user manual - the Melodyne Help Center

user manual - the Melodyne Help Center
user manual
Last updated on 06/28/2017
Melodyne 4 studio
The Melodyne Help Center and this PDF document
This PDF document was generated automatically from the contents of the Melodyne Help Center. It
contains what, on the date indicated on the front page, were the latest versions of the text and images.
You will find the comprehensive and invariably up-to-date Melodyne Help Center along with numerous
films and inspiring tutorials, as well naturally as the latest version of this PDF document, on our web
site. Why not take a look? Just follow the link at the foot of each page of this PDF.
Editing
Transferring audio (plug-in)
How Melodyne works • Transferring audio to the plug-in implementation of Melodyne •
Replace Ranges
Working with ARA
Track Mode • Multi-track view in Track Mode • Clip Mode • Switching from Track Mode
to Clip Mode and from clip to clip • Local playback in Melodyne • Tempo and tempo
adjustment with ARA integration • Tempo and the Time Grid • Quantizing notes •
Copying and pasting notes • The Sound Editor in Track Mode and Clip Mode • The
Compare switch
Loading and saving audio (stand-alone)
Tempo adjustment when audio files are loaded • Loading files from the menu • Loading
files by drag 'n' drop • The File Browser • Saving audio: the Export window • The
'Replace Audio' command
Recording audio (stand-alone)
Audio and recording preferences • Handling the tempo and the metronome • Enabling,
starting and stopping recording
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
2
Melodyne 4 studio
Audio characteristics and algorithms
The detection process • The Melodic algorithm • The Percussive algorithm • The
Polyphonic (Sustain/Decay) algorithm • The Universal algorithm • Switching algorithms
• Automatic or manual algorithm selection
Playback, navigation, zooming
Resizing the window • Controlling playback using the keyboard and transport bar •
Controlling playback, scrubbing and zooming using the Time Ruler • Scrolling and
zooming in the Note Editor • Playback functions in Melodyne Stand-Alone and the
plug-in (when the DAW is stopped) • Navigation and zoom functions
Cycle mode
Cycle mode in the track pane and Note Editor • Defining the cycle range • Switching
cycle mode on and off • Changing the length of, and moving, the cycle range • Defining
the cycle range using a blob selection
Selecting notes
Standard selection techniques • Snake selection • Selection using the Pitch Ruler •
Selection commands in the menu
Correct Pitch Macro
Opening and using the macro • Closing the macro and correction values when it is
reopened
Quantize Time Macro
Quantizing timing: What is moved and where to? • Opening the Quantize Time Macro
and setting the parameters • Closing the macro and correction values on reopening
The Time Grid
Activating and setting the Time Grid • Moving notes when the grid is active
Pitch Grid and scales
The functions of the Pitch Ruler and access to the Pitch Grid • Activating the Pitch Grid
and selecting display options • The Scale Ruler and the Reference Pitch Ruler •
Adjusting the master tuning • Selecting the tonic and scale variety • The Scale Window
• Saving a scale
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
3
Melodyne 4 studio
Editing scales
Displaying the extended scale area • Editing modes • Editing intervals • Intervals
displayed as frequency ratios • Defining intervals • Creating your own scales • Working
with stretch tuning
Identifying scales
Showing the Scale Detective and adjusting its sensitivity • Scale detection options •
Applying the detected scale.
Main Tool
Modifying the pitch and timing of notes • Modifying note lengths • Editing note
separations
Pitch Tool
Shifting the pitch center • Monitoring pitch shifts • Editing pitch with the inspectors •
Correcting pitch with a double click • Pitch transitions • Resetting individual edits and
introducing random deviations
Pitch modulation and drift
Editing pitch modulation and drift • The inspector for pitch modulation and drift • The
Reset commands
Formant Tool
Shifting formants • The inspector for the formants • Formant transitions • The Reset
commands
Amplitude Tool
Editing amplitude • Editing amplitude using the inspectors • Amplitude transitions •
Muting notes • The reset commands
Timing Tool
Modifying the position and length of notes • Timing changes in the case of connected
notes • Correcting timing with a double-click • Adding random deviations • The reset
commands
Time Handles and Attack Speed
How time handles and the Attack Speed Tool work • Modifying the evolution of notes
using time handles • Changing the attack speed of notes • Combining time handles with
the Attack Speed Tool
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
4
Melodyne 4 studio
Note separation tools
Inserting, moving and removing note separations • Editing note separations with
multiple notes selected • Soft and hard note separations • Switching between hard and
soft separations with the Separation Type Tool • Separate Notes as Trills
Copying notes
The selection, cursor and grid when copying • Tempo adjustment when copying: the
Auto Stretch Switch • Copying in a multi-track context
The Note Inspector
The parameters of the Note Inspector • Entering values and handling multiple selected
notes
The Edit menu
Resetting edits • Adding random deviations
Display and other options
Showing and hiding elements of the user interface • Show Pitch Curve • Show Note
Separations • Show Note Tails • Show Blob Info • Show Intended Notes • Highlight
Notes During Playback • Show Replace Ranges (in the plug-in implementation only) •
Highlight Track Affiliation • Monitor When Editing Blobs • Show Clip Borders
Multitrack editing
Multi-tracking in Melodyne • Differences between the stand-alone and plug-in
implementations • The track headers • The Track Inspector in the stand-alone
implementation • The Editing Mix Fader • The track pane and working with tracks in the
stand-alone implementation • Copying between documents, tracks and instances
The Sound Editor
Opening the Sound Editor • The mean spectrum • Emphasis and Dynamics • Bypass,
Gain and the global Sound Editor menu • The working areas • The Harmonics, Hi and
Lo working areas • The harmonics bars and how to use them • The Harmonics, Lo and
Hi macro controls • The EQ working area • The EQ macro sliders • Formants • The
envelopes in the Synth working area • The Resynthesis parameters in the Synth
working area
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
5
Melodyne 4 studio
The Project Browser
Opening the Project Browser • The Project Browser in the stand-alone implementation •
The Project Browser and transfers in the plug-in • Automatic selection of the path for
transfers • Unused and missing audio files • Commands in the drop-down and context
menus
Project documents (stand-alone)
Opening a project document • Creating a new project document and switching between
projects • Closing and saving projects • The audio folder of a project • Copying audio
from one open project to another • Importing projects
Note Assignment Mode
What editing the detection involves • What is edited and where • The Algorithm
Inspector • The Main Tool in Note Assignment Mode • The Activation Tool • The slider
and the Energy Image • The Venetian Blinds • Starting point lines and designated
starting points • The Note Separation Tool and the Separation Type Tool • The Starting
Point Tool • The Energy Share Tool • The Note Inspector
Tempo detection and Auto Stretch
Introduction • Tempo in the stand-alone and plug-in implementations • Determining the
tempo in the stand-alone implementation • Auto Stretch when importing additional audio
files • Auto Stretch when notes are moved or copied • The difference between editing
and assigning tempo
Editing tempo (stand-alone)
Opening the Tempo Editor and overview • Editing the tempo curve • Tempo changes in
the transport bar • The contextual menu • Constant tempo and the start of Bar 1 •
Copying and pasting tempo maps • Importing a tempo map • Exporting a tempo map
Time signature changes (stand-alone, ARA)
Changing the time signature. • Moving the beginning of the first bar • Inserting and
editing time signatures • The time signature display near the tempo display
Assigning tempo
What purpose does Assign Tempo Mode serve? • Overview of the Tempo Editor in
Assign Tempo Mode • Editing the tempo curve using the tools • The tools for changing
the tempo locally through the insertion of beats • Tempo regions • Tempo regions and
sub-beats • Assigning the tempo designation "free" • Triggering a redetection of the
tempo • The assignent of individual file tempos • Commands in the context menu •
Enhanced tempo detection with the Universal Algorithm
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
6
Melodyne 4 studio
Variable tempo in the DAW (plug-in)
A new constant tempo • A new variable tempo • Important when working with variable
tempo
Using Rewire (stand-alone)
About the Rewire interface • Establishing the Rewire link • Activating Rewire in your
DAW • The transmission of audio via Rewire • Starting and stopping playback •
Synchronization
Saving audio as MIDI
About Audio-to-MIDI • Saving MIDI from the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne •
Saving MIDI from the plug-in implementation
Preferences and keyboard shortcuts
Opening the window and general settings • Audio and recording preferences •
Shortcuts • Check for Updates
Troubleshooting
I’m not sure how to install Melodyne correctly. • I have installed Melodyne but cannot
find it. • I’ve installed Melodyne but do not know how to activate it. • I am getting error
messages and cannot complete the activation. • I would like to install Melodyne again
but no longer have the installation program. • I’m not sure whether the right edition and
version of Melodyne is running. • I would like to know whether an update is available for
my Melodyne. • I cannot launch the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne. • I have
inserted Melodyne as a plug-in in one of the audio tracks of my DAW but nothing is
happening. • I have the impression that my DAW and Melodyne are not interacting
correctly. • I am not getting any audio output with the stand-alone implementation of
Melodyne. • After transferring or importing audio, the blobs in Melodyne are not at all as
I expected. • Sometimes, I can only move the blobs in the Note Editor vertically,
sometimes only horizontally. • When I shift the pitch of certain blobs, they sound
unnatural. • In the stand-alone implementation, the tempo of an imported audio file is
wrong.
Melodyne in Pro Tools
Loading the Melodyne plug-in • Backing up and exchanging projects • Duplicating
tracks • Saving plug-in settings for Melodyne • Bouncing/printing Melodyne edits •
Rewire • Miscellaneous notes
Melodyne in Logic Pro
Loading the Melodyne plug-in • Backing up and exchanging projects • Duplicating
tracks • Saving plug-in settings for Melodyne • Bouncing/printing Melodyne edits •
Rewire • Miscellaneous notes
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
7
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne in Cubase and Nuendo
Loading the Melodyne plug-in • Backing up and exchanging projects • Duplicating
tracks • Saving plug-in settings for Melodyne • Exporting/printing Melodyne edits (audio
mixdown) • Rewire • Miscellaneous notes
Melodyne in Studio One using ARA
Loading and installing Melodyne • Editing an audio event with Melodyne and ARA •
Operating procedures no longer necessary thanks to ARA • Changes to audio events
that Melodyne follows automatically • The time stretching behavior of Studio One and
Melodyne • Inserting Melodyne into a channel strip: no ARA • Bypassing or removing
Melodyne from an audio event • Tips & Tricks
Melodyne in Sonar with ARA
Installing Melodyne • Editing of an audio region or a clip with Melodyne and ARA •
Procedures that are no longer necessary thanks to ARA • Changes to audio clips that
Melodyne follows automatically • The time-stretching behavior of Sonar and Melodyne •
Inserting Melodyne into a channel strip: no ARA • Bypassing Melodyne or removing it
from a clip • Other things you should know about the use of Sonar
Melodyne in Live
Loading the Melodyne plug-in • Melodyne in Live's Session View • Backing up and
exchanging projects • Duplicating tracks • Saving plug-in settings for Melodyne •
Bouncing/printing Melodyne edits (freezing/flattening) • Rewire • Miscellaneous notes
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
8
Melodyne 4 studio
Transferring audio (plug-in)
In this tour, you will learn how to transfer audio material to the plug-in implementation of Melodyne as
well as the fundamentals of its use.
How Melodyne works
Before it can make its editing functions available to you, Melodyne must first analyze the audio
material. Since for this analysis the audio file has to be examined as a whole, it cannot be conducted
in real time; it is performed once only, at the start, before the first blobs appear in the Note Editor. In
the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, this is when the audio file is first opened.
In the case of the plug-in, the matter is somewhat more complicated. Since most
commonly-encountered plug-in interfaces are designed for pure real-time operation, a plug-in, logically
enough, is only shown the part of the audio file that is being played at that instant, which is rather like
looking through a keyhole. But Melodyne, as we have seen, requires a more comprehensive overview;
for this reason, you have to send it in advance the track segments you wish to edit, so that it can study
them.
This is the purpose of what we call the “transfer”: This is essentially a recording process whereby the
plug-in implementation of Melodyne makes its own copy of the track segments playing back in the
DAW. In this way, Melodyne obtains the audio data that it must have if it is to detect and display the
notes. These transfers make using Melodyne more effort than one would like, but there is no other
way of overcoming the limitations of real-time plug-in interfaces.
There are, of course, exceptions: To make working with Melodyne in a DAW more effortless, we have
developed the ARA plug-in interface extension. DAWs that support ARA provide Melodyne with all the
information it needs about the audio files they are using and make it possible to open a track for
editing in Melodyne immediately – i.e. without going through the transfer procedure first. This is the
most convenient way of using Melodyne in a DAW.
If your DAW supports ARA, apart from the next paragraph, the rest of this tour need not concern you.
Instead, search for your DAW in the Help Center, where you’ll find details of how to take advantage of
ARA with each of the various DAWs that support it.
The following, however, applies to all scenarios involving Melodyne – with or without ARA: The
amount of memory Melodyne requires depends partly upon the length of the files you are transferring
to it or loading but mainly upon the number of notes they contain: the more notes a file contains, the
longer the detection process takes and the more memory it requires. This makes it difficult to
formulate a concrete rule, but, in general: with files longer than an hour, the detection process is
generally slow; files longer than two hours, however, may be impossible to load or transfer at all, due
to shortage of memory. In such cases, please divide the file up and transfer or load only the segments
that you actually wish to edit in Melodyne.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
9
Melodyne 4 studio
Transferring audio to the plug-in implementation of Melodyne
Open in your DAW the project you wish to edit.
Load the plug-in implementation of Melodyne as an audio insert effect in the audio track containing the
material you wish to edit. Position the plug-in implementation of Melodyne above any insert effects
you may be using in the track – if in doubt, put it in the first insert slot. For the analysis (or “detection”)
to achieve the best possible results, Melodyne needs to be given as dry and clean an input signal as
possible.
Move the playback cursor in the DAW to a point before the beginning of the passage you wish
to edit with Melodyne.
Click the Transfer button at the top left of the Melodyne window to prepare it to accept the
transfer.
Press Play in the DAW to transfer the material, which Melodyne will import automatically. Press
Stop when the end of the passage you wish to edit is reached.
Stopping the DAW playback automatically brings to an end Melodyne’s transfer readiness. You can
also interrupt a transfer in progress at any time by clicking the Transfer button.
If you wish, you can transfer to Melodyne further passages from different parts of the DAW track.
Clicking the Transfer button during playback by the DAW toggles Melodyne’s “enable transfer”
function on and off, allowing you to punch in and out as the playback proceeds. Alternatively, as you
reach the end of each of the passages you wish to transfer you can stop playback by the DAW, find
the start of the next passage, transfer-enable Melodyne again, restart playback by the DAW, stop it
again, and so on. If you wish, you can just transfer the entire track or even several tracks
simultaneously to multiple instances of Melodyne. To do this, simply enable the Transfer buttons of all
the instances to which you wish to transfer material simultaneously.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
10
Melodyne 4 studio
Important: If your DAW project contains changes of tempo or time signature, please consult the tour
entitled “Adjusting to tempo variations in the DAW”.
Tip: Initialize the key prior to the transfer: In the case of monophonic or polyphonic audio material,
Melodyne also recognizes the key (or “tonality”) of the music. With short melodic phrases, however,
the key chosen is often not the one intended, simply because too few notes are available for a correct
appraisal. To prevent this happening, you can set the key using the Scale Ruler of an empty instance
of the plug-in or an empty document (if using the stand-alone implementation of the program) before
the transfer or loading of an audio file. To do this, simply click on the desired keynote in the Scale
Ruler and select the desired scale or key from the context menu. Melodyne will then retain this
initialized value, regardless of its own subsequent analysis.
Replace Ranges
During playback, those passages that have been transferred to Melodyne will be played back by
Melodyne; all others by the DAW. In other words, wherever it has material to play back, Melodyne’s
signal will replace that of the original track.
From the Options > Note Editor sub-menu, choose Show Replace Ranges. All the passages that will
be played back by Melodyne (as opposed to the DAW) will now be marked. Such regions can be
extended simply by dragging their borders with the mouse.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
11
Melodyne 4 studio
To shorten a playback region, delete a few blobs and select Set Replace Ranges to Notes from the
context menu of the Time Ruler. This command works not only at the borders of the playback region
but also when you delete notes from the middle of the region – as shown in the following illustration.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
12
Melodyne 4 studio
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
13
Melodyne 4 studio
Working with ARA
The ARA integration of Melodyne with compatible DAWs is particularly user-friendly. Among its
advantages are that no transfers to the Melodyne plug-in are necessary, that Melodyne follows all
changes on the DAW track automatically, and that the DAW, too, enjoys the benefit of Melodyne’s
tempo detection.
The exact functions and possibilities vary depending upon how a specific DAW implements ARA. This
tour offers you a general explanation of ARA integration – so to speak, from the standpoint of, and in
relation to, Melodyne. Additional, DAW-specific recommendations and tips on ARA integration can be
found in the Help Center – in the “Related topics” section beneath this tour, for instance, or by using
the Search function or topic filters.
Track Mode
With ARA integration, after inserting the Melodyne plug-in and opening a DAW track, two alternative
modes are available for editing the notes: Track Mode and Clip Mode. You can switch between them
using the buttons above the Note Editor. The left-hand button activates Track Mode; the button to the
right of it, Clip Mode.
Track Mode lets you see the entire contents of the track opened in Melodyne, however many clips it is
composed of in the DAW.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
14
Melodyne 4 studio
The clip borders are indicated in Melodyne by vertical gray lines. The moving of borders is performed
in the DAW, not in Melodyne, but the lines in the Melodyne user interface move accordingly. This
allows you to see at once whether a clip change occurs at an unfortunate moment, such as in the
middle of a note.
Multi-track view in Track Mode
In Track Mode, you can show a list of all the DAW tracks into which Melodyne has been inserted.
With the (colored) Edit and (gray) Reference switches, you can display all notes belonging to such
tracks in the Note Editor. By holding down the [Cmd] or [Shift] keys as you click on their Edit buttons,
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
15
Melodyne 4 studio
you can display the notes of multiple tracks in the Note Editor at the same time and edit them
simultaneously. Typically you would do this to obtain simultaneous access to all vocal harmonies, in
order, for instance, to make sure they are in tune with one other.
Using the same technique, you can add one or more additional tracks to the display for the purpose of
reference by [Cmd]- or [Shift]-clicking the corresponding gray Reference buttons. The notes of such
tracks are also displayed in gray,; this indicates that they are locked to protect them from accidental
editing and solely there to assist harmonic and rhythmic orientation. A typical application here would
be adding the lead vocals to the display for reference as you edit the vocal harmonies; this makes it
easy to ensure that the resulting chords are in sync.
Tip: When multiple tracks are displayed at the same time in the Note Editor and these in turn comprise
multiple clips, the gray lines indicating the clip borders, due to their sheer number, can sometimes
obscure the display. In such cases, you might wish to clear the option “Show Clip Borders” in the
Options menu, thereby hiding the gray lines and reducing the clutter.
Follow Clip Selection in the DAW: The Edit switches in Melodyne’s track pane provide one way of
choosing which track(s) are displayed in the Note Editor, but you can also do this by selecting a track
from within the DAW itself, which has the effect of activating/deactivating Melodyne’s Edit switches
remotely. This only happens when “Follow Clip Selection in the DAW” is checked in Melodyne’s
Options menu.
Note: Only one track at a time can be selected remotely from the DAW by this method. When this
occurs, the Edit buttons of all tracks other than the one containing the clip are automatically
deactivated. If you do not want this to happen, clear the “Follow Clip Selection in the DAW” option. As
an alternative to using the menu, you can click on the dot in front of the track name.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
16
Melodyne 4 studio
This dot also serves to indicate the track containing the clip most recently selected in the DAW.
The status of the Reference buttons is not affected by the “Follow Clip Selection in the DAW” option.
Clip Mode
The alternative to Track Mode is called Clip Mode. You select this by clicking the right-hand mode
button (the one with a single blob) above the Note Editor.
In Clip Mode, you see only a single clip from the DAW track at a time. The track list remains in view,
but in Clip Mode the Edit and Reference buttons are grayed out.Track Mode and Clip Mode differ in
the way notes are displayed at clip borders: whilst in Track Mode, only notes lying within the clip
borders determined by the DAW can be seen, in Clip Mode notes on either side of the borders remain
visible; you therefore see in Melodyne – in the area with a gray background – what you might hear if
you were to resize the clip in the DAW.
The ability to reach beyond the borders of the clip has advantages when performing tasks such as
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
17
Melodyne 4 studio
comping. (Comping is the technique of selecting from multiple takes the best rendering of each
passage and concatenating the chosen clips to obtain what, given the available material, you consider
the optimal performance). Notes overlapping the borders of the clips in question pose particular
problems when comping. In Clip Mode, such problems can be resolved on the note level simply by
moving or shortening the offending notes until they fit neatly within the clip. In Clip Mode, it is also
possible to copy notes lying outside the clip borders and paste them into the clip, which can also be
very useful when comping.
Switching from Track Mode to Clip Mode and from clip to clip
Whereas in Track Mode it is always obvious what you are looking at – the contents of the entire DAW
track currently selected – Clip Mode displays only one of a track’s clips, so before you can switch to
Clip Mode, you must indicate clearly which clip you wish to edit. For as long as this remains unclear,
the Clip Mode button will be grayed out. In this case, while still in Track Mode, you must make it clear
which clip you wish to examine. You can do this in either of two ways:
By selecting a note, in which case it is obvious which clip interests you: the one containing the
note selected
By making a selection, which, provided all the notes selected belong to the same clip, is equally
unambiguous; if they do not, you must narrow your selection – if need be, to a single note.
If no note is selected, Melodyne looks to see which clip or clips are selected in the DAW. If only one
clip is currently selected in the DAW, Melodyne opens its contents in Clip Mode. If several clips are
selected, you can resolve the ambiguity by simply selecting a note belonging to the track you wish to
examine.
Tip: If you are already in Clip Mode and wish to change clips, it is not necessary to switch back to
Track Mode in order to do so. Simply click on the desired clip in the DAW, and Melodyne will display
its contents immediately. This only applies, of course, if Melodyne is already present in the track
containing the selected clip.
Entering Note Assignment Mode: You can only enter Note Assignment Mode from Track Mode if it
is clear from the current note selection which clip you wish to examine. If necessary, therefore, click
on one of the notes of the clip you wish to examine in Note Assignment Mode. You can enter Note
Assignment Mode from Clip Mode directly, as only one clip can be selected in Clip Mode at a time and
it is therefore obvious which clip you intend to examine.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
18
Melodyne 4 studio
Local playback in Melodyne
If you commence playback from the DAW, using the bar ruler, for example, or the transport buttons,
the full arrangement plays back. The DAW mixer then determines the balance between tracks. The
same is true if you commence playback by double-clicking on the Melodyne ruler. It is also possible,
however, for Melodyne alone to control the playback. We call this “local playback”. With ARA
integration, this local playback is started by double-clicking in the background of the Note Editor.
What exactly you hear during local playback depends upon the current edit mode.
Local playback in Track Mode:
In Track Mode during local playback, you hear all the DAW tracks in which Melodyne is present.
These tracks pass as usual through the DAW mixer but can be pre-mixed in Melodyne using the
Editing Mix Fader.
When this is at its leftmost extreme, only the colored notes sound – i.e. those belonging to the tracks
currently open for editing in the Note Editor. As you move the fader towards the middle, the gray notes
(displayed merely for reference) are faded in. As the fader is moved still further to the right, the
remaining tracks in Melodyne’s track list – i.e. those open neither for editing nor for reference – are
added to the mix. The Editing Mix Fader is only effective during local playback in Melodyne. If you
commence playback from the DAW, in which case all the song’s tracks can be heard, the Editing Mix
Fader has no function and is grayed out.
Local playback in Clip Mode: In this mode, you hear only the clip currently open in Melodyne’s Note
Editor. A significant difference arises at the clip borders, however, between this mode of playback and
playback in the DAW. During DAW playback, you hear only what lies within the borders of the
selected clip. If any notes are incomplete, due to a poorly positioned clip border slicing off the start or
end of the note, this is immediately obvious during DAW playback. During local playback, on the other
hand, you can hear material lying beyond the borders of the clip (i.e. in areas with a gray background).
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
19
Melodyne 4 studio
This allows you to check out what the result would be if you were to move the clip borders in the DAW.
It can also be useful if, for instance, you wish to use the rest of the track – i.e. the material lying
outside the clip as currently defined – as a “note supply” from which to “pinch” notes, by copying them
and pasting them into the clip you are working on.
Local and DAW playback differ also in respect of playback tempo. This is discussed in the following
section.
Tempo and tempo adjustment with ARA integration
One of the strengths of ARA integration lies in the adjustment of the tempo of audio files to the
existing song tempo. This functions from a technical standpoint like this: Melodyne “detects” in the
case of each audio file (and consequently of each clip in the DAW arrangement) the tempo of the
original recording. This works even with takes that were recorded without a click and that therefore
contain tempo fluctuations – and works even if they were recorded in a quite different context from the
current DAW song e.g. with stems taken from a different song or loops from a loop library. The
information “discovered” in this way by Melodyne is then shared with the DAW, which in turn might
come back to Melodyne with the request that it “reshape” the playback tempo of the file in question to
make it match the song tempo exactly.
This communication, governed by ARA, between Melodyne and the DAW does not preclude human
intervention, as there are times when it is only sensible that you, the user, should have some say in it
– for example, in the question of whether or not the DAW should “believe” what Melodyne is telling it
about the tempo. It may be that you know for a fact that the stems were recorded at a specific
constant tempo, and therefore have no desire for Melodyne to engage in the search for a non-existent
variable tempo. The procedures by which you can intervene in the process are described step by step
in the following section.
The DAW track must first be brought to a state that allows the tempo of clips to be adjusted to
that of the song. This is the responsibility of the DAW itself and is illustrated here by Studio
One:
If the file tempo and the current song tempo are identical, a single value with no brackets is displayed
in Melodyne’s Tempo field. If two values appear here, you know that Melodyne has detected a file
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
20
Melodyne 4 studio
tempo that is different to that of the song. The first value is the tempo of the song (in this example 83
BPM). The value in brackets indicates the tempo Melodyne has detected in the audio file (here 117
BPM).
In Track Mode, too, the song tempo is displayed without brackets, whilst the tempo of the clip over
which the playback line is currently passing is shown in brackets. (If, in a multi-track context, the
playback line is passing simultaneously over two clips with different file tempos, only a dash (“-”) will
be displayed within the brackets.)
In Note Assignment Mode, where you are examining the “raw” source material, only the file tempo (in
our example, the “117”) is displayed.
Now it is up to you to decide how the conflicting tempos are to be reconciled. To do this, open
the Tempo dialog.
“Confirm as File Tempo”: This tells the DAW to take Melodyne’s word for the tempo. This triggers
Melodyne’s time-stretching and the tempo of the audio file is adjusted to match that of the song
(slowing, in our example, from 117 to 83 BPM). Typical application: You are using an audio file (the
tempo of which you do not know) and simply wish it to match that of the song.
“Assign File Tempo”: If you think Melodyne has slipped up in its detection of the file tempo, with this
command you can open the Tempo Editor in Assign Tempo Mode and correct the tempo manually.
Typical application: Your file consists of a vocal take containing many pauses during which Melodyne
can find nothing upon which to base its file detection and as a result, if only in places, gets the tempo
wrong. Through tempo assignment you can lend Melodyne a hand, so to speak, to ensure that any
subsequent time-stretching proceeds upon the basis of accurate values and delivers musically
appropriate results.
“Apply Project Tempo”: In this case, regardless of the tempo detected by Melodyne, you do not
wish the file to be subjected to time-stretching. In other words, you have determined that the file and
song tempos are identical (which means that no time-stretching is necessary). Typical application: You
had already, using functions supplied by the DAW, adjusted the tempo of the file to the song tempo,
before deciding to open a passage within it in Melodyne. Now you wish to change the melody or key in
Melodyne but without jeopardizing the tempo adjustment already performed.
“Apply Constant Tempo”: With this command, you can, if necessary, set the file tempo manually. To
do this, select the command from the menu and type into the Tempo field the desired tempo. You
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
21
Melodyne 4 studio
might wish to do this when you already know the tempo of the recording that you are importing into
your song. Suppose, for example, the song tempo is 83 BPM and you are importing from a sampling
CD a drum loop the stated tempo of which, in the booklet, is 90 BPM. As a rule, Melodyne will detect
the 90 BPM immediately and display “83 (90)” in the Tempo field. To trigger the time-stretching in this
case, it would be enough to select “Confirm as File Tempo”. In the event of Melodyne here displaying
a value other than 90 BPM for the file tempo, as, for instance, when it interprets the loop in double
time and consequently displays “83 (180)”, you can use the “Apply Constant Tempo” command to
correct the misapprehension by typing “90” in place of “180”.
Special cases also exist where the file tempo is set to a particular value automatically, without any
intervention on your part. This happens when ...
... you record new material directly into the song. In this case, Melodyne assumes that you
were listening to the other tracks – or, at the very least, to the click – as you were performing,
and that you therefore “meant” the tempo of the take in question to be that of the song; an
analysis of the tempo would therefore serve no purpose and to apply time-stretching
subsequently to the performance would be likely, at best, to yield mixed results.
... when adding an Apple loop or a loop in Studio One format. The DAW in this case “believes”
the tempo information encoded into the file and does not trouble Melodyne for a second
opinion.
Tempo and the Time Grid
The discovery (or explicit definition in the Tempo dialog) of the “correct” file tempo serves other
purposes as well as that of musically sensitive tempo adjustment. It makes the work of editing the
notes easier, because the file tempo also determines the calibration of the Time Ruler as well as the
positioning of the grid lines in the background to the Note Editor.
Imagine, in this case, that you want to move a note a semiquaver (sixteenth note) to the right or left.
What you intend, in all probability, is that the exact length of this sixteenth note should be a function of
the current song tempo (say 100 BPM). If the Time Grid, however, were still based on the tempo of
the original recording (120 BPM, say), then when you attempted to move a note by a semiquaver, it
would end up in the wrong place – (the rule here being: the quicker the tempo, the more closely
spaced the gridlines). For this reason, the DAW and Melodyne, communicating via ARA, strive to
ensure that their rulers and Time Grids provide at all times an “accurate” representation of the current
tempo and that any quantization that is undertaken is therefore similarly “accurate”. In the following, an
overview taking into account the various edit modes as well as the difference between local and DAW
playback.
Tempo display in Track Mode:
Melodyne’s Tempo field displays a single value: the song tempo in your DAW.
Melodyne’s ruler and the Time Grid in the Note Editor background are synchronized and they
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
22
Melodyne 4 studio
are each calibrated according to the same principle: the faster the song tempo, the smaller the
distance between lines.
Tempo display in Clip Mode:
Melodyne’s Tempo field displays two values (as described above): the song tempo, followed by
the file tempo in brackets. A single value is displayed only when the tempo of the file and that
of the song are identical.
Melodyne’s Time Ruler and the Time Grid in the Note Editor background are now no longer
necessarily in sync, as the ruler reflects the song tempo, whereas the grid represents the
tempo of the file. If the two tempos are not identical, the dashes on the ruler will no longer
coincide with the lines of the grid.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
23
Melodyne 4 studio
This is as it should be and reveals the effect of dynamic time-stretching during DAW playback: the
Time Grid, and with it the notes of the original recording, are squeezed or stretched to accord with the
song tempo and also, therefore, with the ruler. The results, of course, will only be musically viable if
the Time Grid is calibrated on the basis of “accurate” tempo-detection or -input. For this reason, Clip
Mode allows you to examine the Time Grid to ensure that it corresponds with the notes. Should this
not be the case, you can make the necessary adjustments using the Tempo dialog options described
above.
During DAW playback, the clip follows the tempo of the song i.e. the value before the brackets.
This is achieved by stretching or squeezing the original file to match this tempo.
During local playback, the clip is heard at its original (file) tempo – i.e. at the tempo shown in
brackets – and no time-stretching or -squeezing occurs.
Tempo display in Note Assignment Mode:
Melodyne’s Tempo field displays a single value: that of the original file.
The ruler and Time Grid are synchronized.
DAW playback follows the song tempo. Local playback follows the file tempo. There is one
difference here: Double-clicking on the Melodyne ruler in this edit mode also starts local
playback and not (as in Track and Clip modes) playback from the DAW.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
24
Melodyne 4 studio
Quantizing notes
As described above in the section entitled “Tempo and the Time Grid”, it is possible – in Clip Mode
only – for discrepancies between the ruler and Time Grid to occur. These serve initially as an
orientation aid, reminding you perhaps that you have moved a clip in the DAW a sixteenth note
backwards, the evidence being that the Time Grid is now a sixteenth note ahead of the ruler.
Such an offset, however, has an effect upon the quantization, because Melodyne uses its own Time
Grid for the quantization and not the DAW ruler. In practice, of course, the two are nearly always
identical and the quantization therefore mostly behaves in the manner with which users of MIDI
editors, for example, will be familiar. But when, as described above, a clip has been moved in the
DAW arrangement (perhaps only by a few milliseconds, for creative purposes), in Clip Mode the
quantization destinations (i.e. the positions towards which notes will gravitate when quantization
occurs) are visually obvious.
Quantization works the same way in Track Mode as in Clip Mode, being based invariably upon the
Time Grid of the original file. In Track Mode, however, you see the Time Grid of the DAW, which, in
the exceptional cases described above (such as when you have shifted a clip slightly to the left or right
in the DAW) can be misleading, as the quantization destinations may be offset slightly from the
gridlines. This, however, is merely an optical discrepancy. Switch to Clip Mode if it annoys you, and
the quantization destinations and gridlines will again coincide.
Copying and pasting notes
Within a clip, you can copy and paste notes without any restrictions. Whether you can copy a note
from one clip and paste it into another depends upon whether or not the two clips are accessing the
same audio file.
Example: You have sliced up a drum recording in the DAW into individual clips, sorted them in the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
25
Melodyne 4 studio
DAW arrangement, and are looking at them now in Melodyne’s Track Mode. In this case, you can
copy and paste notes freely (because they were originally part of a single long recording) without
paying attention to the clip borders.
If, on the other hand, you have made a collage in the DAW arrangement of snippets taken from
different recordings – from successive vocal takes, for instance – and are looking at these in Track
Mode, you cannot copy and paste notes with the same freedom. In the following illustration, the clips
have been color coded to indicate from which of five different takes they are derived:
Here you cannot copy the note selected at the beginning of Bar 17 (or, indeed, any other note derived
from a red clip) and paste it into Bar 16, because the destination contains a clip of a different color – in
this case, green – which is therefore derived from a different recording. You can, however, paste it into
Bar 18, because the content there is derived from the same red take.
The Sound Editor in Track Mode and Clip Mode
The Sound Editor in the case of ARA integration works – as in the stand-alone implementation – on a
per track basis. So if you are working in Track Mode and the track in question comprises multiple clips,
any changes made in the Sound Editor will affect all the clips in the same way. If, for example, you
have lowered the third overtone by 10 dB, this setting will be applied to all clips on the track.
If, however, you now switch to Clip Mode and raise the third overtone of the selected clip by 4 dB, the
resulting value for the overtone in question in the selected clip will be the sum of the two adjustments
– i.e. -6 dB – whereas in the other clips the third overtone will still be at -10 dB. By this means, you
can apply different settings to different clips.
If you now switch back to Track Mode, you will see displayed in the Sound Editor a value somewhere
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
26
Melodyne 4 studio
between -10 and -6 dB for the overtone in question. This is a display compromise: an average of all
the clips concerned.
By the same token, the other Sound Editor controls may also display approximate values if you keep
switching to Clip Mode to adjust the parameters of individual clips. This is, as we have said, a
compromise; but if ever it does lead to confusion, just give greater credence to your ears than to your
eyes.
The behavior described occurs whenever all of the clips on a given track are derived from a different
recording. Where some, but not all, of the clips on a given track are derived from the same recording,
the behavior is somewhat different: now any changes to the Sound Editor settings of one such clip will
apply only to those clips that are derived from the same recording.
For example: supposing you have assembled a vocal track from four different takes using the comping
technique described above, and suppose further that one of the takes has a slightly different tone
quality (because it was recorded, perhaps, on a different day, when the voice in question had a duller
sound). Now it is only necessary with the Sound Editor to add brightness to one clip derived from the
duller-sounding take and all clips derived from that take will benefit.
The Compare switch
When working in Melodyne, you will constantly be wanting to compare the current state of the edited
recording with the original audio files. In addition to the bypass function of your DAW, which
deactivates Melodyne altogether, you will find next to the level display in Melodyne a Compare switch
that serves a similar purpose.
Unlike the DAW’s bypass function, however, Melodyne’s Compare switch reverses not only the
acoustic but also the visual consequences of all editing. It is also the case that;
the Compare switch affects all clips governed by Melodyne, regardless of track and whether or
not they are currently displayed in the Note Editor. The entire song is therefore returned to the
state it was in before you began editing notes with Melodyne.
all changes made to the notes are undone, whether made using the macros or tools.
any adjustment of the tempo of clips to match that of the DAW does remain effective.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
27
Melodyne 4 studio
Loading and saving audio (stand-alone)
In this tour, you will learn how to open audio files and export audio from the stand-alone
implementation of Melodyne.
Please note: The amount of memory Melodyne requires depends partly upon the length of the files
you are transferring to it or loading but mainly upon the number of notes they contain: the more notes
a file contains, the longer the detection process takes and the more memory it requires. This makes it
difficult to formulate a concrete rule, but, in general: with files longer than an hour, the detection
process is generally slow; files longer than two hours, however, may be impossible to load or transfer
at all, due to shortage of memory. In such cases, please divide the file up and transfer or load only the
segments that you actually wish to edit in Melodyne.
Tempo adjustment when audio files are loaded
When an audio file is opened, Melodyne detects not only the notes it contains but also the musical
tempo. Whether this tempo information is used to adjust the tempo of the file depends upon the status
of the Auto Stretch switch in the transport bar.
For details, see the tour “Tempo detection and tempo adjustment with Auto Stretch”, which you can
access inter alia under “Related topics” below.
Loading files from the menu
Choose File > Import Audio...; then use the file selector to navigate to the desired audio file, and open
it.
You can load audio in various uncompressed formats such as WAV and AIFF but also MP3 – or CAF
– files as well as Apple Loops.
In Melodyne studio you can select and open more than one file at a time; the files will be assigned to
separate tracks and begin at the first bar of your project.
Alternatively, you can load audio files by choosing File > Open from the menu bar. In this case, if you
select more than one audio file, a separate project (with its own tab above the transport bar) will be
created for each file.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
28
Melodyne 4 studio
Loading files by drag 'n' drop
You can load files into Melodyne by drag ‘n’ drop from the following locations:
your operating system’s file manager (e.g. Finder or Explorer)
Melodyne’s File Browser (which displays folders on your hard disk – see below)
Melodyne’s Project Browser (which shows the audio files the project is already using)
For the drag ‘n’ drop procedure, there are two possible drop zones:
the track pane: you can drag one or more audio files onto existing tracks or into the grey area
beneath the tracks. Each file is assigned to a track; if necessary, Melodyne creates new tracks
to accommodate them. The files come to rest wherever in the timeline they are dropped.
the Note Editor: you can only drag one file at a time into the Note Editor. It makes no difference
whether or not the track displayed in the Note Editor already contains audio. The file comes to
rest wherever in the timeline it is dropped.
When dropping audio files into Melodyne, they will snap to the grid if it is active. You must therefore
deactivate it if you wish to position the files freely, i.e. without the grid influencing the result.
Tip: It is not only audio files but also Melodyne project files (MPD files) that can be dragged and
dropped at a desired point in the timeline, in which case Melodyne imports into the current project all
the contents of the MPD file.
Whenever you use the drag ‘n’ drop procedure, pay attention to the status of the Auto Stretch switch,
as this determines whether or not the imported file adopts the tempo of the project.
The File Browser
The File Browser can be displayed in the Info pane and offers you a user-friendly way of accessing
audio file folders you use often.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
29
Melodyne 4 studio
Initially, the File Browser is empty. Drag the folders you wish to include from your computer’s file
manager (e.g. Finder or Explorer) into the empty grey pane.
You can drag to the File Browser folders from different storage devices and different hierarchical
levels within your file structure. In the Browser itself, all the folders appear at the same level in the
form of a simple list. To the left of each entry is a small triangle that can be used to expand the folder
in question. In this way, you can navigate down through the hierarchy of folders.
Any time you double-click on a folder, you “plunge into it”, so to speak, and the rest of the directory
structure in the File Browser is hidden. The pop-up button at the top of the browser displays the path
of the current folder and allows you to ‘resurface’ (i.e. return to the highest level) and regain access to
the hidden folders.
Audio files are indicated in the File Browser by either a colored blob or a grey waveform. Files with a
colored blob already possess an MDD file. This contains information regarding the tempo and note
detection of the file, which means it can be loaded quickly without having to go through the detection
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
30
Melodyne 4 studio
process again. Files with a grey symbol do not possess an MDD file.
To the right of each audio file, you will see a Play button to allow you to preview (or ‘audition’) its
contents. The volume button for this preview function is to the right of the pop-up button displaying the
folder name or level.
Saving audio: the Export window
To save audio material in the form of an audio file on your hard disk, choose File > Export... from the
menu bar. This opens the Export dialog, in which you will find a variety of options.
From the top line, you select the file format, the sample rate and the bit resolution of the file(s) to be
exported. (Exporting MIDI is dealt with in separate tours).
From the second line, you select the scope (in time) of the material to be exported. With the radio
buttons below, you determine whether a stereo mix of the tracks should be created or a separate file
for each track.
Whether the material is exported in mono or stereo depends upon the number of channels in the
original files.
Simply mute the tracks you do not wish to export. Muted tracks are not included in the stereo mix and
no file is created for a muted track. The Solo buttons have the opposite effect: If one or more tracks
are switched solo, only this or these tracks will be exported.
For the Range (i.e. the temporal scope), the following options are available:
Entire Length: everything from the beginning of the first track to the end of the last.
Cycle Range Only: only the segment of the timeline between the cycle locators.
Range of Reference Track: The export in this case is limited in time to the scope of the
‘Reference Track’ selected using the pop-up button to the right.
Start of Reference Track to End: The export begins, as before, at the point in the timeline that
coincides with the start of the reference track, but in this case it continues to the end of the last
track in the arrangement.
Individual Range for Each Track: a separate file will be created for each track, covering in each
case the entire scope of the track in question. No stereo mix can be created if this option is
chosen.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
31
Melodyne 4 studio
The “Include tails” box should be checked in cases where, for example, you have chosen Cycle
Range Only but some notes in the selection overlap the end of the range. Selecting this option
extends the range slightly so that the tails of notes are not chopped off and the decay is preserved.
Click the Export button to begin the export with the selected options. A file selector will open so that
you can choose the storage location.
The 'Replace Audio' command
The ‘Replace Audio’ command in the File menu allows you to save an audio file edited in Melodyne
under its original name without recourse to the Export dialog. The original file is then replaced by the
version edited in Melodyne, but at the same time Melodyne also saves the original file, adding “orig” to
the filename. Access to the unedited original remains possible, therefore, at any time, as it has not
been deleted but simply renamed.
Saving with “Replace Audio” is primarily useful when you define Melodyne in your DAW as the
external sample editor: at the push of a button inside the DAW, you can then open a file for editing in
Melodyne, whereby saving it subsequently with “Replace Audio” ensures that the file is “given back” to
the DAW automatically. This is because the DAW uses the name of the file to identify and access it,
and since Melodyne is no longer changing the name, saving the edited file in Melodyne with “Replace
Audio” makes it instantly available to the DAW.
The advantage of defining Melodyne as a sample editor in your DAW (as opposed to using it as a
plug-in), is that the transfer process, which with long files can be time-consuming, is replaced by a
swifter load operation. The disadvantage is that you cannot hear your editing in the context of the
arrangement and cannot make the audio file available once more to the DAW without “freezing” it.
This is different from working with the Melodyne plug-in, which you can leave open until the final mix,
making further changes at any time and hearing them in the context of the DAW arrangement.
The replacing of audio files and the saving of Melodyne project files are processes that influence one
another. Suppose, for example, you have opened a file from the DAW in Melodyne and performed
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
32
Melodyne 4 studio
some editing, but think you might wish to revise this later. In this case, you should save your editing in
a Melodyne project file (suffix “.mpd”). This .mpd file initially references the audio file provided by the
DAW.
If you wanted at this stage to give the edited audio file back to the DAW, the “Replace Audio”
command, if it were available, would have unintended consequences, because Melodyne’s .mpd file
would be referencing the newly edited version of the audio file not the original. This would mean that if
in the course of further editing you tried to restore a note you had previously deleted, you would
discover that this was impossible, as the note would no longer be present in the file. To avoid this
problem, when replacing an audio file, Melodyne changes the reference in the .mpd file – whenever
one has been created – from a reference not to the edited audio file but to the original (i.e. to the file
with “orig” added to its name) before saving the .mpd file again. This is why the “Replace Audio”
command disappears from the File menu whenever an .mpd file is created and “Save and Replace
Audio” appears there instead.
This solution allows you, on the one hand, immediate access to the edited audio file in the DAW, and
on the other, the freedom to undo, or make further, changes at any time in Melodyne simply by
loading the .mpd file, as this retains access to the original.
When saving, the commands “Replace Audio” and “Save and Replace Audio” use the name of the
track on which the audio file is open in Melodyne, which in turn is determined by the audio file opened.
We point this out because it has two consequences: firstly, it means you can add other samples to the
track in question and arrange them freely in Melodyne without the eventual filename used by the
“(Save and ) Replace Audio” function changing. Secondly, it means that if you rename the track in
Melodyne, this will alter the filename used by “(Save and) Replace Audio”. So if you wish to use the
“Replace Audio” or “Save and Replace Audio” commands in the manner we have just described,
remember not to rename the track.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
33
Melodyne 4 studio
Recording audio (stand-alone)
In this tour you will learn how to record audio with the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne and
what has to be borne in mind when doing so.
Audio and recording preferences
Before recording for the first time in the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, you should open the
Preferences property sheet to examine, and if necessary change, the audio and recording settings.
To open the Preferences property sheet, choose Program (macOS) or File (Windows) followed in
each case by Preferences..
On the Audio page, you will see the general audio settings. If you have already loaded, played back
and edited files with Melodyne and everything functioned, you can just leave the existing settings. (On
the Mac, the internal Core Audio hardware is used by default; under Windows, the ASIO driver of your
audio hardware should be selected).
On the Recording page, you can select a file format for your recordings, such as WAV or AIFF.
Handling the tempo and the metronome
Before you begin the first recording in a new Melodyne project, you should devote some thought to the
matter of tempo. In a new document, the tempo and time signature fields are initially empty; instead of
a value in each case, a simple dash (“–”) is displayed. The Time Ruler, initially, is calibrated in
seconds. At this stage, then, there is no musical tempo.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
34
Melodyne 4 studio
You now have two choices: you can either enter the tempo manually and record in time to a
metronome click or begin recording with the tempo field still empty, allowing Melodyne to detect the
tempo automatically.
To enter the tempo manually, proceed as follows (the default values, unless others are entered by
hand, are 120 BPM for the tempo, 4/4 for the time signature, and quarter note (crotchet) intervals for
the Time Grid):
Enter the desired value in beats per minute (BPM) in the tempo field
Enter the desired values for the numerator and denominator of the time signature (e.g. 6/8)
Enter a musical note value instead of seconds in the menu for the Time Grid
Click on the icon between the time signature and tempo fields in the transport bar to activate
the metronome.
Opening the Tempo Editor
When you choose this procedure, Melodyne assumes that you intend the tempo to be constant, so
any fluctuations in tempo will be revealed by a discrepancy between the position of the blobs and that
of the grid lines. The fact that you have opted for a constant tempo will be indicated by an equals sign
(“=”) before the tempo in the transport bar.
To activate the metronome, click on the icon between the time signature and the tempo in the
transport bar. To make the click quieter or louder, click on the same (metronome) icon and drag
downwards or upwards without releasing the mouse button.
If you are used to working with DAWs, you may be more comfortable setting the tempo manually and
recording to a click. Since Melodyne is extremely good at detecting the tempo, however, it is in many
cases easier and more practical simply to allow Melodyne’s tempo detection routines to determine the
tempo for you.
Instead of initializing the tempo, time signature and Time Grid values manually, as just
described, begin recording with the tempo and time signature fields empty. Now you no longer
need a click to listen to as you record because Melodyne will detect the tempo and tempo
fluctuations within the recording and adjust the grid lines and subsequent click accordingly.
Instead of entering a numerical value for the tempo, in other words, you are determining the
tempo through your performance.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
35
Melodyne 4 studio
This will result in any fluctuations in tempo within the performance being considered deliberate and the
tempo being interpreted as variable. The value in the tempo field will therefore be constantly changing
in the course of playback, and the mesh of the Time Grid will expand or contract accordingly (i.e.
distance between grid lines will increase or decrease) as the tempo changes. The fact that the tempo
is variable is indicated by the presence of a tilde (“~”) before the value in the tempo field.
Enabling, starting and stopping recording
You can record on one or more tracks whether or not they already contain audio. In the latter case,
where the recording overlaps the existing material, the latter will be overwritten. To begin recording,
proceed as follows:
Select the input of your audio hardware in the Track Inspector of the track(s) upon which you
intend to record as well as the output through which the track should be played. All the physical
inputs and outputs are available for selection. The Master Output, as defined in the
Preferences property sheet, is of particular importance in that its level is governed by the
master volume fader in the transport bar. As a rule, you should define as the Master Output,
the one that supplies your monitoring system.
The default input is also defined using the Preferences property sheet.
Record enable (or ‘arm’) the track using the button below. Alternatively, you will find a record
enable button for each track in the track header pane.
Move the playback cursor to a point just to the left of that at which you intend to begin
recording. This will give you a cue.
Click on the record button in the transport bar, to activate Melodyne’s record mode.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
36
Melodyne 4 studio
Begin the actual recording by clicking the play button and commence recording.
The cycle range can also be used during a recording to play back a specific segment of the track
repeatedly. The recording, however, ignores the cycle and appears on your track as though the cycle
were inactive.
By clicking on the record button in the transport bar as the playback proceeds, you can punch in and
out (i.e. toggle record mode on and off). This affects all tracks. To toggle record mode on and off for
individual tracks, use the appropriate record enable buttons in the track header pane. When you halt
the playback in Melodyne, all recording ceases.
You can discard a poor recording simply by choosing Undo. You can listen to a recording even while
the detection process is underway and cancel if you wish.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
37
Melodyne 4 studio
Audio characteristics and algorithms
For the display and editing of different types of audio material, Melodyne employs different algorithms.
Here, we outline which algorithms are available and for which types of audio material each is used.
The detection process
Melodyne analyzes the audio material to find the notes it contains and offer them to you for editing.
We call this process “detection”.
In the course of the detection process, Melodyne itself takes a view as to what kind of material it is
confronted with and decides which algorithm to use for the display and playback of the notes. You can
tell which algorithm is selected at any given time by the check mark in the Algorithm menu as well as
by the blobs in the Note Editor.
Please bear in mind, however, that the detection process – in particular in the case of polyphonic
audio material – cannot, for reasons that have to do with immutable principles, always deliver perfect
results. Since a musically correct analysis of the recorded material is the most important precondition
for efficient editing and convincing acoustic results, we recommend you to check the results of the
detection systematically and make whatever corrections are necessary.
The Melodic algorithm
Melodic material is monophonic, by which we mean it is such that only one note is ever sounding at
any given instant. Please bear in mind, however, that reverberation can cause notes to overlap even
in monophonic material, creating, in effect, a kind of polyphony. If melodic material is to be edited in
Melodyne, therefore, you should aim for as clean and “dry” (reverberation-free) a recording as
possible.
The blobs representing notes in melodic material are displayed at different pitches. Whether the blobs
are isolated or joined to other blobs depends on the way they were played or sung: staccato or legato.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
38
Melodyne 4 studio
The Percussive algorithm
This category includes not only recordings of drums and other percussion instruments but also noise
and atmospheric effects as well as other material in which Melodyne cannot detect any clear pitch in
the sounds. When the Percussive algorithm is selected, successive drum strokes (for example) are
distinguished, but they are all displayed at the same pitch. The blobs can still be raised or lowered in
pitch, but the pitch ruler does not display the names of any notes but simply relative values in
semitones. The scale functions are deactivated.
The Polyphonic (Sustain/Decay) algorithm
In Melodyne, thanks to DNA Direct Note Access, notes can be detected and edited within recordings
even of polyphonic instruments such as the piano or guitar – including the individual notes of which
chords are composed. When the Polyphonic algorithm is used, the blobs are displayed in a similar
manner to those of monophonic material, with the obvious difference that the blobs are stacked
vertically (at their respective pitches) whenever a chord or harmonic interval sounds.
There are two versions of the Polyphonic algorithm:
Polyphonic Sustain is the algorithm with which users of earlier versions of Melodyne are
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
39
Melodyne 4 studio
already familiar and is suitable for a wide range of polyphonic audio material.
Polyphonic Decay is a variation of this algorithm that is particularly suitable for highly
percussive signals within which, however, a tonality is discernible.
Please note that DNA is designed for tracks containing a single polyphonic instrument (a guitar, a
piano, ...) and that it divides the material up according to pitch – not instrument. If two instruments play
the same note at the same time, what is available for editing is a single note comprising the combined
sound of both instruments.
NB: There is some audio material that cannot be detected using the polyphonic algorithms because it
contains too few tonal components. If in the case of such material you have chosen one of the
polyphonic algorithms as the default (see below), the polyphonic detection process will be interrupted
and a fresh detection of the material using the Percussive Algorithm, which is better suited to it, will
commence. If you wish in such cases, when this detection is complete, you can still switch to
Universal or Melodic.
The Universal algorithm
The Universal algorithm is particularly suitable for complex signals containing both percussive and
tonal elements. If, for example, you wish to alter the pitch, timing or tempo of an entire piece of music,
this algorithm will deliver the best sound quality.
The Universal algorithm, like the Percussive one, displays all the detected notes at the same pitch.
The Pitch Ruler displays no note names, merely relative values for the semitones, and the scale
functions are deactivated.
The Universal algorithm completes the detection process very quickly and also consumes far fewer
resources than the Polyphonic algorithm. It represents a good choice, therefore for recordings of
individual instruments of all kinds that you intend simply to speed up, slow down or transpose. Tracks,
in other words, for which you do not need bells and whistles such as DNA or Melodyne’s scale
functions.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
40
Melodyne 4 studio
Please note that with files that have been detected using the Universal Algorithm, the Attack Speed
Tool cannot be used. Attack speed handles will therefore not be displayed for the corresponding blobs
and the Attack Speed field in the Note Inspector will be grayed out.
Switching algorithms
You can at any time select a different algorithm to that chosen automatically for you by Melodyne. You
might want to do this, for example, if you find that the material has not been interpreted in a way that
suits your editing needs. To do this, while playback is halted, select the algorithm you prefer from the
Algorithm menu. Melodyne will reinterpret the material in the light of your choice and adjust the display
accordingly.
Note: when you do this, any editing of the same track performed prior to switching algorithms,
including any copying of notes, will be lost (copied notes on other tracks are retained) . The right time
to decide which algorithm you wish to use, therefore, is before you begin editing.
In the plug-in implementation of Melodyne, the choice of algorithm applies to an entire transfer, in the
stand-alone implementation, to an entire audio file in the document being edited – collectively, we
describe all such material as ‘audio sources’. Before you can change the algorithm applied to a
particular audio source, you must first select one or more notes belonging exclusively to it. If you have
selected no notes, or notes from two different audio sources, the Algorithm menu will be grayed out. In
such cases, reduce your selection to notes belonging to one audio source only and it will be possible
to switch algorithms.
When you switch algorithms, triggering a fresh detection, Melodyne looks at the status of the Auto
Stretch switch: if the Auto Stretch function is activated, once the new detection is complete, the tempo
of the file will also be adjusted: if Auto Stretch is not selected, the original tempo of the file will be
retained.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
41
Melodyne 4 studio
Automatic or manual algorithm selection
Melodyne by default selects the most suitable algorithm automatically, basing its choice on the
characteristics of the audio material. If, however, in an instance of the plug-in implementation of
Melodyne or on a track of the stand-alone implementation material has already been detected, when
new material is transferred to that instance or a new file dragged into the track of the stand-alone
implementation, Melodyne will use the same algorithm for the new material as it used for the old –
even if Automatic is selected.
Overruling the Automatic setting in this way is designed to ensure maximum consistency in the
detection and avoid all risk of one of the transfers from a vocal track suddenly being interpreted as
percussive. If, however, you have altered the algorithm of a transfer or file manually, the automation
kicks in again afterwards, and no further attention is paid in the case of further transfers or files to
already detected material.
This rule only applies when Automatic is selected as the algorithm. It does not apply, however, when
you are using Melodyne with ARA; nor when, in the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, a new
file for which an MDD file already exists, containing the editing applied to its detection, is dragged into
a document
By setting a different default via the Algorithm menu, you can prevent Melodyne selecting an algorithm
automatically for the detection. This can be useful if, for example, you regularly want to edit particular
files using the Percussive algorithm but Melodyne, each time they are opened, is interpreting the
material as polyphonic. By preselecting the Percussive algorithm in such cases you can save time, as
you will no longer have to wait needlessly as Melodyne performs its polyphonic analysis, only to
discard the results moments later when you manually select the Percussive algorithm.
Do not forget, however, when you no longer need to impose your choice of algorithm on Melodyne, to
restore Automatic as the default setting. Otherwise, since Melodyne remembers your default selection
even after you have quit the program, you might be surprised to discover when the program is next
launched that your vocals have been interpreted as percussive.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
42
Melodyne 4 studio
Playback, navigation, zooming
This tour will give you an overview of the functions Melodyne offers for navigation and the playing
back of audio.
Resizing the window
To change the size of the window, click and drag the bottom right-hand corner. The procedure is the
same for both the stand-alone and plug-in implementations of Melodyne.
Controlling playback using the keyboard and transport bar
The plug-in implementation of Melodyne is integrated into the DAW and keeps perfectly in step with its
playback. When you reposition the DAW, this information is conveyed to Melodyne, which mirrors the
new position. As soon as the DAW starts, Melodyne also starts. The Melodyne plug-in is, so to speak,
forever the ‘slave’ of your DAW. It is not possible to start, stop or reposition the DAW’s playback
cursor from within Melodyne.
With the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, you start and stop the playback using the buttons
in the transport bar at the top or by pressing the space bar. If you hold the [Alt] key at the same time,
playback will be confined to the current selection.
You can also control playback in Melodyne Stand-Alone using the numeric keypad of your computer.
The shortcuts can be selected from the Preferences dialog, the default settings being as follows:
Playback/Pause [space bar]: Stop or Start playback from the current position of the playback
cursor
Start [Enter] when stopped: Commence playback from the current position of the playback
cursor
Start [Enter] during playback: Jump to, and continue playback from, the last starting point
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
43
Melodyne 4 studio
Stop [0 on the numeric keypad] during playback: Stop and jump to the last starting point
Stop [0 on the numeric keypad] twice in succession: Jump to the beginning of the project
In both the stand-alone and plug-in implementations of Melodyne, the arrow keys on the keyboard can
be used to step through the blobs. When playback is stopped, the blob currently selected will sound.
Before you can play back the blobs in this way in the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, it may
be necessary to click once in the Note Editor so that it has focus. It is the focus that determines to
which part of the user interface any shortcuts you use apply. The pane with focus at any given
moment is the one enclosed in a thin orange frame.
Please note that you can define a wide variety of keyboard shortcuts – including new playback
shortcuts – using Melodyne’s Preferences dialog. If for any reason you are not satisfied with the
default shortcuts, you can redefine them at will.
Controlling playback, scrubbing and zooming using the Time Ruler
These playback functions are available in both the stand-alone and plug-in implementations of
Melodyne – in the plug-in, however, only when the DAW is stopped; as soon as it starts again, the
Melodyne plug-in reverts to the ‘slave’ status described above and resumes its shadowing of the
DAW.
Double-click in the Time Ruler (or directly in the background of the Note Editor) to commence
playback from the position in question. If you hold down the [Alt] key as you double-click in the Time
Ruler, playback will be confined to the current selection.
Click in the Time Ruler to move the playback cursor to the position in question and halt playback at
the same time.
Click and drag in the Time Ruler to scrub through the audio material.
By dragging upwards or downwards, you can zoom the display at the current position. Scrubbing and
zooming can be used in combination, allowing you to navigate and position the cursor intuitively,
setting the zoom factor at the same time.
Please note that when starting playback or scrubbing via the Time Ruler of the Note Editor, it is the
Editing Mix Fader (near the right-hand end of the toolbar) that determines what you hear: if the fader
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
44
Melodyne 4 studio
button is moved all the way to the left, you will hear only the notes corresponding to the colored blobs
in the Note Editor. As the fader button is moved back towards the center, the gray blobs, which are
only displayed for reference, will become gradually louder. Finally, with the fader button moved all the
way to the right, you will hear all Melodyne tracks, including those not currently displayed in the Note
Editor.
Scrolling and zooming in the Note Editor
Select the Scroll Tool (the hand icon) from beneath the main tool or hold down the [Command] and
[Shift] keys to move the display area with the mouse.
Select the Zoom Tool (the magnifying glass) from beneath the Main Tool or press [Command]+[Alt] to
zoom the display with the mouse. You can zoom horizontally and vertically at the same time – with
different levels of intensity in each case.
[Command]+[Shift]+double-click zooms in on one blob or several (if several are selected). A
corresponding double-click in the editing background returns you to the previous zoom level.
If your hardware supports the corresponding functions, you can also scroll and zoom with the mouse
and trackpad:
The mouse wheel and swiping with two fingers on the trackpad can be used for horizontal and
vertical scrolling.
Pinching with two fingers on the trackpad zooms the display simultaneously on the horizontal
and vertical planes.
Drag the horizontal or vertical scrollers (i.e. the scroll boxes or ‘thumbs’) to move the display. The
horizontal scroller contains a miniaturized image of the contents as an orientation aid.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
45
Melodyne 4 studio
Drag the ends of the scroller to zoom the display.
If you are editing a particularly long audio file, you may find the reduced size of the scroller makes it
difficult to achieve the desired zoom resolution. In that case, you can zoom in further by holding down
the [Command] and [Alt] keys whilst dragging in the edit pane or else by dragging vertically in the
Time Ruler.
If you pull one end of the horizontal or vertical slider as far as it will go and hold it, you can increase
the vertical or horizontal size of the area displayed. This can be useful in the plug-in, for example,
when you have only transferred the first three bars (measures) of your material but wish to insert
something at bar 20.
Double-click in the center of the scroller to zoom in or out just enough to ensure that all the blobs are
displayed. If cycle mode is active, double-clicking on the horizontal scroller zooms the display just
enough to ensure that the entire contents of the cycle range are visible.
Use the slider in the bottom right-hand corner near the Note Editor to alter the height of the blobs. This
does not alter their volume. Your likely motive will be to obtain a clearer view of material containing a
lot of particularly quiet or particularly loud notes.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
46
Melodyne 4 studio
A note about automatic scrolling in the Note Editor
If you have selected one or several notes, Melodyne assumes that you wish to see and edit them, and
exercises the requisite restraint by deactivating the auto-scroll function temporarily. Only when you
deselect the notes (for example, by clicking in the background of the Note Editor) and restart the
playback does the display resume its pursuit of the playback cursor.
Similarly, if you move the horizontal scroller so far during playback that the playback cursor actually
disappears from the screen, automatic scrolling will be deactivated. Stopping and restarting in this
case will reactivate the auto-scroll function.
If automatic scrolling has temporarily been deactivated, the auto-scroll icon in the bottom right-hand
corner of the Note Editor takes the form shown here.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
47
Melodyne 4 studio
Playback functions in Melodyne Stand-Alone and the plug-in (when the DAW is stopped)
Click in the Time Ruler to position the playback cursor.
Double-click in the Time Ruler to start playback from that position.
[Alt]+double-click anywhere in the Time Ruler to play back the current selection.
With most DAWs, pressing the space bar stops the local plug-in playback.
Use the arrow keys to select and play the next/previous blob or the blob above/below.
Click in the Time Ruler to stop the playback and position the playback cursor.
Click and drag in the Time Ruler to scrub.
Playback functions in the stand-alone implementation only:
[Space bar]: Alternates between playback and pause.
[Alt]+[space bar]: Play back the current selection.
[Enter] (numeric keypad) with playback stopped: Commence playback from the current position
of the playback cursor.
[Enter] (numeric keypad) during playback – once: Recommence playback from the most recent
start position.
[Enter] (numeric keypad) during playback – twice: Recommence playback from the beginning
of the cycle range (if Cycle Mode is active) – otherwise from the start of the project.
[Enter] (numeric keypad) during playback – three times: Recommence playback from the start
of the project.
[Zero] (numeric keypad) – once: Stops the playback and returns the cursor to the most recent
start position.
[Zero] (numeric keypad) – twice: Returns the cursor to the beginning of the cycle range if
active, otherwise to the beginning of the file. If cycle mode is active, a third click returns the
cursor to the start of the file.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
48
Melodyne 4 studio
Navigation and zoom functions
To resize the window (also in Plugin), drag the bottom right corner
Hold down the [Command]+[Shift] keys and drag the editing background of the Note Editor to
move the area displayed
Use the mouse wheel to scroll up and down or else (holding the [Shift] key) left and right
A two-finger swipe on the trackpad can be used to scroll the display
A two-finger pinch on the trackpad can be used to zoom the display.
[Command]+[Alt]+drag in the Note Editor serves to zoom the display horizontally and/or
vertically
Drag vertically in the Time Ruler to zoom in on the area indicated
Press [Command]+[Alt] and use the mouse wheel to zoom both axes simultaneously
Press [Command] and double-click to zoom in on a blob or the current selection of blobs
[Command]+double-click in the editing background to restore the previous zoom setting
Drag the scrollers to move the display horizontally or vertically
Drag the ends of the scroller to zoom the display horizontally or vertically
Pull the left- or right-hand ends of the horizontal slider as far as they will go to increase the
length of the section displayed (important in the plug-in e.g. when you have only transferred the
first four bars and are able to navigate only in this area but wish to insert something at bar 20)
Double-click the scrollers to zoom in or out horizontally or vertically until all notes are displayed
The slider in the bottom right-hand corner governs the height of the blobs
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
49
Melodyne 4 studio
Cycle mode
In Melodyne’s cycle mode, a selected passage is repeated endlessly. With the plug-in implementation
of Melodyne, you can only activate cycle mode when the DAW is stopped. If the DAW is running, any
cycling – like the playback itself – is controlled by it.
Cycle mode in the track pane and Note Editor
In the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne studio, you can activate cycle mode from either the
track pane or the Note Editor. A single cycle range is defined for both panes, so it makes no difference
from which pane the range is defined or modified and cycle mode activated or deactivated.
Defining the cycle range
To define a cycle range, click and drag in the lower part of the Time Ruler. If, as you do so, you hold
down the [Alt] key, the Time Grid will be ignored, allowing you to position the start and end points
(which we call the “cycle locators”) freely.
Switching cycle mode on and off
Double-click on the cycle range in the narrow strip immediately below the Time Ruler to toggle cycle
mode on and off. When cycle mode is active, the cycle range is shown in dark grey
In the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, you can also switch cycle mode on and off from the
transport bar.
It is also possible by choosing File > Preferences > Shortcuts to define a keyboard shortcut for
toggling cycle mode on and off.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
50
Melodyne 4 studio
Changing the length of, and moving, the cycle range
Drag the right- or left-hand locators to alter the length of the cycle range. If, as you do so, you hold
down the [Alt] key, the Time Grid will be ignored, allowing you to position the locators freely.
Drag the middle of the cycle range to move it ‘en bloc’ to the left or right. If, as you do so, you hold
down the [Alt] key, the Time Grid will be ignored.
If you [Shift]+click near either of the cycle locators, it will move to the designated position. If, as you do
so, you hold down the [Alt] key, the Time Grid will be ignored.
Defining the cycle range using a blob selection
To move the cycle locators to the beginning and end of the current blob selection (snapping to the
grid) hold the [Shift] key and double-click anywhere in the cycle range. If you hold the [Alt] key as well
as the [Shift] key as you do this, instead of snapping to the grid, the locators will be placed at the
beginning of the first, and end of the last, blob in the selection.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
51
Melodyne 4 studio
Selecting notes
In this tour, you will learn which techniques you can use to select notes in Melodyne prior to editing
them.
Standard selection techniques
Click a note in the Note Editor to select it. Selected notes are more boldly colored.
[Command]-click additional notes to add them to the selection.
[Command]-clicking a selected note removes it from the selection.
Another way of selecting multiple blobs is to lasso them by clicking the background in one corner of
the desired selection and then dragging the pointer to the corner diagonally opposite. This is
sometimes called rubber-banding. If you hold down the [Command] key, you can add a further
rubber-band selection to the existing one. You can also add individual notes to the selection (or
remove them from it) by [Command]-clicking.
To select a passage (i.e. a series of notes), click the first note of the series and then [Shift]-click the
last (or vice versa).
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
52
Melodyne 4 studio
Snake selection
If you press the [Shift] key, click a note and then move the mouse pointer away, Melodyne’s snake
selection mode is activated. You can now add notes to the selection by painting over them with the
snake.
If you move the mouse (and thereby the snake) backwards again, you can remove notes previously
painted over from the selection.
Selection using the Pitch Ruler
Click a note in the Pitch Ruler to select notes of the corresponding pitch.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
53
Melodyne 4 studio
If cycle mode is active, the selection only affects such notes if they lie within the cycle range.
By [Command]-clicking other notes in the Pitch Ruler, you can add them to the selection and later
remove them by the same means.
If you double-click, as opposed to single-clicking, a note in the Pitch Ruler, you will select the same
note in all octaves rather than simply that single instance of the note.
Click and drag in the Pitch Ruler to select a range of notes.
By using the [Command] key in the Pitch Ruler, you can remove from the selection a range of notes or
individual notes. Here too, if a cycle is active, only notes within the cycle range will be selected.
Selection commands in the menu
In the Edit menu and the context menu of the Note Editor, you will find the command Select All and
the Select Special sub-menu, which contains a number of more sophisticated options.
The command Restore Last Selection reverses the last selection step, thereby restoring the selection
that was active beforehand. This is useful if you are in the process of performing a complex selection
and accidentally shoot astray, causing the selection to disappear. By clicking Restore Last Selection,
you can retrieve it.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
54
Melodyne 4 studio
The command Invert Note Selection deselects all selected notes and selects all notes that were
previously not selected. The commands that follow are similarly self-explanatory, allowing you to
select all the notes that follow, all notes of the same pitch, all notes of the same pitch in all octaves,
and so on.
The command Select Fifths Above and Below in All Octaves selects tones a fifth above and below the
selected tones in all octaves. All the Select commands in the second subdivision of the menu operate
on the cycle zone only if cycle mode is active.
The two commands that follow, Select Same Beat in All Bars and Select Notes Between Locators, are
also self-explanatory.
The last command in the list, Rotate and Select Hidden Notes is designed to help out when you have
notes that overlap or completely cover others. It does so by switching the display from layer to layer,
selecting at each successive layer the newly revealed note, so that you can see it more easily and
drag it.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
55
Melodyne 4 studio
Correct Pitch Macro
The Correct Pitch Macro is used to rectify poor intonation quickly and intelligently and rein in any
undue wavering in pitch.
Opening and using the macro
Select the notes you wish to edit. If no notes are selected, macro editing will by default affect all notes.
To open the macro, choose Edit > Quantization Macros > Correct Pitch or click on this button at the
top of the Note Editor.
Here, with the upper slider, you can apply a degree of correction ranging in intensity from 0% (no
influence) to 100% (full power) to the pitch center of the notes selected. By default, such notes are
moved towards, or to, the nearest semitone, but if you check the option “Snap to (the selected scale)”,
notes foreign to the scale will be ignored as possible destinations, and, depending upon the position of
the slider, notes will move a certain distance towards, or all the way to, the nearest degree of the scale
in question.
A word of caution here: notes often fluctuate slightly in pitch, so their position is based on a mean
pitch that Melodyne has to calculate. This mean pitch, or “pitch center”, forms the basis for pitch
correction. If a note wavers slightly in pitch, it cannot be guaranteed that, after 100% correction has
been applied to it, it will sound right at the new pitch – especially since the correct pitch of any given
note is not a constant but depends upon the musical context.
The macro works in a musically intelligent manner: At lower settings it affects only those notes that are
wildly out of tune, leaving untouched those that are already quite close to the intended pitch. As the
slider is moved further towards the right, however, even those notes are influenced, and to an
increasing degree, until at 100% all the selected notes are exactly in tune.
The pitch center, which the macro adjusts automatically, is the same parameter that is modified when
pitch correction is performed manually using the Pitch Tool.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
56
Melodyne 4 studio
With the lower slider, you can progressively reduce the amount of pitch drift exhibited by the notes in
question. By “pitch drift”, we mean the kind of slow wavering in pitch that is symptomatic of poor
technique. More rapid fluctuations in pitch, such as pitch modulation or vibrato, remain unaffected.
You can modify both correction parameters in real time as the audio plays back; and hear, but also
see (by the movement of the blobs in the Note Editor, the effect of different settings.
If you have already fine-tuned some notes using the Pitch Tool, Melodyne will assume you
are satisfied with the results; this means that, by default, if you now open the Correct Pitch Macro with
no notes selected and begin making changes, only the other notes will be affected. By default, in other
words, notes that have been tuned manually are not affected by the macro. If you wish the pitch of
these too to be affected by the macro, check ‘Include notes fine-tuned manually’. The option is grayed
out, of course, as being of no relevance, if no manual editing of intonation has been performed.
Closing the macro and correction values when it is reopened
Exit with OK to keep your changes or Cancel to discard them. Naturally the fact that you have used
the Correct Pitch Macro in no way precludes your fine-tuning notes at any time subsequently by hand.
If you select a note that has already been edited using the macro and then open the macro again, the
settings previously applied to it will be displayed; the macro remembers, in other words, the
parameters previously applied to each note. If the current selection includes notes to which different
settings have been applied, when it is opened the minimum and maximum values for each parameter
will be displayed.
Even after exiting with OK, you can still reverse the effects of the macro editing by using the undo
function.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
57
Melodyne 4 studio
Quantize Time Macro
In this tour, you will learn how to work with the Quantize Time Macro, which makes it possible to
correct the timing of notes swiftly and effortlessly.
Quantizing timing: What is moved and where to?
Before examining the operation of the Quantize Time Macro, we should clarify a few basic concepts
and relationships.
To understand these better, let’s begin by selecting the Time Tool. When this is active, a note
separation (indicated by a vertical dash) or the musical starting point of the note (indicated by a
vertical dash with a triangle) appears near the start of each blob.
Now check Show Intended Notes in the Options > Note Editor sub-menu, which can also be accessed
via the cog icon in the top right-hand corner of the Note Editor.
Gray boxes now enclose each blob.
When it first analyzes the material, Melodyne calculates for each note two parameters of relevance to
the process of time correction.
The first is the intended musical beat of the note; this is indicated by the start of the gray frame
enclosing the blob. As you can see, the start of the frame invariably coincides with a grid line.
The second is the the beginning or musical starting point of the note, represented, respectively, by a
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
58
Melodyne 4 studio
note separation or a vertical dash with a triangle. This will not necessarily be aligned with the left-hand
extremity of the blob. Think of a brass instrument, for example, where each actual note is often
heralded by a certain amount of wind noise. Admittedly this noise belongs to the note, but from the
standpoint of timing what is of relevance is the moment the sound really unfolds and the pitch first
becomes discernible; that is the timing-critical moment.
It may not always be possible to determine when this occurs, in which case only the beginning of the
note will be marked. (Starting points can be edited in Note Assignment Mode).
If you quantize notes with the Quantize Time Macro, the musical starting point of each note (if one has
been determined; if not, the beginning of the note] will move towards the left-hand side of its gray
frame. The quantization intensity slider determines whether it goes all of the way, or only part of the
way, to the beat assigned it.
A note about time quantization in polyphonic audio material: With polyphonic material, as well as
anchors with triangles, there are anchors without them. Notes the anchors of which have no triangle
are in a temporal relationship with another note with a triangle and are therefore treated differently
during quantization. If you play a C on the piano and immediately afterwards an E, the C can also
contain starting transients belonging to the E. The C here gets a marker with a triangle; the E, one
without. To move these two notes for no good reason by different amounts during quantization might
not make much sense musically and could even produce tonal artifacts.
The following rules therefore apply: If during quantization both notes are selected, the note with the
triangle and that without it will move towards the marker by exactly the same amount. There is here, in
other words, a master-slave relationship. If you have only selected the note with the triangle marker,
only this will be quantized. If you have only selected the note without the triangle marker, no
quantization will take place. The same goes for a multiple selection. Naturally, you can move all and
any of the notes manually if you are not satisfied with the way they sound together.
In the case of chords, it is the selection that determines the quantization behavior: If the Notes of the
chord are selected individually, one after the other, and quantized, they behave as described above,
moving individually towards the grid lines. In this way, for instance, you can ensure that the notes of a
strummed chord on the guitar (which sound in quick succession) end up sounding simultaneously – an
effect impossible technically for a player to realize but one that might be musically desirable.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
59
Melodyne 4 studio
If, on the other, prior to quantization, you select all the notes of the chord, each will travel the same
distance. The internal timing of the chord – in our guitar example, the intervals of time separating the
start of successive notes, and therefore the authenticity of the effect – will be preserved. The chord,
after quantization, will sound exactly as it did before; the difference being, of course, that it will no
longer sound ‘too soon’ or ‘too late’.
The value by which all the notes are moved forward or backwards in time is determined by the note
lying closest to the mathematical mean between the first and last note of the chord. In the case of a
six-string guitar chord, this is generally the note sounding on the third or fourth string. If you want the
sounding of some other string to coincide with the grid line, of course, you can always give the whole
chord a little shove.
Opening the Quantize Time Macro and setting the parameters
Select the notes you wish to edit. If no notes are selected, macro editing will by default affect all
notes.
To open the Quantize Time Macro, choose Edit > Quantization Macros > Quantize Time or click the
Quantize Time icon (illustrated here) to the right of the toolbar in the Note Editor.
First, the Groove Reference (if any) that will govern the time correction must be selected.
If Auto is selected, the target (or ultimate destination) of any quantization will be the left-hand edge of
the gray frame, as already described. This is invariably aligned with the grid line that represents the
beat to which Melodyne, in the course of its analysis, assigned the note. (On the whole, the system
functions very well; but it can happen that Melodyne gets it wrong, and that after
quantization you have to move the note manually to the preceding or following beat.) By selecting
Auto, in other words, you are telling the Quantize Time Macro to move notes to (or towards) the beats
assigned them by Melodyne based on its own analysis of the material.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
60
Melodyne 4 studio
If you choose Track, you can use another track or instance of Melodyne Plugin as a quantization
reference. Select the desired track or instance in the flip menu above the buttons. The notes of the
selected track will then supply the grid to which the notes or the track currently being edited will be
quantized.
With the other buttons, you can select the target grid for the quantization. The ‘T’ next to the note
values stands for the corresponding triplet. If you select 1/4 as the Groove Reference, to give one
example, the grey frames will move to the nearest quarter-note (or ‘crotchet’) and this will then
become the ultimate destination for any quantization.
Note that the time correction macro works differently from, and in a more musical fashion than, the
quantization typically offered by MIDI sequencers. Instead of simply causing all notes to snap to the
selected grid, it edits the points of rhythmic emphasis of the selected notes. If, for example, you take a
passage containing successions of sixteenth notes (semiquavers) and quantize it to quarter
notes(crotchets), the beginning of each succession of sixteenth notes will be moved to the nearest
quarter note. The timing of the semiquavers within the sequence, however, remains unaltered. If you
wish to tidy that up as well, you can do so in a second pass, taking each semiquaver sequence in turn
and using sixteenth notes as the quantization factor.
The Intensity slider determines what percentage of the distance to this ultimate destination the notes
will travel in the course of quantization. If you select 0%, for example, they’ll not budge; 50%, and they
’ll go half way; 100%, and they’ll travel the full distance, ending up precisely on the beat. You can
modify both the Groove Reference and the Intensity of the quantization in real time as the audio plays
back; and hear, but also see (from the movement of the blobs in the Note Editor), the effect of different
settings.
If you have already finely adjusted the position of notes using the Timing Tool, Melodyne will assume
you are satisfied with the results; this means that, by default, if you now open the Quantize Time
Macro with no notes selected and begin making changes, all notes will be affected except these. If
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
61
Melodyne 4 studio
you wish the position of these too to be affected by the macro, check ‘Include notes fine-tuned
manually’. The option is grayed out, of course, as being of no relevance, if no manual editing of note
positions has been performed.
Closing the macro and correction values on reopening
Exit with OK to keep your changes or Cancel to discard them. Naturally, the fact that you have used
the Quantize Time Macro in no way precludes your moving notes at any time subsequently by hand.
If you select a note that has already been edited using the macro and then open the macro again, the
settings previously applied to it will be displayed; the macro remembers, in other words, the
parameters previously applied to each note. If the current selection includes notes to which different
settings have been applied, a mean value for each parameter will be displayed.
Even after exiting with OK, you can still reverse the effects of the macro editing by using the undo
function.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
62
Melodyne 4 studio
The Time Grid
The Time Grid slices up the time axis at regular intervals to provide a clearer temporal overview. It can
also have the function, however, of causing content as it is moved to snap to the nearest grid line,
thereby making it easier to position notes exactly on the beat. For the spacing of the grid (i.e. the
distance between adjacent grid lines), you can choose between Seconds and any of a variety of note
values (half note, quarter note etc.).
Activating and setting the Time Grid
There is a time axis and a Time Grid in both the track pane and the Note Editor. In the track pane, the
grid affects the moving and insertion of track content by drag and drop, whereas in the Note Editor, it
is the movement and dragging and dropping of notes that is affected.
In both panes, it is possible to alter the spacing of the Time Grid. Since the two grids, however, are
linked and at all times identical, it does not matter which you select in order to adjust the grid width.
The sole reason for the grid appearing in both panes is to ensure it remains accessible when either
pane is hidden.
To adjust the Time Grid, either choose Options > Time Grid from the main menu or click the note icon
(at the top right of the Note Editor) to open the pop-up menu shown here.
Clicking on the note icon activates or deactivates the grid; you can also define a keyboard shortcut for
this command from the Shortcuts page of the Preferences dialog. If you click the note value or the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
63
Melodyne 4 studio
arrow alongside it and hold down the mouse button, the grid menu pops up.
This allows you to the set the interval between grid lines to any of a variety of regular or triplet note
values or else to Seconds.
The time axis is then graduated at intervals equivalent to the note value selected. If you have chosen
a small note value (such as 1/16) and then zoom the display outwards, at a certain point it will become
impossible to display all the grid lines; the grid value selected, however, will remain active.
Moving notes when the grid is active
When the Time Grid is active and Seconds is not checked, notes moved from one beat to another will
end up the same distance from the new beat as they were from the old one. In other words, whilst the
grid does influence their position, they don’t snap exactly to the nearest grid line unless they were on a
grid line to begin with. The note depicted below, for example, sounds slightly after the first beat of the
bar.
If, while the grid is active, this is moved to the second beat, there, too, it will sound slightly after the
beat – the offset in the two cases being identical.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
64
Melodyne 4 studio
Even if the grid is active, you can still adjust the position of a note (or a selection of notes)
independently of the grid by holding down the [Alt] key as you move it.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
65
Melodyne 4 studio
Pitch Grid and scales
You can shift the pitch of notes in Melodyne either continuously or in discrete steps using the grid.
When the grid is active, notes can only be moved to such pitches as the grid allows. The grid in such
cases can correspond to either the chromatic or some other scale.
The functions of the Pitch Ruler and access to the Pitch Grid
Melodyne offers you a wide choice of scales and a comprehensive set of functions for the editing and
creation of scales that even extends to the ability using the Scale Detective to detect the scale used in
one recording and apply it to another.
All these functions and options are reached via the Pitch Ruler to the left of the Note Editor. They are
organized in such a way that you only ever see the parameters you actually need for the task in hand.
Think of a drawer that can either be pulled slightly open or else opened to its maximum extent. In this
tour, we are concerned with the selection and use of scales, so we will pull the drawer only a third of
the way out.
You can change the options relating to the Pitch Grid either from the sub-menu of the same name
under Options in the main menu or by clicking the clef icon directly above the Pitch Ruler.
Activating the Pitch Grid and selecting display options
Single-clicking the clef icon activates or deactivates the Pitch Grid, thereby switching on and off the
snap function. When the grid is inactive, you can move notes freely in pitch – even to frequencies
falling between notes of the chromatic scale. The Pitch Ruler in this case displays, for reference only,
faint lines between the notes.
If you click the clef icon or the small arrow symbol alongside it, hold down the mouse button and drag
downwards, a drop-down menu opens displaying the snap, background and ruler options:
Snap
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
66
Melodyne 4 studio
No Snap: The grid is inactive. Notes can be moved to any pitch, whether or not it coincides with
a degree of the chromatic scale.
Chromatic Snap: Notes snap to the nearest degree of the chromatic scale and the lines on the
Pitch Ruler are more boldly displayed.
Scale Snap: In this case, based on its own analysis of the audio material, Melodyne selects
what it considers the most appropriate major or minor scale. The tonic (or ‘keynote’) thus
ascertained is highlighted in the Pitch Ruler. Naturally you can alter the scale and tonic but we
will come to that in a moment. Let’s look first at the other options in this menu.
Background
Here you can choose the appearance of the background in the Note Editor.
Piano Keyboard: the darker beams in the Note Editor represent the black notes of a piano
keyboard and the paler beams the white ones – a layout with which users of most MIDI editors
will be familiar.
Scale Notes: The lighter beams are assigned to the notes of the scale, whilst the darker beams
indicate notes foreign to it. When Scale Snap is selected, therefore, notes will invariably come
to rest on the lighter beams.
Pitch Lines: The degrees of the scale are indicated by bold lines instead of beams – with
thinner lines reserved for notes foreign to the scale. This is useful in the case of poor
intonation, as the precise pitch of each degree of the scale is clearly indicated.
Ruler
Here you can choose whether the Pitch Ruler displays the names of the notes or the degrees of the
scale.
The Scale Ruler and the Reference Pitch Ruler
To select a tonic (keynote) and a scale yourself or change other settings, open the drawer we
mentioned earlier a little wider by clicking the rightmost arrow beneath the Pitch Ruler. Two new
columns will appear to the left of it.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
67
Melodyne 4 studio
Adjusting the master tuning
The narrow column on the very left is the Reference Pitch Ruler. Drag in either direction the mark
alongside any note – A4, for example – and the Frequency Ruler appears, which you can consult as
you fine-tune the note in question and, with it, of course, all the other notes of the scale. What you are
doing here is adjusting the master tuning for the entire Pitch Grid. A tip: increase the vertical zoom
factor, as this will make it easier for you to locate the value you want.
By right-clicking any of the marks on the ruler, you can open a small context menu. This offers a
number of pointers to help you bring the Pitch Grid swiftly into line with a particular tuning:
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
68
Melodyne 4 studio
At the top, you will see the current frequency of the note selected.
Concert: bases the tuning on modern standard concert pitch (where A4 = 440 Hz).
Default: bases the tuning on the frequency currently assigned to A4 in the Preferences dialog.
Detected: bases the tuning on Melodyne’s analysis of the music being edited – the original
tuning.
Set as Default: tells Melodyne to use the current value as the default tuning for new documents
and adjusts the value in the Preferences dialog accordingly.
The various settings for A4, incidentally, can be found quickly by clicking the tuning fork icon at the top
of the Reference Pitch Ruler. By typing into the box immediately below this icon, you can assign to A4
any frequency you like.
Selecting the tonic and scale variety
The wider ruler next to the Reference Pitch Ruler is the Scale Ruler. Here you can select the ‘tonic’
(i.e. the first degree or keynote) of the scale as well as its mode or type. First click on the note you
wish to use as the tonic. The following menu opens:
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
69
Melodyne 4 studio
Related scales: in the top part of the menu, you will find a varying number of scales preceded by a “=”
sign. These are scales that correspond to the current scale but are differently named.
Please note that when you select a related scale from this menu, only the main structure of the mode
in question is adopted: the scale is simply given a new name and, if applicable, a new tonic. It can be,
however, that the exact definition of the related scale in question contains additional secondary
degrees or fine-tuning. If you wish to use these, please choose Open Scale... from the scale
drop-down menu.
The current note: in the middle of the submenu, grayed out, you will see the name of the note
you have clicked on and which you can now make the tonic.
Major / Minor: Allows you to select a major or minor scale with the note selected as tonic. To
select C Major, for example, click C in the ruler, followed by C Major from the submenu.
Open Scale... : opens Melodyne’s Scale Window, which offers access to a wide variety of
additional scales. This window will be described in the next section.
Analyzed: this offers you rapid access to two options derived from Melodyne’s analysis of the
material: the closest major or minor scales and an exact microtonal scale.
Notes Reflect Scale Changes: normally when you change the scale, Melodyne adjusts the
Pitch Grid but does not change the notes themselves unless you double-click on them first, in
which case they will snap to the grid. If, however, you wish the notes to adjust automatically to
any change of scale, select either Tuning or Tuning and Mode. Then any changes will take
effect immediately and you will hear them at once during playback.
Play Scale: plays the current scale. When this function is active, the loudspeaker icon appears
above the Scale Ruler. By clicking on this icon, you can deactivate the function without needing
to access a menu.
Apply Dynamic Just Tuning: fine-tunes the selected notes applying the principles of just
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
70
Melodyne 4 studio
intonation to ensure that pure intervals result.
Dynamic just intonation: Dynamic just intonation eliminates the slight dissonances and resulting
interference (or ‘beating’) between notes that come with equal temperament. By this means a
smoother sound can be obtained, as is demonstrated, for instance, by real orchestras. We speak of
“dynamic” just intonation because not only are the intervals pure but the pitches are also shifted
minutely to ensure that the chord member most affected by the just intonation is as near in pitch as
possible to its counterpart in equal temperament. Example: Melodyne shifts a justly tuned chord of C
major (C ± 0 ct, E – 13 ct, G +2 ct) six cents up, so that the E is not too far removed from its even
temperament counterpart. Furthermore, this fine-tuning of notes is not static but governed by the
current harmonic context. So in the time dimension, too, it is dynamic, to ensure that at each instant
optimal tuning is obtained.
Dynamic just intonation is particularly effective and pleasing to the ear in a multi-track context, as it’s
when you select notes from multiple (or all) tracks and apply just intonation to them that its benefits
are most apparent.
Tip: Initialize the key prior to the transfer/load: In the case of monophonic or polyphonic audio
material, Melodyne also recognizes the key of the music. With short melodic phrases, however, the
key chosen is often not the one intended, simply because too few notes are available for a correct
appraisal. To prevent this happening, you can set the key using the Scale Ruler of an empty instance
of the plug-in or an empty document (if using the stand-alone implementation of the program) before
the transfer or loading of an audio file. To do this, simply click on the desired keynote in the Scale
Ruler and select the desired scale from the context menu. Melodyne will then retain this initialized
value, regardless of its own subsequent analysis.
The Scale Window
Melodyne’s Scale Window offers a multitude of scales you can select, listen to, and make use of. To
access this window, choose “Open Scale” from the context menu of the Scale Ruler.
The selected scale applies to all instances of the Melodyne plug-in. In the stand-alone implementation
of Melodyne studio, it also applies to all the tracks of the current document.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
71
Melodyne 4 studio
To open the Scale Window, select Open Scale from the context menu of the Scale Ruler.
Now choose a category from the left-hand pane followed by the desired scale from the pane on the
right. Click the loudspeaker icon to the right of each entry to hear the scale selected.
If you have activated the option Notes Follow Scale Changes, during playback you will hear
immediately the effect of applying the scale selected to your audio material. The window allows you to
try out (or ‘audition’) different scales quickly and easily. If you wish to adopt the changes, exit the
window with OK; otherwise click Cancel.
From the lower pane of the window, you can select between the parameters of your existing scale and
those of the scale selected in the Scale Window.
Mode and Tuning: you can adopt either the parameters of your existing scale (on the left) or of
the scale currently selected in the Scale Window (on the right).
Tonic: you can choose between the selected tonic or the tonic from the preset.
Pitch: here you can choose between current tuning, the pitch from the preset or various
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
72
Melodyne 4 studio
standard tunings.
Stretching: here you can select whether or not stretched tuning should be applied to the scale.
External Scales Folder...: this button allows you to open a folder containing scale definitions in
Scala format (filename extension “.scl”) which will then appear as an additional category in the
Scale Window.
On the Internet, you will find at http://www.huygens-fokker.org/docs/scales.zip a collection of over
4,000 Scala files that you can copy to any part of your hard disk and audition and try out in this way
using Melodyne editor.
You can also load scale definitions created in Melodyne studio (filename extension ‘.mts’) with this
button.
Saving a scale
The Scale Window allows you to experiment swiftly and easily with a large number of scales as well
as combine elements of your existing scale with those of the presets in the Scale Window. In the
process, you are bound to hit upon interesting combinations that you will want to save and use again
later. The command “Save Scale As...” allows you to do just that: store your own scale presets so that
you can access them later in the Scale Window. For this purpose, it opens a window that looks very
like that of the Scale Window and offers you the following options.
Name: here you can enter a name for your scale.
Category: select the category under which you wish the scale to be filed. Click New Folder to
create a new category.
In the text field below, you can enter a comment to be stored along with the scale.
In the lower part of the window, you can assign names to the mode and tuning. All aspects of a
scale are invariably stored along with it. By placing ticks (checkmarks) here, however, you can
specify which aspects of the scale are considered relevant when it is opened subsequently.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
73
Melodyne 4 studio
Editing scales
In the extended scale area, which opens to the left of the Pitch Ruler, you will find the functions for the
editing of scales and creation of new scales.
Displaying the extended scale area
Click on the tuning fork icon beneath the Pitch Ruler to open the extended scale area. To the left of
the Scale and Reference Pitch Rulers, two further rulers will appear: the Mode Ruler and the Tuning
Ruler.
Editing modes
The Mode Ruler allows you to define the degrees of your scale – the mode degrees – and their use.
When you right-click on a degree in the Mode Ruler, a context menu appears, allowing you to assign
to the degree in question any of the following designations:
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
74
Melodyne 4 studio
Primary Degree: a degree always used in the scale.
Secondary Degree: a degree that can be, but is not necessarily, used in the scale.
Ascending Degree: a degree only used when ascending the scale.
Descending Degree: a degree only used when descending the scale. A simple example of a
scale in which different notes are used depending upon whether you are ascending or
descending is the melodic minor.
Non-Scale Degree: a degree made available by the tuning system but not employed by the
scale. Non-scale degrees are grayed out in the ruler.
Set as Tonic: tells Melodyne to regard the selected note as the first note (or “tonic”) of the
scale. The tonic is indicated by a black outline.
Set Mode Degree Names: allows you to choose whether the degrees of the scale are indicated
by Roman numerals, solmization or their Indian designations. After double-clicking on a
degree, however, you can type in any designation you prefer.
Lock Tuning and Mode: By placing the mouse pointer alongside the degree indicator in the
mode menu and dragging upwards or downwards, you can transpose the mode. Normally the
transposition is performed without regard to the tuning of the mode.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
75
Melodyne 4 studio
In the case of a scale exhibiting unequal temperament – one, in other words in which adjacent
degrees are separated by varying numbers of cents – a crude transposition of the mode, however,
would disturb the ratios between the various degrees of the scale. Whenever this outcome is
threatened, the “Lock Tuning and Mode” function is activated automatically so that the degrees of the
scale move en bloc and the intervals between the degrees are preserved. If you prefer, however, you
can activate or deactivate this function manually.
The text box at the top of the Mode Ruler (below the word “Mode”) allows you to assign a name to
your scale.
Editing intervals
The degrees of a scale are defined by a tuning system whereby each degree is a specific distance
from the tuning root. This distance is described as an “interval”. The tuning therefore says nothing
about the absolute pitch but simply expresses the ratios between the various degrees of the scale.
In the Tuning Ruler, you can see these intervals displayed in cents and can edit them. Just drag an
interval upwards or downwards with the mouse to alter its tuning.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
76
Melodyne 4 studio
Intervals displayed as frequency ratios
Alternatively, you can define an interval as a frequency ratio. The interval of an octave, for example, is
formed by the ratio 1:2. This is the function of the Ratio Ruler, which appears at the bottom of the
screen when you click on an interval. Melodyne displays there the frequency ratios that are most
relevant: i.e. the ones lying closest to the selected interval.
The brighter the highlighting, the closer the ratio to the selected interval. If you double-click on one of
the ratios suggested, the Ratio Ruler engages and the cent display of the interval in question is
updated to reflect your choice.
By dragging the upper half of the ruler, you can set any ratio you want. To move the entire ruler, drag
the lower half. If you check the box marked “All” in the Ratio Ruler, Melodyne will no longer preselect
ratios for you but simply display all possible ratios that approximate to the current interval.
Defining intervals
Right-clicking on any interval in the Tuning Ruler opens the following context menu:
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
77
Melodyne 4 studio
Insert Interval Above Selection: inserts an interval above the interval selected.
Remove Interval: removes the selected interval.
Insert Chromatic Intervals: supplements the existing intervals chromatically through the addition
of further intervals.
Remove Non-Scale Intervals: removes all intervals foreign to the scale.
Set as Tuning Root: makes the selected interval the point from which the intervals are
calculated.
Assigned Note Name: any new interval initially takes the name of the nearest note. Musically,
however, it may be preferable to assign the name of the note above or below it, so this entry
allows you to select an alternative name.
Round Tuning to Equal Temperament: rounds all intervals to comply with equal temperament.
Stretch Tuning: opens a window that allows you to apply stretched tuning to your scale (more
on this below).
Create New Scale Based On ...: opens a window that allows you to create from scratch a new
scale (more on this below).
Interval Display: This allows you to make the selected interval the display reference for your
tuning system, deactivate the cyclic interval display, and select between cents, hertz and
Turkish commas (=1/53 octave) as display units. These options only affect the display of the
intervals and have no effect on their tuning.
Interval Monitoring: if this option is checked, as you alter an interval you can hear the results.
The text box at the top of the Tuning Ruler (below the word “Tuning”) allows you to enter a name for
the tuning system of your scale.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
78
Melodyne 4 studio
Tip: If you hold down the Shift key and click between two intervals, you can insert a new interval at the
position of the mouse cursor. Hold down the Shift key and double-click on an existing interval to delete
it.
Creating your own scales
To create a scale from scratch, right-click on an interval in the Tuning Ruler and select “Create New
Scale Based on ...” from the context menu. A new window opens offering you the choice initially
between a cyclic and non-cyclic scale.
Cyclic Scale: If you opt for a cyclic scale, you can specify the size in cents of the cycle and the
number of degrees of which it is composed. For a scale that repeats every octave, for example,
the cycle size would be 1200 cents. Tip: you can also enter the cycle size as a ratio: e.g. “2/1”
for an octave cycle.
Non-Cyclic Scale: Enter the size of the intervals between adjacent notes and the number of
degrees above and below the selected tonic.
Scale Name: Enter the name of your scale in the text box provided.
If you exit with OK, Melodyne will generate a scale in accordance with your specifications and
this will become the new scale grid for the current document. Exit with Cancel to revert to the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
79
Melodyne 4 studio
current scale.
Working with stretch tuning
On upright and grand pianos, the higher registers are generally sharpened slightly and the lower
registers flattened; the tuning, in other words, is “stretched”. If you were now to work in Melodyne with
equal temperament, the desired stretch tuning would be lost. To avoid this, select Stretch Tuning ...
from the context menu of the Tuning Ruler and a window will open allowing you to define the stretch
curve.
By double-clicking on the graph, you can create handles with which you can drag the curve to obtain
the desired characteristic. Double-click on a handle to remove it.
Standard Stretching: if you click this button, Melodyne will generate a typical stretch curve,
which you can then further adjust should you so desire.
Reset Stretching: restores the curve to its starting position.
Pitch Range: defines the maximum deviation and therefore the vertical range of the curve.
Exit with OK to implement the stretch curve you have defined or with Cancel to discard your
changes.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
80
Melodyne 4 studio
Identifying scales
The Scale Detective analyzes the intervals found in the audio material and their implications for the
mode of the scale. The result is a scale grid that reflects the music analyzed. You can edit, save and
apply the extracted scale to other material, and in this way transmit the special character of one
recording to another.
Showing the Scale Detective and adjusting its sensitivity
Click on the leftmost of the three icons beneath the Pitch Ruler. The “drawer” to the left of the Pitch
Ruler is now fully open.
A new column headed “Detective” appears at the extreme left of the screen displaying the results of
the analysis. The “mountains” lying on their sides in the Scale Detective represent the intervals
detected: the higher the mountain, the more importance is attached by Melodyne to the role of the
interval in question in the mode of the scale.
The slider at the top of the Scale Detective governs the sensitivity of the analysis and, with it, the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
81
Melodyne 4 studio
number of intervals detected and displayed. The intervals displayed should correspond as closely as
possible to the intervals actually played. Adjust the sensitivity until only as many intervals are
displayed as the scale in your view contains.
The analysis will take into consideration only the notes selected, unless no notes are selected, in
which case all will be considered.
Scale detection options
A right-click in the Scale Detective opens the following context menu:
Reanalyze Scale: This command requires the Scale Detective to conduct a fresh analysis of
the scale. The analysis will take into consideration only the notes selected, unless no notes are
selected, in which case all will be considered.
Apply Analysis: If this option is selected, the results of the analysis will invariably be applied
directly to the current scale grid.
Analysis Inserts Chromatic Intervals: If this option is selected, the intervals analyzed are
supplemented chromatically by others, which are then regarded as intervals foreign to the scale
(or “non-scale degrees”).
Keep ... as Tonic: If you click and drag the Scale Detective vertically, you can alter the tonic
upon which the analysis of the audio material is based. When you do so, this option is selected
automatically. The next analysis will then be based upon the tonic you have selected rather
than the one indicated by Melodyne’s current analysis of the material.
Scale Cycle: opens a dialog box that allows you to choose between a cyclic or non-cyclic
analysis.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
82
Melodyne 4 studio
Cyclic Scale: selects a cyclical scale analysis. You can enter the size of the cycle in cents or as
a ratio: e.g. “2/1” for a scale that repeats every octave.
Non-Cyclic Scale: selects a non-cyclic scale analysis the upper and lower limits of which in
hertz (Hz) you are free to choose. The analysis will then consider only notes lying within the
range specified.
When you exit the Scale Cycle dialog with OK, a fresh analysis of the material will be
conducted at once, based upon your new settings. If, on the other hand, you select Cancel,
Melodyne will revert to the existing analysis.
Applying the detected scale.
To apply the detected scale to the current scale grid, check the option Apply Analysis in the context
menu of the Scale Detective. You can then edit, save and apply to other material your new scale just
like any other.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
83
Melodyne 4 studio
Main Tool
Melodyne’s Main Tool is context-sensitive, its exact function at any given moment depending upon its
position relative to the selected blob. It has no unique functions but simply offers a different mode of
access to functions it shares with the more specialized tools for editing pitch, timing and note
separations, combining them in such a way that you can perform the most essential editing tasks
without ever having to change tools.
Modifying the pitch and timing of notes
Select the Main Tool (denoted by an arrow) from either the toolbox or the context menu of the Note
Editor or by pressing the [F1] key of your computer keyboard. (If you wish to assign a different
shortcut to this tool, you may do so after choosing Melodyne > Preferences > Shortcuts > Editing
Tools from the main menu.)
With the Main Tool, move the arrow to a point near the center of a blob and press and hold the mouse
button as you drag it upwards or downwards (to alter its pitch) or left or right (to move it forwards or
backwards in time). It is the initial movement (whether vertical or horizontal) that decides whether the
pitch or timing of the note is altered. Before changing axis, you must first release the note. If you hold
down the [Alt] key as you drag the note, the Pitch Grid or Time Grid, even if active, will temporarily be
ignored, allowing you to position the note exactly where you want it.
While you are dragging a note up or down, you will hear the frozen sound of the note at the point
where you clicked. If, whilst dragging, you move the mouse to the right or left, you can put other parts
of the note under the acoustic microscope. If you do not wish to monitor pitch changes in this way,
uncheck the option Monitor When Editing Blobs in the Options > Note Editor sub-menu, which can
also be accessed via the cog icon in the top right-hand corner of the Note Editor.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
84
Melodyne 4 studio
Modifying note lengths
Open the Note Editor Options menu and check Show Blob Info. Zoom in on a few individual blobs, so
that you can study them more closely. Now, as you move the mouse pointer over a blob, thin lines
appear indicating the zones in which the Main Tool performs particular functions. For illustrative
purposes, the lines here have been drawn more boldly than in the program itself. The central area you
already know about. This has to be distinguished from the front, back and upper regions of the blob.
As you move the mouse pointer from one of these regions to another, it changes its appearance to
emulate whichever of the more specialized tools is most appropriate to that zone – adopting its
functions at the same time.
Drag the front part of a note to the right or left. Hold down the [Alt] key as you do so if you wish to
override an active time grid. Now only the beginning of the note moves; the end remains anchored, so
the note is either being stretched or compressed.
In the same way, you can move only the rightmost part of the blob (corresponding to the end of the
note).
Notice that as you move the beginning or end of a note in this way, the preceding or following note, if
adjacent, is also either stretched or compressed by the same amount to avoid either the two notes
overlapping or white space (silence) appearing between them. This type of relationship exists
whenever a pitch transition between consecutive notes has been detected. By moving the adjacent
note as well, Melodyne ensures that discontinuities are avoided and the musicality of the phrasing is
preserved.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
85
Melodyne 4 studio
If this behavior is not what you want, you can change the ‘soft’ separation between the notes into a
‘hard’ one using the Separation Type Tool. Instead of the separation line, a bracket will then appear
between the two notes to indicate that no further connection exists between them. You will find the
Separation Type Tool beneath the Note Separation Tool in the toolbar.
Editing note separations
If you move the mouse pointer to the upper part of a note (above the horizontal line), the Main Tool
adopts the appearance, and emulates the functions, of the Note Separation Tool. If you double-click
now, you can create a note separation – i.e. slice the note in two.
Don’t be surprised if the two notes that result move apart in pitch: this is because a new tonal center is
calculated for each of the newly created notes, and that may differ from the tonal center they shared
when they were one note. In such cases, each therefore moves to a new vertical position based on its
newly calculated pitch center.
You can move an existing note separation horizontally with the Note Separation Tool. Before you
begin, choose Options > Note Editor Options and check Show Note Separations.
You can double-click a note separation to remove it.
If you select several notes and move a note separation, the note separations of the other selected
notes will also be moved. If you double-click one of the note separations to remove it, those of the
other selected notes will also be removed.
If you have selected several notes that overlap, you can simultaneously insert a note separation at the
same point in all of them, as well as move or remove one.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
86
Melodyne 4 studio
Pitch Tool
The Pitch Tool edits the central emphasis of the pitch of each note. This is the ‘pitch center’ note
parameter that can also be edited using Melodyne’s Main Tool.
Shifting the pitch center
Select the Pitch Tool from either the toolbox or the context menu of the Note Editor or by pressing the
[F2] key of your computer keyboard. (If you wish to assign a different shortcut to this tool, you may do
so after choosing Melodyne > Preferences > Shortcuts > Editing Tools from the main menu.)
The Pitch Tool is the topmost of the three pitch editing tools. It is responsible for the pitch center of
each note, which can be thought of as its center of gravity. Melodyne allows you to edit the pitch
center of notes independently of any modulation or drifting in pitch they exhibit. Press the [F2] key
twice and three times in quick succession to select, respectively, the first and second sub-tools of the
Pitch Tool. From the Preferences dialog, you can also, if you wish, define separate keyboard shortcuts
for all three tools.
Drag a note up or down with the Pitch Tool to alter its pitch. If the note is one of several selected, all
the notes in the selection will move up or down en bloc.
Depending upon whether No Snap, Chromatic Snap or Scale Snap is selected, notes can either be
moved freely or will snap to the nearest semitone or note of the selected scale.
Hold down the [Alt] key as you move notes if you wish the selected grid to be ignored; this will allow
you to position the note freely.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
87
Melodyne 4 studio
Monitoring pitch shifts
As you move a note in pitch, you will hear the ‘frozen’ sound of the note at the position clicked. By
moving the mouse to the left or right whilst doing so, you can put other parts of the note under the
acoustic microscope. If you do not wish to monitor pitch changes in this way, uncheck the option
Monitor When Editing Blobs in the Options > Note Editor sub-menu, which can also be accessed via
the cog icon in the top right-hand corner of the Note Editor.
If several notes sound simultaneously at that point, you can hear not only the note being moved but
also its harmonic context, which is very useful if, for example, you wish to construct chords. To do this,
press and hold the [Command] key once you have begun to move the note and you will hear the
frozen sound of all the notes of the chord at the position in question.
Editing pitch with the inspectors
As an alternative to editing the selected notes with the Pitch Tool, you can enter the desired value for
the note and the deviation in cents from equal temperament in the inspector near the toolbar or the
Note Inspector. The Note Inspector also allows you to determine the frequency in hertz of the note or
notes selected. In each case you can increase or decrease the current value by clicking in the relevant
box and dragging the arrow upwards or downwards.
When typing values into the Pitch field, you can enter either absolute values (C3, D4 etc.) or relative
ones (+2, -1, etc.).
If you have selected several notes that differ in pitch, three hyphens are displayed in the boxes –
followed, as you click in the box and drag, by values describing the extent of the relative change.
Correcting pitch with a double click
You can see that a note is sharp or flat from the fact that it doesn’t lie plumb in the middle of any of the
horizontal lanes in the editing display. These represent the notes of the chromatic scale, the note in
question, in each case, being indicated by the vertical Pitch Ruler to the left of the Note Editor. If, with
the Pitch Tool selected, you now double-click the offending note, it – and any other notes selected at
the same time – will ‘snap to the grid’, which means each will move instantly to the very center of the
lane representing the semitone nearest to it in pitch.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
88
Melodyne 4 studio
A word of caution here: notes often fluctuate slightly in pitch, so their position is based on a mean
pitch that Melodyne has to calculate. This value, which we call their pitch center, forms the basis for
any pitch quantization. If a note fluctuates slightly in pitch, it cannot be guaranteed that after snapping
directly to the nearest semitone during quantization it will sound ‘right’ at the new pitch – especially
since ‘correct pitch’ is not an absolute, but something that depends at all times upon the musical
context.
Pitch transitions
When one note follows another and a tonal relationship between the pair has been detected, the pitch
curve is drawn through them, and in the area between them a thick orange line is displayed that
represents the pitch transition.
If you position the Pitch Tool over the rear part of a note, click and drag vertically, you can make the
pitch transition steeper or less steep.
Pitch transitions only exist between adjacent notes between which there is a soft separation. By
clicking on a soft separation with the Separation Type Tool (the sub-tool of the Note Separation Tool),
you can transform it into a hard separation, thereby deactivating all association between the two notes
and with it the pitch transition.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
89
Melodyne 4 studio
Resetting individual edits and introducing random deviations
In the Edit > Reset Individual Edits > Pitch cascading menu, you will find a variety of commands that
can be used to reverse the effects of particular types of pitch editing, thereby restoring specific
aspects of the notes selected to their original state. The commands apply only to the current selection
and are grayed out whenever no editing of the type in question has yet been applied to the notes
concerned. Note that these commands operate entirely independently of the normal undo function!
With the commands in the Edit > Add Random Deviations sub-menu, you can randomly alter the pitch
of the notes currently selected – introducing either slight, moderate or drastic deviations from the
original intonation. You can also employ the commands several times in succession to intensify the
effect. These commands are useful when, for example, you’ve doubled a track in order to obtain a
fuller or ‘fatter’ sound. By introducing random deviations, so that the copy is no longer identical to the
original, you can simulate more realistically the effect of two performers playing or singing in unison.
All these commands affect only the selected notes and are therefore grayed out if no notes are
selected.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
90
Melodyne 4 studio
Pitch modulation and drift
The term ‘pitch modulation’ covers rapid and usually intentional variations in pitch such as trills or
vibrato. ‘Pitch drift’ is our term for slow fluctuations in pitch of the kind that are usually unintentional
and symptomatic of poor technique. You will find the tools for editing these parameters beneath the
Pitch Tool in the toolbar.
Editing pitch modulation and drift
Select the Pitch Modulation or the Pitch Drift Tool from either the toolbox or the context menu of the
Note Editor or by pressing the [F2] key of your computer keyboard.
The Pitch Modulation Tool is the first, and the Pitch Drift Tool the second, sub-tool of the Pitch Tool.
Press the [F2] key twice in quick succession to select the former and three times in quick succession
for the latter. (If you wish to assign a different shortcut to this tool, you may do so after choosing
Melodyne > Preferences > Shortcuts > Editing Tools from the main menu.) There, if you wish, you can
also define separate keyboard shortcuts for all three tools.
With the tool selected, click on a note and – without releasing the mouse button – drag up or down.
The note edited could be part of a multiple selection, in which case you will be editing all the selected
notes simultaneously. Watch as the pitch curve changes shape.
Drag far enough downwards and the modulation or drift are reduced to zero and then inverted.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
91
Melodyne 4 studio
If you double-click a note with the Pitch Modulation Tool or the Pitch Drift Tool, you will restore the
pitch modulation or drift of the original recording, assuming you’ve changed it, otherwise eliminate it
altogether. Subsequent double-clicking toggles between the original modulation or drift and none. If
you eliminate altogether both the modulation and the drift, you will get an unnaturally flat monotone
that can be suitable for effects.
The inspector for pitch modulation and drift
As an alternative to editing selected notes with these tools, you can enter the desired values in the
inspector alongside the toolbar or in the Note Inspector. Drag the existing value to change it or
double-click on it and type in the value desired.
With the Pitch Modulation Tool or the Pitch Drift Tool selected, the inspector displays values in
percentage terms. 100% represents in this case the original modulation or drift, 0% a straight line, and
-100% the same curve inverted with its axis unchanged. If you have selected several notes with
different values, a dash is displayed in the box – followed, as you click in the box and drag, by values
describing the extent of the relative change.
The Reset commands
In the Edit > Reset Individual Edits > Pitch cascading menu, you will find a variety of commands that
can be used to reverse the effects of particular types of pitch editing, thereby restoring the notes
selected in specific respects to their original state. These commands relate always to the current
selection and are grayed out if no editing of the type in question has been applied to the selected
notes. Note that these commands operate independently of the normal undo function.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
92
Melodyne 4 studio
Formant Tool
Formants are areas of emphasis or attenuation in the frequency spectrum of a sound that are
independent of the pitch of the fundamental note but are found always in the same frequency ranges.
They are characteristic of the tone color or ‘timbre’ of each sound source, and interesting effects can
be produced by shifting them, such as making a man’s voice sound like that of a woman, and vice
versa.
Shifting formants
Select the Formant Tool from either the toolbox or the context menu of the Note Editor or by pressing
the [F3] key of your computer keyboard. (If you wish to assign a different shortcut to this tool, you may
do so after choosing Melodyne > Preferences > Shortcuts > Editing Tools from the main menu.) A
beam appears over the blobs indicating the extent (if any) to which the formants have been
transposed from their original pitches.
With the tool selected, click on a note and – without releasing the mouse button – drag the mouse up
or down. As you do so, the formants will be transposed upwards or downwards, the degree and
direction of the movement being indicated by a corresponding vertical movement of the beam.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
93
Melodyne 4 studio
The beams indicate the distance in cents (100 cents = 1 semitone) by which the formants have been
transposed upwards or downwards. You can shift the formants a few cents (for the finest of nuances)
or several thousand (for a drastic denaturing of the sound). Double-clicking on a note with the Formant
Tool restores its formants (as well as those of any other notes selected) to their original pitches.
The inspector for the formants
As an alternative to editing selected notes with the tool, you can enter the desired values in the
inspector, which you will find alongside the toolbox or in the Note Inspector. Drag the existing value to
change it, or double-click on it and type in the value desired.
If you have selected several notes that differ in the amount of formant shifting that has been applied to
them, a dash is displayed – followed, as you click in the box and drag, by values describing the extent
of the relative change.
Formant transitions
A thick orange line appears between the formant beams of adjacent notes as soon as you shift the
formants of one note more, or in a different direction, than those of the other. This line represents the
formant transition between the two notes.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
94
Melodyne 4 studio
If you move the Formant Tool to the end of the first note, it changes into the Formant Transitions Tool.
Dragging vertically with this tool governs the speed of the formant transition, which is indicated by the
steepness of the connecting line.
Formant transitions only exist in the case of adjacent notes between which there is a soft note
separation. If you transform this into a hard note separation by double-clicking with the Note
Separation Type Tool (the sub-tool of the Note Separation Tool), all association between the notes will
be severed and the formant transition between them deactivated.
The Reset commands
In the Edit > Reset Individual Edits > Formants cascading menu, you will find a pair of commands that
can be used to reverse the effects of any shifting of formants or editing of formant transitions you may
have performed, thereby restoring the notes selected in these respects to their original state. These
commands relate always to the current selection and are grayed out if no editing of the type in
question has been applied to the selected notes. Note that these commands operate independently of
the normal undo function!
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
95
Melodyne 4 studio
Amplitude Tool
The Amplitude Tool allows you to adjust the amplitude (i.e. volume) of the selected notes, edit the
amplitude transitions between them, and mute them.
Editing amplitude
Select the Amplitude Tool from either the toolbox or the context menu of the Note Editor or by
pressing the [F4] key of your computer keyboard. (If you wish to assign a different shortcut to this tool,
you may do so after choosing Melodyne > Preferences > Shortcuts > Editing Tools from the main
menu.)
With the tool selected, click on a note (or one of several notes selected) and – without releasing the
button – drag the mouse up or down. The vertical depth of the blobs will increase or decease as the
notes they represent get louder or softer.
The gearing of the amplitude adjustment is dependent upon the vertical zoom resolution. Press and
hold the [Alt] key, to switch to smaller increments for finer adjustment.
Editing amplitude using the inspectors
As an alternative to editing selected notes with the Amplitude Tool, you can enter the desired values in
the inspector to the right of the toolbar or the Note Inspector. Drag the existing value to change it or
double-click on it and type in the value desired. Press and hold the [Alt] key, to switch to smaller
increments for finer adjustment.
If you have selected several notes to which different amplitude adjustment has been applied, a dash is
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
96
Melodyne 4 studio
displayed in the box – followed, as you click in the box and drag, by values describing the extent of the
relative change.
Amplitude transitions
A thick orange line appears between connected notes as soon as you change the amplitude of one
note more, or in a different direction, than that of the other. This line represents the amplitude
transition between the two notes. If you move the Amplitude Tool to the end of the first note, it
changes into the Amplitude Transitions Tool. Dragging vertically with this tool governs the speed of
the amplitude transition, which is indicated by the steepness of the connecting line.
Amplitude transitions only exist in the case of connected notes between which there is a soft note
separation. If you double-click on the separation with the Separation Type Tool (which you will find
beneath the Note Separation Tool in the toolbar), you turn the soft note separation into a hard one,
thereby disconnecting the two notes and deactivating the amplitude transition.
Muting notes
Double-clicking with the Amplitude Tool on one or more selected notes mutes them. Only the outline
of the blobs is now shown, to indicate that the notes in question have been muted, but you can still
select and edit them. A further double-click unmutes the muted notes.
In the Note Inspector, you will find a button marked Note Off for this function. Click once on the button
to mute the selected notes. Clicking them a second time unmutes them.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
97
Melodyne 4 studio
The reset commands
In the Edit > Reset Individual Edits > Amplitude cascading menu, you will find two commands that can
be used to reverse the effects of the two types of amplitude editing we have just described (thereby
restoring the notes selected in certain respects to their original state) as well as the Unmute
command, which is self-explanatory. These commands relate always to the current selection and are
grayed out if no editing of the type in question has been applied to the selected notes. Note that these
commands operate independently of the normal undo function.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
98
Melodyne 4 studio
Timing Tool
The Timing Tool allows you to edit the horizontal position and length of notes with or without
quantization.
Modifying the position and length of notes
Select the Time Tool from either the toolbox or the context menu of the Note Editor or by pressing the
[F5] key of your computer keyboard. Press the [F5] key twice or three times in quick succession to
select, respectively, the first or second sub-tools of the Time Tool. (If you wish to assign a different
shortcut to this tool, you may do so after choosing Melodyne > Preferences > Shortcuts > Editing
Tools from the main menu.) There, if you wish, you can also define separate keyboard shortcuts for all
three tools.
Click the center of a note (or of one of a number of selected notes) and drag it to the left or right to
move the entire note (or notes) horizontally. Press and hold the [Alt] key during the movement if you
wish the time grid to be temporarily ignored to permit finer adjustment.
If you only wish to move the beginning of a note but not the end, click on the front part of the note and
drag. Depending on the direction of movement, the note will be time-stretched or -compressed. Press
and hold the [Alt] key if you wish the Time Grid to be ignored when editing. Stretching and squeezing
also acts upon either a single note or a multiple selection of notes according to choice.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
99
Melodyne 4 studio
In the same way, you can move only the rightmost part of the blob (which corresponds to the end of
the note) or selection of blobs to stretch or squeeze the corresponding note or notes.
Timing changes in the case of connected notes
Notice that as you move the beginning or end of a note in this way, the preceding or following note, if
adjacent, is either stretched or compressed by the same amount to avoid either the two notes
overlapping or white space (silence) appearing between them. This is invariably the case when one
note follows directly on from another and there is a soft note separation between them. By moving the
adjacent note as well in this way, Melodyne prevents discontinuities occurring and preserves the
musicality of the phrasing.
You can, if you wish, deactivate the connection between consecutive notes by transforming the soft
note separation between them into a hard separation. This is done by clicking on it with the Separation
Type Tool (which is a sub-tool of the Note Separation Tool).
All connection between the two notes will also be forcibly severed if you cut one of the notes and
paste it into a different location.
In both cases, when the note separation line between the two notes is replaced by a square bracket, it
means that the notes are no longer connected.
If you move one of the two notes far enough from the other using the Timing Tool, the link between
them will also “snap”. In this case, however, if you move it back, the original link will be restored –
provided the position of the other note has not been moved in the meantime and that you have not
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
100
Melodyne 4 studio
changed tools.
Correcting timing with a double-click
If you double-click a note with the Timing Tool, it (and any other notes selected) will snap to the
selected grid – for example, to one of the subdivisions on the second ruler or one of the vertical lines
indicating the start of an eighth-note. As a result, the musical beginning of the note will come to rest
directly on top of the nearest grid line.
The musical starting point of a note is indicated by a vertical dash with an anchor at the top, and is
found somewhere near the start of the blob but not necessarily at its leftmost extreme (which we call
the ‘physical beginning’ of the note). Melodyne defines the musical starting point of the note to be the
point at which the sound has unfolded sufficiently for the pitch to become discernible, as it is this
moment that is of relevance for the purpose of quantization. Not every note, however, has a musical
starting point. If none is present, the physical beginning of the note is used as the basis of
quantization. (The musical starting point of notes can be edited in Note Assignment Mode).
For a note to snap to the nearest grid line, however, there must be sufficient room; if an adjacent note
that is connected to the edited note is in the way and cannot be squeezed enough to create the
requisite space, quantization of the note to the desired grid will be impossible. In such cases, notes
are quantized to the nearest possible value, such as the eighth-note (quaver) nearest the desired
quarter-note (crotchet).
If no grid is active, a note will be quantized to its ‘intended’ beat – i.e. to that indicated by the left side
of the grey frame enclosing it. This is the beat upon which, according to Melodyne’s analysis, it was
intended to fall.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
101
Melodyne 4 studio
Note: it is not possible to quantize to entire bars: only to fractions of bars.
In chords, it is the selection procedure that determines the quantization behavior: If the notes are
selected and quantized individually, one after the other, they will behave as described above and
move individually to or towards the grid. This could result, for example, in the notes of a chord
strummed on the guitar, which originally sounded in quick succession, sounding simultaneously – an
effect technically impossible for the performer to achieve but which might nonetheless be musically
desirable.
If, on the other hand, all the notes of the chord are selected and quantized simultaneously, each note
will then travel the same distance in time. The internal timing of the chord – in the guitar example, the
interval of time separating the sounding of successive strings – and therefore the authenticity of the
technique, will be preserved. The chord, in other words, will sound after quantization exactly as it did
before – but no longer “too early” or “too late”.
The distance in time through which all the chord members travel is determined by the note lying
closest in time to the halfway point between the sounding of the the first and last notes of the chord. In
the case of a chord strummed on a six-string guitar, this is likely to be the note played on the third or
fourth strings. You can always move the chord by hand if you would prefer the sounding of some other
string to coincide with the grid line.
Adding random deviations
With the commands in the Edit > Add Random Deviations sub-menu, you can randomly alter the
timing of the notes currently selected – introducing either slight, moderate or drastic deviations from
the original timing. You can also employ the commands several times in succession to intensify the
effect. These commands are useful when, for example, you’ve doubled a track in order to obtain a
fuller or ‘fatter’ sound. By introducing random deviations, so that the copy is no longer identical to the
original, you can simulate more realistically the effect of two performers playing or singing in unison.
All these commands affect only the selected notes and are therefore grayed out if no notes are
selected.
The reset commands
In the Edit > Reset Individual Edits > Time sub-menu, you will find a number of commands that can be
used to reverse the effects of whatever editing has been performed on the timing. These commands
apply always to the current selection and are grayed out if no editing of the type in question has been
performed on the notes selected. Note that these reset commands work quite independently of the
normal Undo command.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
102
Melodyne 4 studio
Time Handles and Attack Speed
The Time Handle Tool and the Attack Speed Tool are found below the Timing Tool in the toolbar.
Their purpose is to allow you to adjust the internal time path and envelope of notes.
How time handles and the Attack Speed Tool work
Time handles are handles you can affix to particular stages in the evolution of a note and drag
sideways in order to advance or retard their attainment. In this way, you can accelerate or slow down
particular phases of a note’s development in order to fine-tune the musical phrasing.
The Attack Speed Tool also affects the speed at which a note evolves: either by stretching and
slowing down its early development phase and thereby accelerating its later development, or vice
versa.
The result is either a slower, softer attack or a faster, harder one. The ‘perceived’ musical starting
point of the note, however, remains unchanged.
Modifying the evolution of notes using time handles
The Time Handle Tool is the first of the two sub-tools of the Time Tool. To select it, press the [F5] key
twice in quick succession. (If you wish to assign a different shortcut to this tool, you may do so after
choosing Melodyne > Preferences > Shortcuts > Editing Tools from the main menu.) There, if you
wish, you can also define separate keyboard shortcuts for all three time tools.
Zoom in on the note you wish to edit, so that you can see it clearly and position the time handles more
precisely. Now double-click the point in the note’s evolution that you wish to advance or retard. A time
handle will appear that you can move forwards or backwards in time by dragging the tool respectively
upwards or downwards. Since the overall length of the note remains unchanged, the result is to
shorten and accelerate the phase of the note’s development lying to one side of the time handle while
lengthening and slowing down the phase the other side.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
103
Melodyne 4 studio
You can attach multiple time handles to a single note, moving each one individually, thereby
influencing fine details of the note’s evolution. There is no limit to the number of time handles that can
be attached to a single note. Melodyne does, however, impose constraints as to how close to one
another the handles can be placed. If ever you find you cannot place a time handle exactly where you
want it, try a little further along.
If you select multiple time handles using the usual selection techniques, you can move them all en
bloc.
Double-clicking on a time handle or a selection of time handles removes them, thereby causing the
affected phases of the note to evolve at their original speeds.
By choosing Edit > Reset Individual Edits > Time > Remove Time Handles from the main menu, you
can remove the time handles from all the selected notes.
Changing the attack speed of notes
The Attack Speed Tool is the second sub-tool of the Time Tool. To select it, press the [F5] key three
times in quick succession. From the Preferences dialog, you can also, if you wish, define a separate
keyboard shortcut for this tool.
Please note that this tool has no function when the Universal algorithm is selected. You will notice
therefore that the corresponding blobs lack handles and that the Attack Speed field in the Note
Inspector for these blobs is grayed out.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
104
Melodyne 4 studio
If your DAW supports ARA, the rest of this tour need not concern you. Instead, search for your DAW
in the Help Center, where you’ll find details of how to take advantage of ARA with each of the various
DAWs that support it.
When you select the Attack Speed Tool, a white dot appears at the start of every note. If you now
place the tool anywhere on a note (not necessarily on the dot) and drag vertically, the dot will move up
or down.
If you move it upwards, the attack phase of the note will be compressed and play back faster, but the
rest of the note correspondingly more slowly. The note will therefore have a harder attack; its peak
amplitude will be reached more swiftly.
If you move the point downwards, the opposite will occur. The beginning of the note will be stretched –
even beyond its visible starting point – and will play back more slowly, the rest, however, increasingly
rapidly. The attack will therefore be softer. Note that the position of the musical start of the note
indicated by the orange anchor is not affected by changes in attack speed. The ‘perceived’ start of the
note is therefore independent of the attack speed. The end of the note is in all cases unaffected.
You can vary the attack speed of notes individually, in order to accentuate them. You can also,
however, select and modify the attack speeds of multiple notes simultaneously and thereby alter the
timbre of an entire phrase.
If you double-click on a note or one of a selection of notes with the Attack Speed Tool, the
corresponding parameter will return to its neutral (central) position. The same result can be achieved
by choosing Edit > Reset Individual Edits > Time > Reset Attack Speed from the main menu.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
105
Melodyne 4 studio
Combining time handles with the Attack Speed Tool
You can combine the use of time handles with that of the Attack Speed Tool. Altering the attack speed
in this case will cause the time handles to move, functioning as a kind of timing master. You can
therefore shape the evolution of the note to enhance the phrasing before adjusting the overall timing
(so that the note starts faster or more slowly) with the Attack Speed Tool.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
106
Melodyne 4 studio
Note separation tools
With the Note Separation Tool, you can cut notes as well as removing and moving note separations.
With the Separation Type Tool, you can switch between hard and soft separations.
Inserting, moving and removing note separations
Select the Note Separation Tool from either the toolbox or the context menu of the Note Editor or by
pressing the [F6] key of your computer keyboard. (If you wish to assign a different shortcut to this tool,
you may do so after choosing Melodyne > Preferences > Shortcuts > Editing Tools from the main
menu.)
By double-clicking within a note with the Note Separation Tool, you can introduce a note separation
and thereby slice the note in two.
Don’t be surprised if the resulting pair of notes move apart in pitch; this is because as soon as the
fission occurs a new tonal center is calculated for each of the newly created notes, and their
respective tonal centers may differ from the tonal center the notes shared when they were one. In
such cases, each therefore moves to a new vertical position based on its newly calculated pitch
center.
You can move an existing note separation horizontally simply by dragging it with the Note Separation
Tool.
You can double-click a note separation to remove it.
Editing note separations with multiple notes selected
If you select several notes and move a note separation, the note separations of the other selected
notes will also be moved. If you double-click one of the note separations to remove it, the note
separations of the other selected notes will also be removed.
If you have selected several notes that overlap, you can insert a note separation in the same place in
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
107
Melodyne 4 studio
all of them simultaneously as well as move or remove one.
Soft and hard note separations
Depending upon the audio material and the algorithm selected, Melodyne places either soft or hard
separations between notes. Soft separations only occur between consecutive notes and provide a link
between the notes: if the end of the first note is moved, the beginning of the second note moves along
with it, to ensure that no gap opens between them. This helps you preserve phrasing when editing.
The connection between notes also plays a role in the pitch, formant and amplitude transitions
between notes: such transitions are only possible in the case of connected notes between which a soft
separation exists.
In the case of a hard separation, consecutive notes are independent of one another. This means that
changing the length of the first note has no affect upon the position of the second. It also means there
are no pitch, formant or amplitude transitions between the two notes.
Soft separations are indicated by a thin vertical line between notes, whereas hard separations are
denoted by a bracket.
Switching between hard and soft separations with the Separation Type Tool
The Separation Type Tool is the sub-tool of the Note Separation Tool. It allows you to toggle between
hard and soft separations. To select it, press the [F6] key (assigned by default to the note separation
tools) twice in quick succession. If you would prefer to use some other key combination, choose
Preferences -> Shortcuts -> Editing Tools -> Note Separation Tools and press the keys of your choice.
If you wish, you can define separate keyboard shortcuts for each of the two tools.
Double-click on a separation with this tool in order to change its type.
Please note that it is only with certain separations that the option of switching freely between ‘soft’ and
‘hard’ exists.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
108
Melodyne 4 studio
Soft separations can always be turned into hard ones.
Hard separations, however, can only be turned into soft ones if they were soft to begin with and
their type has subsequently been changed. An exception to this rule is material detected using
the Percussive algorithm; in this case, all separations are initially hard but can be turned into
soft ones.
Separate Notes as Trills
When the Note Separation Tool is selected, you will find the command “Separate Notes as Trills” in
the Note Editor’s context menu. The effect of this is to slice a selection of one or more notes into
smaller segments determined by the instantaneous pitch of each note. This is done by inserting note
separations into the slopes of the pitch curve as it rises and falls, thereby turning each ‘hill’ and each
‘valley’ of a vibrato into a separate note.
The use of this command allows you, for example, to improve the intonation of a trill, by tuning the
notes more closely to their intended pitches, or to rein in an unruly vibrato, by applying the Correct
Pitch Macro to its upper and lower extents.
Please note that the fluctuations in the Pitch Curve must be fairly pronounced for the “Separate Notes
as Trills” function to have any effect and that it is only available when the Melodic algorithm is active,
being grayed out in every other case. If you wish to assign a shortcut to the command “Separate
Notes as Trills”, this can be done using the Preferences dialog.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
109
Melodyne 4 studio
Copying notes
To copy notes in Melodyne, first select the desired notes, then choose Copy from the Edit menu or the
context menu of the Note Editor. To insert them, use the Paste command. The following points here
need to be noted.
The selection, cursor and grid when copying
When you copy notes to the clipboard using the Copy command, you will notice that the cursor moves
to the start of the selection, or, to be more precise, to the quarter-note (crotchet) on the Time Grid
closest to the first note of the selection.
If, with the notes still selected, you use the Paste command, all that appears to happen is that the
notes that were selected prior to the paste are now no longer selected and the cursor is now located
just after the last of them.
In fact, however, the notes previously selected have been replaced by those on the clipboard. In other
words, the notes have been copied onto themselves, with the copies replacing the originals.
Admittedly, this may not sound particularly useful, but look at the position of the cursor: it is now
aligned with the quarter-note on the Time Grid closest to the last copied note.
If you now execute a further Paste, the notes on the clipboard will be pasted a second time. This time,
however, since no notes were selected, nothing will be replaced. Instead, the newly pasted notes will
end up just after those that replaced the originals the first time round.
Their position is now determined by the cursor. And since, after the first paste, this was aligned with a
quarter-note on the Time Grid (the first quarter-note after the pasted notes, to be specific), the effect of
the second paste is that the original alignment of the notes relative to the gridlines is reproduced
exactly, only further along the timeline. This behavior allows you to string together a succession of
copies of the same passage, quickly and accurately – in order, for example, to create multiple
iterations of a drum loop.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
110
Melodyne 4 studio
Based on what we have just seen, we can formulate the following rules:
If any notes are selected when the Paste command is executed, these are replaced by the
contents of the clipboard. The pasted notes are stretched or squeezed until they fit exactly the
range from the beginning of the first to the end of the last note of the selection. This is
illustrated here: on the left are the notes to be copied; in the centre, a single selected note,
which serves as the destination of the copy; on the right is the result after the paste is
performed: The selected destination note has been replaced and the pasted notes squeezed
just enough for them to fit exactly the space it occupied.
If when the Paste is executed no notes are selected, the cursor determines the point at which
the pasted passage begins. The grid settings here play an important role: when copying notes
to the clipboard, Melodyne remembers the distance between the first of the copied notes and
the nearest grid line. When the paste is repeated at the new cursor position, the offset of the
first pasted note to the gridline nearest to it will be exactly the same.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
111
Melodyne 4 studio
In other words, notes in Melodyne are not copied in such a way that they necessarily coincide with
gridlines, because then the subtleties of expression would be lost. Instead, the notes copied retain
their respective offsets to the grid. There is an exception, however, to this rule: if, instead of being
calibrated in beats, the grid is calibrated in seconds (i.e. if you have selected “Sec” from the Time Grid
Settings drop-down menu to the right of the Time Ruler), then the note (or first of a series of copied
notes) will begin exactly at the cursor position, with no offset.
After each paste, the cursor is moved to the first quarter-note following the most recent paste,
making it easy to string together multiple iterations of the same passage. Obviously, if you
wish, you can move the cursor by hand to some other point on the Time Ruler and make that,
rather than the automatically selected quarter-note, the reference point for the next paste. You
might want to do this, for instance, to introduce a pause between iterations.
The pitch of the copied notes is always the same as that of the originals. This is even true when
notes are selected, and therefore replaced, when the paste is performed. The length of the
passage selected, in this case, is retained but the original pitch of the notes it contained is not.
Of course, after performing the paste you can move the notes by hand to any pitches you like.
Tempo adjustment when copying: the Auto Stretch Switch
If notes are selected when the paste is performed, the inserted passage will be stretched or squeezed
to fill the available space (i.e. that between the beginning of the first selected note and the end of the
last) as we have already seen. But how is the tempo of the copied passage treated when the position
of the paste is determined instead by the cursor?
If the tempo at the destination of the paste is different from that of the passage from which the notes
were copied, it is the status of the Auto Stretch Switch that determines whether the pasted notes
adjust to the tempo of the destination or retain their original tempo. If the Auto Stretch Switch is on,
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
112
Melodyne 4 studio
they adjust; if it is off, they do not. So unless you want to change the tempo at the cursor position, you
should switch Auto Stretch on before performing the paste.
If the tempo of the source is different from that of destination, and the material on the clipboard is
adjusted to the new tempo, the pasted version will obviously sound different to the original. If you want
to avoid this happening, however, in the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, you can copy not
only the notes but also the tempo (including any sudden or gradual tempo changes within it) from the
source to the destination. In this case, it makes no difference which you copy first: the notes or the
tempo.
Copying in a multi-track context
In Melodyne 4 studio you can see, select and edit notes from different tracks at the same time in the
Note Editor – and even copy them. Provided after selecting the notes and executing the Copy
command, you do not exit the Note Editor before performing the paste, the track assignments of the
notes selected will be preserved. If, for example, you select a bar from the bass guitar track and a bar
from the lead vocal track and then paste them simultaneously to a different point on the Time Ruler,
the notes copied from the bass track will be pasted into the bass track, and those copied from the
vocal track will be pasted into the vocal track.
If you wish to paste the copied notes into tracks other than the original ones, before performing the
paste you must select the desired destination tracks by clicking the relevant track headers, holding the
[Shift] and/or [Command] keys where necessary.
Here, the following rules apply:
If there are the same number of destination tracks as source tracks, the notes will be copied
accordingly; if the source tracks, for example, are numbered 1, 2 and 3 and the destination
tracks 4, 5 and 6, the material copied from Track 1 will be pasted into Track 4, that from Track
2 into Track 5 and that from Track 3 into Track 6, as you would expect.
If the material on the clipboard has been copied from multiple tracks but a single track has
been selected as the destination, all the material will be pasted into that one track.
If the material on the clipboard has been copied from a single track but multiple tracks have
been selected as destinations, the same notes will be copied into all the destination tracks
(duplicating the material, in other words).
If no sensible correlation can be established between source and destination track(s), the
Paste command will be grayed out.
The same rules apply if, instead of choosing Copy after making the selection, you choose Cut.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
113
Melodyne 4 studio
The Note Inspector
The Note Inspector in the info pane offers you an overview of the parameters of the selected note(s)
and allows you to alter the values.
The parameters of the Note Inspector
The Note Inspector brings together the inspector fields that are usually displayed near the toolbar
when the various tools are in use. It allows you to see all the most important parameters at a glance
and even edit them without having to change tools.
In addition to the data included in the inspector fields, the Note Inspector displays the frequency in
hertz as well as a button for the muting of notes.
The editable parameters displayed in the Note Inspector are (from top to bottom):
the pitch of the selected note in semitones, cents and hertz
the pitch modulation expressed as a percentage
the pitch drift expressed as a percentage
the formant shift in cents
the amplitude in decibels
the button for muting and unmuting notes
the attack speed expressed as a percentage
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
114
Melodyne 4 studio
Lower down in the inspector, you can see to which audio file the selected note belongs and which
algorithm was used for the detection.
Entering values and handling multiple selected notes
When only one note is selected in the Note Editor, the Note Inspector displays the concrete values for
that note.
As a general rule, you can modify all values either by clicking in their respective fields and dragging
the mouse pointer upwards or downwards or by double-clicking in the field and typing in a new value.
In the case of the Pitch field, you can enter either an absolute (C3, D4 etc.) or a relative (+2, -1, etc.)
value. In the other fields, it is always the absolute value that is adopted.
If you have selected multiple notes, the Note Inspector will only displays concrete values for
parameters if these are shared by all the selected notes. Where values differ, a dash “–” is displayed
in the relevant field.
If a dash is displayed, by clicking on it and dragging, you can alter the individual values of all the notes
selected by the same amount; in this way, for example, you could transpose an entire selection up two
semitones. The Scale Snap function, of course, if activated, will govern the eventual destination of the
various notes.
As you drag the values, Melodyne remembers the difference between them. This is even true when
certain parameters ‘collide’ with their maximum or minimum values; provided you keep the mouse
button pressed and drag then in the opposite direction, the initial difference will be restored. Only if
you release the mouse button at the point of collision will the initial difference be forgotten.
Alternatively, with multiple notes selected, you can type in a value that will then be assigned to, and
thereafter shared by, all the selected notes (whereupon the dash, of course, will disappear).
An exception here is the pitch, as, if you type in the value “2”, for example, all the selected notes are
shifted two semitones upwards. If you wish to assign the same pitch to all the selected notes, type in
an absolute value, such as “C2”. If the Percussive or Universal algorithms are selected, of course, this
has no effect, as these algorithms only know relative pitch.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
115
Melodyne 4 studio
The Edit menu
Melodyne’s Edit menu includes items that allow you to reset individual edits and add random
deviations to the audio material.
Resetting edits
The Reset Individual Edits sub-menu contains commands that nullify the effects of various types of
editing.
You will also find in the context menu of the Note Editor whichever of these commands are relevant to
the tool you are using at the time.
The commands invariably apply to the current selection and are grayed out if no editing of the type in
question has yet been applied to the selected notes. Notice that these reset commands work
independently of the normal undo function.
The effect of the following types of editing can be reversed via the Reset Individual Edits sub-menu:
Pitch
all changes of pitch
editing of the pitch center
editing of pitch modulation
editing of pitch drift
editing of pitch transitions
Formants
editing of formants
editing of formant transitions
Amplitude
editing of amplitude
editing of amplitude transitions
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
116
Melodyne 4 studio
the muting of notes
Time
all editing of timing (start position / length of notes)
the placing of time handles
editing of the attack speed
The final command, Restore File to Original State, reverses in one go the effects of all editing
(regardless of type) that has been performed on the audio file.
Adding random deviations
The Add Random Deviations sub-menu varies the pitch or timing of individual notes a) drastically, b)
by a moderate amount, or c) in a subtle way; within these various limits, the direction and extent of the
deviation is determined randomly.
The commands introduce random variation to either the pitch or the timing of the selected notes, and
their effect, if the command is used several times in succession, is cumulative.
Random deviations are particularly useful when you have made one or more copies of a single take
but do not wish them to be identical either to each other or to the original – the object being, perhaps,
to make a single vocalist sound like a choir. Through the addition of a certain amount of random
deviation to each copy you can obtain more natural-sounding results by ensuring that the
synchronization of the individual voices is never improbably perfect and that no two copies exhibit
identical fluctuations in pitch.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
117
Melodyne 4 studio
Display and other options
Melodyne offers for the user interface and working in the Note Editor various options that allow you to
adapt the appearance and behavior of the program to your tastes.
Showing and hiding elements of the user interface
Melodyne’s user interface can be adapted to a variety of different work situations and demands. You
will find the means of doing so in the Options menu as well as the interface itself.
The illustration shows which icons in the user interface of the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne
correspond to which items in the Options menu.
Show Tracks (A): Shows/Hides the track pane, reducing the height of the Note Editor to make
room. If the info pane is displayed on the left, the track headers will remain visible even if the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
118
Melodyne 4 studio
track pane itself is currently hidden.
Show Note Editor (B): Shows/Hides the Note Editor as well as the info pane on the left and
adjusts the height of the Track and track header panes accordingly.
Show Sound Editor (C): Shows/Hides the Sound Editor beneath the Note Editor.
Note Editor (D): Various options for the Note Editor that are described in detail below.
Scale Editor (E): Shows/Hides successively one, two or all three panes of the Scale Editor
window.
Pitch Grid (F): Offers the choice between various options for the Pitch Grid.
Time Grid (G): Offers the choice between various options for the Time Grid.
Show Info Pane (H): Hides the info pane or shows it on the left and/or on the right (full
height/top half only/bottom half only) of the screen.
Show Tempo Editor (I): Closes the Tempo Editor or opens it in either edit or assign mode.
Auto-Scroll Tracks (J): When this option is activated, the display in the track pane follows the
playback cursor.
Auto-Scroll Note Editor (K): When this option is activated, the display in the Note Editor follows
the playback cursor.
In the plug-in, the Options menu and the corresponding elements of the user interface differ somewhat
from those encountered in the stand-alone implementation.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
119
Melodyne 4 studio
List All Plug-in Instances (A): Shows/Hides the pane in which the headers for the various
plug-in instances are displayed and adjusts the height of the info pane accordingly, assuming it
is not hidden at the time.
Scale Editor (B): Shows/Hides successively one, two or all three panes of the Scale Editor
window.
Pitch Grid (C): Offers the choice between various options for the Pitch Grid.
Time Grid (D): Offers the choice between various options for the Time Grid.
Show Info Pane (E): Shows/Hides the info pane.
Show Sound Editor (F): Shows/Hides the Sound Editor beneath the Note Editor.
Auto-Scroll (G): When this option is selected, the display in the Note Editor follows the playback
cursor.
A note about automatic scrolling in the Note Editor: If you have selected one or several notes,
Melodyne assumes that you wish to see and edit them, and exercises the requisite restraint by
deactivating the auto-scroll function temporarily. Only when you deselect the notes (for example, by
clicking in the background of the Note Editor) and restart the playback does the display resume its
pursuit of the playback cursor.
Similarly, if you move the horizontal scroller so far during playback that the playback cursor actually
disappears from the screen, automatic scrolling will be deactivated. Stopping and restarting in this
case will reactivate the auto-scroll function.
If automatic scrolling has temporarily been deactivated, the auto-scroll icon in the bottom right-hand
corner of the Note Editor takes the form shown here.
All the options described below relate to the Note Editor and are found by choosing Options > Note
Editor Options from the main menu or by clicking the cog icon in the top right-hand corner of the Note
Editor.
Please note that these options can be selected independently for Edit and Note Assignment modes.
Show Pitch Curve
If you check the option Show Pitch Curve, a thin line tracing the exact pitch of the tone at each instant
will be superimposed on the corresponding blob.
On the left, you can see the ‘naked’ blobs (with none of the Note Editor display options selected) and
on the right, the same blobs with the Show Pitch Curve option checked.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
120
Melodyne 4 studio
Regardless of whether or not this option is checked, the pitch curve will be displayed whenever the
Pitch Tool is selected.
Show Note Separations
If you select the option Show Note Separations, gray vertical lines appear at the beginnings and
endings of notes indicating their limits or separations.
Note Separations are either shown as lines (soft separations between connected notes) or thin
brackets (hard separations).
Note separations are always displayed when the independent Note Separation Tool is in use,
regardless of whether or not the menu entry is checked.
Show Note Tails
In the detection and display of notes, Melodyne editor draws a distinction between the notes
themselves and their tails – notes being the events of musical relevance and tails depicting the
non-musically-determined fading-away of the sound. The share of the reverberation ascribed to a
given tone, for example, is reflected in its tail. The Show Note Tails option allows you to decide
whether the reverberative phase of notes should be displayed or hidden. This is likely to depend upon
whether you prefer to concentrate upon their musical or their acoustic aspects.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
121
Melodyne 4 studio
If the tail is not displayed, the end of the musically relevant part of the note provides the handle you
can drag with the Time Tool to make the note longer or shorter. Any reverberation present will in this
case automatically be governed by the changes made. This display option serves to provide a clearer
overview of the intended musical events.
If the note tail is displayed (assuming it has one), it is this that provides the handle for the Time Tool.
Show Note Tails is the option most suitable when what is sought is as authentic a picture as possible
of the sounds actually heard – including any reverberation present.
Show Blob Info
With the option Show Blob Info, you can elect to show or hide a variety of display elements designed
to facilitate working with individual notes.
The most striking of these elements is the Local Pitch Ruler that appears directly in front of any note
over which you move the mouse pointer. Within the blob itself, thin lines mark the drag zones for the
context-sensitive tools.
If you drag a blob when the Show Blob Info option is checked, a vertical line also appears in the Time
Ruler aligned with the exact start of the note. This makes more precise positioning possible.
Show Intended Notes
If you check the option Show Intended Notes, gray frames appear around each blob.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
122
Melodyne 4 studio
These invariably lie directly on the semitone and coincide exactly with a gridline. They represent, in
other words, Melodyne’s assumptions (based on its own analysis of the audio) as to the intended pitch
of the note and its intended position within the measure or bar. These assumptions generally turn out
to be correct, but are not inevitably so. They are to be thought of as suggestions.
The frames also display the positions in pitch and time towards which the notes in question will
gravitate if partial quantization is applied to them with the macros, which are also the positions they
will snap to if you double-click on them with the Time Tool or Pitch Tool.
Highlight Notes During Playback
With this option, you can select whether or not you would like your eye to be drawn to the note
currently playing back. Highlighting is mainly useful when the screen is thick with notes.
Show Replace Ranges (in the plug-in implementation only)
If you check this option, those passages will be indicated that have been transferred to the plug-in
from your host and for the playback of which, in consequence, Melodyne rather than the host is
responsible.
This information is conveyed by the fact that the Time Ruler is shaded more palely for the duration of
all such passages.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
123
Melodyne 4 studio
Highlight Track Affiliation
This option gives you a better overview of which notes belong to which tracks when multiple tracks are
being displayed simultaneously in the Note Editor: When the option is checked and you click on a note
with a tool, all notes belonging to tracks other than that of the note selected will be displayed in grey
for as long as you hold down the mouse key. This lets you see at once which notes do, and which do
not, belong to the same track as the note selected.
Monitor When Editing Blobs
When you shift the pitch of blobs in the Note Editor with this option selected, Melodyne plays for the
purpose of orientation the sound of the note at the position originally clicked. You can turn this
acoustic feedback on or off.
Show Clip Borders
This option is only visible when you are using ARA. It allows you, if you wish, to hide the gray lines
between the clips in Track Mode to obtain a clearer overview of the material in the Note Editor. This is
especially useful when the track you are examining contains a large number of clips and you have
zoomed the display a long way out.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
124
Melodyne 4 studio
Multitrack editing
In Melodyne studio, you can work with multiple tracks – in both the stand-alone and plug-in
implementations. You can move from track to track with the utmost ease, and even see and edit
simultaneously notes belonging to different tracks.
Multi-tracking in Melodyne
In Melodyne, multi-tracking has a particular meaning, because here you are working not simply with
audio files but with notes. For this reason, it is in the Note Editor that Melodyne’s multi-tracking comes
into its own.
Consider the case where you have one track containing vocals and a second track with a guitar
accompaniment. As soon as you switch the vocal track to edit mode, the notes of which it is
composed appear in the Note Editor. Now, if you switch the guitar track to reference mode, its notes,
too, are displayed in the Note Editor. The guitar blobs in this case are gray and can neither be
selected nor edited. They are simply displayed for the purpose of orientation in the background to the
vocal notes. This makes following the melody child’s play.
What happens if, while you are editing the vocal track, you notice something on the guitar track that
you would like to alter? No problem. Just switch the guitar track to edit mode or double-click one of the
gray blobs and immediately the two tracks will swap roles: it will be the guitar blobs that are colored
and capable of being edited while the vocal blobs are displayed in gray in the background.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
125
Melodyne 4 studio
And you can change tracks on the fly like this while working with any number of reference tracks. This
makes it very easy for you to edit your audio material in the desired context not only acoustically but
also visually. In this, you are supported by intelligent monitoring that allows you to control the volume
ratios between the edited track, the reference tracks and all other tracks. Whenever you break off
editing one track to edit another, the volume mix adjusts automatically.
But these are by no means all Melodyne’s multi-tracking capabilities: If you wish, you can even switch
several tracks to edit mode at the same time, selecting, editing, deleting and copying notes across
tracks. This is the case in both the stand-alone and plug-in implementations of Melodyne.
In the following sections, we will set out in detail the concepts underlying multi-tracking in Melodyne
and show how to take full advantage of the possibilities it affords.
Differences between the stand-alone and plug-in implementations
When Melodyne is running as a stand-alone application, multiple tracks are displayed in much the
same way as in most DAWs: There is a list of track headers in the left-hand pane, with the audio files
belonging to each track to the right of them.
In the plug-in implementation of Melodyne, multi-tracking is implemented as a collaboration between
the DAW and the various instances of Melodyne. There, too, there is a list of headers on the left. In it,
you will see which instance of the Melodyne plug-in is currently open, as well as any others inserted in
the tracks of the current project. The idea behind this is to allow you to work at all times in one
Melodyne plug-in window only, whilst being able to see and edit the contents of all instances.
In the plug-in, there is no track pane containing audio material, since the audio material is already
present on the tracks of the DAW. All you see, then, is the list of instances and the Note Editor.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
126
Melodyne 4 studio
The track headers
In the stand-alone implementation: Each track header displays the name of the track and a volume
fader along with mute, solo and record enable buttons. The solo function is only ever active in the
track whose solo button was clicked most recently. Hold down the [Command] key to solo multiple
tracks. You can rename the track via the Track menu, the context menu in the track header pane, or
the Track Inspector, which is described in the next section.
The colored blob icon in the track header is the edit button, which causes the notes to be displayed in
the Note Editor. Double-clicking on the contents of a track in the track pane has the same effect. If you
click the edit button or double-click in the track region of another track, its notes will replace those of
the first track in the Note Editor.
If you hold down the [Command] key now and click on the edit button of another track, the notes of
this track too will be displayed as colored blobs in the Note Editor. You will then be able, if you wish, to
select and edit the notes of both tracks simultaneously. Proceed in the same way to add the contents
of further tracks to the Note Editor. Clicking on an edit button that it is already active removes the
contents of the respective track from the Note Editor.
The gray blob icon in the header is the reference button that causes the notes of a track to be
displayed in the Note Editor for reference purposes only. The resulting gray blobs can neither be
selected nor edited. They are there in this case solely for purposes of orientation– for instance, to
facilitate adjustments in pitch or timing. By clicking on further reference buttons, you can add the
contents of further tracks to the Note Editor – again, purely for reference purposes – and remove them
in the same way.
If you switch a reference track to edit mode – either by clicking its edit button in the track header or by
double-clicking one of the gray blobs currently displayed for reference – the gray track will turn orange
and the track that was previously orange, gray. Putting it another way: the two tracks will swap roles.
Right-clicking in the header opens a context menu offering the same commands as the main Track
menu.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
127
Melodyne 4 studio
You can change the order in which tracks appear by dragging the track headers upwards or
downwards as desired.
“Spread Unison Tracks”: When you are displaying several tracks simultaneously in the Note Editor,
before long you may find certain notes overlapping, making it more difficult to see and edit the
material. The switch shown here, which you will find near the bottom right-hand corner of the Note
Editor, can be of assistance in such cases. What it does is separate and spread vertically the various
tracks shown in the Note Editor – causing them to fan out, in other words – which makes it easier to
see and select notes of the same pitch on different tracks. This obviously has no effect upon the
actual pitch of the notes in question; only upon the way they are displayed. Since the Pitch Ruler
provides only an approximate guide to the pitch of the notes when the tracks are fanned out in this
way, the grey and white stripes in the background of the Note Editor (imitating the keyboard of a
piano) disappear.
The Spread Unison Tracks switch can only be activated when several tracks are being displayed
simultaneously in the Note Editor and their notes overlap.
In the plug-in: You see a header for every instance of Melodyne that you have opened in your
project. There are no mute or solo buttons and no volume fader in the header, as these functions are
already provided by your DAW. Instead you will see a Transfer button for every instance, and you can
transfer-enable as many instances as you like swiftly from a single plug-in window.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
128
Melodyne 4 studio
The edit and reference buttons work in exactly the same way as in the stand-alone implementation
and determine which contents in the Note Editor are available for editing and which displayed purely
for reference. You can switch freely between the contents of the instances and, as in the stand-alone
implementation, edit the contents of multiple instances simultaneously – e. g. by selecting and copying
across tracks. All the time you can be working in the same Melodyne window; there is no need to
switch to the window of another instance or open a second window. A small star in front of the
relevant Transfer button shows you, for the purpose of orientation, to which Melodyne instance the
window in which you are working at any given moment belongs.
To leave more room for the info pane or Note Editor, you can hide the header pane in the plug-in by
clicking the corresponding symbol, and show it again in the same way.
In the stand-alone implementation and with certain DAWs, you can rename tracks by right-clicking on
the track header and choosing Rename Track from the context menu.
You will find this option grayed out, however, if your DAW is one that passes on track names to
Melodyne, as the correct name will then already be displayed in the track header.
Similarly, with certain DAWS, as in the stand-alone implementation, you can change the order in
which the tracks are displayed by dragging the track headers upwards or downwards.
This option, again, is grayed out if your DAW has passed on to Melodyne the order of tracks, as they
will then already be displayed in the correct order.
The Track Inspector in the stand-alone implementation
The info pane of the stand-alone implementation offers access to the Track Inspector.
The Track Inspector has the same settings as the track header plus a few additional parameters:
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
129
Melodyne 4 studio
The title field: This can be used to rename the track.
The volume fader: This corresponds to the fader in the track header. A text box below the fader
allows you to set the volume by typing in a new value or clicking on and dragging the existing
one.
The Pan pot: To move the track in question to the left or right in the stereo field, click the knob
and drag downwards or upwards respectively or else type in a value.
Mute, solo and record enable buttons: These work in exactly the same way as their
counterparts in the track header.
Pop-up buttons for selecting the track’s input (for recording) and output. If you are working with
a multi-channel audio interface, you can use these to select the inputs and outputs for your
tracks.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
130
Melodyne 4 studio
The Pitch and Formants knobs offer you a quick way of shifting the pitch or formants of the entire
track. Initially, any changes you make here are merely ‘superficial’ and are not reflected by the blobs
in the Note Editor. If you want to adopt them as actual edits, click the Apply Offsets button below. The
pitch of the notes and/or their formants will then be shifted in line with your settings and the changes
will be reflected in the blobs.
When the offsets are applied and made permanent, the pitch or formant shifts in question will sound
better than they did when they were superficial and temporary. For this reason, you should use the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
131
Melodyne 4 studio
Pitch and Formant knobs simply to find suitable values quickly, but then apply them, so that the
shifting in question can be properly implemented. Once their values have been applied, both knobs
revert to their zero positions.
You can reset all the above-mentioned parameters to their default values by [Command]
double-clicking their respective fields in the inspector.
The Track Inspector refers to one or several selected tracks. The control elements act upon all
selected tracks simultaneously.
Where two or more selected tracks have different values for the same parameter, a dash is displayed
in the corresponding field. When these values are increased or decreased using the mouse, the ratios
between tracks are maintained, the changes being relative. This is so even if, without releasing the
mouse button, you touch on the upper or lower limits of the range before returning to some
intermediate value. Only if you release the mouse button at the top or bottom of the range and then
resume dragging, do the values of the selected tracks become uniform.
It is different if you type in the values. In this case, the value entered is adopted by all the selected
tracks. If, for instance, in the volume field you enter “+2”, the volume of all the selected tracks will be
set to +2 dB.
The Editing Mix Fader
When you are editing the notes of several tracks simultaneously in the Note Editor, the Editing Mix
Fader is of great assistance. Our intention here was to provide you with the acoustic equivalent of
focusing visually on particular blobs: when you are editing a track, you want to be able to concentrate
entirely upon that track and not be distracted by others. Visually, that is easy to accomplish: You
simply select one or two tracks to edit, show perhaps two or three others tracks in the Note Editor for
reference, and hide the rest.
Acoustically, a similar focus is difficult to achieve. Naturally, you could solo the tracks being edited, but
then you would lose the very reference that could best help you assess the intonation and timing of
the tracks being edited. Ideally in this situation you would be able to employ an alternative mix: the
track being edited would be the loudest; the tracks shown as reference would be somewhat quieter,
and other tracks, quieter still or completely inaudible. You could accomplish this, of course, with the
volume controls of the individual tracks, but the Editing Mix Fader makes it far easier.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
132
Melodyne 4 studio
If you move the Editing Mix Fader all the way to the left, you will hear only the track or tracks currently
activated for editing in the Note Editor – in other words, the ones with the orange blobs. As you move
the fader button gradually towards the center, the gray blobs displayed for reference will gradually
become louder, until at the center position the colored and gray blobs will be equally loud. As you now
move the button from the center position towards the right, the remaining tracks – i. e. those included
in the arrangement but not displayed in the Note Editor – will gradually fade in.
In this way, you can quickly and easily arrive at the ideal acoustic balance between the notes
displayed for editing, those displayed for reference, and the rest of the arrangement.
Please note that the soloing and muting of tracks also effects the mix: Tracks that are displayed for
reference or editing in the Note Editor but switched to mute (either directly or because another track
has been soloed) are nonetheless audible when the Editing Mix Fader is between the extreme left and
the center of its range. However, as the button is moved from the center towards the extreme right of
its range (causing tracks not displayed in the Note Editor to become audible), the tracks switched to
mute are faded out, so the soloing of tracks once again functions normally.
As soon as you shift the focus from the Note Editor to the track pane by clicking in the latter, you will
hear the entire arrangement once again; this is equivalent to the rightmost setting of the Editing Mix
Fader. If you then click a further time in the Note Editor, the volume ratios will once again be
determined by the Editing Mix Fader.
In the plug-in, the fader works on the same principle but with one small difference; If you start the
playback from the DAW, the balance between all the tracks will be determined exclusively by the DAW
’s own mixer. The Editing Mix Fader only intervenes when the DAW is stopped and you start playback
in Melodyne by double clicking the Time Ruler.
In this case, again, with the button hard left, only the colored blobs will be heard, the gray ones fading
in gradually as you move towards the center, and the remaining tracks entering and becoming
gradually louder as the button moves ever further to the right. The term ‘remaining tracks’ here,
however, includes only those tracks the contents of which have been transferred to Melodyne. To hear
literally all the tracks, unless all have been transferred, you must start the playback from within DAW.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
133
Melodyne 4 studio
The Editing Mix Fader is only operative when the focus is in the Note Editor – i. e. when the Note
Editor is the pane clicked most recently. The pane with focus at any given moment is the one
delineated by a thin orange frame.
The track pane and working with tracks in the stand-alone implementation
To the right of the track headers is the Melodyne’s track pane, in which the audio files are displayed.
Audio files can be opened, dragged and dropped onto the tracks, or recorded directly to them.
A track can contain multiple audio files without Melodyne displaying them as separate regions, clips,
segments or the like: On each track, regardless of the number of audio files it comprises, a single
waveform is used to display the contents. This is because Melodyne adopts a note-based approach,
and you perform typical actions such as transposing or copying segments within a track by selecting
and editing in the Note Editor the notes of which they are composed, not by manipulating the
segments as such.
The most you can do on the track itself is move its entire contents en bloc. To do this, simply drag the
waveform to the left or right. When you release the mouse button, the contents of the track will snap to
the selected grid (if active) or else remain where you have dropped them.
There are several ways of transferring audio files to the tracks:
One is the Import Audio command in the File menu, which is suitable if the audio file is already
on your hard disk. A new track will be created and the file positioned at the beginning of the
track.
Another is to drag an audio file from Melodyne’s file browser or the finder or explorer of your
computer and drop it in the empty region beneath the existing tracks or onto to one of the latter.
In the former case, a new track will be created; in the latter, the new file will be mixed with the
existing content. In either case, the grid can be used to assist in the exact positioning of the file.
If you wish the start of the file to coincide with the beginning of the track, drop it instead on the
track header.
A third is to record the audio. To do this, select the desired input of your audio interface from
the track’s inspector, record enable the track and then commence recording using Melodyne’s
transport controls.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
134
Melodyne 4 studio
Please note that when importing a file, whether from the menu or by drag ‘n’ drop, it is the Auto
Stretch button in the Transport pane that determines whether or not the tempo of the new material is
adjusted to match the existing content.
If Auto Stretch is active, Melodyne adapts the tempo of the file to that of your project, including any
sudden or gradual tempo changes found therein. If Auto Stretch is not active, the tempo of the original
source project will be retained; no change will be made, in other words, to the original tempo.
You will find further information on this subject in the tours dealing with tempo detection and tempo
editing.
To select a track, either click on its waveform in the track pane or on the header of the track in
question. To select multiple tracks, hold down the [Command] or [Shift] keys as you do so. With the
[Shift] key, all tracks between the first and the most recently clicked will be included in the selection.
The Track menu, like the context menu in the track header pane, contains the following items:
New Track: creates a new (empty) track.
Rename Track: allows you to enter a new name for the track in question.
Merge Tracks: where two or more tracks are selected and this command executed, the
contents of all the selected tracks will be mixed down to a single track, this being whichever of
the selected tracks appears first in the track list.
Duplicate Track: creates a copy of the selected track or tracks, placing in each case the copy
beneath the original.
Delete Track: deletes the selected track or tracks.
Split Track by Source Files: in certain respects the opposite of Merge Tracks. If a track contains
more than one audio file or recording, or if notes from different audio files have been copied to
it, this command has the effect of splitting the track and creating for each of the various audio
sources a separate new track.
Split Track by Selection: This command also splits the selected track(s) but on the basis of the
notes currently selected in the Note Editor. Example: You select in the Note Editor all instances
of Middle C (C4) in a recording and choose this command. Result: All Middle C’s are removed
from the original track to a new one.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
135
Melodyne 4 studio
Copying between documents, tracks and instances
You can copy notes in Melodyne freely between documents, tracks and instances. To copy notes from
a track in the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne or an instance of the plug-in to another track or
instance respectively, proceed as follows:
Select the desired notes and choose Copy.
Select the destination track or instance respectively by clicking its header.
Position the playback cursor by clicking in the Time Ruler and choose Paste.
To copy notes in the stand-alone implementation from one project to another, proceed as follows:
Select the desired notes and choose Copy.
Switch to the destination project and select the desired track e. g. by clicking in its track header.
Position the cursor by clicking in the Time Ruler and choose Paste.
You will find further information about copying in the tour entitled “Copying notes”.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
136
Melodyne 4 studio
The Sound Editor
With Melodyne, you can edit not only the pitch, timing, phrasing and tempo of your recordings in a
unique manner but also their sound. The bandwidth extends from subtle tonal adjustments and
coloring to applications of a highly experimental nature. All these possibilities can be found in
Melodyne’s Sound Editor, which you will get to know in this tour.
The Sound Editor works on the spectral level and offers you extensive access to the overtone
structure of the notes. In combination with Melodyne’s other functions, you can obtain results with it
that no other tool offers.
Working with the Sound Editor requires no special knowledge. This tour and a willingness to
experiment are all you need. If you do wish to learn more about the theoretical basis, however, one
good place to start might be this article in Wikipedia.
Opening the Sound Editor
Melodyne’s Sound Editor has its own pane, which you can open by clicking the button shown here or
by choosing Show Sound Editor from the Options menu.
The Sound Editor is track-based: To open one or more tracks in the Sound Editor, select them in the
track header pane. As you edit multiple tracks simultaneously in the Sound Editor, the starting
parameters of each track are varied by the same amounts.
The Sound Editor can only be used with tracks the notes of which have been detected using the
Melodic or Polyphonic algorithms.
Technical note: When a track is being displayed or edited in the Sound Editor, Melodyne employs
internally the playback type “Tonal” – even if “Complex” was selected in Note Assignment Mode. This
may cause notes whose timing or pitch have been edited to sound slightly different when the Sound
Editor is active on a track.
Tip: If you wish to edit audio material for which the Universal or Percussive algorithms were used in
the detection process, you must first switch to one of the other algorithm, which will trigger a fresh
analysis of the material.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
137
Melodyne 4 studio
The mean spectrum
Before we examine the functions of the Sound Editor in detail, there is one term has to be explained,
as it runs like a thread through them all: the “mean spectrum”.
Once it has detected the notes of which an audio track is composed, Melodyne conducts a spectral
analysis to determine which harmonic partials (from now on, we’ll call them “harmonics”) each note
contains and how loud in each case these are. When the analysis is complete, Melodyne has an
“acoustic fingerprint” (in spectral form) of each note. After averaging the spectra of all notes on the
track, Melodyne obtains what we call the “mean spectrum” of the entire track.
The starting point for any spectral adjustments you effect using the Sound Editor is the mean
spectrum of the track in question, which we can think of as the average timbre (or “tone color”) of its
notes. For the purpose of orientation, the mean spectrum is displayed in the form of a thin line that
remains stationary as you resize the columns or redraw the curve in the various working areas of the
Sound Editor.
If multiple tracks are selected when you open the Sound Editor, it is the mean spectrum of them all
that is displayed and forms the basis for editing.
Emphasis and Dynamics
The Emphasis and Dynamics sliders offer you a simple but effective way of influencing the tone color
and amplitude of the track. They work independently of the other elements of the Sound Editor and
have no effect upon their displays. It is sometimes worth opening the Sound Editor just to use either or
both of these controls.
In case you haven’t already done so, check the option Show Tooltips on the User Interface page of
the Preferences dialog, so that the names of the various control elements pop up as you pass the
mouse over them.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
138
Melodyne 4 studio
Emphasis: As you move this slider from its neutral midpoint towards the right, any differences
between the spectra of the notes actually sounding and the mean spectrum are increased. This makes
their peculiarities more pronounced, as wherever their spectra departs from the mean spectrum, the
difference is progressively exaggerated, in the manner of a caricature.
Moving the slider to the left has the opposite effect, assimilating the spectra of the notes in question
ever more closely to the mean. In this way, their peculiarities gradually disappear, making the timbre
throughout the track more uniform.
The Emphasis slider offers an outstanding means of raising the profile of certain sources within the
mix and helping them cut through, whilst making others less obtrusive so that they blend in better – in
each case, without changing their volume.
Please note that the Emphasis slider has a very wide range in each direction (± 200 %) making it also
a powerful tool for generating effects. Valuable results can be obtained, however, depending upon the
material, with far smaller values. We recommend, therefore, that you operate this particular control
with a light touch. Holding down the [Alt] key as you move the slider will make it easier to
increment/decrement the parameter one per cent at a time.
Dynamics: This slider influences the amplitude of the notes – specifically, their internal dynamics. As
you move the slider to the right, the quieter parts of each note become quieter still; as you move it to
the left, they become louder. In other words, moving the slider to the right exaggerates any
fluctuations in amplitude within each note, whereas moving it to the left smoothes them out.
If you apply the Dynamics slider to a piano recording, for example, you can make the notes decay
more rapidly (for a staccato effect) by moving the slider to the right, whereas moving the slider to the
left gives them a longer decay, lending the passage in question more of a legato feel. Given the way it
operates, the Dynamics slider obviously has no effect on notes with a uniform amplitude – with the
same envelope, in other words, as an organ – other than, at most, to make them somewhat louder.
Tip: With polyphonic material, moving the Dynamics slider to the left can cause notes to overlap that
didn’t do so originally, which, if there was scant headroom to begin with, can lead to the distortion
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
139
Melodyne 4 studio
threshold being crossed. This is easily avoided, however, by giving the Gain knob (described in the
next section) a slight twist anticlockwise.
Bypass, Gain and the global Sound Editor menu
In the top right-hand corner of the Sound Editor, you will find a bypass switch that deactivates the
Sound Editor altogether, so that what you hear is the unedited track signal. Use this switch for a quick
comparison between the sounds of the edited and unedited signals.
Since editing the spectrum can involve dramatic changes in level, Melodyne automatically
compensates, to ensure that the output level remains approximately the same. On rare occasions,
however, you may find either that the distortion threshold is being crossed or that the output level is
too low, in which case you can adjust the level manually using the gain control.
The drop-down menu contains three commands: Reset All governs all the working areas of the Sound
Editor, returning it to the state it was in when first opened for the track in question. Similarly, Copy
Settings copies the settings of all the working areas of the open Sound Editor, which you can then
apply to another track using the command below: Paste Settings.
Please note that the Copy Settings command does not copy the mean spectrum of the source track;
only the relative adjustments you have made to it – to make a particular harmonic louder or quieter, for
instance. When the settings are pasted, therefore, the same offsets are applied to the mean spectrum
of the destination track. The eventual level of the harmonic in question therefore depends partly upon
how loud it was to begin with and only partly on the editing of the same harmonic in the source track
that you have copied over (along with the other settings).
The working areas
Using the tabs, you can switch between the various working areas of the Sound Editor. If you hold
down the [Command] key at the same time, you can open several working areas side by side,
provided there is enough space. To close one of multiple open working areas, [Command]-click in the
same way on its tab.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
140
Melodyne 4 studio
Each of these working areas contains a central display and, beneath it, a number of sliders. Before
going into the details, let’s take a quick look at the various working areas.
Harmonics, Lo and Hi: These three working areas allow you to intervene directly in the overtone
structure of the notes. They are laid out identically, Harmonics being of central importance as it
governs all the notes. Lo and Hi merely allow you, if you wish, to make further adjustments to the
harmonics of the notes whose fundamentals lie in the lower and upper halves (respectively) of the
track’s register.
EQ: This is a graphic equalizer in which the frequency spectrum is sliced up into bands one semitone
wide. The important difference between the EQ and the Harmonics, Lo and Hi working areas is that
the latter govern the levels of the overtones of the notes (the frequencies of which depend upon the
pitch of their respective fundamentals), whereas the EQ acts upon fixed frequency bands like a
conventional graphic EQ.
Synth: This working area contains three envelopes that govern (respectively) the influence over the
lifetime of each note of whatever changes you have made to the spectrum, the gliding upwards or
downwards of formants, and internal changes in amplitude. Here you will also find two sliders that
govern the resynthesis in the Sound Editor.
The Harmonics, Hi and Lo working areas
The Harmonics area displays and allows you to edit the harmonic spectrum of the notes of the
selected track.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
141
Melodyne 4 studio
The bar chart dominating the pane may remind you of a filter bank or one of those plug-ins that allow
spectral filtering. It differs, however, from such filters in one important respect: The spectrum here
relates to the individual notes – i.e. the pitch of the fundamentals; this is only possible because
Melodyne is able to recognize the notes heard on the track.
This means that when you increase or decrease the height of the third bar, for example, you are not
altering the level of a fixed band of the frequency spectrum but that of the third harmonic of all the
notes, the frequency of which, obviously, varies from note to note.
You are editing the sound, so to speak, at the source, exercising a very direct influence upon the
timbre. The harmonics bars therefore have far more in common with the oscillators of an additive
synthesizer or the drawbars of an organ than with the bands of an equalizer. They reflect and
determine the relative amplitude of the harmonics – including that of the fundamental, which is the first
harmonic – of all the notes on the track. The possibilities they afford for the shaping of the timbre are
at once subtle and far-reaching.
The starting point for any editing is the mean spectrum of the entire track, which Melodyne has
determined from its prior analysis. The balls that bounce up and down as the track plays back reflect
the instantaneous level of the harmonics in question. You will notice that these are constantly crossing
and recrossing the mean value indicated and determined by the top of the bar. When you increase or
decrease the height of a bar, the original level of the harmonic in question in the mean spectrum
remains visible, being indicated by a thin line.
The Lo and Hi working areas complement the Harmonics area. All three areas are active
simultaneously and their effect is cumulative. The Lo and Hi working areas offer exactly the same
function sets as the Harmonics area but affect only the harmonics of notes lying in the lower and
upper halves, respectively, of the register of the track in question, the halfway point being determined
by Melodyne automatically. The settings for the two regions morph into one another in the crossover
zone to ensure a smooth transition in timbre.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
142
Melodyne 4 studio
Example: You have a piano track on which the high notes are perfect but the low notes sound a little
dull. If you tried making the lower notes and the midrange brighter using a conventional equalizer, the
high notes would then be too bright. With the Sound Editor, no such problem occurs; you can edit the
harmonic spectrum of the low notes in the Lo working area without this influencing the high notes –
with, at the same time, quite different settings in the Hi working area governing the high notes without
these affecting the bass. The settings in the Harmonics working area remain active, offering you
complementary control over all the notes.
The harmonics bars and how to use them
The bars or columns in the Harmonics, Lo and Hi working areas represent the harmonic partials of the
notes; they have nothing to do, obviously, with bars in the metrical sense (as in “the chorus is 8 bars
long”). The bar marked “1” represents the first harmonic (the fundamental), and the bars to its right
marked “2”, “3”, “4”, represent the second, third and fourth harmonics, the frequencies of which are
(respectively) 2, 3 and 4 times that of the fundamental – and so on as you carry on up. The leftmost
bar, marked “<”, influences the level of all frequencies below that of the fundamental. With many
sources, pulling this bar down can make the sound cleaner.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
143
Melodyne 4 studio
To adjust the height of the bars, proceed as follows:
Drag the top of a bar upwards or downwards to alter its height (and the level of the
corresponding harmonic).
For finer adjustments, hold down the [Alt] key as you do so.
Drag horizontally in the white zone above the bars to make a range selection.
To adjust the height of all the bars within the selection by the same amount, drag upwards or
downwards in the medium-dark area (not the darkest band at the bottom) within the selection.
If, on the other hand, you drag from a point just above the selection (where the mouse pointer
changes shape), the bar closest to the pointer will move the greatest distance and those further
away progressively less.
[Shift]-click to select (or deselect) non-adjacent bars.
Double-click a bar to select all octaves of the corresponding harmonic.
To restore a harmonic or selection of harmonics to their original levels in the mean spectrum,
[Command]-click the bar or selection in question.
The local pull-down menus of the Harmonics, Lo and Hi working areas contain the following
commands, which affect all the harmonics bars of their respective displays.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
144
Melodyne 4 studio
Reset Spectrum: This restores the harmonics bars in the working area in question to their
original positions, reflecting the mean spectrum.
Copy Spectrum: This copes the spectrum of the selected area, so that it can be copied into
another area or track. The copying of spectra can create interesting coloring and morphing-like
effects. As the copy is performed, the current Contour setting is factored into the copied
spectrum, whereas the values of the other macro sliders are simply copied and the formant
settings ignored.
Paste Spectrum: This command works in conjunction with the Copy Spectrum command
described above, the result being to paste the copied spectrum into the currently selected
working area (Harmonics, Hi or Lo) of the track being edited. You can copy and paste between
tracks in the same document or from one document to another. As the paste is performed, the
Contour parameter of the destination track is reset, so its entire range is available for future
editing.
Clear Spectrum: This is like pulling down all the faders of a mixer: the result is silence, which
can be a good place to start if you wish to create a new timbre from scratch.
Shuffle Spectrum: This sets all the harmonics to random levels.
Show All Harmonics: You have the choice of displaying all the harmonics (however high) or
only the lowest and most important ones, the bars of which will then be wider and easier to
manipulate. When the highest harmonics are not being displayed but a selection includes the
rightmost bar that is visible, all the harmonics above it that are excluded from the display are
nonetheless included in the selection and edited accordingly.
The Harmonics, Lo and Hi macro controls
Each of these three working areas offers the same four sliders. These are macro controls that govern
the level of the various harmonics, and their effects are immediately reflected by the display.
[Command]-clicking on any of the macro controls resets it to its neutral position. This removes any
influence it previously had on the level of the harmonics and height of the harmonics bars but any
changes you may have made manually (i.e. other than with the macro) remain effective.
Brilliance: When you move this slider to the right, the level of the higher harmonics is raised, making
the sound brighter. Moving it to the left makes the higher harmonics quieter and the sound duller.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
145
Melodyne 4 studio
Contour: Moving this slider to the right increases any difference in height between neighboring bars,
making the peaks higher and the troughs deeper, and generally sharpening the contours of the
display. Moving the slider subsequently to the left has the opposite effect, restoring gradually the
original contours as it moves back towards the middle, before flattening them out as it moves further to
the left.
Odd/Even: This gradually fades out the odd-numbered harmonics (when moved to the right) or
even-numbered ones (when moved to the left). In the former case, the octaves are steadily reinforced,
whereas in the latter, the source takes on a progressively hollower, clarinet-like sound.
Comb: This slider thins out the harmonic spectrum, creating increasingly weird effects, with the
display resembling a comb losing its teeth. The buttons to each side of the slider allow you to slide the
comb sideways (without removing further teeth) and this, too, has a dramatic effect upon the sound. If
the slider is left in the central position, the effect of clicking the button to its right is to eliminate one by
one the lowest harmonics from the spectrum.
You can combine freely use the four sliders with that of the bars representing the harmonics; this
gives you an abundance of sound design options.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
146
Melodyne 4 studio
The EQ working area
This working area contains a graphic equalizer that – in the usual way – operates upon fixed bands of
the frequency spectrum. The equalizer divides the frequency spectrum into bands a semitone wide
and is calibrated with the note names at the bottom.
Since the equalizer operates on fixed frequency bands within the audio spectrum, it offers a quite
different approach to the shaping of sounds than that offered by the Harmonics, Lo and Hi working
areas, in which the bars represent the various harmonics. All four working areas can be used at the
same time.
The starting point for any editing using the equalizer is the mean spectrum of the track being edited,
which is referenced here to the entire audio spectrum. If the track contains a large number of high or
very bright-sounding notes, the right-hand end of the EQ curve will naturally be more elevated or
“mountainous” than if it did not.
When you reshape the curve, the original mean spectrum remains visible in the form of a thin line.
During playback, the instantaneous spectrum is indicated by balls that cross and recross the current
curve as they bounce up and down.
To avoid confusion between the EQ working area and the other, harmonics-based ones, the current
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
147
Melodyne 4 studio
levels of the individual bands are indicated here by a curve rather than horizontal lines. The same
techniques, however, are used to adjust the level of the various frequency bands as to adjust the
height of the harmonics bars in the other windows, so if you have not already read the section there
explaining how to select and drag the bars, please do so now.
The equalizer employs as a basis the notes that have been detected in the track being edited. This
means that a note in the audio material that has not been correctly identified will not be assigned to, or
governed by, the correct EQ band. If a note in polyphonic material is not detected, its contribution to
the overall sound will be wrongly attributed either to a lower or to a higher note.
In the former case, its energy will be distributed among the overtones of the lower note and will only
be visible as such in the EQ spectrum. If it is attributed to a higher note, on the other hand, it will end
up in the lowest band of the equalizer: the one marked “<”. This collects all frequency components
lying beneath the fundamentals of the detected notes or that cannot be assigned to any note. To hear
what signal components of the track are gathered in the “<” band, you can clear (i.e. set to zero) all
the other bands before lifting this one.
Examine and if necessary edit in Note Assignment Mode the detection, activating all notes that have
not been detected so that these too can be correctly handled by the equalizer.
In the local drop-down menu you will find the following commands for the EQ spectrum:
Reset Spectrum: This restores the original mean spectrum.
Copy Spectrum: This copies the current EQ spectrum so that it can be pasted into another
track. As the copy is performed, the current Contour setting is factored into the copied
spectrum, whereas the values of the other macro sliders are simply copied and the formant
settings ignored.
Paste Spectrum: This command works in conjunction with the Copy Spectrum command
described above, the result being to paste the copied EQ spectrum into the EQ working area of
the track being edited. You can copy and paste between tracks in the same document or from
one document to another. As the paste is performed, the Contour parameter of the destination
track is reset, so its entire range is available for future editing.
Paste Spectrum: This command works in conjunction with the Copy command ( [Ctrl]-C ) also
found in the Edit menu and the context menu of the Note Editor. If you select and copy in the
Note Editor a blob (or a selection of blobs on the same track), you can paste the spectrum of
the blob in question (or the mean spectrum of the blobs selected) into the EQ working area.
The copied spectrum is then applied to the sound, by which means interesting tone colors can
be obtained.
Clear Spectrum: This sets all bands to the minimum, the result being silence.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
148
Melodyne 4 studio
Shuffle Spectrum: This sets all the bands to random levels. Let your EQ surprise you!
The EQ macro sliders
The macro sliders affect the levels of all the frequency bands and their influence is immediately
reflected in the height of the vertical bands. [Command]-clicking on any of the macro controls resets it
to its neutral position. This undoes whatever effect it previously had on the height of the bands but any
changes you may have made manually (i.e. other than with the macro) remain effective.
The controls are from left to right:
Brilliance: When you move this slider to the right, the level of the higher bands is raised, giving
greater prominence to the high frequency content of the signal. Moving it to the left attenuates the
higher bands, making the sound duller.
Contour: Moving this slider to the right increases any difference in height between neighboring bands,
making the peaks higher and the troughs deeper, and generally sharpening the contours of the
display. Moving the slider to the left initially makes the spectrum increasingly linear, before inverting it,
so that what were formally peaks become troughs and vice versa.
Tonality: When moved to the right, this fades out notes foreign to the scale; when moved to the left, it
fades out notes that do belong to the scale.
Comb: In the former case, the notes furthest from the tonic in the circle of fifths are removed
progressively until finally only it and its octaves remain. With the buttons on each side of the slider,
you can determine which note should be considered the tonic for the purpose, cycling clockwise or
anticlockwise around the circle of fifths. The left button indicates the note currently designated as the
tonic.
You can combine freely use the four sliders with direct editing of the individual frequency bands in the
main EQ display.
Formants
Formants are peaks in the frequency spectrum, the position of which is not directly related to the pitch
of the fundamental, that help to give each instrument or voice its individual character. If you have used
Melodyne before, you will be familiar with the Formant Tool that allows you to alter the sound of notes
by shifting their formants up or down.
The Sound Editor, too, offers access to the formants: you can edit them in the EQ, Harmonics, Lo and
Hi working areas, the resulting shift in each case affecting all the notes of the track in question. The
formants are accessible in the dark gray zone at the base of the bars or bands, in which the number of
the harmonic or name of the note are displayed.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
149
Melodyne 4 studio
Drag horizontally in this area to shift the formants governing all the harmonics or EQ bands.
Select adjacent bars or bands to shift the formants governing only these. By repeating the
process successively, you can shift the formants of multiple selections in different directions
and by varying amounts to arrive at complex formant transposition patterns.
[Command]-clicking in the formant zone restores the original formants throughout the register.
The Formant Tool, the technique just described in the Sound Editor, and the Formants knob in the
Track Inspector can be applied simultaneously. Their combined effect is as follows:
The Formant Tool shifts the formants of the selected notes upwards or downwards. If you have
already, in the Sound Editor, ‘bent’ the formants of the track to which the notes in question
belong, it is these ‘bent’ formants that will be shifted. The Formant Tool, in other words, adds a
note-based offset to the formant structure displayed in the Sound Editor.
The Formants knob in the Track Inspector and the formant shifting functions offered by the
Sound Editor affect the track as a whole and work hand in hand. Each time you turn the
Formants knob, the entire formant structure in the Sound Editor (including any editing of it you
may have performed) will be shifted up or down. If you shift all the harmonics in the EQ or
Harmonics working areas, the Formants knob will move accordingly. If, on the other hand, you
shift merely a selection of harmonics or frequency bands in the Sound Editor, the Formants
knob will not reflect the change.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
150
Melodyne 4 studio
Since formants, almost by definition, do not move when the fundamental changes, strictly speaking it
is only in one of the four working areas of the Sound Editor, namely the EQ working area, that they
can be edited; in the Harmonics, Lo and Hi working areas, the bars are tied to harmonics that move in
parallel as note follows note, so it would be better in their case to speak of “manipulation of the
spectrum”. Useful results can nonetheless be achieved using the techniques just described in all four
working areas, and their combined effects are as follows:
A formant shift applied to all the bands of the EQ will be reflected in the Harmonics working
area; similarly, a formant shift applied to all the bars in the Harmonics working area will be
reflected in the EQ. The Hi and Lo working areas will reflect a shift applied to all the bands of
the EQ.
No shifting of formants in the Hi or Lo working areas, however, will ever be reflected in the
Harmonics or EQ working areas. This is because the Hi and Lo working areas only access half
each of the register of fundamentals, so changes effected in either area could not be displayed
in the Harmonics or EQ working areas.
If you have shifted the formants in the Hi and/or Lo working areas and then shift all the
formants in either the Harmonics or EQ working areas, the resulting shift will be reflected in the
Hi and/or Lo working areas. Whatever formant structure(s) you had established in the Hi and/or
Lo would in this case simply be shifted en bloc. By the same token, you can reset the
harmonics in the Hi or Lo working areas without this being reflected in the Harmonics or EQ
working areas.
If, on the other hand, you reset the formants in either the Harmonics or EQ working areas, all
four working areas will reflect the change. In the Harmonics and EQ working areas the
formants will be reset, whereas in Hi and Lo, only whatever editing was performed in those
individual windows will remain effective.
Whenever, in fact, you select anything less than all the harmonics or frequency bands before
shifting formants, the change will only be reflected in the working area in which the shift is
performed.
The envelopes in the Synth working area
This working area contains three envelopes with which you can control dynamically the intensity of the
spectral editing, the formant shifts and also the volume of the notes. Here you will also find two sliders
that govern the resynthesis in the Sound Editor.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
151
Melodyne 4 studio
The envelopes allow you to influence the notes of the track being edited in a variety of ways. You
could, for instance, lengthen slightly the attack of the notes of a piano track, giving the instrument a
subtly different character. You could introduce spectral filtering that diminished in intensity within the
lifetime of each note leaving the original spectrum in its stead. At the same time, you could make the
formants of each note glide upwards.
These effects act directly on all the notes of the track you are editing. Each note, even in polyphonic
audio material, follows the dictates of its own envelope, independently of the other notes. The
operating principle is the same as that of the envelope generator of a polyphonic synthesizer, except
that the Sound Editor’s envelopes are not triggered by MIDI messages but by the notes of an audio
track – or, to be more precise, by the musical starting points of the notes. If a note has no definite
starting point, the note separation preceding it serves as an envelope trigger. (You can examine and
set the starting points of the notes in Melodyne’s Note Assignment Mode.)
To shape the envelopes, either drag their triangular handles or drag directly in the gray area. Each
envelope has six parameters: starting level, attack time, sustain level, sustain time, decay time and
final level (i.e. the level subsequent to the decay phase).
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
152
Melodyne 4 studio
By dragging in the ruler beneath each envelope, you can determine the length of time in seconds
represented by the envelope display and available for the creation of the envelope.
The checkboxes next to the words “Spectrum”, “Formant” and “Amplitude” in the various panes are
used to activate and deactivate the corresponding envelope generators. [Command]-click an envelope
to restore its original, neutral settings.
These are represented by the horizontal line in the middle of the three envelope displays. In the area
above this central line, depending upon the envelope, the intensity of the spectral filtering is increased,
the formants are shifted upwards, or the amplitude is increased. In the area beneath this central line,
again depending upon the envelope, the intensity of the spectral filtering is decreased, the formants
are shifted downwards, or the amplitude is reduced.
The Spectrum envelope governs the intensity of all changes to the original mean spectrum effected in
the Harmonics, Hi, Lo and EQ working areas. The Formant envelope influences all the formant shifting
in these areas by moving all the formant structures created there upwards or downwards.
The Resynthesis parameters in the Synth working area
The Sound Editor, evidently, breaks the signal down into different frequencies that are modified and
then combined to form a new signal. The signals thus combined include not only harmonic partials
(the frequencies of which are integer multiples of that of the fundamental) but also enharmonic partials
and simple noise included in the signal, such as the squeaking of strings or pedals and background
noise) scattered throughout the spectrum and only rarely or accidentally coinciding with the harmonic
partials.
Admittedly the bars in the Harmonics, Lo and Hi working areas are centered on the harmonic partials,
but with Melodyne, unlike a pure synthesizer that has only a finite number of sine wave oscillators at
its disposal, signal components lying between the partials are not lost but reproduced in the signal, to
remain faithful to the original. By moving the Harmonics bars, you can alter the sound – radically, if
you so desire – but the basis of your work is always the material of your original recording.
The case is different when you employ the two Resynthesis sliders.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
153
Melodyne 4 studio
Magnitudes: As you move this slider to the right, changes in the amplitude of the individual harmonics
are gradually reduced until, when the slider reaches its rightmost extent, no timbral changes at all take
place within the lifetime of each note. The balls as a result stop bouncing up and down and come to
rest on the tops of the harmonics bars. Moving the slider to the right has the additional effect of
narrowing the band assigned to each harmonic so that any non-harmonic components gradually
disappear from the signal.
Phases: The different phases of the various partials also have a considerable influence upon the
natural reproduction of the signal. As you move this slider to the right, the original phase ratios
between partials are gradually reduced until all the partials are in phase. This primarily affects the
transients in the signal, making the sound more synthetic. You can use the Phases and Magnitudes
controls singly or in combination.
With both sliders at their rightmost extremes, the results sound particularly “artificial” and reminiscent
of a static synthesizer waveform. Aside from the fact that this may sometimes be precisely what you
want, the sound that results can also be an excellent starting point for further sound design using the
harmonics bars, envelopes and so on.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
154
Melodyne 4 studio
The Project Browser
The Project Browser shows you all the audio files used by each project and helps you manage them
and locate missing files.
Opening the Project Browser
Both the stand-alone implementation and the plug-in possess a Project Browser. It is opened by
clicking the Project tab in Melodyne’s info pane.
The Project Browser in the stand-alone implementation
In the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, the Project Browser displays all the audio files that
you have integrated into the project – whether via the File menu, by dragging and dropping, or by
recording. If you click a blob in the Note Editor, the Project Browser will highlight the audio file to which
the note in question belongs.
You can drag and drop files from the Project Browser into the project in the same way as from the File
Browser. You might do this, for example, when you wish to use the same file in several different
places within the project.
Please note that the Auto Stretch Switch also governs the dragging of files from the Project Browser: if
Auto Stretch is switched on, the tempo of the file will be adjusted to that of the project; if it is switched
off, the inserted file will retain its original tempo.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
155
Melodyne 4 studio
The Project Browser and transfers in the plug-in
In the plug-in implementation of Melodyne, the Project Browser displays a file entry for every
Melodyne transfer from the DAW that has been conducted.
The Melodyne plug-in records the audio material transferred from the DAW track, creating audio files
in the process that it stores on your hard disk. For material to be played back and edited in Melodyne,
it is not enough simply for the original audio files to be present in the DAW project; Melodyne also
requires its own audio files – the ones it created at the time of the transfer.
It is important to remember this when you wish to archive a DAW project or pass it on to another user
complete with your Melodyne editing. In this case, you must be sure to archive or hand over not only
the DAW project along with its audio and other files but also the transfer files created by Melodyne.
Otherwise, when the archived project is restored or when the recipient comes to open it, the
transferred passages and the editing you have applied to them will be inaccessible.
The question that arises, therefore, is this: Where does Melodyne store the files it creates and how
can you append them to your project? The answer is found in the Project Browser, which allows you
to manage the transfer files and also search for lost ones.
The Project Browser of the plug-in allows you to choose the folder in which the transfers will be kept.
To do this, click on the cog icon near the top right-hand corner of the Project Browser and choose Set
Path for Transfers. Your choice applies only to the current project. We recommend, therefore, that you
choose a folder within your DAW’s project folder as the path for transfers, as this will make both
archiving and passing on the project to others more straightforward.
You can set the path for your transfers at any stage in the editing process. As soon as you do so, all
the transfers created up to that point in the course of the project (and stored in Melodyne’s temporary
transfers folder) will be moved to the folder you have selected. Whether the new folder is on the same
or a different volume (e.g. a different hard disk) makes no difference; the existing files will be copied to
the new location. New transfers will be stored in the newly created folder.
Each time you set a new path for transfers, Melodyne tells you to save your DAW project so that the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
156
Melodyne 4 studio
new file references can be stored in a permanent fashion.
Automatic selection of the path for transfers
Many DAWs are able to tell Melodyne where the folder of the current project is located. In these
DAWs, you are not offered the option of specifying a different path. Instead, Melodyne automatically
stores its transfers in the project folder created by the DAW, thereby ensuring that your transfer files
are integrated into the project and do not get lost.
Do not worry, then, if your DAW offers you no way of choosing a path for the transfers. If that is the
case, Melodyne will store the files in question in the right place automatically.
Unused and missing audio files
In both the stand-alone implementation and the plug-in, audio files are color-coded in the browser as
follows:
Black: The file is present and being used by the project
Gray: The file is present but not in use (e.g. because you have deleted from the project all the
notes it contains)
Red: The file is needed but unavailable
The reason unused files are retained in the Project Browser rather than being deleted automatically is
that this allows you to undo the delete operation, which would otherwise be impossible.
If Melodyne cannot find one of the files it needs to use – either because it has been deleted or
because it was not moved to a new computer along with the other project files – the missing file will be
shown in red in the Project Browser. The notes belonging to such a file are shown in gray with a red
outline in the Note Editor and are muted during playback.
Commands in the drop-down and context menus
The drop-down menu opened by the cog icon in the Project Browser as well as the context menu in
the same browser offer the following commands, some of which are designed to facilitate the
assignment of missing files.
Set Path for Transfers... (only in the plug-in): This allows you to specify where the transfer files
should be stored, as is explained above.
Show in Finder/Explorer: If you choose this command after right-clicking on a file in the Project
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
157
Melodyne 4 studio
Browser, a Finder/Explorer window will open showing you the location of the file.
Copy File(s): This copies the selected file(s) onto the clipboard. This might be useful, for example, if
you have passed on to another user a project missing one or more of the requisite transfer files; by
selecting the missing file(s) in the Project Browser, choosing Copy File(s) and then pasting the
contents of the clipboard onto a hard disk or other storage medium, you can remedy the error swiftly
without having to hunt around for the missing file(s).
Copy Path for File(s): This copies as text to the clipboard the path of the selected files. This is useful
if you need to send someone a list of missing files.
Find Missing Files: This opens a file selection window that allows you to locate the missing file on
your hard disk and “show” it to Melodyne.
It is advisable to save your project after reassigning files, in order to store the updated references.
Copy External Files to Project Folder (only in the stand-alone implementation): This command
results in all the files that you have imported into your project from different locations on your hard
disk, whether via the File menu or by drag ‘n’ drop, being copied into the audio folder of your
Melodyne project. This folder, which is created when your Melodyne project is first saved, is on the
same level in the file hierarchy, and bears the same name, as the MPD file of the project, but with the
suffix “_Audio”. It is advisable to save your DAW project after executing this command, in order to
store the updated references.
Delete Unused Files in Project Folder: If you are certain that you will have no further need for files
marked as unused in the Project Browser, this command allows you to delete them and liberate space
on your hard disk.
The last two commands in the context menu allow you to specify whether the files in the Project
Browser should be displayed in alphabetical order or according to status (missing, used, unused).
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
158
Melodyne 4 studio
Project documents (stand-alone)
In the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, you store your projects as MPD documents. You can
open and work on several projects at the same time.
Opening a project document
As soon as you launch the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, a new empty project is created.
To load an existing project, choose File > Open from the menu bar. The Open Recent command offers
you swift access to the documents opened most recently.
Melodyne’s project documents have the suffix “.mpd”.
Creating a new project document and switching between projects
Choose File > New to create a new empty project.
Melodyne allows you to work on several projects at the same time. It is therefore unnecessary to close
the current project before opening another or creating a new one. Each open project is represented by
a tab just below the menu bar at the top left of the screen. Tabs are only displayed when more than
one project is open.
To switch to another project, simply click on the corresponding tab.
Closing and saving projects
To close a project, either choose File > Close or use the keyboard shortcut [Command]+W. Provided
more than one project is open at the time, you can also close a project by clicking on the ‘x’ symbol to
the left of the project name on the tab. If a project contains unsaved changes, an asterisk is displayed
beside the project name on the tab.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
159
Melodyne 4 studio
If you attempt to close a project containing unsaved changes, you will be offered the choice of saving
your changes and closing the project (Save), closing the project without saving your changes
(Discard) or returning to the open project (Cancel). The same dialog box is displayed whenever you
attempt to quit Melodyne while a document with unsaved changes is open.
With the commands Save and Save As... in the File menu, you can save a project at any time, under
its existing name or a new name, respectively.
The command Revert to Version Last Saved has the effect of restoring a project to the state it was in
when last saved i.e. of discarding all the changes you have made in the interim.
The audio folder of a project
When you save a project for the first time, as well as the project’s MPD file, Melodyne creates at the
same level in the directory hierarchy, a folder for the project’s audio files. This has the same name as
the project but with the suffix “_Audio”.
All the recordings you have made within the project and all the samples you have imported using the
Project Browser are stored in this folder.
If you wish to archive a project or pass it on to another user, you must archive or pass on not only its
MPD file but also this audio folder.
Copying audio from one open project to another
Whenever more than one project is open in Melodyne, you can copy individual notes or an entire
audio source from one project to another. Simply select the audio material, copy it, switch projects,
and paste.
It is also possible to drag an audio file from the Project Browser of one project to the tab of another. As
you drag the file over the tab, pause to allow Melodyne time to switch projects, before dropping the file
at the desired location within the destination project.
Importing projects
You can import the contents of one project into the current project by dragging its MPD file from your
computer’s Finder/Explorer or Melodyne’s File Browser.
If you select several MPD files in Melodyne’s Open dialog, these will be loaded simultaneously as
separate projects, each with its own tab.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
160
Melodyne 4 studio
Note Assignment Mode
Since Melodyne invariably conducts an analysis (we call it “detection”) of the audio material before
you can do any editing, the correctness or otherwise of this analysis has a considerable influence
upon how well you are able subsequently to work with the material and how good the results of your
editing sound. For this reason it is important to check whether Melodyne has detected the notes within
your material accurately and if necessary correct any mistakes. This where Melodyne’s Note
Assignment Mode comes in.
What editing the detection involves
When you are working in Note Assignment Mode, none of the changes you make has any audible
effect on the notes themselves. All you are doing is ensuring that the notes that are displayed do
actually correspond to those that were played or sung. In other words, you are bringing what you see
into line with what you hear. In the process, you are working at all times on the display of the original
recording and, with it, so to speak, on the basis for all musical changes made later with Melodyne. The
sounder the basis, the better the eventual sound of your edits.
The fact that it is sensible and necessary to check and edit the detection and, with it, the interpretation
of the audio material may seem tiresome at first sight. But it brings with it enormous advantages, for
there are often several possible interpretations of the audio material, and which is the correct one in a
given acoustic and musical context is for you, ultimately, to decide.
But don’t worry, the detection process in Melodyne is mainly automatic and the end result coherent.
How much there is to edit in this mode depends upon the algorithm used and the audio material in
question. With a dry recording of a single vocalist, for example, you will very rarely encounter
problems. It may happen from time to time that a note is detected in the wrong octave, in which case,
if you later transpose it, it will sound unnatural. Correcting the detection in such cases is a task swiftly
accomplished. The same goes for percussive material, where it is generally only necessary to
introduce or remove the occasional note separation.
It is the detection of polyphonic material, naturally, that requires the most editing. Here the issues are
more complex and more interpretations are possible than with the other algorithms, though, once
again, the amount of editing required is mainly dependent upon the nature of the audio material.
Thanks to their clear overtone structure, notes played on a xylophone, for example, are far easier to
detect accurately than any found on a distorted guitar track. This is because in the latter case the
array of overtones is more complex and assigning them to the correct notes more difficult. With such
and similar signals it might happen, for example, that a particularly prominent overtone is interpreted
as a separate note rather than as a component of another note (known as the “fundamental”) lower
down. If this mistake is not corrected and you later shift the pitch of the overtone on its own, leaving
the fundamental unchanged, the two components will clash and consequently sound unnatural.
The overtone example illustrates it clearly: In many cases, Melodyne cannot be sure of its decision, as
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
161
Melodyne 4 studio
it cannot know which notes were actually intended and played. In Note Assignment Mode, therefore,
the object is to ensure that the notes displayed correspond to those that were actually played and
intended. The advantage comes when you begin editing: a Note Editor that displays only the correct
notes and the best possible sounding results.
What is edited and where
Like the choice of algorithm, Note Assignment Mode applies invariably to all the notes of i) a particular
audio file, ii) a particular recording, or iii) a particular transferred segment – we will use the term “audio
source” to cover all three. When the Note Editor contains notes from different audio sources, begin by
selecting a note belonging to the source the detection of which you plan to edit.
Now click the wrench (spanner) icon next to the toolbox of the Note Editor to activate Note
Assignment Mode. The background in the Note Editor changes color to show that you are no longer in
normal Edit mode but have switched to Note Assignment Mode. In Note Assignment Mode, what you
see and hear is the original state of the audio source; any editing you may have performed on it
previously is ignored here.
Any time you click on the blob icon (to the left of the wrench), you will leave Note Assignment Mode
and return to edit mode. There you will hear once again the results of any editing you performed
before switching to Note Assignment Mode. This only applies, however, if you have not changed
algorithm in Note Assignment Mode, as any change of algorithm triggers a fresh analysis, and any
time you trigger a fresh analysis – any time, in other words, the detection process is repeated – all
editing that has been performed on the notes previously is lost.
The Algorithm Inspector
Whenever Note Assignment Mode is active, the Algorithm Inspector is available in the info pane.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
162
Melodyne 4 studio
Algorithm: The pop-up button at the top shows the current algorithm. With the menu displayed, you
can select a different algorithm from the list, thereby triggering a fresh analysis. Warning: Any time you
switch algorithms, all editing previously performed on the audio source in question is lost! For this
reason, you should make a habit of checking to make sure the best algorithm has been selected and,
if this is not the case, choosing a more suitable one before you begin correcting the analysis or editing
notes.
Tip: In the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, it is possible, prior to switching algorithms, to
save the assignment file of the audio source (see below) and, if not satisfied with the new algorithm,
reload it. In this case, the previous algorithm – and, with it, all your previous editing of the detection –
will be restored; but only of the detection; any normal editing of the notes you may have performed in
edit mode will, even in this case, be lost. This is an inevitable consequence of switching algorithms.
In the preview section, you will find the following important options to assist you with the editing of the
detection and the fine-tuning of the algorithm parameters.
Synth: The objective in Note Assignment Mode is to ensure that the notes displayed really do match
the notes intended and played. Since, however, in Note Assignment Mode you are listening to the full
original sound of the audio file you plan to edit and editing of the blobs has no audible effect,
determining whether notes have been correctly detected is generally only possible on a visual basis.
This is where the Monitoring Synth comes in: Using a synthetic tone generator, the Monitoring Synth
plays the blobs exactly as they appear, thereby providing you with acoustic as well as visual feedback.
You can toggle the synth on and off by clicking on the “Z” icon; click and drag upwards or downwards
to control the volume.
The Monitoring Synth is not available when the Percussive or Universal algorithms are selected.
Tempo, Pitch and Formants: With these three controls, you can “simulate” changes to the
corresponding parameters in order to examine their effect upon the current algorithm settings.
Example: you have changed the formant character in the Algorithm Inspector. This change, however,
has no effect until you shift the formants in normal edit mode, as in Note Assignment Mode you
always hear the original state of the audio source. You would have, therefore, to leave Note
Assignment Mode, shift the formants by way of experiment in normal edit mode, and then return to
Note Assignment Mode if you felt any further adjustment to the formant character was necessary. The
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
163
Melodyne 4 studio
preview controls make such a procedure unnecessary: simply turn the formant control, and you can
begin at once experimenting with the character slider without ever leaving Note Assignment Mode.
The tempo and pitch controls operate much the same way. The values of all three preview controls
only apply temporarily and are reset each time you leave Note Assignment Mode.
NB: When the synth is in use, the controls for pitch and formants are grayed out, as they cannot be
used simultaneously.
The other parameters in the Algorithm Inspector relate to the behavior of the algorithm, allowing you to
fine-tune it for the entire audio source.
Playback Type: Melodyne applies two different processes for the playback of audio. The Melodic
Algorithm employs as standard the playback type “Tonal”, whilst the other algorithms favor “Complex”.
These choices are generally the best in practice but you can override them here if you wish.
The difference is most noticeable when time stretching is performed (and also when notes are
transposed upwards): material with clearly recognisable pitches generally sounds better with the
“Tonal” option. For material in which the pitch of notes is not clear and where noise components are
more in evidence better results are generally obtained with “Complex”. Experimenting with the two
playback types is therefore most useful when material falls between these two stools. Experiment with
the tempo and pitch preview controls to see which playback type is best suited to your needs. Please
note, however, that if “Tonal” is selected, the Character, Transients and Formant Character
parameters described below are no longer available and therefore grayed out.
Tip: For the playback type “Tonal”, a variation called “Tonal (high)” is also available. If you are working
with sopranos or very high-pitched melodic instruments (such as piccolos), instead of “Tonal”, you
should try out the variant “Tonal (high)”, as this could enhance the sound quality. Voices or
instruments with normal registers, however, are less well served by “Tonal (high)”, so its use in such
cases is best avoided.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
164
Melodyne 4 studio
Character: This is a another pop-up button and allows you to select between a smoother and a
crisper playback. If “Crisp” is selected, Melodyne uses a smaller processing window that allows fast
acoustic movements in the signal to be reproduced more clearly. This setting is therefore best for
percussive sounds and others with many fast tone changes. To soft, sustained sounds, however, the
crisper setting can introduce a certain restlessness. To avoid this, opt for “Smooth” which employs a
larger processing window and is therefore more suitable for the reproduction of smoother, more
gradual tonal transitions.
Transients: This parameter is only available when the Universal and Percussive algorithms are in
use. It determines how the transients in the signal should be handled during playback. With the slider
fully to the right (the default position in the case of the Percussive algorithm), the transients are clearer
and more acute. As the slider is moved to the left, the transients become softer. By default, with the
Universal algorithm selected, the slider is in the middle. Experiment to see which setting delivers the
best sound with your own material.
Formant Correction Up/Down: Whenever you transpose a note in Melodyne, the formants are
automatically corrected to avoid, in the case of vocals, the dreaded “Mickey Mouse” effect. Or, in
technical terms, whenever you transpose a note a whole tone upwards, Melodyne automatically
corrects the resulting formants by shifting them back down a tone, in this way preserving the original
timbre. In the case of the human voice, this is generally what is wanted, but with an acoustic guitar
perhaps not: With many sounds, it can add charm if the formants are transposed in parallel with the
fundamentals – i.e. not automatically corrected.
The Formants Up and Down sliders are provided, therefore, to allow you to determine the degree of
the automatic formant correction – independently for upward and downward transpositions. With the
slider all the way to the right, the full 100% formant correction is applied; fully to the left, no automatic
formant correction at all is applied. When you return to normal edit mode, you will only hear the effect
of these parameters if you shift, or have shifted, the formants of one or more notes in the Note Editor.
To simulate and test their effect in Note Assignment Mode, use the pitch controller in the preview
section of the Algorithm Inspector. If the current value for this is positive, you will be able to preview
the effect of the Up slider; if the current value is negative, you will hear the effect of the Down slider.
F(ormant) Character: When formants are shifted, this slider alters their weighting in the frequency
range and therefore alters the sound of the shifted formants. Experiment to see with which setting
your material is best reproduced. This parameter has no audible effect when you return to normal edit
mode unless and until notes have been transposed in the Note Editor. To simulate and test its effect in
Note Assignment Mode, use the formant control in the preview section of the Algorithm Inspector.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
165
Melodyne 4 studio
Separate Audio: When you are editing the detection of an audio source, Melodyne sometimes has a
great deal of processing to perform in the background and large volumes of data to move in and out of
its cache. The option Separate Audio gives you control over this behavior. If the Auto box is checked,
with each change you make, Melodyne performs all the requisite calculations immediately. The
advantage? Whenever you use the preview controls to test your algorithm settings, Melodyne
accesses the latest data, and everything sounds exactly as it would in normal edit mode. The
disadvantage? Melodyne sometimes needs to introduce a processing pause during which the
progress indicator appears and your work is interrupted.
Since you do not always need the preview controls, you have the option of changing this behavior by
clearing the Auto checkbox. The various calculations will then no longer be performed immediately but
only when you click the Now button or leave Note Assignment Mode. The advantage of this is that
your workflow is not interrupted. The disadvantage is that the preview controls in this case do not
always reflect the changes you have made. When there is a discrepancy between the previous data
and the current state, the Now button flashes to warn you. If you click it, Melodyne will perform all the
outstanding calculations and update the totality of the data.
Assignment File Load/Save (stand-alone implementation only): Melodyne can, if you wish, save
your audio source as an assignment file containing such information as which algorithm was used for
the source, the status of the algorithm parameters, and what editing was applied to the detection. The
advantage of this is that it means the detection process does not have to be repeated each time the
file is opened in Melodyne; furthermore, it means you only need to edit the detection and set the
algorithm parameters once, as your work and settings will be restored automatically when the file is
reopened. With the Save button, you can store such an assignment file alongside the edited audio file;
the Load button allows you to reopen the file, in order, for instance, to revert to the original state after
an inadvertent change of algorithm.
The Main Tool in Note Assignment Mode
In Note Assignment Mode, the toolbox contains tools with functions other than those used in normal
Edit mode. The most important difference is this: In Note Assignment Mode, the tools have no direct or
immediate impact on the sound of the notes; their object, rather, is to bring the detected and displayed
notes as closely as possible into line with the actual music. This makes it possible subsequently to edit
the material more efficiently and obtain optimal acoustic results.
Which tools are available depends upon the algorithm, as, to a lesser extent, do their functions.
The Main Tool in Note Assignment Mode combines important functions of the other tools, as it does in
normal editing mode, so that you can perform a variety of common tasks without changing tools.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
166
Melodyne 4 studio
In the lower part of a blob, the Main Tool functions as the Activation Tool.
In the upper part of a blob, the Main Tool functions as the Note Separation Tool.
We will deal with each of these in turn.
The Activation Tool
The Activation Tool has no function when the Percussive and Universal algorithms are selected.
If you click on a note with the Activation Tool, its overtone series is shown in the editing background.
This enables you to recognize at a glance the octaves and other harmonic ratios of the displayed
notes.
The Melodic Algorithm: Double-clicking on a blob instructs Melodyne to remove the note in question
to the next most plausible pitch, if there is one. Particularly plausible alternative pitches are denoted by
hollow blobs – so-called “potential notes” – and tend to lie an octave above or below the original blob.
You can also double-click directly on one of these potential notes in order to activate it and deactivate
the original blob. If Melodyne is unable to find a plausible alternative to the blob you have
double-clicked, it leaves it where it is.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
167
Melodyne 4 studio
Dragging the blobs vertically with this tool has much the same effect: It instructs Melodyne to search
higher up or further down for an alternative pitch. If a plausible pitch is found in the direction indicated,
the blob snaps to it; otherwise it returns to its original position. You will use these double-clicking or
dragging techniques to correct occasional octave errors in the detection.
The Polyphonic Sustain and Polyphonic Decay algorithms: With the polyphonic algorithms,
potential notes play a particularly important role. It can happen, for example, that a note has an
overtone so prominent that this is taken for a separate note and assigned a blob of its own. In extreme
cases, it can happen that a solid blob is awarded only to the overtone in question and denied to the
fundamental itself; here, since the fundamental has been reduced to the status of potential note, it is
represented by a hollow blob.
If you double-click on a solid blob with the Activation Tool, you deactivate the corresponding note. The
spectral energy that Melodyne had attributed to this note will then automatically be redistributed
among the other notes sounding at the time. An overtone wrongly granted the status of fundamental
would, when deactivated, be reassigned to its fundamental. If you double-click on a potential note, it
will be activated. Spectral energy in this case will be “confiscated” from the other notes sounding at
the time and given to the newly activated note.
Dragging blobs upwards or downwards has much the same effect as with the Melodic algorithm.
Melodyne searches in the corresponding direction to see whether a fundamental might plausibly be
located there. In all probability, if a pitch is found that could reasonably be that of the fundamental, a
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
168
Melodyne 4 studio
potential note will already have been detected there; this will then be activated and the previous note
deactivated.
The slider and the Energy Image
When you are editing the detection of polyphonic audio material and have selected the Main or
Activation tools, you will see a slider next to the toolbox. This allows you to determine the number of
potential notes to be displayed and how many actual notes are derived from them.
If you move the right-hand indicator (the “Parenthesis”) in the slider to the left, fewer potential notes
will be displayed. If you drag it to the right, more potential notes will appear. Choose a setting that
ensures that only as many potential notes are displayed as you may conceivably wish to activate in
the course of the subsequent editing. That will give you a clearer overview.
Now drag the left-hand indicator (the “Ball”) from side to side. As you drag it to the left, you reduce the
probability of the potential notes displayed becoming active notes, thereby reducing the number of
active notes. As you drag it to the right, you increase that probability, thereby creating more active
notes from the potential notes displayed.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
169
Melodyne 4 studio
There can never be more active than potential notes, so the Ball can never pass through the
Parenthesis but merely pushes it to the right when it wants to go further, thereby causing additional
potential notes to be displayed and activated simultaneously. Adjust the two indicators until the
number of active notes displayed is as close as you can get to the number of notes that were actually
played. Then proceed to the manual correction of individual notes.
Tip: If you move the indicator a long way, Melodyne is required to do a great deal of processing, which
is why it can take a moment to display the results. You can reduce this delay by checking the option
Update Audio Signal Immediately in the View menu’s Note Editor Options sub-menu – at the cost, of
course, of a temporary increase in the CPU load.
Now and then, it can happen that a note that can be heard in the material is not detected as an active
note, and, even with the Parenthesis at its maximum setting, is not even shown as a potential note. If
that happens, move the Parenthesis fully to the right (to its maximum setting) and then move the
mouse pointer over the position in the Note Editor where the missing note ought to be. Around the
mouse pointer, in the form of an “energy image”, notes will now appear that were detected neither as
active nor as potential notes. When you have identified the missing note in this way, double-click on it
to transform it into an active note. Thereafter, by subsequent double-clicking, you can toggle the
status of these notes between “potential” and “active” just like that of any others.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
170
Melodyne 4 studio
The Venetian Blinds
With instruments in particular that generate powerful overtones, it can happen that over a wide range
notes are detected that you perfectly well know are far higher (or lower) than any that were actually
played. In such cases, the Venetian Blinds come in handy; if you can’t see them at the top or bottom
of the editing area, scroll upwards or downwards until you can.
You can raise or lower the top blind by dragging its thick bottom edge and do the same with the top
edge of the bottom blind, in this way delimiting the range within which Melodyne assigns notes. All
notes partially concealed by the Venetian Blinds are automatically deactivated unless they have
previously been activated by hand. You can still “reach through” the Venetian Blinds, however, to turn
notes on or off. The Venetian Blinds provide a useful first approximation that you can later correct by
activating and deactivating notes singly by hand.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
171
Melodyne 4 studio
Starting point lines and designated starting points
If, in Note Assignment Mode, you select one of the separation tools, vertical lines appear in the Note
Editor. At the same time, a slider with two indicators appears next to the toolbox.
We call the vertical lines “starting point lines”. Rising in parallel from their respective blobs to the Time
Ruler, they show the musical starting points that Melodyne has identified in the audio file. A
“designated starting point” is indicated by a short vertical line (a “vertical”) topped by an inverted
triangle and is invariably found near the start of a blob (though not necessarily at its leftmost
extremity); when active, it indicates what, for the purposes of timing, Melodyne considers to be the
effective musical starting point of the note. The musical starting point may, but does not necessarily
have to, be aligned with the separator at the beginning of the note. Think of a brass instrument, for
example, where each note is often heralded by a certain amount of wind noise. This noise also
belongs to the note, so it falls to the right of the note separator. What is relevant from the standpoint of
timing, however – as is the case also with quantization – is the moment when the sound really unfolds
and the pitch first becomes discernible; that is the timing-critical moment, and it is that later instant that
is designated the musical starting point. If Melodyne is unable to pinpoint the musical starting point of
a note, no starting point line is displayed and the note has no designated starting point. For the
purposes of quantization, the leftmost extremity of the note is then considered to be the starting point.
Each of the longer, starting point lines also culminates in an inverted triangular indicator, which you
will see just below the Time Ruler. This indicator can be solid, in which case the corresponding
starting point line is visible and active; or it can be hollow, in which case the line is invisible: we call it
in this case a “potential” or “inactive” starting point line. An inactive starting point line invariably
coincides with the beginning of a note. For the note in question, however, Melodyne has been unable
to discern with sufficient confidence a musically relevant starting point; it is for this reason that the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
172
Melodyne 4 studio
starting point line is only a potential one and that no vertical (no designated starting point indicator) is
displayed at the blob.
The two slider indicators, the Parenthesis and the Ball, govern, respectively, how sensitive Melodyne
is to the presence of potential starting points and how willing it is to activate them, the result being
reflected in turn by the total number of triangles displayed and the percentage of these that are solid
red. As you move the Parenthesis gradually to the right, more and more hollow triangles (indicating
the presence of “potential” starting points) appear beneath the Time Ruler; this reflects Melodyne’s
increasing sensitivity that is allowing it to divine more and more points in the material at which a
starting point might reside – “might” because the lines that are added remain invisible and do not (yet)
have any effect upon the blobs.
You can alter this, however, with the slider’s second indicator: the Ball. As you move the Ball to the
right, more and more of the previously invisible, “potential” starting point lines will become active; and
directly below them, at the level of the blobs, designated starting points will appear at the same time.
You can activate a potential starting point line by double-clicking on the hollow triangular indicator
beneath the Time Ruler and, conversely, deactivate an active line by double-clicking on the
corresponding solid triangle. Double-clicking in a free place in the ruler generates a new starting point
line.
By dragging its indicator, it is possible to move a starting point line forwards or backwards in time; this,
however, will seldom be necessary, as Melodyne almost invariably identifies the ideal position. You
may still wish, though, to do some fine-tuning. If, for the purposes of experiment, you move a starting
point line from left to right, you will notice that as soon as you pass over the start of a blob, a vertical
appears complete with inverted triangle (indicating the presence of a designated starting point) that
follows the line for a while before disappearing as soon as the note begins to decay, as, clearly, it
would be futile to look any further for the musical starting point.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
173
Melodyne 4 studio
Starting point lines exhibit a kind of “magnetic” property seen not only when you move them but also
when separating notes and designating starting points manually.
The Note Separation Tool and the Separation Type Tool
The Note Separation Tool and the Separation Type Tool (directly below it in the toolbar) are available
with all algorithms and function in the same way as their counterparts in Edit Mode. You can set or
remove note separations by double-clicking and also move them along the time axis. With the
Separation Type Tool, you can toggle between hard and soft separations.
By contrast with normal editing mode: In Note Assignment Mode, the separation tools are not used to
reshape the music but to edit the analysis or “detection”. The object is to ensure that the blobs
represent as accurately as possible the actual music.
Also, edits performed in Note Assignment Mode on chords are implemented, thanks to the magnetic
quality of the starting point line, with sample accuracy. In normal Edit mode, this is not possible.
Tip: To provide two or more notes of differing pitch with a soft separation, you can select “Convert
Selection to Connected Sequence” from the context menu (see below).
Since the placing of note separations and the editing of starting points often go hand in hand, you can
also edit starting points with the Note Separation Tool. Simply move the pointer into the vicinity of the
triangular starting point markers near the Time Ruler and it changes appearance to resemble the
Starting Point Tool.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
174
Melodyne 4 studio
It is possible at any time to deactivate a designated starting point (i.e. withdraw the designation). A
new starting point can only be designated if an active starting point line is present in a plausible place
i.e. the left-hand end of a blob. Look for a moment at the starting point indicators: In the relevant
place, a hollow triangle (indicating the presence of a potential starting point) will probably already be
displayed. Double-click on the triangle to activate the starting point line.
If no potential starting point line has been identified at the desired position, using the slider near the
toolbox you can cause additional potential starting point lines to appear: to do this, simply move the
right-hand control element (the Parenthesis) further to the right.
Alternatively, by double-clicking on an empty area of the ruler at the level of the starting point markers,
you can create a new starting point line and drag it into position with the mouse. If, in the case of
polyphonic material, a chord appears at the corresponding position, the action will affect all chord
members.
When, with the Melodic, Percussive or Universal algorithms selected, you activate a potential starting
point line or create a new starting point line, a note separation is automatically inserted near a note at
the position in question.
Tip: When editing starting point lines, if ever you have the feeling that somewhere a note starting point
exists but that it is not indicated even by a potential starting point line, scrubbing in the relevant area
often makes it to easier to locate the exact position. At the position in question, a rather loud noise
component will be audible. Where the noise is loudest, release the mouse button and double-click to
place a starting point line.
The context menu: When you select one of the note separation tools, a context menu appears in the
Note Editor in which you will find the following commands:
Convert Selection to Connected Sequence: With this command, you can convert a selection
comprising two or more adjacent notes between which there are hard separations into a
connected sequence with soft separations. This is also possible with notes differing in pitch and
allows you gather together melodic lines to make more coherent editing possible later.
Separate Note: This command separates notes automatically at a point determined by
Melodyne. It is useful when you need to make precise cuts in a vocal passage and isolate
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
175
Melodyne 4 studio
sibilants or breathing noise prior to editing using the tools.
Reseparate Notes at Starting Point Lines: This command splits the selected notes at all active
starting point lines passing through them. It offers you, therefore, a convenient way of inserting
separations at the same point in multiple notes simultaneously, while removing any superfluous
separations found elsewhere.
Separate Notes as Trill: The effect of this command is to slice a selection of one or more notes
into smaller segments determined by the instantaneous pitch of each note. This is done by
inserting note separations into the slopes of the pitch curve as it rises and falls, thereby turning
each ‘hill’ and each ‘valley’ of a vibrato into a separate note.
Please note that the fluctuations in the Pitch Curve must be fairly pronounced for the “Separate Notes
as Trill” function to have any effect and that it is only available when the Melodic algorithm is active,
being grayed out in every other case. If you wish to assign a shortcut to the command “Separate
Notes as Trill”, this can be done using the Preferences dialog.
Reset Separations Based on the Selected Grid: This command separates the notes at obvious
starting points as well as at suitable positions on the selected Time Grid. This command is
available with the Melodic, Percussive and Universal
algorithms.
The Starting Point Tool
The Starting Point Tool is the second sub-tool of the Note Separation Tool.
It is available with all algorithms and is used to designate or undesignate starting points manually by
double-clicking. This tool function is also available in Note Assignment Mode by checking the
corresponding option in the Note Inspector.A designated starting point is indicated by a vertical (i.e. a
short vertical line) with a red triangle on top located at or near the leftmost extremity of the blob.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
176
Melodyne 4 studio
By moving the Starting Point Tool in the region of the starting point markers beneath the Time Ruler,
you can also edit these with the Starting Point Tool. As a rule, however, you will generally use the
Note Separation Tool for this purpose, as described above.
The Energy Share Tool
This tool is only available with the Polyphonic Sustain and Polyphonic Decay algorithms. It regulates
the distribution of particular sound components among notes sounding simultaneously.
In the case of chords or certain harmonic intervals (e.g. an octave), the same overtone might be
shared by two or more fundamentals, so Melodyne is obliged to share it out among the notes
concerned. It may be that the resulting distribution is not to your liking, in which case you can exert a
healing influence: By assigning more energy to one fundamental (at the expense of the others), you
enrich its harmonic content, giving it, generally, a brighter sound with greater penetration. Conversely,
you can deprive a fundamental of some of its energy (to the profit of the others). In this way, you can
adjust the tone color of the various notes to achieve the ideal balance.
Please note that this tool, by its very nature, only has any effect when two or more notes sounding
simultaneously have been detected in polyphonic material and one of them is being edited.
Furthermore, only as much energy can be shared as is actually present at the position in question and
available to the blob in question. With this tool, you are therefore to some extent entering a desired
value. How and to what extent it can be attained depends upon the realities of the audio material.
In the extreme case, the tool does ... nothing. If you have two notes sounding simultaneously, for
example, the higher of which does not appear in the overtone series of the lower (you can see
whether or not this is the case by using the Activation Tool to display the overtone series), then these
two notes have no shared energy that could be reassigned using the Energy Assignment Tool. In such
cases, therefore, the tool has no effect whether visual or acoustic.
Click with this tool on a blob and drag upwards to increase its allocation of energy or downwards to
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
177
Melodyne 4 studio
reduce it.
The Note Inspector
As is the case in normal edit mode, the Note Inspector in Note Assignment Mode governs the selected
notes – only here, different parameters are on view.
Pitch: The three fields correspond to those in edit mode and display i) the nearest note of the
chromatic scale, ii) the deviation (if any) in cents from it, and iii) the equivalent frequency in hertz. It is
not possible to input values into these fields but their content is updated whenever a blob is assigned
to a different pitch (e.g. to correct an octave error).
Energy share: The inspector field reflects the changes made with the Energy Share Tool as well as
allowing you to enter values directly.
Hard separation: The status of this field is determined either by changes made with the Separation
Type Tool or by checking/clearing the box. You can only check this box if there is currently a soft
separation between the selected note and an adjacent one.
Starting Point: The status of this field is determined either by changes made with the Starting Point
Tool or by checking/clearing the box. Here, just as with the corresponding tool, you can attach the
selected note to a starting point line or detach it from it.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
178
Melodyne 4 studio
Tempo detection and Auto Stretch
Melodyne is capable of recognizing not only the notes but also the prevailing tempos and time
signatures within a recording. This, combined with the tempo editing functions, offers you fascinating
creative possibilities for your music.
Introduction
Melodyne’s tempo detection and tempo adjustment functions are used often and to great effect, yet
they execute for the most part quietly in the background. Example: Drag a recording, a phrase or a
loop into a document in the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne. Melodyne detects the tempo of
the music and adjusts it to that of your project (even if this includes gradual tempo changes). The
audio file runs in sync without your having to give it a moment’s thought.
No tempo detection is performed in two cases:
When an assignment file containing the results of a previous detection and any editing thereof
has already been saved for the new audio file – here the tempo has been detected already so
there is no need to repeat the process;
When Apple loops are imported, as these already contain information regarding their tempo –
here, again, further analysis of the tempo would be pointless.
People often record to a click so that a timing reference will be available later. Often this metronomic
click is felt to be constraining: Without the click, there is greater freedom and the music that results
sounds more dynamic and vibrant; it is capable of ‘breathing’.
With Melodyne, you can dispense with the use of a click when recording and still retain a timing
reference. The trick is simple: Instead of playing to the click resulting in a rigid timeline, with Melodyne
you can simply adopt the tempo map of the actual recording – with all the minor fluctuations in tempo,
sudden or gradual tempo changes, and changes in time signature it contains. The music, in other
words, dictates to the timeline – not the other way around.
Whether in its detection of notes or in its detection of tempo, Melodyne never obliges you to be
content with the dictates of algorithmic fate. You are invariably able to edit and improve upon the
results of the tempo detection, overruling Melodyne’s decisions wherever necessary with decisions
based upon your own knowledge of the music and thereby ensuring that the tempo map corresponds
exactly to the music.
In this way, you create the ideal foundations for the actual tempo editing. This done, you could, for
example, make the timing of a band recording tighter by quantizing the recording – not to a rigid grid
but to one derived from the music itself, reflecting all the fluctuations and changes in tempo found in
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
179
Melodyne 4 studio
the original recording. The grid that emerges from the detection is still open to optimization, either by
tightening it up or by redrawing the tempo map. In short: Melodyne offers you for the editing of musical
tempo the same unique freedom and power as for working with notes.
Tempo in the stand-alone and plug-in implementations
Melodyne’s tempo detection only plays a role in the stand-alone implementation of the program; not in
the plug-in. The reason is simple: The plug-in operates within a DAW from which it adopts not only the
audio material but also all tempo information. Naturally with the Melodyne plug-in you can edit the
timing in a multitude of ways, but it would be more than a little counterproductive to begin manipulating
the tempo, as this would inevitably result in Melodyne and the DAW parting company. The same does
not apply to the stand-alone implementation, from which you have full control of the tempo.
In consequence, the plug-in implementation of Melodyne has no functions for the editing of tempo.
With two exceptions:
The plug-in offers functions for “learning” tempo progressions, if any are created in the DAW
after the transfer or are changed subsequently.
In the ARA version of the Melodyne plug-in, there are functions for editing the tempo
background that correspond to those in the stand-alone implementation, as – thanks to ARA –
the DAW also profits from Melodyne and can, for example, adopt the tempo detected by, and
edited using, Melodyne throughout the song.
In the following, we present the fundamental concepts for the handling of tempo in the stand-alone
implementation of Melodyne. The two exceptions just referred to and the detailed operation of the
Tempo Editor are subjects dealt with in separate tours.
Determining the tempo in the stand-alone implementation
In the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne, with a new document the tempo and time signature
fields are initially empty; instead of a value in each case a simple dash (“–”) is displayed.
The Time Ruler, initially, is calibrated in seconds. So you begin with a blank sheet and can either enter
the tempo and time signature for the Melodyne project manually or allow Melodyne’s tempo detection
routines to do their work.
To enter the tempo manually, proceed as follows (the default values, unless others are entered by
hand, are 120 BPM for the tempo, 4/4 for the time signature, and quarter note (crotchet) intervals for
the Time Grid):
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
180
Melodyne 4 studio
Enter the desired value in beats per minute (BPM) in the tempo field
Enter the desired values for the numerator and denominator of the time signature
Enter a musical note value instead of seconds in the menu for the Time Grid
Click on the button between the time signature and tempo fields in the transport bar to activate
the metronome.
Opening the Tempo Editor
If you are used to working with a DAW, you may prefer to set the tempo manually before beginning
work on your project. Since Melodyne is extremely good at detecting the tempo, it is in many cases
easier and more practical simply to allow Melodyne’s tempo detection routines to determine the tempo
for you.
To allow Melodyne’s tempo detection routines to determine the tempo, proceed as follows:
Instead of initializing the tempo, time signature and Time Grid values manually, as just
described, begin recording with the tempo and time signature fields empty. Now you no longer
need a click to listen to as you record because Melodyne will detect the tempo and tempo
fluctuations within the recording and adjust the grid lines and subsequent click accordingly.
Instead of entering a numerical value for the tempo, in other words, you are determining the
tempo through your performance.
Melodyne’s tempo detection routines work in an analogous fashion when, instead of recording,
you import previously recorded audio. The same condition applies here: you must begin with a
blank sheet i.e. you must leave the tempo and time signature fields and the Time Grid menu
untouched. To determine the tempo by means of an audio file, you must load it either by
choosing File > Import Audio from the main menu or by drag ‘n’ drop. Melodyne will then detect
the tempo of the file, set the project tempo accordingly and position the file in such a way that
its musical content begins at Bar 1. As a rule, the first note of the music appears in Bar 1, with
any silence in the recording that precedes the first note falling in the negative zone of the Time
Ruler. If the music begins with an anacrusis, however, (i.e. one or more unstressed notes that
precede the first bar line), Melodyne places this in Bar -1, so that the stress falls on the
downbeat at the start of Bar 1.
If you like, however, you can realign the bar lines by dragging in the Time Signature Editor. This is
useful, for example, if you want to renumber the bars or simply nudge the entire contents of the file
one beat to the left or right, so that downbeats become upbeats and vice versa.
In Melodyne studio, you can import multiple audio files in one go to determine and set the tempo for
the entire project. When you do this, Melodyne’s tempo detection is based on information derived from
all the files concerned, which increases the reliability of the process. To take advantage of this facility,
proceed exactly as described above, only select more than one file. When these are imported, they
will be placed on separate tracks.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
181
Melodyne 4 studio
Please note that files imported simultaneously must belong together musically for the tempo detection
to make any sense. If you’ve recorded a band playing live, for example, with different tracks dedicated
to the various instruments, it would make sense to import them all in one go, as they share a common
tempo. It would be nonsensical, on the other hand, to import simultaneously one track recorded at 120
BPM and another recorded at 93 BPM and expect Melodyne to detect a common tempo. Furthermore,
we recommend that the first batch of tracks imported, upon which the joint tempo detection will be
based, should only include instruments that maintain a fairly regular tempo. Solo instruments played
very freely, for instance, that might confuse the tempo detection, are best excluded from the first batch
and only imported later.
Auto Stretch when importing additional audio files
Once the tempo has been determined, by whichever means, your project will have a tempo map with
a time signature, an appropriately spaced grid and a tempo curve tracing any fluctuations in tempo it
contains. The presence of this tempo map introduces new possibilities when additional files are
imported; possibilities that were not present when we were working with a blank sheet. The Auto
Stretch Switch, for example, which was grayed out before, now offers you two choices:
With Auto Stretch switched on, every new file imported into the project will be adjusted to
ensure it conforms to the tempo map in place and replicates any tempo changes it contains. To
make this possible, Melodyne first analyzes the tempo of the material to be imported and then
squeezes or stretches it wherever necessary to match the tempo of the project.
With Auto Stretch switched off, no attempt is made to adjust the tempo of the imported file to
that of the project; so initially, it simply plays back at its original speed. You are perfectly free, of
course, once the material has been imported, to stretch or squeeze notes to your heart’s
content as you edit the material. All turning off the Auto Stretch switch does is prevent the
tempo of the imported file adjusting automatically to the tempo map of the project.
Where on the Time Grid the file is initially positioned depends upon the procedure used to import it:
If you choose File > Import Audio from the main menu or drag the file onto the track header, the
physical start of the file (i.e. the first sample) will be aligned with the “0:00” seconds mark on
the Time Ruler, which may be, but is not necessarily, the beginning of Bar 1. If the Auto Stretch
Switch is on, the file will adjust to the project tempo; otherwise not.
If you import the file by dragging it to a particular point on the Time Ruler (the “dropping point”)
and Auto Stretch is switched on, the file will be aligned such that the first beat of the first
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
182
Melodyne 4 studio
complete bar coincides with the dropping point; if Auto Stretch Switch is off, the physical start of
the file will be aligned with the dropping point. When this procedure is used, the file will snap to
whichever line on the Time Grid is closest to the dropping point, so your Time Grid setting
(quarter notes, eighth notes, sixteenth notes…) is of importance here – unless, of course, you
wish the grid to be disregarded, in which case hold down the [Alt] key as you drag and drop the
file onto the Time Ruler.
If, instead of a time value, the Time Ruler is calibrated in seconds, the Auto Stretch function is
automatically disabled; the Auto Stretch Switch is grayed out and no attempt is made to adjust the
tempo of the imported file to that of the project.
Unless Melodyne has correctly detected the tempo of an audio file, it will be unable to adapt it
successfully to that of the project as it will be working with false assumptions as to the tempo of the
newly imported file that it cannot correct without your intervention.
If you see that something has gone wrong with the tempo adjustment, proceed as follows:
Delete from your project all the blobs belonging to the newly imported file.
Create a new project document in Melodyne and load the file into it.
Open the Tempo Editor in Assign Tempo Mode and correct the erroneous tempo interpretation.
Copy the blobs and switch back to the original project.
Switch Auto Stretch on, move the cursor to where you wish to insert the notes, and choose Edit
> Paste.
Auto Stretch when notes are moved or copied
The Auto Stretch Switch plays a role not only when audio is imported but also when notes are moved
or copied.
If at the destination (i.e. the point to which the notes are moved or pasted) the tempo differs from that
of the source (i.e. the place from which they are taken), depending upon whether Auto Stretch is
switched on or off they either adopt the tempo of the destination or retain that of the source. As a
general rule, before copying or moving notes you will want to switch Auto Stretch on, so that they
adjust to the tempo of the destination.
As a result, naturally, they will sound somewhat different to the way they sounded in their original
location. If you wish to avoid this, in the Tempo Editor of the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne
you can copy not only the notes but also corresponding segment of the tempo map from the source to
the destination (which, naturally, will have the further consequence of influencing the notes already
present at the destination). It makes no difference which you copy first: the notes themselves or the
corresponding segment of the tempo map.
Whenever you alter the tempo curve, the notes affected always adjust to the altered tempo –
regardless of whether Auto Stretch is activated or deactivated.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
183
Melodyne 4 studio
The difference between editing and assigning tempo
Not only is Melodyne capable of detecting the tempo of one piece of audio material and adapting it to
the tempo of another, but it also offers you functions for the detailed editing and shaping of tempo
progressions. To access them, begin by choosing Options > Open Note Editor from the main menu.
Here you are presented with a choice: Just as for notes there is a Note Assignment Mode (for the
detection) and an edit mode (for the music itself), so also for the tempo there are two fundamentally
different operating modes.
In Edit Tempo Mode, you can introduce changes in tempo (whether sudden or gradual) to which the
notes will then conform. In this mode, in other words, you are shaping the tempo of your music.
In Assign Tempo Mode, on the other hand, you are correcting, where necessary, Melodyne’s
interpretation of the tempo prevailing at any given instant. In this mode, it is not the music itself that
you are editing but the tempo map, which you are reshaping to reflect more accurately the musical
reality. In this mode, therefore, you are not making any audible changes but simply checking and
correcting, wherever necessary, the Time Grid behind the blobs. The goal here is to ensure that the
tempos discerned by Melodyne really do accord with those understood and implemented by the
musician(s).
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
184
Melodyne 4 studio
It is just as important to check and, if need be, edit Melodyne’s detection of the tempo before you
begin work as that of the notes, because it forms the foundation of all subsequent tempo editing. It
should be added that Melodyne is extremely good at detecting the tempo; it may even be that you will
never, or seldom ever, need to make use of Assign Tempo Mode; this will largely depend upon the
clarity of the sonic image of your loops or recordings and the playing techniques employed.
The operation of the Tempo Editor in these modes is described in separate tours.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
185
Melodyne 4 studio
Editing tempo (stand-alone)
In Edit Tempo Mode, the Tempo Editor allows you to shape the tempo map of your project and the
audio material it contains in a musical way. This possibility only exists in the stand-alone
implementation of Melodyne, as the plug-in derives its tempo information from the DAW. Tempo
editing in that case is accomplished using the functions of the DAW, which passes the information on
to the Melodyne plug-in.
Opening the Tempo Editor and overview
Open the Tempo Editor from the Note Editor in normal editing mode (Note Assignment Mode must not
be active) by choosing Options > Show Tempo Editor > Edit Tempo from the main menu or by clicking
the triangle to the right of the tempo field in the transport bar and choosing Edit Tempo from the
drop-down menu.
Tip: The Tempo Editor can also be used in an empty document to create a predefined tempo map.
This is useful, for example, if you wish to generate a click with a variable tempo for recording or to
define the tempo to which audio loaded via drag ‘n’ drop should adjust.
The Tempo Editor appears above the Note Editor. You can move the dividing line between the two
editors if you wish to allow the one or the other more headroom. The legend details the various areas
and control elements of the Tempo Editor in Edit Tempo Mode.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
186
Melodyne 4 studio
A:* The Tempo (BPM) Scale. If you click in the central third of the scale and then drag the
mouse upwards or downwards, the display is scrolled. Click in either the upper or lower third
and repeat the same procedure to zoom the display. If you double-click in the center, the
display is zoomed in such a way as to ensure that the entire tempo range is visible. In the
Tempo Editor itself, you can scroll horizontally with the hand tool or mouse wheel and vertically
with the magnifying glass.
B:* The area for editing time signature changes. How this is accomplished is the subject of a
separate tour.
C:* The area above the tempo curve. By clicking here and dragging the mouse pointer
horizontally, you select the segment of the curve you wish to edit.
D:* The tempo curve. This can be redrawn with the help of a context-sensitive tool. There is a
shallow strip just above the curve and two separate areas below it; the functions of the tool in
each of the three areas are different. They will be described in detail later.
E:* The area beneath the tempo curve. Here, too, the function of the tool varies, depending
upon whether you simply click on the curve or do so after previously selecting a segment of it.
As is the case in the Note Editor, you can access most of the functions of the current tool using the
[Cmd] and arrow keys. Whether using a tool in the normal way or operating it using the arrow keys,
holding down the [Alt] key permits finer adjustment of the values.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
187
Melodyne 4 studio
Editing the tempo curve
When you wish to change the tempo or create a tempo map, it will mostly be for a particular segment
of the timeline. The tempo curve is divided into beats that correspond to the denominator of the time
signature. When shaping the curve, you work with these beats; internally, however, the tempo
changes are implemented in higher resolution.
Select first the desired segment of the tempo curve by clicking in the white area above the curve and
dragging horizontally with the standard arrow pointer. You can lengthen or shorten the selection
subsequently by holding down the [Shift] key as you click or drag. The keyboard shortcut [Cmd]+A can
be used to select the entire curve.
Rather than a whole passage, you may wish to edit an individual beat; in that case, click in the gray
area beyond the shallow strip beneath the tempo curve (“E” in the illustration) on the relevant vertical
line and drag it horizontally in the desired direction.
In the Tempo Editor, there is only one tool, but it has a wide variety of functions that depend, naturally,
upon its position with relation to the tempo curve and the segment selected (if any). All the
context-sensitive tool functions allow you, in one way or another, to reshape the tempo curve, with the
form the mouse pointer assumes at any given moment illustrating not only the result to expect but also
(through the two arrows in each diagram) whether to drag the mouse vertically or horizontally to obtain
it. The best thing is to try it out for yourself on a selection several bars long and study the cursor. That
’s the easiest way to get to know how to use the context-sensitive tool and its various functions.
Let’s look first at how the tool functions when it is near the center of the segment of curve selected:
A (just above the curve): With this tool, you can form a “hill” or a “valley”, depending upon whether you
drag upwards or downwards. The highest or lowest point, respectively, of the hill or valley will be
perpendicular to the point at which you begin dragging, so the result will not necessarily be
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
188
Melodyne 4 studio
symmetrical.
B* (just below the curve): With this tool, you can raise or lower the tempo of the entire selection
by a uniform amount, creating a plateau. At each end of the plateau there will then be an abrupt
change of tempo. Whether you begin dragging from a point dead in the middle of the selection
or a little to the left or right of center makes no difference with this tool.
As you create a plateau – or a hill or valley for that matter – you will notice that the length of the edited
area changes. If you have increased the tempo of the passage, it takes up less time; decreasing the
tempo, obviously, has the opposite effect. This is not reflected in the number or numbering of the bars
or beats (as these remain the same whether there is a tempo change or not) but in the displayed
length of the passage on screen: if you reduce the tempo, the bars and beats spread out; if you
increase it, they huddle together.
C (in the gray area beneath the curve) Clicking within the selection and dragging to the left or right
with this tool reshapes the selected passage by creating a wave on one side of the point clicked and a
trough the other. The point within the selection at which you begin dragging determines the shape of
the wave. However, regardless of the exact point at which you begin dragging, the increase in tempo
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
189
Melodyne 4 studio
to one side of it invariably compensates for the reduction in tempo to the other, leaving the overall
length of the selection unchanged; by which we mean that it occupies not only the same number of
beats but also the same number of seconds (and therefore inches on screen).
As you are editing, you will notice that the tempo curve reflects tempo changes with a gentle curve up
to a certain point, but then breaks off and an abrupt tempo change appears at that point. This is
normal and due to the fact that a very sudden and sharp change of tempo cannot be implemented in a
flowing way and in all probability would make no musical sense either – an abrupt change of tempo is
more plausible in such cases.
As you move the mouse pointer towards either end of the selected segment, new context-sensitive
tools appear. Each tool on the right has a mirror image on the left in terms both of appearance and
functionality, so we will consider only the tools on the right-hand end of the selected segment of curve.
D* (just above the curve): Here a ramp tool is active; this creates a gradual increase or
decrease in tempo throughout the selected segment, the level reached being then maintained
beyond the boundaries of the selection.
E* (just below the curve): Here a second ramp tool comes into play; it, too, implements a
gradual increase or decrease in tempo throughout the selected segment, but with this tool,
when the end of the selection is reached, the tempo returns instantly to its former level.
F* (in the gray area beneath the curve): Here you can obtain the same result as in area “E”, this
time by dragging the beat line horizontally. Use whichever of the two you prefer.
Until now, we have been working with a selected segment of the tempo curve. If, however, you have
not made a prior selection and simply click on the curve, the context-sensitive functions are different
still.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
190
Melodyne 4 studio
G* (just above the curve): With this tool, you can raise or lower the entire tempo curve
uniformly from the clicked beat onwards.
H* (just below the curve): With this tool, you can raise or lower the tempo for the duration of a
single beat.
I* (in the gray area beneath the curve): With this tool, you can move the vertical beat line left or
right and thereby increase or decrease the tempo of the preceding beat. If the entire tempo
curve is selected, you can move the zero point of the tempo curve by this means.
Tempo changes in the transport bar
When the Tempo Editor is closed, the tempo edit field in the transport bar reflects the current tempo at
the playback cursor (whether or not playback is in progress).
An equals sign (“=”) in front of the tempo indicates that the tempo is constant. A tilde (“~”) denotes a
variable tempo. These indications, if the Tempo Editor is closed, apply to the whole project. If the
Tempo Editor is open, they relate to the segment of the tempo curve selected. If no segment is
selected, the equals sign or tilde refer to the entire project.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
191
Melodyne 4 studio
When the Tempo Editor is open, the value displayed reflects the average tempo of the selected
segment of the tempo curve. Dragging from the tempo field or typing in a new tempo or percentage
value all then have the effect of modifying the average tempo within the selected segment. The tempo
curve at this point is then raised or lowered proportionally.
When nothing is selected, typing a new value into the tempo field or clicking on the displayed value
and then dragging alters the overall tempo – just as though the entire tempo curve were selected.
The contextual menu
Right-clicking in the Tempo Editor opens a contextual menu with the following commands:
Smooth Tempo Over Several Bars: This function spreads the tempo change smoothly over the
course of several bars, with the start of the bars moving only slightly.
Smooth Tempo Over Several Beats: This function spreads the tempo change evenly over a
bar, producing virtually no change in the position of the start of each bar.
Smooth Tempo Between Beats: This function effects a smooth tempo change between the
beats. This does not change the position of the beats but the tempo change between them is
smooth rather than proceeding in steps.
Create Linear Tempo Progression: This function creates a smooth acceleration – or
deceleration, as the case may be – between the tempos at the beginning and end of the
selected passage (overwriting any existing tempo changes within it).
Make Tempo Constant: This function calculates a constant tempo for the selected segment.
This is equivalent to the average tempo over the course of the selected segment. Using this as
a starting point, you can, of course, increase or decrease the tempo by dragging it or typing a
new value into the tempo field.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
192
Melodyne 4 studio
If nothing is selected at the time, these commands act upon the entire tempo curve.
The tempo editing commands can also be accessed by choosing Edit > Tempo from the main menu.
Constant tempo and the start of Bar 1
If no tempo map has been defined or only a constant tempo was detected in the audio file loaded,
there is only one tempo value. It is simple in that case to specify the tempo in the transport bar. If you
wish to make an existing variable tempo constant, you can do this using the Make Tempo Constant
command already described.
If, when an audio file was analyzed, the first beat was not detected at the beginning of the file, but you
know that that is where it is located, you can move it to the correct position by choosing Edit > Tempo
> Set Bar 1 to Start of File. This command can only be used if the tempo is constant. The command
can only be executed when the tempo is constant and only then when the Tempo Editor is open in
either Assign Tempo or Edit Tempo Mode.
Copying and pasting tempo maps
To copy a part of the tempo map to a new location, select the segment of the tempo curve in question
and choose Copy from the menu; move the playback cursor to the first beat of the passage to which
you would like to copy the tempo and choose Paste. The segment of the tempo curve copied will be
pasted (without changing its length) to the target position, overwriting the existing tempo for the
duration of the pasted segment.
Alternatively, you can select a segment of the curve at the target position. In this case, if the copied
segment is longer than the selected segment, the former will be truncated to fit the selection. If the
copied segment is shorter than the selected segment, part of the selected segment will remain
unchanged.
The insert point, however, will move to the end of the pasted segment to allow you to repeat the
operation once or several times.
Tip: If you copy a selection of notes from part of the project where the tempo is variable to another
part where the tempo is constant, the copied notes will adopt the constant tempo. This adjustment,
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
193
Melodyne 4 studio
naturally, is advantageous and often desirable, though it does mean that the passage once pasted no
longer sounds quite the same. If you do wish its original character to be maintained, first copy the
corresponding section of the tempo curve from the source to the destination and then copy the notes;
or vice versa, copy the notes first and then the corresponding section of the tempo curve. By copying
both the notes and the corresponding section of the tempo curve, you ensure that the notes sound the
same at the destination as at the source.
Importing a tempo map
Similar to the copy and paste procedure is that whereby you import a tempo map from an MPD file,
from an audio file that has already been detected (having a valid assignment file), or from a MIDI file.
The data can be imported by dragging and dropping it into the Tempo Editor. Any tempo regions and
changes of time signature are ignored; only the pure curve is imported. The same principles apply to
importing as copying segments of the tempo map:
If nothing is selected, the imported file snaps to a beat and determines the tempo for a period
equivalent to its own length as defined in the file. If something is selected, the imported file snaps to
the beginning of the selection and determines the tempo of the selected passage. Thereafter, the
original tempo is resumed.
The starting point of the tempo map derived from the file is always its Beat “0”. If in the file a tempo is
defined prior to the first bar, this is ignored.
The import can also be performed, however, by choosing File > Import Tempo from the main menu, in
which case the tempo will be defined from the start of the document.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
194
Melodyne 4 studio
Exporting a tempo map
By choosing File > Export and Tempo Map from the Format list box, you can export a tempo map from
Melodyne as a standard MIDI file. This will create a MIDI file containing no notes but simply a tempo
curve. This file could then be imported, for example, by a DAW, so that the tempo map created by
Melodyne could be used there. To create a MIDI file containing both a tempo map and the notes,
choose File > Export followed by MIDI (not ‘Tempo Map’) from the Format list box.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
195
Melodyne 4 studio
Time signature changes (stand-alone, ARA)
The horizontal strip at the top of the Tempo Editor is the Time Signature Editor. The time signature
entered or displayed there applies always to the whole project, regardless of whether you have
opened the Tempo Editor in Edit Tempo or Assign Tempo Mode.
An exception to this rule comes when the Tempo Editor is open at the same time as Note Assignment
Mode. In that case, the Time Signature Editor applies only to the audio source being edited in Note
Assignment Mode, which may have a different time signature to that of the project. In this
configuration, the Time Signature Editor is also available in the ARA plug-in of Melodyne.
Changing the time signature.
To change the time signature, double-click on the time signature currently displayed (e.g. 4/4). An
input field appears into which you can enter a new time signature. If you do not wish to alter the
denominator, it suffices to change the numerator, and vice versa. To switch from 4/4 to 3/4, for
example, it is enough to replace the first “4” with a “3”.
Moving the beginning of the first bar
If the beginning of the first bar (or “measure”) is not displayed where – knowing the musical content –
you would expect to find it, just click anywhere in the Time Signature Editor and drag to the left or
right, as the case requires, until Bar 1 is correctly aligned. As you do so, the bar lines will move one
beat (as defined by the denominator) at a time. The current setting of the Time Grid has no effect
upon what happens in the Time Signature Editor.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
196
Melodyne 4 studio
Inserting and editing time signatures
You can enter a new time signature wherever you like in the timeline. Just double-click at the
appropriate place in the Time Signature Editor and enter the desired time signature in the text field
that appears.
If you click in the Time Signature Editor and drag horizontally, the time signature governing the bar
within which you have clicked will move one beat at a time (as determined by the denominator) in the
corresponding direction. If, in the course of doing so, it crosses another time signature, this will be
deleted. If you double-click on the double bar line immediately to the left of a time signature, the time
signature in question (as well as the double bar itself) will be deleted. The influence of the preceding
time signature will then be extended to include the range of the deleted one, exactly as you would
expect.
A new bar can only ever begin on a beat that accords with the previous time signature. If necessary,
therefore, compensatory bars of the requisite length will be inserted automatically to preserve the
integrity of the sequence of bars. The time signatures of compensatory bars appear in gray.
If any subsequent dragging of bar lines removes the need for a compensatory bar, it will disappear. If,
however, you wish to retain it, double-click on its time signature (which will turn black). The double bar
line at the start of the bar will then remain in place regardless of changes made elsewhere.
An automatically generated bar will also turn into a normal bar as soon as you edit, insert or delete a
time signature elsewhere in the timeline – you will notice that the gray time signature immediately
turns black – or close the Tempo Editor
You can copy a series of time signature changes simply by selecting the corresponding section of the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
197
Melodyne 4 studio
tempo curve and choosing Edit > Copy from the main menu. After cancelling the selection, you can
then insert them at the position indicated by the playback cursor using Edit > Paste. This is possible in
both Edit Tempo and Assign Tempo modes, though in the latter case only the time signature changes
will be copied, whereas in Edit Tempo Mode the tempo curve will be copied as well.
The time signature display near the tempo display
The time signature display near the tempo display in the transport bar indicates the time signature at
the current playback position. Entering a new time signature in this field does not add a time signature
change but simply alters the time signature in force at the playback position (i.e. the nearest time
signature to the left of the playback cursor).
It is different in the case of an empty document that does not yet have a tempo or time signature.
Here, if you type “3/4” into the time signature field of the transport bar, the time signature will apply to
the entire project. For this simple change it is not necessary to open the Tempo Editor.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
198
Melodyne 4 studio
Assigning tempo
In Assign Tempo Mode, the Tempo Editor is used to correct the tempo map Melodyne creates in the
course of its analysis of the audio material. Here it is not a question of altering the audio material itself
but rather of making the requisite adjustments to the display background (or “Beat Grid”), which
consists of bar lines (intended to coincide here with the first beat of each bar) and fainter lines
between them (indicating the remaining beats of the bar). These are represented acoustically by
metronome clicks. In Assign Tempo Mode, however, you are adjusting the metronome click to fit the
music – not the other way around.
What purpose does Assign Tempo Mode serve?
Adjusting the click and the background display to fit the recording is necessary to ensure that
subsequent editing procedures, such as quantization to the grid or matching the tempo of one
recording to that of another, function correctly.
The point of Assign Tempo Mode is best illustrated by an example: Suppose you have made a
multi-track recording of a live performance during which no click was used by the performers to help
them keep time. You load these tracks into Melodyne. From its own analysis of the music based on
the sum of all the tracks, Melodyne now creates a tempo map; this can be thought of as a virtual click
track that keeps time with the musicians (even though no click was used in the actual performance).
This tempo map, provided it is accurate, gives rise to exciting possibilities. It can be used, for
example, to tighten up the timing of the entire band; and here, remember, we are talking about a
multi-track recording of a live performance!
Or, equally exciting, it can be used to adapt the rigid tempo of a sample to the reconstructed live click
– and, with it, to the fluctuations in tempo real musicians inevitably introduce into each performance.
You are able now, in other words, to record without using a click and yet still retain full control over
tempo and timing. Even if the band gets carried away and bolts towards the end of the song, it’s no
problem; with Melodyne you have the reins at all times in your hands.
There are unbelievable, hitherto unknown, possibilities here – provided, always, that the tempo
detection yields perfect results throughout the entire piece. But what does “perfect” mean here?
Imagine, for example, that you have on one track a saxophone solo played with great rhythmic
freedom and on another the drums played with rhythmic discipline. These two tracks, clearly, are
pulling in different directions and perhaps urging Melodyne to different conclusions. To which
instrument in this example greater weight should be given has nothing to do with perfection in the
sense of right or wrong but is purely a question of interpretation.
It is to resolve such questions that your intervention in the tempo detection process is required. The
Tempo Editor’s Assign Tempo Mode offers you a wealth of different ways of intervening and tools to
assist you in the task, and it is these that form the subject of this tour.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
199
Melodyne 4 studio
Overview of the Tempo Editor in Assign Tempo Mode
Open the Tempo Editor by choosing Options > Show Tempo Editor > Assign Tempo from the menu or
by selecting the same command from the drop-down menu to the right of the tempo field in the
transport bar.
The Tempo Editor appears above the Note Editor. You can move the dividing line between the Tempo
and Note editors if you wish to allow the one or the other GREATER headroom.
Before discussing the individual editing functions, let us begin with an overview of the various zones of
the Tempo Editor in Assign Tempo Mode and the components of the interface.
A:* The Tempo (BPM) Scale. This is made up of three zones: If you click in the central third of
the scale and then drag the mouse upwards or downwards, the display is scrolled. Click in
either the upper or lower third and repeat the same procedure to zoom the display. If you
double-click in the center, the display is zoomed in such a way as to ensure that the entire
tempo range is visible. In the Tempo Editor itself, you can scroll horizontally with the hand tool
or mouse wheel and vertically with the magnifying glass.
B:* The area for editing time signature changes. How this is accomplished is the subject of a
separate tour.
C:* The area above the tempo curve. By clicking here and dragging the mouse pointer
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
200
Melodyne 4 studio
horizontally, you select the segment of the curve you wish to edit.
D:* The tempo curve. This can be reshaped with the help of a context-sensitive tool. The
contexts in question being three zones: a single shallow strip just above the curve and two
separate layers below it.
E:* The area beneath the tempo curve. This, as we have said, is divided into two distinct layers;
in the upper layer the tool is used for the quantized movement of segments of the curve
whereas in the lower layer it is used to reshape the curve within a beat selection. See below for
details.
As in the Note editor, you can also perform the current functions of the tool (which depend, of course,
upon its position) using the command and arrow keys. Since changes made in this way proceed by
small increments, this is a particularly useful technique if you need to make fine adjustments. Whether
you are using keyboard commands or tools in the normal way, holding down the [Alt] key at the same
time allows you to adjust the values in still finer resolution.
Editing the tempo curve using the tools
The tempo curve is intersected by beats that correspond to the denominator of the time signature.
When shaping the curve, you work with these beats; internally, however, the tempo changes are
implemented in higher resolution.
If the tempo of a recording has not been correctly identified throughout, the problem will usually be
that some of the beats coincide with the offbeat, with the result that the metronome click, too, sounds
on the offbeat. This can occur when the performer hesitates or slows momentarily, causing the
detection from that point onwards to slip back to the offbeat. It is recommended in view of this that,
before you begin editing, you listen to the whole piece once through with the metronome running. At
the same time check that the time signature is correct and that the “1” really does coincide with the
start of the bar.
For these corrections, you should work initially with the Time Grid activated, as this will facilitate the
movement of beats. The width of the grid (i.e. the interval between the lines) is of no importance; all
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
201
Melodyne 4 studio
that matters is that the grid is active. The width of the grid, incidentally, is determined by the number of
sub-beats in the tempo region, as is explained below.
When working with an active Time Grid, the two most valuable tools are those found beneath the time
curve, each in a separate layer. In the layer closest to the tempo curve you will find the Tool for
Quantized Movement of segments; in the layer below, you will find the Wave Tool, which is used to
reshape the curve within a beat selection. The shape assumed by the mouse pointer changes as it
moves from layer to layer.
If no tempo regions (the functions of which are explained below) have been detected and the tempo
throughout is on the offbeat, proceed as follows to correct it:
With the Tool for Quantized Movement (the higher of the two tools beneath the tempo curve),
click on the tempo curve at any point within four beats of the first bar definition and drag the
mouse to the right or left. This will move the entire tempo curve sideways along the grid
allowing you to correct the offbeat.
If the tempo has been correctly detected initially but at some later point slips to the offbeat, proceed as
follows:
Select with the Tool for Quantized Movement a beat at the point where the curve slips out of
sync. The entire segment that follows (and which therefore needs to be corrected) will be
selected automatically. Now drag the mouse to the left or right, as appropriate, which will allow
you to move not only the beat you clicked on but also the selected beats that follow it along the
Beat Grid and correct the offbeat.
Note: If several tempo regions have been detected within the recording, the area automatically
selected by this procedure will extend only to the end of the current tempo region. You will find more
information on tempo regions below.
It can also happen sometimes that the tempo as detected gets ahead of, or lags behind, the actual
tempo, or that – perhaps because a passage is played rubato i.e. the performance is rhythmically very
free – the start of almost every bar has to be corrected. This type of error is corrected using the Wave
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
202
Melodyne 4 studio
Tool (found in the lower of the two layers beneath the tempo curve), which reshapes the wave within a
given selection of beats..
Since the Wave Tool affects not only the point clicked but also the surrounding area, clicking with this
tool (when the Time Grid is active) invariably results in a segment of the tempo curve being selected. If
you click on the beginning of a bar, the two neighboring bars are selected. If you now drag the mouse
to the right or left, the beginning of the bar in question (i.e. the bar line) moves the furthest, whereas
the beats in the neighboring bars are affected to a lesser extent. The first beats of the preceding and
following bars are not moved at all.
In this way, if need be, you can go through an entire passage correcting the position of each bar line in
turn. If a longer passage is affected by this “premature” or “tardy” tempo detection, you can select the
passage manually before using the tool. Here, again, the most movement will be at the point from
which the dragging commences, with the effect tailing off towards each end of the selection.
If you click and drag from a point within a bar, only the intermediate beats will move; the first beat of
the bar and that of the following bar will be unaffected. In this way, if you ever need to, you can make
subtle corrections to the tempo curve within a bar.
Tip: If, where the performance is very free, you have made a coarse correction to the position of
almost every bar line, without making any fine corrections within the bars, unnecessary unevenness in
the tempo progression may result. For this reason it is often useful, after making a coarse correction to
the position of the bar lines, to select Smooth Tempo Over Several Bars from the context menu, as
this command is designed to eliminate irregularities on a broader scale.
For the editing procedures described so far, we have been using an active Time Grid. If the Time Grid
is not active, the two tools just described function differently. In this case, a range is not selected
automatically, so the tools only affect the beat selected.
The higher of the two tools allows you to move the beat in question without affecting the
neighboring beats.
The lower tool also moves the beat selected but the tempo flow to the neighboring beats is
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
203
Melodyne 4 studio
preserved.
Suppose, for example, the performer has introduced a fairly long pause before beginning a new
section but that the lead-in (or “anacrusis”) to the following bar is more or less in the new tempo, so
there is no continuous tempo flow and the beats have to be moved one by one to the correct position.
It is to solve problems like these that you need to deactivate the Time Grid before using the two tools.
The tools for changing the tempo locally through the insertion of beats
If the tempo as detected during a particular passage is too slow or too fast, so that a beat needs to be
added or removed, you can correct this by clicking just above the tempo curve and dragging upwards
or downwards. In this way, at the point clicked, you can create a mountain or a valley and alter the
tempo by inserting or removing beats.
Note how this differs from Edit Tempo Mode: Nothing you do in Assign Tempo Mode ever changes the
position in time of the notes. What you are seeking to do is adjust the timing of the metronome clicks
to match the music, which is what happens here when you change the tempo and insert or extract
beats. In Edit Tempo Mode, on the other hand, no beats can be inserted or removed and any tempo
changes affect all the following notes, causing them to sound earlier or later as the case may be.
If, prior to using the tool, you have selected a segment of the curve, the tool will act upon the entire
selection and is available in its central area. If nothing is selected at the time, use of the tool results in
a number of beats being selected automatically.
At the beginning or end of a selection, by dragging downwards or upwards you can also remove or
insert one or several beats. In this way you can, for example, slow the tempo at the end of a phrase
without affecting the tempo of what follows.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
204
Melodyne 4 studio
If you click near a tempo region separation, this tool mode is activated automatically and a segment of
the curve extending to the region division will be selected. You will find more information on tempo
regions in the next section.
Tempo regions
An evenly flowing tempo is generally interpreted by the analysis as a continuous sequence even if the
tempo fluctuates. Just as with a constant tempo, Melodyne creates then a single tempo region for the
entire duration. Tempo regions are indicated by pop-up menus in the horizontal ruler at the bottom of
the Tempo Editor.
A tempo region extends rightwards to the end of the audio source or the beginning of the next tempo
region. By clicking alongside one of these pop-up menus, you can select all the notes of the
corresponding tempo region.
Each tempo region possesses at its left-hand division a black vertical line that serves as a handle and
extends from the bottom to the top of the Tempo Editor. By dragging this line horizontally, you can
move the beginning of a tempo region along the Beat Grid of the tempo curve.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
205
Melodyne 4 studio
If the tempo slows markedly in places, such as at the end of phrases performed in the “romantic” style,
the analysis will split the tempo curve into multiple regions wherever the position is unclear. These
tempo regions, on the one hand, provide a clearer overview of what is happening in terms of the
tempo, but also offer some important setting options to ensure that the tempo in the passage affected
is correctly interpreted.
If several tempo regions have been detected, it is frequently necessary to tidy up their divisions. In the
following section, we describe the type of situation that can arise and how to adjust the tempo regions
accordingly.
Superfluous region divisions:* Sometimes the analysis introduces region divisions where the
tempo only slows slightly. These divisions, and the superfluous tempo regions they create, can
be deleted. To delete a tempo region, double-click on its vertical handle. As a result of the
deletion, the tempo curve corresponding to the surrounding beats will be smoothed
automatically to create a more regular tempo flow.
The creation of additional tempo regions:* If you double-click in the ruler at the bottom of the
Tempo Editor, where the pop-up menus of the tempo regions are located, a new tempo region
will be created there. The insertion of a tempo region can be useful if , prior to the start of a
new phrase, there is a pause that you wish to be spared the effect of any subsequent
smoothing operations.
Position of the region divisions: Often the region divisions are not situated at the exact point where
the music begins to slow down. In such cases, drag the tempo region by its handle to the correct
position. So as to be able to hear inconsistencies clearly, before you begin editing you should check
the detected time signature and ensure that the start of the first bar begins on the correct “1”. When
you move a region division, the tempo and positions of the neighboring regions adjust accordingly.
Tempo regions and sub-beats
The analysis detects what are called “sub-beats”, these being the smallest pulse units found in the
audio material. Beats are generally understood as quarter-notes (or “crotchets”) and the subdivisions
of these displayed in the region indicate how many sub-beats there are to a crotchet. There could be
two or four if the tempo has an even feel to it; three if it has a triplet feel; or even some other number
in exceptional cases.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
206
Melodyne 4 studio
In the following, we discuss the cases in which you will need to edit the parameters of a tempo region
with respect to these sub-beats.
Sub-beats and tempo* It can happen that the analysis interprets sub-beats as eighth notes (or
“quavers”), meaning that there are two sub-beats per crotchet, when in fact the “intended”
tempo is only half as fast, because the sub-beats detected ought to be sixteenth notes (or
“semiquavers”). A quarter note ought, therefore, to consist of four sub-beats, which would halve
the tempo.
It can also happen that two sub-beats are assigned to quarter notes when eighth note triplets are in
fact intended. In this case, the subdivision must be changed from 2 to 3 and the tempo with it by two
thirds. These changes can be effected using the region’s pop-up menu. There you can stipulate how
many sub-beats should make up a quarter note and alter the tempo accordingly. The numbers in
brackets indicate how many of the discovered sub-beats are combined in the tempo, but values are
also available for selection that are not multiples of sub-beats.
If several tempo regions are present and the tempo of the entire recording is to be halved, for
example, select all the regions with [Cmd]+A and alter the tempo in the pop-up menu of one (it doesn’t
matter which) of the selected regions.
Enter Subdivision: If a passage exhibits simultaneously a dual and triple feel or alternates between
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
207
Melodyne 4 studio
the two, it can happen that the analysis detects the sub-beats too unclearly. In such a case, you
should choose Enter Subdivision from the region’s pop-up menu and type the desired value into the
text box that appears.
This changes nothing with respect to the beats and tempo, but in the pop-up menu of the region other
tempo ratios can then be selected and any movement of the region will henceforth be governed by the
new sub-beat subdivision.
The significance of the tempo regions after the editing:* The tempo detection offers regions
initially in places where the detection may have discontinuities. In the case of recordings with a
continuous flowing tempo, all these need to be cleared away; in other words, by the time you
have finished editing, there should be no tempo regions left in the tempo map.
If, on the other hand, there are times in the recording where the performer has paused at the end of a
phrase but returned to an even tempo at the start of the following phrase, the division between the
regions should be moved to the start of this second phrase and left in place, because the tempo flow
has been interrupted. A recording might also be made up of passages with sharply differing tempo
levels that alternate. In this case, too, the region divisions need to be preserved.
Whenever you use one of the “Smooth Tempo ...” commands, the smoothing is invariably confined to
a single region, so the region divisions are unaffected.
Assigning the tempo designation "free"
Where a performance is really free rhythmically, the tempo detection may in some cases provide little
assistance and it may be easier to ignore the results of the detection altogether and simply assign to
the entire passage the tempo designation “free”.
Similarly, where the music is silent for several bars or only contains a wash of sounds with no
discernible note beginnings or rhythm, the analysis is unlikely to deliver a tempo curve that makes
much sense. This, in itself, is hardly a problem, but if you need a click in such passages – because
you wish, for example, to add a rhythmic overdub lasting a definite number of beats – proceed as
follows:
Select the area in question in the Tempo Editor and choose Free Tempo Assignment from the context
menu. If you wish to assign the designation “free” to the tempo of the entire file, nothing should be
selected at the time you use the command; that way it will act upon the entire tempo curve.
The effect of the command is to delete the existing tempo and replace it with a constant one. The
passage in question will appear white – with no beats – and the tempo curve will be a straight line.
First, by dragging the line horizontally at the bar zero point, establish the start of the tempo
progression.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
208
Melodyne 4 studio
Then drag the straight line upwards or downwards until the average tempo of the recording is reached
or the area is filled with the desired number of bars. If you wish to assign the designation "free” to the
tempo of the entire file, as an alternative to moving the curve vertically, you can simply alter the value
in the tempo field in the transport bar.
The best thing then is to go from left to right through the undefined tempo area clicking on the start of
each bar which will result in a valid beat appearing at that point. Drag the beat to the correct note at
the beginning of the bar in question. It is helpful here to orient yourself by the vertical line that appears
at the bottom of the Note Editor during the movement.
When you have edited the tempo in this way until the desired position is reached, choose the
command Finalize Free Tempo Assignment from the context menu. The range will be filled with beats
and its “defined” status restored. If you have assigned the tempo designation “free” to a mere segment
of the tempo curve rather than the entire map in this way, when you click in the last bar, beats will be
inserted automatically and the transition of the curve to the following segment smoothed.
You will find in the context menu, in addition to the command Free Tempo Assignment that has been
described, two other commands: Free Tempo Assignment to End and Free Tempo Assignment from
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
209
Melodyne 4 studio
Start. These two commands are designed to save you the trouble of performing the corresponding
selections manually.
They are useful in the following situations: If there is a marked slowing down during the final notes of a
piece, you will define a corresponding slowing down of the tempo at that point. After that, the defined
tempo that follows needs to be discarded and the slower tempo retained until the end. To achieve this,
select first Free Tempo Assignment to End and then edit the slowed down tempo at the end. The
command Free Tempo Assignment from Start evens out the tempo in a leftward direction until the
beginning of the file is reached.
Triggering a redetection of the tempo
If you have made a mess of your tempo assignments, you can trigger a redetection of the tempo and
begin again from scratch. Instead of wiping the entire slate clean, you may prefer to keep most of your
assignments and redo only the passage with which you have been having difficulty. In this case,
select the blobs of the passage in question and choose from the main menu Edit > Tempo > Detect
Tempo of Selection and Merge with Current Tempo.
This has the effect of discarding all the tempo assignments that you have applied to the passage and
replacing it with tempo information derived by Melodyne from the audio material. To the right and left
of the selected passage, however, the tempo curve remains unchanged, complete with any
improvements you may have made to it.
What is of crucial importance to the success of this procedure is the choice of notes upon which the
redetection will be based.
Remember the example cited earlier of the band recorded live: If you were tapping your foot in time to
the music, in all probability you would be following as you did so (albeit unconsciously) the drums and
bass rather than the less disciplined saxophonist. By the same token, you would want Melodyne to
base its analysis of the tempo on the drums and bass, along with the rhythm guitar perhaps, and not
be distracted by the saxophone.
For this reason, you should drag into the Note Editor only those tracks that will help Melodyne with its
analysis and select within them only the notes that coincide with the saxophone solo. Then choose
Edit > Tempo > Detect Tempo of Selection and Merge with Current Tempo.
Now you have replaced throughout the problem passage the original detection (and your botched
editing thereof) with another based upon an optimized track selection. To recap: The original detection
was triggered when all the tracks were imported simultaneously, with equal weight being given to each
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
210
Melodyne 4 studio
of them. By triggering a redetection (this time based upon a narrower selection of tracks) in the
manner just described, you ensure that the more laid-back playing of the saxophonist does not lead
Melodyne into error.
You can optimize the starting material for a redetection by deliberately deselecting certain notes within
a track. Suppose, for example, you were working with a stereo live recording and wanted to create a
click track retrospectively. In this case, it might be advisable to deselect all the notes derived from the
vocals along with one or two others, so as to ensure that Melodyne based its analysis of the tempo
predominantly upon the bass or kick drum, which tend to be quite easily identified within the overall
mix.
The assignent of individual file tempos
So far, we have been discussing the situation in which the entire project has a single tempo map that
you can then optimize, if necessary, in Assign Tempo Mode to make it correspond more closely to the
audio material. Here we were assuming that the project was composed of tracks that were broadly
synchronous – either because they were recorded simultaneously or because some kind of overdub
procedure was used.
What if you want to combine in a single project recordings with different tempos? With Auto Stretch
switched on, Melodyne adjusts each newly imported audio file to fit the tempo map of the project.
What this involves – and how you can intervene in the process – is the subject of the following
sections.
As each file is imported, Melodyne analyzes the audio material, detects the tempo throughout the file,
and from the information thus obtained creates a tempo map. This is the tempo map of the file. If
several files are imported, each will have its own tempo map. But the project itself can only have one
tempo map: the one you have perhaps already begun editing in Assign Tempo Mode.
When it comes to play back the project, therefore, Melodyne will stretch or squeeze in all the right
places the tempo map of each individual file to ensure that it conforms to the tempo map of the project
A very simple example: Melodyne has detected in the file a fixed tempo of 100 BPM whereas that of
the project is 120 BPM. All that is needed here is to play back the file 20% faster. Now suppose
another file is imported with a fixed tempo of 112 BPM. This time, the new file must be played back
around 7% faster.
The mathematics becomes far more complex, of course, when neither the file nor the project has a
constant tempo, and the fluctuations found in the one have nothing to do with those found in the other.
But no worries; Melodyne can cope even then. No action is called for on your part.
You may occasionally, however, want to redraw the tempo map of the file – i.e. to impose your own
interpretation of the tempo, by halving or doubling the displayed tempo of a drum loop, for example,
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
211
Melodyne 4 studio
or, in the case of a polyrhythmic recording, by opting for triplets or not, as the case may be. Such
decisions have no initial influence upon the file itself; when you come to import the file into a project
with Auto Stretch switched on, however, they can make a considerable difference.
In short: Even single audio files have tempo maps that you can edit. To do this, switch to Note
Assignment Mode. If on the track in question you have multiple audio files, click beforehand on a blob
belonging to the file you wish to work on, to ensure that the correct file is available for editing in Note
Assignment Mode.
In Note Assignment Mode, you always hear one audio file in isolation (and, initially, in its pure state –
i.e. ignoring any note editing you may have done in the meantime).
Because you are now in Note Assignment Mode, when you come to open the Tempo Editor it will
open automatically in Assign Tempo Mode; Edit Tempo Mode is inaccessible from Note Assignment
Mode.
Now, however, it is not the tempo map of the project but that of the audio file alone that is being
assigned. Or you could think of it another way and say you are now in a completely different project –
namely, the one within which the file was originally recorded – and that your objective is to reconstruct
the click track of the original recording so that Melodyne can later “bend” this to match the click track
of the current project.
The procedures and tools used, and the functions available, in the Tempo Editor when you are
assigning the file tempo are identical to those already described for Assign Tempo Mode of the Tempo
Editor, except that two additional commands now come into play in the Edit > Tempo menu:
If you choose Edit > Tempo > Apply Project Tempo to File, the tempo of the file will be ignored and
replaced by that of the project.
This command is particularly useful if you subsequently save an assignment file in the Algorithm
Inspector from Note Assignment Mode. A useful application for this is shown by the following example.
Suppose you have recorded a “chanson” (i.e. some political or satirical song with perhaps a single
guitar or piano as accompaniment) performed live with no click and for which Melodyne has detected
a flowing tempo; suppose further that you want now to import the vocal track into a remix that is
slightly faster but more importantly has a constant tempo. Here you must first create a tempo map for
the vocal track so that it can be “bent” to match that of the remix. But wait – a tempo map already
exists for the vocal track; it is that of the project from which it is derived: the live performance of the
song we mentioned earlier. So adopt this for the current file with the command Apply Project Tempo
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
212
Melodyne 4 studio
Assignment to File Tempo Assignment and store it in your assignment file. During the playback in the
remix context, Melodyne reads the fluctuating chanson tempo from the assignment file and
synchronizes the singing automatically.
Or you might prefer to do things the other way around. If, for example, out of a number of related
recordings you have assigned the tempo of the drum track only and then wish to apply this
assignment to the tempo assignment of the entire project. This is where the command Edit > Tempo >
Apply File Tempo to Project comes into play.
In the Tempo Editor’s Assign Tempo Mode, too, you can import a tempo map stored in an MPD,
assignment or MIDI file if you wish to. This can be done either by choosing “File > Import Tempo...” or
simply by dragging the file in question into the Tempo Editor.
In this way, you could, for example, transfer the tempo detection of a file that has already been edited
to the project or the file just edited in Note Assignment Mode.
In the Tempo Editor’s Assign Tempo Mode, an imported data map is always placed at the start of the
project. From the imported file, not only the tempo map but also any time signature changes and
tempo regions are adopted.
Commands in the context menu
If the Tempo Editor is in Assign Tempo Mode, you will also find in the context menu the following
commands that correspond exactly to those in the Tempo Editor’s edit mode.
Smooth Tempo Over Several Bars: This function spreads the tempo change smoothly over the
course of several bars, causing the start of the bars to move slightly.
Smooth Tempo Over Several Beats: This function spreads the tempo change evenly over a
bar, whereby the bars themselves are hardly affected.
Smooth Tempo Between Beats: This function effects a smooth tempo change within the beats.
This does not change the position of the beats but the tempo change between them is smooth
rather than proceeding in steps.
Create Linear Tempo Progression: This function calculates a gradual tempo change between
the current tempo at the first beat, and that at the last beat, of the selection (regardless of the
prior shape of the Curve between these two points).
Note how this differs from Edit Tempo Mode: If in Edit Tempo Mode an increasing or decreasing
tempo progression has been calculated, the number of beats selected in the range in question
remains the same; the position of the following beats, however, is moved as a result of the new local
tempo progression. When assigning the tempo, this is not what you want, so in Assign Tempo Mode
the number of beats in the range selected alters to match the new tempo progression; the following
beats do not change position.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
213
Melodyne 4 studio
Make Tempo Constant: This function calculates a constant tempo for the selected segmen that
is equivalent to the average tempo over the course of the selected segment. Once again, beats
are added or removed within the selected area to ensure their number matches the new tempo.
You can also use this command when nothing is selected in which case it applies to the entire tempo
map. An example: In the course of the analysis, Melodyne has detected a mildly fluctuating tempo.
You know, however, that a constant click was used during the recording. In this case, the command
calculates the constant tempo that best fits the given material as well as its starting point and adopts
this constant tempo as the assigned tempo.
These commands can also be accessed from the main menu under “Edit > Tempo ...”.
Enhanced tempo detection with the Universal Algorithm
If you wish to edit the tempo of a complex piece of music for which the Universal Algorithm has been
used for the detection, you can achieve still more accurate tempo detection by choosing the option
Edit > Tempo > Enhanced Tempo Detection.
If the option is selected, Melodyne employs the same tempo detection algorithms internally as for
polyphonic detection. The tempo detection is more accurate in this case because it is able to access
additional information about the file.
Of course, in the case of highly rhythmic or comparatively simple material you will notice no difference.
With complex piano sonatas or the mix of an entire band, on the other hand, you will: Such material
reveals the real advantages of the enhanced tempo detection, which delivers better results.
The option “Enhanced Tempo Detection” is only available when the Universal Algorithm is selected.
When the Polyphonic Algorithm is used, it is always active; with the other algorithms it is grayed out.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
214
Melodyne 4 studio
Variable tempo in the DAW (plug-in)
Normally the bar rulers of your DAW and the plug-in implementation of Melodyne will always be in
sync. If, however, there is a tempo change in your DAW between two track segments that you have
transferred to Melodyne, or if you have altered the overall tempo in your DAW after transferring
material to Melodyne, you must inform Melodyne of such changes so that synchronicity between the
bar rulers of the two programs can be restored.
A new constant tempo
Whenever Melodyne registers a tempo change in the DAW, the button near the tempo display will
flash to indicate that a matter requires your attention. If you do nothing, you resign yourself to there
being a discrepancy between the bar ruler in the DAW and that of the Melodyne plug-in.
Click the button to open the tempo dialog. Here you can inform Melodyne of the nature of the tempo
change it has detected, in order to ensure that the two bar rulers remain in step.
If you have simply changed the overall tempo and there are no tempo changes within the song itself,
select Constant Tempo. This tells Melodyne that the new tempo registered applies to the entire song
and that it should adjust its own bar ruler accordingly.
If you want Melodyne to stretch or compress the audio material to reflect the new tempo, check the
box below.
If you select this option, Melodyne will employ time-stretching (or -compression) to adjust the material
already transferred to the new tempo. If your DAW performs its own time-stretching on audio material
when there is a change of tempo, Melodyne will behave exactly the same way whenever this box is
checked, so the audio material in the DAW and the plug-in will remain in sync.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
215
Melodyne 4 studio
If your DAW does not employ time-stretching and merely changes the grid beneath the audio material
when tempo changes occur, to ensure identical behavior in Melodyne clear the check box in question.
Of course, even in this case you may prefer to check the box, in order to achieve through Melodyne
what with your DAW you cannot, namely an adjustment of the audio material to the new tempo by
means of time-stretching.
A new variable tempo
If you have not selected a new constant tempo in your DAW but simply introduced an internal tempo
change (whether sudden or gradual), select Variable Tempo.
Melodyne is perfectly capable of registering tempo changes and implementing them correctly without
any assistance, but it can only do so if they occur within a passage that has been transferred to it. If a
variation in tempo occurs between two transferred passages, Melodyne is obviously in the dark.
The simplest way of informing Melodyne about such tempo variations is to save from the DAW a
standard MIDI file that runs from Bar 1 to the end of the project and then load it using the Import
button in the tempo dialog. This will provide all instances of Melodyne with the information they need
concerning the tempo variations in the DAW project. The synchronicity of the two bar rulers will
therefore be assured.
A second way of doing it is to play through to Melodyne the passage containing the variations in
tempo so that it can analyze them. It is enough to play the passage through to a single instance of
Melodyne as the other instances will be informed of the tempo changes automatically.
To do this, proceed as follows (heeding also the advice in the following section):
While the tempo dialog is open, stop the playback in the DAW and move its playback cursor to
a point in the timeline about one bar prior to the start of the new tempo acceleration or
deceleration
Next, for the benefit of Melodyne, play through the entire passage until the acceleration or
deceleration comes to an end and a constant tempo has been maintained for at least one bar.
Now stop the playback in the DAW. In the tempo dialog, you will see indicated the range of the
tempo variation within the passage concerned. The tempo displayed here is somewhat more
precise than that shown in the tempo field, so do not worry if there is a small discrepancy
between the two values.
Note: Some DAWs (at present only Cubase) are capable of keeping Melodyne informed of changes in
tempo. Since Melodyne in their case already has the information it needs, the minimum and maximum
tempos within the passage in question will be displayed automatically as soon as the tempo dialog is
opened and there is no need to play through the passage in question. Just click OK to close the
dialog.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
216
Melodyne 4 studio
Specify once more whether you want the audio material itself or only the grid to be stretched or
compressed to reflect the tempo variations.
Exit with OK to apply your settings or Cancel to discard them. The OK button will remain greyed out
until you have started your DAW to play the tempo change through to Melodyne and then stopped it
again.
Important when working with variable tempo
If Melodyne has not been fully informed of changes in the tempo or time signature, the time rulers of
the DAW and Melodyne can get out of sync and transfers will sound at the wrong time or be recorded
in the wrong place.
The handling of variable tempo is unfortunately not self-explanatory. It would be far simpler if DAWs
transmitted all information about changes in tempo or time signature to plug-ins, but, sadly, the plug-in
interface at the moment does not provide for this. Melodyne is therefore obliged to obtain all the
relevant information from the material transferred. However, since transfers as a rule do not extend
the full length of the song, the tempo dialog makes it possible for Melodyne to analyze changes in the
tempo or time signature during pure playback – in other words, without any transfer being necessary.
With respect to Melodyne’s analysis of the tempo, if the following rules are observed, everything
should go as expected and there is no reason why you should not be able work successfully with
variable tempo.
Prior to the first transfer, with the tempo dialog open, play through to one instance of Melodyne
the entire song including all passages in which the tempo accelerates, decelerates or changes
abruptly or in which there is a change of time signature. This will allow Melodyne to create a
tempo map, which will be adopted by all instances of Melodyne. Alternatively, using the Import
key you can load a standard MIDI file exported previously from the DAW containing the
requisite tempo data. If in doubt, use this method, which is described above, as it is quicker.
If you have made further changes to the tempo in the DAW, play through once again to one
instance of Melodyne in the tempo dialog the entire song. This will allow Melodyne to map all
the tempo changes and preserve the synchronism of the bar ruler.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
217
Melodyne 4 studio
If, prior to changing tempo progressions in your DAW you have already transferred material to
Melodyne, then once Melodyne has learned about the changes, before closing the tempo
dialog check the Audio Stretching option. This is the only way of ensuring that the material
already transferred can adapt to the new tempo environment.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
218
Melodyne 4 studio
Using Rewire (stand-alone)
Via Rewire, you can connect the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne to your DAW and transmit
audio from Melodyne to your DAW.
About the Rewire interface
The stand-alone implementation of Melodyne’s support for the Rewire protocol provides an alternative
to running Melodyne as a plug-in. This is particularly useful when you want to take advantage of
certain aspects of the stand-alone implementation that are not offered by the plug-in (e.g. the ability to
import material from libraries or its tempo detection/editing functions) or if your DAW either has no
plug-in interface or has one that is incompatible with Melodyne. For this mode of operation to be
possible, of course, your DAW must be capable of supporting Rewire and of doing so in “Host” mode;
but the overwhelming majority of DAWs are.
When Rewire is active, the transport functions and tempo of Melodyne and the DAW are coupled:
commence playback in one, and the other starts too, with both running automatically in sync. In
addition, audio signals can be transmitted from Melodyne (the Rewire slave) to the DAW (the Rewire
host), where you can access them from the mixer.
Establishing the Rewire link
To use Rewire with Melodyne, you must launch your DAW first and the stand-alone implementation of
Melodyne subsequently. Melodyne will detect the presence of a Rewire master (your DAW) and
thereupon activate a device called “Rewire” in the preferences property sheet. If, on the other hand,
you launch Melodyne when the DAW is not running, Melodyne will revert as normal to the audio
device last used.
You cannot change the sampling rate, the size of the buffer used by Melodyne or the input channels in
Rewire mode, as the sampling rate is dictated by your DAW, the buffer sized is fixed and the input
channels are not available in Rewire mode.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
219
Melodyne 4 studio
Activating Rewire in your DAW
Please read the documentation of your DAW to discover how to enable its tracks for Rewire – the
procedure varies from DAW to DAW. Regardless of the exact procedure, however, you must select
the Rewire device “Melodyne” as the input to the desired track or mixer channel in the DAW.
The transmission of audio via Rewire
Select in Melodyne’s Track Inspector the desired audio output for each track that you intend to
transfer to your DAW via Rewire. In Rewire mode, four independent stereo outputs are available for
the transmission of audio signals to your DAW. You can also assign multiple tracks to the same stereo
output.
Tracks assigned to Melodyne’s “Master” audio output will be routed to whichever output has been
defined as the master output on the Audio page of Melodyne’s Preferences property sheet. If, for
example, you have defined the stereo output “1-2” in Melodyne as the master output, then tracks
assigned in Melodyne to the “Master” output or to output “1-2” will be transmitted to your DAW via the
same stereo channel.
Note that Rewire is used to transfer audio from Melodyne to your DAW, not from your DAW to
Melodyne. If you want to edit audio tracks from your DAW in Melodyne when the two are connected
via Rewire, you must first export (“bounce” or “render”) the tracks in your DAW, and then import them
into Melodyne.
Tip: When exporting tracks from your DAW, always begin at Bar 1, as then they will automatically be
aligned correctly when imported by Melodyne. This makes it easy to avoid timing discrepancies.
Starting and stopping playback
The project loaded in Melodyne will start in sync with the DAW whether you activate playback from
within the DAW or from within Melodyne. By the same token, you can halt the playback either from
Melodyne or the DAW.
Melodyne adopts the tempo of the DAW and speeds up, or slows down, the playback of the project as
necessary to maintain synchronicity with the DAW.
Synchronization
If a Melodyne project is to run in perfect sync with the DAW, the tempo of the Melodyne project must
be the same as that in the DAW at the moment when the first files are imported into Melodyne from
the DAW. To ensure that this is the case, when creating the Melodyne project you intend to use for the
Rewire connection, in the transport bar type in the tempo in BPM that is displayed in the DAW. Then
switch off Auto Stretch and import the audio files.
If your DAW project has a variable rather than a constant tempo, this is obviously not something you
can just type in. In this case, you must export a MIDI file from your DAW that runs the entire length of
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
220
Melodyne 4 studio
the project, and then use the Import Tempo command in Melodyne’s File menu to import this MIDI file;
this will allow Melodyne to create a tempo map of the project. Once you have done this, you can
import the audio files with Auto Stretch switched off.
By following this procedure, you will be able to operate the DAW and Melodyne together in such a way
that audio comes on one side from the DAW and on the other from Melodyne. If you now change the
tempo in the DAW, you will not need to take any further action, as Melodyne thereafter will follow
tempo changes in the DAW automatically.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
221
Melodyne 4 studio
Saving audio as MIDI
From this tour, you will learn how to save audio notes in Melodyne as MIDI notes.
About Audio-to-MIDI
Melodyne allows you to export audio notes as MIDI notes. When this is done, a file in Standard MIDI
file format is created and saved to your hard disk. This file can then be loaded into your DAW, so you
can use it, for instance, to double your vocals with a sound from a software synthesizer.
The MIDI notes are an exact representation of the audio notes in Melodyne. For each audio note, a
MIDI note is created with the same position, length and pitch. The velocity of each MIDI note is
derived from the amplitude of the audio note it represents.
When you save rhythmic material as MIDI, all the MIDI notes will share the same pitch but take their
position, length and amplitude from their audio equivalents in the rhythm track. You can use this
technique, for example, to derive from a drum loop a quantization reference for other MIDI tracks in
your DAW.
The generation of MIDI notes from audio material offers a wealth of different creative possibilities. Try
it out for yourself!
Saving MIDI from the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne
To save audio material from the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne as a MIDI file on your hard
disk, choose File > Export... Mute beforehand the tracks you do not wish to export. Empty or muted
tracks are not exported, so much the same effect can be obtained by soloing the tracks you do wish to
export.
In the Export window, you will find various options. First using the pop-up button on the left select MIDI
in the first line; this will gray out the irrelevant options for exporting audio.
In the second line, select the Range (i.e. the portion of the timeline) you wish to export. The radio
buttons below allow you to decide whether all the tracks should share a common MIDI file or whether
a separate file should be created for each track.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
222
Melodyne 4 studio
If you opt for a common MIDI file, a different MIDI channel will be assigned to each track and you can
then name the MIDI file. If you opt for a separate MIDI file to be created for each track, the file in each
case will be given the same name as the track.
In addition to these individual files, an additional MIDI file is saved containing no notes but simply the
tempo map of the song. The name of this file is “<name of the song>.tempo.mid”.
For the range (i.e. the temporal scope), the following options are available:
Entire Length: Everything from the beginning of the first track to the end of the last.
Cycle Range Only: only the segment of the timeline between the cycle locators.
Range of Reference Track: The export will be confined to that segment of the timeline covered
by the track you select as the reference track using the pop-up button on the right.
Start of Reference Track to End of Arrangement: The export begins, as before, at the point in
the timeline that coincides with the start of the reference track, but in this case it continues to
the end of the last track in the project.
Individual Range for Each Track: A separate file will be created for each track, covering in each
case the entire timeline from the beginning to the end of the track in question. If you select this
option, you cannot create a common MIDI file.
The “Include tails” option should be selected when you wish to limit the length of the exported material
to the cycle range but certain of its notes have not finished sounding when the end of the range is
reached. If you choose “Include tails”, the exported segment will be extended just enough to prevent
the tails being chopped off.
Click on Export to begin the MIDI export with the selected options. A file selector will open so that you
can choose the storage location.
Saving MIDI from the plug-in implementation
To save MIDI from the plug-in, begin by switching to “Edit” in the list of instances (holding down the
[Shift] or [Command] keys as you do so) all the instances the notes of which you wish to export as
MIDI, so that their notes appear in the Note Editor. If the notes of an instance are not displayed in the
Note Editor, they will not be exported.
When the MIDI export takes place, a common MIDI file will be created for all instances, with a
separate MIDI channel assigned to each instance.
To perform the export, select Save as MIDI ... from the Settings menu. In the file selection box that
appears, you can enter a name and a storage location for the MIDI file.
The export will begin for all instances at the start of Bar 1, even if the first notes appear in a later bar.
This will ensure that the MIDI notes in your DAW will run in sync with the original audio notes; simply
drag the MIDI file onto a track beginning at Bar 1.
If you opt for the Cycle Range Only option, only the notes within the cycle range will be exported. This
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
223
Melodyne 4 studio
is useful if, for instance, you wish to save as MIDI some specific segment such as a single phrase or
bar.
Please note that the option Cycle Range Only refers to the cycle range in Melodyne not in the DAW.
You can set the cycle range in Melodyne while playback in the DAW is stopped. The default cycle
range in Melodyne is the area of the timeline covered by the first transfer. If this default cycle range is
adopted as the range of a subsequent transfer, it may be that Melodyne will round it up to the nearest
bar to make positioning the resulting MIDI file easier.
The MIDI file exported by Melodyne also contains tempo information. Most DAWs give you the option
of either adopting this tempo information or ignoring it in favor of the current tempo in the DAW itself.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
224
Melodyne 4 studio
Preferences and keyboard shortcuts
From the Preferences property sheet, you can select fundamental options governing the modus
operandi of Melodyne as well as define a number of keyboard shortcuts.
Opening the window and general settings
In the plug-in implementation of Melodyne, you open the Preferences property sheet from the Settings
menu; in the stand-alone implementation, choose Preferences from the program (macOS) or File
(Windows) menu. The settings available in the stand-alone implementation differ slightly from those
offered by the plug-in.
The following options, however, are available in both implementations of Melodyne. Any changes you
make in either implementation apply to both.
Language: Determines the language of the user interface.
Pitch labels: Determines which system is used to name the notes – i.e. (descending
chromatically) English (C, B, Bb etc.), German (C, H, B etc.) or Latin (Do, Si, Sib etc.).
Appearance: Here you can select between different contrast settings for the user interface.
Default tuning: Determines the frequency of the reference pitch A4 (the A above Middle C).
Maximum undo levels: Melodyne allows you to undo up to 100 actions. The default value,
however, is 25. You can, if you wish, increase this value, which will consume more RAM, or
you may prefer to reduce it, if memory is running short.
Show tooltips: Once you are thoroughly familiar with Melodyne, you may prefer to hide the
tooltips, i.e. the explanatory text that appears as you move the cursor over the various icons
and other elements of the user interface.
Audio and recording preferences
In both the stand-alone implementation and the plug-in, you will find the following two options:
Audio cache: Determines the location on your hard disk of the audio cache Melodyne editor
requires for internal processing.
Audio cache size: Determines the maximum size of this audio cache.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
225
Melodyne 4 studio
The following option is only found in the plug-in:
Detect audio after transfer: When this option is selected, the detection (analysis) of the audio
material does not begin until the transfer is complete, thereby reducing the CPU load during the
transfer. Select this option if your computer is not especially powerful and there are indications
during the transfer that its resources are becoming overstretched (e.g. clicks, drop outs,
extreme slowing-down of the system).
The Audio and Recording pages of the Preferences property sheet display the following additional
options:
Audio device: allows you to select an audio driver or the audio hardware driven by it.
Sample rate: determines the sample rate used by Melodyne.
Buffer size: determines the size of the buffer used for audio editing. The smaller the value, the
lower the latency but the greater the load on the CPU.
Ignore buffer underruns: If Melodyne Stand-Alone is running on a slow computer where the
possibility of an overload (and an ensuing click or dropout) exists, by checking this box, you
inform Melodyne that you consider the former to be the lesser of the two evils – the point being
that audio hardware is often very sensitive to dropouts and can even in such cases cause the
entire computer to crash. Check the box if ever this happens. Such occurrences are very rare,
however, and most users can safely ignore this option.
Master output: selects the main output for Melodyne stand-alone. The level at this output is
controlled by the Master Volume control in the transport bar. If your audio hardware only offers
one output, this is automatically the Master output
Default input: selects the main input for Melodyne Stand-Alone. If your audio hardware only
offers one input, this is automatically the Default input.
Audio file format: determines the file format used by Melodyne to store recordings. The most
commonly used formats are WAV and AIFF.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
226
Melodyne 4 studio
Shortcuts
The Shortcuts page of the Preferences property sheet allows you to customize the keyboard shortcuts
used by Melodyne for a wide range of functions.
Click the triangle to the left of the category that interests you in order to see a list of the available
commands.
Click on a command and then press the key or combination of keys that you wish to assign as its
shortcut. Melodyne will assign the key or combination of keys to the command in question. Repeat the
procedure for as many commands as you like.
To remove an unwanted shortcut, select the command in question followed by Delete. You can
restore the factory defaults at any time by clicking the Reset button; you will be asked to confirm that
this is your intention.
The Export and Import buttons allow you to save one set of keyboard shortcuts to a storage device
and reload a set saved earlier. In this way, you can carry your shortcut preferences around with you –
on a USB stick, for example – when moving from studio to studio.
Check for Updates
On this page, you can determine whether Melodyne checks for updates automatically or manually i.e.
only when you click the ‘Check Now’ button, which you can do at any time.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
227
Melodyne 4 studio
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
228
Melodyne 4 studio
Troubleshooting
If you have problems, you will find advice here. If the tips do not help contact [email protected]
Our support staff speaks English and German.
I’m not sure how to install Melodyne correctly.
Just run the installation program that you received as a download or that you will find on your
Melodyne CD. This will install both the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne and the various
plug-ins onto your computer.
I have installed Melodyne but cannot find it.
Under macOS, the stand-alone implementation of the program is called “Melodyne”. You will find it in
the “Melodyne 4” subfolder of the “Applications” folder. The plug-ins are also called “Melodyne” and
you will find them in: Macintosh HD/Library/Audio/Plug-Ins/<Subfolder of the plug-in type in question>.
Under Windows, the stand-alone implementation is called “Melodyne.exe”. You will find it under
C://Programs/Celemony/Melodyne 4/ or C://Program Files (x86)/Celemony/Melodyne 4/. The various
plug-ins are also called “Melodyne” and are generally to be found here:
VST3 (64 Bit): C://Programs/Common Files/VST3/Celemony
VST3 (32 Bit): C://Program Files (x86)/Common Files/VST3/Celemony
VST2 (64 Bit): C://Programs/Common Files/Steinberg/VST2/Celemony (the path can be chosen at the
time of the installation; please check to see which path your DAW is using)
VST2 (32 Bit): C://Program Files (x86)/Steinberg/VSTplugins/ (the path can be chosen at the time of
the installation; please check to see which path your DAW is using)
AAX: C://Programs/Common Files/Avid/Audio/Plug-Ins
RTAS: C://Program Files (x86)/Common Files/Digidesign/DAE/Plug-Ins
In your DAW, you will find Melodyne among the audio effects plug-ins. To use it, insert the plug-in into
the desired audio tracks.
I’ve installed Melodyne but do not know how to activate it.
Launch the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne. In the dialog box that appears, click on “Activate
”. This takes you online to our registration page, where you can create a user account if you do not
already have one. To do this, follow the onscreen instructions. When you have finished, your computer
will be activated and you will be able to run Melodyne on it permanently and without restrictions. If you
purchased Melodyne from our web shop, it is enough to click on “Activate”, as you will already have
created your user account at the time of the purchase.
I am getting error messages and cannot complete the activation.
To activate the program, you need a working Internet connection. Make sure – e.g. by trying to access
another web site – that you are actually online. If you are, restart Melodyne and try again.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
229
Melodyne 4 studio
I would like to install Melodyne again but no longer have the installation program.
You will find your personal installation program in your user account. Log in at
www.celemony.com/login and download it to reinstall Melodyne.
I’m not sure whether the right edition and version of Melodyne is running.
To discover which edition and version number of Melodyne is running, choose “About Melodyne” from
the main menu. If you need it, you will find the installation program for the Melodyne edition
corresponding to your license in your user account (www.celemony.com/login).
I would like to know whether an update is available for my Melodyne.
Melodyne checks automatically via the Internet whether a newer version is available. You will find this
function on the “Check for Updates” page of the Preferences dialog where you can also check for
updates manually by clicking “Check Now”. We also provide information about updates in our
newsletter, to which you can subscribe from your user account (at www.celemony.com/login).
I cannot launch the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne.
Restart your computer, then make a further attempt to launch Melodyne. If that does not work, delete
your Melodyne preferences (instructions below) and try again. If Melodyne still will not launch, please
contact our support at [email protected] You will find your Melodyne preferences here:
• macOS: Hold down the Alt key in Finder and from the main menu choose Go > Library and open the
Preferences subfolder. Scroll down to the file “com.celemony.melodyne.pref.plist” and delete it.
• Windows: Navigate to C://Users/<Your user name>/AppData/Roaming/Celemony/ and delete the file
“com.celemony.melodyne.plist”. If the “AppData” folder is not visible, open the Control Panel by
clicking the Start button (Windows 7) or right-clicking in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen
(Windows 8). Now choose “Appearance and Personalization” followed by “Folder Options”. Click on
the View tab. Under “Advanced Settings”, check “Show hidden files, folders, and drives” and exit with
OK.
I have inserted Melodyne as a plug-in in one of the audio tracks of my DAW but nothing
is happening.
Initially Melodyne is empty; before it can do anything, audio material has to be transferred to it from
the relevant track of the DAW. To do this, click the Transfer button in Melodyne and then, from the
DAW, play the passage you wish to edit. Once you have finished the transfer, the notes will appear in
Melodyne and you will be able to edit them.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
230
Melodyne 4 studio
I have the impression that my DAW and Melodyne are not interacting correctly.
Many DAWs have particular characteristics of which you need to be aware, such as whether or not
they support the ARA interface extension. In our Help Center, you will find the required information
and tips on all leading DAWs. You can reach our Help center from Melodyne’s Help menu or under
www.helpcenter.celemony.com.
I am not getting any audio output with the stand-alone implementation of Melodyne.
Open the Audio page of the Preferences dialog and make sure that the correct audio device is
selected. Under macOS that should be the built-in audio hardware or your audio interface (and not, for
example, the wireless interface Airplay). Under Windows, please select the correct ASIO driver. With
DirectX no recording is possible.
After transferring or importing audio, the blobs in Melodyne are not at all as I expected.
By default, Melodyne selects an algorithm for your audio material automatically. It can happen from
time to time that monophonic material is interpreted as polyphonic. If this happens, click on a note in
the affected passage and select from the main menu under “Algorithm” an algorithm better suited to
your purpose.
Sometimes, I can only move the blobs in the Note Editor vertically, sometimes only
horizontally.
If you are editing a blob using the Main Tool (the arrow symbol), it is the initial direction of the drag
that determines whether the blob can be moved vertically or horizontally. Release the blob
momentarily if you wish to change direction. If the Pitch or Time grid is active, you will need to hold
down the Alt key to make fine adjustments in the dimension concerned. When moving blobs
horizontally, remember that it makes a difference whether you begin dragging from the middle of the
blob or from either the beginning or the end. In the former case, the whole blob is moved; in the latter,
only the beginning or end.
When I shift the pitch of certain blobs, they sound unnatural.
Occasionally, in the detection of monophonic audio material, octave errors can occur, and in that of
polyphonic audio, prominent overtones can be mistaken for separate notes. In such cases, when the
corresponding blobs are moved, artifacts can arise. You can prevent this by checking, and if
necessary editing, the detection in Note Assignment Mode before you start, to ensure that the notes
displayed really do correspond to those actually played.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
231
Melodyne 4 studio
In the stand-alone implementation, the tempo of an imported audio file is wrong.
Activate the Auto Stretch switch to adapt the file you are importing to the project tempo. Deactivate it if
you wish the original tempo of the imported file to be retained. If, in the former case, the tempo of the
imported file is still wrong, open the file first in a separate project document and correct the tempo
assignment there before copying the blobs into the first project.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
232
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne in Pro Tools
This tour shows you how to make efficient use of Melodyne within Pro Tools.
Please take note also of the information regarding the compatibility of Melodyne with Pro Tools on our
website.
Loading the Melodyne plug-in
Insert Melodyne into one of the plug-in slots of the desired track. You will find Melodyne Plugin in the
“Other” category. This is not to be confused with the category “Instrument”, from which the Rewire
device (described below) can be loaded.
You are advised, as a rule, to insert Melodyne in the first plug-in slot – before the compressor, EQ or
other effects. The reason is this: during the transfer, Melodyne records the input signal you intend to
edit – and with it all effects ahead of it in the signal chain, which are then frozen into the signal and
can no longer be adjusted. In order to use your compressor, EQ and other effects in the usual way,
you need therefore to make sure they come after Melodyne Plugin in the signal chain.
Backing up and exchanging projects
Under Pro Tools, Melodyne’s transfer files are stored within the session structure. This means that if
you want to be sure, when archiving your project or passing it on to others, that all instances of
Melodyne will be able to find the audio files they need, the only thing you need to archive or pass on is
the session folder.
When archiving and passing on projects, you do not need to worry about Melodyne’s audio cache, the
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
233
Melodyne 4 studio
size and location of which can be selected from Melodyne’s Preferences dialog. Melodyne will
automatically restore the parameters found there, so there is no need to archive or copy them
separately.
Duplicating tracks
Sometimes you may want to copy a track including its Melodyne instance and Melodyne editing – in
order, for instance, to generate a second voice. To do this, use the “Duplicate …” command in Pro
Tools' Track menu.
To ensure that not only the track itself but also Melodyne and all the editing you have performed with it
are also duplicated, check the “Inserts” box in the “Data to duplicate” section of the “Duplicate Tracks”
dialog.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
234
Melodyne 4 studio
Saving plug-in settings for Melodyne
Just as with an effects plug-in you can store different settings as presets, in Melodyne you can save
different edits. You may wish to do this in order, for example, to allow a performer or artist to hear and
choose between different edits of the same take. To save and reload Melodyne settings, follow the
same procedures as for all other plug-ins.
Click in the upper part of the current Melodyne Plugin window on “Preset” and select “Save Settings
As …”. Then assign a name to the current Melodyne edit. You can store alternative edits as additional
presets and switch between them using the preset selector.
Bouncing/printing Melodyne edits
To render (i.e. make permanent) your Melodyne editing on a Pro Tools track, proceed as follows:
Using the bypass function in the mixer or insert area of the track, deactivate the effects you do
not wish to be included in the recording on the new track. The EQ and compression, for
example, are things you will also wish to adjust on the new track, so these should not be
included.
Then right-click on the track or a specific region thereof and choose “Commit” from the context
menu. You can access the same function by choosing Track > Commit from the main menu at
the top of the screen.
Decide whether the automation should be included in the calculation of the new track or
whether you would rather copy the existing automation to the new track later in order to retain
access to it. In that case, deactivate the automation in the dialog window of the “Commit”
function.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
235
Melodyne 4 studio
As soon as you click on OK, Pro Tools will render the track and create a new track in the session with
the results of the rendering. If you have set Pro Tools to deactivate the original track containing
Melodyne, it will now do so; you can always reactivate it later should you decide further editing is
needed.
Once you have created the desired renderings, copy the deactivated effects by dragging them to the
new track(s) whilst holding down the ALT key; then reactivate them. Via Pro Tools' Edit menu, you can
also copy the automation data from the original Melodyne tracks to the new tracks.
Rewire
Generally you will want to use Melodyne as a plug-in in Pro Tools. This is the most convenient way of
working and means, moreover, that all Melodyne data is stored within your session structure, making
archiving and passing on projects easier. Occasionally, however, you may wish to integrate the
stand-alone version of Melodyne into Pro Tools as a Rewire client.
This can be useful if, for example, you wish to adjust samples quickly to the project tempo. When the
program is integrated via Rewire, this happens automatically as soon as you drag a sample from the
finder or explorer and drop it into the Melodyne window. You can then play back the samples at the
correct tempo via Rewire and make further use of them in Pro Tools, enhancing them there perhaps
through the application of additional plug-ins.
To integrate Melodyne Stand-Alone into Pro Tools as a Rewire client, proceed as follows:
First launch Pro Tools; then create an aux track and choose “Melodyne” from the “Instrument”
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
236
Melodyne 4 studio
category. This will launch Melodyne not as a plug-in but as a stand-alone application integrated via
Rewire. The transport functions and tempo of the two programs will also be synchronized.
Launch Melodyne. From Melodyne’s Track Inspector, select the pair of outputs you wish to use for the
audio transfer of this Melodyne document to Pro Tools. If you are using Melodyne studio, you can
make separate output assignments for each track.
From the Pro Tools Rewire window, select “Left - Right”. You can, if you wish, transfer the audio
signals of multiple Melodyne tracks via separate channels to separate aux tracks in Pro Tools. To do
this, select the appropriate output pair from the Rewire dialog.
Now load or else drag & drop the desired samples into Melodyne. These will then be analyzed and
adapted to the project tempo. When you have finished editing the sample(s) in Melodyne, you can
transfer the corresponding audio signals via Rewire from Melodyne to Pro Tools and record them
there. Route the aux track via the Output menu to a new track and record the audio signal on it.
Please note that data from Melodyne is not automatically saved along with your Pro Tools session
when the two programs are linked via Rewire. To make it possible to recreate an earlier work situation,
you must save the Melodyne document manually in the form of an MPD file – ideally in the session
folder of your Pro Tools project.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
237
Melodyne 4 studio
After saving the MPD file, select the option “Copy External Files to Project Folder” in Melodyne’s
Project Browser to ensure the samples used are also stored by Melodyne in the session folder.
Miscellaneous notes
H/W Buffer Size
Under “Setup > Playback Engine” set the H/W buffer size to 1,024 samples. Smaller values lead to a
significant increase in the CPU load.
Should you require a smaller buffer, e.g. when adjusting the headphone mix directly in your computer
and not via an external channel strip or mixer, switch all instances of Melodyne during the recording to
bypass Reactivate Melodyne as soon as you begin editing your new track.
Keyboard shortcuts
If you are running Pro Tools under Windows, certain keyboard shortcuts within Melodyne do not work,
unfortunately, as they govern Pro Tools itself and not Melodyne:
CTRL+X
CTRL+C
CTRL+V
CTRL+A
CTRL+Z
CTRL+Shift+Z
Instead of these shortcuts, please use the corresponding commands in Melodyne’s menus or the
Melodyne user interface.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
238
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne in Logic Pro
This tour shows you how to make efficient use of Melodyne within Logic Pro.
Please take note also of the information regarding the compatibility of Melodyne with Logic Pro on our
website.
Loading the Melodyne plug-in
Insert Melodyne into one of the plug-in slots of the desired track. You will find Melodyne Plugin under
Audio Units/Celemony Melodyne.
You are advised to insert Melodyne in the first plug-in slot – before the compressor, EQ or other
effects. The reason is this: during the transfer, Melodyne records the input signal you intend to edit –
and with it all effects ahead of it in the signal chain, which are then frozen into the signal and can no
longer be adjusted. In order to use your compressor, EQ and other effects in the usual way, you need
therefore to make sure they come after Melodyne Plugin in the signal chain.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
239
Melodyne 4 studio
Backing up and exchanging projects
During transfers, Melodyne records the track’s signal, making a copy of the passages transferred. The
resulting audio files are stored in a transfer folder of their own that you can select in Melodyne’s
Project Browser. It makes sense to create a transfer folder like this within the Logic project folder of
each Logic project. Then, from the Project Browser of the first instance of Melodyne you create in the
Logic project, select “Set Path for Transfers” from the settings menu and navigate to this folder.
Following this procedure ensures that when archiving or passing on your work, all the files you need
will be in your Logic project folder and not elsewhere on your computer.
If you are copying your Logic project to another location, you should then immediately open the copy
followed by an instance of Melodyne within it. Then, in Melodyne’s Project Browser, choose “Set Path
for Transfers” from the settings menu and navigate to the newly copied transfers folder before saving
your Logic project.
If you didn’t set the transfer path prior to the first transfer, you can do so at any time later. Melodyne
will automatically gather the data for the tracks already edited and move it to the storage location you
have chosen.
When archiving and passing on projects, you do not need to worry about Melodyne’s audio cache, the
size and location of which can be set from Melodyne’s Preferences dialog. Melodyne will automatically
restore the parameters found there, so there is no need to archive or copy them separately.
Duplicating tracks
Sometimes you may wish to copy a track including its Melodyne instance and Melodyne editing – in
order, for instance, to generate a second voice. To do this, use either the “New Track with Duplicate
Setting” icon or the keyboard shortcut CMD-D. Drag the audio material belonging to the original track
into the new track in order to duplicate it.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
240
Melodyne 4 studio
Saving plug-in settings for Melodyne
Just as with an effects plug-in you can store different settings as presets, in Melodyne you can save
different edits. You may wish to do this in order, for example, to allow a performer or artist to hear and
choose between different edits of the same take. To save and reload Melodyne settings, follow the
same procedures as for all other plug-ins.
Just click on the name of the current preset in the Melodyne Plugin window and select “Save As…”
Then assign a name to the current Melodyne edit. You can store alternative edits as additional presets
and switch between them using the preset selector.
Bouncing/printing Melodyne edits
When you are using Melodyne in a project and have finished editing, you have two choices:
You can allow the Melodyne instance(s) to remain active until the final mixdown. If you do this, you will
retain access to your Melodyne editing and will be able to make further refinements up until the very
last moment. This is convenient, but as long as the plug-in remains active it is draining the resources
of your system.
You can make your Melodyne editing permanent by ‘bouncing’ it – i.e. recording the edited track(s) or
passage(s) to a new audio file (or files). This will deprive you of further access to your Melodyne
editing but allow you to deactivate the plug-in and thereby free up resources. Bouncing your Melodyne
edits has the further advantage of allowing you to pass the project on to colleagues who don’t have
Melodyne.
To bounce the track containing Melodyne in Logic Pro and make your editing permanent, proceed as
follows:
Deactivate the effects you do not wish the new track to contain by ALT-clicking on the corresponding
plug-ins. The EQ and compression, for example, are things you will also wish to adjust on the new
track, so these should not be included.
Automation is a similar case: decide whether it should be included in the transfer or whether you
would prefer to copy the existing automation to the new track later, in order to retain access to it there.
In that case, deactivate the automation in the left-hand track area of the edit window or in the mixer
prior to the bounce. You can also deactivate automation when bouncing tracks (see below).
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
241
Melodyne 4 studio
We recommend the following bounce procedure:
Select one or several regions. Right-click on the title bar of a region and select “Bounce to Hard Disk”.
Now enter a name followed by the audio resolution parameters.
Under no circumstances check “Bypass Effect Plug-ins” as this would cause your Melodyne editing to
be ignored.
Since Logic will automatically create a new track for the bounced material, you can decide now what
you wish to do with the original track. If you select “Mute”, the old track will be retained but simply
muted.
Once the bounce has been performed, to copy the automation data to the newly created track hold
down the SHIFT key as you drag a selection within the automation data. Then choose Edit > Copy or
use the shortcut CMD+C to copy the automation data onto the clipboard. After selecting the track with
the bounced material, insert the data by choosing Edit > Paste (or the shortcut CMD+V). Now all that
remains is to reactivate the automation in the channel.
To copy the plug-ins from the original track to the newly created one, drag them from the former to the
latter, holding down the ALT key as you do so.
All that remains is to decide what to do with the original Melodyne tracks. You can either delete or else
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
242
Melodyne 4 studio
mute them, deactivating with the ALT key their Melodyne instances in order to spare resources. If you
adopt the latter course, you will retain access to your original Melodyne editing and be able to make
further refinements later simply by reactivating the tracks.
Rewire
Generally you will want to use Melodyne as a plug-in in Logic Pro. This is the most convenient way of
working; it means, moreover, that all Melodyne data is stored within your project structure, making
archiving and passing on your project easier. Occasionally, however, you may wish to integrate the
stand-alone version of Melodyne into Logic Pro as a Rewire client.
This can be useful if, for example, you wish to adjust audio files swiftly to the project tempo. When the
program is integrated via Rewire, this happens automatically as soon as you drag an audio file from
the finder or explorer and drop it in the Melodyne window. You can then play back the audio files at
the correct tempo via Rewire and make further use of them in Logic Pro, enhancing them there
perhaps through the application of additional plug-ins.
To integrate Melodyne Stand-Alone into Logic Pro as a Rewire client, proceed as follows:
First launch Logic Pro. Then choose from the “Options” menu the command “Create New Auxiliary
Channel Strip”.
A dedicated channel strip will be created automatically in the Logic Pro mixer. Now, from the input
section of this channel strip, select as input “Melodyne 4 > RW:Left/Right”.
You can use multiple tracks in Melodyne in this way and assign their audio output via separate
channels to separate aux tracks in Logic Pro.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
243
Melodyne 4 studio
Now open Melodyne. This will launch Melodyne not as a plug-in but as a stand-alone application
integrated via Rewire. The transport functions and tempo of the two programs will also be
synchronized.
From Melodyne’s Track Inspector, select the pair of outputs you wish to use for the audio transfer of
this Melodyne document to Logic. If you are using Melodyne studio, you can make separate output
assignments for each track.
Now load or else drag & drop the desired audio files into Melodyne. These will then be analyzed and
adapted to the project tempo. When you have finished editing the sample(s) in Melodyne, you can
transfer the corresponding audio signals via Rewire from Melodyne to Logic Pro and record them
there.
Please note that data from Melodyne is not automatically saved along with your Logic Pro project
when the two programs are linked via Rewire. To make it possible to recreate an earlier work situation,
you must save the Melodyne document manually in the form of an MPD file – ideally in your Logic Pro
project folder.
After saving the MPD file, select the option “Copy External Files to Project Folder” in Melodyne’s
Project Browser to ensure the samples used are also stored by Melodyne in the project folder.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
244
Melodyne 4 studio
Miscellaneous notes
Buffer Size
Under Settings > Audio, we suggest an I/O buffer size of 1,024 samples. Smaller values lead to a
marked increase in the CPU load.
Should you require a smaller buffer, e.g. when adjusting the headphone mix directly in your computer
and not via an external channel strip or mixer, switch all instances of Melodyne during the recording to
bypass Reactivate Melodyne as soon as you begin editing your new track.
Mute and Solo
Melodyne continues to play back its audio signal even when the audio region in the same part of the
arrangement has been muted.
If you do, however, wish to mute Melodyne or solo it, you must use the corresponding buttons in the
channel strip. As an alternative to the channel strip buttons, you can also use the buttons in the track
list.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
245
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne in Cubase and Nuendo
This tour shows you how to make efficient use of Melodyne within Cubase and Nuendo.
Please take note also of the information regarding the compatibility of Melodyne with Cubase/Nuendo on
our website.
Loading the Melodyne plug-in
Insert Melodyne into one of the plug-in slots of the desired track. You will find Melodyne Plugin in the
plug-in folder named “Other”.
You are advised to insert Melodyne in the first plug-in slot – before the compressor, EQ or other
effects. The reason is this: during the transfer, Melodyne records the input signal you intend to edit –
and with it all effects ahead of it in the signal chain, which are then frozen into the signal and can no
longer be adjusted. In order to use your compressor, EQ and other effects in the usual way, you need
therefore to make sure they come after Melodyne Plugin in the signal chain.
Backing up and exchanging projects
During transfers, Melodyne records the track’s signal, making a copy of the passages transferred.
Within the Cubase/Nuendo project structure, the resulting audio files are stored inside the specially
created “Melodyne” folder in a sub-folder called “Transfers”. This means that if you want to be sure,
when archiving your project or passing it on to others, that all instances of Melodyne will be able
subsequently to find the audio files they need, the only thing you need to archive or pass on is the
project folder.
If you are making a copy of your project using the “Backup Project” command, please be sure to open
the backup project immediately one time. Only then will the “Melodyne” folder be included in the
backup.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
246
Melodyne 4 studio
When archiving and passing on projects, you do not need to worry about Melodyne’s audio cache, the
size and location of which can be set from Melodyne’s Preferences dialog. Melodyne will automatically
restore the parameters found there, so there is no need to archive or copy them separately.
Duplicating tracks
Sometimes you may want to copy a track including its Melodyne instance and Melodyne editing – in
order, for instance, to generate a second voice. To do this, use the Duplicate Tracks command in
Cubase/Nuendo’s Project menu.
Saving plug-in settings for Melodyne
Just as with an effects plug-in you can store different settings as presets, in Melodyne you can save
different edits. You may wish to do this in order, for example, to allow a performer or artist to hear and
choose between different edits of the same take. To save and reload Melodyne settings, follow the
same procedures as for all other plug-ins.
Click in the upper part of the current Melodyne Plugin window on Manage Presets and select “Save
Preset …”. Then assign a name to the current Melodyne edit. You can store alternative edits as
additional presets and switch between them using the preset selector.
Exporting/printing Melodyne edits (audio mixdown)
When you are using Melodyne in a project and have finished editing, you have two choices:
You can allow the Melodyne instance(s) to remain active until the final mixdown. If you do this, you will
retain access to your Melodyne editing and will be able to make further refinements up until the very
last moment. This is convenient, but as long as the plug-in remains active it is draining the resources
of your system.
You can make your Melodyne editing permanent by ‘exporting’ it – i.e. recording the edited track(s) or
passage(s) to a new audio file (or files). This will deprive you of further access to your Melodyne
editing but allow you to deactivate the plug-in and thereby free up resources. Exporting your Melodyne
edits has the further advantage of allowing you to pass the project on to colleagues who don’t have
Melodyne.
To export the track containing Melodyne in Cubase/Nuendo and make your editing permanent,
proceed as follows:
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
247
Melodyne 4 studio
Specify the desired range within the Cubase/Nuendo timeline; you can record either the entire
Melodyne track or simply a passage (or passages) within it.
Using the bypass function in the mixer or insert area of the track, deactivate the effects you do not
wish to be included in the recording on the new track. The EQ and compression, for example, are
things you will also wish to adjust on the new track, so these should not be included.
Automation is a similar case: decide whether it should be included in the transfer or whether you
would prefer to copy the existing automation to the new track later, in order to retain access to it there.
In that case, deactivate the automation in the left-hand track area of the edit window prior to the
export. You can do this for all the automation (en bloc) or else for those control elements individually
that you wish to deactivate.
To commence the export process, choose File > Export > Audio Mixdown from the menu bar. Now
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
248
Melodyne 4 studio
enter a name followed by the requisite audio resolution parameters.
In the section “Import into Project” be sure to activate the Audio Track option.
Now specify in the left-hand side of the window the track you wish to export.
Tip: The Realtime Export option delivers the most reliable results.
Now click on Export. Cubase/Nuendo will perform the audio mixdown and create a new track
containing your Melodyne edits. If you wish, you can export multiple tracks simultaneously by selecting
them in the “Channel Selection” pane on the left-hand side of the window prior to the mixdown.
Once you have performed the desired exports, in the Cubase/Nuendo mixer copy the deactivated
effects by dragging them to the new track whilst holding down the ALT key; then reactivate them. You
can transfer the automation data from the original Melodyne tracks to your new tracks using the copy
and paste functions.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
249
Melodyne 4 studio
All that remains is to decide what to do with the original Melodyne tracks. You can either delete them
or deactivate them by right-clicking in the track panel and choosing Disable Track. If you adopt the
latter course, you will retain access to your original Melodyne editing and be able to make further
refinements later simply by reactivating the tracks.
Note: The Channel Batch Export function, which you can activate in the same window, offers you the
possibility of exporting multiple tracks simultaneously. The use of this function eliminates the risk of
including unwanted send effects in the export.
Rewire
Generally you will want to use Melodyne as a plug-in in Cubase or Nuendo. This is the most
convenient way of working; it means, moreover, that all Melodyne data is stored within your session
structure, making archiving and passing on your project easier. Occasionally, however, you may wish
to integrate the stand-alone version of Melodyne into Cubase/Nuendo as a Rewire client.
This can be useful if, for example, you wish to adjust samples quickly to the project tempo. When the
program is integrated via Rewire, this happens automatically as soon as you drag a sample from the
finder or explorer and drop it in the Melodyne window. You can then play back the samples at the
correct tempo via Rewire and make further use of them in Cubase/Nuendo, enhancing them there
perhaps through the application of additional plug-ins.
To integrate Melodyne Stand-Alone into Cubase/Nuendo as a Rewire client, proceed as follows:
Launch Cubase/Nuendo first and choose Melodyne 4 Rewire from the Devices menu.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
250
Melodyne 4 studio
A window will open from which you can select the pair of outputs to be used for the audio transfer of
the Melodyne document to Cubase/Nuendo. If you are working with a single Melodyne document,
activate the Left and Right fields. The corresponding tracks will appear automatically in your project
window. You can open multiple Melodyne documents and transfer their audio via separate channels to
separate aux tracks in Cubase/Nuendo.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
251
Melodyne 4 studio
Now open Melodyne. This will launch Melodyne not as a plug-in but as a stand-alone application
integrated via Rewire. The transport functions and tempo of the two programs will also be
synchronized.
From Melodyne’s Track Inspector, select the pair of outputs you wish to use for the audio transfer of
this Melodyne document. If you are using Melodyne studio, you can make separate output
assignments for each track.
Now load or else drag & drop the desired samples into Melodyne. These will then be analyzed and
adapted to the project tempo. When you have finished editing the sample(s) in Melodyne, you can
transfer the corresponding audio signals via Rewire from Melodyne to Cubase/Nuendo and record
them there. To do this, use Cubase/Nuendo’s Audio Mixdown function, which is described above
under “Exporting/printing Melodyne edits”.
Please note that data from Melodyne is not automatically saved along with your Cubase/Nuendo
project when the two programs are linked via Rewire. To make it possible to recreate a work situation
later, you must save the Melodyne document manually in the form of an MPD file – ideally in your
Cubase/Nuendo project folder.
After saving the MPD file, select the option “Copy External Files to Project Folder” from the settings
menu of Melodyne’s Project Browser to ensure the samples used are also stored by Melodyne in the
project folder.
Miscellaneous notes
Buffer Size
Please set the I/O buffer size of your audio driver to 1,024 samples. Smaller values lead to a marked
increase in the CPU load.
To alter the buffer size in Cubase or Nuendo, choose Device > Device Setup from the menu bar. From
the left-hand side of the window, select your audio device under “VST Audio System” From the
content that appears on the right-hand side of the window, select Control Panel. In the next window,
set the buffer size.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
252
Melodyne 4 studio
Should you require a smaller buffer, e.g. when adjusting the headphone mix directly in your computer
and not via an external channel strip or mixer, switch all instances of Melodyne during the recording to
bypass. Reactivate Melodyne as soon as you begin editing your new track.
32-/64-bit
If you are running a 64-bit version of Cubase/Nuendo, do not use the Bit Bridge to link with the 32-bit
version of Melodyne. Instead use the 64-bit VST3 version of Melodyne, which is more powerful.
Synchronization out by cycle length
If you activate Cubase/Nuendo’s cycle function but commence playback at a point after the cycle
range, Melodyne will be noticeably out of sync.
Workaround: If you wish to play back the song from a later position, deactivate the Cubase/Nuendo
cycle function.
Local playback and blob monitoring
To ensure blob monitoring and Melodyne’s local playback function remain activated, deselect the
following option:
"Preferences > VST > Plug-Ins > Suspend VST3 plug-in processing when no audio signals are
received”.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
253
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne in Studio One using ARA
As an extension of the VST interface, ARA allows a close integration of Melodyne editor, assistant or
essential into Presonus Studio One, making your Melodyne experience even more enjoyable. In this
short introduction, you will learn everything you need to know to use Melodyne in Studio One. This
guide complements the normal Melodyne user manual.
Please take note also of the information regarding the compatibility of Melodyne with Studio One on our
website.
Loading and installing Melodyne
Studio One Professional comes with a license for Melodyne essential. With Studio One Artist or
Producer, you receive a trial version of our top-of-the-line Melodyne editor.
If Melodyne has not yet been installed, please open the “Studio One Installation” window.
Click on “Download Contents from PreSonus User Account”. There you will find the Melodyne
installation program in the “My Software” section. Download the program, launch it and follow
the onscreen instructions. If you purchased Studio One in a box, select the second option in the
installation window to install Melodyne from the Studio One DVD.
Before you can use Melodyne, you have to register and activate it. When you launch Melodyne
for the first time, an activation assistant will guide you through the necessary steps.
You will find the serial number of your Melodyne essential in the “About Studio One” dialog
when you click on the “Details” button.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
254
Melodyne 4 studio
Editing an audio event with Melodyne and ARA
In Studio One, select an audio event and choose “Edit with Melodyne” from the Audio menu. You can
also use the keyboard shortcut Cmd-M (Mac) or Ctrl-M (Windows). Melodyne is launched
automatically, analyzes the audio event and displays its notes. Melodyne is now embedded in the
lower pane of the Studio One window just like Studio One’s audio or MIDI editors. Any time you wish
to access this audio event again, simply double-click on it and the notes will immediately be displayed
in Melodyne.
Operating procedures no longer necessary thanks to ARA
To get to know Melodyne, we recommend the normal Melodyne User Manual or the User Manual
Videos. These describe the use of Melodyne without ARA. Since ARA introduces considerable
improvements in the use of Melodyne, certain themes mentioned in the manual are no longer of
relevance:
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
255
Melodyne 4 studio
Transfers: In the absence of ARA, you have to play through to Melodyne in real time the audio
segments from the DAW that you wish to edit – a recording process known as a “transfer”. With ARA,
transfers are no longer necessary; it is enough to choose “Edit with Melodyne” and the desired audio
event will open in Melodyne. For this reason, when you are using ARA, the “Transfer” button is no
longer visible in the Melodyne user interface.
File management: Since ARA eliminates the need for transfers, the associated file management work
is also a thing of the past. For this reason, there is no “File Manager” … dialog in Melodyne Plugin.
When you wish to save and later restore your work or hand it on to someone else, all you need is the
Studio One song. All the data required by Melodyne is saved along with the song.
Tempo and time signature changes: With ARA, Melodyne follows all changes in tempo and time
signature in Studio One automatically. Without ARA, such changes have to be played through to
Melodyne in real-time.
MIDI export: With ARA, there still is a command for exporting MIDI in the “Settings” menus of
Melodyne studio, editor and assistant (though not in that of Melodyne essential). However, ARA
makes exporting MIDI to a DAW track considerably easier: Just drag an audio event that you have
previously opened in Melodyne to an instrument track. This also works with Melodyne essential.
Changes to audio events that Melodyne follows automatically
When you change the arrangement of audio events in Studio One, Melodyne, when integrated with
ARA, follows automatically. Without ARA, every change made to the DAW track has to be reproduced
manually in Melodyne. Changes to audio events that Melodyne with ARA follows automatically include
the following:
muting,
shortening,
moving,
copying,
changes in gain and fades,
stretching of events with Studio One’s Time Tool (Alt + drag end) and
changes to the “Follow Tempo” settings in the Inspector (see following paragraph).
The time stretching behavior of Studio One and Melodyne
In Studio One’s Inspector (just to the left of the track list and accessible by clicking on the i button
above the track list) you can select for each track between the options “Follow Tempo” and
“Timestretch”. With regard to the option selected, Melodyne conforms with Studio One. All the
following examples apply only when Timestretch has been selected for the track in question. If “Follow
Tempo” or “Do Not Follow Tempo” are selected, no time stretching occurs.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
256
Melodyne 4 studio
Select the option “Timestretch” if you want an audio file to adjust automatically to the prevailing tempo
when you drag it into a song. Studio One can perform this adjustment correctly for some files without
Melodyne’s help, but for others it does need Melodyne. If an audio event is opened with Melodyne, it
is always Melodyne that performs the time stretching.
From a technical standpoint, time stretching is based upon a prior determination of the tempo, as both
Studio One and Melodyne need to know the tempo of the file before they can decide whether to
stretch or squeeze it, and by how much, to conform to the tempo of the song. The manner in which the
tempo is determined varies depending on the origin of the file. Suppose, for example, the tempo of
your song is 100 BPM:
If the audio file was recorded or bounced within the current Studio One song, one can safely assume it
is intended to play back at the song tempo (i.e. 100 BPM). In this case, no tempo detection takes
place. If you increase the song tempo to 120 BPM, the tempo of the audio file will also increase from
100 to 120 BPM.
If the origin of the file is another song, with a tempo of 125 BPM, for example, Studio One can’t know
this and offers you two options:
You can enter the value 125 in the “File Tempo” field in the Event Inspector. Melodyne, which has
access to this field, will take 125 BPM to be the tempo of the file and stretch or squeeze the audio
accordingly to make it match your song tempo.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
257
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne detects the original tempo of the audio file automatically in the course of its analysis. Before
Melodyne can stretch the audio to match the host tempo, you must, of course, select one of the four
options in Melodyne’s Tempo Dialog that we are about to describe. You open the Tempo Dialog by
clicking the button next to the tempo display.
“Confirm xx BPM as File Tempo”: Here the tempo detected automatically by Melodyne is displayed
and (if the option is selected) confirmed. This value is then displayed in Studio One’s Event FX
window.
“Assign File Tempo”: Clicking on this entry opens the Tempo Editor. Here you can make changes to
the automatically detected tempo, which is particularly useful in the case of files containing tempo
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
258
Melodyne 4 studio
variations such as ritardandi. When you leave the Tempo Editor again, the value will also be displayed
in Studio One’s Event FX window. If the file tempo is not constant, this will be indicated. Melodyne
then employs time-stretching when playing back the file to adapt it to the project tempo.
“Apply Project Tempo to File”: Use this option to give the file the same tempo as the project.
“Specify Constant Tempo for File”: If you know the file tempo, you can enter it here.
Please note that in Melodyne essential and assistant the entry “Assign File Tempo” is not available, as
the Tempo Editor does not feature in these editions.
Once Melodyne knows the original tempo, you can draw in any tempo path you like in Studio One and
Melodyne will adjust the file to match it.
Inserting Melodyne into a channel strip: no ARA
To benefit from ARA, you have to insert Melodyne as an Event FX (which is what happens
automatically if you use the Edit with Melodyne command). It is also possible to insert Melodyne into a
channel strip, but in this case no ARA integration takes place. This means you will have to perform
transfers and also that Melodyne will no longer follow automatically any tempo changes or changes
made to the audio events on the track in Studio One.
Bypassing or removing Melodyne from an audio event
To switch Melodyne to bypass or remove it from an audio event, deactivate or delete Melodyne in the
Event FX inspector of the audio event. Of course, if you switch Melodyne to bypass, time-stretching
will no longer be performed by Melodyne but by Studio One.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
259
Melodyne 4 studio
Tips & Tricks
Buffer Size
We recommend that you set your audio buffer size to 1,024 samples. Smaller values lead to a
significantly higher CPU load. Should you need to set smaller values, e.g. when doing the headphone
mix directly in your computer and not via an external channel strip or mixer, deactivate all Melodyne
instances while tracking. Switch Melodyne back on when you start editing your new tracks.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
260
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne in Sonar with ARA
As an extension of the VST interface, ARA provides for a particularly close integration of Melodyne
into Cakewalk Sonar, thereby making for a very user-friendly Melodyne experience. In this short
guide, you will find all you need to know in order to use Melodyne in Sonar with ARA. This guide
complements the normal Melodyne User Manual.
Please take note also of the information regarding the compatibility of Melodyne with Sonar on our website.
Installing Melodyne
Melodyne essential is bundled with the editions Sonar Platinum and Sonar Producer and is installed
along with Sonar. If you have unintentionally interrupted the installation of Melodyne and only
succeeded in installing Sonar, you can easily install Melodyne later from the Cakewalk Command
Center.
When you launch Melodyne for the first time, the Activation Assistant will ask you for your Melodyne
serial number. If you already owned Melodyne prior to the Sonar update, your serial number will be
entered automatically, so you need only confirm it. If you did not already own Melodyne, the Serial
Number field will be empty. In this case, enter the Melodyne serial number that came with the Sonar
bundle. You will find this either in the Sonar packaging or, if you purchased Sonar as a download, in
your Cakewalk user account; in this case, upon completion of the download, you should also have
received an e-mail from Cakewalk containing your Melodyne serial number. After entering your serial
number, follow the instructions provided by the Activation Assistant.
Editing of an audio region or a clip with Melodyne and ARA
Within Sonar select an audio clip or make a selection within an audio track. Right-click within the
selected range and choose the entry “Create Region FX” from the context menu. Note: With the
entries “Remove Region FX” and “Bypass/Bypass Region FX” you can, respectively, remove
Melodyne permanently from the region or set it to bypass mode.
Melodyne will launch immediately, analyze the clip, and display the notes contained within it.
Melodyne is now embedded in the lower area of the Sonar window just like Sonar’s audio editor or
mixer. If you wish to access this clip again later, just double-click on it and the notes will be displayed
immediately in Melodyne.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
261
Melodyne 4 studio
Tip: you can also apply this procedure to the selected clip or the current selection using the keyboard
shortcut “CTRL+M”.
Procedures that are no longer necessary thanks to ARA
To get to know Melodyne, we recommend the normal Melodyne User Manual or the handbook films in
the English language. Each of these describes the use of Melodyne without ARA. Since ARA brings
considerable improvements in the use of Melodyne, some of the subjects dealt with in the User
Manual are no longer of relevance:
Transfers: In the absence of ARA, before you can begin editing an audio segment you must first
transfer it from the DAW to Melodyne in real time, in what is essentially a recording process. With
ARA, no such transfers are necessary. It suffices to open Melodyne as a Region FX and the desired
clip will automatically be displayed in Melodyne. So when ARA is operative, the “Transfer” button is no
longer displayed in the Melodyne user interface.
File management: Since there are no more transfers with ARA, you no longer need to concern
yourself with the management of transfer files. Melodyne Plugin therefore no longer has a File
Management dialog. This means that all you have to worry about now, when saving and restoring your
work or passing it on to other users, is your Sonar project. All the data required by Melodyne is stored
along with the Sonar project.
Tempo and time signature changes: With ARA, Melodyne follows automatically any changes in
tempo or time signature in Sonar, provided the option “Follow Host Tempo” is checked in the local
Region FX menu. Without ARA, all such changes must first be played through to Melodyne in real
time.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
262
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne detects the original tempo of the audio file automatically in the course of its analysis. Before
Melodyne can stretch the audio to match the host tempo, you must, of course, select one of the four
options in Melodyne’s Tempo Dialog that we are about to describe. To open the Tempo Dialog, click
on the button next to the tempo display.
“Confirm xx BPM as File Tempo”: Here the tempo detected automatically by Melodyne is displayed
and (if the option is selected) confirmed.
“Assign File Tempo”: Clicking on this entry opens the Tempo Editor. Here you can make changes to
the automatically detected tempo, which is particularly useful in the case of files containing tempo
variations such as ritardandi. When you close the Tempo Editor again, the value will be sent to Sonar.
Melodyne thereafter employs time-stretching when playing back the file to adapt it to the project
tempo.
“Apply Project Tempo to File”: Use this option to give the file the same tempo as the project.
“Specify Constant Tempo for File”: If you know the file tempo, you can enter it here.
Please note that in Melodyne essential and assistant the entry “Assign File Tempo” is not available, as
the Tempo Editor does not feature in these editions.
Once Melodyne knows the original tempo, you can draw in any tempo path you like in Sonar and
Melodyne will adjust the file to match it.
MIDI Export: With ARA, too, a command is provided in the “Settings” menu of Melodyne editor and
Melodyne assistant (but not Melodyne essential) for the exporting of MIDI. But ARA makes exporting
MIDI to a Sonar track far simpler: If you have previously opened a clip in Melodyne, all you need to do
is drag it by its upper handle to a MIDI or instrument track within your Sonar arrangement. Note that
the polyphonic conversion of audio to MIDI is only possible with Melodyne editor or an activated trial
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
263
Melodyne 4 studio
version of Melodyne 4. Otherwise the conversion of audio to MIDI is always monophonic, and also
functions, of course, in Melodyne’s playback mode.
Tip: It is not, in fact, necessary to create a Region FX with Melodyne in order to convert audio to MIDI.
It suffices to drag it to a MIDI or instrument track in the manner already described. The requisite
exchange of information with Melodyne is performed by Sonar in the background using the ARA
protocol.
Changes to audio clips that Melodyne follows automatically
If you change the arrangement of audio clips in Sonar, Melodyne, when connected using ARA, follows
automatically, as long as the function “Follow Host Tempo” is checked in the local Region FX menu. In
the absence of ARA, every change to the DAW track has to be repeated manually in Melodyne. The
changes to audio events automatically followed by Melodyne with ARA include:
muting,
shortening,
moving,
copying,
alteration of the volume and of fades,
time-stretching of the event with Sonar’s Slip Stretch function (by CTRL-dragging the end of the
clip).
Note: Even when Melodyne is running in playback or trial mode, Melodyne will follow the tempo of the
sequencer through time-stretching, provided the “Follow Host Tempo” option is checked. Most of the
ARA functions mentioned are also active; it is only editing within Melodyne that is impossible.
The time-stretching behavior of Sonar and Melodyne
In Sonar, simply by holding down the CTRL key as you drag the right-hand edge of a clip, you can
stretch or squeeze the corresponding audio material (Slip Stretch). The resulting stretch factor is
displayed at the top of the clip.
As long as Melodyne is inserted into the clip as a Region FX, it is Melodyne’s algorithms that will be
used for the stretching of the audio material. In this case, the Time ruler in the Melodyne display will
adjust automatically.
Inserting Melodyne into a channel strip: no ARA
To profit from ARA, Melodyne must be loaded as a Region FX. It is also possible, however, to load
Melodyne as an insert into a channel strip (“Track Effect Bin”) though in this case no ARA integration
takes effect. This means you do have to perform transfers, and Melodyne will no longer follow tempo
changes and changes to the audio events on the track in Sonar automatically.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
264
Melodyne 4 studio
Bypassing Melodyne or removing it from a clip
You have several ways of removing Melodyne as a Region FX from the signal path. For temporary
comparisons between the edited and unedited clip, you can use the “Compare” function in the
Melodyne user interface. With this function, Melodyne’s time-stretching remains active, but all changes
to the notes are temporarily undone, a fact indicated by the fact that the affected blobs are displayed
in gray.
It is also possible, however, to switch Melodyne to Bypass in the Region FX menu, so that the CPU no
longer needs to process it. In this case, any time-stretching will no longer be performed by Melodyne
but by Sonar.
The final option is to remove Melodyne permanently by removing the corresponding Region FX from
the clip.
Other things you should know about the use of Sonar
Buffer size
We recommend an audio buffer size of 1,024 samples. Smaller values lead to a marked increase in
the CPU load. Should you require a smaller buffer, e.g. when you are performing the headphone mix
directly in your computer and not monitoring via an external channel strip or mixer, switch all instances
of Melodyne during the recording to bypass. Reactivate Melodyne as soon as you begin editing your
new track.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
265
Melodyne 4 studio
Melodyne in Live
This tour shows you how to make efficient use of Melodyne within Ableton Live.
Please take note also of the information regarding the compatibility of Melodyne with Live on our website.
Loading the Melodyne plug-in
Load Melodyne as an insert effect into one of the audio tracks of the Live mixer. You will find the
Melodyne Plugin in the Live browser under ‘Plug-Ins’ in the Melodyne or Celemony/Melodyne folder.
You are advised, as a rule, to use Melodyne as the first plug-in in a track – i.e. before the compressor,
EQ or other effects. The reason is this: during the transfer, Melodyne records the input signal you
intend to edit – and with it all effects ahead of it in the signal chain, which are then frozen into the
signal and can no longer be adjusted. In order to use your compressor, EQ and other effects in the
usual way, you therefore need to make sure they are inserted after the Melodyne Plugin in the signal
chain.
Melodyne in Live's Session View
If you are using Melodyne in Live’s Arrangement View, you can transfer audio to Melodyne, edit it and
play back the results using exactly the same procedures as with any other DAW, all of which are
described in our online user manual. However, Live also offers a Session View, and if you wish to use
Melodyne in it, you should bear the following points in mind:
In Session view, Melodyne can sometimes be heard in the wrong places or not at all. Furthermore,
Melodyne ignores clip changes in Session View and does not record transfers in the correct places.
All these phenomena stem from the principles upon which Live operates and its special way of
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
266
Melodyne 4 studio
handling time. The clips in Session View represent small loops within the linear running time of the
Arrangement in Live. It is from this Arrangement time that Melodyne derives its timing information;
Melodyne is not informed about loops hidden within clips. Schematically, the picture looks like this:
Whilst the clip is still cycling within in the loop, Melodyne has long since moved on. If you nonetheless
do wish to use Melodyne with clips in the Session View, you should activate Live’s global
(Arrangement-) loop and set it to the length of the clip that you wish to edit with the plug-in in Session
View. Then the loop of the linear time (and therefore also of Melodyne’s time) will correspond to the
loop of the clip to be edited:
The upshot of all this is that it is impossible to record and subsequently play back the switching of clips
on a track in Melodyne in any sensible way: if you switch clips during the transfer, Melodyne will still
record the contents, but do so along the linear time axis that is determined by the arrangement. And
the contents will be played back accordingly. It is therefore not possible to reproduce in Melodyne clip
changes implemented in Live’s Session View, as Melodyne is always guided by Live’s linear
Arrangement Time rather by that of individual clips.
You are therefore recommended to use Melodyne only when working in Live’s Arrangement View. But
you would presumably do this anyway when editing vocals or other instruments. Besides which, Live
offers user-friendly functions for transforming clips into building blocks of the arrangement, editing
them there in Melodyne and then rendering them once more as clips.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
267
Melodyne 4 studio
Backing up and exchanging projects
During the transfer, Melodyne captures the track’s signal, creating recordings of the corresponding
passages. The resulting audio files are stored in a transfers folder of their own that you create in
Melodyne’s Project Browser. It makes sense to create a transfers folder like this within the project
folder of each Live project. Then, in the Project Browser of the first Melodyne instance that you create
in each project, choose “Set Path for Transfers” from the settings menu and navigate to that folder.
Following this procedure ensures that when archiving or passing on your work, all the files you need
will be in your project folder and not elsewhere on your computer.
If you are saving a copy of your Live project to another location, after doing so you should immediately
open the copy followed by an instance of Melodyne within it. Then, from the settings menu of
Melodyne’s Project Browser, choose “Set Path for Transfers” and navigate to the newly copied
transfers folder before saving your Live project.
If you didn’t set the transfer path prior to the first transfer, you can do so at any time later. Melodyne
will automatically gather the data for the tracks already edited and move it to the storage location you
have chosen.
When archiving and passing on projects, you do not need to worry about Melodyne’s audio cache, the
size and location of which can be selected from Melodyne’s Preferences dialog. Melodyne will
automatically restore the parameters found there, so there is no need to archive or copy them
separately.
Duplicating tracks
Sometimes you may want to copy a track including its Melodyne instance and Melodyne editing – in
order, for instance, to generate a second voice. To do this, right-click on the “Duplicate” command in
the mixer or audio track area.
Saving plug-in settings for Melodyne
Just as with an effects plug-in you can store different settings as presets, in Melodyne you can save
different edits. You may wish to do this in order, for example, to allow a performer or artist to hear and
choose between different edits of the same take. To save and reload Melodyne settings, follow the
same procedures as for all other plug-ins.
Use for the purpose within the relevant effects chain the preset manager for the Melodyne plug-in.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
268
Melodyne 4 studio
Save your current settings using the corresponding symbol and assign a name. You can store
alternative edits as additional presets and switch between them using the preset selector.
Bouncing/printing Melodyne edits (freezing/flattening)
When you are using Melodyne in a project and have finished editing, you have two choices:
i) You can allow the Melodyne instance(s) to remain active until the final mixdown. If you do this, you
will retain access to your Melodyne editing and will be able to make further refinements up until the
very last moment. This is convenient, but as long as the plug-in remains active it is draining the
resources of your system.
ii) You can transform your Melodyne edits into new audio files. This will deprive you of further access
to your Melodyne editing but free up resources, as the plug-in will no longer be in use. Turning your
Melodyne edits into new audio files has the further advantage of allowing you to pass projects on to
colleagues who don’t have Melodyne.
To transform a clip edited using Melodyne into a new audio file in Live, either of two techniques
suggest themselves: one is simply to ‘freeze’ the track in question and the other to ‘freeze’ and then
‘flatten’ it.
"Freeze Track": With this option, which you will find in the track’s context menu, you can transform
temporarily your Melodyne editing and any subsequent insert effects into audio. The advantage? The
track is now a pure audio track and Melodyne is inactive, freeing up resources. Furthermore, you can
unfreeze the track (also from the context menu) at any time in order to modify your Melodyne editing.
The disadvantage? Any additional insert effects are also frozen and cannot therefore be modified
either without unfreezing the track. Similarly, it is impossible to add new effects to the track while it is
frozen. Freezing a track is best used, therefore, as a quick temporary measure designed to economize
on resources rather than as a permanent solution.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
269
Melodyne 4 studio
"Flatten": If, rather than merely freezing a Melodyne track temporarily, you wish to transform it
permanently into a new audio file, after freezing it you should select ‘Flatten’ from the track’s context
menu. This command transforms the frozen track into a normal audio track reflecting permanently the
result not only of your Melodyne editing but also of any effects that follow it in the signal chain. To
avoid these insert effects being flattened along with your Melodyne editing and to make it possible to
modify them later, before freezing and flattening the track, you should remove from it the insert effects
in question (e.g. by dragging them to an empty track). Once the flattening process is complete, you
can drag the effects back onto the Melodyne track and use them as freely as before.
Rewire
Generally you will want to use Melodyne as a plug-in in Live. This is the most convenient way of
working and means, moreover, that all Melodyne data is stored within your project structure, making
archiving and passing on projects easier. Occasionally, however, you may wish to link the stand-alone
version of Melodyne to Live as a Rewire client.
This can be useful if, for example, you wish to adjust samples quickly to the project tempo. When the
program is integrated via Rewire, this happens automatically as soon as you drag a sample from the
finder or explorer and drop it in the Melodyne window. You can then play back the samples at the
correct tempo via Rewire and make further use of them in Live, enhancing them there perhaps
through the application of additional plug-ins.
To link Melodyne Stand-Alone with Live as a Rewire client, proceed as follows:
First launch Live and within it create an audio track. In the Inputs/Outputs area, select as an input
“Melodyne 4”. When you later launch Melodyne, a Rewire connection will be established
automatically. The transport functions and tempo of the two programs will also be synchronized.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
270
Melodyne 4 studio
Now, from Melodyne’s Track Inspector, select the pair of outputs you wish to use for the audio transfer
of this Melodyne document to Live. If you are using Melodyne studio, you can make separate output
assignments for each track.
In the input area of the corresponding Live track, select also under “Melodyne 4” the corresponding
pair of inputs. So as to be able to hear the signal permanently, activate input monitoring for the
corresponding track.
You can, if you wish, open multiple Melodyne documents and transfer their audio via separate
channels to separate audio tracks within Live.
Now load or else drag and drop the desired samples into Melodyne. These will then be analyzed and
adapted to the project tempo. When you have finished editing the sample(s) in Melodyne, you can
transfer the corresponding audio signals via Rewire from Melodyne to Live and record them there.
Please note that data from Melodyne is not automatically saved along with your Live project when the
two programs are linked via Rewire. To make it possible to recreate an earlier work situation, you must
save the Melodyne document manually in the form of an MPD file – ideally in the project folder of your
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
271
Melodyne 4 studio
Live project. After saving the MPD file, select the option “Copy External Files to Project Folder” in
Melodyne’s Project Browser to ensure the samples used are also stored by Melodyne in the project
folder.
Miscellaneous notes
Buffer size
We recommend an audio buffer size of 1,024 samples. Smaller values lead to a marked increase in
the CPU load.
Should you require a smaller buffer, e.g. when adjusting the headphone mix directly in your computer
and not via an external channel strip or mixer, switch all instances of Melodyne during the recording to
bypass. Reactivate Melodyne as soon as you begin editing your new track.
Plug-in format under macOS
Under macOS, you can in principle use Melodyne in Ableton Live either as a VST 2 (32-bit) or as an
AU (32-/64-bit) plug-in. We recommend use of the AU version.
Time signature changes
Melodyne not only follows the time, as described above, but also the timeline of the Live arrangement.
If you are working on the clip level, however, with different time signatures and insert these clips into
the arrangement, discrepancies can arise between what is heard and the time signatures displayed.
The problem here, however, is purely a visual one; the correctness of the audio output and editing
functions of Melodyne, including the quantization, are in no way compromised by it.
Tempo automation
If you automate the song tempo in the master track within Live’s Arrangement View, Melodyne and
Live will no longer run in sync or the transfer may break off prematurely. One workaround for this
consists in transferring all tracks without any tempo changes to Melodyne first and then rendering the
tracks edited with Melodyne, before using the tempo automation.
You can also, however, alter the tempo in Live manually by setting a new constant song tempo in the
Tempo Field. If you then use the Tempo dialog in Melodyne (reached via the broken chain symbol),
Melodyne will ‘learn’ the new tempo.
© Celemony Software GmbH 2017 • Last updated on 28.06.2017 • Help Center • www.celemony.com
272
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement