Keysight PXIe Chassis Family

Keysight PXIe Chassis Family
User Guide
M9019A
Keysight PXIe Chassis
Family
Notices
© Keysight Technologies 2016
No part of this manual may be reproduced
in any form or by any means(including
electronic storage and retrieval or
translation into a foreign language)
without prior agreement and written consent from Keysight Technologies, Inc. as
governed by United States and international copyright laws.
Manual Part Number
Sales and Technical Support
Warranty
To contact Keysight for sales and technical
support, refer to the support links on the
following Keysight websites:
THE MATERIAL CONTAINED IN THIS
DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED “AS IS,” AND
IS SUBJECT TO BEING CHANGED,
WITHOUT NOTICE, IN FUTURE EDITIONS. FURTHER, TO THE MAXIMUM
EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE
LAW, KEYSIGHT DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
WITH REGARD TO THIS MANUAL AND
ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE. KEYSIGHT
SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ERRORS OR
FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES IN CONNECTION WITH THE
FURNISHING, USE, OR PERFORMANCE
OF THIS DOCUMENT OR OF ANY INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN. SHOULD
KEYSIGHT AND THE USER HAVE A SEPARATE WRITTEN AGREEMENT WITH
WARRANTY TERMS COVERING THE
MATERIAL IN THIS DOCUMENT THAT
CONFLICT WITH THESE TERMS, THE
WARRANTY TERMS IN THE SEPARATE
AGREEMENT SHALL CONTROL.
www.keysight.com/find/M9019A (product
specific information and support, software
and documentation updates)
www.keysight.com/find/assist (world-wide
contact information for repair and service)
M9019-90003
Declaration of Conformity
Edition
Declarations of Conformity for this prod-uct
and for other Keysight products may be
downloaded from the Web. Go to
http://keysight.com/go/conformity and click
on “Declarations of Conformity.” You can
then search by product number to find the
latest Declaration of Conformity.
Edition 1, July 2016
Keysight Technologies, Inc. 1400
Fountaingrove Parkway Santa Rosa, CA
95403 USA
Technology Licenses
Trademarks
AXIe is a registered trademark of the AXIe
Consortium.
PXI is a registered trademark of the PXI
Systems Alliance.
PICMG®, Compact PCI®, and
AdvancedTCA® are registered trademarks of the PCI Industrial Computer
Manufacturers Group.
PCI-SIG®, PCI Express®, and PCIe® are
registered trademarks of PCI-SIG.
The hardware and/or software described in
this document are furnished under a license
and may be used or copied only in
accordance with the terms of such license.
Keysight Technologies does not warrant
third-party system-level (combination of
chassis, controllers, modules, etc.) performance, safety, or regulatory compliance unless specifically stated.
DFARS/Restricted Rights
Notices
If software is for use in the performance of
a U.S. Government prime contract or
subcontract, Software is delivered and
licensed as “Commercial computer software” as defined in DFAR 252.227-7014
(June 1995), or as a “commercial item” as
defined in FAR 2.101(a) or as “Restricted
computer software” as defined in FAR
52.227-19 (June 1987) or any equivalent
agency regulation or contract clause. Use,
duplication or disclosure of Software is
subject to Keysight Technologies’ standard commercial license terms, and nonDOD Departments and Agencies of the U.
S. Government will receive no greater
than Restricted Rights as defined in FAR
52.227-19(c)(1-2) (June 1987). U.S. Government users will receive no greater than
Limited Rights as defined in FAR 52.22714 (June 1987) or DFAR 252.227- 7015 (b)
(2) (November 1995), as applica-ble in
any technical data.
iii
Safety Information
The following general safety precautions must be observed during all
phases of operation of this instrument.
Failure to comply with these precautions or with specific warnings or operating instructions in the product
manuals violates safety standards of
design, manufacture, and intended use
of the instrument. Keysight Technologies assumes no liability for the customer's failure to comply with these
requirements.
General
Do not use this product in any manner not
specified by the manufacturer. The protective features of this product must not be
impaired if it is used in a manner specified in
the operation instructions.
Before Applying Power
Verify that all safety precautions are taken.
Make all connections to the unit before
applying power. Note the external markings
described under “Safety Symbols”.
Ground the Instrument
Keysight chassis’ are provided with a
grounding-type power plug. The
instrument chassis and cover must be
connected to an electrical ground to
minimize shock hazard. The ground pin
must be firmly connected to an electrical ground (safety ground) terminal at
the power outlet. Any interruption of
the protective (grounding) conductor
or disconnection of the protective
earth terminal will cause a potential
shock hazard that could result in personal injury.
Do Not Operate in an Explosive
Atmosphere
Do not operate the module/chassis in
the presence of flammable gases or
fumes.
Do Not Operate Near Flammable
Liquids
Do not operate the module/chassis in
the presence of flammable liquids or
near containers of such liquids.
Cleaning
Clean the outside of the Keysight module/chassis with a soft, lint-free,
slightly dampened cloth. Do not use
detergent or chemical solvents.
iv
Do Not Remove Instrument Cover
Only qualified, service-trained personnel who are aware of the hazards
involved should remove instrument
covers. Always disconnect the power
cable and any external circuits before
removing the instrument cover.
Keep away from live circuits
Operating personnel must not remove
equipment covers or shields. Procedures involving the removal of covers
and shields are for use by servicetrained personnel only. Under certain
conditions, dangerous voltages may
exist even with the equipment
switched off. To avoid dangerous electrical shock, DO NOT perform procedures involving cover or shield removal
unless you are qualified to do so.
DO NOT operate damaged
equipment
Whenever it is possible that the safety
protection features built into this product have been impaired, either through
physical damage, excessive moisture,
or any other reason, REMOVE POWER
and do not use the product until safe
operation can be verified by servicetrained personnel. If necessary, return
the product to an Keysight Technologies Sales and Service Office for service and repair to ensure the safety
features are maintained.
DO NOT block the primary
disconnect
The primary disconnect device is the
appliance connector/power cord when
a chassis used by itself, but when
installed into a rack or system the disconnect may be impaired and must be
considered part of the installation.
Do Not Modify the Instrument
Do not install substitute parts or perform any unauthorized modification to
the product. Return the product to an
Keysight Sales and Service Office to
ensure that safety features are maintained.
In Case of Damage
Instruments that appear damaged or
defective should be made inoperative
and secured against unintended operation until they can be repaired by
qualified service personnel.
Do NOT block vents and fan exhaust:
To ensure adequate cooling and ventilation, leave a gap of at least 50mm
(2") around vent holes on both sides of
the chassis.
Do NOT operate with empty slots: To
ensure proper cooling and avoid damaging equipment, fill each empty slot
with an AXIe filler panel module.
Do NOT stack free-standing chassis:
Stacked chassis should be rackmounted.
All modules are grounded through the
chassis: During installation, tighten
each module's retaining screws to
secure the module to the chassis and
to make the ground connection.
Operator is responsible to maintain
safe operating conditions. To ensure
safe operating conditions, modules
should not be operated beyond the full
temperature range specified in the
Environmental and physical specification. Exceeding safe operating conditions can result in shorter lifespan,
improper module performance and
user safety issues. When the modules
are in use and operation within the
specified full temperature range is not
maintained, module surface temperatures may exceed safe handling conditions which can cause discomfort or
burns if touched. In the event of a
module exceeding the full temperature
range, always allow the module to cool
before touching or removing modules
from the chassis.
Safety Symbols
A CAUTION denotes a hazard. It
calls attention to an operating procedure or practice that, if not correctly performed or adhered to,
could result in damage to the
product or loss of important data.
Do not proceed beyond a CAUTION
notice until the indicated conditions are fully understood and met.
A WARNING denotes a hazard. It
calls attention to an operating procedure or practice, that, if not correctly performed or adhered to,
could result in personal injury or
death. Do not proceed beyond a
WARNING notice until the indicated conditions are fully understood and met.
Products display the following symbols:
Refer to manual for
additional safety
information.
The CSA mark is a registered trademark of the Canadian Standards Association and indicates compliance to
the standards laid out by them. Refer
to the product Declaration of Conformity for details.
Notice for European Community: This
product complies with the relevant
European legal Directives: EMC Directive (2004/108/EC) and Low Voltage
Directive (2006/95/EC).
The Regulatory Compliance Mark
(RCM) mark is a registered trademark.
This signifies compliance with the Australia EMC Framework regulations
under the terms of the Radio Communication Act of 1992.
Earth Ground.
Chassis Ground.
ICES/NMB-001 indicates that this ISM
device complies with the Canadian
ICES-001.
Standby Power. Unit is not
completely disconnected
from AC mains when
power switch is in standby
position
Waste Electrical and
Electronic
Equipment (WEEE)
Directive
2002/96/EC
This product complies with the WEEE
Directive (2002/96/EC) marking
requirement. The affixed product label
(see below) indicates that you must not
discard this electrical/electronic product in domestic household waste.
Product Category: With reference to
the equipment types in the WEEE
directive Annex 1, this product is classified as a “Monitoring and Control
instrumentation” product.
Do not dispose in domestic household
waste.
Alternating Current (AC).
Direct Current (DC).
South Korean Class A EMC Declaration. this equipment is Class A suitable
for professional use and is for use in
electromagnetic environments outside
of the home.
This symbol represents the time period
during which no hazardous or toxic
substance elements are expected to
leak or deteriorate during normal use.
Forty years is the expected useful life
of this product.
To return unwanted products, contact
your local Keysight office, or see
www.keysight.com/environment/product for more information.
Indicates that antistatic
precautions should be
taken.
Operate the PXIe chassis
in the horizontal
orientation. Do NOT
operate this chassis in the
vertical orientation.
v
Contents
1. About this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2. Introduction to PXIe chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
M9019 Key Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Front panel trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Rack mounting of the chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Rack mount accessory kits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3. Static-safe handling procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4. Terminologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
5. Power supply operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Voltage rails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Power supply capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Over temperature protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Temperature derating of the primary power module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Power calculator spreadsheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Overcurrent protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Internal fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Measuring the four main voltage rails directly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
6. Chassis and host controller power up or down sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Power sequencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
PC startup requirements for Keysight IO Libraries Suite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Performing a chassis hard reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Performing a system restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
7. PXIe chassis management capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Summary of chassis management capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Enabling use of the SFP to configure chassis parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
8. Chassis revision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Viewing the chassis revision information using the SFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Viewing the chassis revision information using the IVI drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
9. Updating chassis firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
10. Multiple chassis operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Power-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
11. Chassis alarm architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Power-on default alarm thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Events which re-establish the power-on default thresholds . . . . . . . . . . 35
Relationship between alarm occurred and the front panel LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
The SFP alarm thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
12. PXIe chassis fan speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Overview of chassis cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Monitoring Fan Speeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
vi
13. Monitoring the chassis temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature monitoring using the SFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14. Setting the fan speed vs. chassis temperature profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the temperature vs fan speed using the SFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15. Monitoring the power supply rails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Voltage Monitoring using SFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16. Monitoring the 10 MHz reference clock source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17. Configuring the PXI trigger bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The need for trigger management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring persistent PXI trigger bus connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring volatile PXI trigger bus connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating volatile routes and reservations programmatically . . . . . . . . . .
18. PCIe link configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19. Performing a chassis self test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing self test using the IVI drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Self test codes and messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Low-numbered self test codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High numbered self test codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20. Chassis maintenance and inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21. Related documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
41
42
43
44
44
46
48
49
50
52
52
53
54
54
55
55
56
59
60
vii
8
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
1. About this guide
This Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide provides detailed information on
using the PXIe chassis, including the following:
How to configure the PXIe chassis to meet your needs. Parameters such as
the following can be configured:
Voltage limits around the power supply rails at which an alarm will be
generated if a rail falls outside of its limit
The temperature at which an alarm will be generated if the chassis
exceeds this temperature
The fan speed at which an alarm will be generated if a fan speed falls
below this limit
Temperature set point
Chassis clock source
Trigger reservations and routes
Rack mounting of the chassis
It is assumed that you have used the Keysight PXIe Chassis Family Startup
Guide to turn on the chassis system, and install the Keysight IO Libraries Suite,
the chassis drivers, and the chassis soft front panel. If the chassis has not yet
been turned on, use the Keysight PXIe Chassis Family Startup Guide to perform
the initial chassis turn on prior to configuring the chassis as described in this
guide.
If you have been unable to turn on the chassis system using the Keysight PXIe
Chassis Family Startup Guide and need assistance, see the Keysight PXIe
Chassis Family Service Guide. The startup guide provides step-by-step
guidance on turning on the chassis system.
Note that having ready access to certain spare parts may accelerate the
troubleshooting process. The Keysight PXIe Chassis Family Service Guide
includes a list of spare parts that you may want to acquire to support any
repairs that are ever needed.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
9
2. Introduction to PXIe chassis
The PXIe chassis is the backbone of a PXIe system. It contains a high performance
backplane giving the cards in the system the ability to communicate rapidly with
one another. It also provides power and cooling.
Keysight provides two 18-slot PXIe chassis:
M9018A
M9019A
For more information on M9018A, refer to the M9018A user documentation
available at www.keysight.com/find/M9018A. This guide provides detailed
information on using the M9019A.
M9019 Key Features
The Keysight Technologies M9019A PXIe chassis is designed for easy integration
into large systems containing multiple PXIe chassis and other non-PXI
instrumentation . It has 16 PXIe hybrid slots, which allows the system designer to
mix and match the number and location of PXIe and hybrid-compatible modules.
Its ultra-high performing PCIe switch fabric can operate up to Gen 3 providing up
to 24 GB/s of system data bandwidth. The innovative cooling design allows the
chassis to fit into 4U of rack space, in most cases. The Keysight M9019A PXIe
chassis has these key features:
16 PXIe hybrid slots, 1 PXIe timing slot, and 1 PXIe system slot
4U chassis with innovative cooling design
Ultra-high performance Gen 3 PCIe switching with a two-link (x8, x16)
system slot and x8 links to the hybrid/timing slots
High data bandwidth (maximum 24 GB/s system and 8 GB/s slot-to-slot)
Multi-chassis power-sequencing and front panel external trigger inputs
/outputs
Specified up to 55oC and 10,000 ft operating conditions
The following image shows a front view of the M9019A chassis.
10
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Front panel trigger
Two front panel trigger ports (SMB) are connected to the PXI (0:7) trigger bus.
Block Diagram
View the complete interactive block diagram from the Windows Start button:
Start > All Programs > Keysight > PXIe Chassis Family > Interactive Block
Diagram
You can also download the block diagram from www.keysight.com/find/M9019A.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
11
Rack mounting of the chassis
To position chassis vertically, they should be rack mounted as
described in this section.
In handling the chassis in preparation for rack mounting, do not
stand the chassis on its side; the side handles can cause the
chassis to tip over.
Depending on the power consumed by the chassis, a 1U space
may be required below the chassis to ensure adequate
ventilation for cooling. Be sure to provide this space if required as
described in this section.
If you are stacking chassis on top of each other, place any NI
(National Instruments) chassis above Keysight chassis, wherever
applicable.
To rack mount the PXIe chassis, order the Y1215A Rack Mount Kit. This kit provides
the hardware and instructions to mount the chassis in a standard 482.6 mm (19
inch) wide rack. To rack mount the chassis, follow these guideline
Always begin installing chassis at the bottom of the rack and work up. This
maintains a lower center of gravity and reduces the likelihood of the rack
tipping.
Anti-tipping feet, if available with the rack, should always be extended.
The heaviest chassis should always be mounted in the bottom of the rack.
For maximum cooling and optimum rack thermal efficiency, place the
chassis with the greatest power consumption towards the top of the rack.
This promotes efficient cooling since heat rises. When placed nearer to the
top of the rack, higher power chassis will not unnecessarily heat other
chassis. However, in doing this, do not violate the guideline that the heaviest
chassis be placed at the bottom of the rack.
As described in in Power supply operation on page 16, the maximum power
that can be supplied to the modules is 800 watts. If your modules are
consuming the maximum power, 1U of space is required for ventilation
below the chassis when you rack mount it.
The weight of an empty PXIe chassis (no modules installed in the chassis) is
approximately 29.8 lbs (13.5 kg). Lift the chassis using a single side handle only
when the total chassis weight (chassis plus installed modules) does not exceed
75 lbs (34.0 kg). Otherwise use both side handles to lift the chassis. Two people
may be required to lift the chassis and install it in a rack.
Installing modules in the chassis may increase its weight to a point where two
people are required to lift the chassis. If two people are not available, use a
mechanical lift to lift the chassis. The chassis should be transported using a
rolling cart.
12
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Rack mount accessory kits
Chassis rack mount accessory kits provide system design flexibility. The following
kits can be mix-and-matched to suit the needs of a given application:
Y1215C Flush mount rack kit: Complete kit including rack flanges, handles,
and attachment hardware. The kit suspends the chassis in a Keysight rack
using only 4U of rack space. Rack rails may be needed in a non-Keysight
rack.
Y1216B Recess mount rack kit: Complete recess-mount kit including rack
flanges, handles, and attachment hardware. The kit recesses the chassis by
4 inches and suspends the chassis in a Keysight rack using only 4U of rack
space. Rack rails may be needed in a non-Keysight rack.
Y1217B Rack mount rail kit: This optional kit provides additional stability to
the chassis when rack-mounted. When using rails, the chassis will require
5U of rack space. Rails may not fit in a non-Keysight rack.
Y1218A Cable tray kit: Adds a 1U high cable tray to the chassis and includes
cable tray, feet for using the chassis/tray on a table, and attachment
hardware.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
13
3. Static-safe handling procedures
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage or destroy electronic components. Use a
static-safe work station to perform all work on electronic assemblies. The figure
(left) shows a static-safe work station using two types of ESD protection:
Conductive table-mat and wrist-strap combination
Conductive floor-mat and heel-strap combination
Both types, when used together, provide a significant level of ESD protection. Of
the two, only the table-mat and wrist-strap combination provides adequate ESD
protection when used alone. To ensure user safety, the static-safe accessories must
provide at least 1 MΩ of isolation from ground.
DO NOT use these techniques for a static-safe work station when working on
circuitry with a voltage potential greater than 500 volts.
14
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
4. Terminologies
Before continuing, some important terminology is presented. The computer that
controls the chassis is known as the host controller or system controller, and is
shown at the top of the hierarchy in the following figure.
The host controller can either be a remote controller or an embedded controller. A
remote controller is a Windows-based PC, and can be a desktop PC or a rack
mounted PC. The remote controller interfaces to the chassis through a PCIe cable.
An embedded controller, such as the Keysight M9037A Embedded Controller, is a
small form factor, Windows-based PC that is designed for installation in the system
controller slot (slot 1) of the chassis. An embedded controller also consumes two or
three expansion slots to the left of slot 1.
The combination of the chassis, the host controller (and a PCIe cable if the host
controller is a remote controller), and the chassis I/O software running on the host
controller is referred to as a chassis system.
In order for a PC to serve as a remote controller, its BIOS must support
enumeration of the PCIe slots in the chassis; many computers are not capable
of enumerating a sufficient number of PCIe slots to ensure that slots in an
external chassis are enumerated.
Keysight provides the document PCI and AXIe Modular Instrumentation Tested
Computer List Technical Note, which lists the embedded, desktop, laptop, and
rack-mounted PCs that have been verified to enumerate the PCIe slots in the
PXIe chassis. Use this document, available under the Document Library tab at
www.keysight.com/find/pxi-chassis, to guide your selection of remote
controller PCs.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
15
5. Power supply operation
Voltage rails
The power supply provides the six voltage rails listed below. The name of each
voltage rail as it appears on the chassis backplane connectors is shown in the
second column. The image in the following section shows these voltage rails in a
block diagram format, and describes the power available from each rail.
Note that two of the rails, 5 VDC auxiliary and Fan 12 VDC, are active (powered)
whenever the chassis is connected to AC power. The remaining rails are switched
on/off either by the front panel power push button or by the INHIBIT signal on the
rear panel DB-9 connector.
Voltage
Rail
Backplane
name
Comments
3.3
VDC
3.3V
This rail can be switched on/off, either by the front panel power push button or the
5 VDC
5V
INHIBIT signal on the rear panel DB-9 connector. 1
This voltage rail is generated by a DC-to-DC converter
operating from the 12 VDC rail. As shown by the
backplane names, this rail connects to the backplane
under two different names.1
5V V(I/O)
The 5 VDC rail connects
to the 5V pins of the
CompactPCI XP1
connector.
The 5 VDC rail also
connects to the 5V V(I
/O) pins of the
CompactPCI XP1
connector.
5 VDC
auxiliary
5Vaux
This rail provides standby power to the Monitor Processor and the modules, and is
available anytime the chassis is connected to AC power.
12 VDC
12V T
This rail can be switched on/off, either by the front panel power push button or the
INHIBIT signal on the rear panel DB-9 connector.1
–12
VDC
–12V
Fan 12
VDC
Fan 12V
1
This rail can be switched on/off, either by the front panel power push button or the
INHIBIT signal on the rear panel DB-9 connector. 1
This rail supplies the fan driver circuitry, and is not connected to the backplane
connectors. This power supply is active anytime the chassis is connected to AC
power.
The 3.3VDC, 5VDC, 12 VDC, and the –12VDC rails can be switched on/off, either by the front panel power push button or by the
INHIBIT signal on the rear panel DB-9 connector. The 5V rail regulators is fed by the +12VDC. [ a b c d ]
16
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Power supply capacity
The following image shows the maximum power available from each rail. The rails
cannot provide their maximum power simultaneously to the modules in the chassis.
Hence, trade offs are required to ensure that certain maximum power limits are not
exceeded, as described below.
The maximum power available from each rail are shown above. The Primary Power
Module (PPM) shown in green provides 4 rails (12V, 3.3V, -12V, and 5Vaux). The
maximum power available for the 12 VDC rail is 630W, while the maximum power
available for the 3.3 VDC rail is 231W. 4A is available from the -12 VDC rail, and 2A
is available from the 5 Vaux rail. The sum of the powers drawn from these four rails
shall not exceed the maximum power available from the PPM, which itself depends
on the AC voltage. For example, at low line AC (100-120V), the total power drawn
from the PPM cannot exceed 650W, At high line AC (220-240V), the total power
drawn from the PPM cannot exceed 800W.
Similarly, the sum of the power drawn from the 12 VDC and 5 VDC rails shall not
exceed the total power available from the 12 VDC, i.e., 630W.
For more detailed specification of the modules used in the chassis, see the
Keysight M9019A Specification Guide and Keysight Technologies M9019A PXIe
Chassis Data Sheet.
Over temperature protection
The Primary Power Module (PPM) shuts down if its internal temperature threshold
is exceeded. The chassis is rated to perform from 0 to 55 °C. As long as the power
limits are adhered to, an over temperature condition is unlikely to occur. Therefore,
if the chassis appears to be powered down (for example, based on the front panel
LEDs being off), you should consider other possible causes prior to considering an
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
17
over temperature condition.
The Primary Power Module (PPM) will shut down if its internal temperature exceeds
110 °C. This not only shuts down all rails.
If the chassis is operating within its normal ambient temperature range of 0-55°
C and is operating within the power limits described previously, an over
temperature condition is unlikely to occur. Therefore, if the chassis appears to
be powered down (for example, based on the front panel LEDs being off), you
should consider other possible causes prior to considering an over temperature
condition. See the Keysight PXIe Chassis Service Guide for further information.
Note that it is not possible to determine the temperature of the PPM based on
the temperatures reported by the air flow exit temperature sensors. The PPM
and the air flow exit temperature sensors have different ventilation air flows.
To recover from a suspected over temperature shutdown, the PPM internal
temperature must be below 110 °C and the chassis must be power cycled. Power
cycling of the chassis should be performed by detaching and re-attaching the
power cord because neither the front panel ON/OFF push button nor the Inhibit
signal on the rear panel DB-9 connector will function if the PPM is shut down.
If the chassis is power cycled but does not resume operation, either the PPM was
not at fault or the PPM internal temperature is still above 110 °C. Additional cooling
time should be allowed followed by another power cycle to see if that resolves the
problem.
Temperature derating of the primary power module
In general, the total power output of the PPM does not derate with temperature.
However, the output current of each rail derates linearly with temperature and with
altitude, as specified in the datasheet table. For more information on the latest
power supply specifications and temperature derating information, see the M9019A
datasheet available at www.keysight.com/M9019A.
DC supplies
18
Voltage Maximum1
45oC, <10kft
50 o C, 10kft
+3.3V
70A
+5V
+12V
Current
Load regulation
Maximum ripple and noise
(20 MHz BW)
67A
5%
1.5% (pk-pk)
60A 2
52.5A 2
5%
1% (pk-pk)
52.5A2
45A2
5%
1% (pk-pk)
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
DC supplies
-12V
4A
4A
5%
1% (pk-pk)
5 Vaux
2A
2A
5%
50 mV (pk-pk)
1
The total power supplied for all rails must not exceed 650W (100 - 120V) or 800W (200-240V).
2
The total power supplied for 5V and 12V rails must not exceed 630W at 45C, <10kft, or 540W at 50C. [ a b c d ]
Power calculator spreadsheet
The Microsoft Excel power calculator spreadsheet is available online at www.
keysight.com/M9019A . This spreadsheet allows you to enter the following
information and determine if the chassis will be operating within its power limits:
1. The ambient temperature that the chassis will be operating at the ambient
temperature affects the power available to the modules from the power
supply, as noted in the previous section.
2. The mains voltage of the chassis, either low line (100-120V) or high line (220-
240V).
3. The power consumed on each rail by each module.
After the above information is entered, the spreadsheet indicates if any power
supply limits are exceeded.
Overcurrent protection
The PPM has overcurrent protection on its 5Vaux, 12V, -12V, and 3.3V outputs.
Overcurrent protection can occur at currents from 105% of the specified maximum.
The overcurrent protection on the 5V DC/DC converter output is specified typically
at 135% or above.
In the event of a short circuit or overcurrent condition, the chassis shuts down in
order to protect the power supplies from further damage. To recover from the fault,
the short circuit or overcurrent condition needs to be eliminated, and the chassis
needs to be reset or power cycled. To reset the chassis, push the power button for
at least 5 seconds.
Internal fuses
Each supply connected directly to AC is protected by an internal fuse. These fuses
are not customer- replaceable. Contact Keysight if you suspect a fuse is blown.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
19
Measuring the four main voltage rails directly
The four main voltage rails can be measured on the DB-9 connector on the chassis
rear panel using a digital multi-meter. The voltage rail pin assignments are shown
in the following image.
Each voltage rail contains a current limiting resistor to prevent accidentally
shorting the supplies during measurements.
20
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
6. Chassis and host controller
power up or down sequence
This section describes the chassis and host controller PC power up and power
down sequences. In order for the chassis and the host controller PC to interoperate correctly, they must be powered up and down in specific sequences.
Furthermore, the PC must be restarted in certain situations after the chassis and
PC are powered up. If these sequences are not followed, the PC may not be able to
access the chassis or the modules in the chassis.
The chassis has three power states: Powered up, powered down,
and unplugged. When powered up, the chassis is fully
operational. When powered down, the Primary Power Module
(described in Power supply operation on page 16) is turned off,
but 5 Vaux is available to the Monitor Processor and the
modules. When unplugged, the chassis is completely
unpowered. Unless otherwise stated, the chassis is presumed to
be plugged in, and is changing power states between powered
up and powered down.
When you press the chassis power-on button, if the chassis does
not power up and the front panel LEDs do not light, it is possible
for the chassis to be in a safety shutdown state. Remove the
chassis AC power cord from the chassis for one minute.
Reconnect the power cord and turn on the chassis again. If it still
does not power on, refer to the Keysight PXIe Chassis Service
Guide.
The following sections describe differences in starting up the host controller PC
based on the version of Keysight IO Libraries Suite installed on your system
controller.
Power sequencing
When powering up the system, the chassis must be powered up first. After
powering up the chassis, you should wait at least three seconds before turning on
the PC. The chassis front panel temperature LED, which is on for three seconds
after the chassis is powered up, provides a convenient way to measure this delay,
as shown below.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
21
The PC should be shut down before the chassis is powered down. This will prevent
the chassis, as it is being powered down, from disrupting operation of the PC.
In brief, the PC should be off whenever the chassis is powered up or down. Because
chassis modules are not hot-swappable, chassis modules should only be added or
removed when the chassis is powered down.
The above power sequence does not apply to an embedded controller installed in
the chassis because the embedded controller and chassis are powered together.
PC startup requirements for Keysight IO Libraries Suite
This section describes the PC startup events for Keysight IO Libraries Suite.
Improvements have been made in Keysight IO Libraries Suite that considerably
simplify the PC startup process. Keysight recommends use of latest version
Keysight IO Libraries Suit.
Before describing the PC startup events for each version, two situations are
described where Connection Expert, which is part of Keysight IO Libraries Suite, will
not display a PCIe device, be it the chassis or a module in the chassis.
1. If Windows can not find a driver for a device, Windows will not be able to
identify the device and therefore Connection Expert will not be able to
display it. If this occurs, you will typically be presented with the Windows
New Hardware Found Wizard, which will give you the opportunity to assist
Windows in finding a driver. If a driver is found, you should restart the PC
and verify that Windows identifies the device (which will be evident by the
lack of the New Hardware Found Wizard for that device).
2. The other situation where Connection Expert will not display a PCIe device is
in the event that, when Connection Expert is started, Windows has not yet
completed assigning drivers to the devices (the chassis or modules in the
chassis) found during enumeration. Connection Expert will not display
modules that it cannot identify. In this situation, however, the driver exists
but it has not yet been assigned to the device by the time Connection Expert
is started.
22
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
This situation should be very rare; if it occurs, it would be expected to occur with
slower PCs. The solution for this situation depends on which version of IO Libraries
Suite you have installed and is described below. For the first-ever connection of the
chassis to the PC, or after changing the chassis configuration, only a single boot of
the PC is needed. However, sufficient time needs to be allowed between when
Windows is up and when Keysight Connection is started in the following figure.
The two cases described above where Connection Expert does not display the
chassis or a module in the chassis can occur with Connection Expert. If the New
Hardware Found Wizard is displayed, follow the steps in the Using Connection
Expert to connect to the chassis section in the Keysight PXIe Chassis Family
Startup Guide to associate a driver with the device. If Connection Expert, does not
display a particular device, click the Rescan button to see if Windows has now
assigned a driver to the device, which will allow Connection Expert to display the
device.
In general, if it ever appears that your chassis configuration as displayed by
Connection Expert differs from your actual configuration, click the Rescan button.
This should align the displayed configuration to the actual configuration.
Even with the latest version of IO Libraries, it is always advisable to boot the PC
a second time to ensure that the PC properly enumerates all of the modules
within the chassis.
Performing a chassis hard reset
A chassis hard reset refers to powering down the chassis and then disconnecting it
from AC power. A hard reset is required in response to certain self test failures as
described in Self test codes and messages on page 55. As noted in in the above
image, when the chassis is connected to AC power, the 5Vaux supply is powered,
and is supplying power to certain chassis components, such as the Monitor
Processor. Performing a hard reset ensures that power is removed from all chassis
components.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
23
To perform a chassis hard reset, the chassis should be removed from AC power for
a minimum of 30 seconds, this is to ensure that the 5Vaux supply is completely
powered down. The entire sequence is shown in below image.
In essence, a chassis hard reset is a system restart that includes unplugging the
chassis from AC power after the chassis is powered down.
Performing a system restart
For a system with a remote controller PC, system restart refers to the power
sequence shown in the following image. The remote controller PC is turned off
followed by the chassis being powered down for at least one second. The chassis is
then powered up followed by turning on the PC.
When the chassis is powered down using the front panel ON/Standby
pushbutton or the Inhibit signal on the rear panel DB-9 connector, the chassis
is still connected to AC power. Therefore, the 5Vaux (auxiliary) supply is
powered, and is supplying power to components such as the Monitor
Processor. The other chassis supplies (3.3V, 5V, 12V, and -12V) are not
powered.
If the chassis contains an embedded controller, a system restart consists simply of
power cycling the chassis, which will also restart the embedded controller.
24
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
7. PXIe chassis management
capabilities
PXIe chassis provides extensive management capabilities to allow you to monitor
and control many aspects of the chassis operation. For example, you can monitor
the temperatures reported by the air flow exit backplane temperature sensors using
the soft front panel (SFP). Furthermore, you can use the SFP to set a maximum
temperature alarm threshold such that an alarm will be generated if the
temperature of any temperature sensor exceeds the threshold.
In addition to using the SFP to monitor and control the chassis, you can develop
programs to monitor and control the chassis. Keysight provides IVI
(Interchangeable Virtual Instrument, see www.ivifoundation.org) drivers for the
chassis. To support the most popular programming languages and development
environments, Keysight offers both the IVI-C and IVI.NET drivers. See the IVI
Foundation website for a description of these drivers. In addition, Keysight provides
a LabVIEW driver for the chassis.
Keysight recommends that you use the SFP to learn the chassis management
capabilities. Because the programmatic capabilities largely parallel the capabilities
provided by the SFP, learning the SFP first will provide the basis for learning how
the IVI.NET and IVI-C drivers interface to the chassis. In support of this approach,
each chassis management capability is first described by a diagram showing how
that chassis management capability is accessed using the SFP.
Summary of chassis management capabilities
The chassis provides the following management capabilities:
Viewing the chassis hardware and software revision information
Monitoring the speed of the fans. This monitoring capability includes the
ability to set a fan speed threshold such that, if any fan speed falls below the
threshold, an alarm is generated.
Monitoring the temperatures of the air flow exit chassis temperature
sensors. This monitoring capability includes the ability to set a temperature
threshold such that, if the temperature reported by any sensor rises above
the threshold, an alarm is generated.
Setting of the fan speed vs. chassis temperature profile
Monitoring of the main power supply rails: 3.3 VDC, 5 VDC, 12 VDC, -12
VDC and 5Vaux. This monitoring capability includes the ability to set upper
and lower voltage limits around each voltage rail such that, if a voltage rail
falls outside of its limits, an alarm is generated.
Monitoring and manually configuring the 10 MHz reference clock source
Configuring and monitoring the parallel trigger bus signals in PXI-9 standard
Executing a chassis self test
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
25
Front panel external trigger inputs/outputs
Enabling use of the SFP to configure chassis parameters
In order to use the SFP to configure the chassis, the SFP Allow Control check box
shown in the following image must be checked. This check box, which is available
on all three tabs of the SFP, is provided to prevent unintentionally changing a
chassis parameter.
26
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
8. Chassis revision
This section describes how to use the PXIe Chassis SFP and IVI drivers to view the
chassis revision information. The revision number of the chassis firmware is
included in this information. The chassis firmware is shown within the Chassis
Manager block diagram (see Block Diagram) and controls much of chassis
operation. The following sections describe how to determine if there is a later
revision of the chassis firmware available from Keysight.
Viewing the chassis revision information using the SFP
Bring up the SFP About dialog from the SFP menu bar by clicking Help > About.
This will display the dialog in the following image.
The Hardware Revision contains four numbers representing four chassis
components the chassis firmware revision is the first number listed. Of the four
components whose revision numbers are being reported, only the chassis firmware
is customer upgradeable. Information on upgrading chassis firmware is provided
below.
Viewing the chassis revision information using the IVI drivers
The chassis revision string can be viewed using the IVI.NET and IVI-C drivers as
follows:
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
27
IVI.NET: Use the Instrument Firmware Revision property.
IVI-C: Use the KTMPXICHASSSIS_ATTR_INSTRUMENT_FIRMWARE_REVISION
attribute
28
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
9. Updating chassis firmware
To determine if there is a later revision of chassis firmware available, perform the
following steps:
1.Go to www.keysight.com/find/M9019A and click the Technical Support tab.
2. Under Technical Support, click the Drivers & Software tab. If there are
chassis firmware updates available, they will be listed under this tab, and can
be viewed by clicking Firmware Update under Refine the List.
3. Compare your chassis firmware revision number to the list of chassis
firmware revision numbers that are available. If there are later revisions
available, Keysight recommends installing the latest version.
To install the latest chassis firmware, perform these steps:
1. Click the link to the latest (or desired) firmware update and follow the
instructions provided to download and install the firmware on your chassis.
2. Power cycle the chassis after the firmware installation is complete, and verify
that your host controller PC can communicate to the chassis.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
29
10. Multiple chassis operation
In a multiple chassis system, the time base and triggering for each chassis operates
independently from the other chassis. You can use this type of configuration to
increase the number of chassis/modules. For more information, refer to Keysight's
Multiple PXIe and AXIe Chassis Configuration tool . This tool is available online at:
www.keysight.com/find/pxie-multichassis.
The power-up and power-down sequences, also termed as power sync, in multiple
chassis configurations are similar to a single chassis configuration. However,
additional cabling is required for synchronized chassis power coordination. Two RJ45 connectors on the chassis rear panel provide this coordination.
These RJ45 connectors are for multichassis power-up synchronization. Do not
connect cables to a corporate or local LAN to these connectors.
PXIe chassis may be connected in any order.
Power-up
When connected via the RJ-45 connectors, the power button on any chassis may
be used to power up the entire system.
If you are using an external host controller, it should be turned off until all chassis
are powered on.
Cables used for multiple chassis power-up synchronization purposes should not
exceed 30 meters in length. Straight CAT5 or better cables are required.
30
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
31
11. Chassis alarm architecture
The chassis provides seven alarms to assist you in monitoring the chassis. For
example, you can set a temperature alarm threshold such that, if a chassis
temperature sensor reports a temperature above the threshold, an alarm will be
generated. Alarms can be set and monitored programmatically and using the SFP.
The following image describes the chassis alarm architecture, including identifying
the functionality that is provided in hardware and the functionality that is provided
in software. The figure also describes how alarms operate if multiple processes are
using the same alarm.
In the following sections, the information provided by the front panel Power, Fan,
and Temperature LEDs is described.
32
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Chassis Alarm Architecture
Interactions between programs using the chassis alarms
Alarm operation
The chassis has these eight alarms: 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
It is important to understand how your IVI.NET or IVI-C program interacts with the SFP alarms -- or, for that matter, with any
program(s) that use the alarms. Programs that are operating simultaneously will need to share certain alarm resources. Each of
the seven alarms has one instance of the tan-colored Set/Reset Latch and each alarm has the OR gate feeding into the latch –
these tan elements represent hardware in the chassis. For discussion purposes, the Fan Speed Alarm Set/Reset Latch will be
used as an example. The chassis contains one Fan Speed Alarm Set/Reset Latch, which all processes share.
Fan speed alarm
Temperature alarm
3.3V alarm
5V alarm
12V alarm
-12V alarm
5Vaux alarm
10 MHz reference clock changed alarm
The elements which provide inputs to the tan-colored hardware elements are also singular and shared. For example, there is
only one Minimum Fan Speed Alarm Threshold. If the threshold is set using the SFP and is then set to a different value using
the IVI.NET driver, the last-set threshold will be in effect.
Each alarm has an Alarm Set/Reset Latch (“latch”) – please see the figure below for an example of one
latch . Each of the seven latches is set if its associated alarm threshold is exceeded. In the case of the fan
speed alarm, exceeded means that at least one fan speed is lower than the Minimum Fan Speed Alarm
Threshold. Similarly, a power supply rail that has exceeded its alarm threshold means that its voltage is
outside of the range defined by the upper and lower voltage limits.
NOTE: To keep the SFP in sync with any changes that have been made programmatically to their shared resources, the SFP will
poll the relevant chassis parameters every second and update its display accordingly. For example, if your program
changes the Minimum Fan Speed Alarm Threshold, the new value will be reflected on the SFP Configure Alarms tab (if the
SFP is running, of course) within one second. If your application program is running in an environment where the SFP is
also running and if chassis parameters are being changed using the SFP, your program can likewise poll the relevant
parameters in order to detect if they have been changed by the SFP user.
Continuing with the fan alarm example, the two fan alarm resources that are not shared are Alarm Enabled and Alarm Occurred.
Each process, including the SFP, will have its own software version of these two properties as shown in the figure below. This
allows a process that is interested in the fan alarm to enable its version of fan alarm while another, disinterested process can
disable its version of fan alarm. In the example below, there are three Alarm Occurred properties, one for the SFP and two
representing user applications. While they share the output of the Set/Reset Latch, they each have their own Alarm Enabled
signal and their own Alarm Occurred signal.
Setting of the latches allows alarm conditions to be detected/captured in the absence of an operator. The
latch OUT does not have a default value—if the SET input is true (for example, at power-on due to a fan
speed being below the default Minimum Fan Speed Threshold of 1200 RPM), the fan alarm latch OUT
will be set True at power-on.
Each latch can be reset (cleared) using its associated Clear Alarm button on the SFP. Reset on the SFP
Utility dropdown menu will reset all seven latches. However, if any alarm threshold is still exceeded when
the latch is reset, the latch will be immediately set true again.
IMPORTANT: Even though the Alarm Enabled and Alarm Occurred properties are separate for each process, all processes share
the same latch as shown below. This can lead to the situation where one process detects that its version of Alarm
Occurred is true and then resets the shared latch (using the Clear Alarm call) before a second, also-interested
process has read its version of Alarm Occurred. This can result in the second process missing its version of Alarm
Occurred. As recommended in the section PXIe chassis Software Architecture, application developers should
establish policies for accessing shared resources to avoid this situation.
If the latch output is True and if the SFP Alarm Enabled is true, Alarm Occurred will be lit on the SFP.
Alarm Occurred is set false if Alarm Enabled is set false. However, setting Alarm Enabled false does not
reset the latch—this can only be done using Clear Alarm or Reset. Likewise, changing the corresponding
alarm threshold to a value such that the alarm limit is no longer being exceeded does not reset the latch.
Example of one alarm latch
Latch SET input example
parameter value;
for example, chassis
temperature
A Clear Alarm IVI.NET or IVI-C call can be made
from the application program to reset the
latch. The SFP, in fact, implements its Clear
Alarm button by making an IVI.NET Clear Alarm
call.
Application #1
Alarm Enabled
AND
Application #1
Alarm Occurred
Application #2
Alarm Enabled
AND
Application #2
Alarm Occurred
threshold
The SET input will be True
if the associated alarm
limit/threshold is exceeded.
Clear Alarm
Each of the seven alarms has a
Clear Alarm button and an Alarm
Enabled checkbox on the SFP. The
Fan Alarm Enabled check box is
shown here.
The Alarm Occurred signals need to be polled
in software in order to detect their presence.
The IVI.NET and IVI-C drivers do not support
an interrupt or event mechanism that can be
used by software to detect the occurrence of
an alarm.
Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
SET
OUT
AND
SFP Alarm Occurred
RESET
OR
The SFP Reset will
reset all seven alarm
latches.
Fan Alarm Enabled
SFP thresholds: When the SFP is started, it will read and display the seven
alarm thresholds from the chassis. Therefore, the SFP does not provide its own
default thresholds – the thresholds it displays are based on the thresholds
maintained by the chassis. The chassis thresholds will either be its power-on
default values or the current value of any alarm threshold that has been
changed – for example, if the user ran the SFP previously and changed the
chassis minimum fan speed threshold. At SFP startup, the modified minimum
fan speed threshold (which is maintained by the chassis) will be read and
displayed by the SFP.
Power-on default alarm thresholds
This section summarizes the power-on default values of the chassis alarm
thresholds as well as the valid range over which the alarm thresholds can be set.
The phrase power-on default means that, regardless of how the thresholds are
changed while power is applied, the thresholds return to factory-defined default
values whenever the chassis is power cycled.
For example, if you use the SFP to set the Minimum Fan Speed Alarm Threshold to
500 RPM, this setting will not persist through a power cycle; the Minimum Fan
Speed Alarm Threshold will be restored to the power-on default value of 1200 RPM
when the chassis is power cycled.
Both the SFP and the IVI drivers will error check the alarm values to ensure they are
within the valid range. The SFP will prevent setting of alarm values outside the valid
range while the IVI drivers will return an error for values outside the valid range.
Threshold
Default
Threshold
Settable Range
Minimum Fan Speed Alarm
Threshold
1200 RPM
1 to 10,000 RPM
Maximum Temperature Alarm
Threshold
70 °C
1 to 70°C
3.3V Rail
3.630V
nominal value +.01% up to nominal value + 20%
Upper Voltage Limit
(3.3V + 10%)
5V Rail
12V Rail
–12V Rail
34
Lower Voltage Limit
2.970V
(3.3V - 10%)
nominal value -.01% down to nominal value
-20%
Upper Voltage Limit
5.25V1
nominal value +.01% up to nominal value + 20%
Lower Voltage Limit
4.75V
nominal value -.01% down to nominal value 20%
Upper Voltage Limit
12.6V
nominal value +.01% up to nominal value +20%
Lower Voltage Limit
11.4V
nominal value -.01% down to nominal value
-20%
Upper Voltage Limit
-11.4V
nominal value +.01% up to nominal value + 20%
Lower Voltage Limit
-12.6V
nominal value -.01% down to nominal value
-20%
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Threshold
+5.0Vaux Rail
1
Default
Threshold
Settable Range
Upper Voltage Limit
5.25V
nominal value +.01% up to nominal value + 20%
Lower Voltage Limit
4.75V
nominal value -.01% down to nominal value 20%
Note that the 5V rail initially has voltage limits of ±5% around the nominal value. However, the IVI driver will expand the 5V limits
to ±10%. Because the PXIe chassis SFP uses the IVI.NET driver, the SFP also expands the 5V limits to ±10%
Events which re-establish the power-on default thresholds
Power cycling is just one event that causes the chassis power-on default alarm
thresholds to be re-established by the chassis. The complete list is:
Power cycling, as mentioned
Asserting a chassis reset using the SFP Utility > Reset menu
Asserting a programmatic chassis reset using the IVI.NET, IVI-C or
LabVIEW drivers
Relationship between alarm occurred and the front panel LEDs
The fans, temperature sensors, and voltage rails have front panel LEDs associated
with them. This section describes the relationship between each LED and its
associated Alarm Occurred indicator.
The following image shows one example of an alarm latch and an LED.
In this example, the Threshold Exceeded signal will be True if the chassis parameter
being monitored exceeds its threshold. For example, if a temperature sensor
reports a temperature greater than the temperature threshold. A True value of
Threshold Exceeded causes the following:
1.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
35
1. The LED drive logic will flash the front panel LED, indicating that the
parameter being monitored has exceeded its threshold.
2. The Alarm Set/Reset Latch will be set. If, in addition, Alarm Enabled is True,
the SFP Alarm Occurred indicator will be illuminated.
If the parameter being monitored then returns to below its threshold (for example,
the room temperature is lowered, causing the chassis temperature sensors to
report lower temperatures), Threshold Exceeded will go False. This will cause the
LED to cease flashing. However, the alarm latch will remain latched. This can lead
to the situation where Alarm Occurred (based on the latched signal) will be
indicating an alarm condition, while the associated LED is not likewise indicating an
alarm condition.
This situation simply means that the condition that caused the alarm is no longer
present. While the alarm can be easily cleared by pressing the SFP Clear button, it
is suggested that the cause of the alarm be explored. Although it can be difficult to
determine the cause of a prior alarm, the SFP will often provide information
regarding what might have caused the alarm. For example, the temperature
threshold may be set too close to the temperature being reported by one of the
chassis temperature sensors, which could cause intermittent setting of the
temperature alarm latch. Possible next steps include determining if a module is
running excessively hot, or adjusting the temperature threshold higher to provide
additional margin.
Note that, while the front panel Temperature LED is off when temperatures are
normal, the Fan and Power LEDs are on when their associated parameters are
normal. In all cases, a flashing LED indicates that the associated parameter has
exceeded its alarm threshold.
The SFP alarm thresholds
In Simulation Mode, the SFP default alarm thresholds are identical to the chassis
alarm thresholds. However, in SImulation Mode, the alarms are not active. In
Hardware Mode, however, the SFP reads and displays the chassis thresholds. In
other words, the SFP does not provide its own default thresholds in Hardware
Mode.
For example, assume that the SFP has been used to change the Minimum Fan
Speed Threshold from 1200 RPM to 500 RPM followed by closing the SFP. When
the SFP is started next, it will read the value of Minimum Fan Speed Threshold from
the chassis (500 RPM, in this example), and display this value on the SFP as the
Minimum Fan Speed Alarm Threshold.
Power cycling the chassis will re-establish all default values. Continuing with the
previous example, the chassis Minimum Fan Speed Alarm Threshold will be set
back to its power-on default value of 1200 RPM by the power cycle. When the SFP
next connects to the chassis, it will read this value from the chassis and display
1200 RPM as the Minimum Fan Speed Alarm Threshold.
36
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
In the description of each SFP alarm capability, the SFP alarm diagrams will
show the chassis default alarm thresholds. This is because, as described above,
the SFP reads and displays the chassis alarm thresholds. As long as the
particular chassis alarm has not been changed earlier (for example, during a
prior SFP session), the chassis power-on default alarm threshold will still be in
effect and will be read and displayed by the SFP.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
37
12. PXIe chassis fan speed
Overview of chassis cooling
The key points regarding chassis cooling are:
The chassis is cooled by three 186 cubic feet per minute (CFM) fans,
providing a total airflow of up to 558 CFM.
The fans are mounted on the chassis rear panel and exhaust air out the rear
of the chassis. The air intakes are in the front, sides and bottom of the
chassis.
A minimum of 50 mm (2 inches) of clearance should be provided in the front,
rear and sides of the chassis for ventilation. Depending on module power
consumption, clearance may also be needed below the chassis to
accommodate the air intakes on the bottom of the chassis. This is discussed
further in the next section.
The fans can either be set to operate at maximum speed, or can be set so
that the fan speeds are a function of the chassis temperature. With the latter
capability, you can specify the fan speed vs. temperature profile using either
the soft front panel (SFP) or programmatically using the IVI drivers.
The chassis contains air flow exit temperature sensors mounted to the top of
the backplane to allow you to monitor the temperatures in the airflow
downstream from the modules. These temperatures can be read using the
SFP or programmatically. See Monitoring the chassis temperature on page
40 for information on the sensor locations and how to read their
temperatures.
Monitoring Fan Speeds
The M9019A chassis contains three fans that are mounted on the chassis rear
panel and provide cooling for the chassis. The chassis allows you to monitor the
speed of each fan in revolutions per minute (RPM). You can also set a minimum fan
speed threshold such that, if any fan speed falls below this threshold, a fan speed
alarm is generated.
These monitoring capabilities are available using the SFP and programmatically
using the chassis drivers. In addition, the front panel Fan LED provides information
on fan speeds. Use of the SFP, the front panel Fan LED, and the IVI drivers to
monitor the chassis temperature sensors are described in the following SFP and
the front panel Fan LED diagram:
38
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Fan Speed Monitoring using the SFP
and the Front Panel Fan LED
The Monitor tab allows the three fan
speeds to be monitored. This tab also
provides the fan speed Alarm Occurred
indicator and the Clear Alarm button,
which are described below.
COMPARATOR
FAN1
Compare fan
speeds to the
Minimum Fan
Speed Alarm
Threshold.
FAN2
FAN3
Minimum Fan
Alarm Speed
Threshold
Front panel Fan LED
Output
Fan Speed Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
True if any fan speed is
below the Minimum Fan
Speed Alarm Threshold
SET
Clear Alarm
Minimum Fan
Speed Alarm
Threshold
Select slowest
fan speed
RPM of slowest
fan
On: All fan speeds are > Minimum Fan Speed
Flashing: One or more fans speeds are < Minimum Fan Speed
LED drive logic
Speed of
any fan
OUT
AND
Fan Speed Alarm
RESET
OR
The Fan Speed Alarm Set/Reset Latch (“latch”) is set if any fan speed drops below the usersettable Minimum Fan Speed Alarm Threshold (“Minimum Fan Speed”). Setting the latch allows
fan speed issues to be detected/captured in the absence of an operator. The latch does not have
a default value. If the SET input is true, for example, at power-on due to a fan speed below the
default Minimum Fan Speed threshold (1200 RPM), the latch will be set True at power-on. The
latch can be reset (cleared) using the Clear Alarm button, Reset on the SFP Utility dropdown
menu, or programmatically. However, if any fan speed is still below the Minimum Fan Speed
when the latch is reset, the latch will be immediately set true again.
If the latch output is True and if Alarm Enabled is true, Alarm Occurred will be lit. Alarm
Occurred is set false if Alarm Enabled is set false. However, setting Alarm Enabled false does not
reset the latch—this can only be done using Clear Alarm or Reset. Likewise, changing the
Minimum Fan Speed to a value lower than the three fans are currently operating at does not
reset the latch.
Default value = 1200 RPM
Alarm Enabled
Default value = True (checked)
The Configure Alarms tab is used to set the Minimum Fan Speed threshold and
enable/disable the Fan Speed Alarm. The Minimum Fan Speed can be set from 1 to
10,000 RPM either by entering the value directly or by using the up/down arrow buttons.
As an aid in setting the Minimum Fan Speed, the current value of the slowest fan is
displayed.
As described in the Keysight PXIe Chassis User Guide section Relationship between Alarm
Occurred and the front panel LEDs, it is possible for Alarm Occurred to indicate a low fan speed
while the front panel Fan LED indicates that fan speeds are normal. This situation can occur if a
fan speed is momentarily below the Minimum Fan Speed (which sets the latch) followed by the
fan speed increasing above the Minimum Fan Speed, which restores the Fan LED to being on
continuously (normal).
13. Monitoring the chassis
temperature
PXIe chassis allows you to monitor each of the air flow exit temperature sensors
using either the SFP, the IVI drivers, or the LabVIEW driver. In addition, the SFP and
IVI drivers can be used to set an upper temperature threshold such that an alarm
will be generated if any temperature sensor reports a temperature above the
specified threshold. The front panel Temperature LED also provides information
about the chassis temperature.
The air flow exit chassis temperature sensors are located on the chassis printed
circuit board that contains the module connectors as shown in the following image.
This board is known as the chassis backplane or just backplane.
By knowing the location of the temperature sensors relative to the chassis slots,
you can determine which modules are potentially contributing to excessive
temperatures. To address this, you can take steps such as redistributing modules in
the chassis or installing air inlet modules adjacent to high power modules to
provide additional ventilation.
Use of the SFP , the front panel Temperature LED, and the IVI drivers to monitor
the chassis temperature sensors is described in the following Temperature
Monitoring using the SFP and the Front Panel Temperature LED diagram.
The Monitor tab allows the temperatures reported by the air flow exit chassis
temperature sensors to be monitored. This tab also provides the temperature Alarm
Occurred indicator and the Clear Alarm button.
40
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Temperature Monitoring using the SFP
and the Front Panel Temperature LED
The Monitor tab allows the
temperatures reported by the eight
chassis temperature sensors to be
monitored. This tab also provides
the temperature Alarm Occurred
indicator and the Clear Alarm
button.
Front panel Temperature LED
On: The LED is illuminated for 3 seconds at power on to permit verification
that the LED and its drive circuitry are operational.
LED drive logic
Temperature Sensor 1
COMPARATOR
Temperature
of any sensor
Temperature Sensor 2
Temperature Sensor 3
Compare all 8
temperatures
sensors to the
Max Temp
Threshold.
Temperature Sensor 4
Temperature Sensor 5
Output
Temperature Sensor 6
Temperature Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
Output of
Comparator
SET
True if any temperature
sensor is above the
Maximum Temperature
Alarm Threshold
Temperature Sensor 8
Max Temp Threshold
OUT
AND
Temperature Alarm
Occurred
RESET
Temperature Sensor 7
Maximum Temperature
Alarm Threshold
(1 °C to 70 °C )
Off: All temperature sensors are < Maximum Temperature Alarm Threshold
Flashing: One or more temperature sensors are > Maximum Temperature
Alarm Threshold
Max Temp
Threshold
OR
The Temperature Alarm Set/Reset Latch (“latch”) is set if any temperature is above the usersettable Maximum Temperature Alarm Threshold (“Max Temp Threshold”). Setting the latch
allows temperature issues to be detected/captured in the absence of an operator. The latch
does not have a default value—if the SET input is true, for example, at power-on due to a
temperature sensor reporting a temperature above the default Max Temp Threshold (70 °C),
the latch will be set True at power-on.
The latch can be reset (cleared) using the Clear Alarm button, Reset on the Utility dropdown
menu, or programmatically. However, if any temperature sensor is still reporting a temperature
above the Max Temp Threshold when the latch is reset, the latch will be immediately set True
again.
Select hottest temperature sensor
If the latch is set and if Alarm Enabled is True, Alarm Occurred will be True. Alarm Occurred is
set False if Alarm Enabled is set False; however, setting Alarm Enabled False does not reset the
latch. Likewise, changing the Max Temp Threshold to a temperature higher than all eight
temperature sensors are currently reporting does not reset the latch.
Default value = 70 °C
Alarm Enabled
Default value = True (checked)
The Configure Alarms tab is used to set the Max Temp
Threshold and enable/disable the Temperature Alarm.
The Max Temp Threshold can be set from 1 to 70 °C
either by entering the value directly or by using the
up/down arrow buttons. To aid in setting the Max Temp
Threshold, the current value of the hottest temperature
sensor is displayed.
As described in the Keysight PXIe Chassis User Guide section Relationship between Alarm
Occurred and the front panel LEDs, it is possible for Alarm Occurred to indicate an over
temperature condition while the front panel LED indicates the temperatures are normal. This
situation can occur if a temperature sensor momentarily reports a temperature above Max
Temp Threshold (which sets the latch) followed by the chassis temperature dropping such that
all sensors now report temperatures below Max Temp Threshold – this will turn the LED off
(normal operation).
14. Setting the fan speed vs.
chassis temperature profile
The chassis allows you to control the fan speed vs. temperature profile . This is
done by specifying a chassis temperature at which the three fans will operate at
maximum speed. Maximum speed is achieved by the chassis supplying a drive
voltage to the fans with a 100% duty cycle.
For temperatures below the specified chassis temperature, the duty cycle of the fan
drive voltage will be less than 100%, which reduces the fan speed and the fan
noise. The reduction in fan speed is proportional to how far the chassis temperature
is below the specified chassis temperature. To ensure adequate cooling at any
temperature, the drive voltage to the fan will never drop below 40% duty cycle.
These fan speed vs. chassis temperature profile can be set using both the SFP and
programmatically, as described in the following Using the SFP diagram.
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Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Setting the Temperature at which the
Maximum Fan Speed is Achieved using the SFP
Lowest MaxRPMTemperature setting = 25 °C
MAX TEMPERATURE SELECTOR AND FAN DRIVER
Temperature Sensor 1
Generate fan voltage
duty cycle of 100% for
highest speed.
Temperature Sensor 2
FAN1
Temperature Sensor 3
Temperature Sensor 4
Temperature Sensor 5
Temperature Sensor 6
HIGH
Select
hottest
temperature
Generate fan voltage
duty cycle based on
the hottest chassis
temperature sensor
and the setting of the
temperature where
maximum fan speed
is achieved.
AUTO
fan
driver
Fan voltage duty cycle
25 °C: Temperature at which the maximum
fan RPM is achieved
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0 °C: Temperature where the fan speeds begin ramping
up from 40% duty cycle for the 25 °C lowest
MaxRPMTemperature
0
FAN2
5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70
Highest temperature (°C) reported by the
eight backplane temperature sensors
FAN3
FAN switch
(rear panel)
Default MaxRPMTemperature setting = 50 °C
Temperature Sensor 8
The Allow Control
check box must be
checked in order to
use the functionality
described on this
diagram.
This field displays the
position of the Fan Speed
Selector Switch. This
switch is on the rear panel
and is labeled FAN.
The Configure Fan Control dialog is used to set the parameter “Temperature (°C) where
maximum fan speed achieved” – this parameter will be referred to by its IVI.NET driver
name, MaxRPMTemperature. At SFP startup, the SFP reads the chassis value of
MaxRPMTemperature and inserts that value here. The chassis default value is 50 °C.
Fan voltage duty cycle
Temperature Sensor 7
50 °C: Temperature at which the
maximum fan RPM is achieved
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
25 °C
25 °C: Temperature where the fan speeds begin
ramping up from 40% duty cycle for the
50 °C default MaxRPMTemperature
0
Highest temperature (°C) reported by the
eight backplane temperature sensors
The PXIe chassis controls the speed of its three fans by varying the duty cycle of the drive voltage to the fans. When the rear panel FAN switch
(referred to as the “Fan Speed Selector Switch”) is set to HIGH, the fan voltage duty cycle is set to 100%, which generates the highest fan speeds and
the best chassis cooling – however, this also generates the most fan noise.
Regardless of the MaxRPMTemperature that is set, the fan speeds begin ramping up at 25 °C below MaxRPMTemperature. For example, if
MaxRPMTemperature is set to 65 °C (bottom curve), the fan speed begins ramping up at 25 °C below this temperature, or at 40 °C. At 65 °C, the fan
voltage duty cycle will be 100% (maximum fan speed).
Highest MaxRPMTemperature setting = 65 °C
65 °C: Temperature at which the
maximum fan RPM is achieved
Fan voltage duty cycle
When the Fan Speed Selector Switch is set to AUTO, the speed of the three fans is controlled based on the temperature of the chassis and the setting
of the SFP parameter “Temperature (°C) where maximum fan speed achieved” shown above (which will be referred to by its IVI.NET driver name for
brevity, “MaxRPMTemperature”). MaxRPMTemperature specifies the chassis temperature where the maximum (100% duty cycle) fan speed is
achieved, and is set using the Configure Fan Control dialog – this dialog is opened from the SFP Configure pull down menu. The hottest temperature
reported by the eight temperature sensors is used to control the fan speed as shown in the block diagram. MaxRPMTemperature can be set from 25 °C
(right top curve) to 65 °C (right bottom curve) in 1 °C increments either by entering the value directly or by using the up/down arrow buttons. The default
MaxRPMTemperature parameter is 50 °C (right middle curve).
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
25 °C
40 °C: Temperature where the fan speeds begin
ramping up from 40% duty cycle for the 65 °C
highest MaxRPMTemperature
0
Note that the chassis doesn’t attempt to maintain its temperature at a particular temperature although it is expected that, in most cases, the chassis
temperature will stabilize before MaxRPMTemperature is reached. To maximize cooling, MaxRPMTemperature should be set lower while, to minimize
fan noise, MaxRPMTemperature should be set higher.
5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70
5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70
Highest temperature (°C) reported by the
eight backplane temperature sensors
15. Monitoring the power supply
rails
The chassis allows you to monitor the following five power supply rails :
3.3V
5V
5 Vaux (This rail is monitored indirectly using the front panel Power LED)
12V
–12V
For a description of these rails, see Power Supply Operation on page 16. With the
exception of the 5Vaux rail, all voltage rails can be viewed using the SFP, can be
read programmatically using the chassis drivers, and can be read directly on the
rear panel DB-9 connector using a voltmeter.
In addition, the SFP and the chassis drivers can be used to set voltage limits
around the rails (again, except for the 5Vaux rail) such that an alarm will be
generated if a rail voltage falls outside of the specified limits. The front panel Power
LED provides collective information about all five rails.
Use of the SFP, the front panel Power LED, and the IVI drivers to monitor the power
supply rails is described in the following Soft front panel (SFP) and the front panel
Power LED diagram.
In rare cases where the 5Vaux is loaded to the point where it deviates outside
of the ±5% tolerance, it can cause the Power LED to blink. Unfortunately, the
5Vaux is not visible through the IVI command layer. Therefore, you will not see
voltage nor alarm change on the Soft Front Panel.
44
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
The Output of a Comparator will be True if the
power supply voltage is outside of its upper and
lower voltage limits. This will set the
corresponding Set/Reset Latch.
Voltage Monitoring using the SFP
and the Front Panel Power LED
3.3V Upper
Voltage
Limit
On: The five voltage rails are within their limits
Flashing: One or more voltage rails are outside of
their upper/lower voltage limits
Front panel Power LED
3.3V COMPARATOR
3.3V supply
Enabled
3.3V Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
3.3V Alarm
Occurred
Upper voltage limit
3.3V input
SET
Output
LED drive logic
OUT
AND
OR
Lower voltage limit
RESET
3.3V Lower Voltage Limit
5V Upper
Voltage
Limit
5V supply
Enabled
5V input
The Configure Alarms tab is used to set the Upper and Lower
Voltage Limits for each of the four primary voltage rails.
The Configure Alarms Voltage column displays the current value
of each supply; these values are also displayed on the Monitor
tab. Each voltage rail has a Comparator and Voltage Alarm
Set/Reset Latch (“latch”) that are used to detect and store the
occurrence of an out-of-limit power supply condition. The
voltage rail latch is set if the associated voltage rail is outside of
its Upper/Lower Voltage Limits. Setting of the latch allows
power supply issues to be detected/captured in the absence of
an operator. The latch can be reset (cleared) using the
corresponding Clear Alarm button, Reset on the Utility
dropdown menu, or programmatically. However, if the voltage
rail is still outside of its Upper/Lower Voltage Limits when the
latch is cleared, the latch will immediately be set true again.
If a latch is set and if the corresponding Alarm Enabled is True,
Alarm Occurred will be True. Alarm Occurred is set False if Alarm
Enabled is set False; however, setting Alarm Enabled False does
not reset the latch. Likewise, changing the Upper/Lower Voltage
Limits such that the voltage rail is within the limits does not
reset the latch.
As described in the Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
section Relationship between Alarm Occurred and the front
panel LEDs, it is possible for Alarm Occurred to indicate an outof-range voltage condition while the front panel Power LED
indicates the voltages are normal. This situation can occur if a
voltage rail momentarily exceeds its limits (which sets that
particular latch) followed by the voltage rail changing such that
the voltage rail is now within its limits -- this will restore the
Power LED to being on continuously (normal operation).
Output
Lower voltage limit
5V Lower Voltage Limit
SET
OR
12V COMPARATOR
12V Upper
Voltage
Limit
12V supply
Enabled
OUT
AND
RESET
12V Alarm
Occurred
12V Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
Upper voltage limit
Output
12V input
Lower voltage limit
5V Alarm
Occurred
5V Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
5V COMPARATOR
Upper voltage limit
SET
OR
OUT
AND
RESET
12V Lower Voltage Limit
12V Upper Voltage Limit – For the -12V
rail, the Upper Voltage Limit is more positive
than the nominal voltage of -12V; for
example, -11.4V.
-12V supply
-12V COMPARATOR
Enabled
Upper voltage limit
Output
-12V input
Lower voltage limit
-12V Alarm
Occurred
-12V Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
OUT
SET
OR
AND
RESET
-12V Lower Voltage Limit – For the -12V rail, the Lower Voltage Limit
is more negative than the nominal voltage of -12V; for example, -12.6.
5Vaux COMPARATOR
5Vaux Upper
Voltage
Limit
5Vaux Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
Upper voltage limit
5Vaux supply
Enabled
5Vaux input
Output
SET
OUT
RESET
Lower voltage limit
5Vaux Lower Voltage Limit
OR
Reset clears all
four voltage latches.
5Vaux Alarm
Occurred
AND
16. Monitoring the 10 MHz
reference clock source
Chassis timing is based on a 10 MHz reference clock. The 10 MHz reference clock
can originate from the three sources listed below. These sources are listed in the
order of precedence from low to high if multiple 10 MHz reference clock sources
are available:
1. Chassis internal 10 MHz clock
2. Rear panel 10 MHz clock (connected to the chassis through a BNC
connector)
3. System timing slot (slot 10) 10 MHz clock
A clock source with a higher number supersedes a clock source with a lower
number if both are present. For example, if both a rear panel 10 MHz clock (#2) and
a system timing slot 10 MHz clock (#3) are provided, the system timing slot 10 MHz
clock (#3) will be used by the chassis to generate its internal timing signals.
There are no means to override this order of precedence; for example, there are no
means to select the rear panel 10 MHz clock if a system timing slot clock is
present. The module in the system timing slot would need to be removed from the
chassis in order to activate selection of the rear panel 10 MHz clock.
The chassis references either the rear panel 10 MHz clock or the system timing
slot 10 MHz clock as long as the clock frequency remains within the
specification range of ±100 ppm. The chassis clocks are undefined if the
reference clock is outside of this range.
Use of the SFP and the IVI drivers to monitor the 10 MHz reference clock source is
described in the following Using the SFP diagram.
46
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
10 MHz Reference Clock Source Monitoring Using the SFP
The Monitor tab allows the source of the 10 MHz
reference clock to be monitored. This tab also
provides the 10 MHz reference clock source
change Alarm Occurred indicator and the Clear
Alarm button, which are described below.
Clock Selector
Selects chassis
reference clock
based on order of
precedence. Also
detects change in
clock source
Internal 10 MHz clock
External 10 MHz clock
(if available)
System timing slot 10 MHz clock
(if available)
Chassis 10 MHz
Clock reference clock
Output
10 MHz Reference Clock
Source Change Alarm
Set/Reset Latch
Momentarily True when
the 10 MHz reference
Clock Source clock source changes
SET OUT
Change
AND
10 MHz Reference Clock
Source Change Alarm
RESET
The order of clock precedence is as follows:
1. Chassis internal 10 MHz clock
2. Rear panel external 10 MHz clock
3. System timing slot (slot 10) 10 MHz clock
A clock source with a higher number supersedes a clock
source with a lower number if both are present. For example,
if both a rear panel 10 MHz clock (#2) and a system timing
slot 10 MHz clock (#3) are provided, the system timing slot 10
MHz clock (#3) will be used by the chassis as its reference
clock to generate its internal timing signals.
OR
Clear Alarm
The 10 MHz Reference Clock Source Change Alarm Set/Reset Latch (“latch”) is
set whenever the source of the 10 MHz reference clock changes. Setting the
latch allows a clock source change to be detected/captured in the absence of an
operator. The latch is reset (cleared) at power-on. The latch can also be reset
using the Clear Alarm button, Reset on the SFP Utility dropdown menu, or
programmatically.
If the latch output is True and if Alarm Enabled is true, Alarm Occurred will be
True. Alarm Occurred is set False if Alarm Enabled is set False. However, setting
Alarm Enabled False does not reset the latch—this can only be done using Clear
Alarm, Reset on the SFP Utility dropdown menu, or programmatically.
The Configure Alarms tab is used to enable the
10 MHz Reference Clock Source Change Alarm.
Alarm Enabled
Default value = True (checked)
17. Configuring the PXI trigger bus
The PXI trigger bus consists of eight trigger lines spanning the XP4 backplane
connectors. The trigger lines are divided into three trigger bus segments,
numbered 1-3. There are also two front panel trigger ports (SMB) are connected to
the PXI (0:7) trigger bus. See Front panel trigger on page 11 for more information.
To view the PXI trigger bus, see the Block Diagram. To open Block Diagram, go
to Start > All Programs > Keysight > PXIe Chassis Family > Block Diagram. In
the block diagram, select the PXI_TRIG[0:7] check box under the Show Triggers
label.
By default, when you power-on the chassis, these trigger bus segments are
isolated from one another. Only the modules inside a given segment are able to
detect a trigger signal originating from another module in that same segment. The
dash
in the following figure represents a trigger line in the default isolated
state.
For each trigger line in a segment, you can enable buffers that to allow a trigger
signal on that line to either flow out of a segment and into an adjacent segment, or
to flow into that segment from an adjacent segment.
When you enable a buffer to allow a trigger line to cross into another segment, it is
called a route or trigger route. A trigger route always has a source segment and a
destination segment. The following image shows an example where trigger lines 0
and 3 have no routes, trigger line 1 has a route from segment 1 to segment 2, and
trigger line 2 has a route from segment 3 to segment 2.
48
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
With three trigger bus segments, there are eight possible trigger bus segment
connections. In the following image, there are eight trigger lines, each line is
showing a different connection so that all eight may be seen. Any of these
combinations can be applied to each of the eight trigger lines PXI_TRIG[0:7].
Do not confuse the eight combinations of trigger bus segment connections
with the eight trigger lines of the PXI_TRIG[0:7] bus.
Any one of the eight trigger bus segment combinations in Figure 31 can be
applied to each of the eight trigger lines PXI_TRIG[0:7].
Some multi- slot PXI instruments, such as the M9381A use peer-to-peer (moduleto-module) triggering to function. If you install these modules on the same trigger
bus segments, no routes are needed. But if you install them on different trigger bus
segments, you must configure trigger routes.
The need for trigger management
A PXI chassis may contain multiple PXI instruments, some of which may require
trigger bus resources that must be configured and reserved for its use. Software
applications that operate these PXI instruments should have a systematic way to
share the backplane trigger lines without interfering with each other.
For example, consider that application A uses backplane trigger line 0 to send a
trigger signal sourced from the slot 2 module to a destination module in slot 3.
There is another application named B that needs to send a signal source from the
slot 4 module to the slot 5 module. It would not work well if both applications tried
to use the same trigger line 0, because the slot 5 module would receive trigger
signals generated by Application A's slot 2 module. Application B's use of trigger
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
49
line 0 would likewise confuse Application A's slot 3 module. Such resource
contention not only interferes with the applications, but also has the possibility of
damaging the trigger drive hardware multiple trigger source modules try to drive a
signal to the same trigger line.
To help manage the use of trigger lines between applications, the PXI and PXI
Express Trigger Management Specification (PXI-9) was developed. Chassis
manufacturers who supply a PXI-9 Trigger Manager DLL that is compliant to that
specification provide a consistent way for applications to share backplane trigger
lines without interfering with one another.
Keysight supplies the PXI Systems Alliance (PXISA) PXI-9 Trigger Manager as a part
of Keysight Connection Expert.
Configuring persistent PXI trigger bus connections
The Keysight Connection Expert is the recommended tool for configuring persistent
(static) routes and reservations. To illustrate how to configure persistent trigger
routes and reservations, the following shows the steps you must perform in
Connection Expert to configure trigger line 1 to the configuration shown in Figure
31 on page 69. Recall that since we are configuring persistent routes and
reservations, you must use Connection Expert (there is no programmatic way to
configure Persistent routes using the KtMTrig driver). The follow steps configure a
persistent route on trigger line 1 from bus segment 1 to bus segment 2:
Open Keysight Connection Expert and select the Instruments tab.
Then, if you have more than one chassis shown under Chassis Content,
select the chassis you want to configure.
1.
50
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
2. Click the Chassis Triggers tab, and the Trigger Manager appears in the right
window pane. A partial view is shown in the following image (note that no
pre-existing routes are present in this case).
3. To reserve trigger line1, place the cursor onto Line 1 area inside the Bus 2
column and then click.
Keysight Connection Expert automatically uses a PXI-9 client label of
Keysight_Persistent as the owner of this reservation.
To create a route from Bus 1 to Bus 2, the PXI-9 specifications require only the
destination segment (Bus) to have a reservation. This is why only one of the arrows
shows a solid line. If you had reserved both lines, both Bus 1 and Bus 2 segments
could be the destination of the route and both arrows would have solid outlines
indicating that a route in that direction is allowed.
4. To create the route, click the solid arrow in the following image and the
arrow is filled in which indicates that there is now a route from Bus 1 to Bus
2.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
51
5. Click the Accept button to save the changes and create the route.
After clicking the Accept button, the trigger bus is configured with the new route
and the configuration has been saved by Connection Expert for use at the next boot
of the system controller (when the Keysight_Persistent settings is reconfigured
again automatically).
This route is now applied and the route is persistent; it will persist across boot
/restart of the computer.
Configuring volatile PXI trigger bus connections
You can make volatile (dynamic) trigger bus connections using PXI-9 trigger
manager DLL.
Creating volatile routes and reservations programmatically
Volatile routes and reservations can also be made programmatically. The
programmatic approach gives the user full access to all of the features of the PXI-9,
PXI and PXI Express Trigger Management Specification.Recall that Persistent
routes and reservations can only be made through the Keysight Connection Expert
Chassis Triggers panel. The programmatic approach only supports configuration of
Volatile trigger settings.
52
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
18. PCIe link configuration
PCIe Switch Fabric is fixed to 2 Link x8 x 16 in M9019A. You cannot change or
restore the PCIe Link Configuration . Do not run the PCIe Link Fabric Configurator
utility .
The PCIe link configuration can be viewed from the Monitor tab of the SFP as
follows:
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
53
19. Performing a chassis self test
This section describes how to perform a chassis self test , and lists the codes and
messages generated by self test . For detailed information on the self test
messages and how to use the self test results to troubleshoot issues with the
chassis, see the Troubleshooting Based on the Self Test Results section in the
Keysight PXIe Chassis Service guide.
Self test can be initiated from the SFP or programmatically using the IVI or
LabVIEW drivers.The following image shows how to initiate self test from the PXIe
chassis soft front panel. Note that the Allow Control check box must be checked in
order to perform a self test.
The following diagram shows the SFP implementation of self test. The diagram
shows that a limited set of self tests are performed whenever any program,
including the SFP, performs the first initialization call to the chassis. Any self test
results from the first initialization call are then merged with any self test results
generated when the full self test is executed.
The programmatic execution of self test is performed in a similar manner to the SFP
implementation of self test. In fact, the process by which the SFP reads the self test
results is the same process that would be followed by an application program.
Performing self test using the IVI drivers
Refer to the IVI help system for information on performing self test
programmatically. As noted above, executing self test programmatically is very
similar to the SFP implementation of self test.
54
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Self test codes and messages
The self test codes and messages are listed below. The messages are grouped into
low numbered codes (starting at 1) and high numbered codes (starting at 500).
Low-numbered codes generally indicate a situation where service is required. Highnumbered codes indicate situations that you can often resolve yourself. For details
on these groups, the meaning of each message and possible actions to take in
response to the messages, refer to Keysight PXIe Chassis Service Guide.
Low-numbered self test codes
Test Code
Error
1
"Chassis Monitor processor is not responsive."
2
Unused
3
"Unable to operate IO channel that allows PCIe Switch Fabric reconfiguration."
4
"Unable to operate IO channel to PXI Trigger routing buffers."
5
"Unable to operate IO channel to chassis EPROM."
6
"Error writing to the chassis EPROM. Reinstall chassis PCIe Switch Fabric."
7
"One or more chassis fans operating outside valid RPM range."
8
"Chassis fan 1 in fan tray 1 operating outside valid RPM range"
9
"Chassis fan 2 in fan tray 1 operating outside valid RPM range."
10
"Chassis fan 3 in fan tray 1 operating outside valid RPM range."
11
"Chassis fan speed selector switch is in HIGH position, but one or more fans not operating at maximum speed."
12
"Chassis fans are operating at dissimilar speeds."
13
"Chassis fan AUTO speed control is not functioning properly."
14
"IO failure during self test. If problem persists, contact Keysight Technical Support."
15
unused
16
unused
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
55
Test Code
Error
17
"Reading from non-volatile chassis memory failed."
18
"Corrupt serial number in non-volatile memory."
19
"Chassis self-test cache memory inaccessible."
20
"Failed to recover to the Base (factory default) PCIe Switch Fabric during initialization."
High numbered self test codes
56
Test
Code
Error message
500
”Chassis Manager operating on backup (read-only) firmware image. See Keysight Technical Support.”
501
”Chassis Manager firmware was updated since power-up. Power cycle the chassis and reboot system controller.”
502
”Chassis memory structure corrupted. Run IVI driver (or SFP utility) Reset command, and then rerun self test to validate.”
503
”Previous reset operation found chassis memory structure corrupted, chassis memory was re-initialized.”
504
”PCI Configuration Space Header corrupted. Power cycle the chassis and reboot the system controller.”
505
”Unable to operate IO channel to Chassis Manager. Check PCIe connection.”
506
”New PCIe Switch Fabric has been selected, but not loaded. Reboot the system controller to load the new fabric.”
507
”Previous PCIe Switch Fabric update failed. Restoring Base (factory default) PCIe Switch Fabric.”
508
”PCIe Switch Fabric currently in use is of a type that is not recognized by this version of chassis driver software. Consider
updating your chassis driver software to a newer version.”
509
”Chassis EPROM checksum failure. Reinstall PCIe Switch Fabric.”
510
”Chassis EPROM does not match currently installed PCIe Switch Fabric. Reinstall PCIe Switch Fabric.”
511
unused
512
”Non-volatile memory failure during PCIe Switch Fabric install/repair operations. Reinstall PCIe Switch Fabric.”
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Test
Code
Error message
513
”Chassis driver's built-in PCIe Switch Fabric cache has an older fabric revision than the PCIe Switch Fabric currently in
use. Consider updating your chassis driver software to a newer version.”
514
”Chassis driver's built-in PCIe Switch Fabric cache has newer fabric than the PCIe Switch Fabric currently in use.
Consider updating your chassis to your driver's newer fabric.”
515
”PCIe Switch Fabric chip loaded with wrong image for that chip. Reinstall PCIe Switch Fabric.”
516
”PCIe switch fabric chips loaded with mismatching Type code. Reinstall PCIe switch Fabric.”
517
”PCIe switch fabric chips loaded with mismatching Revision code. Reinstall PCIe Switch Fabric.”
518
”PCIe switch fabric chips loaded with unexpected Revision. Reinstall PCIe Switch Fabric.”
519
”One or more chassis temperatures operating outside valid range.”
520
”Chassis temperature sensor 1 operating outside valid range.”
521
”Chassis temperature sensor 2 operating outside valid range.”
522
”Chassis temperature sensor 3 operating outside valid range.”
523
”Chassis temperature sensor 4 operating outside valid range.”
524
”Chassis temperature sensor 5 operating outside valid range.”
525
”Chassis temperature sensor 6 operating outside valid range.”
526
”Chassis temperature sensor 7 operating outside valid range.”
527
”Chassis temperature sensor 8 operating outside valid range.”
528
”One or more voltage rails operating outside valid range.”
529
”3.3V voltage rail operating outside valid range.”
530
”5V voltage rail operating outside valid range.”
531
”-12V voltage rail operating outside valid range.”
532
”+12V voltage rail operating outside valid range.”
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
57
58
Test
Code
Error message
533
”5V auxiliary voltage supply operating outside valid range.”
534
”Non-volatile self test memory cache size is invalid. Cache repaired, please rerun self test to validate repair.”
535
”Non-volatile self test memory cache checksum failure. Cache repaired, please rerun self test to validate repair.”
536
”Non-volatile self test memory problem required re-initializing the memory.”
537
”Error detected during PCIe Switch Fabric configuration. Base (factory default) PCIe Switch Fabric was re-selected.”
538
”Load Base Configuration Pushbutton press was latched. Power cycle chassis to clear latch, and then reboot the system
controller.”
539
”Currently loaded PCIe Switch Fabric has no revision information.”
540
“Chassis Manager operating on backup (read-only) firmware image. DIP switch 1 is flipped to on.”
999
“Too many self-test codes generated, aborting.”
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
20. Chassis maintenance and
inspection
This is a Safety Class 1 Product (provided with a protective
earthing ground incorporated in the power cord). The mains plug
shall only be inserted in a socket outlet provided with a
protective earth contact. Any interruption of the protective
conductor inside or outside of the product is likely to make the
product dangerous. Intentional interruption is prohibited. Inspect
the protective conductor periodically to ensure that it is
uninterrupted.
No operator serviceable parts inside. Refer servicing to qualified
personnel.
To prevent electrical shock, do not remove covers.
To prevent electrical shock, disconnect the chassis power cord
before cleaning. Use a dry cloth or one slightly dampened with
water to clean the external case parts. Do not attempt to clean
internally.
Cleaning connectors with alcohol shall only be done with the
chassis power cord removed and in a well-ventilated area. Allow
all residual alcohol moisture to evaporate, and the fumes to
dissipate prior to energizing the chassis.
No periodic maintenance of the chassis is required. However, Keysight
recommends monitoring the following chassis parameters on an ongoing basis:
Power supply voltages—The four main power supply rails (3.3V, 5V, 5Vaux,
12V, and –12V) should all be within ±5% of their nominal values. Keysight
recommends checking the power rails at least yearly using the chassis soft
front panel (SFP) or programmatically. In addition, the power rails are
accessible on the rear panel DB-9 connector, and can be checked with a
DMM as described in Measuring the four main voltage rails directly on
page 20.
Fan speeds —The chassis has fans located at the rear of the chassis. A low
fan speed possibly indicates that a fan is wearing out or a fan blade is
partially obstructed. Keysight recommends using the chassis SFP to check
the fan speeds yearly as well.
Chassis firmware —Keysight recommends that you periodically check to see
if there is a chassis firmware revision available that is later than your chassis
firmware revision. If so, it is suggested that you download and install the
latest firmware revision available as described in Updating chassis firmware
on page 29.
If a power supply voltage is out of tolerance or a fan speed is low, see the Keysight
PXIe Chassis Service Guide for diagnostic information and troubleshooting tips.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
59
21. Related documentation
The documentation listed below can be found on the Software and Product
Information CD (M9019-10001) that came with your chassis.
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family Startup Guide
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
For the latest versions of the above documents, visit the Keysight website at www.
keysight.com/find/M9019A. The following documents are also available on this
website:
Keysight M9019A PXIe Chassis Data Sheet
Keysight M9022A/ M9023A/ M9024A PXIe system module Data Sheet
PC Tested Configuration with PXIe/AXIe Chassis Technical Overview — This
document lists the PCs that have been verified to work with the M9019A
chassis.
Multiple PXIe and AXIe Chassis System Configuration Tool
To assist you in locating the documentation that will best meet your needs, the
following table lists the recommended chassis documents by audience. Also listed
are the key topics covered in each group of documents.
Product specifications, available accessories, firmware and software may change
over time. Check the Keysight website at www.keysight.com/find/pxi-chassis for
the latest updates to the product software, guides, help files and data sheets.
PXIe chassis documents by audience
Audience
First-time
users of
the PXIe
chassis
Recommended Documents
Key Topics
PXIe Chassis Family Startup Guide
M9019A Data Sheet
M9022A/ M9023A/ M9024A/ M9048B/
M9049A Data Sheet
PC Tested Configuration with PXIe/AXIe
Chassis Technical Overview
Documentation for each module
SFP Help
Interactive Block diagram
Multiple PXIe and AXIe Chassis System
Configuration Tool
60
- PXIe chassis architecture
and
capabilities
- Selection of the host
controller PC
- Connecting the chassis to a
computer
and powering up the system
- Using Connection Expert
and the soft
front panel (SFP) to verify
chassis
operation
- Installing Keysight modules
in the
chassis
- Using the SFP to configure
the chassis
Keysight PXIe Chassis Family User Guide
Index
PPM 18
F
Primary Power Module 17, 17
PPM 17
Fan Speed 41, 58
Fan speed monitoring 37
PXI Trigger Bus 47
Firmware 58
chassis 58
1
R
10 Mz reference clock 45, 46
Rack Mounting 10
SFP 46
M
Rear panel 10 MHz clock 45
M9022A PXIe system module 59
reset 22
hard 22
Maximum power available 16
Measuring primary voltage rails 15
A
Measuring voltage rails 19
Alarm, power-on default 33
Module handling procedures 13
Alarm architecture 31
Monitoring 10 MHz reference clock 45, 46
Alarm Occurred 34
SFP 46
Monitoring chassis temperature 39, 40
SFP 40
B
Monitoring fan speed 38
SFP 38
Block Diagram 10
Monitoring power supply 43, 43
SFP 43
S
Self test 53, 53
IVI drivers 53
Self test codes and messages 54
SFP alarm thresholds 35
Soft Front Panel 39
System restart 23
System timing slot 45
Multiple chassis 29, 29, 29, 29, 29, 59
C
Configuration tool 29, 59
Chassis Cooling 37
Operation 29
T
Chassis firmware 58
power-sync 29
Temperature 39
Chassis hard reset 22
power-up and power-down synchronization 29
monitoring 39
Chassis internal 10 MHz clock 45
Temperature derating 17
Chassis Management 24
Trigger Bus 47
Chassis revision 26
Chassis Self Test 53
Chassis Temperature 39
Chassis Temperature Profile 41
O
PXI 47
Overcurrent protection 18
Over temperature protection 16
U
Updating firmware 28
P
D
diagram 10
block 10
PCIe Link Configuration 52
PCIe Switch Fabric 52, 52
Configyrator utilty 52
E
V
Voltage Limit 33
Power calculator spreadsheet 18
Voltage monitoring 43
Power-on default alarm 33
Voltage rails 15
Power sequence requirements 20
electrostatic discharge 13
Power supply capacity 16
ESD 13
Power Supply Operation 15
Power supply voltage limits 33
Power supply voltages 15, 58
This information is subject to change
without notice.
© Keysight Technologies 2016
Edition 1, July, 2016
M9019-90003
www.keysight.com
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