Series 600 SmartImage Sensor Installation Guide

Series 600 SmartImage Sensor Installation Guide
Series 600 SmartImage Sensor Installation Guide
October 1999
© Copyright 1998-9
DVT Corporation
All rights reserved.
1
7DEOHRI&RQWHQWV
1
INTRODUCTION TO THE SERIES 600
1
2
SERIES 600 SPECIFICATIONS
1
2.1
Series 600 Components
1
2.2
Additional Components
2
2.3
Series 600 System Specifications
3
2.4
Dimensions
4
2.5
Model Numbers
5
2.6
Power & Digital I/O (15-pin Connector)
2.6.1
Wiring
2.6.2
Configuration
6
6
6
2.7
Ethernet Communications (RJ-45 Jack)
2.7.1
WIRING
2.7.2
Configuration
7
7
8
2.8
RS-422 Communications (RJ-11 Jack)
2.8.1
WIRING
15
15
3
16
3.1
HARDWARE INTEGRATION
Typical Inspection Sequence
16
3.2
Configuring Digital Inputs
3.2.1
Input Function
3.2.2
Invert Polarity
3.2.3
Debounce Times
17
17
17
17
3.3
Switching Products for Inspection
3.3.1
What is a Product?
3.3.2
Product ID & Digital Selection
3.3.3
Confirmation of Product Selection
17
17
18
19
3.4
19
Starting Inspections on Power-Up
3.5
Inspection Trigger Source
3.5.1
Delaying Image Acquisition After a Trigger Signal is Sent
20
20
3.6
Image Exposure Time
21
3.7
Configuring Digital Outputs
3.7.1
Output Function
3.7.2
Invert Polarity
22
22
22
3.7.3
3.8
4
Timing
Typical I/O Configuration
TROUBLESHOOTING/FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
22
24
25
4.1
Series 600 System LEDs
25
4.2
Verifying Electrical Connections
25
4.3
Checking Timing Signals Using the Digital I/O Graph
4.3.1
Configuring the Digital I/O Graph
4.3.2
Using the Digital I/O Graph for Typical Testing Procedures
26
26
28
4.4
29
Communications Troubleshooting
APPENDIX A SERIES 600 STROBE LIGHT
30
APPENDIX B SERIES 600 RING LIGHT
31
APPENDIX C SERIES 600 MOUNTING BRACKET
32
APPENDIX D SERIES 600 STROBE LIGHT BRACKET
33
APPENDIX E SERIES 600 I/O BREAKOUT BOARD
34
APPENDIX F ADVANCED ETHERNET & TCP/IP
35
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The Series 600 SmartImage Sensor is an on-line inspection device used for a variety of industrial applications.
The Series 600 utilizes DVT’s FrameWork software user interface. The FrameWork software is used to configure
inspection applications with the aid of a PC. Once all of the inspection applications have been defined the Series
600 will run as a stand-alone system and the PC may be removed.
Figure 1.1 The Series 600 SmartImage Sensor
This guide covers hardware installation, hardware integration and includes sections on Troubleshooting and
Frequently Asked Questions.
•
Installation: If you are physically installing and wiring the Series 600 SmartImage Sensor see Chapter Error!
Reference source not found.. The hardware installation section covers system specifications, mounting, pinouts and wiring information.
•
Integration: If you are integrating the Series 600 into a manufacturing line see Hardware Integration, Chapter
3. The hardware integration section covers issues related to integrating the Series 600 into the manufacturing
line.
•
Troubleshooting: If you have any problems integrating the Series 600, see Troubleshooting / Frequently
Asked Questions, Chapter 4. The Troubleshooting section covers communications, imaging and conditions that
make Products fail when they should not be failing.
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6HULHV&RPSRQHQWV
The components that come with the Series 600 vary depending on which model you receive. The
model number indicates the
configuration for a specific system. The following components come with a typically configured
Series 600 SmartImage Sensor
package:
•
Series 600 SmartImage Sensor Unit
•
DVT Series 600 Installation
Guide
•
Dedicated illumination source (the default is an LED
•
DVT FrameWork User Guide
strobe light)
•
Lens adapter (CS mount to C mount converter)
•
FrameWork on CD-ROM
•
CS Mount, 8mm lens (default selection)
1
Depending on your ordering options, the Series 600 may come equipped differently. The lens and illumination
source might be different than those listed above.
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To use the Series 600 system, a few additional components are required. The following additional
equipment is also necessary:
System
•
•
•
Power Supply: Regulated 15-28V DC, 5 W. Supplying 210mA @ 24Volts.
Dedicated illumination: Standard LED strobe light or optional light source. (Additional
power is required for LED strobe illumination, description covered in a separate document.)
Inspection trigger source: photoelectric sensor, proximity switch, programmable logic
controller (PLC) etc.
Cables
•
•
•
•
15-pin high density D-Sub: Carries the Digital I/O and power lines. A fully populated,
double shielded cable should be used. See Section 2.6 for more information on this
connector wiring.
RJ-45 Ethernet cable: Carries the Ethernet communications. A Category 5, 4 twisted pair,
shielded (STP), EIA-568 cable should be used. Use straight through-type if connecting the
Series 600 to a hub, then a PC. Use a crossover cable or connector if connecting the Series
600 directly to a PC. (See Section 2.7)
RJ-11 cable: Carries the RS-422 communications. A Category 5, 2 twisted pair, shielded,
USOC cable should be used.(optional, See Section 2.8)
Strobe Illumination Cable: Connects an optional strobe light to the Series 600 system.
Available from DVT in various lengths.
PC Requirements
•
•
•
Pentium PC: With FrameWork software installed, running Windows 95, Windows NT 3.5 or
more recent release.
FrameWork Software: PC must have the FrameWork software installed (requires 20 MB
free disk space and 16 MB RAM).
Ethernet Card: Use a 10/100 megabit Ethernet card with RJ-45 jack.
2
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Size: 114mm x 55mm x 40mm (not including lens) + add’l 50mm cable clearance
Mechanical
Mounting: Four M4 threaded holes (on bottom of unit), 7.9mm depth
Weight: 170g / 6 oz. (without lens)
24 Volts DC, 210 mA at 24 Volts (or minimum 5W supply), Regulated and Isolated (sold separately)
Power Requirements
Operating Temperatures
Additional 30W required per DVT LED array light used
Maximum 50° C / 122° F
4.8mm x 3.6mm (1/3” format) CCD
Image Sensor
Electronic Shuttering (10µs – 1s exposure times)
640 x 480 pixel resolution
7.4 µm x 7.4 µm, square pixels
CS mount standard
Optics
External Ports
C mount-capable with included adapter
15 pin high density D-Sub
RJ-45
RJ-11
Power and Digital I/O
Ethernet communications
RS-422 serial communications
24 Volts DC optically isolated
12 configurable inputs & outputs
Digital I/O
NPN (current sinking) inputs, PNP (current sourcing) outputs, active high signals
Input can sink up to 1.5mA and outputs source a maximum of 200mA
Connect with a fully populated, double shielded, 15-pin high density D-Sub Cable (sold separately)
Ethernet communications
Port A (RJ-45)
10/100 megabit Ethernet
TCP/IP protocol
Connect with a Category 5, shielded twisted pair (STP), EIA568 cable (sold separately)
RS-422 serial communications
Port B (RJ-11)
Up to 115.2k baud rate
Connect with a Category 5, 2 shielded twisted pair (STP), USOC cable (sold separately)
Certifications
CE Approval pending
Inspection Speed
6 to 6000 inspections per minute
Image Acquisition
200µs - 28 ms (partial to full image acquisition)
Product Storage
Up to 300 (depending on file size)
3
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54.92
43.80
111.00
8.00
28.42
40.00
32.00
CS-Mount (Ø1.00" x 32 TPI)
4X, M3 x 0.5 THD
3.8mm deep
54.92
34.62
8.00
6.51 Typ
10.00, Typ
54.92
4X, M4 x 0.7 THD
7.8mm deep
40.00
111.00
83.00
Note: all dimensions in mm.
41.90
4
50
cable
clearance
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The Series 600 model number is located on the back of the Series 600 unit.
630 – C 3 E 4 0
Model Number
630: Resolution: 640 x 480
Optics
C = CS/C lens mount
Number of Connectors
3 = 3 connectors on Series 600 unit
Communications Port A
E = Ethernet
Communications Port B
4 = RS-422
5
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On the Series 600, the 15-pin high density D-Sub connector carries the system’s power connections
and digital input/output lines. Inputs and outputs on the Series 600 share twelve lines. Each I/O line
is user-selectable as an input or output. Inputs for the Series 600 are current sinking (NPN-type) and
outputs are current sourcing (PNP-type). When viewing the Series 600 system from the rear, the 15pin connector is below the other two connectors (RJ-45 & RJ-11). The cable used for this port is a
double shielded, 15-pin (fully populated), high density D-Sub cable. DVT supplies this cable in
various lengths.
The cable can also be purchased off the shelf at many computer stores. Look for a VGA monitor
extension cable. Extension cables are typically not fully populated (pin 9 is usually missing) or
shielded. A standard VGA computer monitor cable (used to connect a monitor to a PC) cannot be
used because multiple pins are missing, including the one carrying power (VP+, pin 15).
2.6.1 WIRING
To use the 15-pin D-Sub (high density) connector please refer to the following diagram:
High density, 15-pin Connector
1
6
2
3
4
5
5
1
10
6
15
11
Male connector (Series 600)
Female connector (Cable)
Pins 1-12: Inputs & Outputs
Pins 13: Ground
Pin 14 &15: + 24V
Figure 2 Power and Digital I/O connections are found on the 15-pin connector.
Inputs for the Series 600 are current sinking (NPN-type) and outputs are current sourcing (PNPtype). Both inputs and outputs are active in the high state. That is, switching any I/O line to 24 V is
read as an active signal. The following table summarizes this information about inputs and outputs:
Signal Type
Inactive State Voltage Active State Voltage
Current Limits
Current sinking
0.3 V
14 V min. to activate
1.5 mA to activate
Inputs
PNP
0.3 V
22 V
100 mA maximum
Outputs
When connecting DVT digital inputs and outputs to industrial devices, use current sinking input modules and PNP
output modules.
2.6.2 CONFIGURATION
Within FrameWork, the user may select from many functions for each input/output line. To configure
I/O lines in FrameWork, select the I/O menu and click on the I/O Parameters selection. Please
refer to Section 3.7 for more information on how to configure the Series 600 input and output lines.
• Inputs: Some I/O lines will be designated as inputs. One example of the use of an input line
is the trigger signal. Typically, integration will use a digital triggering signal for inspections.
6
•
Outputs: The I/O lines not already designated as inputs can be used as outputs. The fail
signal is an example of a commonly used output. This signal flags flawed parts and could be
used to activate a rejection mechanism.
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The RJ-45 jack for Ethernet communications is found on the back of the Series 600 system, just
above the 15-pin connector and to the right of the RJ-11 jack.
2.7.1 WIRING
To make use of the RJ-45 jack for Ethernet communications, use a 10 Base T Category 5 network
cable. DVT recommends using a shielded (STP) cable to guard against electrical noise. The cable
should be wired according to the EIA 568 standard. The cable can be either straight through or
crossover. If connecting through a hub, a straight-through cable is used. If connecting directly to a
PC’s Ethernet card, use a crossover cable. Cables purchased through DVT are straight through and
when purchased with a crossover converter (part #CON-RJ45N), can be used in exactly the same
manner as a crossover cable.
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Function
TX+
TXRX+
NC
NC
RXNC
NC
Note: DVT recommends using
Category 5 shielded cables with
molded connectors for the best
performance.
RJ-45 Jack
Figure 3 RJ-45 Wiring.
7
2.7.2 CONFIGURATION
The RJ-45 connection is designed to communicate between the Series 600 and a PC running
FrameWork. To do this, the PC must have an Ethernet network card running the TCP/IP protocol.
TCP/IP Setup
In this section, we will step through setting up the TCP/IP protocol on a PC. TCP/IP stands for
Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol and is based on identifying elements on a network
by unique numbers, called IP numbers.
In our use, we will be identifying our PC with one IP number and any Series 600 systems with
another. There are several methods of connecting PCs and Series 600 systems. In the following
sections, after configuring TCP/IP on our PC, we will move on to these various methods.
For setup on a PC running Windows 95 (NT and Win98 systems may appear differently):
1. Click on the Start menu in Windows, select Settings, then Control Panel.
2. Double click on the Network Control Panel icon (shown above right).
3. Check the list of installed network components for TCP/IP(as shown at right). If TCP/IP is on
the list, click Cancel and skip to the end of this list.
4. If TCP/IP is not on the list, click the Add button.
5. Click on Protocol, then Add… (as shown below).
8
6. Under Manufacturer, click Microsoft and under Protocol, click TCP/IP then click Ok (see
below).
7.
Windows will then install the protocol and return you to the Network control panel. During
this installation process, the PC may ask for the Windows 95 CD-ROM and will copy relevant
files to the PC’s hard drive. After this is done, the PC must be restarted.
9
Connecting One PC to One Series 600
To communicate with the Series 600 system directly, you will need an Ethernet crossover cable (or a straight
through cable with a crossover converter on one end) with RJ-45 plugs on each end. The diagram below shows an
example of this connection. This section enables users to directly connect one PC and one Series 600 system. In this
scenario, no other networks are involved (the PC is not otherwise networked). Typically, computers on a network
will obtain IP numbers from a server. However, when connecting a PC and Series 600 directly, no network is
involved. So, in Step 5, the user will name an IP number to identify the PC being used. All Series 600 systems arrive
pre-programmed with an IP number. That number is 192.168.0.242. The connecting PC must use an IP number
different than the Series 600 system.
The diagram below shows a typical installation using a single PC and one Series 600 unit. IP addresses given in the
diagram are for demonstration purposes (the user has flexibility in assigning IP addresses to both the PC and Series
600 unit).
Ethernet cable, crossover connection
Laptop
computer
Ready
SmartImage Sensor
Typical IP: 192.168.0.240
Trigger
Pass
Fail
CUbYUc&
=_TU\&#
Typical IP: 192.168.0.242
Figure 4 Connecting 1 PC and 1 Series 600 system.
To connect:
1. Make a crossover RJ-45 connection between the PC and Series 600. Plug the cable into the
RJ-45 jack on the rear of the Series 600 and the Ethernet card in your PC.
2. Click on the Start menu, choose Settings, then Control Panel.
3. Double-click on the Network Control Panel icon.
4. Select the TCP/IP protocol and click on the Properties button.
5. Click on the radio button for “Specify an IP address:” and type an IP address of
192.168.0.240 to identify your PC. Also, type a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
6. Click Ok to close the TCP/IP Properties dialog box.
7. Click Ok to close the Network Control Panel.
8. Start FrameWork.
9. In the PC Communications dialog box, expand the “Ethernet” tree, select “Default Series
600” and click the Connect button.
Note: IP numbers for the Series 600 system and PC should start out exactly the same (i.e.
192.168.0.xxx). Only the last numbers should be different.
For more information about IP addressing, please see Appendix C, beginning on page 33.
10
Connecting One PC to Multiple Series 600s
In this scenario, a lone PC (not otherwise networked) is communicating with multiple Series 600
units. In addition to a PC and the Series 600 units, the user will need to supply a hub and Ethernet
cables. All cables used for this scenario are the straight-through type, because the hub will handle
the crossover function. The diagram below shows a typical layout of the PC and Series 600 network.
All IP addresses given are typical of an installation.
Ready
Hub
SmartImage Sensor
Trigger
Pass
Fail
CUbYUc&
=_TU\&#
IP: 192.168.0.242
Ready
SmartImage Sensor
Typical IP: 192.168.0.240
Trigger
Pass
Fail
CUbYUc&
=_TU\&#
IP: 192.168.0.243
Ready
SmartImage Sensor
Trigger
Pass
Fail
CUbYUc&
=_TU\&#
IP: 192.168.0.244
Figure 5 Connecting 1 PC to a network of Series 600 systems.
If a network of Series 600 systems is to be connected to a single PC (non-networked), follow these
steps:
Re-designating the IP address of a PC:
1. Connect one end of a straight through Ethernet (RJ-45) cable to the RJ-45 jack on the rear
of one Series 600 system and the other end to a 10 or 100 megabit hub. Repeat for all Series
600 systems to be networked.
2. Connect a PC with an Ethernet card to the hub.
3. Click on the Start menu, choose Settings, then Control Panel.
4. Double-click on the Network Control Panel.
5. Select the TCP/IP protocol and click on the Properties button.
6. Click on the radio button for “Specify an IP address:” and type the IP address 192.168.0.240
to identify your PC. Also, type the subnet mask 255.255.255.0.
7. Click Ok to close the TCP/IP Properties dialog box.
8. Click Ok to close the Network Control Panel.
9. Restart the PC.
At this point, your PC should have the IP address of 192.168.0.240. Now, we need to assign unique
IP addresses to the Series 600 systems.
11
Re-designating the IP address of a Series 600:
1. Temporarily connect an RJ-11 cable to Port A of the Series 600 system and use the RS-422
/ RS-232 converter (DVT part CON-4T2) to connect to a serial port on the PC.
2. Start FrameWork.
3. Select “Serial” and the appropriate COM port (usually “COM 1”) from the PC
Communications dialog box and click Connect.
4. After communications are started with the Series 600, select the Comm menu and click
Image Sensor Communications (below).
5.
Click on “Ethernet – Port A” and click the Edit button and Ethernet Properties will appear
(below).
6. Type a new IP address next to “Image Sensor Address”. This address is for the Series 600
unit to which you are currently connected. This value should begin the same as the IP
address for your PC (the first three sections should be identical, i.e. 192.168.0).
7. Type the “Sensor Address Mask” of 255.255.255.0.
8. Click Ok twice.
9. Click on the Comm menu and choose PC Communications. Click the Disconnect button.
10. Power-down the Series 600 unit. The next time the system powers up, the new IP address will
be used. Label the system with its unique IP address.
Repeat these steps for each Series 600 system you have. When complete, the PC and all Series 600
systems will have unique IP addresses. Connect all of the systems to a hub (or multiple hubs) and
the hub to your PC. You now have a “DVT network.”
Notes: These instructions suggest connecting serially to the Series 600 in order to change the IP
address of the SmartImage Sensor.
This is recommended to avoid IP addressing conflicts between the PC and Series 600. An Ethernet
connection could be made and the same should be followed to change a Series 600’s IP address.
Remember, though, to communicate over Ethernet set your PC to have an IP address of
192.168.0.240 (The Series 600’s factory assigned IP address is 192.168.0.242).
Power must be cycled to the Series 600 before the new IP address will take effect.
For more information about IP addressing, please see Appendix C, beginning on page 33.
12
Connecting a Networked PC to One or more Series 600s
The first two scenarios describe a lone PC connecting to one or more Series 600 systems. If a plantwide Ethernet network is in place (using TCP/IP), then any Series 600 systems attached to that
network via a hub can be addressed. In addition to the Series 600 units and at least one PC, users
will need to supply a hub and Ethernet cabling.
In the following diagram, an example is shown of connecting several Series 600 units into an existing
network. Here, the existing network is using 192.168.0.xxx type IP numbers. For other networks,
change the IP address of the Series 600 to match the IP addressing scheme (consult with the
Network Administrator for valid IP addresses).
Ready
SmartImage Sensor
Trigger
Pass
Fail
CUbYUc&
=_TU\&#
IP: 192.168.0.242
Hub
IP: 192.168.0.1
Ready
SmartImage Sensor
Trigger
Pass
Fail
CUbYUc&
=_TU\&#
IP: 192.168.0.243
Ready
SmartImage Sensor
Trigger
Pass
Fail
IP: 192.168.0.2
CUbYUc&
=_TU\&#
IP: 192.168.0.244
Figure 6 Connecting networked PC9s) to Series 600(s).
Instructions:
1. Contact your network administrator regarding IP addresses for the Series 600 units, then redesignate the IP number for the Series 600 systems (see steps 1-10 on page 12). All Series
600 systems leave the factory pre-programmed with the IP number 192.168.0.242. In order
for the PC to address each Series 600 individually, they will require unique IP addresses that
are valid on your company’s network.
2. Use a straight through Ethernet cable to connect the Series 600 to a hub on the network.
3. Start FrameWork.
4. In the PC Communications dialog box select “Ethernet”
5. Click on the Add button.
6. Next to “Image Sensor Name” type any name to help identify the Series 600 unit. The name
is not actually used by FrameWork, but is provided to help tell systems apart (see below).
13
7. Next to “Image Sensor Address”, type the IP address assigned to that system (see above).
8. Click the Ok button.
9. Select the Image Sensor from the list under Ethernet and click the Connect button (see
below).
Notes: Whenever connecting a node to an existing network, please exercise extreme caution.
Connecting a Series 600 system onto a network without the Network Administrator’s knowledge is
not recommended.
A general rule of thumb about IP addresses is that with the PC and Series 600 address masks set to
255.255.255.0, both PC and 600 IP addresses should start with the same three numbers.
Series 600 systems ship from the factory with the IP address 192.168.0.242. To attach the Series
600 to an existing network, you will need to change that IP to match the IP addressing used in your
company’s network.
For more information about IP addressing, please see Appendix C, beginning on page 33.
14
56&RPPXQLFDWLRQV5--DFN
Serial communications over an RS-422 protocol are accomplished via the RJ-11 jack on the Series
600. With an RS-422 to RS-232 converter (DVT Part CON-4T2), the RS-422 protocol can be
converted to RS-232 on a 9-pin D-Sub connector.
2.8.1 WIRING
To use the RJ-11 jack for RS-422 communications, use a 2 twisted pair, Category 5 cable. DVT
recommends using a shielded (STP) cable to guard against electrical noise. The cable should be
wired according to the USOC standard.
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
1 2 3 4 5 6
Function
+5 V
TX+
RXRX+
TXGND*
* connection to
ground is optional
Note: DVT recommends using
Category 5 shielded cables with
molded connectors for the best
performance.
RJ-11 Jack
Figure 7 RJ-11 Jack.
15
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The Hardware Integration section includes information on using the FrameWork software to configure your Series
600 system. This section mainly deals with setting up digital I/O.
FrameWork is the software that is used to configure the Series 600 SmartImage Sensor for inspections. Once
installed, FrameWork actually exists in two places: the software resides on a PC, and the firmware resides in the
Series 600. Inspections are set up using both the PC and the SmartImage Sensor. Once the inspection process has
been set up, the FrameWork firmware will control the DVT SmartImage Sensor independently of the PC. A PC can
be used to monitor inspection results if desired, but the SmartImage Sensor is designed to operate without the need
for a PC. For detailed information on FrameWork, see the DVT FrameWork User Guide.
The FrameWork software provides many tools designed to aid in the integration process. Let’s look at a typical
inspection sequence, and then discuss software integration issues related to the inspection process.
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For each part to be inspected, the SmartImage Sensor must take an image, process that image for inspection, and set
outputs. The following diagram shows the interaction with I/O lines to take an inspection of a part. In Figure 3.1, a
Product with an ID of 5 is selected and inspected. The Product passes inspection.
Product ID
Bit 0 Input
1st bit of a binary
ID (Bin 1)
Product ID
Bit 1 Input
2nd bit of a binary
ID (Bin 2)
Product ID
Bit 2 Input
3rd bit of a binary
ID (Bin 4)
Product ID
Bit 3 Input
4th bit of a binary
ID (Bin 8)
Product
Select Input
When toggled,
sensor reads ID bits
Trigger Input
Typically, a photoeye
or prox switch
Busy Output
Active while acquiring
an image or processing
Inspection
Pass Output
Indicates all SoftSensors
passed inspection
Inspection
Fail Output
Active if any SoftSensors
failed inspection
User Definable
Outputs
Signal is defined by user
based on pass/fail results
of SoftSensors
Product Select
Pass Output
Indicates Product with matching
ID found in memory
Time (ms)
Figure 3.1 Typical inspection timing diagram.
16
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Inputs on the Series 600 are configured from FrameWork’s I/O menu, I/O Parameters selection, Inputs tab. On the
Series 600 system, 12 multipurpose I/O lines may be configured as inputs or outputs.
3.2.1 INPUT FUNCTION
Inputs on the Series 600 can serve one of three functions. The following table summarizes these functions:
Input Functions
Purpose
Product ID Bits
Binary equivalent of an assigned Product ID for a Product.
Product Select
Toggled when Product ID bits are active to select a Product.
Inspection Trigger
Toggled to start acquisition of an image for inspection.
For each input line, a function may be assigned from the drop down list of functions.
3.2.2 INVERT POLARITY
Input signals on the Series 600 are active high (switching to 24V). Check “Invert Polarity” for any input, and that
input will read active when at 0V.
3.2.3 DEBOUNCE TIMES
The debounce time parameter allows the Series 600 to stop accepting signals for a specified period of time after a
signal is received. This is essential where the signal is noisy, for instance if a mechanical device is involved that
produces extraneous electric noise. Noisy signals are often a problem with the use of mechanical relays. Debounce
time can be configured for three types of signals: trigger signals, select signals, and input signals.
FrameWork’s solution for noisy trigger signals is found in the Inputs tab of the I/O Parameters dialog box. Click I/O
| I/O Parameters and choose the Inputs tab.
Debounce time is set for a signal at the beginning of the signal (active edge) and at the end of the signal (inactive
edge). All signal edges after the first edge will be ignored for the amount of the debounce time.
That is, if a 10 ms debounce time is set for the active edge, the Series 600 will not accept another signal for 10
milliseconds after the signal is first received.
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3.3.1 WHAT IS A PRODUCT?
The Product is FrameWork’s term for all of the criteria defined by a user to inspect a single type of part. Depending
on the requirements of an installation, users will need to switch Products quickly, without the interaction of a PC
running FrameWork. The Series 600 allows you to digitally select up to 256 different Products.
Figure 3.2 shows an example of a family of widgets manufactured by one facility. For each widget, a different set of
inspection parameters must be applied. In this case, the user would need to create 4 different Product files. Four
inputs are necessary in order to switch between these four Products: 1) Trigger, 2) Product Select, 3) Product ID Bit
0, and 4) Product ID Bit 1. For more information on configuring input lines, please refer to Section 3.2.
17
Model A
Widget
Model D
Widget
Model B Widget
Model C Widget
Figure 3.2 A family of parts requires separate Products within FrameWork in order to inspect for different
types of flaws.
3.3.2 PRODUCT ID & DIGITAL SELECTION
Products are identified by the SmartImage Sensor using an identification (ID) numbering scheme. In turn, these ID
numbers can be signaled using the Series 600 digital inputs. When using digital inputs, the ID number must be
transformed into a binary number. Each input bit is actually a binary value (bit 0 is the least significant).
Series 600 systems can digitally identify a large number of Products. This is because all 12 I/O lines are selectable
as inputs or outputs. In order to configure the I/O lines, click on the I/O menu and choose the I/O Parameters
option. Mapping I/O line functions is a system-wide parameter, meaning that all Products on the system will share
this setting. Because configuring lines as inputs means limiting the number of outputs, before committing to a
certain number of input lines, give some thought as to which outputs are needed. Refer to Section 3.7 for further
information on configuring the digital outputs.
♦
4 Product ID Bits = 24 Products = 16 Product IDs
♦
6 Product ID Bits = 26 Products = 64 Product IDs
♦
5 Product ID Bits = 25 Products = 32 Product IDs
♦
7 Product ID Bits = 27 Products = 128 Product IDs
♦
8 Product ID Bits = 28 Products = 256 Product IDs
A common configuration for I/O setup involves designating 4 lines as Product ID bits (bits 0 through 3). The
following table reviews the binary combinations for 16 Product ID numbers (binary 0-15) using these 4 input bits:
Product
ID
Binary Pattern
(Bit 3, Bit 2, Bit 1, Bit 0)
Product
ID
Binary Pattern
(Bit 3, Bit 2, Bit 1, Bit 0)
Product
ID
Binary Pattern
(Bit 3, Bit 2, Bit 1, Bit 0)
0
0,0,0,0
6
0,1,1,0
11
1,0,1,1
1
0,0,0,1
7
0,1,1,1
12
1,1,0,0
2
0,0,1,0
8
1,0,0,0
13
1,1,0,1
3
0,0,1,1
9
1,0,0,1
14
1,1,1,0
4
0,1,0,0
10
1,0,1,0
15
1,1,1,1
5
0,1,0,1
The user may assign Product ID numbers in FrameWork from the Products menu, Product Management selection.
Please refer to the FrameWork User Guide for more information on assigning Product ID’s.
Digitally selecting a Product is a two step process. First, set the binary bit pattern of a Product’s ID number on the
“Product ID Input” lines. Next, toggle the Product Select input line. The following diagram shows the relative
timing of this procedure for a Product with an ID number of 5.
18
Product ID
Bit 0 Input
1st bit of a binary
ID (Bin 1)
Product ID
Bit 1 Input
2nd bit of a binary
ID (Bin 2)
Product ID
Bit 2 Input
3rd bit of a binary
ID (Bin 4)
Product ID
Bit 3 Input
4th bit of a binary
ID (Bin 8)
Product
Select Input
When toggled,
sensor reads ID bits
Time (ms)
Figure 3.3 Select a Product using the digital inputs.
3.3.3 CONFIRMATION OF PRODUCT SELECTION
Two outputs are dedicated to alerting the user to the success or failure of the digital selection process.
Product Select Pass: The Series 600 provides a Product Select Pass signal to verify that the Product Select signal is
being received correctly. While the Product Select signal is held active, the Product Select Pass line will also be
active if the Series 600 is receiving a valid Product ID signal. A Product ID must be assigned to the Product being
selected and the Product Select signal must be received in order for the Product Select Pass signal to go active.
Product Select Fail: The Series 600 provides a Product Select Fail signal to warn that the Product Select signal is
being received incorrectly. While the Product Select signal is held active, the Product Select Fail line will also be
active if the Series 600 is receiving an invalid Product Select signal. If no Product ID exists for the Product ID
number selected or the Product Select signal is not received the Product Select Fail signal will go active.
6WDUWLQJ,QVSHFWLRQVRQ3RZHU8S
The Power-on Product allows the system to begin running inspections at power-up. The Power-on Product is the
Product used for inspection when the SmartImage Sensor is powered up. The Power-on Product is assigned in the
Product Management dialog box. To open this dialog, go to Products | Product Management.
Only Products which have been saved to flash memory may be assigned as Power-on Products. The Power-on
Product assignment is critical where the SmartImage Sensor is used as a stand-alone system. Once the system is
configured with a PC, the Power-on Product must be assigned in order for the sensor to signal digital outputs
(known as running inspections).
In selecting the Power-on Product at start-up, the SmartImage Sensor actually completes 2 tasks. First, the system
selects the named Product for inspections (called the Current Inspection Product). This same function can be
accomplished using the Product Selection process described in section 3.3.2. Second, in naming a Power-on
Product, the SmartImage Sensor sets the Inspection State to Running.
19
Figure 3.4 Inspection State, as shown on the Standard Toolbar (left) and Expanded Toolbar (right).
The SmartImage Sensor must have Inspections Running (radio button on the right side of the Standard Toolbar) to
output the results of an inspection. When an inspection application is being developed with the PC, Running
Inspections mode can be toggled on and off. Inspections must be set to Running in order for the SmartImage Sensor
continue running after the FrameWork software has been exited.
The Inspection State is a system-wide setting. That is, Products are not stored with the last Inspection State.
Therefore, at Power-on, in order for the SmartImage Sensor to be placed in Running mode (and thus display
inspection results over digital outputs), a Power-on Product must be named.
,QVSHFWLRQ7ULJJHU6RXUFH
The inspection trigger signal is used to begin an inspection. The trigger signal should be sent after the Product has
been selected. The Series 600 begins the inspection process at the beginning of the trigger signal, and does not
begin an inspection again until a new trigger signal is received.
A trigger signal is generated either externally or internally. The Trigger Source section of the Image Parameters
dialog box is used to determine whether an internal or external trigger is used to begin inspections. To bring up the
Image Parameters dialog box, click the Images menu and choose the Image Parameters selection.
Figure 3.5 Trigger Source Options.
Basically, the user may choose from three options in naming the triggering source:
♦ Internal At Full Speed: Internal triggers are generated by the SmartImage Sensor. That is, FrameWork
controls the taking of inspections. Normally internal triggering is used only when initially setting up an inspection.
Internal triggers are timed so that no inspection functions are overlapped (the image acquisition and image
inspection).
♦ Internal with Period: Similar to the internal trigger described above, FrameWork signals the beginning of the
image acquisition process. In this case, however, the user may pre-define the rate of trigger signals. Be careful,
however, in setting the trigger period too low. If a trigger time is lower than the overall inspection time, then all
inspections will not be taken and resource conflicts will occur. Communications between the PC and Series 600
may encounter difficulties as well if the period is set too fast.
♦ External: External triggering is normally used once an inspection has been defined, and the external trigger
comes from a PLC or a photoelectric cell, or some other external device. External triggers require a minimum
pulse width of 2 milliseconds.
3.5.1 DELAYING IMAGE ACQUISITION AFTER A TRIGGER SIGNAL IS SENT
FrameWork provides a way to delay image acquisition after a trigger signal is received by the Series 600 in the
Image Parameters dialog box. This feature is useful on manufacturing lines when it is necessary to trigger an
inspection at a point on the line preceding the point at which image acquisition takes place. To bring up the Image
Parameters dialog box, click Images | Image Parameters.
To delay image acquisition after the trigger signal, simply enter the millisecond time delay in the Delay After
Trigger edit box, or use the spin buttons to set the delay.
20
,PDJH([SRVXUH7LPH
Exposure time refers to the time that the charged-coupled device (CCD) in the image sensor head is exposed to light
during image acquisition. The longer the exposure time, the more light enters the CCD. The exposure time you set
will depend on the demands of the inspection and available lighting. Two factors will determine the exposure time
you set for an inspection. First, consider the overall speed of the parts. For high speed parts, short exposure times
will be necessary to minimize blur within the images. Second, consider the overall inspection rate (parts per minute).
In situations where the overall part rate is high, you should try to reduce exposure time. In both cases, you will want
to reduce the exposure time to optimize the inspection.
You have the following options where you must reduce exposure time an maintain overall image intensity:
♦
Increase the light aimed at the inspection area.
♦ Increase the gain on the CCD. Increasing the gain makes the CCD more sensitive to light. The greater the gain,
the grainier the image. Higher sensor gains may affect the inspection.
♦ Use a lens with an adjustable aperture. Many C and CS mount lenses have aperture controls. An aperture is the
hole which lets light through the lens onto the imaging surface. The larger the hole, the more light is allowed to
strike the CCD.
Increasing exposure time slows down the image acquisition process and may increase image blur for moving
inspections.
21
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The timing and the duration of the digital outputs can be setup using the DVT FrameWork interface. For information
on interfacing with these output lines, please consult Section Error! Reference source not found..
3.7.1 OUTPUT FUNCTION
The 12 multipurpose I/O lines on the Series 600 system are configurable as inputs or outputs. The following table
summarizes the available output functions. Any function may be assigned to any output line. This assignment is
made from the I/O Parameters dialog box on the I/O menu.
Output Functions
Purpose
Pass
After inspection is completed, Pass is set to show that all SoftSensors within the Inspected Product
passed inspection.
Warn
After inspection is completed, Warn is set to show that any SoftSensor within the Inspected Product met
its warn condition.
Fail
After inspection is completed, Fail is set to show that any SoftSensor within the Inspected Product failed
inspection.
Busy
Busy is set after Inspection Trigger is read until the inspection result (Pass or Fail) is signaled.
Strobe
When active, any connected strobe light source will be on during image exposure.
Resource Conflict
Signals some conflict with using the system resources. Typically, signals that an Inspection Trigger was
received while the system was acquiring another image.
Select Pass
While Select input is active, Select Pass signals that the Product ID bits signaled a Product ID found in
the system.
Select Fail
While Select input is active, Select Fail signals that the Product ID bits signaled an invalid Product ID.
Acquiring
Signaled after Inspection Trigger is read, during exposure time and image digitization. Another
Inspection Trigger cannot be signaled while Acquiring is active. (Note: Acquiring + Inspecting =
Busy)
Inspecting
Signaled after the Acquiring signal while an image is being processed for inspection. (Note: Acquiring +
Inspecting = Busy)
Inspection Toggle
Changes state once with each inspection performed.
User Definable
Multiple outputs defined on the I/O Parameters dialog, User tab.
In addition to the digital output lines, all Series 600 systems include 4 LED indicators. Each LED can show 2 colors
(Red and Green). On the front of the system, these LEDs are labeled, “Ready”, “Trigger”, “Pass”, and “Fail.” The
Pass and Fail LEDs may be assigned any Output Function from the corresponding drop down list.
3.7.2 INVERT POLARITY
Any line configured as an output on a Series 600 system is active in the high state. Check “Invert Polarity” to read 0
volts in the active state.
3.7.3 TIMING
Output timing is controlled in the Timing tab of the I/O Parameters dialog box. Click I/O | I/O Parameters and
then click the Timing tab. Figure 3.6 shows the Timing tab of the I/O Parameters dialog box.
22
Figure 3.6: Set the output timing in the I/O parameters dialog.
The Outputs are available section of the Timing tab allows you to control when the output signal is sent:
Immediately: Outputs are sent immediately after inspection processing is complete. Typically the busy signal is
monitored by a PLC for correct signal timing
Immediately, but within _ ms after trigger: Outputs are sent immediately after the inspection is complete, but if
the inspection is not completed within the time allotted, the inspection will fail. This is useful if you are using a
rejection station and you wish to ensure the result is available in time to reject the part.
At a fixed delay of _ after trigger: Outputs are sent at the delay you specify after the trigger signal is received. If
inspection has not occurred within the time allotted, the inspection will fail. Typically the PLC uses a timer so that
is knows when to look for outputs.
Maintain Output Result: If you wish the output signal to remain on after an inspection is completed, the Maintain
Output Result box should be checked. If you wish the output to remain on for a specific length of time after the
inspection takes place, uncheck the Maintain Output Result box and then specify the output pulse width. The output
pulse width is the length of time that the output signal remains on after inspection.
Figure 3.7 Top: Pulsed outputs vs. Bottom: Maintained outputs.
23
7\SLFDO,2&RQILJXUDWLRQ
The following table outlines the typical configuration of inputs and outputs on a Series 600 system:
24
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4XHVWLRQV
The DVT FrameWork User Interface contains many useful tools for diagnosing many types of problems. The major
tools for diagnosing problems are the LED indicators on the outside of the system case and the Digital I/O tools
within FrameWork.
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The Series 600 provides LED function codes and a diagnostics mode for hardware diagnostics. The Series 600
provides several LEDs which show various system states. Each LED on the Series 600 is software configurable.
That is, each LED can be set up to display a specific I/O line. In addition, the LEDs are bi-color (red/green). By
default, the LEDs are configured to display the following information:
Function Name
Description
Ready
Glows green if system is powered and ready to inspect. Flashes red
once per second if in diagnostics mode.
Trigger
Glows green if system is currently receiving an external trigger signal.
Pass
Glows green if system has completed a passed inspection.
Fail
Glows red if system has completed a failed inspection.
9HULI\LQJ(OHFWULFDO&RQQHFWLRQV
The FrameWork software has an I/O Diagnostics feature which allows the user to explicitly set the state of the
digital output pins and to monitor the signal on the input pins. This feature is used to debug the physical connections
between the Series 600 and external devices connected to the system. To open the I/O Diagnostics dialog box in
FrameWork, click I/O | I/O Diagnostics.
This dialog box is divided into two sections, Digital Output State and Digital Input State. For the Series 600, there
are 12 input / output lines. From the I/O Parameters dialog box (I/O menu, I/O Parameters selection), the user may
define which of the 12 I/O lines are inputs and which are outputs. Also, the active state for all I/O lines can be
configured as high or low.
After the outputs have been configured to your satisfaction, open the I/O Diagnostics dialog and toggle the outputs
between high and low. Monitor your external device (PLC, multimeter) according to the following table to see if the
output signal is received. After toggling the outputs between high and low, the outputs will remain in the last state
set by the user until cleared out by the results of an inspection or by a new Product selection.
Voltmeter
Series 600 system
+ (Red) Lead
Output 1, etc.
- (Black) Lead
Ground
High/Low Readings
18-23 volts / 0.7 volts
To test an input, hold the input signal active for two to three seconds and monitor the I/O Diagnostics dialog to see if
the state changes. (Note: inputs must be held for two to three seconds because the I/O dialog box is updated every 2
seconds.)
25
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FrameWork provides a Digital I/O Graph as a diagnostic tool to monitor system timing. The Digital I/O Graph is
used to display a time history of a total of eight outputs and/or inputs. Eight traces are displayed which indicate
changes in state for the assigned I/Os within a specified range of time. The FrameWork Digital I/O graph is a
System Graph located in the Graphs menu. To open the Digital I/O Graph, click Graphs | System Graphs and
choose Digital I/O from the System Graphs dialog box. Figure 4.1 displays the Digital I/O Graph.
Figure 4.1: Output timing can be check using the I/O graph.
This time history can be used to tune the timing of various events taking place during the inspection process. The
time history graph can also be used to look for signal noise by using the Enable Memory Mode feature.
The graph snaps to one millisecond time segments. If a change in state occurs between milliseconds, the graph will
round to the nearest millisecond, displaying the change in state at that point.
4.3.1 CONFIGURING THE DIGITAL I/O GRAPH
To configure the Digital I/O Graph, click the Setup button on the graph. The Digital I/O Graph Configuration
dialog box will appear (see Figure 4.2).
Figure 4.2: The I/O timing graph can be configured for different inputs and outputs.
Configuring I/O trace selection for the Digital IO Graph
26
Both inputs and outputs can be assigned to the eight traces available in this graph. To assign a trace to an input or
output, click on the arrow in the drop down box to the right of the trace you wish to configure and select an available
input or output.
Time History Synchronization
The beginning of the time history, or time zero, is synchronized to Trace 1. Trace 1 is assigned to the Busy output
by default. Since the busy light is activated at the beginning of each inspection, the assignment of Trace 1 to the
busy light allows the beginning of the time history to be synchronized to the beginning of the processing of an
image. You may assign Trace 1 to another output or input as needed in the context of your testing procedures
Range: Setting the range of time displayed
To set the amount of time displayed on the Digital I/O Graph, click the up or down spin buttons in the Range section
of the configuration dialogue box. You can display up to ten seconds worth of data at a time. The graph is updated
approximately every three seconds and the most recent 50 transitions are displayed. A transition is defined as a
change in state for a trace, from high to low or low to high.
Delay: Controlling where the graph begins to display data
To control where the graph begins to display data, click the spin buttons in the Delay section of the configuration
dialogue box. Decreasing the delay value will allow you to display transitions which occurred before time zero, and
increasing the delay value will allow you to display more data after time zero. Time zero is synchronized to Trace 1
(see Time History Synchronization above).
Trigger from Rising Edge: Starting at a rising or a falling edge
The Trigger from Rising Edge check box is checked by default. If checked, the graph will begin at time zero at a
rising edge for the output or input assigned to Trace 1. For example, if the busy line is assigned to Trace 1 and the
Trigger from Rising Edge check box is checked, then time zero will begin when an inspection begins. If the check
box is unchecked the graph will begin at a falling edge for the output or input assigned to Trace 1. In this case, if the
busy signal is assigned to Trace 1 graphing would begin at the end of the inspection processing.
Enable Memory Mode: Capturing streaming historical data
The Digital I/O Graph normally shows one range of historical data at a time. If the range is set for 3 seconds, data
for the last three seconds will be displayed as it is reported to the PC. Data previous to the specified range is not
displayed. If the Enable Memory Mode check box is checked, all the historical data is displayed, each trace
overlapping the traces from previously reported historical ranges. This feature allows the user to see fluctuations in
the timing of each trace. If a trace changes state irregularly, the traces will not overlap perfectly. Data refreshes
very quickly on this graph and noise in a particular trace may be hard to see on the graph if it does not occur
regularly within the time history range. Enable Memory Mode will allow the user to see any noise occurring in a
trace since all data is captured permanently to the graph until memory mode is disabled.
27
4.3.2 USING THE DIGITAL I/O GRAPH FOR TYPICAL TESTING PROCEDURES
The Digital I/O Graph configuration will depend on what you are interested in observing. The most critical trace to
configure is Trace 1, since the rest of the graph is synchronized to Trace 1. There are typically four cases of interest:
♦
Debug the Product Selection process.
♦ Where a fixed delay after trigger is used, verify that the Trigger signal sent from a PLC is received by the Series
600, and check the time between the external trigger and the inspection output results.
♦
Where results are generated immediately after inspection, check when the output results are available.
♦
Determine the overall inspection times.
Checking Product Selection Timing: In this case you are determining whether Product Selection occurs correctly.
Set the Product Select signal to trace 1.
Set Product ID bits to traces 2 through 7. These inputs are used to digitally set the input bits for the Product
ID.
Set the Product Select Pass signal to trace 8.
Verify that the input bits are held active when the Product Select signal is active.
Verify that the Product Select Pass signal is active while the Product Select signal is active.
Checking External Trigger Signal and Inspection Timing: In this case, a fixed delay after trigger is used. You
wish to verify that the trigger signal sent from a PLC is received by the Series 600, and you wish to check the
time between the external trigger and the inspection output results. For more information on using a fixed delay
after trigger, see Section 3.5.1.
Set Trace 1 to the trigger signal. The Trigger from Rising Edge check box should be checked, since you
will be interested in what happens after a trigger signal is received. The Series 600 begins the
inspection process at the beginning (rising edge) of the trigger signal. Verify that the Trigger signal
sent from a PLC is received by the Series 600.
Set the output signals to traces 2 - 4. The outputs you will be primarily interested in are Pass, Fail, and the
User outputs. Set any other outputs of interest to the remaining traces.
The graph will indicate the length of time between activation of the trigger signal and activation of the
outputs.
Checking Output Result Timing: In this case, inspection outputs are generated immediately after inspection. You
wish to verify when the output results are available. For information concerning inspection timing, see Section
3.7.3.
Set Trace 1 to the Busy signal or to the inspection trigger signal if external triggering is being used.. The
Trigger from Rising Edge check box should be unchecked since inspections end at the same time that the
Busy signal goes off.
Set the output signals to traces 2 - 4. The outputs you will be primarily interested in are Pass, Fail, and the User
outputs. Set any other outputs of interest to the remaining traces.
The graph will indicate the length of time between the busy signal going inactive and the outputs going active.
28
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Communications between a PC and SmartImage Sensor can be tricky at times. To make finding problems and
conflicts easier, a troubleshooting guide has been included in the on-line help shipped with FrameWork. Click on the
Help menu and choose Help File Index. From the table of contents, double click Troubleshooting, then double
click Troubleshooting Communications. The guide will walk the user through the troubleshooting process.
Basically, with any communications problem, users should try to isolate all of the following:
Œ
Physical Connection: no matter what communications protocol is being used (Ethernet, Serial, etc.) make
certain all physical connections are in working order and are properly implemented. For Ethernet
connections, this includes making certain the connection is “crossed” at some point. Ethernet connections
can be tested by “pinging” a known IP address. Simply connect the Series 600 to a PC, go to the DOS
prompt and type ‘ping 192.168.0.242’ (substituting the appropriate IP address).
Œ
IP Addressing for the PC: this point is specific to troubleshooting Ethernet communications. The PC
being used must have a valid IP address. Generally speaking, the PC and Series 600 should have IP
addresses that start out with the first three numbers identical to each other. The PC’s IP address is set
under the Network control panel.
Œ
IP Addressing for the Series 600: this is specific to Ethernet communications. The Series 600 IP address
is 192.168.0.242 as shipped from the factory. If using a direct PC connection (no other network involved),
the PC should be set to 192.168.0.240 or similar. If connecting the 600 into a network, work with the
Network Administrator to choose an appropriate IP address for the 600. To assign a new address to the
600, first connect to the system (over a serial cable or Ethernet – isolated from the existing network), then
choose Comm, Image Sensor Communications. Use the Edit button to edit the IP address. The new IP
address will not take effect until the Series 600 is powered down then powered up.
Œ
Subnet and Address Masks: For most applications, the PC and Series 600 systems should use the
255.255.255.0 subnet mask. For the PC, check on this value by opening the Network control panel and
double clicking on the TCP/IP protocol. The Series 600 mask can be checked by connecting to the system
and choosing Comm, Image Sensor Communications. When using this subnet mask, the PC and Series
600 IP addresses must be common to the first three places (i.e. in this IP: xxx.xxx.xxx.yyy, the PC and 600
must have the same thing for the x’s).
Œ
Diagnostics Mode: diagnostics mode communications are supported only on the RS-422 serial port (Port
B on the Series 600). Ethernet communications are not possible when the Series 600 is in diagnostics
mode. Diagnostics mode is signified by the “Ready” LED flashing red once per second on the Series 600
unit. Please refer to the on-line help documentation for instructions on how to place the Series 600 into
diagnostics mode.
29
$SSHQGL[$ 6HULHV6WUREH/LJKW
This appendix covers the Series 600 Strobe lights (Part numbers: IDRA-6, IDIA-6, IDRA-6D, and IDIA-6D). To
determine if the strobe light you have is one of these, look at the part number on the rear. A drawing of this case
follows:
Hole for M4 or 6-32 screws
Valox Housing
72, Typ.
81.05
Lexan Cover
M4x0.7, 8mm deep
For 6mm OD x 19mm
(1/4" OD x 3/4") Hex Standoff
30
19.05
Note: all units in millimeters.
M12x1 male Eurofast
4 pin connector
To use the Series 600 Strobe light, start FrameWork and connect to the Series 600 system. Open I/O Parameters
from the I/O menu. Click on the “Outputs” tab and select “Strobe” for I/O 12 (pin 12). Click Ok. Next, wire the
light according to the following table:
Wire Color Pin Number*
Function
Brown
1
+ 24V
White
2
No connection
Blue
3
Ground
Black
4
Strobe Output signal
* See figure at right for this numbering scheme.
Breakout Board
16: V+
No connection
15: GND
14: or 17-20: IO12
Female Pinout
(cable end)
4
3
1
2
LED Color
Light Part Number
Max Current
Max Duty Cycle
Max Average Current
Red
IDRA-6 & IDRA-6D
1.25 A
15%
188 mA
Infrared
IDIA-6 & IDIA-6D
4.5 A
5%
225 mA
*General characteristics: Voltage Supply = 24V, Trigger Voltage = 15V, Max single pulse = 50 ms
30
$SSHQGL[% 6HULHV5LQJ/LJKW
This appendix covers the Series 600 ring light (IDRR-6T & IDIR-6T). To determine if the strobe light you have is
one of these ring lights, look at the part number on the side. This Series 600 strobe light uses the same case as the
Series 800 and Series 700 ring lights (parts IDRR-8 and IDRR-7). Drawings (not to scale) of this case follow:
∅ 3.81 [0.15]
∅ 73.66 [2.90]
∅ 39.52 [1.56]
∅ 31.75 [1.25]
41.91 [1.65]
Side View
all units in mm [in]
Back View
To use the IDRR-6T & IDIR-6T lights, start FrameWork and connect to the Series 600 system. Open I/O
Parameters from the I/O menu. Click on the “Outputs” tab and select “Strobe” for I/O 12 (pin 12). Click Ok. Next,
wire the light according to the following table:
Wire Color
Function
Breakout Board
Red
+ 24V
16: V+
Green
Ground
15: GND
White
Strobe Output signal
14: or 17-20: IO12
31
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This appendix covers the Series 600 mounting bracket (ID0R-6B). A drawing (not to scale) of this bracket follows:
DVT and S&Y ringlights
AI DomeLight
AI RingLight
M6 or 1/4-20
1/4-20 for Bogen
Arm mounting.
M4, #6, or #8
M4 for Series 600 back mounting
allows 2.75" (70mm) of travel.
Overall Dimensions for the
Series 600 Mounting Bracket:
Width
90 mm
Length
187.8 mm
Height
60 mm
The mounting bracket is designed for a number of applications. Primarily, however, the bracket provides a means to
attach different illumination sources to the Series 600 SmartImage Sensor. The following table summarizes the light
sources that will attach directly to the Series 600 mounting bracket.
Illumination Source Description
DVT Part Number(s)
Ring Lights (both fluorescent and LED based) from DVT and Stocker & Yale
IDRR-6T, IDIR-6T, ISFR-1
LED based DiffuseLite from Advanced Illumination
IARD-5
LED based ring light from Advanced Illumination (4” model)
IARR-4
In addition, the mounting bracket provides a means to easily affix the Series 600 to another surface. The slots on the
extreme edges of the bracket (labeled as “M6 or ¼-20” and “M4, #6, or #8”) provide several options for mounting.
At the center of the mounting bracket is a hole labeled as “1/4-20 for Bogen Arm mounting.” This hole and the
accompanying retaining tab are used to attach the Series 600 easily and readily to an adjustable arm for laboratory
use. The Bogen Arms used by DVT provide a ¼-20 threaded receptacle on one end of the arms. With a short ¼-20
bolt through the hole in the mounting bracket, any user can affix the Series 600 to a Bogen Arm. The Bogen Arm is
sold under DVT part number ACC-MA.
32
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This appendix covers the Series 600 strobe light bracket (ID0A-BR). This part is designed to adapt the IDRA-6
series lights to mount in the same manner as the IDRA-6T lights. Drawings (not to scale) of this bracket follow:
72
1.9
72
Slots for M4 screw
R 2.25
3
1/4-20 press in nut
Note: All units in millimeters.
72
31.75
8
24.77
R 2.25
4.5 dia.
33
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The Series 600 I/O Breakout Board (CON-600) provides an easier way to interface digital I/O, power, and strobe
illumination lines. The board is housed in a plastic DIN Rail-mountable case. The Breakout Board is 75mm wide by
115mm high by 155mm deep (including all necessary cable clearances).
Feature
Purpose
Power Jack
For demonstration purposes only. Use a 24V @ 1.42 A wall-mount power supply.
15 pin high density D-sub plug
Series 600 Digital I/O and Power lines. The board breaks these lines out on screw
down terminals.
Trigger Button
Connected to IO1. If configured as a Trigger Input in FrameWork, this button will
trigger inspections.
Power Terminals
3 terminals on left side of board (V+, GND, Shield) provide connections for an
industrial power supply.
I/O Terminals
Individual screw-down terminals for all 12 I/O lines, V+, and GND.
Strobe Terminals
Four screw-down terminals, tied to IO12. If IO12 is configured in FrameWork as the
Strobe Output, these terminals will be activated during image exposure time.
Power
Jack
Shield
Trigger
Button
15 pin High
Density D-Sub
Connector
34
12 input/
output lines
115mm.
20:
19:
18:
17:
16: V+
15: GND
14: IO12
13: IO11
12: IO10
11: IO9
10: IO8
9: IO7
8: IO6
7: IO5
6: IO4
5: IO3
4: IO2
3: IO1
2: GND
1: V+
4 DVT Strobe
Light (IO12)
Terminals
V+
GND
DVT Strobe
IO12
76mm.
$SSHQGL[) $GYDQFHG(WKHUQHW7&3,3
The Series 600 SmartImage Sensor runs TCP/IP over an Ethernet (RJ-45 only) connection. This Appendix provides
some advanced information about this setup that may be useful to Network Administrators.
Œ
Series 600 IP address is 192.168.0.242 (factory programmed),
Œ
The Series 600 does not support DHCP,
Œ
When dealing with multiple Series 600 units, beware that all units are shipped with the same IP address:
192.168.0.242. To use these systems on either an existing network or to create a new network of just DVT
Series 600 systems, you’ll need to assign new IP addresses to these units.
Œ
IP address can be changed from FrameWork software (Comm menu, Image Sensor Communications
selection),
Œ
IP addresses should not use 0 or 255 as the last value (these are reserved and have special meaning on some
networks),
Œ
With both PC and Series 600 using the Subnet (or, Address) mask of 255.255.255.0, the IP addresses of PC and
600 must be identical for the first three values and unique in the fourth value. Example: Series 600 (IP:
192.168.0.242) & PC (IP: 192.168.0.240)
Œ
FrameWork’s PC Communications dialog box gives the PC (host) IP address when Ethernet is highlighted in
the left pane,
Œ
Query the Series 600 for its IP address in two places. 1) Run FrameWork, click Comm, Image Sensor
Communications, select “Ethernet – Port A” in the left pane and view the IP address in the right pane. 2) From
a terminal command line (serial communications, HyperTerminal @ 38400 baud, 8-N-1, no flow control), the
‘#Cn’ command queries the Series 600 for its IP address and address mask,
Œ
Type ‘ping ###.###.###.###’ (replacing # with numbers) to check if an IP address is connected to the network.
This command can be useful in determining if a node is powered up, operational, and physically connected to
the network,
Œ
Type ‘arp –a’ from a DOS prompt to view the ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) table. The response should
look something like this:
C:\WINDOWS>arp -a
Interface: 192.0.0.111
Internet Address
Physical Address
Type
192.0.0.211
00-90-68-00-00-42
dynamic
192.0.0.212
00-90-68-00-00-42
dynamic
192.0.0.253
00-60-97-4f-c0-45
dynamic
The “Internet Address” column refers to the IP addresses you’ve recently communicated with. The
“Physical Address” column contains the corresponding Ethernet Addresses for the IP’s in column 1. DVT
Series 600 systems will have Physical Addresses starting with “00-90-68”. In the case above, 192.0.0.253
is not a Series 600, but another PC on the same network as the named Interface. The ARP table is cleared
approximately every two minutes. The ‘arp’ command is useful in determining if an IP address belongs to a
Series 600 system or other node on the network.
35
*ORVVDU\
Category 5
Standard for the networking cable used most commonly. Category 3 & 4 have
maximum data rates around 20 MHz while Category 5 cables can operate at 100
MHz or higher.
crossover cable
Unlike the straight through cable, this one crosses receive and transmit and
positive and negative (i.e. RX+ connects to TX-). This cable would be used any
time a direct connection between two devices is used (instead of through a hub).
The cable itself does the crossing, instead of a hub.
EIA-568
The wiring standard used in most Ethernet networking situations. EIA568A and
B contain the same twisted pairs but the wire colors used are slightly different.
USOC is another standard which pairs different wires together.
Ethernet
One type of network cabling and signaling developed by Xerox in the late 1970s.
As it applies to the Series 600, Ethernet is the physical connection used to
communicate data with a PC. Ethernet is typically communicated over RJ-45 or
coaxial cables.
RJ-45
Also called a ‘network’ cable. RJ-45 is an 8 wire (4 twisted pairs) cable with a
connector slightly larger than a common telephone jack. RJ-11 is the style used
for telephone service.
RS-422
A serial communications standard typically used to communicate ASCII data
between devices. The RJ-11 jack on a Series 600 uses RS-422 communications.
RS-422 specifies 4 lines for communication: RX (receive) +, RX-, TX (transmit)
+, and TX-.
Shielded Twisted Pair (STP)
Twisted pair refers to the fact that the cable is made of 4 pairs of wires, twisted
together. Shielded refers to electrical shielding for resistance to electrical noise.
DVT recommends using only STP type cables for Ethernet and RS-422
communications.
Straight through cable
All pins on the cable are carried straight through. That is, the RX- on one end is
pinned through to RX- on the other end. For communication to occur; transmit
and receive, positive and negative must be crossed. Typically, a hub does the
crossing.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. The dominant protocol used
for communication over the internet. Relating to the Series 600, TCP/IP is the
protocol run over the Ethernet/RJ-45 connection for communications with a PC.
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP)
Twisted pair refers to the fact that the cable is made of 4 pairs of wires, twisted
together. Unshielded refers to electrical shielding for resistance to electrical
noise. Most cables sold at computer stores for common networking environments
are UTP and not suitable for permanent installation in a factory environment.
USOC
The wiring standard used in telephone cables. USOC twisted pair cables should
be used with the RJ-11 jack for RS-422 communications.
36
,QGH[
DVT strobe light, 36
Inspecting output, 22
Inspection Timing, 28
Inspection Toggle output, 22
IP address. See subnet mask
default assigned to Series 600, 35
A
Acquiring output, 22
aperture, 21
arp command, 35
L
B
LED Function Codes, 25
LED strobe light, 30, 31, 32, 33
output signal, 22
binary Product IDs, 18
Busy output, 22
C
M
cables, 3
Category 5, 3, 36
CCD, 3, 21
charged coupled device, 21
crossover cable, 36
maintain output result, 23
O
output pulse width, 23
Output Result Timing, 28
D
debounce time, 17
delay after trigger, 20
Delaying Image Acquisition, 20
diagnostics mode, 25
Digital I/O Graph Configuration, 26
dimensions, 4
P
Pass LED, 25
Pass output, 22
ping command, 35
Power-on Product, 19
Product, 17
changing, 17
digital selection, 18
ID, 18
Product Select Pass, 19
Product selection, 17
Product Selection Timing, 28
pulsed outputs, 23
E
EIA-568, 36
Ethernet, 3, 36
exposure time, 21
External Trigger Signal Timing, 28
F
R
Fail LED, 25
Fail output, 22
FrameWork, 1, 16, 18, 26
FrameWork Software Diagnostics, 25
Ready LED, 25
relays, 17
resolution, 3
Resource Conflict output, 20, 22
RJ-45, 36
RS-422, 36
running inspections, 19
I
I/O, 24
electrical diagnostics, 25
graph, 26
inputs, 17
outputs, 22
strobe light pinout, 30, 31
timing, 17, 22
typical configuration, 24
typical use, 16
I/Os, debugging, 25
illumination
S
Select Fail output, 22
Select Pass output, 22
Shielded Twisted Pair (STP), 36
Straight through cable, 36
strobe light, 30, 31, 32, 33
Strobe output, 22
subnet mask, 35. See IP address
37
system timing, 26
internal, 20
T
U
TCP/IP, 36
timing
inputs, 17
outputs, 22
trigger, 20
delay, 20
Trigger LED, 25
trigger source
external, 20
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP), 36
User Definable outputs, 22
USOC, 36
W
Warn output, 22
38
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