQ
devices.
AT Modem Cable
5724B56H04
Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE
Ordering Instructions
To minimize communications problems, use this
specified twisted shielded pair. The INCOM cabling
standard permits taps from the main cable up to 200
feet long. Each tap may have up to 64 nodes. For more
information, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and in
the first search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in
the text box and type 00017513.PDF. Note that the
shield connection is grounded only at the MINT. All
other shield connections are tied together but left
ungrounded.
Ordering a transfer switch with option 48A causes the switch
to be supplied with an IPONI mounted. The MINTII interface
can be ordered by description from your transfer switch
representative. The cable connecting the MINT to the
computer is ordered as Cutler-Hammer style 5724B56H04.
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
Technical Data
Page 7
ATC 400/600/800 Direct Connect - Modbus MINT (mMINT)
2-wire
RS-485
network
shown with
optional
signal ref.
mMINT
INCOM to RS-485 Adapter
100 Ω terminator resistor
(connected at the end of
the cable)
Belden 9463 (8500' max) or CutlerHammer IMPCABLE (10000' max)
Ω
IPONI
Other RS-485
Modbus Slaves
IPONI
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
Other RS-485
Modbus Slaves
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
150
ohm
Black Box IC620A-F
RS-485 to RS-232
converter. Plugs into
COM1 or 2
IPONI
Components Required
Modbus MINT (mMINT)
The mMINT connects an RS-485 based Modbus master
device (e.g. computer serial port, modem, PLC) to the
INCOM network. The mMINT supports bit rates of 1200,
9600 and 19200 bps. Supports INCOM data rate of 9600
bits per second only.
RS-485 to RS-232 Converter
The RS-485 signal is suitable for transmission for up to
4000 feet using Belden 3106A or equivalent low
capacitance cable. Since most computers do not
include RS-485 ports, install a converter (Black Box
IC620A-F or equivalent) to convert the 2-wire twisted
pair to a 9-pin RS-232 port.
Some RS-485 devices utilize the third wire “signal
reference” lead defined by the RS-485 standard. The
mMINT includes support for that terminal.
Note that unlike INCOM or Lonworks, RS-485 is a
polarity- sensitive standard. When multi dropping cable
between nodes, connect each terminal marked “A” (or -)
together and connect all terminals marked “B” (or +)
together in a daisy chain fashion. Refer to the mMINT
instruction leaflet IL 66A7508H01 for more information.
Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE
To minimize communications problems, use this
specified twisted shielded pair. The INCOM cabling
standard permits taps from the main cable up to 200
feet long. Each tap may have up to 64 nodes. For more
information, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and in
the first search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in
the text box and type 00017513.PDF. Note that the
shield connection is grounded only at the mMINT. All
other shield connections are tied together but left
ungrounded.
TD1502TE
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
The INCOM Product Operated Network Interface translates
low level data signals obtained from the IQ device into a
robust signal that can be transmitted for 8,500 feet using
Belden 9463 or up to 10,000 feet using IMPCABLE.
100 Ohm Terminator Resistor
Minimizes reflections by absorbing excess energy that has
been transmitted onto the twisted pair cable (1/4 watt, carbon,
5% recommended). Do not use wirewound resistors.
150 Ohm Terminator Resistor
RS-485 networks typically have a higher impedance and so
require a different termination resistance. As with the INCOM
termination resistor, use a carbon type, 5%, 1/4 watt (or
larger) device. Do not use wirewound resistors as they do not
present a “pure” resistance, but rather contain a significant
reactance component at the frequencies that appear on this
network. The result is that the reflections are not attenuated
as effectively as with carbon resistors.
Software: Customer Provided
Users typically specify a Modbus interface to Cutler-Hammer
Transfer Switches because they have existing Modbus
infrastructure into which they wish to include the transfer
switches. In that case, the customer would provide the
Modbus master software. The Cutler-Hammer business,
however, does offer several options for providing a Modbus
master software solution. These include the shrink wrapped
DG Monitor, optionally provided with our Soft Load Transfer
Switches. If this does not provide the functionality desired, a
full custom solution utilizing our Cutler-Hammer Engineering
Services and Systems (CHESS) group is available. Contact
CHESS or your transfer switch representative more information on the custom software programming services
available.CHESS or your transfer switch representative more
information on the custom software programming services
available.
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Technical Data
Page 8
Effective: February 2002
Ordering Instructions
Ordering a transfer switch with option 48A to include the
IPONI mounted. Order the mMINT by description form
your transfer switch representataive. Also needed is the
Beldon 9463 or CH IMPCABLE cable for the INCOM wiring
and Belden 3106A or equivalent for the RS-485 wiring and
the Black Box IC620A-F (or equivalent) RS-485 to RS-232
converter to interface to a computer, modem or PLC RS232 serial port.
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
Technical Data
Page 9
ATC 400/600/800 Direct Connect - PMCOM5
RJ-11 Jack
PMCOM5
INCOM to
RS-232
Adapter
Black and Red
connected to one
INCOM wire
Belden 9463 (8500' max) or CutlerHammer IMPCABLE (10000' max)
100 Ω terminator resistor
(connected at the end of
the cable)
Ω
RS-232
Port
IPONI
Yellow and Green
connected to other
INCOM wire
DB-9 Male
IPONI
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
"9-pin to 9-pin M-F straight
through" cable
Plugs into
COM1 or 2
9-pin female
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
Components Required
Cutler-Hammer
ATS
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
Cutler-Hammer
ATS
100 Ohm Terminator Resistor
PMCOM5
The device known as the “mini-MINT”, connects an RS232 based device (e.g. computer serial port, modem,
PLC) to the INCOM network. The PMCOM5 only
supports bit rates of 9600 and an INCOM data rate of
9600 baud. Legacy INCOM devices (e.g. white PONIs)
are not supported. Also, the RS-232 port does not
support hardware handshaking, therefore, it may not be
applied to half-duplex, 2-wire systems. The PMCOM5
works best when directly connected to a computer or a
modem. The PMCOM5 operates on 120V AC.
This resistor minimizes reflections by absorbing excess
energy that has been transmitted onto the twisted pair cable
(1/4 watt, carbon, 5% recommended). Do not use wirewound
resistors.
Software: PowerPort
PowerPort is a program that connects a Windows based PC
with a device that uses the INCOM protocol. For a free
download, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and in the first
search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in the text box and
type PowerPort.
Software: PowerNet
Standard straight-through 9-pin male to 9-pin female
cable. The RS-232 port only requires 3 wires for
operation (pins 2, 3 and 5).
PowerNet is a more powerful Windows based software suite
that permits multiple simultaneous connections with up to
1,000 IQ devices. Features include alarm logging, trending,
reporting, programming and monitoring of all connected IQ
devices.
Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE
Ordering Instructions
To minimize communications problems, use this
specified twisted shielded pair. The INCOM cabling
standard permits taps from the main cable up to 200
feet long. Each tap may have up to 64 nodes. For more
information, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and in
the first search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in
the text box and type 00017513.PDF. Note that the
shield connection is grounded only at the PMCOM5. All
other shield connections are tied together but left
ungrounded.
Ordering a transfer switch with option 48B causes the switch
to be supplied with an IPONI mounted. In addition, a
PMCOM5 and a 9-pin to 9-pin cable (suitable for connection to
a 9-pin COM port on your computer) is supplied. The only
remaining items needed for a functioning system are the
customer-supplied wiring (Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE) and a
copy of either PowerPort or PowerNet software to load onto
the computer.
9-Pin to 9-Pin Straight Through Cable
IPONI
The INCOM Product Operated Network Interface
translates the low level data signals obtained from the
IQ device into a robust signal that can be transmitted
8,500 feet using Belden 9463 or up to 10,000 feet using
IMPCABLE.
TD1502TE
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Technical Data
Page 10
Effective: February 2002
ATC 400/600/800 Modem to - MINT
MINT
INCOM to RS-232 Adapter
RS-232
Port
100 Ω terminator resistor
(connected at the end of
the cable)
Belden 9463 (8500' max) or CutlerHammer IMPCABLE (10000' max)
MINT-toModem
Cable
Ω
IPONI
IPONI
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
AT-Modem Cable
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
Components Required
MINT to Modem Cable
MINT
Most external modems have a 25-pin RS-232 port with the
following pinouts:
Master INCOM Network Translator connects an RS-232
based device (e.g. computer serial port, modem, PLC) to the
INCOM network. The MINT supports bit rates of 1200, 2400,
9600 and 19200 bps, as well as INCOM data rates of 9600
and 1200 baud.
Modem
25-pin
female
Modem
2
3
Common
An RS-232 to tone converter. RS-232 is limited to only 50
feet, whereas a tone signal may connect to a phone system
and allow for much further communications. Modems are
available in a variety of types:
■ Dial-Up
■ Lease Line (2- or 4-wire)
Modem
25-pin
female
Data In ←
2
Data Out →
3
7
■
■
Cable
9-pin
female
Cable
25-pin
male
2
2
3
3
7
5
AT Modem Cable
5724B56H04
Computer
9-pin
male
2
→ Data In
3
← Data Out
5
Signal Common
7
2
3
3
2
7
5
MINT
25 pin
female
2
→ Data In
3
← Data Out
5
Signal Common
MINT to Modem
(Null Modem) Cable
5724B56H02
■
AT Modem Cable
JP
102
Data In ←
Data Out →
Cable
25-pin
male
Cable
25-pin
male
Pin 2, Data In to modem
Pin 3, Data Out from modem
Pin 7, Signal Ground
These signals must be connected to the MINT. Since the
MINT pinouts are identical to those of the modem, we
must use a “cross-over” or “null-modem” cable.
Note that since both the modem and the MINT will have
female connectors, the necessary cable will have 25-pin
male connectors on each end.
Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE
To minimize communications problems, use this specified
twisted shielded pair. The INCOM cabling standard
permits taps from the main cable up to 200 feet long.
Each tap may have up to 64 nodes. For more information,
see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and in the first
search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in the text box
and type 00017513.PDF. Note that the shield connection is
grounded only at the MINT. All other shield connections
are tied together but left ungrounded.
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
IPONI
The INCOM Product Operated Network Interface
translates low level data signals obtained from the IQ
device into a robust signal that can be transmitted 8,500
feet using Belden 9463 or up to 10,000 feet using
IMPCABLE.
100 Ohm Terminator Resistor
Minimizes reflections by absorbing excess energy that
has been transmitted onto the twisted pair cable (1/4
watt, carbon, 5% recommended). Do not use
wirewound resistors.
Software: PowerPort
PowerPort is a program that connects a Windows based
PC with a device that uses the INCOM protocol. For a
free download, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and
in the first search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in
the text box and type PowerPort.
PowerNet is a more powerful Windows based software
suite that permits multiple simultaneous connections
with up to 1,000 IQ devices. Features include alarm
logging, trending, reporting, programming and monitoring of all connected IQ devices
Ordering Instructions
Option code 48A includes the IPONI mounted to your
transfer switch, ready for connection to the customersupplied Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE twisted pair. Not
supplied, but needed, are the MINTII , the 5724B56H04
“AT Modem Cable,” and the 5724B56H02 “MINT to
Modem Cable.” Each of these three parts may be
ordered by these part numbers from your transfer
switch representative.
TD1502TE
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Technical Data
Page 11
Technical Data
Page 12
Effective: February 2002
ATC 400/600/800 Modem to - PMCOM5
Twist Black and Red
wires from connector and
connect to one of INCOM
wires. See diagram at
right.
PMCOM5
INCOM to
RS-232
Adapter
100 Ω terminator resistor
(connected at the end of
the cable)
Belden 9463 (8500' max) or CutlerHammer IMPCABLE (10000' max)
Ω
"9-pin male to
25 pin male
null-modem
cable
DB-9 Male
Twist Yellow and Green
wires from connector and
connect to one of INCOM
wires. See diagram at
right.
IPONI
IPONI
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
Ribbon cable
connection
to IQ Device
External "AT Modem" cable Plugs
into COM1 or 2
9-pin female
Components Required
PMCOM5
The device known as the “mini-MINT”, connects an RS-232
based device (e.g. computer serial port, modem, PLC) to
the INCOM network. The PMCOM5 only supports bit rates
of 9600 and an INCOM data rate of 9600 baud. Legacy
INCOM devices (e.g. white PONIs) are not supported.
Also, the RS-232 port does not support hardware handshaking, so it cannot be applied to half-duplex, 2-wire
systems. The PMCOM5 works best when directly connected to a computer or a modem.
Modem
As the PMCOM5 cannot provide or use modem control
signals, the modem must be programmed to ignore them.
Usually, this is accomplished by sending the set up string
“AT&H0” from Hyperterminal set to 9600 baud to the
modem via a separate “straight-through” cable connected
between the computer’s COM port and the modem’s serial
port. This set up string disables transmit flow control
causing the modem to ignore signals on pins 4,6,7 and 8.
Note that the modem must be configured so that its serial
port only transmits data at 9600. While certain
USRobotics modems accomplish with a setup string, most
modems “autobaud.” That is, they listen to the last
communication sent to them on the serial port and
configure the bit rate to match that data. There are no
commands that set the serial port bit rate. Since the
PMCOM5 cannot initiate communications to force an
autobaud, the user must configure the modem with a
separate device (laptop computer for example), then
connect the cable to the PMCOM5. The PMCOM5 must be
connected to a reliable source of 120V AC since we do not
want a power up of the PMCOM5 to cause a spurious
message that is interpreted by the modem as data,
causing the modem to attempt to autobaud again.
Recommended Modem Setup
ATZ0
reset modem
AT&F0
load factory default profile
ATE0
disable local echo
ATF0
disable xmited data echo
ATS0=1 answer on 1st ring
AT&B1
set fixed serial bit rate
AT&D0
ignore DTR hang up
AT&H0
ignore xmt flow control
AT&I0
ignore rcv flow control
AT&N6
connect at 9600 bps
AT&R1
modem ignores RTS
AT&U6
min connect speed: 9600 bps
ATY0
power on profile 0 selected
AT&W0 write to NVRAM
Modem
25-pin
female
Data In ←
2
Data Out →
3
Common
7
Adapter:9pin male to PMCOM5
9-pin
25-pin
female
female
Cable
25-pin
male
Cable
25-pin
male
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
7
7
7
5
5724B56H02
2
← Data Out
3
→ Data In
5
Common
5724B56H03
9-Pin to 25-Pin Null Modem Cable
Standard null-modem (pins 2 and 3 crossed, 5 straight
through, other pins may be disconnected or optionally looped
back; 7 connected to 8 and 4 connected to 6, both sides) 9-pin
male to 9-pin female cable. The RS-232 port only requires 3
wires for operation (pins 2, 3 and 5).
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
Belden 9463 or IMPCABLE
To minimize communications problems, use this
specified twisted shielded pair. The INCOM cabling
standard permits taps from the main cable up to 200
feet long. Each tap may have up to 64 nodes. For more
information, see www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com and in
the first search box, labeled “For Documents,” click in
the text box and type 00017513.PDF. Note that the
shield connection is grounded only at the PMCOM5. All
other shield connections are tied together but left
ungrounded.
AT Modem Cable
Modem
25-pin
female
Data In ←
2
Data Out →
3
JP
102
7
Cable
9-pin
female
Cable
25-pin
male
2
2
3
3
7
5
Computer
9-pin
male
2
→ Data In
3
← Data Out
5
Signal Common
AT Modem Cable
5724B56H04
IPONI
The INCOM Product Operated Network Interface
translates low level data signals obtained from the IQ
device into a robust signal that can be transmitted 8,500
feet using Belden 9463 or up to 10,000 feet using
IMPCABLE.
100 Ohm Terminator Resistor
Minimizes reflections by absorbing excess energy that
has been transmitted onto the twisted pair cable (1/4
watt, carbon, 5% recommended). Do not use
wirewound resistors.
Ordering Instructions
Ordering a transfer switch with option 48C causes the
switch to be supplied with an IPONI mounted. In
addition, a PMCOM5, a 25-pin to 25-pin mull modem
cable and a 9-pin to 25-pin adapter are supplied
(suitable for use with 25-pin modems).
TD1502TE
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Technical Data
Page 13
Technical Data
Page 14
Effective: February 2002
ATC 400/600/800 Ethernet 10BASE-T
Ethernet Backbone
10BASE-T or fiber
Ethernet Hub
Ethernet Hub
Ethernet Hub
CAT5 cable
(Black Box
EVNSL01-0010)
CAT5 cable
(Black Box
EVNSL01-0010)
EPONI mounts on
the back of the IQ
Device. Ribbon
cable (supplied)
connects to IQ
Device
24V
P.S.
EPONI mounts on
the back of the IQ
Device. Ribbon
cable (supplied)
connects to IQ
Device
24V
P.S.
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
CAT5 cable
(Black Box
EVNSL01-0010)
Components Required
Power Supply
EPONI (10BASE-T version)
The Ethernet Product Operated Network Interface connects
an IQ device such as the IQ Transfer to an Ethernet
unshielded twisted pair network (CAT5 UTP 10BASE-T RJ45 connector). The EPONI operates at 10 Mbps. If connected to a 100 or 1,000 Mbps Ethernet LAN, do not
connect to an Ethernet hub. Instead, be sure to connect
the EPONI to an Ethernet switch that supports a 10 Mbps
device. The more sophisticated switch will handle the
details of retransmitting the Ethernet message at the
slower 10 Mbps rate to the EPONI.
CAT5 Patch Cable
Ethernet 10BASE-T supports up to 300 feet of cabling
between any two nodes. A straight-through cable is used
to connect a device (computer network interface card [NIC]
or EPONI) to an Ethernet hub.
The EPONI can connect directly to the 10BASE-T port of
the computer if a cross-over cable is used. Order Black
Box EVCRB85-0010 or equivalent.
As the IQ Transfer does not provide sufficient 24V DC control
power for the EPONI, a separate external power supply is
needed (if a source of 24V DC @300 mA is not available
elsewhere).
The power supply is only needed for the IQ Transfer. Other IQ
Devices (IQ Analyzer, DP4000, etc.) provide sufficient internal
power to support the EPONI without the need for an external
power supply. This power supply is included when you order
the option 48D as discussed below.
Ordering Instructions
Ordering a transfer switch with option 48D causes the switch
to be supplied with an EPONI and a 24V DC power supply
mounted and wired. Not supplied, but needed, are a CAT5
patch cable and an Ethernet hub.
PowerPort software does not support the EPONI. You must
purchase the more powerful PowerNet software to connect to
the IQ device using the EPONI.
Ethernet Hub (Switch)
As 10BASE-T is a point-to-point topology, a certain method
is required to connect multiple nodes into a larger
network. This is accomplished by connecting each
10BASE-T device to a multiplexing device called a hub.
Any message received on any port of the hub is rebroadcast on all other ports of that hub.
A more advanced version of a hub is called an Ethernet
switch. A switch examines the individual Ethernet
messages and forwards them to the other ports on the
switch as appropriate. This reduces traffic on segments of
the Ethernet LAN that do not need to hear messages that
are not intended for that segment.
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
Technical Data
ATC 400/600/800 Ethernet Fiber 10BASE-FL Multi-mode
Ethernet Backbone
10BASE-T or fiber
Ethernet Hub
Ethernet Hub
Ethernet Hub
Duplex multimode
fiber optic patch cable
(Black Box EFN072003M)
EPONI mounts on
the back of the IQ
Device. Ribbon
cable (supplied)
connects to IQ
Device
24V
P.S.
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
Duplex multimode
fiber optic patch cable
(Black Box EFN072003M)
EPONI mounts on
the back of the IQ
Device. Ribbon
cable (supplied)
connects to IQ
Device
24V
P.S.
(Typical)
IQ Analyzer
IQ Transfer
etc.
CAT5 cable
(Black Box
EVNSL01-0010)
Components Required
Ethernet Hub (Switch)
EPONI (Multi-mode Fiber Version)
The Ethernet Product Operated Network Interface
connects an IQ device, such as the IQ Transfer, to an
Ethernet fiber optic network using multi-mode fiber and
Type ST connectors. The EPONI operates at 10 Mbps. If
connected to a 100 or 1,000 Mbps Ethernet LAN, do not
connect to an Ethernet hub. Instead, be sure to connect
the EPONI to an Ethernet switch that supports a 10
Mbps device. The more sophisticated switch will handle
the details of retransmitting the Ethernet message at the
slower 10 Mbps rate to the EPONI.
As 10BASE-FL (fiber) is a point-to-point topology, a certain
method is required to connect multiple nodes into a larger
network. This is accomplished by connecting each
10BASE-FL device to a multiplexing device called a hub.
Any message received on any port of the hub is rebroadcast on all other ports of that hub.
A more advanced version of a hub is called an Ethernet
switch. This switch examines the individual Ethernet
messages and forwards them to the other ports on the
switch as appropriate. This reduces traffic on segments of
the Ethernet LAN that do not need to hear messages that
are not intended for that segment.
Multi-mode Patch Cable
Ethernet 10BASE-FL (fiber optic) supports up to 6500
feet of cabling between any two nodes. Two fibers are
used to connect the EPONI-F to an Ethernet hub.
If you need to connect to a single-mode fiber network,
install a “single-mode to multi-mode” converter (Black
Box LH7401A-STSC-R2). Single-mode fiber is more
expensive, but supports longer distances (20-40 km are
typical) and is usually used on 100 or 1,000 Mbps LANs.
Note that the Type SC (rather than the Type ST supplied
with the EPONI-F) is usually specified with single-mode
fiber networks. The LH7401A-STSC-R2 provides SC
connectors for the single-mode fiber connection and ST
connectors for the multi-mode connection. The EPONI,
without an external converter, supports multi-mode
fiber only.
Another method of providing single-mode fiber connectivity for the IQ Transfer is to supply the 10BASE-T
EPONI and purchase a 10BASE-T to single-mode
converter (Black Box LMC005A-R2).
TD1502TE
Power Supply
As the IQ Transfer does not provide sufficient 24V DC
control power for the EPONI, a separate external power
supply is needed (if a source of 24V DC @300 mA is not
available elsewhere).
The power supply is only needed for the IQ Transfer.
Other IQ Devices (IQ Analyzer, DP4000, etc.) provide
sufficient internal power to support the EPONI without the
need for an external power supply. This power supply is
included when you order the option 48E as discussed
below.
Ordering Instructions
Ordering a transfer switch with option 48E causes the
switch to be supplied with an EPONI-F and 24V DC power
supply mounted and wired. Not supplied, but needed, are
a duplex multi-mode patch cable and an Ethernet hub.
PowerPort software does not support the EPONI. You
must purchase the more powerful PowerNet software to
connect to the IQ device using the EPONI.
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Page 15
Technical Data
Page 16
Effective: February 2002
Soft Load / Peaker Modem Connect - Modbus / RS-232
Encorp GPC Controller
Pin 2 of 25 pin cable
Pin 3 of 25 pin cable
Pin 7 of 25 pin cable
80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73
"AT Modem" cable
9-pin female to 25 pin
male. Black Box
Catalog BC00301
"AT Modem" cable
9-pin female to 25 pin male.
Black Box Catalog BC00301,
cut off 9-pin connector and
ring out pins 2, 3, 7 from 25
pin connector
JP
101
JP
104
JP
105
JP
103
JP
107
JP
102
Components Required
Encorp GPC
The GPC includes two serial port connections:
■ Modbus RTU slave
- RS-232 or
- RS-485 (2-wire)
■ Lonworks FT-10 78 kbps
This section will only discuss the Modbus RTU RS-232
connection when using modems. The default (and nonadjustable) settings for the Modbus port are: 9600 bps,
no parity, 8 data bits and 1 stop bit.
Remote modem communication via the Modbus
connection involves:
■ Setting GPC COM port to RS-232 (see jumpers JP101JP107 above)
■ Connecting Modbus Master to RS-232 I/O pins
- 79 Data Out from GPC
- 77 Data In to GPC
- 76 RS-232 common
The GPC RS-232 port does not support hardware
handshaking pins (RTS/CTS or DSR/DTR). Data received
on terminal 77 of the GPC controller will be examined.
If the message is good, the GPC transmits a reply on
terminal 79. Both terminals are referenced to terminal
76 as the common.
Modem
As the GPC cannot provide or use modem control
signals, the modem must be programmed to ignore
them. Usually this is accomplished by sending the set
up string “AT&H0” from Hyperterminal set to 9600 baud
to the modem via a separate straight-through cable
connected between the computer’s COM port and the
modem’s serial port. This set up string disables transmit Flow
Control causing the modem to ignore signals on pins 4,6,7
and 8. Note that the modem must be configured so that its
serial port only transmits data at 9600. Certain USRobotics
modems accomplish with the setup strings. Most modems
“autobaud;” that is, they listen to the last communication
sent to them on the serial port and configure the bit rate to
match that data. The original “Hayes” AT command set did
not include any commands that set the serial port bit rate.
Since the GPC cannot initiate communications to force an
autobaud, the user must configure the modem with a
separate device (laptop computer for example), then connect
the cable to the RS-232 port on the GPC (pins 79, 77 and 76).
The GPC is connected to a reliable source of 24V DC since we
do not want a power up of the GPC to cause a spurious
message that is interpreted by the modem as data, causing
the modem to attempt to autobaud again.
Recommended Modem Setup
ATZ0
reset modem
AT&F0
load factory default profile
ATE0
disable local echo
ATF0
disable xmited data echo
ATS0=1 answer on 1st ring
AT&B1
set fixed serial bit rate
AT&D0
ignore DTR hang up
AT&H0
ignore xmt flow control
AT&I0
ignore rcv flow control
AT&N6
connect at 9600 bps
AT&R1
modem ignores RTS
AT&U6
min connect speed: 9600 bps
ATY0
power on profile 0 selected
AT&W0 write to NVRAM
Depending on the model of modem, a DIP switch or other
setting may be necessary to set the modem connected to the
GPC into auto-answer mode.
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
AT Modem Cable
Standard cable where pins 2, 3 and 7 on the 25-pin male
connector are connected to pins 2, 3 and 5, respectively
on the 9-pin female connector.
Configuring GPC
The Soft-Load and Peaker Switches, as standard, are
shipped with the serial port configured to respond to a
message intended for Modbus Node 002. A second
internal Modbus Node 001 is reserved for the PLC built
within the GPC controller. However, most SCADA
systems will want to interrogate the main control at
address 002.
Software: Cutler-Hammer DG Monitor
DG Monitor is a Windows 98/NT/2000/XP program that
communicates with a Soft-Load Transfer Switch or
Peaking Switch via a direct RS-232 connection, a
modem connection, or a LAN (Modbus TCP/IP) connection.
Software: Other Modbus Master
The GPC understands Modbus function codes 1 (Read
Coil Status), 2 (Read Input Status), 3 (Read Holding
Registers), 4 (Read Input Registers), 5 (Force Single
Coil), 6 (Preset Single Holding Register), 15 (Preset
Multiple Coils) and 16 (Preset Multiple Registers).
Third parity or custom programs that can interrogate a
Modbus slave can directly connect to the Soft-Load
Transfer Switch or the Peaking Switch without modification.
TD1502TE
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Technical Data
Page 17
Technical Data
Page 18
Effective: February 2002
Soft Load / Peaker Modbus Addresses
This table provides a partial cross reference of Modbus register to name for the GPC controller. Refer to your Cutler-Hammer
sales representative for a complete listing.
Modbus
Address
30002
30030
30060
30090
30150
30180
30210
30310
30314
30312
30316
30318
30320
30330
30050
30080
30110
30324
30326
30400
30410
30430
30435
30300
30302
30304
30306
30120
30240
30335
30445
30604
10001
10010
10011
10012
10013
10014
10015
10016
10017
10491
10493
Description
Note: GPC 3-phase connection is assumed to be “Utility”
Read internal clock
GPC 1-phase connection is assumed to be “Generator”
Utility A Phase Voltage
Utility B Phase Voltage
Utility C Phase Voltage
Utility A Phase Amperes
Utility B Phase Amperes
Utility C Phase Amperes
Utility Watts
Utility VA
Utility VAR
Utility PF
Utility Average 3-phase voltage
Utility Average 3-phase current
Utility Hz
Utility A Phase Voltage THD
Utility B Phase Voltage THD
Utility C Phase Voltage THD
Utility Voltage Unbalance
Utility Current Unbalance
Demand (watt) meter #1 (connected to Utility), sliding window
Demand (watt) meter #2 (connected to Generator), sliding window
Watt-Hour meter #1 (connected to Utility)
Watt-Hour meter #2 (connected to Generator)
Generator Watts
Generator VA
Generator VAR
Generator PF (PF = 1-abs(30306-(30307/65535)), >0: Leading, <0: Lagging
Generator Voltage
Generator Amperes (GPC only)
Generator Hz
Generator Runtime Runtime = ((30445*24)+(30446)+(30447/65535))/60
Synchroscope (12 O’clock: 0 radians, 6 O’clock: pi radians, <0 hand move counterclockwise
4: watchdog good, 0: watchdog bad
Generator 52b input contact (INV is internal GPC function — this register provides the non-inverted
input)
Utility 52b input contact (INV is internal GPC function — this register provides the non-inverted input)
Service Input contact
Alarm/Test Reset input contact (INV is internal GPC function — this register provides the non-inverted
input)
Close/Open Transfer input contact
Transfer Test input contact
Engine Run input contact
Auto Enabled input contact
ATS is transferring
ATS is transferring to Normal
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
TD1502TE
Effective: February 2002
Soft Load
00020
Close Generator Breaker output contact
00021
Open Generator Breaker output contact
00022
Close Utility Breaker
00023
Open Utility Breaker
00024
Spare
00025
Spare
00026
Sources Synchronized
00027
Start Engine output contact
40002
Set internal clock
40085
Voltage Bias output (to Genset AVR)
40095
Frequency Bias output (to Genset governor)
40302
Generator HiHi voltage trip setting
40304
Generator Hi voltage trip setting
40306
Generator Lo voltage trip setting
40308
Generator LoLo voltage trip setting
40358
Utility HiHi Voltage trip setting
40360
Utility Hi Voltage trip setting
40362
Utility Lo Voltage trip setting
40364
Utility LoLo Voltage trip setting
40402
Utility HiHi Negative Sequence Overvoltage
40404
Utility Hi Negative Sequence Overvoltage
Note:
Peaking Switch
Close Generator Breaker output contact
Open Generator Breaker output contact
Spare
Generator Power Available
Peaking Mode (not used)
Failed to Sync
Sources Synchronized
Start Engine output contact
output = (40085+(40086/65535))/200
output = (40095+(40096/65535))/200
All 3xxxx and 4xxxx register data is stored as two-register pair.
For example, to read Utility Hz (Modbus register 30330):
59.99
Hz
30330
003B h
59 (decimal)
30331
FE93 h
65171 (decimal)
The fractional part (second register of register pair, in this case 30331) is
divided by 65535 to convert to decimal value.
30331
FE93 h
65171
divided by
65535
=
0.994446
Therefore the correct frequency is 59.994446 (only the first two digits of fraction are
significant).
TD1502TE
Technical Data
For more information visit: www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Page 19
Technical Data
Page 20
Eaton Corporation
Cutler-Hammer business unit
1000 Cherrington Parkway
Moon Township, PA 15108
United States
tel: 1-800-525-2000
www.cutler-hammer.eaton.com
Effective: February 2002
© 2001 Eaton Corporation
All Rights Reserved
Printed in USA
Form No. TD1502TE
February 2002
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