Flashing Yellow Arrow

Flashing Yellow Arrow
1/17/2017
MMU2-16LEip FYA Overview
NEMA Flashing Yellow Arrow
Standard
011617
© Copyright EDI 2017
Flashing Yellow Arrow
• Need for FYA
– FHWA issued Interim Approval for use in March of 2006,
dropping the experimental status
– Allows protected-permitted left-turns and lead-lag phasing
without the “Yellow Trap”.
– Extremely flexible allowing protected-only or permitted-only
by Time of Day or Queue
– Has Good Driver Understanding
– The array of phasing and detection combinations allows the
engineer to maximize capacity at an intersection
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Flashing Yellow Arrow Milestones
• NCHRP 3-54 Report 2003
• First FYA capable monitor deployed in 2005 by EDI
• MUTCD formal release in 2009
– Defines Signal operation
• NEMA TS2-2016 Standard
– Includes FYA Amendment #4 November 2012
– Defines Equipment operation
NEMA TS-2 FYA Amendment
• Defines both CU and MMU2 operation
– Devices conformant to the NEMA Standard will be
interoperable and interchangeable.
– An MMU conformant to the NEMA FYA Standard is labeled
an “MMU2”.
• Development Cycle
–
–
–
–
Project started in Q1-2009
Completed in August 2011
Publication in 2012 as NEMA TS2 FYA Amendment #4
Publication in 2016 as NEMA TS2-2016
• Compliant to MUTCD 2009
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NEMA Controller Section
• NEMA Definitions
– Four output groups with four output states
– Uses an Overlap concept to control the permissive phases
• FYA Signal Output Group
–
–
–
–
Red Arrow assigned to Overlap Red
Solid Yellow Arrow assigned to Overlap Yellow
Flashing Yellow Arrow assigned to Overlap Green
Green Arrow assigned to LT Protected movement
• NTCIP object definitions are still needed
NEMA MMU2 Section
• Definitions – “MMU2”
–
–
–
–
Permissive Turn Channel
Protected Turn Channel
Opposing Through Channel
Paired Channels
• The NEMA Standard does not define a method of
programming the MMU2.
– Interchangeability is achieved when MMU2 units are
configured to produce the same functional operation.
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NEMA MMU2 Paired Channels
• The MMU2 uses two paired channels to monitor the
four outputs of the FYA Signal Output Group.
Load Switch #A
Protected Channel
Load Switch #B
Permissive Channel
• Each FYA approach typically requires two load
switches and two MMU channels.
• Unused Red and Yellow outputs of the Protected
channel can be disabled.
MMU2 Paired Channel Modes
• The NEMA Standard provides for a minimum of 8
modes.
– Four modes require no remapping
• Two load switches and two MMU channels per approach
– Two modes remap the Ped Yellow outputs
• One+ load switch and two MMU channels per approach
– Two alternate modes
• One+ load switch and one+ MMU channel per approach
• Preconfigured modes simplify the cabinet and MMU2 setup and
follow typical phase to channel assignment conventions in use.
• Choose a mode based on cabinet resources and level of remapping
to be tolerated.
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How to Choose a Mode
Assume each FYA approach needs 2x MMU channels and 2x load
switches.
• If the cabinet can provide two MMU channels and two load switches for
each FYA approach then use Modes A-D.
–
•
–
–
–
•
Simple configuration with No mapping.
If the cabinet can provide two MMU channels but does not have an
additional load switch for each FYA approach then use Modes E-F.
For example, a 12 position back panel.
CU mapping and MMU mapping required, adds programming and trouble shooting complexity.
Monitoring of Pedestrian Yellow Clearance interval for Conflicts is sacrificed.
If the cabinet does not have any additional MMU channels or load
switches then use Modes G-H.
–
–
–
–
–
For example, 4 thru + 4 Ped + 4 OLPs + 4 FYA.
CU mapping required, adds programming and trouble shooting complexity.
Restricts FYA permissive programming to be the same as the parent Ped phase programming.
MMU display combines the flashing Yellow Arrow icon with the Ped Walk and Don’t Walk icons.
Monitoring of Pedestrian Yellow Clearance interval for Conflicts is sacrificed.
Modes A-B (No Mapping)


Modes A and B assign the Protected turn phases to channels 1, 3, 5, and 7, and the Permissive turn overlap phases to either channels 9‐
12 or 13‐16. This accommodates cabinets that have pedestrian phases assigned to either channel group;
9‐12 or 13‐16
Ch: 1
Mode
A
3
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
Ch: 1
Mode
B
5
3
5
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Green Arrow
Turn
Signal Driver
Channels
Source
(Ra, Ya, fYa)
9
1 Green
10
3 Green
11
5 Green
12
7 Green
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, fYa)
13
14
15
16
Green Arrow
Signal Driver
Source
1 Green
3 Green
5 Green
7 Green
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Modes C-D (No Mapping)
• Modes C and D assign the
Protected turn phases to
either channels 9-12 or 1316. Channels 1, 3, 5, and 7,
are the Permissive turn
overlap phases.
Ch:1
Mode
C
3
Mode
D
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
9
10
11
12
2
4
6
8
Ch:1
• This accommodates
cabinets that have
pedestrian phases
assigned to either channel
group, 9-12 or 13-16
5
3
5
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
13
14
15
16
2
4
6
8
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Green Arrow
Turn
Signal Driver
Channels
Source
(Ra, Ya, fYa)
1
9 Green
3
10 Green
5
11 Green
7
12 Green
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, fYa)
1
3
5
7
Green Arrow
Signal Driver
Source
13 Green
14 Green
15 Green
16 Green
Modes E-F (Ped-Y Mapping)
• Modes E and F have the
Ped-Y outputs remapped to
drive the Protected turn
phases.
Ch:1
Mode
E
7
Opposing
Through
Channels
9
10
11
12
2
4
6
8
Ch:1
Mode
F
5
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ga)
– Mapping adds a level of
difficulty to trouble shoot.
• Modes E and F would be
used when there are not
enough load switches
provided in the back panel.
3
3
5
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
13
14
15
16
2
4
6
8
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Green Arrow
Turn
Signal Driver
Channels
Source
(Ra, Ya, fYa)
1
13 Yellow (Ped)
3
14 Yellow (Ped)
5
15 Yellow (Ped)
7
16 Yellow (Ped)
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, fYa)
1
3
5
7
Green Arrow
Signal Driver
Source
9 Yellow (Ped)
10 Yellow (Ped)
11 Yellow (Ped)
12 Yellow (Ped)
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Modes I-J (Ped-Y Mapping)
• Modes I and J have the
Ped-Y outputs remapped to
drive the Permissive turn
phases.
Ch: 1
Mode
I
7
Opposing
Through
Channels
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
Ch: 1
Mode
J
5
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, Ga)
– Mapping adds a level of
difficulty to trouble shoot.
• Modes I and J would be
used when there are not
enough load switches
provided in the back panel.
• Retrofit would be easier.
3
3
5
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
9
12 13
16
Permissive Flashing Yellow
Turn
Arrow Signal
Channels
Driver Source
(fYa)
9
13 Yellow (Ped)
10
14 Yellow (Ped)
11
15 Yellow (Ped)
12
16 Yellow (Ped)
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Green Arrow
Turn
Signal Driver
Channels
Source
(fYa)
13
9 Yellow (Ped)
14
10 Yellow (Ped)
15
11 Yellow (Ped)
16
12 Yellow (Ped)
Modes G-H (Alternate, Mapping)

Modes G and H have the Ped‐Y outputs remapped to drive the Permissive turn phases.



Permissive turn channels assume compatibility programming and display of the associated Ped phases.
Startup in Yellow or TOD Flash in Yellow is not supported.
Modes G and H are used when there are not enough load switches and/or channels provided.


Simplify retrofits & use only one MMU channel per pair.
Leaves four channels available for normal overlap uses. For example, 4 thru + 4 ped + 4 OLPs + 4 FYA
Ch: 1
Mode
G
3
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
Ch: 1
Mode
H
5
3
5
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
9
12 13
16
Permissive Flashing Yellow
Turn
Arrow Signal
Channels
Driver Source
(fYa)
9
9 Yellow (Ped)
10
10 Yellow (Ped)
11
11 Yellow (Ped)
12
12 Yellow (Ped)
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Turn
Channels
(fYa)
13
14
15
16
Flashing Yellow
Arrow Signal
Driver Source
13 Yellow (Ped)
14 Yellow (Ped)
15 Yellow (Ped)
16 Yellow (Ped)
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Modes K-L (Alternate, No Mapping)

Modes K and L assign the Permissive turn phases to either channels 9‐12 or 13‐16. Channels 1, 3, 5, and 7, are the Protected turn phases. Ch:1
Mode
K
3
Retrofits would be easier, but this assignment does not follow the NEMA overlap definition.
Mode
L
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
Ch:1

5
3
5
7
Protected Turn
Channels
(Ra, Ya, Ga)
Opposing
Through
Channels
1
3
5
7
2
4
6
8
9
12 13
16
Permissive Flashing Yellow
Turn
Arrow Signal
Channels
Driver Source
(fYa)
9
9 Green
10
10 Green
11
11 Green
12
12 Green
9
12 13
16
Permissive
Turn
Channels
(fYa)
13
14
15
16
Green Arrow
Signal Driver
Source
13 Green
14 Green
15 Green
16 Green
Additional FYA Functions
• Dynamic Clearance Conflict Detection
– During Permissive clearance interval, the solid Y arrow is
compatible with the opposing thru phase.
– During Protected clearance interval, the solid Y arrow is
conflicting with the opposing thru phase.
• Flashing Yellow output is monitored for a stuck-on
malfunction.
• Protected channel R and Y inputs can be disabled if
not utilized.
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MMU2-16LEip FYA Programming
First step is to select the Mode, A‐L.
For each mode selected the display will show the channel assignments.
For Type 12 operation only modes A, C, G, and K are provided.
MMU2-16LEip FYA Programming
Second step is to Enable a channel pair for each approach.
For each pair enabled the display will show the channel assignments.
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MMU2-16LEip FYA Programming
Third step is to Enable the use of the Red and Yellow input of the sparse channel (G only) if needed. Typically, the R&Y input is disabled, and the MMU will ignore any voltage on the inputs and set them to Off. This eliminates the need to use a dummy resistor on the unused Red and Yellow load switch outputs.
MMU2-16LEip FYA Programming
Final step is to select the FYA Options.
The FlashRate Fault option will set a fault if the flashing Yellow Arrow stops flashing.
The FYA Trap Detect option will set a fault if the permissive turn channel (fYa) clears to solid Yellow while the opposing thru phase is Green.
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EDI FYA Product Plans
• NEMA published the FYA Standard in November 2012.
• NEMA FYA functionality will be released as the MMU2-16LE(ip)
product.
– The MMU2-16LE(ip) is functionally the same as the MMU-16LE(ip)
but includes the NEMA FYA compliant operation.
– The MMU-16LE(ip) product line is discontinued. It provided only the
basic FYA and FYAc modes of operation.
• The EDI MMU2-16LEip SmartMonitor will provide an additional
four FYA modes beyond the NEMA standard for a total of 12
modes.
FAQ
•
What is the difference between the MMU2-16LE(ip) and the MMU-16LE(ip)?
–
–
–
The units are functionally the same except for the FYA operation. The MMU2-16LE complies
with the new NEMA standard.
NEMA Mode B is equivalent to the MMU-16LE “FYA” mode.
NEMA Mode F is equivalent to the MMU-16LE “FYAC” compact mode.
•
Is there any price difference?
•
Can EDI update the MMU-16LE firmware to the MMU2-16LE?
•
Can a user reflash the MMU-16LE with MMU2-16LE firmware?
•
If an MMU-16LE is returned for factory repair and needs a firmware update, will it be
automatically updated to MMU2-16LE level?
–
–
–
–
No.
Yes
Yes, consult the factory for details and firmware files.
Yes, it will be changed to MMU2-16LE firmware with a label indicating the update.
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Advances in Signal Monitoring
• Be aware of new technology advancements.
• Keep equipment specifications up to date.
– You are likely not using the same cell phone or TV that
you used even 5 years ago.
• Technicians must learn to be more productive and
more effective to keep up.
• New applications such as Flashing Yellow Arrow
provide opportunities to move more vehicles and
in a safer manner.
MMU2-16LE FYA Overview
NEMA Flashing Yellow Arrow Standard
Setting the Standard
for
Quality and Reliability
Eberle Design Inc.
www.EDItraffic.com
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