FactoryTalk View Site Edition - Rockwell Automation Knowledgebase

FactoryTalk View Site Edition - Rockwell Automation Knowledgebase
FACTORYTALK VIEW SITE EDITION DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
FactoryTalk View Site Edition® Distributed System Design Considerations
FactoryTalk View Site Edition v5.10 (CPR9 SR2)
Best practices for designing and
implementing FactoryTalk View Site
Edition Distributed Applications
FACTORYTALK VIEW SITE EDITION DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
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Table of Contents
FactoryTalk View Site Edition® Distributed System Design Considerations ................................................... 1
Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................ 5
What’s New .................................................................................................................................................... 5
Prerequisite Reading: FactoryTalk View Site Edition Documentation .......................................................... 6
Prerequisite Reading: FactoryTalk Help ........................................................................................................ 7
Prerequisite Reading: FactoryTalk View SE Release Notes .......................................................................... 7
Additional Related Documentation ................................................................................................................ 8
Revision History ............................................................................................................................................. 8
What’s New in FactoryTalk View Site Edition (Network) v5.10 (CPR9 SR2)? ............................................... 9
Known Issues (New in CPR9 SR2!) ................................................................................................................ 9
Recommended Platform Requirements ............................................................................................................ 10
Hardware and Operating System Requirements........................................................................................... 10
Installing a new Operating System on computers ........................................................................................ 11
Server OS vs. Workstation OS ..................................................................................................................... 11
Internet Information Server (IIS).................................................................................................................. 12
Windows Error Reporting ............................................................................................................................ 12
Virtual Environments ................................................................................................................................... 12
Workgroup vs. Domain .................................................................................................................................... 12
Workgroup .................................................................................................................................................... 12
Domain ......................................................................................................................................................... 13
Domain Best Practices ...................................................................................................................................... 14
Windows Support Tools ............................................................................................................................... 15
Component Installation Best Practices ............................................................................................................. 16
Software Installation ......................................................................................................................................... 17
Default File Locations for FactoryTalk View SE......................................................................................... 17
Default File Locations for FactoryTalk View SE Distributed Applications ................................................ 17
System Limits ................................................................................................................................................... 18
Activation ......................................................................................................................................................... 19
EvRSI Activation.......................................................................................................................................... 19
FactoryTalk Activation ................................................................................................................................. 19
FactoryTalk Alarms & Events .......................................................................................................................... 20
Redundancy (HMI & Live Data Server) .......................................................................................................... 20
System Modification ........................................................................................................................................ 21
General System Modification Procedure (Redundant & Non-Redundant) .................................................. 21
System Modification Procedure on Redundant Servers ............................................................................... 21
Communications ............................................................................................................................................... 22
Live Data: TCP/IP or DCOM ...................................................................................................................... 24
RSLinx Enterprise Predefined Items ............................................................................................................ 24
How many tags can RSLinx poll in a given amount of time? ...................................................................... 24
Data Server Load .......................................................................................................................................... 25
RSLinx Classic vs. RSLinx Enterprise vs. 3rd Party OPC ............................................................................ 25
RSLinx Classic Remote OPC Server ........................................................................................................... 26
FactoryTalk Gateway ................................................................................................................................... 27
RSLinx Classic with a Logix Controller ...................................................................................................... 27
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System Security ................................................................................................................................................ 27
FactoryTalk Security ........................................................................................................................................ 28
Access to Open an Application .................................................................................................................... 29
Thin Clients: Windows Terminal Services ...................................................................................................... 30
Thin Clients: FactoryTalk Viewpoint ............................................................................................................... 30
Time Synchronization ...................................................................................................................................... 31
HMI Tags and Direct Referenced Tags ............................................................................................................ 32
Tag related limits .......................................................................................................................................... 32
Tag Database (HMI Tags) ............................................................................................................................ 32
Direct Referenced Tags ................................................................................................................................ 32
Alarm Acknowledge Bit ............................................................................................................................... 32
Calculate number of tags on-scan................................................................................................................. 33
Data Logging .................................................................................................................................................... 33
Data Logging to Secondary Path .................................................................................................................. 33
Multiple data log models .............................................................................................................................. 34
Data Log Storage Formats ............................................................................................................................ 34
Trending ........................................................................................................................................................... 34
Database Considerations .................................................................................................................................. 35
Language Switching ......................................................................................................................................... 35
Global Objects .................................................................................................................................................. 35
Graphic Displays .............................................................................................................................................. 36
Importing and Exporting Graphic Display XML Files ................................................................................ 36
ActiveX Components ................................................................................................................................... 37
Visual Basic for Applications ....................................................................................................................... 37
New faceplates for RSLogix 5000 Advanced Process Control Instructions (New in CPR9 SR2!) ................. 38
FactoryTalk View SE Enterprise Tools (Improved in CPR9 SR2!)................................................................. 38
Naming Components ........................................................................................................................................ 39
Overall Considerations ..................................................................................................................................... 39
How to determine what SE projects load when O/S initializes .................................................................... 40
Designing A Multi-User System .................................................................................................................. 41
Languages ..................................................................................................................................................... 41
Miscellaneous Procedures ............................................................................................................................ 41
RSView32 to View SE Conversions ................................................................................................................ 41
ControlLogix Redundancy (v13 and above) .................................................................................................... 42
Automatic IP Address Swapping.................................................................................................................. 42
Tricks and Tweaks ............................................................................................................................................ 42
Tools and Utilities ............................................................................................................................................ 43
Additional Reference Links .............................................................................................................................. 43
FactoryTalk View Site Edition (Network) ................................................................................................... 43
FactoryTalk View Machine Edition ............................................................................................................. 43
General ......................................................................................................................................................... 44
Communications ........................................................................................................................................... 44
ControlLogix ................................................................................................................................................ 44
Microsoft ...................................................................................................................................................... 44
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Introduction
This document is intended as a supplement the standard documentation that is provided with the FactoryTalk
View Site Edition v5.10 software. It is designed to make system developers aware of the fundamental bestpractice guidelines for designing and implementing a FactoryTalk View Site Edition (“View SE”) system.
What’s New
In addition to the applicable View SE “legacy” content, this document contains new information that is
specific to the View SE V5.10 (CPR9 SR2) release. Sections with new information are clearly marked with
“(New in CPR9 SR2!)” or “(Improved in CPR9 SR2!)”.
Much of the general networking content was moved because a separate document titled Ethernet Design
Considerations for Control System Networks exists (found in the Rockwell Automation Literature Library ENET-SO001A-EN-E) This companion document provides fundamental best-practice guidelines for
designing the Ethernet infrastructure for Supervisory Controls and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems using
Rockwell Automation hardware and software products.
Additionally, much of the information regarding Hardware and Operating System Requirements,
Workgroup vs. Domains, and Component Installation Best Practices has been removed from this
document with instead references to the FactoryTalk Help or FactoryTalk View SE Release Notes.
For more information on the Integrated Architecture and the FactoryTalk Services Platform, refer to
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/rockwellsoftware/factorytalk/integrated.html. For product information on
FactoryTalk View, refer to http://www.rockwellautomation.com/rockwellsoftware/performance/view/.
Using this Document
The purpose of this document is not to repeat information included elsewhere. In some cases, this document
may discuss topics in detail; in other cases, a section may simply refer to another document or website where
the same topic is thouroughly discussed or is more routinely updated.
The structure of this document is as follows:
• General information on distributed applications (e.g., workgroup vs. domain questions)
• Overview, installation and activation of the FactoryTalk View components
• Best Practice Guidelines on Communications (e.g., RSLinx Entperise vs. RSLinx Classic)
• General information on security
• Best Practice Guidelines using FactoryTalk View features
• Overall Considerations and Useful Tools
• Quick reference links
Specific information is sorted by relevance to a specific component or capability, so it is possible to find some
overlap.
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Document Naming Conventions/Abbreviations
Frequently throughout this document, the user will be directed to more information in the form of Answer IDs, or
AIDs. These are technical papers created by Rockwell Automation and posted on the Rockwell Automation
Knowledgebase, accessible here: http://www.rockwellautomation.com/knowledgebase
Prerequisite Reading: FactoryTalk View Site Edition Documentation
The following View SE related documents are installed with the product and should be considered prerequisite
reading for this document. These documents may also be found in the Rockwell Automation Literature
Library (Software > Performance & Visibility) and, when possible, are linked directly below.
FactoryTalk View Site Edition Installation Guide
Literature Library
VIEWSE-IN003I-EN-P
Installed Help File Name
FTViewSEInstallENU.pdf
FactoryTalk View Site Edition User's Guide
VIEWSE-UM006E-EN-P
FTViewSEUserENU.pdf
FactoryTalk Security Quick Start Guide (June 2009)
FTSEC-QS001B-EN-P
FactoryTalk Alarm and Events System Config Guide (May 2009)
FTAE-RM001A-EN-E
RSLinx Enterprise Getting Results Guide (June 2009)
LNXENT-GR001E-EN-E
FTSecuritySysConfig.pdf
FT Alarm and Events System
Configuration Guide.pdf
RSLinxEnterpriseGRG.pdf
When using View Studio or the SE Administration console, links to most of these documents are located on
the Help menu:
Note: In a default View SE installation, the .PDF files launched by these links can also be found in
C:\Program Files\Common Files\Rockwell\Help.
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Prerequisite Reading: FactoryTalk Help
Another source for reference documentation is FactoryTalk Help which can be accessed from the Windows
Start Menu on any machine installed with the FactoryTalk Services Platform.
Start > Programs > Rockwell Software > FactoryTalk Tools > FactoryTalk Help
Prerequisite Reading: FactoryTalk View SE Release Notes
New features in this release can be found in the “What’s new in FactoryTalk View Site Edition v5.10”
section of the Release Notes. The Release Notes are available from the View SE installation menu:
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After View SE is installed, a link to the Release Notes is also located on the Help menu of FactoryTalk View
Studio (and the FactoryTalk View Administration console):
Release notes can also be found in Answer ID 56362 - Factory Talk View / RSView ME and SE Release
Notes.
Additional Related Documentation
The following related documents, available from the Rockwell Automation Literature Library, provide
additional information:
•
•
•
Logix5000 Controllers Design Considerations (Publication 1756-RM094C-EN-P)
Ethernet/IP Performance (Publication ENET-AP001D-EN-P )
Plant PAx Process Control System (Publication PROCES-RM001D-EN-P )
For more information on the Integrated Architecture and the FactoryTalk Services Platform, refer to
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/rockwellsoftware/factorytalk/integrated.html.
Regarding network design, as mentioned above:
Ethernet Design Considerations for Control System Networks (Publication ENET-SO001A-EN-E)
Check also the Rockwell/Cisco Reference Architecture site. Reference Architectures are built on technology
and manufacturing standards common between IT and manufacturing. The information here inclues Design
Guides for Network Infrastructure, Design and Implementation (DIG), and Ethernet I/P Media planning and
installation.
Revision History
•
•
•
•
Revision 1.0 (12/2007): Initial release for v5.00 (CPR9)
Revision 1.1 (02/2010): Release for v5.10 (CPR9 SR2)
Revision 1.1a (03/2010): Corrected System Limits, p. 18
Revision 1.1b (11/2010): Removed reference to unavailable Knowledgebase Answer, p. 35
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What’s New in FactoryTalk View Site Edition (Network) v5.10 (CPR9 SR2)?
As mentioned previously, a complete list of what’s new can be found in the Release Notes.
A summary of the new features has also been included here:
•
New Operating System support for Windows XP with Service Pack 3, Windows Server 2008
Standard Service Pack 1 and Windows Vista Business with Service Pack 1.
•
Application Documenter and HMI Server Backup and Restore utilities are now installed with the
product.
•
New faceplates for the Advanced Process Control instructions introduced in RSLogix 5000 v17
release.
•
Trend object enhanced to support FactoryTalk Historian Site Edition.
New features of View SE 5.1 are discussed in Answer ID 64333 - FactoryTalk View Site Edition Version
5.1 New Features
Known Issues (New in CPR9 SR2!)
Known issues in this release can be found in the “Known anomalies” section of the View SE Release Notes
or also within the FactoryTalk Help.
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Recommended Platform Requirements
The hardware and operating system used with FactoryTalk View SE depends on the demands the application
will place on the system. The greater the demand, the more powerful a system needed. For large or complex
applications computers should be used with faster CPUs and more RAM. For applications that demand high
availability and the ability to server many clients, a Windows Server operating system should be used. In
smaller, local applications, a Windows Workstation operating system might be just fine.
Hardware and Operating System Requirements
Keep in mind that as a general rule, there will be improved performance in any application with a faster CPU
and additional RAM over the published mimimum or even recommended amounts. In addition, there should
always be sufficient disk space to provide virtual memory that is at least twice the size of the physical RAM.
See the platform requirements in the FactoryTalk View SE Installation Guide – Chapter 2 for specific
information on hardware and software requirements. This information is also in the “Before Installing
FactoryTalk View SE” section of the View SE Release Notes.
Information on system requirements may also be found in Answer ID 44183 - System Requirements for
FactoryTalk View
For the latest information about the software platforms supported by View SE, refer to Answer ID 42682 Rockwell Automation Software Product Compatibility Matrix in the Rockwell Automation Knowledgebase.
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Note:
•
Some Microsoft operating system service packs and hot fixes are not compatible with FactoryTalk
View Site Edition. To find out if there are any problems with a particular Microsoft update, refer to
Answer ID 20450 - FactoryTalk View SE Operating System and Service Pack compatibility matrix
in the Rockwell Automation Knowledgebase.
•
FactoryTalk View SE is only tested on operating systems installed from original Microsoft media.
Important!
For all FactoryTalk View Site Edition (Network) Applications using Windows 2000 Professional SP4
•
Anyone running a network (distributed) application on Windows 2000 Professional with Service
Pack 4 or Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition with Service Pack 1 should install the Microsoft
Hotfix for the DCOM 108 (also known as RPC_E_DISCONNECTED) errors. Go to Answer ID
37039 in the Rockwell Automation Knowledgebase for details and a link to the Microsoft patch.
This fix does not apply to Microsoft Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 3, Microsoft Windows
Server 2003 R2 with Service Pack 2 (Standard Edition), or Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Standard with
Service Pack 1.
Installing a new Operating System on computers
Be sure to always install the computer vendor supported or recommended OS if upgrading or modifying the
system. In some cases, there are not proper hardware drivers for a particular hardware/software combination.
Using unsupported operating systems or drivers can cause the computer to be unstable. Obviously, if the OS is
unstable, it is too much to ask for any applications running on it to be stable. Please be aware that computer
manufacturers can make modifications to Operating Systems which may impact the installation or performance of
our software products. It is recommended to use full versions of the intended operating system on all
workstations.
Server OS vs. Workstation OS
•
•
•
It is highly recommended that the FactoryTalk Directory, HMI and Live Data Servers be installed on
a server OS. Windows XP and 2000 Pro are workstation operating systems (they have a 10
connection limit). Multiple connections are established to each ‘server’ by every View SE Client
(including View SE Studio).
As a general rule, servers and clients should be in the same Windows OS ‘vintage’. For example,
Windows 2000 clients should not be used with Windows 2003 (or Windows XP) ‘servers’. The
combination of Windows XP SP2 ‘servers’ and Windows 2000 Professional SP4 clients has been
problematic with both Rockwell Software and third-party products. Refer to Answer ID 32427 FactoryTalk View SE clients get no data when Windows XP SP2 hosts an OPC Live Data Server.
View SE server side components are not supported on clustered servers. However, when using
Windows 2003 Server and Terminal Services, the SE Client component can be installed on 2003
Terminal Servers that are using Network Load Balancing (NLB).
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Internet Information Server (IIS)
Internet Information Server (IIS) is a required component only on any computer hosting an HMI Server. It is
not required (and in fact not recommended) for any other View SE computers (Live Data Servers, clients,
etc). It is recommended that IIS be installed with only the minimum required components as described in
Chapter 2 of the FactoryTalk View SE Installation Guide. For more information on using IIS with
FactoryTalk View SE, refer to Answer ID 39618 - FactoryTalk Internals: FactoryTalk View Site Edition IIS
Handbook.
Windows Error Reporting
There is an error reporting feature included with Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008
Standard and Windows Vista with Service Pack 1 that can be used to report computer and program errors to
Microsoft. Typically, there is no benefit to using this feature in a Rockwell Software environment, and disabling
it is recommended. For more information refer to Answer ID 42651- Instructions for disabling the Windows
Error Reporting feature.
Virtual Environments
Rockwell Automation announced limited support for virtualization in production environments
using VMware. Refer to Answer ID 30209 - Rockwell Software in Virtual Environments for more
information.
Workgroup vs. Domain
FactoryTalk systems require a Windows network and rely on a number of Windows elements, including
Internet Information Services (IIS). All FactoryTalk systems components must reside in either a Windows
workgroup or a Windows domain.
Workgroup
Decentralized Administration
Advantages:
• No Domain Controller (Windows Server OS) to purchase.
• One less computer in network to maintain.
• Recommended only for small View SE applications where user accounts don’t change often.
Workgroup Rules:
• The system can consist of no more than 10 FactoryTalk computers.
• All computers participating in an application must be members of the same Windows workgroup.
• All users participating in the workgroup must be members of the Administrators group.
• Create the same set of user accounts and passwords on every computer in a FactoryTalk View SE
application. For details refer to Help provided with Windows.
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Domain
Centralized Administration
Advantages:
• Centralized Administration
• One place to manage Users, Groups and Security
• Automate IP addresses with Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), and Name
Resolution and with Domain Name Service (DNS) and Windows Internet Name Service (WINS).
Domain Rules:
• For applications consisting of more than 10 computers, a domain controller is required.
• Rockwell Software components (including FactoryTalk Service Platform components) should not be
installed on domain controllers.
Information to help make the decision between a Windows Workgroup and a Windows Domain can be
found in the FactoryTalk Help, under the headings Installing FactoryTalk Software / Guidelines for
Windows Workgroups and Domains.
An abbreviated version of the help file can be found in AID 66173 - FactoryTalk Considerations for
Windows Workgroups and Domains.
Additionally, the View SE Release Notes contains information on how to set up the Windows domain or
workgroup under the heading “Before installing FactoryTalk View SE”.
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Domain Best Practices
Extensive information is available from Microsoft and is beyond the scope of this document, however there
are some key points that users of a View SE system in a Windows Domain should understand:
•
View SE supports the following domains:
o Windows 2000 Server Active Directory (in Native or Mixed mode)
o Windows Server 2003 Active Directory (in any functional level)
o Windows Server 2008 Active Directory (in any functional level)
Note: Windows 2000 Active Directory (AD) domains introduced the concept of a “forest.”
A forest can consist of a single “domain tree”, or multiple domain trees. A domain tree can
consist of a single domain (a.k.a. the “parent” domain) or multiple domains (a.k.a. the “child”
domains). A single forest, single tree, single domain configuration is recommended. In
Windows Server 2008 Active Directory, both domains and forests have individual functional
levels. The default functional levels are recommended:
o Domain: Windows Server 2008 mixed
o Forest: Windows Server 2008
To determine the Window 2000 domain mode, launch Active Directory "Domains and Trusts"
(Start > Programs > Administrative Tools), right-click the domain and select "Properties". To
determine the Window 2003 or Windows 2008 functional levels, the identical procedure is
used.
•
It is recommended to select internal Microsoft Active Directory domain names carefully. An internal
Microsoft Active Directory domain name should not be confused with an Internet (external) domain
name, and while they can be the same name, typically they are not. Consult the local IT department
or the Microsoft Best Practice Active Directory Deployment for more information.
•
Domain Controller Redundancy:
o Windows NT4: In addition to the Primary Domain Controller (PDC), it is recommended to
implement at least one backup Domain Controller (BDC) to provide high availability.
o Windows 2000 Server & Windows Server 2003 Active Directory: it is recommended to
implement at least 2 domain controllers, where both are configured with the Global Catalog
(GC) role to provide high availability. By default, the GC role is only on the first domain
controller in the forest, but the GC role on other domain controllers can be added from the
Active Directory Sites and Services console. Simply expand Sites > site name > Servers >
server name, right-click NTDS Settings, and select Properties. The Global Catalog check box
is on the General tab. Note: There are still a number of single instance domain controller
roles that can result in a single point of failure. These 5 Flexible Single Master Operations
(FSMO) roles are:
1. PDC Emulator (one per domain)
2. Infrastructure master (one per domain)
3. Relative ID (RID) master (one per domain)
4. Schema master (one per forest)
5. Domain naming master (one per forest)
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•
It is recommended to configure time synchronization throughout a domain. For more information,
refer to the section entitled Time Synchronization later in this document.
•
Prior to deploying a View SE system, both new and existing active directory domains should have
their operation verified using Microsoft’s Domain Controller Diagnostics (Dcdiag.exe) utility. This
utility is included with the Windows Support Tools located on the Operating System CD and also
available via download from Microsoft.
•
Rockwell Software does not support our software on computers configured as domain controllers.
The following information comes from a Microsoft TechNet article posted at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/maintain/security/secdefs.mspx.
The key sentence in this TechNote is "In general, Microsoft does not recommend running
applications on computers configured as domain controllers, and certainly not applications that
require more than Authenticated User privileges in order to run successfully." Installation of any
application software on a domain controller can have adverse affects on the network and is the
responsibility of the user to accept the risk.
Windows Support Tools
Microsoft provides numerous diagnostic tools for Domain Controllers, Active Directory and networking in
general that must be installed after the operating system. To install the tools, browse the operating system
CD (Windows XP and Server 2003) to \Support\Tools\ and run SupTools.Msi. To get an overview of the
tools available, click Start > Programs > Windows Support Tools > Support Tools Help. For more
information, see Answer ID 30956 - Microsoft Network Diagnostic Tools for Ethernet.
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Component Installation Best Practices
A typical View SE deployment consists of a FactoryTalk Directory Server, an HMI Server(s), a FT Live
Data Server(s) and Client(s). In the case of a Site Edition (Local) application, all of these components are
located on a single machine. In the case of a Site Edition (Network) application, these components may be
distributed across multiple host computers. The many potential choices result in a large number of potential
architectures.
A comprehensive and graphical explanation of where FactoryTalk components should be installed can be
found in the FactoryTalk Help under the heading “Installing FactoryTalk software”.
Other topics covered by this section of the FactoryTalk Help:
• upgrading from previous versions
• installing software updates
• FactoryTalk Activations
• deploying a FactoryTalk system.
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Software Installation
The View SE installation is largely unchanged, however in order to simplify the installation, it is
recommended to follow the FactoryTalk View Installation Assistant, which can be found using the ‘Open
Installation Instructions’ link from the View SE installation menu:
Note: Establish the system’s computer names prior to installing FactoryTalk Service Platform and
View SE. Changing computer names after the installation of the software is not recommended.
Default File Locations for FactoryTalk View SE
Core program files: C:\Program Files\Rockwell Software\RSView Enterprise
Help files and additional documentation: C:\Program Files\Common Files\Rockwell\Help
Default File Locations for FactoryTalk View SE Distributed Applications
The locations of the product files vary slightly depending on the operating system used:
Windows 2000:
Network FactoryTalk Directory File:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Rockwell\RNAServer\Global\*.RnaD
Application Files:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Documents\RSView Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects\
Windows Server 2003:
Network FactoryTalk Directory File:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Rockwell\RNAServer\Global\*.RnaD
Application Files:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Shared Documents\RSView Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects\
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Windows Server 2008 Standard:
Network FactoryTalk Directory File:
C:\ProgramData\Rockwell\RNAServer\Global\*.RnaD
Application Files:
C:\Users\Public\Documents\RSView Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects
Windows XP:
Network FactoryTalk Directory File:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Rockwell\RNAServer\Global\*.RnaD
Application Files:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Documents\RSView Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects\
Windows Vista:
Network FactoryTalk Directory File:
C:\ProgramData\Rockwell\RNAServer\Global\*.RnaD
Application Files:
C:\Users\Public\Documents\RSView Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects
Help Files and additional documentation: C:\Program Files\Common Files\Rockwell\Help
System Limits
To set up a FactoryTalk View Site Edition HMI system successfully, observe these limits taken from the
FactoryTalk View SE Installation Guide – Chapter 2, under the “Limits for application server host
computers” heading:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The maximum number of FactoryTalk View Studio clients that can have simultaneous access to a
FactoryTalk View Site Edition application is 5.
The maximum number of HMI servers supported in an application is 10.
Each redundant server definition is a pair - primary and secondary. Therefore, each redundant server
definition consumes 2 of the 10 available servers.
The maximum number of FactoryTalk View SE Clients that can have simultaneous access to a
FactoryTalk View Site Edition application is 50.
In non-redundant scenarios, the maximum number of HMI servers that can be hosted on a single
computer is 2*.
In redundant scenarios, the maximum number of HMI servers that can be hosted on a single computer
is 1.
* The FactoryTalk View SE Installation Guide states that running more than one HMI server on a single
computer is not recommended, but the maximum number of HMI servers supported on a single computer
in a non-redundant scenario is two.
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Activation
An electronic product activation tool, FactoryTalk® Activation™, is supported along with EvRSI activation.
EvRSI activation will be replaced by FactoryTalk Activation in a future release. If EvRSI activation are
used, please contact the local Rockwell Automation Sales office or Technical Support for information on
migrating EvRSI activations to FactoryTalk Activation.
EvRSI Activation
When using the EvRSI activation mechanism with View SE, there are generally 3 configuration options:
1. on local hard drive
• this is the recommended configuration, for more information refer to the Activation On-line Help
(Programs > Rockwell Software > Utilities > Activation Help).
• HMI Servers must use this configuration.
2. on a network drive
• often used for SE Client activations, so that they do not need to be placed on each individual
client computer
• for more information, refer to the Activation On-line Help and Answer ID 2777 - Network
Installation Of EvRSI.SYS Activations
3. on the FactoryTalk Directory (a.k.a. “Floating”)
• for more information, refer to the Activation On-line Help.
FactoryTalk Activation
FactoryTalk Activation also provides a choice of configuration options:
1. node-locked (includes local and mobile)
2. concurrent (includes floating and borrowed)
In systems using HMI clients that may not be dedicated, it might be desirable to use a single, centralized
FactoryTalk Activation server to serve client licenses.
For more information regarding FactoryTalk Activation, refer to:
• FactoryTalk View SE Installation Guide - Chapter 4 - Activating FactoryTalk View software
• the FactoryTalk Activation On-line Help
• Answer ID 38510 - What are FactoryTalk Activation System Requirements v3.02 (CPR 9 SR2)?
• Answer ID 35251 - FactoryTalk Activation Frequently Asked Questions
• Answer ID 44623 - What VIDEOS are available on FactoryTalk Activations?
• Answer ID 35717 - How would I be able to check the connection between the FactoryTalk Activation
Server and Client
When deploying a FactoryTalk Activation Server, refer to:
• Answer ID 35376 - FactoryTalk Activation Server User Management
• Answer ID 41573 - FactoryTalk Activation End User Options File to Include/Exclude Borrowing
Activations
• Answer ID 35708 - How to support FactoryTalk Activations in a LAN/WAN Environment
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FactoryTalk Alarms & Events
Before FactoryTalk Alarms and Events, FactoryTalk View SE supported only HMI tag alarm monitoring.
To maintain compatibility with existing applications, View SE still supports this type of alarm monitoring.
However, FactoryTalk Alarms & Events now allows multiple FactoryTalk products to participate in a
common, consistent view of alarms and events throughout a FactoryTalk system. For more information,
refer to:
• FactoryTalk Alarm and Events System Configuration Guide
• Answer ID 44177 - FactoryTalk Alarms & Events - Special Considerations for the initial release
• Answer ID 44479 - How To Configure a Device-Based Alarm Server in CPR9
• Answer ID 44175 - How to configure a Tag-based Alarm Server in CPR9
To migrate existing HMI alarms to FactoryTalk Tag-based alarms, a conversion utility can be found in
Answer ID 45583 - Tool: Converting RSViewSE HMI Alarms to FactoryTalk View SE A&E Tag-Based
Alarms.
Redundancy (HMI & Live Data Server)
Redundancy requirements are unique to each application. The ideal redundant solution involves having at
least two instances of everything – hardware, software, networks, and so on. In practice, this is seldom
feasible or even necessary. View SE redundancy allows creation of duplicate server information that can be
used if a server fails. The desired outcome is to maximize system availability. Software redundancy is not
the equivalent of PLC style hot backup.
Keep in mind that FactoryTalk View SE Enterprise Redundancy is typically used for:
• Computer hardware failure
• Software failure on one HMI/Live Data Server computer
• Power failure on one HMI/Live Data Server computer
Before setting up redundancy, plan:
• Which components in the system require redundancy?
• What software components on PC’s require backup systems?
• The network layout of the components within the system.
• CPU processing load that is expected for each computer.
Software redundancy can be configured for:
• HMI Server
• Live Data Server
Note: Alarm & Events Server redundancy is not available in CPR9 SR2.
If using (2) computers, one server should be designated as the “Primary” with the responsibility of the
Primary HMI Server and Primary Live Data Server. The second computer designated as “Secondary” with
the responsibility of the Secondary HMI Server and Secondary Live Data Server. A “load sharing”
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configuration where one server is the primary in one role and the secondary in the other role is not
recommended.
The FactoryTalk Directory server does not require configuration for redundancy. The FactoryTalk Directory
information is cached on each computer that is participating in a distributed application. If the FactoryTalk
Directory server computer is disconnected from the network or fails, each client and server in the application
can continue to access the graphics (from HMI Servers) and tags (from Live Data Servers) in the application
as long as the computer had previously accessed the FactoryTalk Directory server. However, since the
FactoryTalk Directory is required to edit the application, it is recommended to place the FactoryTalk
Directory on a PC with high availability. Though placement on the Primary HMI Server is supported since in
theory that is a highly available server, it is strongly recommended that the FactoryTalk Directory be located
apart from the redundant servers on a separate machine.
Additional Information
• FactoryTalk View SE User’s Guide - Chapter 13 - Setting up FactoryTalk system availability
• Answer ID 40891 - FactoryTalk View SE 5.0 (CPR9) Server Redundancy Guidelines
• Answer ID 44624 – FactoryTalk View SE 5.0 (CPR9) - Determining any Server's Current Status and
State in a Display Client.
System Modification
General System Modification Procedure (Redundant & Non-Redundant)
•
Some tag information is loaded into RAM when the View SE services start. Therefore, some tag
database modifications may require:
o Server restart/reboot
o Client session restart
o Client screen refresh
In order for the change(s) to take affect. The integration team should evaluate what modifications
may be needed and have a procedure in place to allow for them once a project has been
commissioned.
System Modification Procedure on Redundant Servers
•
•
•
Simple Display modifications which do not require new Tag creation can be` copied and pasted from
one server to the other without halting the servers. The change will then take effect the next time the
screen is displayed.
Simple Macro modifications which do not require new Tag creation can be copied and pasted from
one server to the other without halting the servers. The change will then take effect the next time the
macro is executed.
Simple modifications to Data Log Models, Derived Tag Files, and Event Files which do not require
Tag creation can be copied and pasted from one server to the other without halting the servers. Prior
to changing these files they should be stopped first, by issuing the following commands:
o DatalogOff <Data Log Model Name>
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o EventOff <Event file Name>
o DerivedOff <Derived Tag Name>
Once modifications have been completed and saved, then the files need to be restarted by issuing the
following commands:
o DatalogOn <Data Log Model Name>
o EventOn <Event file Name>
o DerivedOn <Derived Tag Name>
Type the command without the < > around the object name.
HMI Tag Deletion requires halting the server and transferring the project to the other server. All
references to tags must first be removed. This includes all reference used in Display Animation, VB
code, Event File, Derived Tag File, and Data Log Model.
Any Alarm Tag changes which require the use of the “Accept Button” in the Tag Database editor
requires halting the server and transferring the project to the other server.
Communications
RSLinx Classic (RSLC) and RSLinx Enterprise (RSLE) can both communicate with SLC/PLC/CLX
controllers. However, RSLE is the preferred method of communications for View SE unless one of the
following features of RSLC is needed.
• OPC/DDE Server to non-FactoryTalk applications (RSLE can provide OPC, but requires FactoryTalk
Gateway)
• Alias Topic Functionality
• Unsolicited Messaging
• Complex communication routing. Protocol changing (ex. Ethernet to DH+)
• Offline browsing of PLC/SLC RSLogix files
RSLC and RSLE can also co-exist on the same computer at the same time (refer to Appendix C of the RSLE
Getting Results Guide for more information).
When designing an application, do not duplicate references to Live Data Servers (RSLC, RSLE and 3rd Party
OPC Servers) in the application. Tags from a single Live Data Server may be referenced from any HMI
project in any area of the application; therefore, it is recommended to place only one Live Data Server per
Area.
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If a particular physical area in the plant has more than one Live Data Server (RSLinx for Rockwell
controllers and Kepware for a 3rd party controller, for example), create logical “sub-Areas” to separate the
two as illustrated below:
For more information, refer to Answer ID 29663 - FactoryTalk View SE Area Best Practices.
When planning communications:
• Gather information about the types of controllers or devices in the plant, and the software that is
available for communicating with them.
• Determine how the programmable controllers on the network will communicate with the application.
This will help plan the number of Live Data Servers needed in the application.
• Determine how the application will access data in the controllers or devices. In most instances, the
values in controllers or devices can be directly referenced without needing to create an HMI tag.
For certain special instances however, the need to set up an HMI tag database may exist. HMI tags provide
extended capabilities, such as:
• Triggering alarms when tag values cross a specified threshold.
• Scaling or offsetting a value before sending it to a programmable controller or device.
• Security
Live Data Servers allows clients to access information in programmable controllers, devices and other Live
Data Servers that comply with the OPC-DA 2.0 specification.
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Live Data: TCP/IP or DCOM
FactoryTalk System Policy allows the Live Data protocol to be selected. This policy setting affects
communications between client and server services and between the FactoryTalk directory and servers on the
network. This setting is considered a "default" because if the FactoryTalk Live Data service detects that
some components on the network are not compatible with the selected policy setting, it overrides the policy
and uses whichever setting is most likely to ensure uninterrupted communications. For example, for thirdparty servers and RSLinx Classic, FactoryTalk Live Data will not attempt a TCP/IP connection and will
always use DCOM.
The FactoryTalk Services Platform installation process evaluates the services and components on the
network and sets the communication protocol appropriately. For example, if an earlier version of the
FactoryTalk platform is upgraded to FactoryTalk Services Platform 2.10 (CPR 9) or later, the
communications default is automatically set to DCOM. If the FactoryTalk Services Platform 2.10 or later is
installed for the first time on a computer, the communications default is automatically set to TCP/IP.
Typically, it is not necessary or advisable to change the default setting. Refer to the FactoryTalk Help for
more information.
RSLinx Enterprise Predefined Items
RSLinx Enterprise Predefined Items are internal counters and strings that are made available as data items
(tags) for diagnostic purposes. These items differ from regular data items in that they access internal
information contained in RSLinx Enterprise. The referenced technote includes two View SE graphics
containing RSLinx Enterprise diagnostics counters. One graphic contains counters that can be used with
ControlLogix family controllers and the other one contains counters that can be used with PLC-5, SLC, and
MicroLogix family of controllers. These graphics will import into a View ME or SE project. Refer to
Answer ID 30148 - Using RSLinx Enterprise Diagnostic Counters - Predefined items
How many tags can RSLinx poll in a given amount of time?
There is no straight forward answer to this question. There are many factors involved, some of which are:
•
•
•
•
•
The computer hardware that the Live Data Server (RSLinx Classic or Enterprise) is running
on. The more memory and the faster the processor, the better.
Additional CPU loading from other software running on the same computer. Even if the
multiple software products are compatible to run on the same PC, performance may be affected if
they must fight for PC resources. Use Task Manager or perfmon to monitor for resource hogs. Those
software packages may need to be moved to another PC to improve the overall performance.
Other software packages communicating to the controllers from the same or different PC.
Batch or Recipe packages doing uploads or downloads.
The network the data will be polled over (Ethernet, ControlNet, DH+, DH-485, Serial, Dial-up,
etc.). There are physical and practical limits to how much data a network can transmit. Additional
research may be needed for the specific design.
The number of controllers the Live Data Server will need to communicate with. Just as in
conversations, it is easier and more productive for you to call one person for a lot of information than
it would be for you to call fifty people for only a little bit of information each. That is one reason
why a data concentrator controller may be beneficial or needed.
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The type of controllers. Some of the newer Logix brand controllers have been developed with
networking optimization in mind and therefore perform better then others.
How the controller program is written. Are the tags or data points optimized in the controller to be
in consecutive blocks or are they scattered randomly throughout the controller? Are they in arrays?
How the controller is configured. In the Logix family of controllers, the communication time slice
can be tuned. This setting only applies to the continuous task in a project. The background task uses
the remaining time after running the periodic tasks and any motion task. This determines how much
time is used for communication processing. Be sure not to increase this value too much so that it
does not impact on the scan time of the controllers program. Refer to Answer ID 25915 - Setting the
Overhead Time Slice or Increasing Processor Bandwidth for Comms.
Data Server Load
The loading on a data server is a combination of three variables:
• the number of controllers from which data must be collected
• the number of tags being requested from each of those controllers (and the frequency)
• the number of View SE clients (and the refresh rates of their displays)
As a data server becomes more taxed, tag/screen updates will appear slow. There may also be errors in the
FactoryTalk Diagnostic Viewer. While there is no single rule to specify the performance boundary of a data
server, there are best practices that can be followed.
With RSLinx Classic, the recommended maximum values for each of these variables are:
1. No more than 10 Logix controllers per data server (via Ethernet)
No more than 20 PLC/SLC controllers per data server (via Ethernet)
2. No more than 10,000 active (on-scan) tags per data server
3. No more then 10 HMI cliens per data server
With RSLinx Enterprise, the recommended maximum values for each of these variables are:
1. No more than 20 Logix controllers per data server (via Ethernet)
No more than 20 PLC/SLC controllers per data server (via Ethernet)
2. No more than 20,000 active (on-scan) tags per data server
3. No more then 20 HMI cliens per data server
If a proposed system exceeds these recommendations, then additional data servers may be required as a
result. Note that the recommended maximum values are not hard-coded limits and must only be considered
as a recommended best practice.
RSLinx Classic vs. RSLinx Enterprise vs. 3rd Party OPC
When designing an application, do not duplicate references to Live Data Servers (RSLinx Classic, RSLinx
Enterprise and 3rd Party OPC Servers) in the View SE application. Tags from a single Live Data Server may
be referenced from any HMI project in any area of the application.
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As mentioned previously, it is recommended to place all Servers (HMI and Data) in their own individual
Areas. Answer ID 29663 - RSView SE Area Best Practices.
Data Server Load Balancing
• ControlLogix CPU utilization, with communications enabled, should be kept at about 40% average
during normal run time.
• It is recommended that spare memory in the controller be reserved to accommodate for tag lists
• Amount of memory varies depending on the type of data being read
• Data in structures and arrays require less space than individual tags
RSLinx Classic:
• When using Alias Topics never use “Switch on Error” when communicating to ControlLogix
processors. Answer ID 26228 - Using RSLinx Alias Topic "Switch On Error" and "Switch On
Command"
• Can communicate with SLC/PLC/CLX controllers (including PLC-2, PLC-3 and PLC-5/250)
• Complex communication routing. Protocol changing (ex. Ethernet to DH+)
• Can serve OPC data
• RSLinx connections to processors on an Ethernet network. Answer ID 7480 - RSLinx; Ethernet
Networks; Problems and Solutions.
RSLinx Enterprise:
• Preferred View SE Live Data Server to Rockwell controllers
• Can communicate with SLC/PLC/CLX controllers (excluding PLC-2, PLC-3 and PLC-5/250)
• Can serve OPC data with the addition of FactoryTalk Gateway
3rd Party OPC servers
For an OPC Server to successfully and efficiently be added to FactoryTalk Live Data:
• it must be fully compliant with the OPC DA 2.0 specification
• it must be designed to accept "Out of Process" calls made to it as a service.
• it should be running as a Windows service
o Answer ID 31195 - Third Party OPC Servers in a FactoryTalk Application should be
configured to run as a Windows Service.
Further information about 3rd Party OPC servers, including how to add them to a FactoryTalk application
can be found in the PDF document attached to Answer ID 65406 - Using FactoryTalk Applications with
Third Party Devices.
RSLinx Classic Remote OPC Server must be selected under the "OPC Server name (ProgID):" when
configuring RSLinx as an OPC Live Data Server in View SE. Regardless of where the actual copy of
RSLinx.exe is running the "RSLinx Remote OPC Server" option must be selected in order to prevent
problems accessing OPC Topics. To better understand what is remote vs. what is local, the Live Data Server
should be viewed from the SE Client point of view and not the HMI Server. In most cases Live Data Servers
will be remote from the SE Client point of view. In the rare case where an SE Client may host a Live Data
Server, using the "RSLinx Remote OPC Server" configuration will not cause any problems.
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FactoryTalk Gateway
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•
•
•
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•
•
•
•
FactoryTalk Gateway is an OPC server that enables OPC clients to connect to FactoryTalk
applications that contain RSLinx Enterprise and FactoryTalk View Site Edition servers. By doing so,
they can access tag data within those applications.
It is OPC Version 2.05 compatible.
FactoryTalk Gateway Station is for use on stand-alone, local applications.
FactoryTalk Gateway Distributed is for FactoryTalk network applications.
Only one FactoryTalk Gateway can be installed per computer.
Multiple FactoryTalk Gateways can point to a single FactoryTalk application.
FactoryTalk Gateway can only point to a single FactoryTalk application at a time.
FactoryTalk Gateway can communicate to as many unique tags as licensed.
20 remote OPC clients have been formally tested and validated against FactoryTalk Gateway.
FactoryTalk Gateway v3.00, released in CPR9 SR2, must be used with RSLinx Enterprise v5.00 and
View SE/ME V5.10 also released in CPR9 SR2
For additional information, refer to Answer ID 45470 - RSLinx Enterprise Getting Results Guides.
RSLinx Classic with a Logix Controller
Please be aware that there are known issues when online editing or downloading to a Logix Controller,
particularly when RSLinx Classic is being used as the Live Data Server. If a client application requests tag
data, RSLinx Classic will group the tags into packets, and put these packets on scan with the controller(s). If
an online edit or download causes a change to the controller’s data table for a data packet on scan, the packet
may need to be taken off scan, and put back on scan for the changes to be reflected.
This may be as minor as navigating off a particular HMI Display to take the tags off scan, and then
navigating back to the display; however, in larger, distributed applications (particularly with alarms, event
detection, data logging, etc. all enabled), it may be operationally difficult to achieve this short of rebooting
the RSLinx Live Data Server. This would obviously affect ANY client requesting data from this instance of
RSLinx Classic.
Many of these issues have been addressed with RSLinx Enterprise, which was designed specifically for the
Logix family of controllers, and why RSLinx Enterprise is the recommended Live Data Server for this
platform.
RSLinx Classic was originally designed for the structured data tables of the SLC and PLC product lines. The
Logix platform introduced new communication and memory performance parameters that can affect RSLinx
Classic. For this reason, RSLinx Enterprise was designed to be the preferred communication server for the
Logix platform. Please consult the local Rockwell account representative for a complete comparison.
Answer ID 30605 - Runtime Editing with RSLinx Classic and Logix Processors
System Security
Security threats to a Process Control System generally fall into 4 categories: external, internal, intentional
and accidental. Detailed security recommendations against external threats are beyond the scope of this
document. However, there are some basic measures that should be taken to protect against the most common
threat – the day-to-day users of the HMI system. Recommendations in this area include:
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•
•
Password protect the computer’s BIOS: to prevent booting from anything other than the local hard
drive, configure the computer to boot only from the hard drive, and then configure a BIOS password
so that mischievous users cannot change the boot device
Password protect the local Administrator account: this often overlooked task is critical
Configure the Windows environment so that it is “strictly business” for the operators: restrict access
to required applications only using Group Policy (in a domain) or Local Policy (on an individual
machine or workgroup). Rockwell Software’s DeskLock can also be used for this purpose.
FactoryTalk Security
FactoryTalk Security authenticates user identities and authorizes user requests to access a FactoryTalkenabled system. These security services are fully integrated into the FactoryTalk Directory and are included
as part of the FactoryTalk Services Platform. FactoryTalk Security includes user authentication that
determines who can open, create, modify, and delete application components, and on which computers the
actions are allowed. Use FactoryTalk Security to add user and group security accounts as well as Windowslinked accounts, and set up security for common actions such as tag writes, open, and delete.
FactoryTalk Security can be configured to:
• Prevent writes to specified tags from the View SE Client.
• Prevent access to specified displays from the View SE Client.
• Prevent access to specified commands from the View SE Client
• Prevent changes to the application from FactoryTalk View SE Studio or the FactoryTalk View SE
Administration Console.
To open the FactoryTalk View SE User Accounts editor or the Secured Commands editor, the user requires
access to the Common/Create Children action, in addition to the Common actions, Configure Security, List
Children, Read, and Write, on the area or application.
•
FactoryTalk Security Quick Start Guide
Answer ID 30980 - FactoryTalk Security - Tips and Best Practices
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Access to Open an Application
To open an application in View SE Studio, the
user must have read/write access to the subfolder that holds the HMI projects. If, for
example, the security designation for View SE
Studio users is Power Users, they will not
necessarily have write access.
To make sure that the settings for Power Users
are correct, navigate to the sub-folder that holds
the HMI projects; right-click; select Properties.
Refer to “Default File Locations for SE
Distributed Applications” earlier in this
document for folder locations.
In the Security tab of the Properties dialog,
select Power Users from the list of groups and
user names. In the Permissions box below the
list, select Full Control and check the Allow
check box.
Additional information:
Answer ID 26251 - DCOM Security Settings for RSView SE
Remote Logging
Answer ID 28967 – Starting an RSView SE Data Log into a
remote ODBC Database on Boot, without logging in.
Answer ID 39984 – SE Alarming: How to enable the SE
Alarm Logger to log to a remote machine.
Answer ID 29103 - Virtual Private Networking (VPN)
Connections for Remote Communications Across the
Internet
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Thin Clients: Windows Terminal Services
View SE v5.10 fully supports Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 Standard Terminal Services,
refer to technical note Answer ID 29919 - Using View SE with Windows 2003 Terminal Server.
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•
•
Terminal Services is a standard feature built into the Windows Server family (Server, Advanced
Server, and Datacenter Server) which provides remote access to servers from practically anywhere in
the enterprise. It is a transparent system that runs applications and performs data processing and
storage functions on the server computer to minimize the amount of information traveling across the
network. While multiple sessions run on a single server, each user can only refer to their individual
session. Users’ desktops are transmitted to clients for display using terminal emulation software.
Similarly, the software sends print streams and command functions such as keyboard inputs and
mouse clicks across the network between the client and the server.
For a computer to be a Terminal Services client, it only requires an operating system and the
Terminal Services client software. No other software (not even a web browser) is required. For this
reason, these clients are known as “thin” clients.
Since minimal software is needed on the client computer and all the processing is done on the server,
client computer hardware can be scaled down to reduce cost.
Thin Clients: FactoryTalk Viewpoint
FactoryTalk Viewpoint is a service that web-enables a View SE HMI application and allows viewers to see
real-time plant floor operations data simply by logging onto an Internet browser. Some features of
Viewpoint include:
• Automatic Display Scaling
• Maintain a Fully Active Browser
• Multiple Display Browsing Made Easy
• Easily Set-Up and Access Favorites
• Casual User Accessing Information
Displays in a FactoryTalk ViewPoint application are read-only. Graphic objects in the displays are fully
animated; however, they cannot be used to write to tags or to start and stop HMI components.
FactoryTalk Viewpoint uses Microsoft Silverlight as browser plug-in to display fully animated graphics;
however, some features supported by View SE are not supported within the Viewpoint/Silverlight
architecture. An outline of the supported features is included in Answer ID 57596 - FactoryTalk View SE
Feature Support within FactoryTalk ViewPoint.
FactoryTalk ViewPoint SE 1.1 supports FactoryTalk View SE 5.1 only. For complete information about
version compatibilities between FactoryTalk Viewpoint, FactoryTalk View ME and FactoryTalk View SE,
consult Answer ID 62112 - FactoryTalk ViewPoint Compatibility Matrix.
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System requirements to use FactoryTalk Viewpoint SE v1.1 can be found in Answer ID 66342 - FactoryTalk
ViewPoint SE v1.1 - System Requirements
Links to further documentation can be found in Answer ID 57990 - FactoryTalk ViewPoint Tips and Best
Practices TOC.
Time Synchronization
The Windows Time service (W32tm.exe) uses the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize computer
clocks on the network. Time synchronization is critical for the proper operation of many Windows services
and to ensure the security of Kerberos authentication within an Active Directory environment. In a View SE
distributed system, time synchronization ensures accurate time stamps on alarms and diagnostic logs.
Therefore, configuring time synchronization is highly recommended.
• In workgroup environments, configure Windows Time to synchronize all the SE computer clocks to
an authoritative time server (e.g. the FactoryTalk Directory).
• In domain environments, Windows Time should be automatically configured on each computer
(when they join the domain) for the appropriate authoritative time server (i.e., the domain controller
that is also the PDC emulator).
• In either environment, the authoritative time server should then be synched to:
o a reliable time server on the Internet
o a locally-connected hardware time source such as an atomic clock
• Check the Event Viewer System log of each computer to verify that the time is being updated
properly.
How Windows Time Service Works
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc773013(WS.10).aspx
Windows Time Service Tools and Settings
http://technet2.microsoft.com/windowsserver/en/library/b43a025f-cce2-4c82-b3ea3b95d482db3a1033.mspx?mfr=true
Administering the Windows Time Service
http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/ac86e77c-0be3-430a-ba0bc2225506fc4f1033.mspx?mfr=true
How to configure an authoritative time server in Windows Server (2003 and 2008)
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/816042
How to configure an authoritative time server in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314054/
How to configure an authoritative time server in Windows 2000
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/216734/
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HMI Tags and Direct Referenced Tags
Refer to Chapter 9 of the FactoryTalk View SE Site Edition User's Guide for complete information.
Tag related limits
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•
An HMI Server supports 40,000 alarmed tags, 10,000 of them can be analog alarms.
Each graphic display can contain up to 3,000 references to expressions or tags (HMI and Direct).
This limit includes duplicate tags and tags contained in embedded variables.
Tag Database (HMI Tags)
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•
Very useful when creating similar controls. Parameter files can reference directory folder structure or
tags for quick duplication of controls
Easy to do Tag Replacement (search and replace)
HMI tags must be used (that is, Direct Referenced tags can not be used) for any of the following
components in the application
o Alarms
o Security (can not set security to Direct Referenced tags)
o Data manipulation (Live Data Server does not provide: scaling, offset values, setting
minimum or maximum limits on values)
For optimum performance, do not place all the HMI tags in the root folder. It is also recommended
that the number of tags in a folder be limited to less than 1000. HMI tags contained in nested folders
do not contribute to the number of tags in the root of the folder. Answer ID 29266 - Slow object
animation performance when opening HMI displays.
Direct Referenced Tags
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No need to build or create a tag database since tags are directly referenced from the controller
Provides access to complex data types in the Logix5000 environment. Reference the tag values
directly, and eliminate the need to createan HMI tag for each member element.
Parameter files can be used with Direct Referenced Tags
Tag Replacement can be used with Direct Referenced Tags
Security cannot be configured; however, an easy workaround is to use the function
UserHasSecurityCode() with visibility on Input fields. Answer ID 46484 - How to apply security on
tags when using direct referenced tags.
Alarm Acknowledge Bit
The acknowledge bit is used for telling other View SE applications or controllers that a tag has been
acknowledged. When an acknowledge bit for a tag is set up, all HMI servers automatically monitor that bit
at run time. When an operator acknowledges an alarm for the tag, the acknowledge bit is set. All other HMI
servers then acknowledge the alarms associated with that bit. This means operators can acknowledge an
alarm in one application and have it recognized in other applications (i.e. global alarm acknowledge between
applications).
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One acknowledge bit can be setup for each tag, one for a group of tags or one for all tags. The more
acknowledge bits that are set up, the greater the system overhead. If possible, group alarms to share an
acknowledge bit.
A burst of alarms or alarm acknowledges will induce a high amount of read/write traffic over a very short
period of time. Acknowledge bits as well as Handshake bits should be accounted for when determining the
total number of tags on scan.
Calculate number of tags on-scan
To calculate the maximum number of tags that could possibly be on-scan from a Live Data Server (ex.
RSLinx) add all of the following: (if a tag is used in multiple places it only counts once)
• Tags on graphics being displayed (or having been displayed if displays are configured to cache and
always update)
• Alarm and Alarm Acknowledge tags
• Tags in Derived tag equations (only derived files running)
• Tags in Event files (only event files running)
• Tags in Data Logs Models (only models that are running)
• Handshake tags
• Tags that Macros or VBA are Reading or Writing to
• Also take into consideration other applications like RSSql and RSBatch that may be using the same
Live Data Server
Data Logging
Data logging is a View SE component that collects and stores tag values. Using a Data Log Model, the tag
values to be collected are specified, as well as when to collect them, and where to store them.
When planning data collection, design the system so only essential data is collected. Limiting data collection
is important because collection activities require substantial processing power and generate significant traffic
on the communication channel or network.
Keep data collection requirements in mind when designing the layout of the programmable controller data
tables and the tag database. Ideally, tag addresses should reference contiguous blocks of programmable
controller data tables to reduce network traffic and optimize system response.
In a redundant SE system it is suggested to log to a third computer as opposed to locally, in doing this there
is only one location to manage the data and there is no need to merge multiple files or databases together
after a failover or switchover.
Data Logging to Secondary Path
FactoryTalk View SE allows for a secondary or backup path to be specified if the primary path for file sets
or the ODBC database becomes unavailable. This could happen because of network failures or because of
lack of disk space on the computer where the data is being logged.
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If the primary data log location becomes unavailable, View SE begins to store the data in a buffer. The buffer
can hold up to 64 Kb of data. If the primary location is still unavailable when the buffer fills, or when the
maximum amount of time to buffer data has elapsed, View SE switches to the secondary path.
View SE checks periodically to determine whether the primary file path has become available again. If it has
become available, View SE switches back automatically.
If both paths are unavailable, View SE buffers the data. If the buffer fills and both paths are still unavailable,
View SE empties the buffer (the data in the buffer is lost) and begins storing new data in the buffer. View
SE continues checking both paths until one becomes available.
Multiple data log models
At run time, up to 20 models can run simultaneously on each View SE Server. Use multiple data log models
to:
• Store related information in separate file sets
• Log groups of tags at different rates
• Log groups of tags based on events
Data Log Storage Formats
Logged data is stored in either an internal file set, providing faster performance for historical trends, or in an
ODBC compliant database. If a file set is used, tag values are stored in proprietary format files. Trend
objects can read the data to plot in a graphic display.
If values are stored to an ODBC compliant database, it is highly recommended that this be a separate
database server and not an SE Server. This data can then be viewed using FactoryTalk Historian Classic,
FactoryTalk Historian Site Edition, or in third party ODBC compliant tools such as Microsoft Excel or
Seagate Crystal Reports.
If the ODBC database becomes inaccessible, View SE logs the data to backup files in proprietary format.
The location of backup files is configurable.
Trending
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When planning trends, consider how they will be used. For example, will the trend be used to:
o Analyze process trends
o Monitor production efficiency
o Archive process variables to ensure compliance with government regulations
Based on such considerations, it can be determined:
o Which tags need to be plotted on the same trend
o Which tags need to be plotted from a data log model or FactoryTalk Historian
o Which tags need to be plotted against time, or against another tag
Trends can display real-time or historical data, from data log models or FactoryTalk Historian, with
up to 100 pens (tags) in each trend. (Improved in CPR9 SR2!)
Trend Templates may be used to create preconfigured trend objects for use in graphic displays.
Trend Snapshots may be used as overlays with real-time trends.
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Graphic displays that contain trend objects created in previous versions of View Studio may need to be
opened in View Studio 5.10 and re-saved to ensure that they work correctly at run time.
For more information, refer to Answer ID 39463 - RSView Supervisory Edition Trending Best Practices
Database Considerations
Oftentimes View SE data logging, FactoryTalk Transaction Manager data logging or FactoryTalk Historian
Classic reporting gets blamed for being slow when it is truly the fault of the database. Commonly, a system
will perform well at startup, but will see performance degradation as time goes on – this is a symptom of the
database growing larger and communicating slower.
The larger a database gets, the longer it takes for SQL queries to execute. Report generation will also be
impacted as the size of the database grows. Proper database management will be required to maintain a
responsive reporting system. Server hardware will also play an important roll in the responsiveness of the
database.
Additional information:
• SQL-Server-Performance.Com
• SQL Server Books Online (SQL Server 2000 – 2008)
• Oracle DBA Information
Language Switching
Language switching allows operators to view user-defined text strings in an application, in up to 40 different
languages. At run time, in a distributed application, multiple View SE clients can switch between any of the
languages the application supports. Multiple clients can also run in different languages, at the same time.
For more information, refer to Chapter 12 of the FactoryTalk View SE Site Edition User's Guide or the
online help.
Generally, it is best practice to develop all the screens in one language first, then import the translations at
the very end. Once translated, all screen text edits and additions must be updated in both languages.
Global Objects
A Global Object is an object that is created once and can then be referenced multiple times on multiple
displays in an application. When changes are made to the original (base) object, the copies (reference
objects) are changed as well. For more information refer to Chapter 15 of the FactoryTalk View SE Site
Edition User's Guide, and the online help.
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Graphic Displays
Develop a hierarchy of displays with each display giving more granular detail of an object, area or function.
This prevents displays from being cluttered by attempting to display a large amount of information at one
time. This also reduces the demands on the Live Data Server from having to poll and display a large amount
of unnecessary data.
Create templates to ensure consistency of appearance.
Each graphic display can contain up to 3,000 references to expressions or tags (HMI and Direct). This limit
includes the tags contained in embedded variables.
When importing a large graphic object (*.jpg, *.bmp) to use as a background. Converting the object to
wallpaper will allow smoother mouse control over the object and provide a better environment for
developing the graphic. It also saves memory for faster display of screen.
Consider using faceplates. Faceplates are standard screens that can be used (and re-used) within an
application. Faceplates can correspond to a Logix5000 instruction, a tag structure within Logix5000 AOI, or
any group of tags that is repeated through an application. Process faceplates can be included in any
application by right-clicking on the HMI server in Studio and selecting “Add Process Faceplates…”
Other device or application-applied faceplates can be downloaded from the Rockwell Automation
Samplecode website: http://samplecode.rockwellautomation.com
Refer to Chapter 19 of the FactoryTalk View SE Site Edition User's Guide or the online help.
Importing and Exporting Graphic Display XML Files
FactoryTalk View SE stores graphic displays in a proprietary format using a .gfx extension (e.g.,
DisplayName.gfx). However, the Graphics Import Export Wizard in FactoryTalk View SE Studio allows for
both graphic displays to be exported to an XML file, and graphic displays to be imported from an XML file.
The XML files can be edited to modify objects that already exist or to add new objects.
A display cannot be imported or exported that is currently open in the same instance of View SE Studio.
Having the display open in a second or remote instance of Studio will not cause it to fail. However if an
older version of a display is open and it is saved after the import has been done, the imported changes will
be overwritten.
For more information about importing and exporting graphic display XML files, refer to Appendix D,
Importing and exporting XML files, in the FactoryTalk View SE Site Edition User's Guide and Answer ID
40968 - Editing FactoryTalk View XML files in Excel 2003 .
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ActiveX Components
An ActiveX object is a software component that is supplied independently from View SE through products
such as Microsoft® Office XP, Visual Basic®, and many other third-party applications.
An ActiveX object gives access to its features through the object’s properties, events, and methods. By
embedding an ActiveX object in a View SE graphic display and then assigning properties or specifying
handlers for the object’s events, the object can interact with FactoryTalk View. Information is passed
between an ActiveX object and View SE using View SE tags.
For example, Microsoft Forms ActiveX objects can be embedded in View SE graphic displays. If a View SE
tag is attached to an ActiveX object’s Value property, the object’s behavior changes as the tag’s value
changes.
Be aware that ActiveX versions may vary based on the operating system and in turn may not work properly.
For example if the Server is running Windows 2003 and the Client is Windows XP the installed ActiveX
components may be different. This is only a concern if ActiveX components are embedded in View SE
graphics or a VBA form. Answer ID 29730 - How to register an ActiveX control in Win32 Windows
2000/XP computer.
Visual Basic for Applications
Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) can be used to customize and extend the capabilities of View SE.
View SE graphic displays include the ability to incorporate Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA)
scripts. Use the VBA integrated development environment (IDE) to create, test, and debug VBA procedures
that run in response to events triggered from within View SE graphic displays.
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VB third-party access to the View SE Display Client object model, which includes the Tag and
Graphic object models, is currently not supported. Access to the View SE object model is available
only within the View SE client’s VBA.
Limited support is available through Rockwell Automation Technical Support for customers needing
assistance debugging their VBA scripts. A maximum of 20 lines of code per problem can be
considered.
The version of Visual Basic for Applications that is supported by View SE for its object model has
been updated from 6.3 to 6.4 (VBA 6.4 for View SE versions 3.2 through 5.0)
Use of custom VBA code should be limited. Only use when a native feature of the product does not
meet the necessary requirements.
VBA is single threaded.
VBA is not recommended for continuous calculations. For continuous calculations the use of an
OCX or EXE is recommended only if derived tags are not suitable.
VBA is not compiled code.
Additional information:
• Answer ID 30399 - Recommendations For Writing Visual Basic for Applications in RSView SE
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If VBA is used in an application, be sure to include proper error handling. Since the VBA process is singlethreaded, if the code encounters a problem, the client may act unexpectedly and require a restart. For more
information, see Answer ID 51771 - Sample VBA: Learn Error Handling Techniques.
New faceplates for RSLogix 5000 Advanced Process Control Instructions
(New in CPR9 SR2!)
New faceplates for the Advanced Process Control (APC) instructions are now included with the product.
These instructions were introduced in the RSLogix 5000 V17 release and the faceplates correspond directly
to these instructions and provide a way to visualize what it happening within the process.
All three APC blocks rely on “Internal Models” of the process being controlled.
Internal Model Control (IMC) – Compares actual process error against error calculated by an internal first
order lag plus deadtime model.
Coordinated Control (CC) – Controls a single process variable by manipulating as many as three different
outputs.
Modular Multivariable Control (MMC) – Controls process variables to their setpoints using up to three
controller outputs.
The APC function blocks are purchased separately and licensed per use.
The RSLogix 5000 v17.00 Help file has limited information when searching for the instruction mnemonics,
so for complete details, see Answer ID 54859 - Advanced Process Control Instructions ( IMC, CC, MCC )
FactoryTalk View SE Enterprise Tools (Improved in CPR9 SR2!)
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Application Documenter is a stand-alone utility that provides detailed information on SE or ME
projects and is now installed with the product. It allows the contents of the project’s components and
the tags used in these components to be viewed in a browser. If using a software version prior to
CPR9 SR2, download the utility from Answer ID 46928 – FactoryTalk View Project Documenter.
Application Manager is software for moving, copying, renaming, backing up, and restoring
applications.
DeskLock is software that locks users in the View SE Client program and prevents them from having
access to the Windows desktop and using Windows system keys.
FactoryTalk View SE Secure Web Site Setup is software that allows for a secure web site to be
configured that IIS will use instead of its default web site, to transfer information between HMI
servers and clients in a FactoryTalk View SE network application. For information about when and
how to enable it, refer to Answer ID 39618 - FactoryTalk Internals: FactoryTalk View Site Edition
IIS Handbook.
HMI Server Backup and Restore is software that allows one to back up an HMI server’s project
components while the HMI server is running and is now installed with the product.
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FactoryTalk View SE Administration Console is software for administering FactoryTalk View SE
Site Edition applications after they have been deployed.
SE HMI Tag Alarm Log Viewer is software for viewing the contents of alarm log file sets.
FactoryTalk View SE Service Manager is a tool for starting and stopping HMI servers. For
example, use this tool to stop an HMI server before copying its set-up files to a redundant server.
Tag Import and Export Wizard is software for importing or exporting the FactoryTalk View SE
Server’s tag database.
Naming Components
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View SE supports long file names. File names, including the path can be up to 200 characters long.
For example a graphic with the name “System Overview” has 15 characters in it but has 118
characters in its full name because of the directory structure “C:\Documents and Settings\All
Users\Documents\RSView SE Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects\My Application\Gfx\System
Overview.gfx”
Names that conflict with commands and macros: To avoid problems when issuing commands and
macros, do not use command names to name macros. For example, to avoid confusion with the
Display command, name a macro that displays screens something like DisplayScreen or MyDisplay
instead of Display.
Overall Considerations
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The browse button appears beside data entry fields. Type information into the field or click the
browse button to open a list containing valid entries for the field. Using the browse button will
prevent typographical errors from requiring a debug later in the application development.
During the design phase and before the development portion of the project, talk to the operators,
maintenance personnel and other experts who are going to use the system. Find out what information
they need to optimize plant operations to allow for efficient design and implementation of the
application.
Keep update rates only as fast as necessary for the processes like Tag Read/Write, Data Logging,
Derived Tags or Events. Their update rates are important and can have a direct influence on the
performance of the HMI server and clients. The update rate is also influenced by the rate that the tag
in the target device changes.
When creating graphic screens, selecting ‘Replace’ will cause the
currently displayed screen to close while opening the newly
requested screen. If ‘Overlay’ is selected, it must be managed more
closely. It is possible for multiple screens to be open one on top of
the other using up memory and CPU resources unnecessarily. Refer
to the online Help for more information.
HMI startup components (services) have two options, ‘On Demand’ and ‘Load and run startup components
when operating system initializes’. This setting can be accessed in View Studio or the Administration
Console by right mouse clicking on the HMI Server icon and selecting properties. In general ‘On Demand’
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is selected during development so that all the services do not startup every time the HMI Server is started.
Once the system is deployed – or if redundancy is desired- it should be set to ‘Load and run startup
components when operating system initializes’.
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When using10/100Mb Network Interface Cards (NICs) and switch ports, do not leave them at auto
detect. Set them at 100Mb / Full Duplex unless communicating to older 10Mb hardware, in that case
set the speed at 10Mb and not 100Mb. Leaving network ports at ‘Auto’ and the NICs at hardware
defaults may degrade network throughput dramatically.
Ghosting may be used in order to be more efficient in setting up a large system. However, this may
cause an issue with communications due to duplicate serial numbers. Answer ID 30727 - Ghosting /
Imaging multiple computers with RSLinx Enterprise will cause serial number duplication problems
and will require registration modification
How to determine what SE projects load when O/S initializes
HMI servers in a distributed View SE project can be configured to launch in one of two ways:
• On demand, when a client attempts to make a connection to them, or
• Load and run when the operating system initializes
This selection is made in each HMI server's "Properties". Over time, as new projects are developed and
tested, it can be easy to forget which HMI servers are automatically running every time the computer starts.
Since each HMI server uses memory, CPU time and Activations, this becomes an increasing burden on the
computer.
To determine which HMI Servers are loading automatically, open the following file: C:\Documents and
Settings\All Users\Documents\RSView SE Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects\SLHMIServers.XML (default
location).
If it can't be found, that means that all of the HMI projects are configured to run On Demand. The first time
one of the projects is configured to “Start On Boot”, the XML file will be created. Another way to force the
XML to be created is to change the startup setting from "On Demand" to "Load and run startup
components..." and immediately back to "On Demand", and then click Apply/Ok. The above applies to all
FactoryTalk View SE versions 3.0 and above.
Additional information can be found in Answer ID’s:
• Answer ID 26334 - How to determine what SE projects load when O/S initializes, and how to prevent
them from loading automatically
• Answer ID 24896 - RSView SE Studio is unable to attach to an existing HMI server
• Answer ID 27207 - Renaming an RSView SE application causes its HMI Servers to lose its startup
properties
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Designing A Multi-User System
When an application is run by multiple users, behavior which is appropriate in a single-user environment
might not be appropriate. For example, if a graphic display that is running on several clients contains a
shutdown macro that stops a derived tags file. When the display is closed on one client, the shutdown macro
will stop the derived tags file. This would affect the display on the other clients, because the derived tags file
resides at the server. This would be true of all server side components like Alarming, Data Logging and
Derived Tags.
Languages
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Do not install a local language version of View SE (for example, German, French or Japanese) on an English
Operating System (Windows 2000, XP Pro, Server 2003 Standard Edition, or Server 2008 Standard) or errors
may occur. Use the same localized version of the desired operating system for best results.
FactoryTalk View SE has been tested on English versions of Windows with English (US) settings. Should
other configurations encounter issues, please report them to Technical Support.
Miscellaneous Procedures
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Before any Tags are deleted from the online ControlLogix Tag Database, they must first be removed
from View SE Application. This includes all reference used in Tag Database, Display Animation,
VB code, Event File, Derived Tag File, and Data Log Model. This will remove tags from the scan
list and prevent communication errors that can disrupt the performance of the application.
Frequently users want to monitor the utilization and performance of the various components of a
View SE system and be automatically alerted if a process begins to consume too many system
resources. For information on how to accomplish this refer to technote Answer ID 31196 Monitoring FactoryTalk View SE memory and CPU usage using Performance Monitor
RSView32 to View SE Conversions
Based on RSView32 v7.0 and FactoryTalk View SE v3.10
The following objects won't convert from RSView32 to View SE:
• VBA
• Native trends
• Tag monitors
• Command lines embedded in graphics
• External applications that depend on RSView32 to be an OPC or DDE Live Data Server
• Alarm Summaries
Certain ActiveX controls may not function as they did in RSView32. These will need to be evaluated on a
case by case basis.
To migrate an RSView32 project to a View SE distributed application, do not use the ‘Attach’ option.
Instead, create a new HMI server by importing the project. To do this, select 'Import a project' in the Select
Operation window of the Add HMI Server Wizard. Then in the Import Project window, select RSView32 as
the project type and specify the path to the RSView32 project file.
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For a complete list of commands that can not be executed in View SE refer to Technotes:
• Answer ID 27708 - RSView32 to RSView SE upgrade issues
• RSView32 to RSView SE Migration Considerations (via RSI Extranet)
• Answer ID 51770 - Sample VBA: Exercise in migrating a View32 application with VBA to ViewSE
ControlLogix Redundancy (v13 and above)
Automatic IP Address Swapping
During a switchover, 1756-ENBT and 1756-EWEB modules now swap their IP addresses with their partner
modules in the other redundant chassis. This allows the Live Data Server to use the same IP address to
communicate with a primary module regardless of which CLx chassis is the primary.
• Typically, the ControlLogix Redundancy Alias Topic Switcher software is no longer needed to
manage the IP addresses. If the application still requires alias topics to manage IP addresses, refer to
ControlLogix Redundancy System User’s Guide, publication 1756-UM523.
• In a ControlLogix redundant configuration, when the controller fails over to the secondary chassis the
IP address of the ENBT is swapped with the module in the primary chassis. RSLinx Enterprise can
take > 32 seconds to recognize this change. Refer to Answer ID 31520 - Understanding HMI Switch
Overtimes when using Ethernet/IP Swapping and ControlLogix Redundancy for details.
• If bumpless communication between Live Data Servers and CLx controllers is required, use a
separate ControlNet network that is dedicated to communication with those devices.
In a redundant system, use an Ethernet/IP network only for HMI/workstation communication and messaging.
Do not use an Ethernet/IP network for:
• communication with I/O modules
• communication between devices via produced/consumed tags
Tricks and Tweaks
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Answer ID 22007 - How to trigger a command on an SE client from an HMI server
Answer ID 29298 - How to play an SE client wave file triggered off of an alarmed tag
Answer ID 31307 - How to AppStart the Windows "User Account" Manager from
RSView32/RSViewSE
Answer ID 33075 - How to print a text file using VBA and Notepad
Answer ID 50813 - Sample VBA: Position a popup or faceplate in SE relative to the clicked mouse
position.
Automatic logout of FactoryTalk. Answer ID 32566 – Studio seems unresponsive and generates: The
requested Access Check failed because the token has expired
Answer ID 41060 – How to move the FactoryTalk Diagnostics Log to Another Location
Answer ID 41498 - Tips for viewing the FactoryTalk Diagnostics logs of several computers
simultaneously
Answer ID 36594 - How to disable Alt-F4 and Ctl-F4 in an RSView SE client.
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Tools and Utilities
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Answer ID 30393 - Patch File Validator Utility
Answer ID 31196 - Monitoring RSView SE memory and CPU usage using Performance Monitor
Answer ID 30148 - Using RSLinx Enterprise Diagnostic Counters - Predefined items
Answer ID 30498 - Windows Firewall Configuration Utility for Windows XP Service Pack 2
Answer ID 29942 - RSView SE Graphic Tags Search and Replace using Graphics XML Exported
Files
Answer ID 20697 - Troubleshooting a Windows Network
Answer ID 31073 - Tool for collecting Event log files
Additional Reference Links
FactoryTalk View Site Edition (Network)
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FactoryTalk View SE Installation Guide
FactoryTalk View SE Site Edition User's Guide
Answer ID 39431 - Common Recommended Settings and Considerations for a FactoryTalk View SE
Distributed (RSView SE) and RSView32 Active Display Systems
Answer ID 60716 - FactoryTalk View 5.10.00 (CPR9 SR2) Patch TOC (Now for SE and ME!)
Answer ID 44190 - Upgrading from RSView SE 4.00 and earlier, to FactoryTalk View SE 5.00
(CPR9)
Answer ID 20450 - FTView SE Operating System and Service Pack compatibility
Answer ID 40891 - FactoryTalk View SE 5.0 (CPR9) Server Redundancy Guidelines
Answer ID 23120 - Applying RSView SE in a 21 CFR Part 11 environment
Answer ID 34321 - Using RSView SE Distributed with multiple monitors
FactoryTalk View Machine Edition
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FactoryTalk View Machine Edition Install Guide
FactoryTalk View Machine Edition User’s Guide Volume 1
FactoryTalk View Machine Edition User’s Guide Volume 2
Answer ID 60716 - FactoryTalk View 5.10.00 (CPR9 SR2) Patch TOC (Now for SE and ME!)
Answer ID 32590 - ME to SE Conversion revision 4.0
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General
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Answer ID 35330 - Rockwell Software Products and Antivirus Software
Answer ID 42682 - Software Platform\Hardware Compatibility Matrix
Answer ID 20440 - Compatibility Matrix of RSI/AB software on Windows XP Pro
Answer ID 28293 - Compatibility Matrix of RSI/AB software on Windows XP Pro Service Pack 2
Answer ID 27743 - RSI Products and Intel Hyper-Threading Technology
Communications
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Answer ID 22199 - RSLinx Classic Service Pack/Hotfix TOC
Answer ID 54605 - FactoryTalk Services Platform 2.10.02 (CPR9 SR2)/RSLinx Enterprise 5.20.00
(CPR9 SR2) Patch TOC
Answer ID 26464 - RSLinx Internals: OPC/DCOM timeouts when a remote client is disconnected
ControlLogix
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Answer ID 45926 - Logix 5000 Tag Import Utility for RSView32, RSView ME / SE and RSSQL
Answer ID 6408 - Logix Data Collection Application Guide
o general performance and application design information on the packet optimization features added to RSLinx
ControlLogix Enhanced Redundancy System User Manual
http://literature.rockwellautomation.com/idc/groups/literature/documents/um/1756-um535_-en-p.pdf
ControlLogix Data Collection with RSLinx
http://www.software.rockwell.com/download/comms/rslinx/clx_perf.zip
Logix 5000 Controllers Design Considerations
http://literature.rockwellautomation.com/idc/groups/literature/documents/rm/1756-rm094_-en-p.pdf
ControlLogix Redundancy System Revision 13
http://literature.rockwellautomation.com/idc/groups/literature/documents/rn/1756-rn608_-en-e.pdf
ControlLogix Enhanced Redundancy System Revision 16.80
http://literature.rockwellautomation.com/idc/groups/literature/documents/rn/1756-rn650_-en-e.pdf
Microsoft
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Microsoft TechNet article: Domain Controllers
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windows2000serv/maintain/security/secdefs.mspx
Article ID: 146219 - How To Register an ActiveX Control (.ocx) Manually
Microsoft TechNet article: Maximize Data Throughput Setting for Performance
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb878076.aspx
Article ID: 259025 - Microsoft’s Description of Performance Options in Windows
Log Parser 2.2 Download
FactoryTalk View Site Edition v5.10 (CPR9 SR2) Distributed System Design Considerations Rev. 1.1b
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