HP Virtual Workstation technology overview

HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Technical white paper
HP Virtual Workstation
technology overview
Solution overview and implementation guidelines for
HP Virtual Workstations
Table of contents
Purpose of this document...................................................................................................................................................... 2
Virtual Workstation concepts and technology................................................................................................................... 2
The Virtual Workstation user model................................................................................................................................. 2
Workstation virtualization software architectures........................................................................................................ 2
Remote Workstation............................................................................................................................................................ 3
Pass-through GPU (pGPU).................................................................................................................................................. 3
Virtualized GPU (vGPU)........................................................................................................................................................ 4
The HP DL380z Gen8 Virtual Workstation.......................................................................................................................... 5
Planning considerations for implementing workstation virtualization technologies................................................. 6
Determining the right GPU and platform for your use case......................................................................................... 6
Virtualization solution feature comparison and considerations................................................................................. 6
Complete the solution with HP Thin Clients........................................................................................................................ 8
Appendix A—Configuring a Virtual Workstation solution................................................................................................ 8
Appendix B—HP DL380z graphics slot options............................................................................................................... 11
Appendix C—HP Remote Graphics Software (RGS)......................................................................................................... 13
Appendix D—Abbreviations and naming conventions................................................................................................... 13
Resources................................................................................................................................................................................ 14
Endnotes.................................................................................................................................................................................. 14
Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Purpose of this document
•
•
•
Provides an overview of concepts and practical implementation of virtual workstation technologies
Introduces the HP DL380z Gen8 Virtual Workstation
Gives IT decision makers, architects, and implementation specialists an overview of how HP and its virtualization
partners approach and implement virtual workstation solutions
Virtual Workstation concepts and technology
This section defines the concept of a “virtual workstation user” and provides an overview of the technologies behind
HP’s Virtual Workstation Solution. It also discusses the high-level differences between workstation virtualization
technologies and illustrates how the major desktop virtualization providers implement these technologies in their products.
The Virtual Workstation user model
As shown in figure 1, there is a broad spectrum of PC/Workstation user models where virtualization solutions can be
effective:
Figure 1: Virtualized PC/Workstation use models
Task worker
• Primary text based applications
Solution Type
Session Virtualization
Knowledge worker
Desktop power user
Virtual Desktop Infrastructure
Graphics Accelerated VDI
• Limited graphics & minimal
multimedia applications
• Some compute - intensive
applications
• Performance desktop
graphics
Performance user
• Graphics - intensive
applications
• Many compute-intensive
applications
Virtual Workstation
Graphics Performance
Within these models, the HP Virtual Workstation Solution addresses the performance user who demands the highest
possible graphics performance with an overall experience similar to a local desktop. To meet these user requirements, it
is not only important to have a strong hardware platform, but also a virtualization software architecture that can provide
the required performance.
Workstation virtualization software architectures
Figure 2 summarizes the system architectures that meet the needs of the performance user, including Remote Workstation,
Pass-through GPU, and Virtualized GPU. The following sections describe each of these solutions in more detail.
Figure 2: Virtual Workstation Architectures
Remote Workstation
Pass-through GPU
Receiving Software
Receiving SW
Receiving SW
Receiving SW
Receiving SW
Receiving SW
Pixels
Pixels
Pixels
Pixels
Pixels
Pixels
LAN or WAN Connection Broker (optional)
USB - HID
Remoting Software
Client OS
Connection Broker (optional)
USB - HID
USB - HID
Remoting SW
Remoting SW
Virtual Client OS A Virtual Client OS B
Hypervisor
PM G
P - Processor Cores
M - Memory
G - GPU
USB/HID - USB Human Interface Device(s)
2
Virtualized GPU
G1
PM
Connection Broker (optional)
USB - HID
USB - HID
Remoting SW
Remoting SW
Virtual Client OS A
USB - HID
Remoting SW
Virtual Client OS B Virtual Client OS C
vGPU Hypervisor Support
G2
Hypervisor
PMG1*G2*
* Virtualizable GPU, for example NVIDIA GRIDTM K2
Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Remote Workstation
Not a virtualized solution in the traditional sense, this method is the classic workstation remoting architecture (see
Figure 3). The client OS is installed directly on the Remote Workstation hardware and a hypervisor is not used. End users
connect to the workstation via remote protocols such as HP RGS1, Teradici® PCoIP®, and Citrix HDX® 3D Pro via client
hardware. This method is still the best solution for users that demand the power, performance, and high availability of
dedicated hardware.
Figure 3: Remote Workstation
Endpoint
Receiving Software
Pixels
LAN or WAN
Connection Broker (optional)
USB - HID
Remoting Software
P - Processor Cores
M - Memory
G - GPU
USB/HID - USB Human Interface Device(s)
Client OS
PM G
Note
Remote Workstation support on the DL380z Gen8 platform is available for a limited range of system environments.
Please contact your HP Account Representative for more information.
Pass-through GPU (pGPU)
Also referred to generically as “direct attached GPU” or vendor specific “vDGA” (VMware®) and “GPU pass-through”
(Citrix®), this method allows discrete GPU devices to be directly mapped to a virtual machine (VM) for dedicated 1:1 use
(see figure 4). The VM has full and access to the virtual GPU assigned to it, including the native graphics driver (which is
loaded within the VM), allowing for full workstation class graphics and GPU computing in a virtual environment. Typically
intended for high-end 3D and GPU compute users, the GPU device is directly accessed by the VM operating system(s), just
as in a desktop workstation scenario. Table 1 lists the available pass-through mode configuration options:
Table 1: Pass-through GPU mode configuration options
Endpoint examples
Workstation, mobile workstation, thin client, Windows tablet
Receiving agent
Citrix® Receiver
Teradici® Tera2 Zero Client
HP RGS1 Receiver
Virtual desktop management/
(optional) connection broker
Citrix XenDesktop®
VMware Horizon™ (with view)
Leostream™ Connection Broker
Remoting protocol
Citrix HDX® 3D Pro
HP RGS protocol
Teradici® PCoIP® (requires additional Teradici PCoIP Workstation Card such as the Teradici® Tera2220)
VM operating system
Windows® 7 Professional (64-bit)2
Linux
Hypervisor
Citrix XenServer® 6.02sp1 and newer
VMware ESXi™ Version 5.5 and newer
Virtual workstation
HP DL380z Gen8
3
Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Capabilities:
• Support for 3D technologies including DirectX 9/10/11, OpenGL 4.3, and NVIDIA CUDA via the native NVIDIA driver in
the VM
• Best performing virtualized solution, as the graphics driver resides in the VM, which in turn has full access to the
virtual GPU assigned to it
• Can mix accelerated and non-accelerated VMs on the same host to maximize resource utilization
• Centralized/secure data access
Constraints:
• Higher cost-of-ownership per connection (as compared to possible virtualized GPU configurations) due to a dedicated
GPU per VM
• Lower VM density per host when compared to a virtualized GPU configuration
• Live migration of a VM with pass-through devices is not supported
Virtualized GPU (vGPU)
The virtualized GPU (sometimes referred to as a “true virtual GPU”) offers the benefit of GPU sharing while delivering
the performance and full functionality of a native NVIDIA graphics card and driver, as it has direct access to the GPU.
Multiple VMs can share the processing power of each physical GPU, and each VM also has direct access to the GPU with
a configurable static videoRAM size. For example, if a GPU has 8 GB of videoRAM, the videoRAM can be divided to create
two vGPUs with 4 GB of videoRAM, or four vGPUs with 2 GB of videoRAM, etc. Table 2 illustrates the available virtualized
GPU mode configuration options:
Table 2: Virtualized GPU (vGPU) mode configuration options
Endpoint examples
Workstation, mobile workstation, thin client, Windows tablet
Receiving agent
Citrix® Receiver
HP RGS1 Receiver
Virtual desktop management/
(optional) connection broker
Citrix XenDesktop®
Leostream™ Connection Broker
Remoting protocol
Citrix HDX® 3D Pro
HP RGS1
VM operating system
Windows® 7 Professional (64-bit)2
Linux
Hypervisor
Citrix XenServer® 6.2 and newer
Virtual workstation
HP DL380z Gen8
Capabilities:
• Support for 3D technologies including DirectX 9/10/11, OpenGL 4.3 via the native NVIDIA driver in the VM
• The VM has full and direct access to the GPU, including the native graphics driver, for full workstation performance
• The only virtualization technology that allows true GPU sharing, yielding more total users per GPU
Constraints:
• Potential for slightly lower overall performance when compared to a pass-through GPU architecture
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Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
The HP DL380z Gen8 Virtual Workstation
The HP DL380z Gen8 Virtual Workstation offers a true workstation experience with the added benefits of end-to-end
security and simpler, centralized management. By placing the primary computing power in the datacenter—rather than
on the user’s desk—the DL380z allows access to certified workstation ISV applications from virtually anywhere. Another
benefit of having the compute node in the datacenter is that project file-load times can be substantially reduced by using
a high-performance interconnect to link both compute and storage.
Supporting the NVIDIA® Quadro® K4000, K5000, K6000 and NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 graphics cards, the DL380z Gen8 can
support up to eight workstations users in a single 2U rack mount system. The DL380z Gen8 also supports
industry-standard hypervisors from Citrix® and VMware® and unique tools such as HP Remote Graphics Software1 (RGS)
and HP Velocity 2.1 to manage network traffic.
Figure 4: HP DL380z Gen8 Virtual Workstation platform overview
•
•
•
•
2U Rack System
−
Dual XeonTM E5 IVB series CPUs
−
Redundant power supplies
−
Up to 21 DL380z VWS per standard 42U rack enclosure
1- 8 concurrent workstation-class users per system, up to 168 users
per 42U rack enclosure
Graphics Cards
−
NVIDIA GRID™ K2
−
NVIDIA Quadro® K4000, K5000, K6000
ProLiant iLO Management options
•
•
•
•
•
•
Industry standard Hypervisors
Client OS – Windows and Linux
ISV application certifications
Protocols: HDX®3D Pro, PCoIP, RGS1
HP Thin Client integration
Mobile WS and tablet integration
Table 3 summarizes the features and specifications of the NVIDIA® graphics options available for the HP DL380z Gen8
Virtual Workstation:
Table 3: Supported Graphics Cards
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2
Quadro® K6000
Quadro® K5000
Quadro® K4000
GPU
2 High End Kepler GPUs (K5000-class)
Kepler
Kepler
Kepler
CUDA cores
3072 (1536/GPU)
2880
1536
768
Memory size
8 GB GDDR5 (4 GB/GPU)
12 GB GDDR5
4 GB GDDR5
3 GB GDDR5
Max power
225 W
225 W
122 W
80 W
Form factor
Double-width
Double-width
Double-width
Single-width
PCIe
x16
x16
x16
x16
PCIe generation
Gen3 (Gen2 compatible)
Gen3
Gen2
Gen2
Cooling solution
Passive
Active
Active
Active
OpenGL
4.3
4.3
4.3
4.3
Microsoft DirectX
9/10/11
9/10/11
9/10/11
9/10/11
5
Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Planning considerations for implementing workstation virtualization
technologies
This section provides high-level guidelines and feature comparisons to consider when choosing a workstation
virtualization solution appropriate for your needs. Please contact your HP account representative for further information
and complete details.
Determining the right GPU and platform for your use case
Figure 5 shows a comparison of workstation virtualization technologies, GPU models, and the industry segment and use
cases where they provide the best fit.
Figure 5: Workstation virtualization technology use case and segment positioning
Oil & Gas, Life Science
Healthcare (imaging)
M&E Animation
Auto/Aero Analysis, Design
Enterprise CAD
Entry CAD
Financial Services
GRIDTM K2
High End 3D
GRIDTM K2
Quadro® K4000/ K5000/ K6000
Ultra High 3D
GPU Compute
Hardware
Virtualized
GPU
Power User Office
Pass-through
GPU
Mid-Range 3D
Entry 3D
3D for Office
Non-3D
Virtualization solution feature comparison and considerations
The tables in this section summarize and compare various features of the different virtual workstation technologies and
configurations. Additional considerations for various implementations are also listed following the tables.
Table 4: Graphics virtualization technology feature comparison
HP RGS1
VMware® vDGA
w/PCoIP® via Teradici®
TERA2220 card
Citrix® w/HDX 3D Pro
Citrix® vGPU®
w/HDX 3D Pro
System architecture
remote workstation, passthrough and virtualized GPU
pass-through
pass-through
virtualized
GPU
OpenGL (2.x, 3.x, 4.x)
2.x, 3.x, 4.x
2.x, 3.x, 4.x
2.x, 3.x, 4.x
2.x, 3.x, 4.x
DirectX (9, 10, 11)
9, 10, 11
9, 10, 11
9, 10, 11
9, 10, 11
Supported NVIDIA® GPUs
GRID™ K2, K4000, K5000,
K6000
GRID™ K2, K4000,
K5000, K6000
GRID™ K2, K4000,
K5000, K6000
GRID™ K2
Supports four (4) displays*
Yes
No (2)
Yes
Yes
Max. resolution (# of
displays supported)
* see note below
2560x1600 (1)
1920x1200 (2)
* see note below
* see note below
* GPU capabilities, bandwidth constraints and/or client capability can limit the number of supported displays and available resolution.
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Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Table 5: NVIDIA GRIDTM vGPU™ profiles
Card
Virtual GPU
Use case
Frame buffer (MB)
Virtual display
heads
Maximum
resolution
Maximum vGPUs
per GPU
per Board
GRID™ K2
GRID K260Q
Typical Designer
2048
4
2560 x 1600
2
4
GRID™ K2
GRID K240Q
Entry-Level Designer
1024
2
2560 x 1600
4
8
Table 6: DL380z Gen8 maximum supported graphics cards per platform/configuration
Hardware configuration
Remote Workstation
w/HP RGS1
Citrix® w/HDX 3D Pro or
w/HP RGS1(pass-through)
VMware® vDGA w/ PCoIP
implemented in HW via
Teradici® TERA2220
card (pass-through)
Citrix® vGPU® w/HDX
3D Pro or w/HP RGS1
(virtualized GPU)
NVIDIA® Quadro® K4000
3
3
2
N/A
NVIDIA® Quadro® K5000
2
2
1
N/A
NVIDIA® Quadro® K6000
2
2
1
N/A
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2
N/A
2
N/A
2
XenServer multi-GPU pass-through usage notes:
• GPU pass-through technology allows for maximum graphical performance (workstation-class) as each VM has a
dedicated GPU
• XenServer® supports passing through only one GPU per VM
• Creating a VM for workstation-class graphics performance also requires workstation-class resources with at least
two vCPU and 2–4 GB of graphics memory
• GPU to VM density is determined by the number of GPUs, this model uses one GPU per VM, no sharing
Citrix XenServer® NVIDIA GRID™ vGPU™ usage notes:
• Each physical GPU can be split into two or four vGPUs
• NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 cards have two K5000-level GPUs with 8 GB of videoRAM
• Creating a VM for workstation-class graphics performance also requires workstation-class resources with at least
two vCPU and 2–4 GB of graphics memory
• At the time of publication, the predefined GRID™ vGPU™ profiles must be the same on a given physical GPU
VMware® vDGA density considerations:
• VMware® vDGA pass-through GPU technology allows for maximum graphics performance (workstation-class) as
each VM has a dedicated GPU
• Creating a VM for workstation-class graphics performance, also requires workstation-class resources with at least
two 2 vCPU and 2–4 GB of graphics memory
• GPU to VM density determined by number of GPUs, this model uses one GPU per VM, with no sharing
• Teradici® TERA2220 PCoIP Workstation Card consumes one PCIe slot
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Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Complete the solution with HP Thin Clients
There are many options for client (user endpoint) systems in a Virtual Workstation environment including Windows
tablets, Mobile Workstations, Small Form-Factor desktops, and even “repurposed” older desktop workstations. However,
one of the best client choices is HP’s broad portfolio of thin clients, which include a number of high-performance models
such as the HP t620 and HP t820. For more information on HP Thin Clients, please contact your HP account representative
or visit the HP Thin Client link in the Resources section at the end of this document.
Figure 6: HP Thin Client positioning
Zero
Smart
Flexible
No-OS/single-environment
No-OS/multi-environment
Multi-OS/environment
Power User
HP t310
•HP’s best PColl®
•Excellent security
•Zero management
Performance
Knowledge
Worker
HP t820
•Intel® CoreTM i5 or PentiumTM
•TPM3,4 & fiber3
HP t410
•AIO and “Puck” form factors
•Hardware-accelerated protocols
•Zero management
•Power-over-ethernet (AIO only)
AIO
Task Worker
Puck
HP t620
•Dual/Quad Core AMD CPU’s
•PCIe expansion slot
•Multi-touch OS
•TPM chipset3,4
•Fiber NIC option
HP t510
•Dual Core CPU
•Peripheral support
•High density
HP t41
•Mobile form factor
•Thin and light
•Wireless WAN5,6
•TPM chipset3,4
•Image / data security
Flexibility
= # of display supported
Appendix A—Configuring a Virtual Workstation solution
Although the final details will vary with user and application workloads, the following information will help you
appropriately configure a Virtual Workstation solution using the HP DL380z. The overall method is similar to configuring
a desktop workstation; however there are some unique considerations, especially when working with virtual HW
implementations. We suggest the following process:
1.
Consider each user’s graphics needs. Start by determining the “GPU-class” (performance/features) that each user
requires, and then determine the number of users per DL380z. To help you make a selection, Table 7 references
common desktop workstation graphics used in various workstation market segments and maps them to the cards
available on the DL380z.
Table 7: Graphics requirements mapping
8
Typical Desktop workstation
Graphics Card
Equivalent DL380z
graphics card option
Users per
DL380z
Comments
(refer to Appendix B for
details of graphics slot
options)
Market segments
(guideline only)
NVIDIA® Quadro® K6000
Quadro® K6000 (2 cards)
Quadro® K6000 (1 card)
2
1
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8, (1) x16
Oil & Gas; Government;
Media and Entertainment
NVIDIA® Quadro® K5000
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 (2 cards)
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 (1 card)
Quadro® K5000 (2 cards)
Quadro® K5000 (1 card)
4
2
2
1
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8, (2) x16
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8, (2) x16
Oil & Gas; Media and
Entertainment
NVIDIA® Quadro® K4000
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 (1 card)
4
Quadro® K4000 (1 card)
Quadro® K4000 (1 card)
Quadro® K4000 (1 card)
3
2
1
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8, (2) x16
K2 GPU more powerful than
K4000
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8, (1) x16
Extra PCIe slot: (1) x8, (2) x16
Media and Entertainment;
Product Development;
Architecture, Engineering
and Construction (AEC)
Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Typical Desktop workstation
Graphics Card
Equivalent DL380z
graphics card option
Users per
DL380z
Comments
(refer to Appendix B for
details of graphics slot
options)
Market segments
(guideline only)
NVIDIA® Quadro® K2000
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 (2 cards
in vGPU implementation)
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 (1 card in
vGPU implementation)
8
K260Q profile. Max 4 displays
per user
K260Q profile. Max 4 displays
per user
Product Development;
Architecture, Engineering
and Construction (AEC);
Government
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 (1 card in
vGPU implementation)
NVIDIA GRIDTM K2 (1 card in
vGPU implementation)
8
K240Q profile. Max 2 displays
per user
K260Q profile. Max 4 displays
per user
Financial Services
NVIDIA® NVS® 510
2.
4
4
Estimate each user’s CPU requirements. Use the number of cores per user and the CPU speed (frequency) to estimate
the number of users per DL380z. Refer to Table 8 to help make a selection.
Be sure to compare the results of the CPU requirement (number of users per DL380z) with the results of the graphics
requirement (number of users per DL380z) from step 1. It may be necessary to limit the number of users per DL380z
based on the required number of cores per user, regardless of the graphics requirement.
Table 8: CPU cores and frequency mapping
CPU cores per user
Users per
DL380z
Recommended CPU selection
(best fit)
Extended CPU
recommendations
Workstation market segments
(guideline only)
16
1
(2) E5-2680v2 2.8 GHz, 10c
(2) E5-2667v2 3.3 GHz, 8c
Oil & Gas
10
2
1
(2) E5-2680v2 2.8G Hz, 10c*
(1) E5-2680v2 2.8 GHz, 10c
4
2
(2) E5-2695v2 2.4 GHz, 12c*
(2) E5-2650v2 2.6 GHz, 8c
Oil & Gas; Media and Entertainment
(1) E5-2690v2 3.0 GHz 10c,
(2) E5-2643v2 3.5 GHz, 6c
1
(2) E5-2630v2 2.6 GHz, 6c
(2) E5-2697v2 2.7 GHz 12c
(1) E5-2697v2 2.7 GHz 12c*
(2) E52667v2 3.3 GHz, 8c
(1) E5-2643v2 3.5 GHz 6c
4
4
2
1
(2) E5-2680v2 2.8 GHz, 10c
(1) E5-2680v2 2.8 GHz, 10c
(1) E5-2630v2 2.6 GHz, 6c
(2) E5-2690v2 3.0 GHz 10c
(1) E5-2690v2 3.0 GHz 10c
(1) E5-2637v2 3.5 GHz 4c
Product Development; Architecture,
Engineering and Construction (AEC);
Government
2
8
4
2
1
(2) E5-2670v2 2.5 GHz, 10c
(1) E5-2670v2 2.5 GHz, 10c
(1) E5-2630v2 2.6 GHz, 6c
(1) E5-2630v2 2.6 GHz, 6c
(2) E5-2690v2 3.0 GHz 10c
(1) E5-2690v2 3.0 GHz 10c
(1) E5-2643v2 3.5 GHz 6c
(1) E5-2637v2 3.5 GHz 4c
Product Development; Architecture,
Engineering and Construction (AEC);
Government
6
Architecture, Engineering and
Construction (AEC)
Notes
• All processors are E5-2xxxv2. “Ivy Bridge”
• In cases where there is more than one user, this table assumes two or more additional cores are dedicated to
support hypervisor functions. Otherwise, an asterisk (*) indicates cases where the hypervisor must share cores with
users due to the available CPU SKUs
3. Calculate memory requirements. There are no unique guidelines for calculating memory requirements, but a good
method is to simply allow the same memory-per-user as you would for a typical desktop configuration with the
same application performance and data set requirements. As with CPU core allocations, we advise adding additional
memory to support hypervisor functions in cases where there is more than one user. See Table 9 for
recommendations.
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Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Table 9: Memory configurations
Memory per user
Users per DL380z
Recommended memory configuration
Comments
128 GB
2
1
(18) 16 GB DIMMs
(8) 16 GB DIMMs
Populates all memory channels – best performance
64 GB
2
1
(10) 16 GB DIMMs
(4) 16 GB DIMMs
32 GB for Hypervisor
32 GB
4
2
1
(10) 16 GB DIMMs
(6) 16 GB DIMMs
(2) 16 GB DIMMs
32 GB for Hypervisor
32 GB for Hypervisor
16 GB
4
2
1
(6) 16 GB DIMMs
(4) 16 GB DIMMs
(1) 16 GB DIMM
32 GB for Hypervisor
32 GB for Hypervisor
8 GB
8
4
2
1
(6) 16 GB DIMMs
(4) 16 GB DIMMs
(2) 16 GB DIMMs
(1) 16 GB DIMM
32 GB for Hypervisor
32 GB for Hypervisor
16 GB for Hypervisor
4.
Estimate storage requirements. When estimating storage, please keep in mind that local storage for each user is
normally treated as separate from storage allocated to support a hypervisor. Also, the DL380z supports a maximum
of eight (8) small form-factor (2.5-inch) drives.
•
Performance not critical, size ~100 GB
•
Recommended drive: 100 GB 6G SATA ME2.5in SSD FIO Kit HP part number: 774114-B21
Hypervisor storage
•
There are also many other storage options. See:
http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/14212_na/14212_na.pdf (North America) or
http://h18000.www1.hp.com/cpq-products/quickspecs/14211_div/14211_div.pdf (world-wide) for
more information.
User local storage
•
Will vary widely from customer to customer depending on workloads and storage policy
•
A general rule is to estimate the typical storage requirement for a desktop workstation user, multiply by the
number of users on the DL380z, and then round up to the next available drive capacity.
Sample drive recommendation: 400 GB 6G SATA ME2.5in SSD FIO Kit HP part number: 774115-B21
•
•
There are also many other storage options. See:
http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/14212_na/14212_na.pdf (North America) or
http://h18000.www1.hp.com/cpq-products/quickspecs/14211_div/14211_div.pdf (world-wide) for
more information.
5. Finally, configure the networking solution. Networking is primarily determined by your existing infrastructure,
typically 1 gigabit/second (Gb/s) Ethernet or 10 Gb/s Ethernet. 10 Gb/s fiber connections (as opposed to “direct attach
copper cable”) will also require a fibre transceiver in addition to the network adapter (see figure 7 for examples).
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Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Figure 7: Example network adapters and fiber transceiver
1Gb 4-port 366FLR LOM Adapter 10Gb 2-port 560FLR-SFP+ LOM Adapter Fiber optic transceiver module
10Gb SFP+ SR Transceiver (455883-B21) (short range)
10Gb SFP+ LR Transceiver (455886-B21) (long range)
Additional 1 Gb/s Ethernet cards can be added via PCIe slots. For example:
• HP Ethernet 1 Gb 4-port 331T Adapter 647594-B21
• HP Ethernet 1 Gb 2-port 361T Adapter 652497-B21
• HP Ethernet 1 Gb 2-port 332T Adapter 615732-B21
Similarly, additional 10 Gb/s Ethernet cards can also be added via PCIe slots. For example:
• HP Ethernet 10 Gb 2-port 560SFP+ Adapter 665249-B21
• HP Ethernet 10 Gb 2-port 561T Adapter 716591-B21
• HP Ethernet 10 Gb 2-port 570SFP+ Adapter 718904-B21
• HP Ethernet 10 Gb 2-port 571SFP+ Adapter 728987-B21
Appendix B—HP DL380z graphics slot options
Figures 8, 9, and 10 illustrate installation options for graphics cards in the DL380z Virtual Workstation.
Figure 8: DL380z graphics slot basic layout
Primary Riser
Secondary Riser
x16
x16
x16
Power Supply
x8
Power Supply
Rear view of DL380z
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Figure 9: Options for single-height graphics cards
Primary Riser
K4000
x16
Secondary Riser
K4000
x16
K4000
x16
Power Supply
Power Supply
x8
Rear view of DL380z
Figure 10: Options for double-height graphics cards
Primary Riser
Secondary Riser
x16
K2/K5/K6
x16
x16
Power Supply
x8
Primary Riser
Secondary Riser
K2/K5/K6
x16
Power Supply
x8
Primary Riser
K2/K5/K6
Secondary Riser
K2/K5/K6
x16
x8
Rear view of DL380z
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Power Supply
x16
x16
Power Supply
x16
Power Supply
x16
Power Supply
Technical white paper | HP Virtual Workstation technology overview
Appendix C—HP Remote Graphics Software (RGS)
With the release of HP RGS 7, you can securely access your Virtual Workstation-based graphic-rich applications and
collaborate remotely in real time from any PC, Thin Client, or Windows tablet. All applications run natively on the Virtual
Workstation and take full advantage of its graphics resources, including 3D graphics support for the latest versions
of Open GL and Direct X. HP RGS runs on Windows or Linux workstations or virtual machines and allows real-time
collaboration and screen sharing between users.
The graphics output from the Virtual Workstation is transmitted over a standard network to a window on a local
computer using advanced image compression technology specifically designed for digital imagery, text, and high frame
rate video applications. A local keyboard and mouse are supported as well as redirection of most USB devices to provide
an interactive, high-performance workstation experience. Additional new features of HP RGS Version 7 include:
•
Professional productivity from a Windows 8 tablet
–
Touch support
–
Gesture to hot-key mapping
–
Pan and zoom
–
Virtual mouse
• Greatly improved frame rate and responsiveness when connecting over poor wide area networks or Wi-Fi with
HP Velocity 2.1 built into HP RGS 7 (as compared to systems running without Velocity 2.1).
With HP RGS, there are no monthly fees; the receiver is a free download and a license is required to run the HP RGS
Sender. For new HP RGS customers, please contact your HP account representative for more details.
Appendix D—Abbreviations and naming conventions
Table 10: Abbreviations and terminology used in this document
Convention
Definition
GPU
Graphical Processing Unit (Graphics Card). It is important to note that some graphics cards have
more than one GPU processor
HDX®
Citrix® set of advanced desktop remoting technologies to deliver a High Definition Experience
HDX® 3D Pro
Feature of XenDesktop® for delivering high-end 3D professional graphics
Hypervisor (HV)
Virtualization host platform (VMware® ESXiTM, Microsoft® Hyper-V, Citrix XenServer®)
Pass-Through Graphics
Technology that allows hypervisor to directly pass-through a graphics card device to a VM
PCoIP
Teradici® remote desktop protocol used in VMware® HorizonTM (with View)
RDP
Microsoft Remote Desktop Protocol
RGS
HP Remote Graphics Software
vCPU
Virtual Central Processing Unit
vDGA
VMware® specific terminology for GPU pass-through
vGPU (Definition depends on platform)
• VMware® vGPU: VMware implementation for software virtualized GPU
• Citrix®/NVIDIA GRID™ vGPUTM: Hardware virtualization of the GPU
VM
Virtual Machine
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Resources
HP DL380z Gen8 Virtual Workstation - hp.com/go/zvirtualworkstation
HP Thin Clients - hp.com/go/thinclients
HP RGS – hp.com/go/rgs
HP Velocity – hp.com/go/velocity
HP and Citrix® - hp.com/go/citrix and citrix.com/hp
Citrix XenDesktop® - citrix.com/xendesktop
Citrix XenApp® - citrix.com/xenapp
HP and VMware® HorizonTM (with View) - hp.com/go/vmware and vmware.com/view
Endnotes
1.
2. 3.
4.
5.
6.
HP Remote Graphics Software requires an internet connection
This system may require upgraded and/or separately purchased hardware to take full advantage of Windows 7 functionality. Not all features are
available in all editions of Windows 7. See microsoft.com/windows/windows-7/ for details.
Sold separately or as an optional feature
The TPM chipset has the opportunity to be utilized with WES8
Wireless use requires separately purchased service contract. Check with your local vendor for coverage area and availability in your area. Connection
and speeds will vary due to location, environment, network conditions, and other factors.
Wireless access point and Internet service required. Availability of public wireless access points limited.
Sign up for updates
hp.com/go/getupdated
© 2014 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and
services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional
warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
Microsoft and Windows are U.S. registered trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies.
Citrix® and XenDesktop® are registered trademarks of Citrix Systems, Inc. and/or one more of its subsidiaries, and may be registered in the United States Patent and
Trademark Office and in other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Intel and Intel Core are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. AMD is a trademark of Advanced Micro Devices Inc.
4AA5-3382ENW, July 2014
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