Release Notes for VSP Operating System Software

Release Notes for VSP Operating System Software
Release Notes for VSP Operating System
Software
Release 6.0
NN47227-401
Issue 10.04
April 2017
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Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction............................................................................................................ 6
Purpose.................................................................................................................................. 6
Chapter 2: New in this release................................................................................................. 7
Features................................................................................................................................. 7
VOSS feature differences....................................................................................................... 11
Documentation changes........................................................................................................ 13
Support changes................................................................................................................... 13
Chapter 3: Important notices................................................................................................. 14
Hardware compatibility........................................................................................................... 14
Hardware compatibility for VSP 4000 Series...................................................................... 14
Hardware compatibility for VSP 7200 Series...................................................................... 16
Hardware compatibility for VSP 8000 Series...................................................................... 21
Power supply compatibility............................................................................................... 23
Software scaling capabilities................................................................................................... 24
Fabric scaling for VSP 4000 Series................................................................................... 31
Fabric scaling for VSP 7200 Series................................................................................... 32
Fabric scaling for VSP 8000 Series................................................................................... 34
Recommendations.......................................................................................................... 36
File names for this release..................................................................................................... 36
Calculating and verifying the md5 checksum for a file on a switch....................................... 38
Calculating and verifying the md5 checksum for a file on a client workstation....................... 39
Best practices for SPB regarding MSTP.................................................................................. 40
Feature licensing................................................................................................................... 41
SFP+ ports........................................................................................................................... 41
show vlan remote-mac-table command output ........................................................................ 42
dos-chkdsk........................................................................................................................... 42
Auto negotiation settings........................................................................................................ 42
Interoperability notes for Fabric Attach.................................................................................... 42
Interoperability considerations for IS-IS external metric............................................................. 43
VSP 4000 specific notices...................................................................................................... 44
Converting ERS 4850 to VSP 4000................................................................................... 44
Interoperability notes for VSP 4000 connecting to an ERS 8800.......................................... 44
Notes on combination ports for VSP 4000......................................................................... 45
Chapter 4: Known issues and limitations............................................................................. 46
Known issues in this release.................................................................................................. 46
Limitations in this release....................................................................................................... 58
Chapter 5: Resolved issues................................................................................................... 63
Chapter 6: Resources............................................................................................................. 64
Support................................................................................................................................ 64
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Contents
Documentation...................................................................................................................... 64
Training................................................................................................................................ 64
Viewing Avaya Mentor videos................................................................................................. 64
Searching a documentation collection..................................................................................... 65
Subscribing to e-notifications.................................................................................................. 66
Appendix A: Related information.......................................................................................... 69
Overview of features by release and platform.......................................................................... 69
MIB changes......................................................................................................................... 81
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Chapter 1: Introduction
Purpose
This document provides information on features in VSP Operating System Software (VOSS). VOSS
runs on the following product families:
• Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4000 Series
• Avaya Virtual Services Platform 7200 Series
• Avaya Virtual Services Platform 8000 Series
This document describes important information about this release for the VOSS products.
These Release Notes include supported hardware and software, scaling capabilities, and a list of
known issues (including workarounds, where appropriate). This document also describes known
limitations and restrictions.
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Chapter 2: New in this release
The following sections detail what is new in Release Notes.
Features
See the following sections for information about feature changes.
New hardware
VOSS 6.0 introduces the following new hardware:
• New 10 Gigabit Ethernet SFP Transceiver:
- 10GBASE-T SFP, AA1403043-E6
Bridge Protocol Data Unit (BPDU) Guard
The Spanning Tree Protocol detects and eliminates logical loops in a bridged or switched network.
Any bridge that participates in the spanning tree exchanges information with other bridges using
configuration messages known as Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDU). Based on the BPDU
information exchange, the bridge with the lowest bridge ID becomes the root.To ensure the correct
operation of Spanning Tree in the network, BPDU Guard protects the stability of the Root Bridge by
dropping stray, unexpected, or unwanted BPDU packets entering a port, and immediately shutting
down those ports for a specified time period. BPDU Guard is normally enabled on access ports
connecting to end user devices such as servers that are not expected to operate Spanning Tree.
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and NLB.
Distributed Virtual Routing
Stretching IP subnets across multiple locations, racks in a data center and floors or buildings in a
wireless deployment, enables hosts (virtual machines or wireless users) to move around freely
without changing their IP addresses. However, when IP subnets are stretched, inefficient routing
(traffic tromboning) can occur because the default gateway router might not be local to the roaming
hosts.
Distributed Virtual Routing (DvR) addresses this problem by distributing the routing instance to all
switches that have an IP interface in the IP subnet or VLAN. Virtual machines use their first hop Top
of the Rack (TOR) switches to be their default gateways. In wireless deployments users can roam
between buildings and each building provides default gateway routing capabilities for the users, thus
distributing the load and optimizing traffic patterns.
By solving the problem of inefficient routing caused by the Trombone effect, DvR effectively reduces
latency in real-time applications such as voice and video.
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New in this release
Note:
In 6.0, DvR is a demo feature only. This feature will be generally available in Release 6.0.1.
DvR requires a Premier license.
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
EDM support for viewing licenses
You can now use EDM to view information about the license file on the switch.
For more information, see Administering.
Entity MIB - Physical Table
The Entity MIB - Physical Table assists in the discovery of functional components on the switch. The
Entity MIB - Physical Table supports a physical interface table that includes information about the
chassis, power supply, fan, I/O cards, console, and management port.
For more information, see Administering.
Fabric Attach Zero Touch Client Attachment
Fabric Attach Zero Touch Client Attachment provides the ability for an FA client to automatically
attach to an existing Shortest Path Bridging Network and provide for automatic configuration of the
service identifier (I-SID) and virtual LAN based on FA client element type. FA clients must signal the
desire to join an SPB network through the use of specific LLDP TLVs.
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Fabric RSPAN (Mirror to I-SID)
With Fabric RSPAN (Mirror to I-SID) feature, mirrored traffic captured from any switch in the network
is sent to a remote switch over an SPB cloud for traffic analysis. With this feature, you can monitor
traffic on ports from different switches connected in the network using just one network analyzer
connected to a remote switch which acts as a collector. The source device where the traffic is
mirrored to an I-SID is known as Mirroring BEB (Backbone Edge Bridge), and the remote device
where the traffic analyzer is connected for mirrored traffic analysis is known as Monitoring BEB.
Remote mirroring of traffic is not supported on NNI ports, Fabric Extend Layer 2 core ports, and
Open Networking Adapter (ONA) devices and ports.
For more information, see Troubleshooting.
Forgiving mode for CWDM and DWDM SFP+ transceivers
The switch now operates in forgiving mode for coarse wave division multiplexing (CWDM) and
dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) SFP+ transceivers. For all other SFP+ transceivers, the
switch continues to operate in strict mode.
For more information, see Installing Transceivers and Optical Components.
Increased VRF and L3 VSN scaling
You can now use a boot config flag to increase the number of Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF)
instances on the switch from the previous maximum of 24. This enhancement also impacts the
number of Layer 3 Virtual Services Networks (VSN). The maximum number of supported VRFs and
Layer 3 VSNs differs depending on the hardware platform.
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Features
Important:
If you use the boot config flag to increase the number of VRFs and Layer 3 VSNs, and the
switch operates in SPBM mode, the switch reduces the number of configurable VLANs.
A Premier or Premier + MACsec license is required to use more than 24 VRFs.
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
Industry Standard Discovery Protocol (ISDP) (CDP compatible)
Industry Standard Discovery Protocol (ISDP) is a CDP compatible discovery protocol used to detect
directly connected networking equipment.
For more information, see Administering.
IPsec for the Out-of-band management port
This release adds IPsec support for IPv6 traffic on the out-of-band management interface.
For more information, see Configuring Security.
IEEE 802.3x Pause frame transmit
This release introduces support for flow control mode and the ability for an interface to send pause
frames. When congestion occurs on an egress port, the system can send pause frames to the
offending devices to stop the packet flow. The system uses flow control if the rate at which one or
more ports receives packets is greater than the rate at which the switch transmits packets.
For more information, see the following documents:
• Administering
• Monitoring Performance
Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP)
This release introduces support for Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) which has been
standardized by the IEEE as part of 802.1ab. LLDP enables you to advertise your identity and
capabilities and obtain the same information from a physically adjacent Layer 2 peer to detect and
correct network and configuration errors.
For more information, see Administering.
MACsec enhancements
MACsec updates in this release enable enhanced security where multiple Secure Association (SA)
Keys are internally derived from the configured Connectivity Association Key (CAK), to secure
communication on the link. These SA Keys are periodically refreshed to ensure that the same key is
not used for an extended period of time. From a provisioning perspective, the administrator still
configures a single shared CAK on the two ends of the MACsec enabled link. This CAK is now used
to internally derive multiple SA Keys. In order to differentiate the transmit and receive SA keys used
between two ends of a MACsec enabled link, one additional parameter has been added (keyparity <even|odd>). MACsec links should always be provisioned as odd/even pair.
After the upgrade, previously configured MACsec links will continue to be operational with earlier
MACsec implementations where fewer SAs were used to secure the link. In order to utilize the
enhanced security, it is strongly recommended to add the key-parity configuration, which will
enable multiple SA keys to be used to secure the link. This enhancement will also require CAK to be
a minimum of 20 characters to ensure derivation of stronger keys.
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New in this release
Note:
With this release, key-parity is an optional parameter. Future releases will make this a
mandatory parameter. As such, to avoid configuration breaks during upgrade to future releases,
it is strongly recommended that once you upgrade to VOSS 6.0, you should update your
existing MACsec configuration to include the key-parity keyword and provision the MACsec
links as odd/even pairs.
MACsec requires a Premier license.
For more information, see Configuring Security.
Network Load Balancing (NLB) Multicast operation
When you enable NLB multicast mode on a VLAN, the routed traffic destined to the NLB cluster is
flooded by default on all ports of the VLAN. All VLANs support multiple cluster IPs by default.
Multicast MAC flooding and static multicast ARP entries are not supported for NLB Unicast or NLB
Multicast in this release.
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and NLB.
nni-mstp boot config flag
The default value for the nni-mstp flag is false. In previous releases, MSTP was enabled for the
CIST and all MSTIs other than MSTI-62. In the current release, the default behavior of the MSTP on
SPBM NNI ports is that CIST is disabled automatically on the NNI and the NNI ports cannot be
members of any VLANs other than B-VLANs. You can override this by setting the nni-mstp flag to
true, which disables MSTP on MSTI-62, and allows any VLAN to be configured on NNI ports.
On SPBM NNI links, MSTP is disabled and no VLAN, except SPBM B-VLANs can be added. When
nni-mstp flag is set to true, it only disables MSTI 62 and additional VLANs on other MSTIs can be
added to NNI links.
Important:
Before you upgrade
If you upgrade to a new release that introduces support for the boot config flags nni-mstp
command, and your previous configuration included coexistence of MSTP and SPB-based
services on the NNI ports in the configuration file or your current release supports the nni-mstp
boot configuration and the flag is set to false, take note of the following:
During startup, your configuration file will load successfully with only one change, in that the nnimstp flag is set to true. Your system will operate the same as before upgrading. Save the
configuration file. If you do not save your configuration, you continue to see the following
message on reboot:
Warning Detected brouter and/or vlans other than BVLANs on NNI ports.
Setting the boot config flag nni-mstp to true. Saving configuration
avoids repetition of this warning on reboot.
For more information, see Administering.
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) for log notification
The switch supports the SMTP feature to send email notification of failed components or other
critical log-event conditions. The switch can also send periodic health status notifications.
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VOSS feature differences
For more information, see the following documents:
• Troubleshooting
• Monitoring Performance
• Administering
sFlow
sFlow monitors the traffic on routers and switches in a network, and captures traffic statistics about
those devices. Because sFlow performs random samples and periodic counter samples, it is
scalable for network-wide monitoring, which includes high speed networks.
For more information, see Monitoring Performance.
SPB-PIM Gateway
SPB-PIM Gateway (SPB-PIM GW) provides multicast inter-domain communication between an SPB
network and a Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) network. SPB-PIM GW accomplishes this interdomain communication across a special gateway VLAN. The gateway VLAN communicates with the
PIM network through the PIM protocol messaging and translates the PIM network requirements into
SPB language and vice versa.
For more information, see Configuring SPB-PIM Gateway.
SSH client disable
This release adds the ability to disable the SSH client in the software.
For more information, see Administering.
VXLAN Gateway
VXLAN Gateway is a hardware-based virtual tunnel end point (VTEP) that terminates virtual
extensible LAN (VXLAN) tunnels. The VXLAN tunnels “stretch” emulated Layer 2 segments over an
IP network. Each VTEP has at least one segment ID called a VXLAN Network Identifier (VNID). This
VNID mechanism allows up to 16 million VXLAN segments to coexist within the same administrative
domain. Each VTEP can support multiple VNIDs.
The VXLAN Gateway feature provides a solution that allows VXLANs to seamlessly communicate
with traditional VLANs, other VXLANs, or Fabric Connect I-SIDs. For more information about
VXLAN, see the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard RFC 7348.
VXLAN Gateway requires a Premier license.
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and NLB.
VOSS feature differences
Avaya has implemented feature parity between the VSP Operating System Software (VOSS)
platforms in all but a few exceptions. Some features are supported in one platform and not another
to maintain compatibility with previous releases. In other cases, the difference is because of the role
of the switch in the network.
The following table summarizes the feature differences between the platforms in this release.
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New in this release
Feature
VSP 4000 Series
VSP 7200 Series
VSP 8000 Series
Channelization of 40
Gbps ports
Not applicable
Supported
Supported
CFM CMAC for the CVLAN
Supported
Not supported
Not supported
DvR Controller
Not supported
Supported
Supported
DvR Leaf
Demo only
Supported
Supported
Endura scripts
Supported
Not supported
Not supported
Fabric RSPAN
Flow-based Mirroring into
single ISID only
Supported
Supported
FDB protected by port
Supported
Not supported
Not supported
Ingress Dual Rate Port
Policers
Supported
Not supported
Not supported
MAC FDB Protect by
port
Supported
Not supported
Not supported
MAC security limitlearning
Supported
Not supported
Not supported
Multicast Route
Statistics for IPv4 and
IPv6
Not supported
Supported
Supported
NLB Unicast and
Multicast
Not supported
Supported
Supported
SPM-PIM GW
Controller
Not supported on VSP
4850
Supported
Supported
SPM-PIM GW Interface
Supported
Supported
Supported
PoE/PoE+ Allocation
Using LLDP
Supported on VSP
Not supported
4850GTS-PWR+ and
VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR+
Not supported
Port licensing
Not supported
Applicable to Port
licensed VSP 7254XSQ
fiber switch and VSP
7254XTQ copper switch
Not supported
QoS
Supported
Supported with
exceptions:
Supported with
exceptions:
• Classification does not
have routed packet
classification
• Classification does not
have routed packet
classification
• No ingress policerUses ingress port rate
limiting instead
• No ingress policerUses ingress port rate
limiting instead
Supported
Supported
sFLOW
Reduced sampling rate
Table continues…
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Documentation changes
Feature
VSP 4000 Series
VSP 7200 Series
VSP 8000 Series
Software licensing
(Premier)
Supports the Avaya Data
Licensing Portal and the
Product Licensing &
Delivery System (PLDS)
Supports Product
Licensing & Delivery
System (PLDS) only
Supports Product
Licensing & Delivery
System (PLDS) only
Use of
Required
Open Networking Adapt
er for Fabric Extend
Not required
Not required
VXLAN Gateway
Supported
Supported
Not supported
Documentation changes
The following changes have been made to the Documentation suite in this release.
Relocation of image upgrade information
The information on image upgrade has been moved from Release Notes to Administering.
For more information, see Administering.
Resources
Information about related resources is moved to the last chapter in this document.
Support changes
This release makes the following support changes to pre-existing features.
ECMP support for VXLAN Gateway and Fabric Extend
VXLAN Gateway requires ECMP support to communicate with remote VTEPs. The software
extended this ECMP support to Fabric Extend Layer 3 core tunnels. Therefore, if your switch
supports VXLAN Gateway, it also supports ECMP for both VXLAN Gateway and Fabric Extend.
Fabric Extend IP over ELAN/VPLS enhancement
This release removes the single next hop / ARP restriction on VSP 7200 and VSP 8000 series
switches. This feature allows multiple switches running Fabric Extend IP to be directly connected
over a Layer 2 broadcast domain without the need for loopback VRFs.
SPB Ethertype – change in behavior on NNI
SPB switches now follow the configured Ethertype on egress from NNI interfaces. On ingress the
switches will honor Ethertype of either 0x8100 and 0x88a8.
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Chapter 3: Important notices
This section describes the supported hardware and software scaling capabilities, and provides
important information for this release. Unless specifically stated otherwise, the notices in this section
apply to all VOSS platforms.
Hardware compatibility
This section lists the hardware compatibility for all VOSS platforms.
Hardware compatibility for VSP 4000 Series
This section lists the Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4000 Series hardware and indicates the
software release support.
Note:
4.1 is the first VOSS release. Release numbers earlier than 4.1 are releases specific to VSP
4000.
Part numbers that end in GS are the TAA-compliant version of the hardware.
VSP 4000 hardware
Part number
Initial
release
4.2
4.2.1
5.0
5.1
5.1.1
6.0
4.0.50
—
—
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC4400A03-E6 VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR+
(no power cord)
4.0.40
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC4400E03-E6 VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR+
(NA power cord)
4.0.40
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC4400x05-E6
4.0
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC4400004-E6
Model number
VSP 4450GSX-DC
VSP 4450GSX-PWR+
Supported release
Note: Replace
the “x” with a
country specific
power cord
Table continues…
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14
Hardware compatibility
Part number
Model number
Initial
release
Supported release
4.2
4.2.1
5.0
5.1
5.1.1
6.0
code. See the
footnote for
details.
EC4400A05E6GS
VSP 4450GSX-PWR+
TAA Compliant (no power
cord)
4.0.50
—
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC4400E05E6GS
VSP 4450GSX-PWR+
TAA Compliant (NA
power cord)
4.0.50
—
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC4800078-E6
VSP 4850GTS DC
3.0
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC4800x78-E6
VSP 4850GTS
3.0
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
VSP 4850GTS-PWR+
3.0
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC4800x78E6GS
Note: Replace
the “x” with a
country specific
power cord
code. See the
footnote for
details.
EC4800x88-E6
EC4800x88E6GS
Note: Replace
the “x” with a
country specific
power cord
code. See the
footnote for
details.
Note: The character (x) in the order number indicates the power cord code. Replace the “x” with the proper
letter to indicate the desired product nationalization. See the following for details:
“A”: No power cord included.
“B”: Includes European “Schuko” power cord common in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, The
Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden.
“C”: Includes power cord commonly used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.
“D”: Includes power cord commonly used in Japan.
“E”: Includes North American power cord.
“F”: Includes Australian power cord.
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Important notices
Compatible transceivers
Important:
Avaya recommends using Avaya-branded SFP, and SFP+ transceivers as they have been
through extensive qualification and testing. Avaya will not be responsible for issues related to
non-Avaya branded transceivers.
• The VSP 4000 Series operates in forgiving mode for SFP transceivers, which means that
the switch will bring up the port operationally when using non-Avaya SFP transceivers.
Avaya does not provide support for operational issues related to these SFPs, but they will
operate and the port link will come up. The switch logs the device as an unsupported or
unknown device.
• The VSP 4000 Series operates in forgiving mode for coarse wave digital multiplexing
(CWDM) and dense wave digital multiplexing (DWDM) SFP+ transceivers, and will bring
the port up operationally when using non-Avaya SFP+ transceivers. For all other SFP+
transceivers, the switch operates in strict mode, which means that the switch will not bring
the port up operationally when using non-Avaya SFP+ transceivers.
• The VSP 4000 Series operates in forgiving mode for SFP+ direct attached cables, which
means that the switch will bring up the port operationally when using Non-Avaya direct
attached cables. Avaya does not provide support for operational issues related to these
DACs, but they will operate and the port link will come up.
For more information about compatible transceivers, see Installing Transceivers and Optical
Components on VSP Operating System Software, NN47227-301.
Important operational note for VSP 4000 switches
This section provides information to take into consideration to prevent system operation failure.
Operational consideration for USB Flash Drive on factory supplied and converted VSP 4000
switches
Warning:
The USB FLASH drive on all models of VSP 4850 (factory built and converted from ERS 4850) must be
treated as a permanent non-removable part of the switch and must NEVER be removed from the
switch to ensure proper operation. Additionally, the USB cover must be installed to ensure additional
protection against removal. The USB FLASH drive on the VSP 4850 switch is uniquely and
permanently bound to the operating system of the switch it is first used on and cannot be transferred to
a different switch. Removal (and reinsertion) of the USB FLASH drive from the switch is not supported
as it can permanently compromise the switch functionality and render it non-functional.
Hardware compatibility for VSP 7200 Series
This section lists the VSP 7200 Series hardware and indicates the software release support.
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16
Hardware compatibility
VSP 7200 hardware
Part number
Model
number
Initial
release
Supported release
4.2.1
5.0
5.1
5.1.1
6.0
EC720001FE6
VSP
7254XSQ
DC (Front
to back
airflow)
4.2.1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC7200x1BE6
VSP
7254XSQ
4.2.1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC720002FE6
VSP
7254XTQ
DC (Front
to back
airflow)
4.2.1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC7200x2BE6
VSP
7254XTQ
4.2.1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC7200x1FE6
B represents
back to front
airflow.
F represents
front to back
airflow.
Note: Replace
the “x” with a
country
specific power
cord code.
See the
footnote for
details.
EC7200x2FE6
B represents
back to front
airflow.
F represents
front to back
airflow.
Note: Replace
the “x” with a
Table continues…
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17
Important notices
Part number
Model
number
Initial
release
Supported release
4.2.1
5.0
5.1
5.1.1
6.0
VSP
7254XSQ
Port
Licensed
5.1
N/A
N/A
Y
Y
Y
VSP
7254XTQ
Port
Licensed
5.1
N/A
N/A
Y
Y
Y
country
specific power
cord code.
See the
footnote for
details.
EC7200x3BE6
EC7200x3FE6
B represents
back to front
airflow.
F represents
front to back
airflow.
Note: Replace
the “x” with a
country
specific power
cord code.
See the
footnote for
details.
EC7200x4BE6
EC7200x4FE6
B represents
back to front
airflow.
F represents
front to back
airflow.
Note: Replace
the “x” with a
country
specific power
cord code.
See the
footnote for
details.
Table continues…
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18
Hardware compatibility
Part number
Model
number
Initial
release
Supported release
4.2.1
5.0
5.1
5.1.1
6.0
*Note: The character (x) in the order number indicates the power cord code. Replace the “x” with the proper
letter to indicate desired product nationalization. See the following for details:
“A”: No power cord included.
“B”: Includes European “Schuko” power cord common in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, The
Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden.
“C”: Includes power cord commonly used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.
“D”: Includes power cord commonly used in Japan.
“E”: Includes North American power cord.
“F”: Includes Australian power cord.
Compatible transceivers
Important:
Avaya recommends using Avaya-branded SFP, SFP+, and QSFP+ transceivers as they have
been through extensive qualification and testing. Avaya will not be responsible for issues related
to non-Avaya branded transceivers.
• The VSP 7200 Series operates in forgiving mode for SFP transceivers, which means that
the switch will bring up the port operationally when using non-Avaya SFP transceivers.
Avaya does not provide support for operational issues related to these SFPs, but they will
operate and the port link will come up. The switch logs the device as an unsupported or
unknown device.
• The VSP 7200 Series operates in strict mode for some SFP+ and QSFP+ transceivers,
which means that the switch will not bring the port up operationally when using non-Avaya
SFP+ or QSFP+ transceivers. For coarse wave digital multiplexing (CWDM) and dense
wave digital multiplexing (DWDM) SFP+ transceivers, the switch operates in forgiving
mode and will bring up the port operationally when using non-Avaya SFP+ transceivers of
these types.
• The VSP 7200 Series operates in forgiving mode for SFP+ and QSFP+ direct attached
cables, which means that the switch will bring up the port operationally when using NonAvaya direct attached cables. Avaya does not provide support for operational issues
related to these DACs, but they will operate and the port link will come up.
For more information about compatible transceivers, see Installing Transceivers and Optical
Components on VSP Operating System Software, NN47227-301.
VSP 7200 operational notes
• The VSP 7254XSQ has a PHYless design, which is typical for Data Center top of rack
switches. The benefits of a PHYless design are lower power consumption and lower latency.
However, due to the PHYless design, the following transceivers are not supported:
- AA1403017-E6: 1-port 10GBASE-LRM SFP+
- AA1403016-E6: 1-port 10GBase-ZR/ZW SFP+
The AA1403165 10GBASE-ZR CWDM DDI SFP+ transceiver can be substituted for
AA1403016-E6 10GBASE-ZR/ZW SFP+.
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Important notices
• Software partitions the switch into two logical slots: Slot 1 and Slot 2.
- Slot 1: 10 Gbps ports: 1 - 48
- Slot 2: 40 Gbps ports: 1 - 6
• Channelization is supported on the 40 Gbps QSFP+ ports.
• MACsec support:
- MACsec is only supported on the VSP 7254XTQ 10 Gbps ports.
- MACsec is not supported on VSP 7254XSQ 10 Gbps ports.
- MACsec is not supported on VSP 7254XTQ and VSP 7254XSQ 40 Gbps ports whether
channelization is enabled or not.
• Port licensing support:
On the port licensed VSP 7254XSQ fiber switch:
- 24 ports (Slot 1, ports 25 to 48) out of the 48 1/10 GbE SFP/SFP+ ports require a Port
License to be unlocked.
- two ports (Slot 2, ports 5 and 6) out of the six 40 GbE QSFP+ ports require a Port License to
be unlocked.
On the port licensed VSP 7254XTQ copper switch:
- 24 ports (Slot 1, ports 25 to 48) out of the 48 100 Mbps/1 GbE/10 GbE RJ-45 ports require a
Port License to be unlocked.
- two ports (Slot 2, ports 5 and 6) out of the six 40 GbE QSFP+ ports require a Port License to
be unlocked
• 1000BASE-T SFP (AA1419043-E6) will only operate at 1 Gbps speeds when used on a VSP
7254XSQ.
• When you use 1 Gigabit Ethernet SFP transceivers on VSP 7254XSQ, the software disables
auto-negotiation on the port:
- If you use 1 Gbps fiber SFP transceivers, the remote end must also have auto-negotiation
disabled.
- If you use 1 Gbps copper SFP transceivers, the remote end must have auto-negotiation
enabled. If not, the link will not be established.
• When a port on VSP 7254XSQ is disabled or enabled, or a cable replaced, or the switch
rebooted, the remote link can flap twice.
• Avaya recommends enabling auto-negotiation to ensure proper operation at 100 Mbps speeds
on VSP 7254XTQ:
- Link instability will be seen if both ends are set to 100 Mbps auto-negotiation disabled and
you use a straight through cable.
- If Link instability is seen when you use a cross-over cable, a port disable or enable can fix
the issue.
For more information, see Installing Transceivers and Optical Components on VSP Operating
System Software, NN47227-301.
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Hardware compatibility
Hardware compatibility for VSP 8000 Series
This section lists the VSP 8000 Series hardware and indicates the software release support.
Note:
4.1 is the first VOSS release. Release numbers earlier than 4.1 are releases specific to VSP
8000.
Part numbers that end in GS are the TAA-compliant version of the hardware.
VSP 8000 hardware
Part number
EC8200x01-E6
Model number
Initial
release
Supported release
4.2
4.2.1
5.0
5.1
5.1.1
6.0
VSP 8284XSQ
4.0
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC8200001-E6
VSP 8284XSQ-DC
4.0.50
—
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC8400001-E6
VSP 8404-DC
4.2.1
—
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC8400x01-E6
VSP 8404
4.2
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC8200x01-E6GS
Note: Replace the “x”
with a country specific
power cord code. See
the footnote for
details.
EC8200x01-E6GS
Note: Replace the “x”
with a country specific
power cord code. See
the footnote for
details.
Ethernet Switch Modules (ESM) — VSP 8400 only
Important:
Ensure the switch runs, at a minimum, the noted initial software release before you install an ESM.
EC8404001-E6
8424XS
4.2
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
8424XT
4.2
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
8408QQ
4.2
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
8418XSQ
4.2
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC8404001-E6GS
EC8404002-E6
EC8404002-E6GS
EC8404003-E6
EC8404003-E6GS
EC8404005-E6
Table continues…
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Important notices
Part number
Model number
Initial
release
Supported release
4.2
4.2.1
5.0
5.1
5.1.1
6.0
8418XTQ
5.0
—
—
Y
Y
Y
Y
8424GS
5.0
—
—
Y
Y
Y
Y
8424GT
5.0
—
—
Y
Y
Y
Y
EC8404005-E6GS
EC8404006-E6
EC8404006-E6GS
EC8404007-E6
EC8404007-E6GS
EC8404008-E6
EC8404008-E6GS
*Note: The character (x) in the order number indicates the power cord code. Replace the “x” with the proper
letter to indicate desired product nationalization. See the following for details:
“A”: No power cord included.
“B”: Includes European “Schuko” power cord common in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, The
Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden.
“C”: Includes power cord commonly used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.
“D”: Includes power cord commonly used in Japan.
“E”: Includes North American power cord.
“F”: Includes Australian power cord.
Compatible transceivers
Important:
Avaya recommends using Avaya-branded SFP, SFP+, and QSFP+ transceivers as they have
been through extensive qualification and testing. Avaya will not be responsible for issues related
to non-Avaya branded transceivers.
• The VSP 8000 Series operates in forgiving mode for SFP transceivers, which means that
the switch will bring up the port operationally when using non-Avaya SFP transceivers.
Avaya does not provide support for operational issues related to these SFPs, but they will
operate and the port link will come up. The switch logs the device as an unsupported or
unknown device.
• The VSP 8000 Series operates in strict mode for some SFP+ and QSFP+ transceivers,
which means that the switch will not bring the port up operationally when using non-Avaya
SFP+ or QSFP+ transceivers. For coarse wave digital multiplexing (CWDM) and dense
wave digital multiplexing (DWDM) SFP+ transceivers, the switch operates in forgiving
mode and will bring up the port operationally when using non-Avaya SFP+ transceivers of
these types.
• The VSP 8000 Series operates in forgiving mode for SFP+ and QSFP+ direct attached
cables, which means that the switch will bring up the port operationally when using NonAvaya direct attached cables. Avaya does not provide support for operational issues
related to these DACs, but they will operate and the port link will come up.
For more information about compatible transceivers, see Installing Transceivers and Optical
Components on VSP Operating System Software, NN47227-301.
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Hardware compatibility
Power supply compatibility
You can use certain power supplies in more than one VOSS platform. This section lists the power
supplies and indicates the compatible platforms.
For more specific information on each power supply, see the following documents:
• Installing Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4850GTS Series, NN46251-300
• Installing Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4450GTX-HT-PWR+ Switch, NN46251–304
• Installing Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4450GSX-PWR+ Switch, NN46251-307
• Installing the Avaya Virtual Services Platform 8000 Series, NN47227-300
• Installing the Avaya Virtual Services Platform 7200 Series, NN47228-302
VSP 4000 Series power supplies
Platform
300 W AC
300 W DC
1,000 W AC
1,000 W AC-HT
AL1905x08-E5
AL1905005-E5
AL1905x21-E6
EC4005x03-E6HT
VSP 4850GTS-DC
—
Y
—
—
VSP 4850GTSPWR+
—
—
Y
Y
VSP 4850GTS
Y
—
—
—
VSP 4450GTX-HTPWR+
—
—
—
Y
VSP 4450GSX-DC
—
Y
—
—
VSP 4450GSXPWR+
—
—
Y
Y
VSP 7200 Series and VSP 8000 Series power supplies
Platform
460 W AC
front-toback
460 W AC
back-tofront
800 W AC
front-toback
800 W AC
front-toback
800 W AC
back-tofront
800 W DC
front-toback
EC7205x1FE6
EC7205x1BE6
EC8005x01E6
EC7205x0FE6
EC7205x0BE6
EC8005001E6
VSP
8284XSQ
—
—
Y
—
—
—
VSP
8284XSQ-DC
—
—
—
—
—
Y
VSP 8404
—
—
Y
—
—
—
VSP 8404DC
—
—
—
—
—
Y
Table continues…
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23
Important notices
Platform
460 W AC
front-toback
460 W AC
back-tofront
800 W AC
front-toback
800 W AC
front-toback
800 W AC
back-tofront
800 W DC
front-toback
EC7205x1FE6
EC7205x1BE6
EC8005x01E6
EC7205x0FE6
EC7205x0BE6
EC8005001E6
VSP
7254XSQ
front-to-back
Y
—
—
—
—
—
VSP
7254XSQ
back-to-front
—
Y
—
—
—
—
VSP
7254XTQ
front-to-back
—
—
—
Y
—
—
VSP
7254XTQ
back-to-front
—
—
—
—
Y
—
VSP
7254XSQ-DC
—
—
—
—
—
Y
VSP
7254XTQ-DC
—
—
—
—
—
Y
Note: The character (x) in the order number indicates the power cord code. Replace the “x” with the
proper letter to indicate desired product nationalization. See the following for details:
“A”: No power cord included.
“B”: Includes European “Schuko” power cord common in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France,
Germany, The Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden.
“C”: Includes power cord commonly used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.
“D”: Includes power cord commonly used in Japan.
“E”: Includes North American power cord.
“F”: Includes Australian power cord.
Software scaling capabilities
This section lists software scaling capabilities of the following products:
• Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4000 Series
• Avaya Virtual Services Platform 7200 Series
• Avaya Virtual Services Platform 8000 Series
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Software scaling capabilities
Table 1: Software scaling capabilities
Maximum number supported
VSP 4000 Series
VSP 7200 Series
VSP 8000 Series
n/a
200*
200*
Layer 2
Directed Broadcast
interfaces
Note:
* The number of Directed Broadcast interfaces must be equal to, or less than, 200. However, if you
configure VLANs with both NLB and Directed Broadcast, you can only scale up to 100 VLANs.
MAC table size (without
SPBM)
32,000
224,000
224,000
MAC table size (with
SPBM)
16,000
112,000
112,000
Port based VLANs
4,059
4,059
4,059
Private VLANs
1,000
4,059
4,059
Protocol based VLANs
(IPv6 only)
1
1
1
RSTP instances
1
1
1
MSTP instances
12
12
12
LACP aggregators
24
54 (up to 72 with
channelization)
84 (up to 96 with
channelization)
Ports per LACP
aggregator
8 active
8 active
8-active
MLT groups
50
54 (up to 72 with
channelization)
84 (up to 96 with
channelization)
Ports per MLT group
8
8
8
SLPP VLANs
128
128
128
VLACP interfaces
50
54 (up to 72 with
channelization)
84 (up to 96 with
channelization)
Microsoft NLB cluster IP
interfaces
n/a
200*
200*
Note:
* The number of NLB cluster IP interfaces multiplied by the number of configured clusters must be less
than or equal to 200. The number of NLB cluster IP interfaces is the key, not the number of VLANs.
You can configure 1 VLAN with up to 200 NLB cluster IP interfaces or configure up to 200 VLANs with
1 NLB cluster IP interface per VLAN.
For example: 1 NLB cluster IP interface x 200 clusters = 200 or 2 NLB cluster IP
interfaces x 100 clusters = 200 However, if you configure VLANs with both NLB and
Table continues…
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25
Important notices
Maximum number supported
VSP 4000 Series
VSP 7200 Series
VSP 8000 Series
Directed Broadcast, you can only scale up to 100 VLANs assuming there is only 1 NLB cluster IP
interface per VLAN.
IP Unicast
IP interfaces (IPv4/IPv6)
256
506*
506*
VRRP interfaces (IPv4/
IPv6)
64
252*
252*
Routed Split Multi-Link
Trunking (RSMLT)
interfaces (IPv4/IPv6)
252
252*
252*
Note:
* The number of IP interfaces plus the number of VRRP interfaces plus the number of RSMLT
interfaces plus 2 (if IP shortcuts is enabled) plus 1 for DvR should not exceed 506.
VRRP interfaces with fast
timers (200ms) - IPv4/
IPv6
24
24
24
DvR Virtual IP interfaces
n/a
501 with vIST
501 with vIST
502 without vIST
502 without vIST
ECMP groups/paths per
group
500/4
1,000/8
1,000/8
OSPF v2/v3 interfaces
100
500
500
OSPF v2/v3 neighbors
(adjacencies)
100
500
500
OSPF areas
12 for each VRF
12 for each VRF
12 for each VRF
64 for the switch
80 for the switch
80 for the switch
IPv4 ARP table
6,000
32,000
32,000
IPv4 CLIP interfaces
64
64
64
IPv4 RIP interfaces
24
200
200
IPv4 BGP peers
12
12
12
IPv4 VRF instances
128 including mgmt VRF
and GRT
256 including mgmt VRF
and GRT
256 including mgmt VRF
and GRT
IPv4 static ARP entries
2,000 for each VRF
2,000 for each VRF
2,000 for each VRF
1,000 for the switch
10,000 for the switch
10,000 for the switch
1,000 for each VRF
1,000 for each VRF
1,000 for each VRF
1,000 for the switch
5,000 for the switch
5,000 for the switch
500 for each VRF
500 for each VRF
500 for each VRF
5,000 for the switch
5,000 for the switch
5,000 for the switch
IPv4 static routes
IPv4 route policies
Table continues…
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26
Software scaling capabilities
Maximum number supported
VSP 4000 Series
VSP 7200 Series
VSP 8000 Series
IPv4 UDP forwarding
entries
128
512
512
IPv4 DHCP Relay
forwarding entries
128
1,024
1,024
IPv6 DHCP Snoop entries 1,024
in Source Binding Table
1,024
1,024
IPv6 Neighbor table
4,000
8,000
8,000
IPv6 static entries in
Source Binding Table
256
256
256
IPv6 static neighbor
records
128
256
256
IPv6 CLIP interfaces
64
64
64
IPv6 static routes
1,000
1,000
1,000
IPv6 6in4 configured
tunnels
254
506
506
IPv6 DHCP Relay
forwarding
128
512
512
IPv6 RIPng interfaces
24
48
48
Layer 3 route table entries
IPv4 RIP routes
IPv4 OSPF routes
IPv4 BGP routes
IPv4 SPB shortcut routes
IPv4 SPB Layer 3 VSN
routes
See Table 2: IPv4 and IPv6 route scaling on page 30.
IPv6 OSPFv3 routes GRT only
IPv6 SPB shortcut routes
- GRT only
IPv6 RIPng routes
IP Multicast
Combination of VLANs +
4,059
number of IPv4 senders +
IPv6 senders (non-SPBM
mode)
8,192
8,192
Combination of Layer 2
VSNs + number of IPv4
8,192
8,192
4,059
Table continues…
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Important notices
Maximum number supported
VSP 4000 Series
VSP 7200 Series
VSP 8000 Series
4,059
4,059
4,059
PIM interfaces (IPv4/IPv6) 128 Active
128 Active
128 Active
PIM Neighbors (IPv4/
IPv6) (GRT Only)
128
128
128
PIM-SSM static channels
(IPv4/IPv6)
512
4,000
4,000
Multicast receivers/IGMP
joins (IPv4/IPv6) (per
switch)
1,000
6,000
6,000
Total multicast routes
(S,G,V) (IPv4/IPv6) (per
switch)
1,000
6,000
6,000
Total multicast routes
(S,G,V) (IPv4) on a PIMGateway configured
switch
1,000
3,000
3,000
Static multicast routes
(S,G,V) (IPv4/IPv6)
512
4,000
4,000
Multicast enabled Layer 2
VSN (IPv4)
1,000
2,000
2,000
Multicast enabled Layer 3
VSN (IPv4)
128 including mgmt VRF
and GRT
256 including mgmt VRF
and GRT
256 including mgmt VRF
and GRT
SPB-PIM Gateway
controller S,Gs (source
announcements) with
MSDP (IPv4)
6,000
6,000
6,000
SPB-PIM Gateway
controllers per SPB fabric
(IPv4)
5
5
5
SPB-PIM Gateway nodes
per SPB fabric (IPv4)
64
64
64
SPB-PIM Gateway
interfaces per BEB (IPv4)
64
64
64
PIM neighbors per SPBPIM Gateway node (IPv4)
64
64
64
501 with vIST
501 with vIST
senders + number of IPv6
senders (SPBM mode)
IGMP/MLD interfaces
(IPv4/IPv6)
Distributed Virtual Routing (DvR)
DvR Virtual IP interfaces
n/a
Table continues…
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Software scaling capabilities
Maximum number supported
VSP 4000 Series
VSP 7200 Series
502 without vIST
VSP 8000 Series
502 without vIST
DvR domains per SPB
fabric
n/a
16
16
Controller nodes per DvR
domain
n/a
8
8
Leaf nodes per DvR
domain
n/a
250
250
DvR enabled Layer 2
VSNs
n/a
501 with vIST
501 with vIST
502 without vIST
502 without vIST
DvR host route scaling
n/a
32,000
32,000
Note:
On the DvR leaf, you must enable the VRF-scaling boot configuration flag if more than 24 VRFs are
required in the DvR domain.
VXLAN Gateway
MAC addresses in base
interworking mode
n/a
112,000
112,000
MAC addresses in full
interworking mode
n/a
74,000
74,000
VNI IDs per node
n/a
2,000
2,000
VTEP destinations per
node or VTEP
n/a
500
500
Total IPv4 Ingress rules/
ACEs (Port/VLAN based,
Security/QoS filters)
1,530
766
766
Total IPv4 Egress rules/
ACEs (Port based,
Security filters)
254
252
252
Total IPv6 Ingress rules/
ACEs (Port/VLAN based,
Security/QoS filters)
256
256
256
32
32
Filters, QoS, and Security
EAPoL 802.1x (clients per 32
port)
OAM and Diagnostics
FTP sessions (IPv4/IPv6)
4
4
4
Rlogin sessions (IPv4/
IPv6)
8
8
8
Table continues…
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Important notices
Maximum number supported
VSP 4000 Series
VSP 7200 Series
VSP 8000 Series
SSH sessions (IPv4/IPv6)
8 total (any combination
of IPv4 and IPv6)
8 total (any combination
of IPv4 and IPv6)
8 total (any combination
of IPv4 and IPv6)
Telnet sessions (IPv4/
IPv6)
8
8
8
Mirrored ports
49
53 (up to 71 with
channelization)
83 (up to 95 with
channelization)
Fabric RSPAN Port mirror Port mirror sessions can
instances per switch
be mapped to a
(Ingress only)
maximum of 24 unique ISID offsets for Ingres
Mirror. Only one I-SID
offset for Egress Mirror.
Port mirror sessions can
be mapped to a
maximum of 24 unique ISID offsets for Ingres
Mirror. Only one I-SID
offset for Egress Mirror.
Port mirror sessions can
be mapped to a
maximum of 24 unique ISID offsets for Ingres
Mirror. Only one I-SID
offset for Egress Mirror.
Fabric RSPAN Flow
mirror instances per
switch (Ingress only)
Filter ACL ACE sessions
can be mapped to only 1
mirror I-SID offset.
Filter ACL ACE sessions
can be mapped to a
maximum of 24 unique ISID offsets.
Filter ACL ACE sessions
can be mapped to a
maximum of 24 unique ISID offsets.
Fabric RSPAN Monitoring
ISIDs (network value)
1000 Monitoring I-SIDs
across SPB network.
1000 Monitoring I-SIDs
across SPB network.
1000 Monitoring I-SIDs
across SPB network.
sFlow sampling limit
100 samples per second
3,000 samples per
second
3,000 samples per
second
The following table provides information on IPv4 and IPv6 route scaling.
The route scaling does not depend on the protocol itself, but rather the general system limitation in
the following configuration modes:
• URPF check mode - Enable this boot configuration flag to support Unicast Reverse Path
Forwarding check mode.
• IPv6 mode - Enable this boot configuration flag to support IPv6 routes with prefix-lengths
greater than 64 bits. When the IPv6-mode is enabled, the maximum number of IPv4 routing
table entries decreases. This flag does not apply to all hardware platforms.
Table 2: IPv4 and IPv6 route scaling
URPF
mode
IPv6 mode
VSP 4000 Series
IPv4
IPv6
Prefix less
than 64
Prefix
greater
than 64
VSP 7200 Series and VSP 8000
Series
IPv4
IPv6
Prefix less
than 64
Prefix
greater
than 64
No
No
15,744
7,887
256
15,488
7,744
n/a
No
Yes
n/a
n/a
n/a
7,488
3,744
2,000
Yes
No
7,744
3,872
256
7,488
3,744
n/a
Yes
Yes
n/a
n/a
n/a
3,488
1,744
1,000
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Software scaling capabilities
VRF scaling note
By default, the system reserves VLAN IDs 4060 to 4094 for internal use.
If you enable both the VRF scaling and the SPBM mode boot configuration flags, the system
reserves additional VLAN IDs (3500 to 3999) for internal use.
By default, VRF scaling is disabled and SPBM mode is enabled.
Fabric scaling for VSP 4000 Series
The following table provides fabric scaling information.
Table 3: Fabric scaling
Attribute
vIST configured
vIST not configured
Number of SPB regions
1
1
Number of B-VIDs
2
2
Maximum number of Physical and
Logical (Fabric Extend) NNI
interfaces/adjacencies
VSP 4450 = 255
VSP 4450 = 255
VSP 4850 = 24
VSP 4850 = 24
SPBM enabled switches per
region (BEB + BCB)
500
500
Number of BEBs this node can
share services with (Layer 2
VSNs, Layer 3 VSNs, E-Tree,
Multicast, Transparent Port UNI).
vIST clusters are counted as 3
nodes. Each Fabric Extend ISIS
adjacency or VXLAN remote
VTEP reduces this number by 1.
500
500
Maximum number of vIST/IST
clusters this node can share ISIDs with
500
500
Layer 2 MAC table size (with
SPBM)
16,000
16,000
I-SIDs supported
See Table 4: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 32.
See Table 4: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 32.
Maximum number of Layer 2
VSNs per switch
1,000
1,000
Maximum number of Switched
UNI I-SIDs per switch
See Table 4: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
See Table 4: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
Table continues…
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Important notices
Attribute
vIST configured
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 32.
vIST not configured
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 32.
Maximum number of Transparent
Port UNIs per switch
48
48
Maximum number of E-Tree
PVLAN UNIs per switch
1,000
1,000
Maximum number of Layer 3
VSNs per switch
128 including mgmt VRF and GRT 128 including mgmt VRF and GRT
Maximum number of SPB Layer 3
multicast UNI I-SIDs
Maximum 1,000 for a BEB:
Maximum 1,000 for a BEB:
Due to internal resource sharing
IP Multicast scaling depends on
network topology. Switch will issue
warning when 85 and 90% of
available resources are reached.
Due to internal resource sharing
IP Multicast scaling depends on
network topology. Switch will issue
warning when 85 and 90% of
available resources are reached.
Maximum number of FA ISID/
VLAN assignments per port
94
94
Maximum number of IP multicast
S,Gs when operating as a BCB
1,000
1,000
Table 4: Number of I-SIDs supported for the number of configured IS-IS interfaces and adjacencies
(NNIs)
Number of IS-IS interfaces
(NNIs)
vIST configured
vIST not configured
4
1,000
1,000
6
1,000
1,000
10
650
1,000
20
350
700
48
n/a
n/a
72
n/a
n/a
100
n/a
n/a
128
n/a
n/a
250
n/a
n/a
Fabric scaling for VSP 7200 Series
The following table provides fabric scaling information.
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Software scaling capabilities
Table 5: Fabric scaling
Attribute
vIST configured
vIST not configured
Number of SPB regions
1
1
Number of B-VIDs
2
2
Maximum number of Physical and
Logical (Fabric Extend) NNI
interfaces/adjacencies
255
255
SPBM enabled switches per
region (BEB + BCB)
500
500
Number of BEBs this node can
share services with (Layer 2
VSNs, Layer 3 VSNs, E-Tree,
Multicast, Transparent Port UNI).
vIST clusters are counted as 3
nodes. Each Fabric Extend ISIS
adjacency or VXLAN remote
VTEP reduces this number by 1.
500
500
Maximum number of vIST/IST
clusters this node can share ISIDs with
330
330
Layer 2 MAC table size (with
SPBM)
112,000
112,000
I-SIDs supported
See Table 6: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 34.
See Table 6: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 34.
Maximum number of Layer 2
VSNs per switch
4,059
4,059
Maximum number of Switched
UNI I-SIDs per switch
See Table 6: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 34.
See Table 6: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 34.
Maximum number of Transparent
Port UNIs per switch
54 (up to 72 with channelization)
54 (up to 72 with channelization)
Maximum number of E-Tree
PVLAN UNIs per switch
4,059
4,059
Maximum number of Layer 3
VSNs per switch
256 including mgmt VRF and GRT 256 including mgmt VRF and GRT
Maximum number of SPB Layer 2/ See Table 6: Number of I-SIDs
Layer 3 multicast UNI I-SIDs (S,G) supported for the number of
per switch
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 34.
See Table 6: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 34.
Table continues…
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Important notices
Attribute
vIST configured
vIST not configured
Maximum number of FA ISID/
VLAN assignments per port
94
94
Maximum number of IP multicast
S,Gs when operating as a BCB
16,000
16,000
Table 6: Number of I-SIDs supported for the number of configured IS-IS interfaces and adjacencies
(NNIs)
Number of IS-IS interfaces
(NNIs)
vIST configured
vIST not configured
4
4,000
4,000
6
3,500
4,000
10
2,900
4,000
20
2,000
4,000
48
1,000
2,000
72
750
1,500
100
550
1,100
128
450
900
250
240
480
Fabric scaling for VSP 8000 Series
The following table provides fabric scaling information.
Table 7: Fabric scaling
Attribute
vIST configured
vIST not configured
Number of SPB regions
1
1
Number of B-VIDs
2
2
Maximum number of Physical and
Logical (Fabric Extend) NNI
interfaces/adjacencies
255
255
SPBM enabled switches per
region (BEB + BCB)
500
500
Number of BEBs this node can
share services with (Layer 2
VSNs, Layer 3 VSNs, E-Tree,
Multicast, Transparent Port UNI).
vIST clusters are counted as 3
nodes. Each Fabric Extend ISIS
500
500
Table continues…
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Software scaling capabilities
Attribute
adjacency or VXLAN remote
VTEP reduces this number by 1.
vIST configured
vIST not configured
Maximum number of vIST/IST
clusters this node can share ISIDs with
330
330
Layer 2 MAC table size (with
SPBM)
112,000
112,000
I-SIDs supported
See Table 8: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 35.
See Table 8: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 35.
Maximum number of Layer 2
VSNs per switch
4,059
4,059
Maximum number of Switched
UNI I-SIDs per switch
See Table 8: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 35.
See Table 8: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 35.
Maximum number of Transparent
Port UNIs per switch
84 (up to 96 with channelization)
84 (up to 96 with channelization)
Maximum number of E-Tree
PVLAN UNIs per switch
4,059
4,059
Maximum number of Layer 3
VSNs per switch
256 including mgmt VRF and GRT 256 including mgmt VRF and GRT
Maximum number of SPB Layer 2/ See Table 8: Number of I-SIDs
Layer 3 multicast UNI I-SIDs (S,G) supported for the number of
per switch
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 35.
See Table 8: Number of I-SIDs
supported for the number of
configured IS-IS interfaces and
adjacencies (NNIs) on page 35.
Maximum number of FA ISID/
VLAN assignments per port
94
94
Maximum number of IP multicast
S,Gs when operating as a BCB
16,000
16,000
Table 8: Number of I-SIDs supported for the number of configured IS-IS interfaces and adjacencies
(NNIs)
Number of IS-IS interfaces
(NNIs)
vIST configured
vIST not configured
4
4,000
4,000
6
3,500
4,000
10
2,900
4,000
20
2,000
4,000
48
1,000
2,000
Table continues…
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35
Important notices
Number of IS-IS interfaces
(NNIs)
vIST configured
vIST not configured
72
750
1,500
100
550
1,100
128
450
900
250
240
480
Recommendations
This section provides recommendations that affect feature configuration.
Pay special attention to the expected scaling of routes in the network and the number of OSPF
neighbors in a single VRF when you select configuration values for the isis l1-hellointerval
and isis l1-hello-multiplier commands on IS-IS interfaces. The default values for these
commands work well for most networks, including those using moderately-scaled routes.
VSP 7200 and 8000 Series
The default values work well for 16,000 routes and 64 OSPF neighbors in a single VRF. However, in
highly-scaled networks, you may need to configure higher values for these commands.
For example, if the total number of non IS-IS routes on a given BEB exceeds 16,000 in combination
with approximately 128 OSPF neighbors in a single VRF, you should configure a value of 12 for
isis l1-hellomultiplier , instead of using the default value of 3.
VSP 4000 Series
If the total number of non IS-IS routes on a given BEB exceeds 25,000 in combination with
approximately 60,000 IS-IS routes that the BEB receives from other BEBs in the network, you
should configure a value of 12 for isis l1-hellomultiplier instead of using the default value
of 3.
File names for this release
This section lists the software files for the following VOSS platforms:
• VSP 4000 Series
• VSP 7200 Series
• VSP 8000 Series
Caution:
To download the software files, use Mozilla Firefox. Do not use Internet Explorer or Google
Chrome to download software files.
Download images using the binary file transfer.
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36
File names for this release
Check that the file type suffix is .tgz and that the image names after you download them to the
device match those shown in the following table. Some download utilities append .tar to the
file name or change the filename extension from .tgz to .tar. If the file type suffix is .tar or
the filename does not exactly match the names shown in the preceding table, rename the
downloaded file to the name shown in the table so that the activation procedures operate
properly.
Important:
After you download the software, calculate and verify the md5 checksum. To calculate and
verify the md5 checksum on the device, see Calculating and verifying the md5 checksum for a
file on a switch on page 38. To calculate and verify the md5 checksum on a Unix or Linux
machine, see Calculating and verifying the md5 checksum for a file on a client workstation on
page 39. On a Windows machine, use the appropriate Windows utility that is supported on
your Windows version.
Starting in VOSS 4.2, the encryption modules are included as part of the standard runtime software
image file.
Prior to VOSS 4.2.1, image filenames began with VSP, for example, VSP4K4.1.0.0.tgz. In VOSS
4.2.1 and later, image filenames start with VOSS, for example, VOSS8K4.2.1.0.tgz.
The following table lists the files for this release.
Table 9: VSP 4000 file names and sizes
Description
File name
Size (in bytes)
Standard runtime software image
VOSS4K.6.0.0.0.tgz
101,290,582
MIB files
• VOSS4K.6.0.0.0_mib.zip
• 1,049,771
• VOSS4K.6.0.0.0_mib.txt
• 6,972,436
Supported MIB object names
VOSS4K.6.0.0.0_mib_sup.txt
1,074,022
EDM Help
VSP4000v600_HELP_EDM_gzip.
zip
3,310,106
EDM plug-in for COM
VSP4000v6.0.0.0.zip
4,834,793
Logs reference
VOSS4K.6.0.0.0_edoc.tar
61,214,720
Table 10: VSP 7200 file names and sizes
Description
File name
Size (in bytes)
Standard runtime software image
VOSS7K.6.0.0.0.tgz
64,924,484
MIB files
• VOSS7K.6.0.0.0_mib.zip
• 1,049,771
• VOSS7K.6.0.0.0_mib.txt
• 6,972,436
Supported MIB object names
VOSS7K.6.0.0.0_mib_sup.txt
1,076,152
EDM Help
VOSSv600_HELP_EDM_gzip.zip
3,331,998
EDM plug-in for COM
VOSSv6.0.0.0.zip
5,386,378
Logs reference
VOSS7K.6.0.0.0_edoc.tar
61,214,720
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Important notices
Table 11: VSP 8000 file names and sizes
Description
File name
Size (in bytes)
Standard runtime software image
VOSS8K.6.0.0.0.tgz
64,923,535
MIB files
• VOSS8K.6.0.0.0_mib.zip
• 1,049,771
• VOSS8K.6.0.0.0_mib.txt
• 6,972,436
Supported MIB object names
VOSS8K.6.0.0.0_mib_sup.txt
1,076,152
EDM Help
VOSSv600_HELP_EDM_gzip.zip
3,331,998
EDM plug-in for COM
VOSSv6.0.0.0.zip
5,386,378
Logs reference
VOSS8K.6.0.0.0_edoc.tar
61,214,720
Open Source software files
The following table lists the details of the Open Source software files distributed with the switch
software.
Table 12: Open Source software files
Product
Master copyright file
Open source base software for
5.0
VSP 4000 Series
VOSS4K.6.0.0.0_oss-notice.html
VOSS4K.6.0.0.0_OpenSource.zip
VSP 7200 Series
VOSS7K.6.0.0.0_oss-notice.html
VOSS7K.6.0.0.0_OpenSource.zip
VSP 8000 Series
VOSS8K.6.0.0.0_oss-notice.html
VOSS8K.6.0.0.0_OpenSource.zip
Calculating and verifying the md5 checksum for a file on a switch
Perform this procedure on a VSP switch to verify that the software files downloaded properly to the
switch. Avaya provides the md5 checksum for each release on the Avaya Support website.
Before you begin
• Download the md5 checksum to an intermediate workstation or server where you can open
and view the contents.
• Download the .tgz image file to the switch.
About this task
Calculate and verify the md5 checksum after you download software files.
Procedure
1. Log on to the switch to enter User EXEC mode.
2. Use the ls command to view a list of files with the .tgz extension:
ls *.tgz
3. Calculate the md5 checksum for the file:
md5 <filename.tgz>
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File names for this release
4. Compare the number generated for the file on the switch with the number that appears in the
md5 checksum on the workstation or server. Ensure that the md5 checksum of the software
suite matches the system output generated from calculating the md5 checksum from the
downloaded file.
Example
The following example provides output for VSP 8200 but the same process can be used on other
VSP switches.
View the contents of the md5 checksum on the workstation or server:
3242309ad6660ef09be1b945be15676d
d000965876dee2387f1ca59cf081b9d6
897303242c30fd944d435a4517f1b3f5
2fbd5eab1c450d1f5feae865b9e02baf
a9d6d18a979b233076d2d3de0e152fc5
8ce39996a131de0b836db629b5362a8a
80bfe69d89c831543623aaad861f12aa
a63a1d911450ef2f034d3d55e576eca0
62b457d69cedd44c21c395505dcf4a80
VSP8200.4.0.0.0_edoc.tar
VSP8200.4.0.0.0_mib.txt
VSP8200.4.0.0.0_mib.zip
VSP8200.4.0.0.0_modules.tgz
VSP8200.4.0.0.0_OpenSource.zip
VSP8200.4.0.0.0_oss-notice.html
VSP8200.4.0.0.0.tgz
VSP8200.4.0.0.0.zip
VSP8200v400_HELP_EDM_gzip.zip
Calculate the md5 checksum for the file on the switch:
Switch:1>ls *.tgz
-rw-r--r-- 1 0
0
44015148 Dec 8 08:18 VSP8200.4.0.0.0.tgz
-rw-r--r-- 1 0
0
44208471 Dec 8 08:19 VSP8200.4.0.1.0.tgz
Switch:1>md5 VSP8200.4.0.0.0.tgz
MD5 (VSP8200.4.0.0.0.tgz) = 80bfe69d89c831543623aaad861f12aa
Calculating and verifying the md5 checksum for a file on a client
workstation
Perform this procedure on a Unix or Linux machine to verify that the software files downloaded
properly. Avaya provides the md5 checksum for each release on the Avaya Support website.
About this task
Calculate and verify the md5 checksum after you download software files.
Procedure
1. Calculate the md5 checksum of the downloaded file:
$ /usr/bin/md5sum <downloaded software-filename>
Typically, downloaded software files are in the form of compressed Unix file archives (.tgz
files).
2. Verify the md5 checksum of the software suite:
$ more <md5–checksum output file>
3. Compare the output that appears on the screen. Ensure that the md5 checksum of the
software suite matches the system output generated from calculating the md5 checksum
from the downloaded file.
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Important notices
Example
The following example uses files from Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4000 Series but the same
process applies to software files for all VSP switches.
Calculate the md5 checksum of the downloaded file:
$ /usr/bin/md5sum VSP4K.4.0.40.0.tgz
02c7ee0570a414becf8ebb928b398f51 VSP4K.4.0.40.0.tgz
View the md5 checksum of the software suite:
$ more VSP4K.4.0.40.0.md5
285620fdc1ce5ccd8e5d3460790c9fe1 VSP4000v4.0.40.0.zip
a04e7c7cef660bb412598574516c548f
ac3d9cef0ac2e334cf94799ff0bdd13b
29fa2aa4b985b39843d980bb9d242110
c5f84beaf2927d937fcbe9dd4d4c7795
ce460168411f21abf7ccd8722866574c
1ed7d4cda8b6f0aaf2cc6d3588395e88
1464f23c99298b80734f8e7fa32e65aa
945f84cb213f84a33920bf31c091c09f
02c7ee0570a414becf8ebb928b398f51
VSP4000v4040_HELP_EDM_gzip.zip
VSP4K.4.0.40.0_edoc.tar
VSP4K.4.0.40.0_mib_sup.txt
VSP4K.4.0.40.0_mib.txt
VSP4K.4.0.40.0_mib.zip
VSP4K.4.0.40.0_modules.tgz
VSP4K.4.0.40.0_OpenSource.zip
VSP4K.4.0.40.0_oss-notice.html
VSP4K.4.0.40.0.tgz
Best practices for SPB regarding MSTP
Use NNI ports exclusively to transport traffic for SPB-based services and not be configured as
members of any VLANs other than SPB B-VLANs. In releases that do not support nni-mstp, when
an SPBM IS-IS interface is created on an NNI port or an MLT, MSTP is automatically disabled for
MSTI-62 on the port/MLT. However, MSTP is not automatically disabled on NNI ports for the CIST
(default MSTI). In releases that support the boot config flags nni-mstp command, the
default behavior of the MSTP NNI ports is that CIST is disabled automatically on the NNI and the
NNI ports cannot be members of any VLANs other than B-VLANs. The default boot config flags nnimstp must be set to false (which is the default). The following example shows the command to
disable the MSTP on the NNI ports.
Example:
Switch:1(config)#interface gigabitEthernet 1/8
Switch:1(config-if)#no spanning-tree mstp
Coexistence of MSTP and SPB-based services on NNI ports
In releases that do not support nni-mstp boot configuration, you can support the coexistence of nonSPB based services on the NNI ports, by adding NNI ports as members of VLANs, except for BVLANs. These other VLANs rely on the use of MSTP for Loop prevention. The network operator
must carefully consider the implications of keeping MSTP enabled on the NNI ports because any
MSTP topology changes detected on the NNI ports impacts all services and causes most
dynamically learned information on the UNI side to be flushed and relearned. This includes, but is
not limited to, all customer MAC and ARP records. This can also cause all the UNI ports on a BEB
to be temporarily put into a spanning-tree blocking state before transitioning to a forwarding state
again. The net result is that MSTP topology changes on the NNI ports adversely impact traffic for
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Feature licensing
SPB-based services. Therefore, it is recommended that the NNI ports be used exclusively for SPB
traffic.
If you upgrade to a release that supports the mstp default behavior change that is associated with
the boot config flags nni-mstp, and your previous configuration included coexistence of MSTP and
SPB-based services on the NNI ports in the configuration file, take note of the following:
During startup, your configuration file continues to load successfully but now it includes a change
that sets the nni-mstp flag to true (if it was not already set to true). Your system operates the same
as before the upgrade.
After startup, save the configuration file. If you do not save your configuration, you continue to see
the following message on reboot.
Warning
Detected brouter and/or vlans other than BVLANs on NNI ports. Setting the boot config
flag nni-mstp to true. Saving configuration avoids repetition of this warning on reboot.
For information about upgrading, see Administering.
For information about feature support, see Release Notes.
Feature licensing
After you start a new system, the 60–day Premium Trial license countdown begins. You will see
notification messages as the countdown approaches the end of the trial period. After 60 days, the
Premium Trial license expires. You will see messages on the console and in the alarms database
that the license has expired. The next time you restart the system after the license expiration, the
system no longer supports Premier services.
If you use a Base License, you do not need to install a license file. If you purchase a Premier
License, you must obtain and install a license file. For more information about how to generate a
license file, see Getting Started with Avaya PLDS for Avaya Networking Products, NN46199-300.
For more information about how to install a license file, see Administering.
Important:
The license filename stored on a device must meet the following requirements:
• Maximum of 63 alphanumeric characters
• No spaces or special characters allowed
• Underscore (_) is allowed
• The file extension ".xml" is required
SFP+ ports
SFP+ ports support 1 Gbps and 10 Gbps transceivers only.
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Important notices
For a complete list of supported SFPs and QSFPs, see Installing Transceivers and Optical
Components on VSP Operating System Software, NN47227-301.
show vlan remote-mac-table command output
The output for the show vlan remote-mac-table command can be different than what appears
for the same command on VSP 9000.
Because all MinM packets that originate from the IST switch use the virtual B-MAC as the source BMAC, the remote BEB learns the C-MAC against the virtual B-MAC. Because the remote BEB uses
the shortest path to the virtual B-MAC, the remote BEB can show the IST peer as a tunnel in the
show vlan remote-mac-table command output.
dos-chkdsk
If at the end of the dos-chkdsk WORD<1-99> command output you see:
1) Correct
2) Don't correct
Then, you should run the dos-chkdsk WORD<1-99> repair command.
Auto negotiation settings
VOSS 4.1 and later software requires the same auto negotiation settings on link partners to avoid
incorrect declaration of link status. Mismatched settings can cause the links to stay down as well as
unpredictable behavior. Ensure the auto negotiation settings between local ports and their remote
link partners match before upgrading software to VOSS 4.1 or later.
Interoperability notes for Fabric Attach
For Fabric Attach to operate between a VOSS platform and an ERS device, the ERS device must
meet minimum software requirements. The following tables identify the minimum GA software
releases required to build an FA solution.
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Interoperability considerations for IS-IS external metric
Table 13: Extending Fabric using Static FA Proxy configuration (ISID/VLAN is manually configured on
FA Proxy)
FA Server
FA Proxy
Product
Minimum release
Product
Minimum release
VSP 4000
5.0.0.0
ERS 5900
7.0.1
VSP 7200
ERS 5600
6.6.3
VSP 8200
ERS 4800
5.9.2
VSP 8400
ERS 4500
5.7.3
Table 14: Extending Fabric to FA Clients by using FA Proxy
FA Server
FA Proxy
Product
Minimum
release
Product
Minimum
release
VSP 4000
5.0.0.0
ERS 5900
7.0.1
VSP 7200
ERS 5600
6.6.3
VSP 8200
ERS 4800
5.9.2
VSP 8400
ERS 4500
5.7.3
FA Policy
FA Client
Product
IDE Release
9.1 (See
Note below)
AP9100
Minimum
release
7.2.5
Note:
Required for AP9100 FA Client. IDE sends FA ISID/VLAN assignment request by using FA Proxy to
VOSS FA Server.
Interoperability considerations for IS-IS external metric
Support for the external metric in IS-IS has been added in VOSS release 5.0. BEBs running
VOSS 5.0 can advertise routes into IS-IS with the metric type as external. They can also correctly
interpret routes advertisements with metric type external received via IS-IS. In an SPB network with
a mix of product types running different versions of software releases, care must to be taken to
ensure that turning on the ability to use metric-type external does not cause unintended loss of
connectivity.
Important:
Note the following before turning on IS-IS external metric if the SPB network has switches
running a release prior to VOSS 5.0.
• There are no special release or product type implications if the switch does not have IP
shortcuts or L3VSN enabled. For example, this applies to L2 only BEBs and BCBs.
• There are no special release or product type implications if the L3VSN in which routes are
being advertised with a metric-type of external is not configured on the switch.
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Important notices
• If a switch running a VOSS release that is prior to VOSS 5.0 but VOSS 4.2.1 or later, it will
treat all IS-IS routes as having metric-type internal, irrespective of the metric-type
(internal or external) used by the advertising BEB in its route advertisement.
• Switches running VSP 9000 release 4.1.0.0 or later will treat all IS-IS routes as having
metric-type internal, irrespective of the metric-type (internal or external) used by the
advertising BEB in its route advertisement.
• Switches running VOSS releases prior to 4.2.1.0 may not correctly install IS-IS routes in a
L3VSN if any routes are advertised with metric-type external are advertised in that L3VSN
by other BEBs in the network. L3VSNs in which there are no routes with an external
metric-type will not be impacted. Similar note applies to GRT.
• Switches running VSP 9000 releases prior to 4.1.0.0 may not correctly install IS-IS routes
in a L3VSN if any routes are advertised with metric-type external are advertised in that
L3VSN by other BEBs in the network. L3VSNs in which there are no routes with an
external metric-type will not be impacted. Similar note applies to GRT.
• Switches running any ERS 8800 release may not correctly install IS-IS routes in of a
L3VSN if any routes are advertised with metric-type external are advertised in that L3VSN
by other BEBs in the network. L3VSNs in which there are no routes with an external
metric-type will not be impacted. Similar note applies to GRT.
VSP 4000 specific notices
Converting ERS 4850 to VSP 4000
This section lists information on Avaya switch conversion supported in this release.
Important:
Switch conversion is applicable only to the Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4000 Series.
Currently, only the conversion of an Avaya ERS 4850 switch to a VSP 4000 switch is supported.
Interoperability notes for VSP 4000 connecting to an ERS 8800
• For customers running version 7.1.x: The minimum software release is 7.1.3.1, however the
recommended ERS 8800 software release is 7.1.5.4 or later. On switches using 8612 XLRS or
8812XL modules for the links connecting to the VSP 4000 the minimum software version is
7.1.5.4. The “spbm version” on the ERS 8800 must be set to “802.1aq”.
• For customers running version 7.2.x: The minimum software release is 7.2.0.2, however the
recommended ERS 8800 software release is 7.2.1.1 or later. On switches using 8612 XLRS or
8812XL modules for the links connecting to the VSP 4000 the minimum software version is
7.2.1.1.
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VSP 4000 specific notices
• Diffserv is enabled in the VSP 4000 port settings, and is disabled in the ERS 8800 port
settings, by default.
Notes on combination ports for VSP 4000
When the VSP 4000 is reset, the peer connections for all ports, including combination ports 47 and
48 on VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR+, will transition down. During the reset, the fiber ports remain down,
but only the copper ports 47 and 48 come up periodically throughout the reset. The copper ports 47
and 48 come up approximately 15 seconds into the reset, remain up for approximately 60 seconds,
and then transition down until the boot sequence is complete and all ports come back up.
The following is an example of the status of the combination ports during reset.
CP1 [03/18/70 09:55:35.890] 0x0000c5e7 00300001.238 DYNAMIC SET GlobalRouter HW INFO Link
Down(1/47)
CP1 [03/18/70 09:55:35.903] 0x0000c5e7 00300001.239 DYNAMIC SET GlobalRouter HW INFO Link
Down(1/48)
CP1 [03/18/70 09:55:49.994] 0x0000c5ec 00300001.239 DYNAMIC CLEAR GlobalRouter HW INFO
Link Up(1/48)
CP1 [03/18/70 09:55:50.322] 0x0000c5ec 00300001.238 DYNAMIC CLEAR GlobalRouter HW INFO
Link Up(1/47)
CP1 [03/18/70 09:56:43.131] 0x0000c5e7 00300001.238 DYNAMIC SET GlobalRouter HW INFO Link
Down(1/47)
CP1 [03/18/70 09:56:43.248] 0x0000c5e7 00300001.239 DYNAMIC SET GlobalRouter HW INFO Link
Down(1/48)
Cabled connections for both copper and fiber ports
The following limitations apply when the combination ports have cabled connections for both the
copper and fiber ports.
• Do not use the fiber port and do not insert an SFP into the optical module slot in the following
situations:
- a copper speed setting of either 10M or 100M is required
- a copper duplex setting of half-duplex is required
Note:
These limitations are applicable only when auto-negotiation is disabled. To avoid this limitation,
use auto-negotiation to determine the speed to 10/100/1000 and to determine the duplex.
• The 100M-FX SFP requires auto-negotiation to be disabled. Therefore, auto-negotiation will
also be disabled for the copper port. Configure peer switch to disable auto-negotiation.
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Chapter 4: Known issues and limitations
This chapter details the known issues and limitations found in this release. Where appropriate, use
the workarounds provided.
Known issues in this release
This section identifies the known issues in this release for the following products:
• VSP 4000 Series
• VSP 7200 Series
• VSP 8000 Series
Device related issues
Table 15: Known issues
Issue number
Description
Workaround
wi01144867
On the port that is removed from a T-UNI
LACP MLT, non T-UNI configuration is
blocked as a result of T-UNI consistency
checks.
When a port is removed from a T-UNI
LACP MLT, the LACP key of the port
must be set to default.
wi01166763
SLA Mon™ tests fail (between 2% and 8%
failure) between VSP 4000 devices when you
have too many agents involved with scaled
configurations.
This happens only in a scaled scenario
with more than seven agents, otherwise
the failure does not occur. The
acceptable failure percentage is 5%, but
you may see failures of up to 8%.
wi01168610
VSP 4450GSX: The command sys
None. This issue does not impact any
shutdown does not change the STATUS LED functionality.
on the VSP 4450GSX-PWR+ device.
wi01168706
The following error message occurs on VSP
4000 when performing shutdown/noshutdown commands continuously:
IO1 [05/02/14 06:59:55.178:UTC]
0x0011c525 00000000 GlobalRouter
COP-SW ERROR vsp4kTxEnable Error
None. When this issue occurs, the port in
question may go down, then performs a
shutdown/no-shutdown of the port to
bring it up and resumes operation.
Table continues…
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Known issues in this release
Issue number
Description
changing TX disable for SFP
module: 24, code: -8
Workaround
wi01171802
VSP 4450GSX: On a fresh boot, peer ports
connected to ports 1/49 and 1/50 bounce and
may cause additional transitions in the
network.
None.
wi01171907
VSP 4450GSX: CAKs are not cleared after
setting VSP 4000 to factory-default.
None. Currently this is the default
behavior and does not affect functionality
of the MACsec feature.
wi01173026
A reboot with verbose configuration does not
allow you to delete a VRF.
This issue occurs only if you save the
configuration file in verbose mode and
reboot the switch in that configuration.
This situation is unlikely to exist; verbose
mode is used more as a diagnostic tool.
This issue does not impact functionality.
wi01173136
T1 SFP: Shutting down the T1 link from one
end of the VSP 4000 or VSP 7200 Series or
VSP 8000 Series does not shut down the link
at the remote end. You may experience traffic
loss if the remote side of the link is not shut
down.
This issue occurs only when a T1 SFP
link from one end is shutdown. Enable a
dynamic link layer protocol such as
LACP or VLACP on both ends to shut
the remote end down too. As an
alternative, administratively disable both
ends of the T1 SFP link to avoid the
impact.
wi01175118
On a MACsec enabled port, you may see
delayed packets when the MACsec port is
kept running for more than 12 hours.
None.
This delayed packet counter may also
increment when there is complete reordering
of packets so that the application might
receive a slow response.
But in this second case, it is a marginal
increase in the packet count, which occurs
due to PN mismatch sometimes only during
Key expiry, and does not induce any latency.
wi01195988
You cannot use EDM to issue ping or
traceroute commands for IPv6 addresses.
Use ACLI to initiate ping and traceroute.
wi01196000
You cannot use EDM to issue ping or
traceroute commands for IPv4 addresses.
Use ACLI to initiate ping and traceroute.
wi01197712
On the 40-gigabit ports, the small metallic
fingers that surround the ports are fragile and
can bend out of shape during removal and
insertion of the transceivers. When the fingers
are bent, they prevent the insertion of the
QSFP+ transceiver.
Insert the QSFP+ carefully. If the port
gets damaged, it needs to be repaired.
Table continues…
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Known issues and limitations
Issue number
Description
Workaround
Note:
This issue is specific to VSP8404QQ
ESMs.
wi01208650
The Console gets disconnected frequently
when you enable screen trace (trace screen
enable). The error displayed is Forced
log-out after 65535 secs.
None
wi01209346
In an IGMP snoop environment, after
dynamically downgrading the IGMP version to
version 2 (v2), when you revert back to
version 3 (v3), the following is observed:
Use a v3 interface as querier in a LAN
segment which has snoop– enabled v2
and v3 interfaces.
• The multicast traffic does not flow.
• The sender entries are not learned on the
local sender switch.
• The Indiscard packet count gets
incremented on the show int gig error
statistics command.
wi01209604
From EDM, you cannot perform a Layer 2 IP
PING for an IPv6 address. EDM displays the
following error: No next Hop address
found for ip address provided.
Use the ACLI perform a Layer 2 IP
PING.
wi01210104
In EDM, you cannot select multiple 40–gigabit
ports or a range of ports that includes 40–
gigabit ports to graph or edit. You need to
select them and edit them individually.
None.
Note:
This issue applies to products that
support 40 Gbps ports.
wi01212099
In the COM EDM Plugin command, the Layer
2 Traceroute IPv6 does not work properly and
gives the error, No Such Name.
Use the ACLI to initiate the Layer 2
Traceroute for IPv6.
wi01212115
On EDM, the port LED for channelized ports
None.
only shows the status of sub-port #1, but not
the rest of the sub-ports. When you remove
sub-port #1, and at least one other sub-port is
active and online, the LED color changes to
amber, when it should be green because at
least one other sub-ports is active and online.
The LED only shows the status of sub-port #1.
wi01212860
An intermittent link-flap issue can occur in the
following circumstance for the copper ports of
Administratively shutdown, and then
reenable the port.
Table continues…
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Known issues in this release
Issue number
Description
the VSP 7254XTQ or the 8424XT ESM for
VSP 8400:
Workaround
Note:
Avaya recommends that you use
auto-negotiation. Disabling autonegotiation on these ports is not a
recommended configuration.
If you use a crossover cable and disable autonegotiation, the port operates at 100 Mbps. A
link flap issue can occur intermittently and link
flap detect will shutdown the port.
wi01214025
Traffic is forwarded to IGMP v2 SSM group,
even after you delete the IGMP SSM-map
entry for the group.
If you perform the delete action first, you
can recreate the SSM-map record, and
then disable the SSM-map record. The
disabled SSM-map record causes the
receiver to timeout because any
subsequent membership reports that
arrive and match the disabled SSM-map
record are dropped. You can delete the
SSM-map record after the receivers time
out.
wi01214772
The 4 byte AS confederation identifier and
peers configuration are not retained across a
reboot. This problem occurs when 4 Byte AS
is enabled with confederation.
Reconfigure the 4 byte AS confederation
identifier and peers on the device, and
reboot.
wi01215220
After you enable enhanced secure mode, and None.
log in for the first time, the system prompts
you to enter a new password. If you do not
meet the minimum password requirements,
the following system output message appears:
Password should contain a minimum
of 2 upper and lowercase letters,
2 numbers and 2 special characters
like !@#$%^*(). Password change
aborted. Enter the New password:
The system output message does not display
the actual minimum password requirements
you need to meet, which are configured on
your system. The output message is an
example of what the requirements may need
to meet. The actual minimum password
requirements you need to meet are configured
on your system by the administrator.
wi01215773
The switch provides an NTP log message that
indicates that the NTP server did not
synchronize, even though one of the NTP
servers synchronized correctly and the NTP
stats show that it did.
None.
wi01216535
The router ospf entry always appears in
the configuration file regardless of whether
None.
Table continues…
April 2017
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Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
49
Known issues and limitations
Issue number
Description
OSPF is configured. This line does not
perform any configuration and has no impact
on the running software.
Workaround
wi01216550
When you use Telnet or SSH to connect to the Do not provision DNS servers on a
switch, it can take up to 60 seconds for the
switch to avoid this issue altogether.
login prompt to appear. However, this situation
is very unlikely to happen, and it does not
appear in a standard normal operational
network.
wi01217251
If you configure egress mirroring on NNI ports, Use an Rx mirror on the other end of the
you do not see the MAC-in-MAC header on
link to see the packets.
captured packets.
wi01217347
A large number of IPv6 VRRP VR instances
on the same VLAN can cause high CPU
utilization.
wi01217871
If you attach the QSFP+ end of a passive
This issue will be fixed in a future VSP
breakout cable to a VSP 4000 or VSP 7200
9000 software release.
Series or VSP 8000 Series switch, and the
SFP+ ends of the cable to a VSP 9000
running Release 4.0.1, the output for the show
pluggable-optical-modules basic
command on the VSP 9000 shows an
incorrect vendor name and part number. The
incorrect information also appears in EDM
under the Edit > Port > General menu path.
wi01221817
If you disable IPv6 on one RSMLT peer, the
switch can intermittently display COP-SW
ERROR and RCIP6 ERROR error messages.
Do not create more than 10 IPv6 VRRP
VRs on a single VLAN.
None.
This issue has no impact.
wi01222078
If you delete the SPBM configuration and reReboot the switch after you delete the
configure SPBM using the same nickname but SPBM configuration.
a different ISIS system id without rebooting,
the switch displays an error message.
wi01223719
You cannot use EDM to configure SSH rekey
and enable or disable SFTP.
Use ACLI to configure SSH rekey and
enable or disable SFTP.
wi01223723
EDM displays the user name as Admin, even
though you login using a different user name.
None.
wi01223759
You cannot use EDM to view the IPv6 DHCP
relay counters.
Use ACLI to view the IPv6 DHCP relay
counters.
wi01224076
When you re-enable insecure protocols in the
ACLI SSH secure mode, the switch does not
display a warning message.
None.
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
50
Known issues in this release
Issue number
Description
Workaround
wi01224644
EDM displays the IGMP group entry that is
learnt on vIST MLT port is as TX-NNI.
Use ACLI to view the IGMP group entry
learnt on vIST MLT port.
wi01224710
On a VSP 4000 Series untagged ARP packet,
ingressing on a Layer 2 VSN interface will
honor default the port QOS. Changing port
QOS value will not be honored.
Create an ACLI filter that can remark the
packet to any Queues.
When port-lock is enabled on the port and reauthentication on the EAP client fails, the port
is removed from the radius assigned VLAN.
This adds the port to default VLAN and
displays an error message.
The error message is incorrect and can
be ignored.
VOSS-1420
wi01225023
This issue has no impact.
wi01225232
When an operational SMLT is removed from a Disable SMLT ports and then remove
TUNI ISID and is not added to any other
them from TUNI ISID.
VLAN or TUNI ISID, then spanning tree is
enabled on this SMLT interface. Spanning tree
is disabled when added to VLAN or TUNI
ISID. This issue has no impact.
wi01225310
When ISIS is disabled on one of the VIST
peer nodes with RSMLT interfaces and it has
ECMP routes with the RSMLT Peer as the
next hop, the ECMP routes that are being
replaced during the transition of the ISIS state
now will have a next hop of the local interface.
This results in an error message COP-SW
ERROR ercdProcIpRecMsg: Failed to
Replace IP Records.
Enable ISIS on both the vIST peers.
wi01225514
On a VSP 7200 Series 40 Gbps ports with
CR4 direct attach cables (DAC), when you
manually enable or disable ISIS, the port
bounces once.
Configure ISIS during the maintenance
period. Bring the port down, configure
the port and then bring the port up.
wi01226335
In a rare scenario in Simplified vIST
configuration when vIST state is toggled
immediately followed by vIST MLT ports are
toggled, one of the MLT ports will go into
blocking state resulting in failure to process
data packets hashing to that link.
Before enabling vIST state ensure all
VIST MLT ports are shut and re-enabled
after vIST is enabled on the DUT.
wi01226433
When you configure a scaled Layer 3 VSN (24 None.
Layer 3 VSN instances), route leaking from
GRT to VRF on the local DUT does not
happen. The switch displays an incorrect error
message Only 24 L3 VSNs can be
configured.
wi01226437
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
51
Known issues and limitations
Issue number
Description
Workaround
wi01230533
When you use Fabric Extend over IP (FE-IP)
and Fabric Extend over L2 VLAN (FE-VID)
solution, if you change the ingress and
egress .1p map, packets may not follow
correct internal QoS queues for FE tunnel to
FE tunnel, or FE tunnel to regular NNI traffic. .
Do not change the default ingress and
egress .1p maps when using Fabric
Extend. With default ingress and egress .
1p maps, packets follow the correct
internal QoS when using the Fabric
Extend feature
wi01230953
wi01232817
wi01232095
EDM and ACLI show different local preference None
values for a BGP IPv6 route.
EDM displays path attributes as received and
stored in the BGP subsystem. If the attribute is
from an eBGP peer, the local preference
appears as zero.
ACLI displays path attributes associated with
the route entry, which can be modified by a
policy. If a route policy is not configured, the
local preference shows the default value of
100.
wi01232581
You cannot use EDM to enable or disable
ASG. You can only view ASG status.
Use ACLI to enable or disable ASG.
wi01233201
If the I-SID associated with a Switched UNI or
Fabric Attach port does not have a platform
VLAN association and you disable Layer 2
Trusted, then the non IP traffic coming from
that port does not take the port QoS and still
uses the .1p priority in the packet.
None
wi01233828
If you establish an SSH connection to a
switch, and then use that switch to create a
Telnet session with another device, when you
exit the Telnet session, the original SSH
connection can stop responding.
Halt the original SSH connection and
reconnect.
wi01234422
If you improperly close an SSH session, the
session structure information does not clear
and the client can stop functioning.
Disable and enable SSH.
wi01234071
You cannot use EDM to clear Fabric Attach
statistics for VSP 4000 Series.
Use the ACLI clear fa stats
command.
wi01234623
VSP 7200 Series and VSP 8000 Series do not None
Support Fabric Extend over Layer 2 VLAN
(FE-VID) logical interface configuration over
an MLT interface.
wi01234739
If you apply an ipv6-out-route-map on a BGP
Configure the incoming policy to filter
peer to filter a particular IPv6 prefix range with incoming advertised routes on BGP+
a match network condition, it does not filter the peers.
full prefix range.
VOSS-1487
Table continues…
April 2017
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Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
52
Known issues in this release
Issue number
Description
Workaround
wi01234872
The show debug-file all command is
missing on VSP 7200 Series and VSP 8000
Series platforms.
None
wi01234873
The system does not generate a log message, None
either in the log file or on screen, when you
run the flight-recorder command.
wi01235018
If you use an ERS 4850 FA Proxy with a
VOSS FA Server, a mismatch can exist in the
show output for tagged management traffic.
The ERS device always sends traffic as
tagged. The VOSS FA Server can send both
tagged and untagged. For untagged, the
VOSS FA Server sends VLAN ID 4095 in the
management VLAN field of the FA element
TLV. The ERS device does not recognize this
VLAN ID and so still reports the traffic as
tagged.
There is no functional impact.
wi01235053
If you use EDM to create an ACL filter, the
ACL tab does not automatically refresh to
show the new filter.
Click Refresh on the ACL tab to force a
data refresh.
wi01235140
You cannot configure an untagged-traffic
ELAN endpoint and enable BPDU in the same
command.
1. Create the untagged-traffic endpoint
first:
untagged-traffic port
{slot/port[/sub-port][slot/port[/sub-port]][,...]
OR
untagged-traffic mlt <1–
512>
2. Enable BPDU:
untagged-traffic port
{slot/port[/sub-port][slot/port[/sub-port]][,...]
bpdu enable
OR
untagged-traffic mlt <1–
512> bpdu enable
VOSS-1706
EAPOL: Untagged traffic not honouring port
QOS for Layer 2 trusted/ Layer 3 untrusted.
None
Issue is only seen on EAPOL enabled port.
VOSS-1747
On a VSP 8404 with MLT on 10G ports on an
8424XT or 8424XTQ module, multiple VLANs
that have the MLT as a member of the VLAN,
None
Table continues…
April 2017
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53
Known issues and limitations
Issue number
Description
there is a possibility that a copy of the IP
multicast traffic may not be sent on all VLANs
that have a receiver on the MLT.
Workaround
VOSS-2014
IPV6 MLD Group is learned for Link-Local
Scope Multicast Addresses.
None
This displays additional entries in the Multicast
routing tables.
VOSS-2033
The below error messages is seen when you
“shut” and “no shut” the MLT interface with
ECMP, BGP+ enabled.
Disable the alternate path.
Error message:CP1 [01/23/16
11:10:16.474:UTC] 0x00108628
00000000 GlobalRouter RCIP6 ERROR
rcIpReplaceRouteNotifyIpv6:FAIL
ReplaceTunnelRec conn_id 2
CP1 [12/09/15 12:27:02.203:UTC]
0x00108649 00000000 GlobalRouter
RCIP6 ERROR ifyRpcOutDelFibEntry:
del FIB of Ipv6Route failed with
0: ipv6addr: 201:6:604:0:0:0:0:0,
mask: 96, nh: 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0 cid
6657 owner BGP
CP1 [12/09/15 12:20:30.302:UTC]
0x00108649 00000000 GlobalRouter
RCIP6 ERROR ifyRpcOutDelFibEntry:
del FIB of Ipv6Route failed with
0: ipv6addr: 210:6:782:0:0:0:0:0,
mask: 96, nh:
fe80:0:0:0:b2ad:aaff:fe55:5088 cid
2361 owner OSPF
VOSS-2036
IPsec statistics for the management interface
do not increment for inESPFailures or
InAHFailures.
None.
VOSS-2117
If you configure static IGMP receivers on an
IGMPv3 interface and a dynamic join and
leave are received on that device from the
same destination VLAN or egress point, the
device stops forwarding traffic to the static
receiver group after the dynamic leave is
processed on the device. The end result is
that the IGMP static groups still exist on the
device but traffic is not forwarded.
Disable and re-enable IGMP Snooping
on the interface.
Table continues…
April 2017
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54
Known issues in this release
Issue number
Description
VOSS-2128
EAP Security and Authentication tabs displays There is no functional impact. Ignore the
additional information with internal values
additional information in EDM.
populated which is not useful for the end user.
Use ACLI command. "show eapol port
interaface” to get port status.
VOSS-2207
You cannot configure an SMTP server
hostname that begins with a digit. The system
displays the following error: Error:
Invalid IP Address or Hostname for
SMTP server.
VOSS-2208
While performing CFM L2 traceroute between None
two BEB’s via a transit BCB, transit BCB’s hop
is not seen, if the transit BCB has ISIS
adjacencies over FE l3core with both
source BEB and destination BEB.
VOSS-2253
Trace level command does not list module IDs To get the list of all module IDs, type
when '?' is used.
“trace level” and then press Enter.
VOSS-2270
The packet internal CoS is derived incorrectly
for packets sourced from a brouter port when
the CoS should be derived from the port level
QoS.
wi01227920
wi01230534
Workaround
The following list identifies scenarios that
derive the internal CoS from the port QoS:
None.
Use the port default QoS configuration
for the brouter port. The port default
configuration is Layer 2 trusted and
Layer 3 trusted, and under this
configuration, only the first scenario in
the list is still an issue. The other
scenarios do not occur.
• Untagged non-IP packet
• Untagged IP packet, and the source port is
Layer 3 untrusted
• Tagged non-IP packet and the source port is
Layer 2 untrusted
• Tagged IP packet and the source port is
Layer 3 untrusted and Layer 2 untrusted.
VOSS-2279
When IPv6 neighbor device boots up, the
following error message occurs in the peer
device console:
GlobalRouter COP-SW ERROR
ercdProcIpv6RouteMsg: Failed to
Delete IPV6 Record - Ip:
fe80:0:0:8dc:b2ad:aaff:fe55:1b91,
NextHop:0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0, mask: 128
VOSS-2285
When on BEB, continuously pinging IPv6
neighbor address using ACLI command ping s, ping packets don’t drop, but see "no
answer" messages.
There is no functional impact. Port
shut/no shut which recovers the traffic
works even when the switch is in error
state.
Restart the ping. Avoid intensive CPU
processing.
Table continues…
April 2017
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55
Known issues and limitations
Issue number
Description
Workaround
VOSS-2333
L2 ping to Virtual BMAC (VBMAC) fails, if the
VBMAC is reachable via L2core.
None
VOSS-2397
If you configure a channelized port in EDM by
using the Configuration > Edit > Port >
General or Configuration > Edit > Port > IP
or IPv6 navigation paths, you can only see
and configure the first sub-port.
In the Device Physical View, right-click
the port and use the General, IP, or IPv6
sub-menu to configure all sub-ports.
VOSS-2411
On a VSP 4450GSX-DC device, the https-port
info is not displayed or saved into the config.
None
VOSS-2415
There is no option in the “Insert V3 Interface"
screen of EDM to insert a VRRP v3 interface
for IPv6. The two check boxes in the screen
are disabled.
There is no functional impact. EDM has
two menus of IP and IPv6 and this
functionality is available there along with
other features.
VOSS-2422
When BGP Neighbor times out, the following
error message occurs:
There is no functional impact. Ignore the
error message.
CP1 [03/11/16 13:43:39.084:EST]
0x000b45f2 00000000 GlobalRouter
SW ERROR ip_rtdeleteVrf: orec is
NULL!
VOSS-2444
The output of the show ip mroute stats
[group address] wraps to an additional
line.
None
Four columns of data are on one line and the
fifth column AverageSize wraps to an
additional line.
There is also an extra line feed in the column
header.
VOSS-2859
You cannot modify the port membership on a
protocol-based VLAN using EDM after it has
been created.
VOSS-4114
You cannot use Internet Explorer 11 or Firefox Do not use these newer browser
49 to connect to EDM using HTTPS.
versions until Release 6.1.
VOSS-4116
Use the CLI to provision the port
membership on the protocol-based
VLAN or delete the protocol-based
VLAN, and then re-create it with the
correct port member setting.
VOSS-4972
VOSS-4554
VOSS-4910
VOSS-4627
The show ip vrrp address command
does not accurately display the value of the
holddown timer remaining.
None.
The qos if-policer allows configuration of
peak-rate and svc-rate in the range 64 10000000 Kbps. However on 1G and 10G
links, the effective policer rate is on the
On 1G and 10G links, there is no
workaround for this issue. The qos ifpolicer peak-rate and svc-rate should
Table continues…
April 2017
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56
Known issues in this release
Issue number
Description
nearest 500 Kbps boundary (approximately),
with a minimum policer rate of 500 Kbps. For
example, configuring both peak-rate and svcrate at 900 will result in an effective policer
rate of 1000 (Kbps). This limitation does not
apply to 10M and 100M negotiated links. On
10M and 100M links, the effective policer rate
is close to any configured rate in the
advertised range.
Workaround
be configured in 500 Kbps increments in
the range 500 - 10000000.
Note:
Due to a related issue, the minimum rate
of 64 should not be used on any link.
VOSS-4728
If you remove and recreate an IS-IS instance
on an NNI port with autonegotiation enabled in
addition to vIST and R/SMLT enabled, it is
possible that the NNI port will briefly become
operationally down but does recover quickly.
This operational change can lead to a brief
traffic loss and possible reconvergence if nonISIS protocols like OSPF or BGP are also on
the NNI port.
If you need to remove and recreate an
IS-IS instance on an autonegotiation
enabled NNI port that also has non-ISIS
traffic, do so during a maintenance
window to minimize possible impact to
other non-ISIS traffic.
VOSS-4840
If you run the show fulltech command in
an SSH session, do not disable SSH on the
system. Doing so can block the SSH session.
None.
VOSS-4843
CDP packets include the prompt name instead None.
of the device ID and platform.
VOSS-4875
You cannot select an MLT on the Insert
Switched UNI dialog box in EDM.
Use CLI.
VOSS-4877
If you use the no boot config flags ?
command, vxlan-gw-fullinterworking-mode appears as an option
even though the VXLAN Gateway feature is
not supported on the VSP 4000 series.
None.
VOSS-4934
Hardware fan warnings are displayed during
the boot sequence of the VSP 4450GTX-HTPWR even when no faults have occurred.
Additionally, the CLI command sys-info
does not show any info on the fan status.
None.
VOSS-4970
If you use the vrfids parameter with the
show ip msdp [count | mesh-group |
peer | sa-cache | show-all |
summary] commands to display output for
only a specific VRF ID or range of VRF IDs,
the software displays the following error:
Use the vrf parameter instead to
specify the VRF context by name.
Table continues…
April 2017
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57
Known issues and limitations
Issue number
Description
Info: MSDP Instance does not exist
for VRF with id: 1
Workaround
Limitations in this release
This section lists known limitations and expected behaviors that may first appear to be issues.
Limitations for VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR+
Caution:
The VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR+ has operating temperature and power limitations. For safety and
optimal operation of the device, ensure that the prescribed thresholds are strictly adhered to.
The following table provides a description of the limitation or behavior and the work around, if one
exists.
Table 16: Limitations for VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR+
Behavior
Description
Workaround
For high-temperature threshold
The VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR
+ supports a temperature range of
0°C to 70°C.
To prevent equipment damage,
ensure that the operating
temperature is within the
supported temperature range of
0°C to 70°C.
In the alpha release, power supply
does not shut down at an intended
over-temperature threshold of
79°C.
For power supply wattage
threshold
Software functionality to reduce
the POE power budget based on
the number of operational power
supplies and operating
temperature is not available in the
Alpha SW image.
Ensure that the POE device power
draw is maintained at the following
when the device is at
temperatures between 61°C
and 70°C:
• 400W — with 1 operational
power supply
• 832W — with 2 operational
power supplies
For inoperable external USB
receptacle
The VSP 4450GTX-HT-PWR+
has an empty external USB
receptacle that was not available
in GTS models. Software to
support the use of the external
USB receptacle is not yet
available in the Alpha SW image.
No workarounds are provided with
the alpha image.
Therefore the USB port is
inoperable.
April 2017
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58
Limitations in this release
General limitations and expected behaviors
The following table provides a description of the limitation or behavior.
Table 17: General limitations and expected behaviors
WI number
Description
wi01068569
The system displays a warning message that routes will not inject until the apply
command is issued after the enable command. The warning applies only after you
enable redistribution, and not after you disable redistribution. For example,
4k2:1(config)#isis apply redistribute direct vrf 2.
wi01112491
IS-IS enabled ports cannot be added to an MLT. The current release does not
support this configuration.
wi01122478
Stale SNMP server community entries for different VRFs appear after reboot with no
VRFs .
On a node with a valid configuration file saved with more than the default vrf0 ,
SNMP community entries for that VRF are created and maintained in a separate text
file, snmp_comm.txt, on every boot. The node reads this file and updates the SNMP
communities available on the node. As a result, if you boot a configuration that has
no VRFs, you may still see SNMP community entries for VRFs other than the
globalRouter vrf0 .
wi01137195
A static multicast group cannot be configured on a Layer 2 VLAN before enabling
IGMP snooping on the VLAN. After IGMP snooping is enabled on the Layer 2 VLAN
for the first time, static multicast group configuration is allowed, even when IGMP
snooping is disabled later on that Layer 2 VLAN.
wi01138851
Configuring and retrieving licenses using EDM is not supported.
wi01141638
On a VSP 4000, when a VLAN with 1000 multicast senders is deleted, the console or
Telnet session stops responding and SNMP requests time out for up to 2 minutes.
wi01142142
When a multicast sender moves from one port to another within the same BEB or
from one VIST peer BEB to another, with the old port operationally up, the source
port information in the output of the show ip igmp sender command is not
updated with new sender port information.
You can perform one of the following workarounds:
• On an IGMP snoop-enabled interface, you can flush IGMP sender records.
Caution:
Flushing sender records can cause a transient traffic loss.
• On an IGMP-enabled Layer 3 interface, you can toggle the IGMP state.
Caution:
Expect traffic loss until IGMP records are built after toggling the IGMP state.
wi01145099
IP multicast packets with a time-to-live (TTL) equal to 1 are not switched across the
SPB cloud over a Layer 2 VSN. They are dropped by the ingress BEB.
Table continues…
April 2017
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59
Known issues and limitations
WI number
Description
To prevent IP multicast packets from being dropped, configure multicast senders to
send traffic with TTL greather than 1.
wi01159075
VSP 4450GSX-PWR+: Mirroring functionality is not working for RSTP BPDUs.
wi01171670
Telnet packets get encrypted on MACsec enabled ports.
wi01198872
On a VSP 4000, loss of learned MAC addresses occurs in a vIST setup beyond 10k
addresses.
In a SPB setup the MAC learning is limited to 13k MAC addresses, due to the
limitation of the internal architecture when using SPB. Moreover, as vIST uses SPB
and due to the way vIST synchronizes MAC adresses with a vIST pair, the MAC
learning in a vIST setup is limited to 10K Mac addresses.
wi01210217
The command show eapol auth-stats displays LAST-SRC-MAC for NEAP
sessions incorrectly.
wi01211415
In addition to the fan modules, each power supply also has a fan. The power supply
stops working if a power supply fan fails, but there is no LED or software warning that
indicates this failure.
Try to recover the power supply fan by resetting the switch. If the fan does not
recover, then replace the faulty power supply.
wi01212034
When you disable EAPoL globally:
• Traffic is allowed for static MAC configured on EAPoL enabled port without
authentication.
• Static MAC config added for authenticated NEAP client is lost.
wi01212247
BGP tends to have many routes. Frequent additions or deletions impacts network
connectivity. To prevent frequent additions or deletions, reflected routes are not
withdrawn from client 2 even though they are withdrawn from client 1. Disabling
Route-reflection can create blackhole in the network.
Workaround: Bounce the BGP protocol globally.
wi01212585
LED blinking in EDM is representative of, but not identical to, the actual LED blinking
rates on the switch.
wi01213040
When you disable auto-negotiation on both sides, the 10 Gbps copper link does not
come up.
wi01213066
EAP and NEAP are not supported on brouter ports.
wi01213374
wi01213336
When you configure tx mode port mirroring on T-UNI and SPBM NNI ports,
unknown unicast, broadcast and multicast traffic packets that ingress these ports
appear on the mirror destination port, although they do not egress the mirror source
port. This is because tx mode port mirroring happens on the mirror source port
before the source port squelching logic drops the packets at the egress port.
wi01219295
SPBM QOS: Egress UNI port does not follow port QOS with ingress NNI port & Macin-Mac incoming packets.
Table continues…
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60
Limitations in this release
WI number
Description
wi01219658
The command Show khi port-statistics does not display the count for NNI
ingress control packets going to the CP.
wi01223526
ISIS logs duplicate system ID only when the device is a direct neighbor.
wi01223557
Multicast outage occurs on LACP MLT when simplified vIST peer is rebooted. You
can perform one of the following work arounds:
• Enable PIM on the edge.
• Ensure that IST peers are either RP or DR but not both.
wi01224683
wi01224689
Additional link bounce may occur on the following ports, when toggling links or during
cable re-insertion:
• VSP 7254XSQ 10 Gbps port
• VSP 7254XSQ and VSP7254XTQ 40Gig optical cables and 40 Gbps break out
cables
• VSP 8200 and VSP 8400 40 Gbps ports with optical cable
• VSP 8200 and VSP 8400 40 Gbps ports with optical breakout cable
wi01229417
Origination and termination of IPv6 6-in-4 tunnel is not supported on a node with
vIST enabled.
wi01232578
When SSH keyboard-interactive-auth mode is enabled, the server generates the
password prompt to be displayed and sends it to the SSH client. The server always
sends an expanded format of the IPv6 address.
When SSH keyboard-interactive-auth mode is disabled and password-auth is
enabled, the client itself generates the password prompt, and it displays the IPv6
address format used in the ssh command.
wi01234289
HTTP management of the ONA is not supported when it is deployed with a VSP
4000 Series device.
VOSS-7
Even when you change the LLDP mode of an interface from CDP to LLDP, if the
remote side sends CDP packets, the switch accepts them and refreshes the existing
CDP neighbor entry.
VOSS-687
EDM and CLI show different local preference values for a BGP IPv6 route. EDM
displays path attributes as received and stored in the BGP subsystem. If the attribute
is from an eBGP peer, the local preference appears as zero. CLI displays path
attributes associated with the route entry, which can be modified by a policy. If a
route policy is not configured, the local preference shows the default value of 100.
VOSS-1954
After you log in to EDM, if you try to refresh the page by clicking on the refresh button
in the browser toolbar, it will redirect to a blank page. This issue happens only for the
very first attempt and only in Firefox.
VOSS-2166
The IPsec security association (SA) configuration has a NULL Encryption option
under the Encrpt-algo parameter.
Currently, you must fill the encrptKey and keyLength sub-parameters to set this
option; however, these values are not used for actual IPsec processing as it is a
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Known issues and limitations
WI number
Description
NULL encryption option. The NULL option is required to interoperate with other
vendors whose IPsec solution only supports that mode for encryption.
VOSS-2185
MAC move of the client to the new port does not automatically happen when you
move a Non-EAP client authenticated on a specific port to another EAPoL or NonEAP enabled port .
SSH connections
VOSS 4.1.0.0 and VOSS 4.2.0.0 SSH server and SSH client support password authentication
mode.
VOSS 4.2.1.0 changed the SSH server from password authentication to keyboard-interactive. VOSS
4.2.1.0 changed the SSH client to automatically support either password authentication or keyboardinteractive mode.
In VOSS 4.2.1.0, you cannot configure the SSH server to support password authentication. This
limitation creates a backward compatibility issue for SSH clients that do not support keyboardinteractive mode, including SSH clients that are part of pre-VOSS 4.2.1.0 software releases. For
example, VOSS 4.1.0.0 SSH clients, VOSS 4.2.0.0 SSH clients, and external SSH clients that only
support password authentication cannot connect to VOSS 4.2.1.0 SSH servers.
This issue is addressed in software release VOSS 4.2.1.1 and later. The default mode of the SSH
server starting from VOSS 4.2.1.1 is changed back to password authentication. Beginning with
VOSS 5.0, you can use an ACLI command to change the SSH server mode to keyboard-interactive.
For more information about how to configure the SSH server authentication mode, see
Administering.
Note:
If you enable the ASG feature, the SSH server must use keyboard-interactive.
See the following table to understand SSH connections between specific client and server software
releases.
Client software release
Server software release
Support
VOSS 4.1.0.0
VOSS 4.2.0.0
Supported
VOSS 4.1.0.0
VOSS 4.2.1.0
Not supported
VOSS 4.2.0.0
VOSS 4.2.1.0
Not supported
VOSS 4.1.0.0
VOSS 4.2.1.1
Supported
VOSS 4.2.0.0
VOSS 4.2.1.1
Supported
Single next hop/ARP limitation for Fabric Extend
This limitation only exists for releases that do not support VXLAN Gateway.
Default console port speed
The default console port speed for all platforms is 9600 bits per second.
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Chapter 5: Resolved issues
This section details the issues that are resolved in this release.
Fixes from previous releases
VOSS 6.0 incorporates all fixes from prior releases, up to and including VOSS 5.1.1.3.
Table 18: Resolved issues in this release
Issue Number
Description
VOSS-1329
If you configure both IPv4 and IPv6 on a VLAN interface, and then change the IPv6
MTU, the IPv4 MTU is also changed for that interface.
wi01235322
Secure Copy (SCP) file transfers on VSP switches, running VOSS 5.0, stall
intermittently due to 100% thread utilization of the SCP process, which is
responsible for file transfer. This problem is seen intermittently when the transfer is
initiated from SSH client versions earlier than OpenSSH_5.0, or for files with size of
1 GB or larger. For client versions later than OpenSSH_5.0, this stall condition is
rare for file sizes up to 500 MB and has not been seen for files with sizes that are
typically transferred to and from VOSS switches. The use of some older client
versions such as the ones shown in the following list always result in stalled file
transfers:
VOSS-1682
• Sun_SSH_1.1, SSH protocols 1.5/2.0, OpenSSL 0x0090704f
• OpenSSH_3.9p1, OpenSSL 0.9.7a Feb 19 2003
The recommended client and file size range to avoid this problem is to use Open
SSH client version later than 5.0 and file sizes up to 500 MB.
VOSS-1758
After changing ISIS System-ID, it is possible that CFM L2 ping will not work properly.
VOSS-2237
Configuring NTP server with wrong key value, error message occurs in two
scenarios.
• When passwords (keys) start with a special 9 character instead of alphanumeric
characters.
• When passwords (keys) contain a space between characters.
Error message:
setting NtpKeyTbl, Operation not allowed
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Chapter 6: Resources
Support
Go to the Avaya Support website at http://support.avaya.com for the most up-to-date
documentation, product notices, and knowledge articles. You can also search for release notes,
downloads, and resolutions to issues. Use the online service request system to create a service
request. Chat with live agents to get answers to questions, or request an agent to connect you to a
support team if an issue requires additional expertise.
Documentation
See Documentation Reference for a list of documentation for all VOSS products.
For installation and initial setup information of the Open Networking Adapter (ONA), refer to the
Quick Install Guide that came with your ONA.
Note:
The ONA works only with the Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4000 Series.
Training
Ongoing product training is available. For more information or to register, you can access the Web
site at http://avaya-learning.com/.
Viewing Avaya Mentor videos
Avaya Mentor videos provide technical content on how to install, configure, and troubleshoot Avaya
products.
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Searching a documentation collection
About this task
Videos are available on the Avaya Support website, listed under the video document type, and on
the Avaya-run channel on YouTube.
Procedure
• To find videos on the Avaya Support website, go to http://support.avaya.com and perform one
of the following actions:
- In Search, type Avaya Mentor Videos to see a list of the available videos.
- In Search, type the product name. On the Search Results page, select Video in the
Content Type column on the left.
• To find the Avaya Mentor videos on YouTube, go to www.youtube.com/AvayaMentor and
perform one of the following actions:
- Enter a key word or key words in the Search Channel to search for a specific product or
topic.
- Scroll down Playlists, and click the name of a topic to see the available list of videos posted
on the website.
Note:
Videos are not available for all products.
Searching a documentation collection
On the Avaya Support website, you can download the documentation library for a specific product
and software release to perform searches across an entire document collection. For example, you
can perform a single, simultaneous search across the collection to quickly find all occurrences of a
particular feature. Use this procedure to perform an index search of your documentation collection.
Before you begin
• Download the documentation collection zip file to your local computer.
• You must have Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader installed on your computer.
Procedure
1. Extract the document collection zip file into a folder.
2. Navigate to the folder that contains the extracted files and open the file named
<product_name_release>.pdx.
3. In the Search dialog box, select the option In the index named
<product_name_release>.pdx.
4. Enter a search word or phrase.
5. Select any of the following to narrow your search:
• Whole Words Only
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Resources
• Case-Sensitive
• Include Bookmarks
• Include Comments
6. Click Search.
The search results show the number of documents and instances found. You can sort the
search results by Relevance Ranking, Date Modified, Filename, or Location. The default is
Relevance Ranking.
Subscribing to e-notifications
Subscribe to e-notifications to receive an email notification when documents are added to or
changed on the Avaya Support website.
About this task
You can subscribe to different types of general notifications, for example, Product Correction
Notices (PCN), which apply to any product or a specific product. You can also subscribe to specific
types of documentation for a specific product, for example, Application & Technical Notes for Virtual
Services Platform 7000.
Procedure
1. In an Internet browser, go to https://support.avaya.com.
2. Type your username and password, and then click Login.
3. Under My Information, select SSO login Profile.
4. Click E-NOTIFICATIONS.
5. In the GENERAL NOTIFICATIONS area, select the required documentation types, and then
click UPDATE.
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Subscribing to e-notifications
6. Click OK.
7. In the PRODUCT NOTIFICATIONS area, click Add More Products.
8. Scroll through the list, and then select the product name.
9. Select a release version.
10. Select the check box next to the required documentation types.
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Resources
11. Click Submit.
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Appendix A: Related information
The following section contains information related to the current release.
Overview of features by release and platform
This section provides an overview of which release introduced feature support for a particular
platform. Each new release for a platform includes all the features from previous releases unless
specifically stated otherwise.
Note:
4.1 is the first VOSS release. Release numbers earlier than 4.1 are releases specific to the
particular platform.
Feature introduction
For more information about features and their configuration, see the documents listed in the
respective sections.
Features
Release introduced by platform series
Default autonegotiation behavior when using a 1 Gbps SFP
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
Enabled
Disabled
Disabled
N/A
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
N/A
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
For more information, see the hardware documents and
Administering
Operations and management
CLI
For more information, see Using CLI and EDM.
Channelization of 40 Gbps ports
For more information, see Administering.
Configuration and Orchestration Manager (COM)
For more information, see Avaya Configuration and
Orchestration Manager (COM) documentation, http://
support.avaya.com/.
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Related information
Features
Release introduced by platform series
Domain Name Service (DNS) client (IPv4)
For more information, see Administering.
DNS client (IPv6)
For more information, see Administering.
The encryption modules file is included in the runtime
software image file; it is not a separate file.
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
4.2
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
4.2
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
3.0
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
Enable or disable ICMP Broadcast/Multicast
For more information, see the following documents:
• Configuring IPv4 Routing
• Configuring IPv6 Routing
Enable/disable IP Source Routing
For more information, see the following documents:
• Configuring IPv4 Routing
• Configuring IPv6 Routing
Enhanced Secure mode
For more information, see Administering.
Enterprise Device Manager (EDM)
For more information, see Using CLI and EDM.
Entity MIB - Physical Table
For more information, see Administering
EDM representation of physical LED status
For more information, see the following documents:
• Installing Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4850GTS Series,
NN46251-300
• Installing Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4450GTX-HTPWR+ Switch, NN46251–304
• Installing Avaya Virtual Services Platform 4450GSX-PWR+
Switch, NN46251-307
• Installing the Avaya Virtual Services Platform 7200 Series,
NN47228-302
• Installing the Avaya Virtual Services Platform 8000 Series,
NN47227-300
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server/client (IPv4)
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Overview of features by release and platform
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
3.1
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
For more information, see Administering.
FTP server/client (IPv6)
For more information, see Administering.
Flight Recorder (for system health monitoring)
For more information, see Troubleshooting.
Forgiving mode for CWDM and DWDM SFP+ transceivers
For more information, see Installing Transceivers and Optical
Components on VSP Operating System Software,
NN47227-301.
IEEE 802.1ag Connectivity Fault Management (CFM)
• Layer 2 Ping
• TraceRoute
• TraceTree
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Industry Standard Discovery Protocol (ISDP) (CDP
compatible)
For more information, see Administering
Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) and EAP over LAN
(EAPoL)
For more information, see Configuring Security.
Extensible Authentication Protocol over LAN (EAPol) MHMAMV
For more information, see Configuring Security.
Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP)
For more information, see Administering
Key Health Indicator (KHI)
For more information, see Monitoring Performance.
Logging (log to file and syslog [IPv4])
For more information, see Monitoring Performance.
Logging (log to file and syslog [IPv6])
For more information, see Monitoring Performance.
Mirroring (port and flow-based)
For more information, see Troubleshooting.
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Related information
Features
Release introduced by platform series
Network Time Protocol (NTP)
For more information, see Administering.
Non EAPoL MAC RADIUS authentication
For more information, see Configuring Security.
NTP with SHA Authentication
For more information, see Administering.
Power over Ethernet
For more information, see Administering.
PoE/PoE+ Allocation Using LLDP
For more information, see Administering.
RADIUS, community-based users (IPv4)
For more information, see Configuring Security.
RADIUS (IPv6)
For more information, see Configuring Security.
Remote Login (Rlogin) server/client (IPv4)
For more information, see Administering.
Rlogin server (IPv6)
For more information, see Administering.
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.1
4.2.1
4.2.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
3.0
N/A
N/A
N/A
5.1
N/A
N/A
N/A
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.2
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.2
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
3.0
5.0
4.0
5.0
Remote Monitoring 1 (RMON1) for Layer 1 and Layer 2
Note:
Release 5.0 and 5.1 do not support RMON1.
Remote Monitoring 2 (RMON2) for network and application
layer protocols
For more information, see Monitoring Performance.
Remote Shell (RSH) server/client
For more information, see Administering.
Russia summer time zone change
For more information, see Administering.
Secure Copy (SCP)
Note:
WinSCP client is not supported with SCP on the switch.
For more information, see Administering.
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Overview of features by release and platform
Features
Release introduced by platform series
Secure FTP (SFTP)
For more information, see Administering.
Secure hash algorithm 1 (SHA-1) and SHA-2
For more information, see Configuring OSPF and RIP.
Secure Shell (SSH) (IPv4)
For more information, see Administering.
sFlow
For more information, see Monitoring Performance.
Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate management
For more information, see Administering.
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.2
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
4.1
6.0
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.0.1
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) for log notification
For more information, see the following documents:
• Monitoring Performance
SLA Mon™
For more information, see Configuring the SLA Mon™ Agent.
Simple Loop Prevention Protocol (SLPP)
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning
Tree, and NLB.
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) v1/2/3 (IPv4)
For more information, see Configuring Security.
SNMP (IPv6)
For more information, see Configuring Security.
SoNMP (Avaya topology discovery protocol)
For more information, see Administering.
spbm-config-mode boot flag
For more information, see Configuring IP Multicast Routing
Protocols.
SSH (IPv6)
For more information, see Administering.
SSH client disable
For more information, see Administering.
SSH rekey
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Related information
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
4.0
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
N/A
N/A
N/A
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
For more information, see Administering.
TACACS+
For more information, see Configuring Security.
Telnet server/client (IPv4)
For more information, see Administering.
Telnet server/client (IPv6)
For more information, see Administering.
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server/client (IPv4)
For more information, see Administering.
TFTP server/client (IPv6)
For more information, see Administering.
Virtual Link Aggregation Control Protocol (VLACP)
For more information, see Configuring Link Aggregation,
MLT, SMLT, and vIST.
Layer 2
Avaya switch cluster (multi-chassis LAG)
• Virtual Inter-Switch Trunk (vIST)
For more information, see Configuring Link Aggregation,
MLT, SMLT, and vIST.
Bridge Protocol Data Unit (BPDU) Guard
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning
Tree, and NLB.
First Hop Security
For more information, see Configuring Security.
IEEE 802.3x Pause frame transmit
For more information, see the following documents:
• Administering
• Monitoring Performance
MAC security (MAC-layer filtering, limit learning)
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning
Tree, and NLB
Media Access Control Security (MACsec)
4.0
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Overview of features by release and platform
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
N/A
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
N/A
6.0
6.0
6.0
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
Note:
VOSS 5.0 officially removes the replay protection
commands. Do not use replay protection in earlier
releases.
For more information, see Configuring Security.
MACsec enhancements
For more information, see Configuring Security.
Microsoft Network Load Balancing Service (NLB) — unicast
mode
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning
Tree, and NLB.
Microsoft Network Load Balancing Service (NLB) —
multicast mode
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning
Tree, and NLB.
MultiLink Trunking (MLT) / Link Aggregation Group (LAG)
For more information, see Configuring Link Aggregation,
MLT, SMLT, and vIST.
nni-mstp boot flag
This flag has special upgrade considerations the first time
you upgrade to a release that supports it.
For more information, see Administering.
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
• Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP)
• Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP)
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning
Tree, and NLB.
VXLAN Gateway
N/A
6.0
6.0
6.0
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning
Tree, and NLB.
Avaya Fabric technologies
All Fabric Connect services with Avaya switch cluster
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
ECMP support for VXLAN Gateway and Fabric Extend.
4.1
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
N/A
6.0
6.0
6.0
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Related information
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
3.0.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
For more information, see Configuring VLANs, Spanning
Tree, and NLB.
Equal Cost Trees (ECT)
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
E-Tree and Private VLANs
• For more information about E-Tree, see Configuring Fabric
Connect.
• For more information about Private VLANs, see
Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and NLB.
• For information about how to configure MultiLink Trunks
(MLT) and Private VLANs, see Configuring Link
Aggregation, MLT, SMLT, and vIST.
Fabric Attach
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Fabric Attach Zero Touch Client Attachment
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Fabric Extend
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Fabric RSPAN (Mirror to I-SID)
For more information, see Troubleshooting.
Inter-VSN routing
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
IPv6 inter-VSN routing
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
IP Multicast over Fabric Connect
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
IP Shortcut routing including ECMP
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
IPv6 Shortcut routing
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
IS-IS accept policies
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Layer 2 Virtual Service Network (VSN)
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Overview of features by release and platform
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
3.0
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
4.1
N/A
N/A
N/A
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
3.1
4.2.1
4.2.1
4.2.1
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
3.1
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
3.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
4.2
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
3.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Layer 3 VSN
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
run spbm installation script
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
run vms endura script
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
SPB-PIM Gateway controller
For more information, see Configuring SPB-PIM Gateway.
SPB-PIM Gateway interface
For more information, see Configuring SPB-PIM Gateway.
Switched UNI
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Transparent Port UNI (T-UNI)
For more information, see Configuring Fabric Connect.
Layer 3 IPv4 and IPv6 routing services
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
• Proxy ARP
• Static ARP
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
Alternative Routes for IPv4
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing
Alternative Routes for IPv6
For more information, see Configuring IPv6 Routing
Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) for IPv4
For more information, see Configuring BGP Services.
BGP+ (BGP for IPv6)
For more information, see Configuring BGP Services.
Internal Border Gateway Protocol (IBGP)
For more information, see Configuring BGP Services.
External Border Gateway Protocol (EBGP)
For more information, see Configuring BGP Services.
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
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77
Related information
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
Distributed Virtual Routing (DvR) controller
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
6.0
6.0
6.0
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing
N/A
Demo
only
Demo
only
Demo
only
Distributed Virtual Routing (DvR) leaf
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
Demo
only
Demo
only
Demo
only
Demo
only
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
4.2
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.2
4.2.1
4.2
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Relay, DHCP
Option 82
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
DHCP Snooping and Neighbor Discovery Inspection
For more information, see Configuring Security.
Equal Cost Multiple Path (ECMP) for IPv4
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
Equal Cost Multiple Path (ECMP) for IPv6
For more information, see the following documents:
• Configuring IPv4 Routing
• Configuring IPv6 Routing
• Configuring BGP Services
• Configuring Fabric Connect
Gratuitous ARP filtering
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) , including
virtualization
For more information, see Configuring IP Multicast Routing
Protocols.
IP route policies
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
IPsec for the Out-of-band management port
For more information, see Configuring Security.
IPv6 (OSPFv3, VRRP, RSMLT, DHCP Relay, IPv4 in IPv6
tunnels)
For more information, see Configuring IPv6 Routing.
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
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78
Overview of features by release and platform
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
IPv6 mode flag (boot config flags ipv6-mode)
For more information, see Configuring IPv6 Routing.
Layer 3 switch cluster (Routed SMLT) with Virtual InterSwitch Trunk (vIST)
For more information, see Configuring Link Aggregation,
MLT, SMLT, and vIST.
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
4.1
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.1
4.2.1
4.0.1
4.2
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
N/A
5.1
5.1
5.1
3.1
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
4.1
4.2.1
4.0.1
4.2
3.1
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
N/A
Layer 3 switch cluster (Routed SMLT) with Simplified vIST
For more information, see Configuring Link Aggregation,
MLT, SMLT, and vIST.
Multicast Listener Discovery
For more information, see Configuring IP Multicast Routing
Protocols.
Multicast Route Statistics for IPv4 and IPv6
For more information, see Configuring IP Multicast Routing
Protocols.
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)
For more information, see Configuring OSPF and RIP.
Protocol Independent Multicast over IPv6
For more information, see Configuring IP Multicast Routing
Protocols.
Protocol Independent Multicast–Sparse Mode (PIM-SM),
PIM-Source Specific Mode (PIM-SSM)
For more information, see Configuring IP Multicast Routing
Protocols.
Route Information Protocol (RIP)
For more information, see Configuring OSPF and RIP.
RIPng
For more information, see Configuring IPv6 Routing.
Static routing
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (URPF) checking (IPv4
and IPv6)
For more information, see Configuring Security.
Virtualization with IPv4 Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF)
• ARP
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
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79
Related information
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
5.1
5.1
5.1
5.1
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
Differentiated Services (DiffServ) including Per-Hop Behavior
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
• DHCP Relay
• Inter-VRF Routing (static, dynamic, and policy)
• Local Routing
• OSPFv2
• RIPv1/2
• Route Policies
• Static Routing
• VRRP
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
Increased VRF and L3 VSN scaling
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP)
• Avaya Backup Master
For more information, see Configuring IPv4 Routing.
VRRPv3 for IPv4 and IPv6
For more information, see the following documents:
• Configuring IPv4 Routing
• Configuring IPv6 Routing
• Monitoring Performance
Quality of Service and filtering
Access Control List (ACL)-based filtering
• Egress ACLs
• Ingress ACLs
• Layer 2 to Layer 4 filtering
• Port
• VLAN
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
Avaya Auto QoS
Table continues…
April 2017
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80
MIB changes
Features
Release introduced by platform series
VSP
4000
VSP
7200
VSP
8200
VSP
8400
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
4.0
N/A
N/A
N/A
4.1
4.2.1
4.1
4.2
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
QoS per queue rate limiting
5.1
5.1.1
5.1.1
5.1.1
3.0
4.2.1
4.0
4.2
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
Egress port shaper
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
Egress port mirror
For more information, see Troubleshooting
IPv6 ACL filters
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
Layer 2 to Layer 4 ingress port rate limiter
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
QoS Access Control Entries (ACE)
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
Security ACEs
For more information, see Configuring QoS and ACL-Based
Traffic Filtering.
MIB changes
This section contains information on the MIB changes in this release.
Deprecated MIBs
Object Name
Object OID
Deprecated in
Release
msdpRequestsTable
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.4
6.0
msdpRequestsEntry
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.4.1
6.0
msdpRequestsGroupAddress
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.4.1.1
6.0
msdpRequestsGroupMask
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.4.1.2
6.0
Table continues…
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Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Deprecated in
Release
msdpRequestsPeer
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.4.1.3
6.0
msdpRequestsStatus
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.4.1.4
6.0
msdpPeerOutSAResponses
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.10
6.0
msdpPeerProcessRequestsFrom
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.24
6.0
msdpPeerInNotifications
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.31
6.0
msdpPeerOutNotifications
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.32
6.0
msdpPeerLastError
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.33
6.0
msdpPeerInSAResponses
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.9
6.0
msdpMIBPeerGroup
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.2
6.0
msdpMIBRequestsGroup
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.6
6.0
rcIsisLogicalInterfaceNextHopIfIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.26.
1.11
6.0
rcIsisLogicalInterfaceNextHopVid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.26.
1.12
6.0
rcMsdpPeerAsNumber
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1. 6.0
2.1.1
rcMsdpSACacheTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1. 6.0
3
New MIBs
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
msdpMIB
1.3.6.1.3.92
6.0
msdpMIBobjects
1.3.6.1.3.92.1
6.0
msdp
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1
6.0
msdpTraps
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.0
6.0
msdpEstablished
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.0.1
6.0
msdpBackwardTransition
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.0.2
6.0
msdpEnabled
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.1
6.0
msdpRPAddress
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.11
6.0
msdpMeshGroupTable
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.12
6.0
msdpMeshGroupEntry
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.12.1
6.0
msdpMeshGroupName
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.12.1.1
6.0
msdpMeshGroupPeerAddress
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.12.1.2
6.0
msdpMeshGroupStatus
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.12.1.3
6.0
msdpCacheLifetime
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.2
6.0
msdpNumSACacheEntries
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.3
6.0
Table continues…
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MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
msdpPeerTable
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5
6.0
msdpPeerEntry
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1
6.0
msdpPeerRemoteAddress
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.1
6.0
msdpPeerOutSAResponses
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.10
6.0
msdpPeerInControlMessages
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.11
6.0
msdpPeerOutControlMessages
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.12
6.0
msdpPeerInDataPackets
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.13
6.0
msdpPeerOutDataPackets
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.14
6.0
msdpPeerFsmEstablishedTransitions
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.15
6.0
msdpPeerFsmEstablishedTime
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.16
6.0
msdpPeerInMessageTime
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.17
6.0
msdpPeerLocalAddress
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.18
6.0
msdpPeerConnectRetryInterval
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.20
6.0
msdpPeerHoldTimeConfigured
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.21
6.0
msdpPeerKeepAliveConfigured
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.22
6.0
msdpPeerDataTtl
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.23
6.0
msdpPeerProcessRequestsFrom
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.24
6.0
msdpPeerStatus
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.25
6.0
msdpPeerRemotePort
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.26
6.0
msdpPeerLocalPort
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.27
6.0
msdpPeerEncapsulationType
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.29
6.0
msdpPeerState
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.3
6.0
msdpPeerConnectionAttempts
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.30
6.0
msdpPeerInNotifications
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.31
6.0
msdpPeerOutNotifications
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.32
6.0
msdpPeerLastError
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.33
6.0
msdpPeerDiscontinuityTime
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.34
6.0
msdpPeerRPFFailures
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.4
6.0
msdpPeerInSAs
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.5
6.0
msdpPeerOutSAs
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.6
6.0
msdpPeerInSARequests
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.7
6.0
msdpPeerOutSARequests
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.8
6.0
msdpPeerInSAResponses
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.5.1.9
6.0
msdpSACacheTable
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6
6.0
msdpSACacheEntry
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1
6.0
Table continues…
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Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
msdpSACacheGroupAddr
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.1
6.0
msdpSACacheStatus
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.10
6.0
msdpSACacheSourceAddr
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.2
6.0
msdpSACacheOriginRP
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.3
6.0
msdpSACachePeerLearnedFrom
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.4
6.0
msdpSACacheRPFPeer
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.5
6.0
msdpSACacheInSAs
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.6
6.0
msdpSACacheInDataPackets
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.7
6.0
msdpSACacheUpTime
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.8
6.0
msdpSACacheExpiryTime
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.6.1.9
6.0
msdpMIBConformance
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8
6.0
msdpMIBCompliances
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.1
6.0
msdpMIBCompliance
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.1.1
6.0
msdpMIBFullCompliance
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.1.2
6.0
msdpMIBReadOnlyCompliance
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.1.3
6.0
msdpMIBGroups
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2
6.0
msdpMIBGlobalsGroup
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.1
6.0
msdpMIBEncapsulationGroup
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.3
6.0
msdpMIBSACacheGroup
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.4
6.0
msdpMIBNotificationGroup
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.5
6.0
msdpMIBRPGroup
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.7
6.0
msdpMIBMeshGroupGroup
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.8
6.0
msdpMIBPeerGroup2
1.3.6.1.3.92.1.1.8.2.9
6.0
sflow
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706
6.0
sFlowMIB
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1
6.0
sFlowAgent
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1
6.0
sFlowRcvrTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4
6.0
sFlowRcvrEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1
6.0
sFlowRcvrIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1.
1
6.0
sFlowRcvrOwner
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1.
2
6.0
sFlowRcvrTimeout
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1.
3
6.0
sFlowRcvrMaximumDatagramSize
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1.
4
6.0
Table continues…
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84
MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
sFlowRcvrAddressType
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1.
5
6.0
sFlowRcvrAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1.
6
6.0
sFlowRcvrPort
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1.
7
6.0
sFlowRcvrDatagramVersion
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.4.1.
8
6.0
sFlowFsTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.5
6.0
sFlowFsEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.5.1
6.0
sFlowFsDataSource
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.5.1.
1
6.0
sFlowFsInstance
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.5.1.
2
6.0
sFlowFsReceiver
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.5.1.
3
6.0
sFlowFsPacketSamplingRate
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.5.1.
4
6.0
sFlowFsMaximumHeaderSize
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.5.1.
5
6.0
sFlowCpTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.6
6.0
sFlowCpEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.6.1
6.0
sFlowCpDataSource
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.6.1.
1
6.0
sFlowCpInstance
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.6.1.
2
6.0
sFlowCpReceiver
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.6.1.
3
6.0
sFlowCpInterval
1.3.6.1.4.1.14706.1.1.6.1.
4
6.0
rc2kBootConfigEnableVxlanGwFullInterworkingMode
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.100.5.
1.52
6.0
rc2kBootConfigEnableDvrLeafMode
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.100.5.
1.54
6.0
rcBridgeVnidFdbTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.14.24
6.0
rcBridgeVnidFdbEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.14.24.
1
6.0
rcBridgeVnidFdbVnid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.14.24.
1.1
6.0
Table continues…
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Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcBridgeVnidFdbAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.14.24.
1.2
6.0
rcBridgeVnidFdbStatus
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.14.24.
1.3
6.0
rcBridgeVnidFdbInterfaceIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.14.24.
1.4
6.0
rcBridgeVnidFdbType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.14.24.
1.5
6.0
rcPrFilterAceMonitoringIsidOffset
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.202.1.
1.2.4.1.1.32
6.0
rcPrFilterAceMonitoringIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.202.1.
1.2.4.1.1.33
6.0
rcPrFilterAceMirroringQos
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.202.1.
1.2.4.1.1.34
6.0
rcPrFilterAceRemoveTag
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.202.1.
1.2.4.1.1.35
6.0
rcPrFilterAceProtoShowIcmpv6MsgTypeList
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.202.1.
1.2.4.27.1.24
6.0
rcPrFilterAceProtoShowIcmpv6MsgTypeOper
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.202.1.
1.2.4.27.1.25
6.0
rcPrFilterAceProtoIcmpv6MsgTypeTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.202.1.
1.2.4.38.1
6.0
rcVxlan
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218
6.0
rcVxlanVtepSourceIp
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.1
6.0
rcVxlanVtepVrf
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.2
6.0
rcVxlanVtepTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.3
6.0
rcVxlanVtepEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.3.
1
6.0
rcVxlanVtepId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.3.
1.1
6.0
rcVxlanVtepIpAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.3.
1.2
6.0
rcVxlanVtepName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.3.
1.3
6.0
rcVxlanVtepRowStatus
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.3.
1.4
6.0
rcVxlanVtepNextHopVrfName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.3.
1.5
6.0
rcVxlanVnidTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.4
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
86
MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcVxlanVnidEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.4.
1
6.0
rcVxlanVnidIdentifier
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.4.
1.1
6.0
rcVxlanVnidIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.4.
1.2
6.0
rcVxlanVnidRowStatus
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.4.
1.3
6.0
rcVxlanVnidAction
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.4.
1.4
6.0
rcVxlanVnidEndPointTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.5
6.0
rcVxlanVnidEndPointEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.5.
1
6.0
rcVxlanVnidEndPointVnid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.5.
1.1
6.0
rcVxlanVnidEndPointVtepId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.5.
1.2
6.0
rcVxlanVnidEndPointIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.5.
1.3
6.0
rcVxlanVnidEndPointRowStatus
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.5.
1.4
6.0
rcVxlanVtepNextHopTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.6
6.0
rcVxlanVtepNextHopEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.6.
1
6.0
rcVxlanVtepNextHopVtepId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.6.
1.1
6.0
rcVxlanVtepNextHopIp
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.6.
1.2
6.0
rcVxlanVtepNextHopIfIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.6.
1.3
6.0
rcVxlanVtepNextHopVid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.6.
1.4
6.0
rcVxlanVnidElanEndPointTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.7
6.0
rcVxlanVnidElanEndPointEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.7.
1
6.0
rcVxlanVnidElanEndPointVnid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.7.
1.1
6.0
rcVxlanVnidElanEndPointCvid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.7.
1.2
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
87
Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcVxlanVnidElanEndPointIfIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.7.
1.3
6.0
rcVxlanVnidElanEndPointIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.7.
1.4
6.0
rcVxlanVnidElanEndPointRowStatus
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.218.7.
1.5
6.0
rcDvr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219
6.0
rcDvrGlobal
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1
6.0
rcDvrGlobalDomainId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
1
6.0
rcDvrGlobalGatewayMac
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
10
6.0
rcDvrGlobalInbandMgmtIp
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
11
6.0
rcDvrGlobalInjectDefaultRouteDisable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
12
6.0
rcDvrGlobalOperState
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
13
6.0
rcDvrGlobalSystemIdAsMac
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
14
6.0
rcDvrGlobalRole
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
2
6.0
rcDvrGlobalEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
3
6.0
rcDvrVirtualIstLocalAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
4
6.0
rcDvrVirtualIstLocalMask
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
5
6.0
rcDvrVirtualIstPeerAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
6
6.0
rcDvrVirtualIstClusterId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
7
6.0
rcDvrGlobalDomainIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
8
6.0
rcDvrGlobalBackboneIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.1.
9
6.0
rcDvrRouteTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2
6.0
rcDvrRouteEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
88
MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcDvrRouteDestIpAddrType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.1
6.0
rcDvrRouteType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.10
6.0
rcDvrRouteDestIpAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.2
6.0
rcDvrRouteDestMask
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.3
6.0
rcDvrRouteL3Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.4
6.0
rcDvrRouteEcmpIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.5
6.0
rcDvrRouteNextHopMac
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.6
6.0
rcDvrRouteL2Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.7
6.0
rcDvrRouteCost
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.8
6.0
rcDvrRouteNextHopName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.2.
1.9
6.0
rcDvrMembersTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.3
6.0
rcDvrMembersEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.3.
1
6.0
rcDvrMemberMacAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.3.
1.1
6.0
rcDvrMemberSysId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.3.
1.2
6.0
rcDvrMemberNickName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.3.
1.3
6.0
rcDvrMemberRole
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.3.
1.4
6.0
rcDvrMemberDomainId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.3.
1.5
6.0
rcDvrInterfacesTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4
6.0
rcDvrInterfacesEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceVlanIpAddrType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.1
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceAdminState
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.10
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
89
Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcDvrInterfaceSpbmcState
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.11
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceIgmpVersion
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.12
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceVlanIpAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.2
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceL3Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.3
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceL2Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.4
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceVlanIpMask
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.5
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceVrfId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.6
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceVlanId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.7
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceGwIpAddrType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.8
6.0
rcDvrInterfaceGwIpAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.4.
1.9
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesIpAddrType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.1
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesNextHopName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.10
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesNextHopMac
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.11
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesIpAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.2
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesMask
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.3
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesL3Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.4
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesMacAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.5
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesL2Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.6
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
90
MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcDvrHostEntriesPort
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.7
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesDomainId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.8
6.0
rcDvrHostEntriesType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.5.
1.9
6.0
rcDvrL3vsnTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.6
6.0
rcDvrL3vsnEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.6.
1
6.0
rcDvrL3vsnVrfId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.6.
1.1
6.0
rcDvrL3vsnIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.6.
1.2
6.0
rcDvrL3vsnVrfName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.6.
1.3
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseDestIpAddrType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.1
6.0
rcDvrDatabasePrefixCost
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.10
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseNextHopName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.11
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseAge
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.12
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseDestIpAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.2
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseDestMask
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.3
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseL3Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.4
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseEcmpIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.5
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseNextHop
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.6
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseL2Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.7
6.0
rcDvrDatabaseOutgoingInterface
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.8
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
91
Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcDvrDatabaseSpbCost
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.7.
1.9
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesIpAddrType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.1
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesNextHopName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.10
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesNextHopMac
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.11
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesIpAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.2
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesL3Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.3
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesDomainId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.4
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesEcmpIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.5
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesHostMacAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.6
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesL2Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.7
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesAdvControllerName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.8
6.0
rcDvrBackboneEntriesAdvController
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.8.
1.9
6.0
rcDvrBackboneMembersTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.9
6.0
rcDvrBackboneMembersEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.9.
1
6.0
rcDvrBackboneMemberMacAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.9.
1.1
6.0
rcDvrBackboneMemberSysId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.9.
1.2
6.0
rcDvrBackboneMemberNickName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.9.
1.3
6.0
rcDvrBackboneMemberRole
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.9.
1.4
6.0
rcDvrBackboneMemberDomainId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.219.9.
1.5
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
92
MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcSflow
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221
6.0
rcSflowMib
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1
6.0
rcSflowObjects
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1
6.0
rcSflowScalars
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.1
6.0
rcSflowAdminEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.1.1
6.0
rcSflowAgentAddressType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.1.2
6.0
rcSflowAgentAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.1.3
6.0
rcSflowStatsTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.2
6.0
rcSflowStatsEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.2.1
6.0
rcSflowStatsIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.2.1.1
6.0
rcSflowStatsDatagramCount
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.2.1.2
6.0
rcSflowStatsClearStats
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.221.1.
1.2.1.3
6.0
rcDiagMirrorMonitoringIsidOffset
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.1.1.
21
6.0
rcDiagMirrorMonitoringIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.1.1.
22
6.0
rcDiagMirrorMirroringQos
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.1.1.
23
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1.1
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidMonitorIsidOffset
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1.2
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidMonitorIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1.3
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidEgressPortList
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1.4
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
93
Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcDiagMonitorByIsidEgressMltId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1.5
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidMapToVlanId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1.6
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1.8
6.0
rcDiagMonitorByIsidRowStatus
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.18.
1.9
6.0
rcDiagIsidMirroringStatsTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.19
6.0
rcDiagIsidMirroringStatsEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.19.
1
6.0
rcDiagIsidMirroringStatsIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.19.
1.1
6.0
rcDiagIsidMirroringStatsMonitorIsid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.19.
1.2
6.0
rcDiagIsidMirroringStatsMirroredPackets
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.19.
1.3
6.0
rcDiagIsidMirroringStatsClearStats
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.23.19.
1.4
6.0
rcVlanPimGatewayEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.3.2.1.7
3
6.0
rcVlanDvrEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.3.2.1.7
6
6.0
rcVlanDvrGwIpv4Addr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.3.2.1.7
7
6.0
rcPortBpduGuardTimerCount
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.4.10.1.
1.117
6.0
rcIsisGlobalBackboneEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.1.2
2
6.0
rcIsisLogicalInterfaceNextHopTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.28
6.0
rcIsisLogicalInterfaceNextHopEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.28.
1
6.0
rcIsisLogicalInterfaceNextHopId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.28.
1.1
6.0
rcIsisLogicalInterfaceNextHopIp
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.28.
1.2
6.0
rcIsisLogicalInterfaceNextHopDestIfIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.28.
1.3
6.0
rcIsisLogicalInterfaceNextHopDestVid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.28.
1.4
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
94
MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcIsisPlsbMcastSpbPimGwControllerEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.4.1.
15
6.0
rcIsisPlsbMcastSpbPimGwGatewayEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.63.4.1.
16
6.0
rcIpConfPimGatewayEnable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.1.1.1
.30
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGw
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGlobal
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGlobalHelloInterval
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
1.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGlobalJoinPruneInterval
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
1.2
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceIfIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2.1.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceOperState
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2.1.2
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceAddressType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2.1.3
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2.1.4
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceAddressMask
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2.1.5
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceHelloInterval
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2.1.6
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwInterfaceJoinPruneInterval
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
2.1.7
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwNeighborTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
3
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwNeighborEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
3.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwNeighborIfIndex
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
3.1.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwNeighborAddressType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
3.1.2
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
95
Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcIpSpbPimGwNeighborAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
3.1.3
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwNeighborUpTime
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
3.1.4
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwNeighborExpiryTime
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
3.1.5
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcSourceAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4.1.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcGroupAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4.1.2
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcRowStatus
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4.1.3
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcGatewaySysId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4.1.4
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcGatewayHostName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4.1.5
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4.1.6
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerForeignSrcOwner
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
4.1.7
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerSpbmcSrcTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
5
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerSpbmcSrcEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
5.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerSpbmcSrcSourceAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
5.1.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerSpbmcSrcGroupAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
5.1.2
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerSpbmcSrcOriginatorSysId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
5.1.3
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwControllerSpbmcSrcOriginatorHostName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
5.1.4
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
96
MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcSourceAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.1
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcGroupAddress
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.2
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcControllerSysId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.3
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcControllerHostName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.4
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcGatewaySysId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.5
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcGatewayHostName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.6
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcInVid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.7
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcInPort
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.8
6.0
rcIpSpbPimGwGatewayForeignSrcOwnerType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.114.
6.1.9
6.0
rcMRouteExt
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115
6.0
rcMRouteExtTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
1
6.0
rcMRouteExtEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
1.1
6.0
rcMRouteExtProtocol
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
1.1.1
6.0
rcMRouteExtNextHopTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
2
6.0
rcMRouteExtNextHopEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
2.1
6.0
rcMRouteExtNextHopProtocol
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
2.1.1
6.0
rcMRouteExtNextHopL2Isid
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
2.1.2
6.0
rcMRouteExtInterfaceTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
3
6.0
rcMRouteExtInterfaceEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
3.1
6.0
rcMRouteExtInterfaceProtocol
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.8.115.
3.1.1
6.0
rcMsdp
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
97
Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcMsdpMib
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1
6.0
rcMsdpObjects
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1
6.0
rcMsdpScalars
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
1
6.0
rcMsdpRouteMapName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
1.1
6.0
rcMsdpRedistributeFilterEnabled
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
1.2
6.0
rcMsdpRedistributeFilterApply
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
1.3
6.0
rcMsdpImplicitDefaultPeerEnabled
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
1.4
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheClear
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
1.6
6.0
rcMsdpStatsClear
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
1.7
6.0
rcMsdpPeerTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2
6.0
rcMsdpPeerEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1
6.0
rcMsdpPeerAsNumber
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.1
6.0
rcMsdpPeerDescription
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.10
6.0
rcMsdpPeerSALimit
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.11
6.0
rcMsdpPeerMd5AuthEnabled
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.12
6.0
rcMsdpPeerMd5AuthPassword
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.13
6.0
rcMsdpPeerSAsLearnedFromThisPeer
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.14
6.0
rcMsdpPeerSAsAdvertisedToThisPeer
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.15
6.0
rcMsdpPeerUpOrDownTime
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.16
6.0
rcMsdpPeerConnAndStatsClearedTime
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.17
6.0
rcMsdpPeerRouteMapName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.18
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
98
MIB changes
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcMsdpPeerAdminEnabled
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.19
6.0
rcMsdpPeerTooShortMessages
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.2
6.0
rcMsdpPeerOperEnabled
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.20
6.0
rcMsdpPeerClearPeer
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.23
6.0
rcMsdpPeer4ByteAsNumber
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.24
6.0
rcMsdpPeerInBadMessages
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.3
6.0
rcMsdpPeerInKeepAliveMessages
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.4
6.0
rcMsdpPeerOutKeepAliveMessages
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.5
6.0
rcMsdpPeerInSAFilterEnabled
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.6
6.0
rcMsdpPeerInSAFilterRouteMapName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.7
6.0
rcMsdpPeerOutSAFilterEnabled
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.8
6.0
rcMsdpPeerOutSAFilterRouteMapName
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
2.1.9
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheRecordsTable
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
4
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheRecordsEntry
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
4.1
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheRecordsTypeInformation
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
4.1.1
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheRecordsGroupAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
4.1.2
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheRecordsSourceAddr
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
4.1.3
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheRecordsOriginRP
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
4.1.4
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheRecordsOriginatorAsNumber
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
4.1.5
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheRecordsRouteType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1.
4.1.6
6.0
Table continues…
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
99
Related information
Object Name
Object OID
Added in Release
rcMsdpNotificationObjects
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.2
6.0
rcMsdpSACacheType
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.2.
1
6.0
rcMsdpVrfId
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.2.
2
6.0
rcMACSecConnectivityAssociationTxKeyParity
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.88.1.1.
6
6.0
Object Name
Object OID
Obsolete in
Release
rcMsdpSACacheStatsClear
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.80.1.1. 6.0
1.5
rcPortBpduFilteringTimerCount
1.3.6.1.4.1.2272.1.4.10.1. 6.0
1.69
Obsolete MIBs
April 2017
Release Notes for VOSS
Comments on this document? infodev@avaya.com
100
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