basic projects - INFN-LNF

basic projects - INFN-LNF
BASIC PROJECTS
INDEX
HELLO
How to use this document 3
MUSICAL OBJECT PROJECT 4
bareconductive.com
GAME CONTROLLER PROJECT 8
MIDI PIANO PROJECT 12
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
BASIC PROJECTS
WORKSHOP MANUAL
TECHNIQUES
& INSPIRATION
BASIC SKILLS
BASIC PROJECTS
DIGITAL TOOLKIT
How to use this document
This document provides three basic project-driven lesson plans using
Electric Paint and the Touch Board to create Musical Objects, Game
Controllers and MIDI Pianos. Each project is designed for use by the
workshop leader, and comes complete with a Lesson Prep outline,
materials list, downloadable templates, video and step-by-step
instructions. Use these projects as they are, bulk them up with the
Workshop Manual resources, or customise the templates to suit your
own theme. If you’ve never used the Touch Board or Electric Paint
before, this is the place to get started.
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© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
OUTPUTS
PROJECT
MUSICAL OBJECTS
MUSICAL OBJECTS
With the Touch Board, making musical sensors is easy.
You can build interaction and sound into your environment
by simply exploring the objects and materials around
you. Anything conductive can become a sensor when
connected to the electrodes on your Touch Board, so start
experimenting. Load some sounds onto your board, and
create a quirky orchestra by connecting everyday objects to
the Touch Board.
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© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
MUSICAL OBJECTS
LESSON PREP
The Musical Objects project is a quick and fun
activity for any beginner group. If you want a
computer free lesson, pre load sounds onto
the microSD cards, and focus on exploring and
connecting objects to learn what is conductive.
Build stories from the objects around you.
Computer free workshop
By pre loading microSD cards with sounds you
can eliminate the computer from your workshop.
One computer to share
If you want participants to load sounds on the
microSD card themselves, you can set up a
computer with the sounds in the correct format,
so selecting and loading them is easy. A lot of
time can be wasted selecting, cropping, and
renaming files, so get this out of the way before
the workshop.
STEP 1
PREP MATERIALS
Load sounds onto microSD cards
Touch Boards
MicroSD card reader
MicroSD cards
Mini speaker or headphones
Micro USB cable
Conductive objects
Alligator clips
Internet connection
PC
Follow the Changing the MP3s tutorial in
the Basic Skills document, or do it online:
www.bareconductive.com/make
changing-the-mp3s-on-the-micro-sd-card/
If you want to switch sound libraries
quickly, you can prepare multiple microSD
cards and have each host a different sound
collection. Give these to participants to
choose from, for example: animals, city
sounds, robot sounds etc.
STEP 2
Gather conductive objects
Have a look at the Visual Guide to
Conductive Sensors for ideas, or ask each
participant to bring along conductive
objects.
STEP 3
Print out or share pdf
Share the step-by-step instructions with
participants, you can print these, adapt
them to your lesson template or share
them on screen in the classroom.
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LESSON MATERIALS
Touch Boards
MicroSD cards with sounds
Conductive objects
3 participants per 1 Touch Board
1 – 4 objects per participant
1 MicroSD card per Touch Board
SCHEDULE
Refer to the Workshop Manual for suggested
time schedules for different length of
workshops. This Basic Project lends itself well
to a 45 minute workshop.
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
MUSICAL OBJECTS
STEP 1
CHOOSE OBJECTS
STEP 2
LOAD SOUNDS
STEP 3
AUDIO, POWER AND TESTING
To begin, select the objects you want to make
interactive. You can explore which objects are
conductive by attaching them to the Touch
Board with alligator clips and touching them.
Insert the preloaded microSD card into the
Touch Board.
Rest the Touch Board on a non conductive
surface. If there is metal around the Touch
Board it may disrupt the sensors.
If the object you’d like to use isn’t metallic
or conductive, you can create a conductive
touch point yourself. Do this by painting
the object with Electric Paint, or inserting
something conductive to make contact.
Electric Paint is water soluble so it is easy to
remove, but it can permanently stain certain
materials so take care if applying it to fabrics
or other porous materials.
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Plug in your speaker or headphones and
Micro USB Cable for power. You can use a
mains socket or a computer USB.
Turn on your Touch Board using the switch on
the lower left hand side of the board. Now
touch each electrode to check all the sounds
are working.
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
MUSICAL OBJECTS
STEP 4
ATTACH OBJECTS
STEP 5
TRIGGER YOUR SENSORS
STEP 6
CREATE STORIES
Connect one end of the alligator clips to the
objects you’ve selected and the other to the
one of the electrodes on the Touch Board.
Ensure all connections are secure and the
sensors are not touching each other. Use the
reset button on the lower right hand side of
the Touch Board to recalibrate the board once
you’ve connected all the objects.
Touch the objects you’ve connected to trigger
your sounds. Swap the objects around and test
which ones work and which don’t. Use the visual
diagrams in the Workshop Manual to explain how
the sensors are working and why some objects
work while others don’t.
What stories can be made from the objects and
sounds you have chosen? Use the objects to
play a song, make a mini-orchestra or organise
them to tell a story or create a physical narrative
timeline.
bareconductive.com
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
OUTPUTS
PROJECT
GAME CONTROLLER
GAME CONTROLLER
This project uses Electric Paint and the Touch Board to
create a quick retro game controller to trigger sounds.
Use the template provided to paint an interface, or let
participants design their own. Select and load MP3s,
connect the Touch Board, and play. This is a great project
to introduce the basic principles behind conductive paint,
and to start an exploration into custom interfaces.
bareconductive.com
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
GAME CONTROLLER
LESSON PREP
Like Musical Objects, the Game Controller
activity uses the Touch Board in its original Touch
MP3 mode. To keep the lesson focused on the
interface design and how the technology works,
we suggest you select and load the MP3 files
prior to the workshop.
Computer free workshop
By selecting and pre loading sounds on the
microSD cards you can run this workshop
computer free.
One computer to share
A lot of time can be wasted adjusting and re
saving audio files. If you want participants to
load sounds on the microSD card themselves,
select the files beforehand, and set up a
computer with the files saved with the correct
naming convention. This way participants can
focus on selecting and loading sounds rather
than on editing MP3s.
STEP 1
PREP MATERIALS
Load sounds onto microSD cards
Touch Board
Mini speaker or headphones
Micro USB cable
Electric Paint
Internet connection
PC
Follow the Changing the MP3s tutorial in
the Basic Skills document, or do it online:
www.bareconductive.com/make/
changing-the-mp3s-on-the-micro-sd-card/
If you want to switch sound libraries
quickly, you can prepare multiple microSD
cards and have each host a different sound
collection. Give these to participants to
choose from, for example: animals, city
sounds, robot sounds etc.
STEP 2
Print out or share pdf
Share the step-by-step instructions with
each participant. These can be printed
out, adapted into your lesson template or
shared on screen in the classroom.
STEP 3
LESSON MATERIALS
MicroSD cards with sounds
Electric Paint 10ml Tubes
Electric Paint 50ml Jars
Paint brushes
Game Controller templates or stencils
3 participants per 1 Touch Board
SCHEDULE
Refer to the Workshop Manual for suggested
time schedules for different types of
workshops. This Basic Project lends itself well
to a 45 minutes workshop.
Print out the template on card
This project requires one Touch Board per
template. It’s best to print or photocopy
the template. Another option is to use the
vector file to cut out a stencil.
Make sure to use heavy paper stock — at
least 200gsm — so the paper won’t warp
when you coat it with Electric Paint.
bareconductive.com
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
GAME CONTROLLER
STEP 1
PAINT THE INTERFACE
STEP 2
LOAD SOUNDS
STEP 3
AUDIO, POWER AND TESTING
Use Electric Paint to paint the game
controller graphic on your paper template.
The graphic is there as a guide, but you
can also create your own designs as long as
your sensor lines do not cross or touch.
Once you’ve selected your sounds, introduce
the microSD card into the Touch Board.
Rest the Touch Board on a non conductive
surface. If there is metal around the Touch
Board it may disrupt the sensors.
Electric Paint takes about 15 minutes to dry
at room temperature.
Use this time to select sounds, or review
the Capacitive Sensing diagrams from the
Workshop Manual to understand how the
sensors are working.
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Plug in your speaker or headphones and
Micro USB Cable for power. You can use a
mains socket or a computer USB.
Turn on your Touch Board using the switch on
the lower left hand side of the board. Now
touch each electrode to check all the sounds
are working. Make sure to note which sound
is mapped to which electrode.
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
GAME CONTROLLER
STEP 4
ATTACH TOUCH BOARD TO PAPER
STEP 5
TRIGGER SOUNDS TO CREATE STORIES
Ensure the graphic you painted is dry.
Squeeze a small droplet of paint onto the
circles at the bottom of your template.
Carefully centre the Touch Board over
your grid, and place it down so that each
electrode makes contact with the droplet
below. Squeeze a second set of droplets on
the top of your electrodes. You don’t need
to cover them, only to connect to the paint
beneath.
Once your solder is completely dry, the
graphic sensors are ready to use. Test that
everything is working by turning on the Touch
Board and touching each of the painted
sensors. Your game controller should trigger
the sounds you selected.
If any of the sensors aren’t working, make sure
the connection to the paint is robust, and that
you don’t have a short circuit beneath the
electrodes. Now play away!
Make sure no paint bridges between the
electrodes as this will cause a short circuit.
This method of attaching the Touch Board
to paper is called ‘cold soldering’. Check
out the Basic Skills document for a detailed
tutorial and troubleshooting on this
technique.
bareconductive.com
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
OUTPUTS
PROJECT
MIDI PIANO
MIDI PIANO
You can use the Touch Board in MIDI mode to simulate
instruments. This project shows you how to use the Touch
Board in MIDI mode to run a paper piano workshop. The
Touch Board has a powerful MP3 chip that can read MIDI
notes from its on board library. In MIDI mode, the board is
capable of playing multiple samples simultaneously. Just
make some small physical changes to the board, load the
MIDI code and get participants playing on paper pianos.
bareconductive.com
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
MIDI PIANO
LESSON PREP
The outcome of this easy MIDI Piano project is
to create a working paper piano using Electric
Paint and the Touch Board. This activity will
consist of painting the conductive interface,
attaching the Touch Board, resetting the board
and playing.
Computer free workshop
You can make this a computer-free workshop by
preparing and programming the Touch Boards
for on board MIDI in advance.
Programming
If you want the participants themselves to
upload the code just plan to include Step 1 in
your lesson.
What is MIDI
Refer to the Workshop Manual for a visual
diagram and explanation on MIDI.
Waiting for the paint to dry
Electric Paint takes about 15 minutes to dry.
Plan this time into the workshop and take the
opportunity to explain how the technology is
working. Refer to the Workshop Manual for
visual diagrams and explanations on both MIDI
and Capacitive Sensing.
STEP 1
PREP MATERIALS
Prepare all the Touch Boards for on
board MIDI mode
Touch Board
Mini speaker or headphones
Micro USB cable
Electric Paint
Internet connection
PC
To begin, follow this step-by-step tutorial
online:
www.bareconductive.com/make/onboard-midi-mode/
This will show you how to cold solder the
correct pins on your Touch Board and how
to upload the MIDI code.
STEP 2
Print out or share pdf
Share the step-by-step instructions with
each participant. These can be printed
out, adapted into your lesson template or
shared on screen in the classroom.
STEP 3
Print out the template on card
LESSON MATERIALS
Touch Boards prepared for MIDI
Electric Paint 10ml Tubes
Electric Paint 50ml Jars
Paint brushes
Piano templates or stencils
3 participants per 1 Touch Board
SCHEDULE
Refer to the Workshop Manual for suggested
time schedules for different types of
workshops. This Basic Project lends itself well
to a 45 minutes workshop.
This project requires one Touch Board per
template. It’s best to print or photocopy
the template. Another option is to use the
vector file to cut out a stencil.
Make sure to use heavy paper stock — at
least 200gsm — so the paper won’t warp
when you coat it with Electric Paint.
bareconductive.com
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
MIDI PIANO
STEP 1
PAINT THE PIANO GRAPHIC
STEP 3
AUDIO, POWER AND TESTING
STEP 4
ATTACH TOUCH BOARD TO PAPER
Use Electric Paint to fill in the conductive
piano graphic on the paper template. You
can use the tube directly, or paint it with a
brush. Make sure that the piano keys don’t
touch each other or they won’t play.
Rest the Touch Board on a non conductive
surface. If there is metal around the Touch
Board it may disrupt the sensors.
Squeeze a small droplet of paint onto each
of the circles at the bottom of your template.
Carefully centre the Touch Board over your
grid, and place it down so that each electrode
makes contact with the droplet below.
Squeeze a second set of droplets on the top
of your electrodes. You don’t need to cover
them, only to connect to the paint beneath.
Electric Paint takes about 15 minutes to dry,
so wait patiently before attaching the Touch
Board.
Use this time to review the Capacitive
Sensing diagrams from the Workshop
Manual to understand how the sensors are
working.
bareconductive.com
Plug in your speaker or headphones and
Micro USB Cable for power. You can use a
mains socket or a computer USB.
Turn on your Touch Board using the switch
on the lower left hand side of the board.
Touch each of the electrodes to test they’re all
working.
Make sure no paint bridges between the
electrodes as this will cause a short circuit.
This method of attaching the Touch Board to
paper is called ‘cold soldering’. Check out the
Basic Skills document for a detailed tutorial
and troubleshooting on this technique.
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
INDEX
PROJECT
MIDI PIANO
STEP 5
PLUG AND PLAY
Wait 5 – 10 minutes to make sure the paint
is totally dry and to ensure the board won’t
slide and smudge.
Plug in your battery or power supply and
connect your speaker or headphones once
again. Now you can play a tune with your
awesome paper keys!
If any of the sensors aren’t working, make
sure the connection to the paint is robust,
and that you don’t have a short circuit
beneath the electrodes.
bareconductive.com
© 2015 / Bare Conductive Ltd.
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