DeviceNet Communications Handbook

DeviceNet Communications Handbook
DeviceNet
Communications
handbook
DeviceNet
HA027506ENG/5
July 2010
© 2010 Eurotherm Limited
All rights are strictly reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, modified, or transmitted in any form by any means, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system other than for the purpose
to act as an aid in operating the equipment to which the document relates, without the prior, written
permission of Eurotherm Limited.
Eurotherm Limited pursues a policy of continuous development and product improvement. The
specification in this document may therefore be changed without notice. The information in this
document is given in good faith, but is intended for guidance only. Eurotherm Limited will accept
no responsibility for any losses arising from errors in this document.
Contents
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
1. Contents
1.
Contents ................................................................................................................................ 1-1
2.
General .................................................................................................................................. 2-1
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
3.
This Document ...................................................................................................................................... 2-1
Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 2-1
The DeviceNet Object Model ................................................................................................................ 2-2
The DeviceNet Implementation ............................................................................................................ 2-3
Hardware............................................................................................................................................... 2-4
Tag Addresses ....................................................................................................................................... 2-4
Procedure for Setting up a Network....................................................................................... 3-1
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
4.
Physical Wiring ...................................................................................................................................... 3-1
Terminal Description ............................................................................................................................. 3-2
Typical Wiring Diagram ......................................................................................................................... 3-3
Setting up the Controller ...................................................................................................................... 3-4
Setting up the Scanner .......................................................................................................................... 3-4
Establishing Communications ................................................................................................................ 3-5
Transferring Data – 2600 / 2700 .............................................................................................. 4-1
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
5.
Default Example 1 ................................................................................................................................. 4-3
Example 2. ............................................................................................................................................. 4-7
Example 3 ............................................................................................................................................ 4-12
Example 4 ............................................................................................................................................ 4-12
2600 & 2700 Class, Instance, Attribute ID Tables ................................................................................. 4-14
Transferring Data – 2500 ........................................................................................................ 5-1
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
6.
Default Example 1 ................................................................................................................................. 5-5
Example 2 .............................................................................................................................................. 5-7
Example 3 – iTools............................................................................................................................... 5-11
2500 Class, Instance, Attribute ID Table .............................................................................................. 5-13
Transferring Data – 2400 ........................................................................................................ 6-1
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
7.
Default Example 1 ................................................................................................................................. 6-3
Example 2 .............................................................................................................................................. 6-5
6.2.1
Simple plc application ................................................................................................................................................................................. 6-6
6.4.1
Ramp/Dwell Programmer Data............................................................................................................................................................... 6-15
Example 3 .............................................................................................................................................. 6-6
2400 Class, Instance and Attribute ID Table .......................................................................................... 6-8
Transferring Data - 2200 ......................................................................................................... 7-1
7.1
7.2
7.3
8.
Default Example 1 ................................................................................................................................. 7-2
Explicit Messaging ................................................................................................................................. 7-2
7.2.1
7.2.2
7.2.3
7.2.4
User Parameters ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 7-2
Explicit Read Message ................................................................................................................................................................................. 7-3
Explicit Write .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 7-4
Explicit Message Descriptions ................................................................................................................................................................... 7-5
2200 Class Instance &Attribute ID Table ............................................................................................... 7-6
Transferring Data – Mini8 Controller ...................................................................................... 8-1
8.1
8.2
DeviceNet Interface .............................................................................................................................. 8-1
8.1.1
8.1.2
Setting Baud Rate and Address in the Standard Module.................................................................................................................. 8-1
Hardware Wiring ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 8-1
Enhanced DeviceNet Interface .............................................................................................................. 8-2
8.2.1
8.2.2
8.2.3
8.2.4
Address Switch .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 8-2
Baud Rate Switch .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 8-2
Switch Position in iTools ............................................................................................................................................................................. 8-2
Connector ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8-2
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8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
8.8
9.
Contents
DeviceNet Status Indication .................................................................................................................. 8-3
8.3.1
8.3.2
8.3.3
8.3.4
Status Indication for Enhanced DeviceNet ............................................................................................................................................ 8-4
Module Status Indication ............................................................................................................................................................................ 8-4
Network Status Indication .......................................................................................................................................................................... 8-4
Table Modification........................................................................................................................................................................................ 8-5
Default Example 1 ................................................................................................................................. 8-6
Example 2 .............................................................................................................................................. 8-9
Example 3 ............................................................................................................................................ 8-11
Example 4 ............................................................................................................................................ 8-12
Mini8 controller Class, Instance and Attribute ID Table ..................................................................... 8-14
Transferring Data – 3500 ........................................................................................................ 9-1
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
Table Modification ................................................................................................................................ 9-3
Default Example 1 ................................................................................................................................. 9-4
Example 2 .............................................................................................................................................. 9-7
Example 3 .............................................................................................................................................. 9-9
3500 Class, Instance and Attribute ID Table ........................................................................................ 9-10
10.
PC3000 ................................................................................................................................. 10-1
11.
Explicit Message Block Read/Write ....................................................................................... 11-1
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
12.
Flow Chart ........................................................................................................................................... 11-2
Implementation – 2700 Read Block ..................................................................................................... 11-2
Implementation – 2700 Write Block .................................................................................................... 11-8
Implementation – 2600 Programmer Upload/Download ....................................................................11-10
References ........................................................................................................................... 12-1
Issue Status of this manual
Issue 4 includes Enhanced DeviceNet designed for the semiconductor industry.
Issue 5 corrects parameters in the EDS List in sections 4, 4.2 and 4.5 and updates the mini8 LED status list in section 8.3.2.
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General
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
2. General
2.1
This Document
The purpose of this document is to provide practical assistance to help set up a Eurotherm controller on a DeviceNet
network. It is not a treatise on DeviceNet.
In order to make it practical specific hardware has to be used and in these examples the Rockwell Allen Bradley
SLC500/03 processor has been used with a 1747-SDN Scanner module and a 1770-KFD RS232 Interface together with
Rockwell RSLinx, RSNetWorx and RSLogic500. A familiarity with these software tools is assumed.
For other hardware the interfaces will be different but the basic process required will be the same.
2.2
Introduction
DeviceNet was designed as a low-level network for communications between Programmable Logic Controllers and
relatively simple devices such as limit switches and I/O clusters.
Although the Eurotherm Advanced DeviceNet products allow large I/O messages (2700 has 120 words of input and
output data), practical systems are constrained by the total I/O space available in the scanner being used – for example
300 words of combined I/O data in the Allen Bradley 1747-SDN/B Scanner Module - and by the amount of traffic
permissible on the network. To put this in perspective, a single Eurotherm device can generate and consume as much
information as 15 DeviceNet 64 bit digital I/O modules! Not only is this a great deal of data, but it also takes 15 times as
long to transmit as a simple I/O device.
Eurotherm controllers offer DeviceNet communications on three different levels. The first two only require configuration
of the network, the third requires plc programming as well.
1. The simplest uses standard pre-configured parameters which allow a network to be set up with little configuration
work, the most common parameters then being available in the plc.
2. The next level uses ‘indirection’ techniques which gives access to any parameter in the controller via its Tag address.
Again in this application the parameters are available in the plc.
3. The third level of communications uses ‘explicit message program control’ on DeviceNet. This allows the plc to control
the network messages directly by issuing a Request and waiting for a Response. This can reduce network traffic.
On the 2400, 2500, 2600 & 2700 explicit messaging can be used to read or write blocks of 16 parameters, such as may be
used to up / download a recipe program.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
2.3
General
The DeviceNet Object Model
The mix of objects within a DeviceNet device is usually depicted graphically. The diagram below shows the overall
distribution of DeviceNet objects within the interface.
Application Objects
Identity Object
Assembly Object
Message Router
Explicit
Msg.
I/O
DeviceNet Object
Connection Class
DeviceNet Network
This is very much a standard object mapping, containing the usual mandatory DeviceNet objects, as described in the
ODVA Specification.
Application
Variables
Tag Access Object
I/O Remapping Object
Application Variable
Remapping Object
(2500, 2600, 2700)
The I/O Remapping Objects are the parameters being read/written on the DeviceNet network
The Application Variable Object is a list of predefined parameters available to be selected as IO Remapped objects.
The Application Variable Remapping Object uses Tag Addresses to add further User defined parameters to the
Application Variables Object ( and from there to the I/O Remapping Object)
The Tag Access Object requires the use of explicit messaging to read and write blocks of data.
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General
2.4
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
The DeviceNet Implementation
This implementation provides a common DeviceNet interface firmware for 2400/2500/2600/2700/3500 & Mini8
controller. This takes the form of an internally fitted DeviceNet gateway. The physical implementation is identical for
2400/2600/2700/3500, but is a separate board for 2500 & Mini8 controller. The 2200 and the PC3000 are implemented in
a different way but are included in the examples.
The implementation provides a Group 2 only Server, supporting all optional DeviceNet features, i.e.:
Polled I/O, COS/Cyclic, Bit Strobe, Heartbeat Messaging, Device Shutdown Messaging
For further information on the definitions of these functions, refer to the ODVA DeviceNet specification.
DeviceNet masters exchange data with DeviceNet slave devices by using I/O messages; there are four different types of
I/O messages: strobe, poll, change-of-state (COS), and cyclic.
The strobe I/O message, which is 8 bytes (64 bits) in length, is broadcast by the master to all devices on the network.
Each of the bits corresponds to one of the node addresses (0 to 63). Each device on the network that supports strobe
I/O messages, responds by placing its input data, which can be a maximum of 8 bytes per device, on the network. This is
supported by some Eurotherm controllers but is only likely to be useful if one or two parameters are required from a
large number of devices.
The poll I/O message, which can be a maximum of 255 bytes in length, is sent by the master to a specific slave device on
the network. This is effectively point-to-point communication. The Input data from the slave device is read continuously
and the output data to the device is written continuously
The change-of-state (COS) I/O message is sent by a slave device to the master whenever the state of the input data
changes or, in some cases, at a user-configurable rate (heartbeat). A COS I/O message does not solicit a response from
the scanner. This is a point-to-point communication.
The cyclic I/O message is sent by a slave device to the master at a user-configurable rate. A cyclic I/O message does not
solicit a response from the master. This is a point-to-point communication.
I/O Message
Strobe
Poll
COS
Cyclic
2600 / 2700
√
√
√
√
2500
√
√
√
√
2400
√
√
√
√
√
2200
Mini8
controller
√
√
√
√
3500
√
√
√
√
√
PC3000
The granularity of data transmitted on a DeviceNet network is one byte. This means that even if just a single bit of data
needs to be transmitted a whole byte has to be used.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
2.5
General
Hardware
The 2400, 2600, 2700 and 3500 use a plug in DeviceNet module. The 2200, 2500 and Min8 have to be ordered as
DeviceNet ready products, although the Mini8 can be modified in the field. The PC3000 requires a DeviceNet
Communications Module.
2.6
Tag Addresses
The default communications in all Eurotherm controllers is Modbus. Whilst Modbus is not available in controllers set up
for DeviceNet the Tag Address map used to identify parameters within the controllers is based on the same tables.
To read and write the very common parameters it is not really necessary to refer to these Tag Address maps. However
when other parameters are required to be used it may be necessary to find the particular parameter addresses.
The best way to find a parameter address is on iTools, otherwise it will be necessary to refer to the instrument
documentation. Some tag details are included in the tables at the end of each instrument section. On the 2700 it is
possible to determine a particular parameters address via the operator interface.
The 3500 & Mini8 controller provide look up tables in the iTools Help Pages.
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Setting up a Network
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
3. Procedure for Setting up a Network
There are 5 stages to setting up a network.
- Physical wiring
Section 2.1
- Setting up the controller
Section 2.2
- Setting up the Scanner using EDS files
Section 2.3
- Establishing Communications
Section 2.4
- Transferring data on the network
Section 3 2700
Section 4 2500
Section 5 2400
Section 6 2200
Section 7 Mini8 controller
Section 8 3500
Section 9 PC3000
Section 10 Explicit Messages
3.1
Physical Wiring
The DeviceNet linear bus trunk line – drop line topology may be constructed from either DeviceNet Thick Cable or
DeviceNet Thin Cable or a combination of both. DeviceNet Thick Cable enables long trunk line distances and sturdier
trunk or drop lines while the use of DeviceNet Thin Cable provides easier routing and termination of either trunk lines or
drop lines. Table 1 lists recommended DeviceNet Thick Cable and DeviceNet Thin Cable from Belden Wire & Company.
Belden DeviceNet Thick Cable & Thin Cable
Belden #
3082A
3083A
3084A
3085A
Conductors
2 – 15 AWG/ 2 –
2 – 15 AWG/ 2 –
2 – 22 AWG/ 2 –
2 – 22 AWG/ 2 –
18 AWG
18 AWG
24 AWG
24 AWG
Type
Trunk (Thick)
Trunk (Thick)
Drop (Thin)
Drop (Thin)
The total amount of trunk line allowable on the network depends upon the data rate and the type of cable used – thick
or thin. The cable distance between any 2 points in the cable system must not exceed the Maximum Cable Distance
allowed for the baud rate. For trunk lines constructed of only 1 type of cable refer to Table 2 to determine the
Maximum Cable Distance based on the data rate and the type of cable used. Cable distance between two points includes
both trunk line cable length and drop line cable length that exists between the two points.
Terminating resistors are required on each end of the trunk line. Specification for the resistors: 121ohm, 1% metal film, ¼
watt. Drop lines up to 6m (20 feet) each are permitted, allowing 1 or more nodes to be attached. DeviceNet allows
branching structures only on a drop line. Termination resistors should never be installed at the end of a drop line, only
at the ends of the trunk line. Up to 64 nodes are supported.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
3.2
Setting up a Network
Network Length
Varies w/speed, up to 4000m possible w/repeaters
Baud Rate
125
250
500
Thick trunk
500m (1,640ft)
250m ((820ft)
100m (328ft)
Thin trunk
100m (328ft)
100m (328ft)
100m (328ft)
Max drop
6m (20ft)
6m (20ft)
6m (20ft)
Cumulative drop
156m (512ft)
78m (256ft)
39m (128ft)
Terminal Description
2200; 2400;
2600; 2700;
3500
Terminal
Std Label
Colour
Description
HA
V+
Red
DeviceNet network power positive terminal. Connect the red wire of the
DeviceNet cable here. If the DeviceNet network does not supply the
power, connect the positive terminal of an external 11-25 Vdc power
supply.
HB
CAN_H
White
DeviceNet CAN_H data bus terminal. Connect the white wire of the
DeviceNet cable here.
HC
DRAIN
None
Shield/Drain wire connection. Connect the DeviceNet cable shield here.
To prevent ground loops, the DeviceNet network should be grounded in
only one location.
HD
CAN_L
Blue
DeviceNet CAN_L data bus terminal. Connect the blue wire of the
DeviceNet cable here.
HE
V-
Black
DeviceNet network power negative terminal. Connect the black wire of
the DeviceNet cable here. If the DeviceNet network does not supply the
power, connect the negative terminal of an external 11-25 Vdc power
supply.
2500
Mini8
Controller
For PC3000 see supplied installation documents.
Note that the DeviceNet network is powered by an external independent 24v supply which is separate from the internal
powering of the individual controllers themselves.
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Setting up a Network
3.3
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Typical Wiring Diagram
V+
CAN-H
Drain
CAN-L
V-
2000 Controller
RED
WHTE
5
4
3
2
1
HA V+
HB CAN-H
HC Drain
HD CAN-L
HE V-
BLU
BLK
HF
(SLAVE)
Address 11
MASTER
2000 Controller
HA V+
HB CAN-H
HC Drain
HD CAN-L
HE V24Vdc (+/- 1%)
250mV p-p
Ripple
Network Supply
V+
V-
HF
(SLAVE)
Address 12
Gnd
2000 Controller
HA V+
HB CAN-H
HC Drain
HD CAN-L
HE VHF
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121Ω
(SLAVE)
Address N+1
3-3
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
3.4
Setting up a Network
Setting up the Controller
The configuration of controller for DeviceNet is slightly different for each type of controller but, having selected
DeviceNet, there are only 2 parameters to set up – Baud rate and Address.
Valid Baud rates are 125k, 250k and 500k, and addresses may be from 0 to 63. Generally use 500k unless the network is
longer than 100m. There is no priority in the addressing – all addresses are treated equally.
The 3500, 26/2700 and 2400 use a DeviceNet communications module in slot H. This may be added by the User. The
2200, 2500 and Mini8 controller have to be purchased from the factory as DeviceNet ready instruments. A DeviceNet
Comms module has to be purchased for PC3000.
In the 3500, 26/2700, 2400 and 2200 the configuration is set on the HA comms. The instrument must be in configuration
mode to select DeviceNet communications and to set the baud rate. The address may be set in operating mode at access
level 3.
The 2500 and Mini8 controller use a DIL switch. An enhanced DeviceNet interface, designed for use in the
semiconductor industry, is available for Mini8 controller which uses a rotary switch for setting baud rate and a pair of
rotary switches for setting address.
PC3000 is set using the DeviceNet slave function block as described in Section 9.
3.5
Setting up the Scanner
Use RSLinx and the Tools/Node Commissioning on RSNetWorx to set up the Scanner address and Baud Rate at which the
network is to run. Baud rate cannot be changed ‘on-line’ it is only changed by closing down and re-starting the network.
Scanner is set up as the master.
Register all the required Eurotherm Electronic Data Sheets using the EDS Wizard in the Tools menu of RSNetWorx.
EDS Files are available from Eurotherm.
Files: 2200.eds 2400.eds 2500.eds 2600.eds 2700.eds 3500.eds Mini8.eds PC3kDNS.eds
www.eurotherm.co.uk or www.eurotherm.com
Hint for Profibus Users: Note the EDS file is unique and applies to the specific device. The device itself, not the .eds file, is
configured for each DeviceNet application.
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Setting up a Network
3.6
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Establishing Communications
With the DeviceNet network correctly wired up and powered, and the scanner and controllers configured with valid
unique addresses and the same baud rate, communications will commence. If there is no communications check the
common baud rate, unique addresses, 24v supply, the wiring, the termination resistors and finally the devices themselves.
In these examples the Scanner in slot 6 has been set to address 1, the RS232 interface to 62 and the 2700 to address 33.
All baud rates are 500k.
RSLinx will show the active items
on the network.
RS Linx showing the computer
via the RS232 interface the
scanner and the 2700 at address
33.
At this stage communications is active. Looking at Comms/H Module/Activity (Level 3 access) on the 2700 will show that
it is active. At this stage though it is only ‘Hardware’ communications and there is no transfer of data.
Data transfer has to be set up as a separate operation which involves both setting up the 2700 so that it knows what
parameters it has to handle and setting up the scanner to make use of these parameters.
Parameters are either INPUT parameters read by the Scanner or OUTPUT parameters written by the scanner.
One way to configure the 2700 INPUT parameters and OUTPUT parameters is via the DeviceNet network. To do this the
following examples use RSNetWorx.
The network as seen on the
graph view of RSNetWorx.
Looking on the master/slave view
the 2700 will be under the list
‘Slaves w/out master.’
The 1747-SDN scanner module
and the host computer (via the
1770 RS232 unit) will be in the
list as ‘Devices which are not
slaves’.
Note that going ON-LINE with RSNetWorx (Menu Network – On Line) or F10 will first give a warning message:
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Setting up a Network
To Upload or download first right click on the device and select upload. In the case of Eurotherm Instruments do not
download unless you are absolutely certain that the RSNetWorx file (*.DNT) is what you want. It is possible, for example,
to overwrite the address of a slave.
Having uploaded from the instrument and going to the Properties – Device Parameters tab you can see the on-line
controls.
The radio buttons give the choice of single parameter
upload/download or all parameters.
It is suggested that with Eurotherm devices Upload
using ‘All’ but download each parameter one by one
using ‘Single’
The ‘Start Monitor’ button will continuously scan ‘All’ or a ‘Single’ parameter(s) giving the current values. This is a good
way to double check parameters that you have modified as part of the network configuration.
The ‘Monitor’ mode showing live values of the
‘predefined’ parameters in the 2700.
Output parameters can clicked on and be written to.
The DeviceNet files from RSNetWorx that are included
are only designed to allow them to be opened and
browsed. There is NO purpose in downloading them to
your network as the DeviceNet configuration also
requires the actual physical instruments identities to
match the original in the saved files.
For example, replacing one 2700 at address 33 with
another at address 33 will cause the network to assume
there is NO instrument at address 33. First delete the
original from the scanlist and then add the new one.
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2600 & 2700
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
4. Transferring Data – 2600 / 2700
This has been set up with a 2700 controller but the 2600 communications is identical.
The 2700 is a “Generic device type, Group 2 only server.” As a DeviceNet slave or server the 2700 offers up to 60
analogue INPUT parameters TO the master or client and may receive up to 60 analogue OUTPUT parameters FROM the
master or client.
The design of DeviceNet in the 2700 has been to make it easy to read the most common parameters but retain the
possibility of a user selecting any other parameter within the controller. This information is all in the 2700 electronic
data sheet registered in RSNetWorx, 2700.eds and is the way the parameters are viewed through the 2700 device
properties in RSNetWorx.
The 2700 DeviceNet parameters are divided into 8 sections.
A list of instrument parameters pre-defined and immediately available for selection on the INPUT or OUTPUT tables
a list of additional user defined parameters to add to the OUTPUT table
a list of additional user defined parameters to add to the INPUT table
the actual INPUT table of parameters to be READ by the DeviceNet client
the actual OUTPUT table of parameters to be WRITTEN by the client
the Tag address of additional parameters to be READ by the DeviceNet client
the Tag address of additional parameters to be WRITTEN by the client
a group that can be used for explicit messaging
EDS
Quantity
Description
1 to 161
161
Predefined parameters 2700 Data #0 to #160
162 to 177
16
User defined OUTPUT parameters 2700 Data #168 to #183
178 to 193
16
User defined INPUT parameters 2700 Data #184 to #199
194 to 253
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
254 to 313
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
314 to 329
16
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
330 to 345
16
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
346 to 351
Specialist Parameters – explicit messaging
List
This information can be seen by inspecting the 2700.EDS file in a text editor.
To set up the controller so that the desired parameters can be read and written involves setting up the INPUT and
OUTPUT data assembly tables (highlighted in the table above).
This is illustrated by the following diagram and examples.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
To set up the controller so that
the required parameters are
available on the network requires
setting up the INPUT and OUTPUT
data assembly tables with the IDs
from the Application Variable
Object.
2600 & 2700
Application
Variable
Object
List of available
parameters
Predefined #0
If parameters are required that
are not on the pre-defined list
then the Tag Addresses are used
to identify these particular
parameters.
IO Remapping
Object
OUTPUT
assembly table
(Max 60)
to
Application
Variable
Remapping
Object
List of User
defined Output
Tag Addresses
(Max 16)
Predefined #160
Output #168
User defined
INPUT assembly
table
(Max 60)
to
Output #183
Input #184
User defined
List of User
defined Input
Tag Addresses
(Max 16)
to
Input #199
Example 1 is the controller default DeviceNet configuration
Example 2 uses other predefined parameters
Example 3 adds user defined parameters not included on the pre-defined list.
Example 4 sets the 2700 up first and uploads its configuration to the network.
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2600 & 2700
4.1
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Default Example 1
This is called the default example because this is the way the controller is delivered, as new, from Eurotherm. It is also
the way the controller would be set up if a new DeviceNet module was added to an existing controller. There is an
exception to this statement which is highlighted in Example 4.
The requirement is to be able to read and write the following parameters. Firstly the input parameters. The #numbers in
the table below come from the Attribute ID Table in Section 3.5.
Input Parameter
#<number>
Process Variable (Loop 1)
0
Working Setpoint (Loop 1)
4
Working Output Power (Loop 1)
3
Process Variable (Loop 2)
33
Working Setpoint (Loop 2)
37
Working Output (Loop 2)
36
Process Variable (Loop 3)
66
Working Setpoint (Loop 3)
70
Working Output (Loop 3)
69
TOTAL LENGTH
18 bytes
Example 1 – Required INPUT Data assembly table
Right click on the 2700 icon in RSNetWorx and select Properties –to Device Parameters tab. The #numbers in the table
above have to be entered into the first nine INPUT table parameters ‘Input Def #1’ to ‘Input Def #9’ as per the figure
below.
This is the Device Parameters tab
of the properties of the 2700
DeviceNet slave.
Add the required Attributes
(#numbers) for the input table.
Download single parameters as
they are entered.
All the remaining parameters of the input table MUST be set to 255 to indicate that they are not being used – in this case
Input Def#10 to #60.
Notice that there are 9 parameters giving a data table size of 18 bytes. This information will be required later to set up
the scanner.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
2600 & 2700
The same now has to be done for the OUTPUT parameters. The # numbers in this table have to be entered into the first
nine OUTPUT table parameters ‘Output Def#1’ to ‘Output Def#9’ as per the figure below taken from the Device
Parameters tab of the properties of the DeviceNet slave.
Output Parameter
#<number>
Target Setpoint (Loop 1)
6
Target Output Power (Loop 1)
2
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 1)
18
Target Setpoint (Loop 2)
39
Target Output Power (Loop 2)
35
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 2)
51
Target Setpoint (Loop 3)
72
Target Output Power (Loop 3)
68
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 3)
84
TOTAL LENGTH
18 bytes
Example 1 – Required Output Data Assembly Table
Adding the IDs for the
output table.
Download single
parameters as they are
entered.
All the remaining parameters of the output table MUST be set to 255 to indicate that they are not being used – in this
case Output Def#10 to #60.
Note that the output data table length is 9 parameters or 18 bytes. This will be needed later to set up the scanner.
With all these parameters set in the controller the DeviceNet set up of the controller is completed. It now remains to set
the scanner up to poll these parameters.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Setting up the scanner to read/write these parameters, right click on the Scanner Icon and go to the Scanner properties.
Ensure under the ‘Module’ Tab that the Scanner is allocated to the correct slot.
Select the Scanlist tab.
Firstly, if the 2700 is not already in the scanlist
highlight it and click the right arrow to add it.
Select the 2700 on the scanlist and then click
on ‘Edit I/O Parameters’.
Select ‘Polled’ mode
Set the Rx (or INPUT) byte size to 18
Set the Tx (or OUTPUT) byte size to 18.
THIS MUST MATCH THE LENGTH OF THE
PARAMETERS SET UP IN THE 2700.
In this example:
9 parameters = 9 words = 18 bytes.
This is now sufficient to establish communications between the scanner and the controller.
To make use of the parameters they have been mapped into discrete I/O. The scanner is in slot 6 and the INPUT values
are in I:6.1 to I:6.9 and the OUTPUT values in O:6.1 to O:6.9
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2600 & 2700
Click OK and now Download this
into the scanner module.
The SLC500 has to be in
PROGRAM mode. Once the data
is downloaded power cycle the
plc or reboot the Scanner.
In the plc using RSLogix500 the actual controller parameter values are
The parameters will be in the same order
as they were defined in the controller
INPUT table, i.e.
I:6.1 is Loop 1 PV = -16
I:6.4 = Loop 2 PV = 105
I:6.7 = Loop 3 PV = 0.
Note: these are integers.
If PV1 is displayed with 1 decimal point
then the –16 above represents –1.6.
Similarly a setpoint of 10.0 would be sent
as 100.
The parameters can now be used just like any other I/O in the plc.
Note that the setpoints are outputs from the plc. If an operator were to change a setpoint on the instrument itself, it
would immediately be overwritten from the plc by the next scan of the DeviceNet network.
Note further that if the value written by the plc is ‘out of range’ as far as the controller is concerned it is silently ignored.
This feature is required if, for example, the PID terms are in the output list. In this situation they would be being
permanently written to putting the PID block into perpetual debump.
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4.2
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Example 2.
In this example the 2700 User Variables 1 to 4 will be added to the default OUTPUT table and the RealCV 1 to 8 (the
results of analogue calculation blocks 1 to 8) will be added to the default INPUT table.
The IDs of the User Values 1 to 4 (ID 121 to 124) are taken off the Attribute ID Table of pre-defined parameters for the
2700 in section 3.5.
Output Parameter
#<number>
Target Setpoint (Loop 1)
6
Target Output Power (Loop 1)
2
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 1)
18
Target Setpoint (Loop 2)
39
Target Output Power (Loop 2)
35
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 2)
51
Target Setpoint (Loop 3)
72
Target Output Power (Loop 3)
68
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 3)
84
User Value 1
121
User Value 2
122
User Value 3
123
User Value 4
124
TOTAL LENGTH
26 bytes
Example 2 – Required Output Data Assembly Table
Add the extra IDs for the output
table Output Def #10 to #13.
Download single parameters as
they are entered.
Unused Output def parameters
must be set to 255.
Note that the OUTPUT table has 13 parameters and is therefore 26 bytes in length.
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Input Parameter
#<number>
Process Variable (Loop 1)
0
Working Setpoint (Loop 1)
4
Working Output Power (Loop 1)
3
Process Variable (Loop 2)
33
Working Setpoint (Loop 2)
37
Working Output (Loop 2)
36
Process Variable (Loop 3)
66
Working Setpoint (Loop 3)
70
Working Output (Loop 3)
69
Analogue Block 1 O/P
Analogue Block 2 O/P
Analogue Block 3 O/P
Analogue Block 4 O/P
Analogue Block 5 O/P
Analogue Block 6 O/P
Analogue Block 7 O/P
Analogue Block 8 O/P
TOTAL LENGTH
34 bytes
Example 2 – Required Input Data Assembly Table
Studying the reference table in of pre-defined parameters (Section 3.5) it is not possible to find these new Analogue
block parameters.
In this situation the user has first to define these parameters using their Tag address in the table using the device
parameters 330 to 337 as highlighted below.
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 161
161
Predefined parameters #0 to #160
162 to 177
16
User defined OUTPUT parameters #168 to #183
178 to 193
16
User defined INPUT parameters #184 to #199
194 to 253
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
254 to 313
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
314 to 329
16
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
330 to 345
16
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
346 to 351
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
The Tag Addresses for these parameters are in the table below.
Parameter
Tag address
Analogue Block 1.RealCV
6158
Analogue Block 1.RealCV
6178
Analogue Block 1.RealCV
6198
Analogue Block 1.RealCV
6218
Analogue Block 1.RealCV
6238
Analogue Block 1.RealCV
6258
Analogue Block 1.RealCV
6278
Analogue Block 1.RealCV
6298
Add the Tag address for each new user
defined parameter required in the input
table ‘Tag for Val #184 to #191.
Download single parameters as they are
entered.
These 8 parameters are Tag for #184 to #191 so returning to the INPUT table, add these IDs, values 184 to 191 for the
new parameters.
Input Parameter
Attribute ID
Process Variable (Loop 1)
0
Working Setpoint (Loop 1)
4
Working Output Power (Loop 1)
3
Process Variable (Loop 2)
33
Working Setpoint (Loop 2)
37
Working Output (Loop 2)
36
Process Variable (Loop 3)
66
Working Setpoint (Loop 3)
70
Working Output (Loop 3)
69
Analogue Block 1 O/P
184
Analogue Block 2 O/P
185
Analogue Block 3 O/P
186
Analogue Block 4 O/P
187
Analogue Block 5 O/P
188
Analogue Block 6 O/P
189
Analogue Block 7 O/P
190
Analogue Block 8 O/P
191
TOTAL LENGTH
34 bytes
#<number>
Example 2 – Required INPUT data assembly with the 8 user defined parameters.
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Note that the input data table is 19 parameters or 34 bytes long.
Giving the final set up of the controller
Add the IDs for the new user defined
parameters into the input table.
Download single parameters as they are
entered.
Using this technique of indirection any parameter within the controller may be accessed using its Tag address. There is a
maximum of 16 INPUT and 16 OUTPUT parameters that can be defined in this way.
The 2700 is set up as required to match the defined data assembly tables of this example.
The scanner module now has to be updated to include these extra parameters which make the INPUT data assembly 34
bytes and the OUTPUT data assembly 26 bytes.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
These may now be mapped into the plc I/O tables or memory.
Again the instrument parameters are available to the plc as any other I/O.
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4.3
2600 & 2700
Example 3
Example 2 used User defined parameters in the OUTPUT table.
To add User defined parameters to the OUTPUT table the Tag addresses would be entered starting in item 314 as ‘Tag for
Val #168’. This #168 is entered in the OUTPUT table in the first available slot starting at item 267 ‘Output Def #14’ .
For example an analogue out put Module in slot 4 has a PV with the Tag address 4628. So ‘Tag for Val#168’ takes the
value the Tag address 4628
This is ‘Tag for Val #168’ so the output assembly table Output Def #14 takes the value 168.
The Scanner has now also to be configured to have two more bytes in the output table making it 28.
4.4
Example 4
DeviceNet Configuration via the 2700 controller.
The indirection table for the 2600/2700 user defined parameters is available in the controller itself. The normal way to
access this is via iTools which does not work on DeviceNet. To use iTools either use the J port or the H communications
module in the instrument would have to be changed to a standard RS232 or 485 module and the instrument
configuration changed to Modbus.
If the table has been set up in an instrument and then it is converted to DeviceNet the indirection table in the instrument
will be copied automatically to the DeviceNet Module.
However if there is no indirection table configured, the DeviceNet module will automatically take the default
configuration shown in Example 1.
In the example below a Modbus instrument was set up on iTools using the READ ONLY comms blocks. As can be seen the
outputs from the first 4 analogue calculation blocks have been added.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Looking at this back on DeviceNet the
properties of the Read only parameters
show the same parameters, addresses
6158, 6178 etc.
It is still necessary to add these (#184
to #188) to the Input assembly table
via the network.
Similarly output parameters can be added to the indirection table.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
4.5
2600 & 2700
2600 & 2700 Class, Instance, Attribute ID Tables
EDS
Quantity
Description
161
Predefined parameters 2700 Data #0 to #160
List
1 to 161
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 0 to 160
162 to 177
16
User defined OUTPUT parameters 2700 Data #168 to #183
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 168 to 183
178 to 193
16
User defined INPUT parameters 2700 Data #184 to #199
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 184 to 199
194 to 253
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 1 Attributes 1 to 60
254 to 313
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 2 Attributes 1 to 60
314 to 329
16
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
Class 103 Instance 2 Attributes 1 to 16
330 to 345
16
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
Class 103 Instance 1 Attributes 1 to 16
346 to 351
Specialist Parameters – explicit messaging
Class 101 Instance 1 Attributes 1 to 6
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Attribute ID
#<number>
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Tag
Address
Loop1 PV
1
Loop1TargetSP
2
Loop1 Manual Output
3
Loop1 Working OP
4
Loop1 Working SP
5
Loop1 SP select
15
Loop1 SP1
24
Loop1 SP2
25
Loop1 Valve Position
53
Loop1 Active Set
72
Loop1 Loop Status
76
Loop1 Feedforward Trim Limit
99
Loop1 Cascade Disable
131
Loop1 Ratio Enable
151
Loop1 Lead PV
155
Loop1 Ratio SP
156
Loop1 Ratio Trim
157
Loop1 Override Disable
160
Loop1 Manual Mode
273
Loop1 Alarm Status Word
336
Loop1 PropBand1
351
Loop1 IntegralTime1
352
Loop1 DerivativeTime1
353
Loop1 RelCoolGain1
354
Loop1 ManReset1
355
Loop1 CutbackHigh1
356
Loop1 CutbackLow1
357
Loop1 Remote SP
485
Loop1 Remote SP enable
633
Loop1 Aux PV
769
Loop1 Aux WSP (override sp)
773
Loop1 Aux LSP (cascade slave lsp) 792
Loop1 Override SP
831
Loop2 PV
1025
Loop2 Target SP
1026
Loop2 Man Output
1027
Loop2 Working OP
1028
Loop2 Working SP
1029
Loop2 SP select
1039
Loop2 SP1
1048
Loop2 SP2
1049
Loop2 Valve Position
1077
Loop2 Active Set
1096
Loop2 Loop Status
1100
Loop2 Feedforward Trim Limit
1123
Loop2 Cascade Disable
1155
Loop2 Ratio Enable
1175
Loop2 Lead PV
1179
Loop2 Ratio SP
1180
Loop2 Ratio Trim
1181
Loop2 Override Disable
1184
Loop2 Manual Mode
1297
Loop2 Alarm Status Word
1360
2600/2700 Variable
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Attribute ID
#<number>
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
Tag
Address
Loop2 PropBand1
1375
Loop2 IntegralTime1
1376
Loop2 DerivativeTime1
1377
Loop2 RelCoolGain1
1378
Loop2 ManReset1
1379
Loop2 CutbackHigh1
1380
Loop2 CutbackLow1
1381
Loop2 Remote SP
1509
Loop2 Remote SP enable
1657
Loop2 Aux PV
1793
Loop2 Aux WSP (override sp)
1797
Loop2 Aux LSP ( cascade slave lsp) 1816
Loop2 Override SP
1855
Loop3 PV
2049
Loop3 Target SP
2050
Loop3 Manual Output
2051
Loop3 Working OP
2052
Loop3 Working SP
2053
Loop3 SP select
2063
Loop3 SP1
2072
Loop3 SP2
2073
Loop3 Valve Position
2101
Loop3 Active Set
2120
Loop3 L Status
2124
Loop3 Feedforward Trim Limit
2147
Loop3 Cascade Disable
2179
Loop3 Ratio Enable
2199
Loop3 Lead PV
2203
Loop3 Ratio SP
2204
Loop3 Ratio Trim
2205
Loop3 Override Disable
2208
Loop3 Manual Mode
2321
Loop3 Alarm Status Word
2384
Loop3 PropBand1
2399
Loop3 IntegralTime1
2400
Loop3 DerivativeTime1
2401
Loop3 RelCoolGain1
2402
Loop3 ManReset1
2403
Loop3 CutbackHigh1
2404
Loop3 CutbackLow1
2405
Loop3 Remote SP
2533
Loop3 Remote SP enable
2681
Loop3 Aux PV
2817
Loop3 Aux WSP (override sp)
2821
Loop3 Aux LSP ( cascade slave lsp) 2840
98
Loop3 Override SP
2600/2700 Variable
2879
4-15
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Attribute ID
#<number>
99
100
101
102
Attribute ID
#<number>
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
Attribute ID
#<number>
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
Attribute ID
#<number>
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
4-16
2600/2700 Variable
Tune Loop
Tune PID
TUNE Tune State
Autotune
2600/2700 Variable
Programmer WSP1
Programmer WSP2
Programmer WSP3
Prog. Segm. Time Remaining
Prog. Run Program Logic
Programmer Run Program No
Programmer Run Segment No
Programmer PSP1 Run Target
Programmer PSP2 Run Target
Programmer PSP3 Run Target
Programmer PSP1 Run Rate
Programmer PSP2 Run Rate
Programmer PSP3 Run Rate
Programmer Dwell Time1
Programmer Dwell Time2
Programmer Dwell Time3
Programmer Prog Run
Programmer Prog Hold
2600/2700 Variable
User VAL 1
User VAL2
User VAL3
User VAL4
User VAL5
User VAL6
User VAL7
User VAL8
User VAL9
User VAL10
User VAL11
User VAL12
2600/2700 Variable
Loop1 Alarm 1 Setpoint
Loop1 Alarm 1 Ack
Loop1 Alarm 2 Setpoint
Loop1 Alarm 2 Ack
Loop2 Alarm 1 Setpoint
Loop2 Alarm 1 Ack
Loop2 Alarm 2 Setpoint
Loop2 Alarm 2 Ack
Loop3 Alarm 1 Setpoint
2600 & 2700
Tag
Address
3072
3073
3074
3075
Tag
Address
5800
5801
5802
5813
5817
5820
5822
5829
5830
5831
5832
5833
5834
5841
5842
5843
5893
5894
Tag
Address
9220
9225
9230
9235
9240
9245
9250
9255
9260
9265
9270
9275
Attribute ID
#<number>
142
143
144
Attribute ID
#<number>
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161-167
Attribute ID
#<number>
168-183
184-199
Tag
Address
11690
11692
11700
2600/2700 Variable
Loop3 Alarm 1 Ack
Loop3 Alarm 2 Setpoint
Loop3 Alarm 2 Ack
Tag
Address
11730
11738
11746
11754
11762
11770
11778
11786
11794
11802
11810
11818
11826
11834
11842
2600/2700 Variable
User Analog Alarm 1 SP
User Analog Alarm 1 Ack
User Analog Alarm 2 SP
User Analog Alarm 2 Ack
User Analog Alarm 3 SP
User Analog Alarm 3 Ack
User Analog Alarm 4 SP
User Analog Alarm 4 Ack
User Analog Alarm 5 SP
User Analog Alarm 5 Ack
User Analog Alarm 6 SP
User Analog Alarm 6 Ack
User Analog Alarm 7 SP
User Analog Alarm 7 Ack
User Analog Alarm 8 SP
User Analog Alarm 8 Ack
11850
Reserved (not used)
2600/2700 Variable
Indirect OUTPUT parameters
(configurable)
Indirect INPUT parameters
(configurable)
Tag
Address
User
defined
Tag
Address
11586
11594
11596
11604
11634
11642
11644
11652
11682
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2500
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
5. Transferring Data – 2500
A network has been set up with a 2500 base at address 25, a 2400 at address 24 and a 2200 at address 22. The baud rate
has been set at 500k.
The 2500 has to be set up using the DIL switches on the IOC terminal base
The DeviceNet IOC is identified by the front label and the order code printed on the side label. This IOC must be used
with the DeviceNet Terminal Unit.
LED Status
Indicators
Network Active
Module connector
Baud / Address Switch
Configuration Port
(RS232)
5-way DeviceNet Communications
Connector
24V power supply terminals
+24V 0V
Baud
Baud
125k ↓ ↓
250k ↓ ↑
500k ↑ ↓
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32 16 8 4 2 1
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07/2010
5-1
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
2500
The 2500 uses the standard DeviceNet 5 way connector marked on the terminal unit.
2500 CAN Label
V+
CAN_H
SHIELD
CAN_L
V-
Colour
Red
White
None
Blue
Black
Once correctly connected to the network the yellow ‘Network Active’ LED will flash. This shows that the module is being
scanned but does not have a master. The red Node Fault LED will be on.
The DeviceNet parameter mapping in the 2500 is done solely by means of user defined parameters. There is no fixed list
of pre-defined parameters.
The 2500 device parameters are divided into 7 sections
the values of the user defined parameters in the OUTPUT table
the values of the user defined parameters in the INPUT table
the actual INPUT table of parameters to be READ by the DeviceNet client
the actual OUTPUT table of parameters to be WRITTEN by the client
the Tag addresses of the user defined OUTPUT parameters
the Tag addresses of the user defined INPUT parameters
a group that can be used to control block parameter read / write
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 100
100
User defined OUTPUT parameter values 2500 Data #0 to #99
101 to 200
100
User defined INPUT parameter values 2500 Data #100 to #199
201 to 260
60
Enter #number of required INPUT parameters
261 to 320
60
Enter #number of required OUTPUT parameters
321 to 420
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
421 to 520
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
521 to 526
Specialist Parameters – block read or write by explicit messaging
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Output Parameters
The procedure to be followed is
enter Tag address of required parameters in list from ‘Tag for Val#0’.
Unused slots should be set to 65535.
enter the #number of these parameters (values 1 to 100) starting at ‘Output Def #1’.
Unused slots must be set to 255.
Note the number of input bytes that have been used.
The values of these parameters will be found on-line in 2500 Data#0 to 99.
Input Parameters
The procedure to be followed is
enter Tag address of required parameters in list from ‘Tag for Val#100’.
Unused slots should be set to 65535.
enter the #number of these parameters (values 100 to 199) starting at ‘Input Def #1’.
Unused slots must be set to 255.
Note the number of input bytes that have been used.
The values of these parameters will be found on-line in 2500 Data#100 to 199.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
2500
Application
Variable
Remapping
Object
List of User
defined Output
Tag Addresses
(Max 100)
2500
2500
Application
Variable Object
List of available
parameters
User defined #0
OUTPUT
2500
IO Remapping
Object
OUTPUT
assembly table
(Max 60)
to
# 99
User defined
#100
INPUT
List of User
defined Input
Tag Addresses
(Max 100)
INPUT assembly
table
(Max 60)
to
#199
This is further illustrated by 3 examples.
Example 1 is as the controller is delivered new.
Example 2 uses other user defined parameters.
Example 3 shows how the 2500 can be configured beforehand using iTools and how this configuration can be uploaded
to be used by the Scanner. However the Scanner still has to be set up to match.
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2500
5.1
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Default Example 1
A new 2500 DeviceNet controller comes with a default parameter set as laid out below. This provides the most
commonly required parameters for the 8 loops amounting to 24 input parameters and 24 output parameters.
Input Parameter
1
Process Variable (Loop 1)
2
Working Setpoint (Loop 1)
3
Alarm Status (Loop 1)
4
Process Variable (Loop 2)
5
Working Setpoint (Loop 2)
6
Alarm Status (Loop 2)
7
Process Variable (Loop 3)
8
Working Setpoint (Loop 3)
9
Alarm Status (Loop 3)
10
Process Variable (Loop 4)
11
Working Setpoint (Loop 4)
12
Alarm Status (Loop 4)
13
Process Variable (Loop 5)
14
Working Setpoint (Loop 5)
15
Alarm Status (Loop 5)
16
Process Variable (Loop 6)
17
Working Setpoint (Loop 6)
18
Alarm Status (Loop 6)
19
Process Variable (Loop 7)
20
Working Setpoint (Loop 7)
21
Alarm Status (Loop 7)
22
Process Variable (Loop 8)
23
Working Setpoint (Loop 8)
24
Alarm Status (Loop 8)
TOTAL LENGTH = 24 words = 48 bytes
Tag
Address
1
5
16085
513
517
16086
1025
1029
16087
1537
1541
16088
2049
2053
16089
2561
2565
16090
3073
3077
16091
3585
3589
16092
Output Parameter
1
Target Setpoint (Loop 1)
2
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 1)
3
Alarm Group Ack (Loop 1)
4
Target Setpoint (Loop 2)
5
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 2)
6
Alarm Group Ack (Loop 2)
7
Target Setpoint (Loop 3)
8
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 3)
9
Alarm Group Ack (Loop 3)
10
Target Setpoint (Loop 4)
11
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 4)
12
Alarm Group Ack (Loop 4)
13
Target Setpoint (Loop 5)
14
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 5)
15
Alarm Group Ack (Loop 5)
16
Target Setpoint (Loop 6)
17
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 6)
18
Alarm Group Ack (Loop 6)
19
Target Setpoint (Loop 7)
20
Auto/Manual Select (Loop 7)
21
Alarm Group Ack (Loop 7)
22
Target Setpoint (Loop 8)
23
Alarm Group Ack (Loop 8)
24
Alarm Status (Loop 8)
TOTAL LENGTH = 24 words = 48 bytes
Tag
Address
2
152
13344
514
664
13384
1026
1176
13424
1538
1688
13464
2050
2200
16160
2562
2712
16200
3074
3224
16240
3586
3736
16280
Using RSNetWorx , Right-Clicking on the 2500 and select ‘Properties’ and the Device I/O Parameter List tab. The
information reflects the tables above.
Tag for Val #0 to #23 will be the output Tag addresses (remainder 65535)
Output Def 1 to 24 will have the value 1 to 23 (remainder 255)
Tag for Val #100 to #123 will be the input Tag addresses (remainder 65535)
Input Def 1 to 24 will have the value 100 to 123 (remainder 255)
The default table is 24 INPUT parameters and 24 OUTPUT parameters which is 48 bytes each. For the default example
nothing has to be changed.
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Now we need to set up the Scanner to read and write these
parameters.
‘General’ Tab – information only
‘Module’ Tab – set the Scanner module slot correctly (6 in this
example)
‘Scanlist’ Tab – add the Eurotherm 2500 to the scan list (shown)
Edit I/O parameters – leave set to Polled 48 Input and 48 output
‘Input’ Tab – Map the 24 input parameters to the M file M1:6.0 to
M1:6.23
‘Output’ Tab – Map the 24 output parameters to the M file
M0:6.0 to M1:6.23
Click apply and download this to the Scanner (PLC must be in program mode).
Once the network is restarted the 2500 yellow ‘Network Active’ LED will change from flashing to steady and the red
‘Node Fault’ LED will go off.
Similarly the Scanner error indicator will show no error on node 25.
The 24 INPUT and 24 OUTPUT parameters are now being transferred back and forth on the network and using COP the
data can be transferred periodically between the plc and the M files.
This simple ladder uses COP to transfer
the data to and from the M files.
Note that in the interests of minimising resources it would be advantageous to co-ordinate the 2500 refresh rate –
typically 220 or 330 mS, the DeviceNet background poll rate and this file transfer interval.
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5.2
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Example 2
The default table as supplied by Eurotherm in a new module will not suit every application. In this example we will
reduce the PLC INPUT parameters to just the 8 loop process variables and the PLC OUTPUT parameters to the 8 loop
target setpoints and the 4 setpoints for the User Analogue Alarms blocks.
Number
Input Parameter
Tag Address
1
Process Variable (Loop 1)
1
2
Process Variable (Loop 2)
513
3
Process Variable (Loop 3)
1025
4
Process Variable (Loop 4)
1537
5
Process Variable (Loop 5)
2049
6
Process Variable (Loop 6)
2561
7
Process Variable (Loop 7)
3073
8
Process Variable (Loop 8)
3585
TOTAL LENGTH = 8 words = 16 bytes
To set this up we go to the 2500 properties and enter the above Tag Address values. Any unused parameters may be set
to 65535.
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 100
100
User defined OUTPUT parameter values #0 to #99
101 to 200
100
User defined INPUT parameter values #100 to #199
201 to 260
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
261 to 320
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
321 to 420
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
421 to 520
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
521 to 526
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
The Tag addresses of the required
parameters have been entered against the
Tags for Val #100 to 107.
Unused parameters may be set to the value
65535.
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EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 100
100
User defined OUTPUT parameter values #0 to #99
101 to 200
100
User defined INPUT parameter values #100 to #199
201 to 260
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
261 to 320
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
321 to 420
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
421 to 520
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
521 to 526
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
The value 100 to 107 are now entered into Input Def #1 to #8
Unused parameters must be set to the value 255.
Now for the OUTPUT parameters.
Number
Output Parameter
Tag address
1
Target Setpoint (Loop 1)
2
2
Target Setpoint (Loop 2)
514
3
Target Setpoint (Loop 3)
1026
4
Target Setpoint (Loop 4)
1538
5
Target Setpoint (Loop 5)
2050
6
Target Setpoint (Loop 6)
2562
7
Target Setpoint (Loop 7)
3074
8
Target Setpoint (Loop 8)
3586
9
User Analogue Alarm SP1
15779
10
User Analogue Alarm SP2
15795
11
User Analogue Alarm SP3
15811
12
User Analogue Alarm SP4
15827
TOTAL LENGTH = 12 words = 24 bytes
To set this up we go to the 2500 properties and enter the above Tag values. Any unused parameters may be set to
65535.
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EDS List
Quantity
Description
1 to 100
100
User defined OUTPUT parameter values #0 to #99
101 to 200
100
User defined INPUT parameter values #100 to #199
201 to 260
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
261 to 320
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
321 to 420
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
421 to 520
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
521 to 526
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
The Tag addresses of the required parameters
have been entered against the Tags for Val #0
to #11.
Unused parameters may be set to the value
65535.
EDS List
Quantity
Description
1 to 100
100
User defined OUTPUT parameter values #0 to #99
101 to 200
100
User defined INPUT parameter values #100 to #199
201 to 260
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
261 to 320
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
321 to 420
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
421 to 520
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
521 to 526
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
So these values #0 to #11 must be entered into the OUTPUT data list from Def #1 to #12.
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2500
Now download all these new settings to the 2500.
Each value can be downloaded after entry using ‘Single’ or
download ‘All’.
Finally return to the properties of the Scanner Module. On the scanlist select the 2500 and use ‘Edit I/O’ to modify the
input byte count to 16 and the output byte count to 24. Map these parameters as required. As there are less parameters
than were used in the default example it is possible to map them directly onto discrete I/O, in these example the input
data is on M1:6.9 to 6.16 and the output data on M0:6.7 to 6.18
Download this new setting to the scanner and restart the network.
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5.3
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Example 3 – iTools
In Example 2 the required 2500 parameters were selected by configuring the 2500 DeviceNet tables using RSNetWorx. It
is also possible to first configure the 2500 directly using iTools and then UPLOAD the configuration from the 2500 into
RSNetWorx.
The data in the above screen shows the configuration from Example 2.
The INPUT parameters are in Comms_Blocks.Ro. The Val directory shown above gives the current value of the selected
parameters and where the data comes from. The Tag addresses are in the Src directory.
The OUTPUT parameters are in Comms_Blocks.Rw. The Val directory gives the current value of the selected parameters
and where the data goes to. The Tag addresses are in the Src directory.
To configure the 2500 it must be connected to iTools using the configuration cable into the RJ11 configuration port on
the IOC itself. Plugging in this cable will disconnect the 2500 slave from the DeviceNet network.
Now enter the required Tag Addresses into the Comms_Blocks.Ro.Src and Comms_Blocks.Rw.Src directories.
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In the Src directory the tag Value is the Tag address of the required user defined parameter.
Now remove the configuration cable. Using RSNetWorx UPLOAD the 2500 Device Parameters and, if necessary (i.e. the
input or output byte count has changed, the mapping needs to be changed etc) modify the Scanner 2500 scanlist I/O
parameters to suit.
Restart the DeviceNet network.
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5.4
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
2500 Class, Instance, Attribute ID Table
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 100
100
User defined OUTPUT parameter values 2500 Data #0 to #99
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 0 to 99
101 to 200
100
User defined INPUT parameter values 2500 Data #100 to #199
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 100 to 199
201 to 260
60
Enter #number of required INPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 1 Attributes 1 to 60
261 to 320
60
Enter #number of required OUTPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 2 Attributes 1 to 60
321 to 420
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined OUTPUT parameters
Class 103 Instance 1 Attributes 1 to 100
421 to 520
100
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT parameters
Class 103 Instance 2 Attributes 1 to 100
521 to 526
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
Class 101 Instance 1 Attributes 1 to 6
Note – all variables of type INT unless configured using indirection table to be 32 bit (described elsewhere in this
document). Data formats are therefore as Tag, i.e. Scaled Integers.
Attribute ID
Variable
Tag Address
0-99
Indirect R/W parameters (configurable)
16512
100-199
Indirect RO parameters (configurable)
16768
#<number>
Note that all these parameters are User defined as described in the examples above. To define the parameters their Tag
Addresses are required. With the 2500 the best source of Tag Addresses is iTools.
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2500
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
6. Transferring Data – 2400
A network has been set up with a 2500 base at address 25, a 2400 at address 24 and a 2200 at address 22. The baud rate
has been set at 500k.
The 2400 has to be set up via the user interface. The controller must have a DeviceNet communications module fitted.
In Configuration mode HA must be set as shown below
id = CmS
Func = dnEt
bAud = 500
res = FuLL
In Operating Mode, with Full Access, in the cmS LiSt the address must be set as shown below
Addr = 24
Hardware wiring is as follows:
Series 2400
Terminal
CAN
Colour
HA
V+
Red
HB
CAN_H
White
HC
SHIELD
None
HD
CAN_L
Blue
HE
V-
Black
Label
Once correctly wired to the network and with the correct DeviceNet baud rate and a unique address, communications at
the hardware level will be established. This is indicated at the controller by the flashing REM beacon.
Now the 2400 and the Scanner have to be configured to transfer parameter data.
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2400
The 2400 device parameters (Full table in Section 6.4) are divided into 6 ‘groups’
- A list of instrument parameters pre-defined and immediately available for selection on the INPUT or OUTPUT
tables
- a list of additional user defined parameters to add to the INPUT or OUTPUT table
- the actual INPUT table of parameters to be READ by the DeviceNet client
- the actual OUTPUT table of parameters to be WRITTEN by the client
- the Tag address of parameters to be READ by or WRITTEN to the DeviceNet client
- a group that can be used to control block parameter read / write
To set up the controller so that
the required parameters are
available on the network
requires setting up the INPUT
and OUTPUT data assembly
tables with the IDs from the
Application Variable Object.
2400
Application
Variable Object
List of available
parameters
Predefined #0
2400 IO
Remapping
Object
OUTPUT
assembly table
(Max 60)
If parameters are required that
are not on the predefined list
then the Tag Addresses are
used to identify these particular
parameters.
to
INPUT assembly
table
(Max 60)
List of User defined
Tag Addresses
(Max 10)
Predefined #160
User defined #190
to
#199
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EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 161
161
Predefined parameters #0 to #160
162 to 171
10
User defined INPUT or OUTPUT parameters #190 to #199
172 to 231
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
232 to 291
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
292 to 301
10
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT or OUTPUT parameters
302 to 307
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
To set up the controller so that the desired parameters can be read and written involves setting up the INPUT and
OUTPUT tables (highlighted in the table above).
This information can be seen by inspecting the 2400.EDS file in a text editor and is the way in which the data is displayed
in RSNetWorx Device Parameters.
This is best illustrated by three examples.
Example 1 is the default 2400 DeviceNet configuration.
Example 2 uses other pre-defined parameters and includes a simple plc application.
Example 3 adds user defined parameters not included on the pre-defined list.
6.1
Default Example 1
As supplied new the 2400 comes with the following DeviceNet parameter setup. The Attribute for the parameters on the
table below come from the full listing in Section 5.4.
Item
Input Parameter
Attribute
1
Process Value
0
2
Working Setpoint
4
3
Working Output Power
3
4
Summary Status
74
Total length = 4 words = 8 bytes
Looking at the Device Parameters via the network we
will see these 4 input parameters defined with the
above IDs.
Remaining input parameters must be set to 255.
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Item
Output Parameter
Attribute
1
Target Setpoint
1
2
Target Output Power
2
3
Auto / Manual
127
4
Alarm Acknowledge
128
Total length = 4 words = 8 bytes
Looking at the Device Parameters via the network we will see these 4 output parameters defined with the above IDs.
Remaining input parameters must be set to 255.
Looking at the Device Parameters via the network we
will see these 4 output parameters defined with the
above IDs.
Remaining input parameters must be set to 255.
All that has to be configured now is the Scanner to transfer these variables.
On the Scanner properties:
‘General’ Tab – information only
‘Module’ Tab – set the Scanner module slot correctly (6 in
this example)
‘Scanlist’ tab – add the Eurotherm 2400 to the scan list
Edit I/O parameters – leave the default settings - Polled 8
input and 8 output (shown)
‘Input’ Tab – Map the 4 input parameters to the M file M1:6.0
to M1:6.3
‘Output’ Tab – Map the 4 output parameters to the M file
M0:6.0 to M1:6.3
Click apply to download this to the Scanner (PLC must be in program mode). Once the network is restarted the 2400
REM will change from flashing to steady. Similarly the Scanner error indicator will show no error on node 24. The 4
INPUT and 4 OUTPUT parameters are now being transferred back and forth on the network and will be available in the
plc in the I/O files.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Example 2
In this example the INPUT table stays the same as Example 1 but the output table modified and extended to include the 2
setpoints and the setpoint selector and the disable keys function.
Item
Output Parameter
Attribute
1
Setpoint 2
24
2
Setpoint Select
14
3
Target Output Power
2
4
Auto / Manual
127
5
Disable Keys
133
Total length = 5 words = 10 bytes
On the 2400 Device Parameters change the Output parameters to
the new IDs as listed in the table above.
Download them ‘Singly’ as entered. Download all may work but
check by uploading all afterwards.
All that has to be configured now is the Scanner to transfer these variables.
On the Scanner properties
‘Scanlist’ tab –
‘Edit I/O parameters’ – leave set to Polled 8 Input and change the output length to 12.
‘Input’ Tab – Map the 4 input parameters to the I file I:6.1 to I:6.4
‘Output’ Tab – Map the 5 output parameters to the O file O:6.1 to O:6.5
Click apply and download this to the Scanner (PLC must be in program mode). Restart the network.
The 4 INPUT and 5 OUTPUT parameters are now being transferred back and forth on the network, and will be available in
the plc in the I/O files.
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6.2.1
2400
Simple plc application
This uses the 2400 Example 2 configuration:
Item
Output Parameter
PLC Map
1
Setpoint 2
O:6.1
2
Setpoint Select
O:6.2
3
Target Output Power
O:6.3
4
Auto / Manual
O:6.4
5
Disable Keys
O:6.5
Item
Input Parameter
PLC Map
1
Process Value
I:6.1
2
Working Setpoint
I:6.2
3
Working Output Power
I:6.3
4
Summary Status
I:6.4
The 2400 controls a furnace which is used during the day by the operators who use and change the main setpoint, SP 1.
The plant is turned down to a standby setpoint SP2 overnight. Setpoint 2 During the day the operators can change the
controller settings but overnight the keys are locked.
File 2400Example2.rss ladder
6.3
Do not leave the keys locked when closing application!
Example 3
The list of pre-defined parameters in the 2400 is extensive but there is a means of addressing parameters which have not
been included. This is done by using the Tag address of the required parameter in the 2400.
For example we shall enable the plc to write to the gain scheduler setpoint at Tag address 153 and to read the CJC
temperature of the 2400 t/c input (a useful way to monitor the temperature of a remote cabinet) at Tag Address 215.
See Section 6.4.
These two tags will be added onto the end of an existing configuration.
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 161
161
Predefined parameters #0 to #160
162 to 171
10
User defined INPUT or OUTPUT parameters #190 to #199
172 to 231
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
232 to 291
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
292 to 301
10
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT or OUTPUT parameters
302 to 307
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
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On the properties list for the 2400 we have to go to the list no
292 to enter these Tag addresses in ‘Tag for Val #190’ and #191.
Gain Schedule SP has Tag address 153, is an OUTPUT and now has
ID #190
Input CJC has Tag address 215, is an INPUT and now has ID#191.
So on the output definition list we modify the next
available parameter Output Def #7 from 255 to 190
and on the input definition list we modify the next
available parameter Input Def #5 from 255 to 191
Finally we have to update the scanlist on the Scanner as the 2400 now has 10 input bytes and 14 Output bytes. These
extra parameters will have to be mapped and will then be available to the plc.
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6.4
2400
2400 Class, Instance and Attribute ID Table
EDS list
1 to 161
162 to 171
172 to 231
232 to 291
292 to 301
302 to 307
Quantity
161
Description
Predefined parameters #0 to #160
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 0 to 160
10
User defined INPUT or OUTPUT parameters #190 to #199
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 190 to 199
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 1 Attributes 0 to 60
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 2 Attributes 0 to 60
10
Enter Tag Address of user defined INPUT or OUTPUT parameters
Specialist Parameters – block read or write
Class 101 Instance 1 Attributes 1 to 6
Note – all variables of type INT - 32 bit format is not supported in this instrument type. Data formats are therefore as
Tag, i.e. Scaled Integers. The scaling is based on the number of decimal point places used on the instrument display.
Tag addresses are used to identify parameters in the controller and are identical to the Modbus addresses which are also
listed in the Series 2000 Communications Manual, Eurotherm Part No. HA 026230.
After the description is the Tag Address, followed where it is available, by the Attribute ID used in DeviceNet.
There are 161 parameters pre-defined for use on DeviceNet and a further 10 that can be pointed to using parameters
with Attributes 190 to 199.
Attribute ID
Description
190-199
Indirect R/W parameters (configurable) – these are not managed via an
indirection table, but rather within the interface itself
The tables that follow include all the main instrument parameters in the ‘pages’ as they appear on the instrument display.
Controller
Display
Home Tab
Parameter Description
Tag
ID
Process Variable
1
0
SP
Target setpoint
2
1
OP
% Output power
3
2
in Man only)
AmPS
Heater current (With PDSIO
mode 2)
80
C.id
Customer defined
identification number
629
Setpoint Span
552
Error (PV-SP)
39
38
Remote Input Value
26
25
For ON/OFF controllers the
following power levels must
be written:
Cool
-100%
OFF
0%
Heat
w.SP
Status Tab
100%
Working set point. Read
only: use Target set point or
currently selected set point
(1 to 16) to change the
value
5
4
Auto-man select
0: Auto
1: Manual
273
Pot Position
317
-
Valve Posn (computed by
VP algorithm)
53
52
-
VP Manual Output (alterable
60
59
m-A
6-8
127
Tag
Summary Output Status Word
BIT
79
ID
75
74
DESCRIPTION
0
Alarm 1 State
(0 = Safe 1 = Alarm)
1
Alarm 2 State
(0 = Safe 1 = Alarm)
2
Alarm 3 State
(0 = Safe 1 = Alarm)
3
Alarm 4 State
(0 = Safe 1 = Alarm)
4
Manual Mode
(0 = Auto 1 = Manual)
5
Sensor Break ( 0 = Good PV 1 = Sensor Broken)
6
Loop Break
(0 = Good closed loop
1 = Open Loop)
7
Heater Fail
(0 = No Fault
1 = Load fault detected)
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8
Tune Active
(0 = Auto Tune disabled
1 = Auto Tune active)
9
Ramp/Program Complete (0 = Running/Reset
1 = Complete )
10
PV out of range
(0 = PV within table range
1 = PV out of table
range)
11
DC control module fault (0= Good. 1= BAD)
12
Programmer Segment Synchronise
(0 = Waiting,
1 = Running)
13
Remote input sensor break (0 = Good, 1 = Bad)
14
IP1 Fault
15
Reserved
Status Tab
Tag
ID
Fast Status Byte
74
73
BIT
DESCRIPTION
Bit 0
Alarm 1 State
(0 = Safe 1 = Alarm)
Bit 1
Alarm 2 State
(0 = Safe 1 = Alarm)
Bit 2
Alarm 3 State
(0 = Safe 1 = Alarm)
Bit 3
Alarm 4 State
(0 = Safe 1 = Alarm)
Bit 4
Manual Mode
(0 = Auto 1 = Manual)
Bit 5
Sensor Break (0 = Good PV 1 = Sensor Broken)
Bit 6
Loop Break (0 = Good closed loop 1 = Open
Loop)
Bit 7
Heater Fail (0 = No Fault 1 = Load fault
detected)
Control Status Word
76
75
BIT
DESCRIPTION
0
Control algorithm Freeze
1
PV input sensor broken
2
PV out of sensor range
3
Self Tune failed
4
PID servo signal
5
PID debump signal
6
Fault detected in closed loop behaviour (loop
break)
7
Freezes the integral accumulator
8
Indicates that a tune has completed successfully
9
Direct/reverse acting control
10
Algorithm Initialisation flag
11
PID demand has been limited.
12
Autotune enabled
13
Adaptive tune enabled
14
Automatic Droop compensation enabled
15
Manual / Auto mode switch
Instrument Status Word
77
76
BIT
DESCRIPTION
0
Config/Oper mode switch
1
Disables limit checking
2
SRL ramp running (Read Only)
3
Remote setpoint active
4
Alarm acknowledge switch.
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6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Program Logic Status
162
BIT
DESCRIPTION
0
Program Output 1
( 0 = OFF 1 = ON )
1
Program Output 2
( 0 = OFF 1 = ON )
2
Program Output 3
( 0 = OFF 1 = ON )
3
Program Output 4
( 0 = OFF 1 = ON )
4
Program Output 5
( 0 = OFF 1 = ON )
5
Program Output 6
( 0 = OFF 1 = ON )
6
Program Output 7
( 0 = OFF 1 = ON )
7
Program Output 8
( 0 = OFF 1 = ON )
8
Reserved
9
Reserved
10
Reserved
11
Reserved
12
Reserved
13
Reserved
14
Reserved
15
Reserved
Digital Output Status Word
551
BIT
DESCRIPTION
0
H Interface module telemetry (0 = Off, 1 = On)
1
J Interface module telemetry (0 = Off, 1 = On)
2
1A module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
3
LB logic telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
4
LA logic telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
5
1B module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
6
1C module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
7
2A module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
8
2B module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
9
2C module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
10
3A module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
11
3B module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
12
3C module telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
13
AA relay telemetry
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
14
Reserved
15
Reserved
Digital Input Status Word
87
8
6
BIT
DESCRIPTION
0
H Interface module
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
1
J Interface module
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
2
1A module
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
3
LB logic input
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
4
LA logic input
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
1B module telemetry
1C module
2A module
2B module
2C module
3A module
3B module
3C module
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
2400
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
(0 = Off, 1 = On)
Parameter Description
SP Rate Limit Holdback Status
0: Inactive
1: Active
Pot Break
Freeze Control Flag
0: Controlling
1: Hold
SP Rate Limit Active Status
0: No setpoint rate limit
1: Setpoint rate limit active
Sensor Break Status Flag
0: Good
1: Sensor break
Power Failed flag
0: Good
1: Power fail detected
New Alarm Flag
Loop Break Status Flag
0: Good
1: Loop break
Integral Hold Status Flag
0: Good
1: Integral hold
SRL Complete Status
0: Setpoint rate limit incomplete
1: Setpoint rate limit complete
Remote Input Status Flag
0: Good
1: Fault
Sync Continue Flag
0: Continue
1: Awaiting synch
Controller
Display
Prg
StAt
6-10
Run Tab
Parameter Description
Current program running
(active prog no.)
Program Status
1: Reset
2: Run
4: Hold
8: Holdback
PSP
CYC
SEG
StYP
SEGt
Tag
41
ID
40
TGt
350
257
275
Rate
PrGt
FASt
129
out.1
258
58
55
28
36
35
63
62
160
161
58
57
57
56
464
1: On (applies to all 8 logic
o/ps)
260
263
264
131
280
281
Tag
Logic 1 output (current
program)
163
59
56
29
0: Off (applies to all 8 logic
outputs)
259
277
16: Complete
Programmer setpoint
Program cycles remaining
Current segment number
Current segment type
0: End
1: Ramp (Rate)
2: Ramp (Time to target)
3: Dwell
4: Step
5: Call
Segment time remaining
(secs)
Segment time remaining
(mins)
Target setpoint (current
segment)
Ramp rate
Program time remaining
Fast run
0: No
1: Yes
ID
22
21
23
22
out.2
Logic 2 output (current
program)
465
out.3
Logic 3 output (current
program)
466
out.4
Logic 4 output (current
program)
467
out.5
Logic 5 output (current
program)
468
out.6
Logic 6 output (current
program)
469
out.7
Logic 7 output (current
program)
470
out.8
Logic 8 output (current
program)
471
Sync
Segment synchronisation
488
SEG.d
0:
No
1:
Yes
Flash active segment in lower
display
284
Advance Segment Flag
149
Skip Segment Flag
154
Program Logic Status
162
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Controller
Display
Alarm Tab
Parameter Description
Alarm 1setpoint value
Alarm 2setpoint value
Alarm 3setpoint value
Alarm 4setpoint value
Alarm 1 hysteresis
Alarm 2 hysteresis
Alarm 3 hysteresis
Alarm 4 hysteresis
Loop break time
0: Off
Enable diagnostic messages
0: No Diagnostics
1: Diagnostics
Acknowledge All Alarms
Tag
274
128
Autotune Tab
Parameter Description
Autotune enable
0: No Tune
1: Tune
Adaptive tune enable
0: No Adaotive Tune
1: Tune
Adaptive tune trigger level
Automatic droop
compensation (manual
reset)
0: Manual reset
1: Calculated
Tag
ID
270
124
Controller
Display
PID Tab
Parameter Description
Tag
G.SP
Gain scheduler setpoint
153
SET
Current PID set (read only if
gain scheduling is selected)
72
71
1--2--3--4--HY1
Hy2
HY3
HY4
Lbt
DiAG
Controller
Display
tunE
drA
dra.t
adc
0:
Set 1
1:
Set 2
13
14
81
82
47
68
69
71
83
ID
12
13
80
81
46
67
68
70
82
282
271
125
100
272
99
126
ID
Proportional band PID1
6
5
Ti
Integral time PID1
8
7
9
8
td
Manual reset PID1
28
27
Hcb
Cutback high PID1
18
17
17
16
19
18
0:
Relative cool gain PID1
pb2
Proportional band PID2
48
47
ti2
Integral time PID2
49
48
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50
Hcb2
Cutback high PID2
118
0:
Lcb2
Auto
Cutback low PID2
0:
117
Auto
reL2
Relative cool gain PID2
52
51
ff.pb
Feedforward proportional
band
97
96
ff.tr
Feedforward trim
98
97
ff.dv
Feedforward trim limit
99
98
Controller
Display
Motor Tab
Parameter Description
Tag
ID
tm
Valve travel time
21
20
In.t
Valve inertia time
123
100
bac.t
Valve backlash time
124
101
mp.t
Minimum pulse time
54
v.br
Bounded sensor break
strategy
128
105
VP Bounded sensor break
62
61
Controller
Display
I/O Tab
Parameter Description
Tag
DC Output 1A Telemetry
126
94
DC Output 2A Telemetry
127
58
DC Output 3A Telemetry
128
22
BCD Input Value
96
ID
95
Auto
reL.c
0:
49
Off
Manual reset PID2
Auto
Cutback low PID1
0:
50
Off
res
Lcb
0:
51
Off
Derivative time PID1
0:
Derivative time PID2
res.2
sb.op
PB
0:
td2
Off
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Controller
Display
sseL
L-r
Setpoint Tab
Parameter Description
Select setpoint
0: SP1
1: SP2
2: SP 3
3: SP 4
4: SP 5
5: SP 6
6: SP 7
7: SP 8
8: SP 9
9: SP 10
10: SP 11
11: SP 12
12: SP13
13: SP14
14: SP15
15: SP16
Local or remote setpoint
select
0: Local
1: Remote
2400
Tag
15
ID
14
34
70
69
Holdback value for srtpoint
rate limit
65
64
Programmer State Write
57
Programmer state Read
23
Input Tab
Parameter Description
Tag
FiLt
Input 1 filter time constant
101
FLt.2
Input 2 filter time constant
Hb.tY
Hb
Controller
Display
0:
276
130
0:
136
140
F.2
Derived input function
factor 2
293
141
Hi.1P
Switchover transition region
high
286
134
Lo.1P
Switchover transition region
low
287
135
Potentiometer Calibration
Enable
310
Potentiometer Input
Calibration Node
311
Potentiometer Calibration
Go
312
Emmisivity
38
Emmisivity input 2
104
User calibration enable
0: Factory
1: User
110
Selected calibration point
0: None
1: Input 1 low
2: Input 1 high
3: Input 2 low
4: Input 2 high
102
AdJ
User calibration adjust input
1
146
AdJ
User calibration adjust input
2
148
OFS.1
Input 1 calibration offset
141
118
OFS.2
Input 2 calibration offset
142
119
Setpoint 2
25
24
sp 3
Setpoint 3
164
sp 4
Setpoint 4
165
SP 5
Setpoint 5
166
SP 6
Setpoint 6
167
SP 7
Setpoint 7
168
SP 8
Setpoint 8
169
SP 9
Setpoint 9
170
SP 10
Setpoint 10
171
SP 11
Setpoint 11
172
SP 12
Setpoint 12
173
SP 13
Setpoint 13
174
EmiS
SP 14
Setpoint 14
175
EmiS.2
SP 15
Setpoint 15
176
SP 16
Setpoint 16
177
Rm.SP
Remote setpoint
485
rmt.t
Remote setpoint trim
486
Ratio setpoint
61
60
26
6-12
CAL
27
112
SP H
Setpoint 1 high limit
111
SP2.L
Setpoint 2 low limit
114
SP2.H
Setpoint 2 high limit
113
Loc.L
Local setpoint trim low limit
67
66
Loc.H
Local setpoint trim high
limit
66
65
Off
288
sp 2
Setpoint 1 low limit
103
292
23
Local setpoint trim
Off
Derived input function
factor 1
24
SP L
ID
Select input 1 or input 2
Setpoint 1
Loc.t
22
F.1
PV.iP
sp 1
rAT
Setpoint rate limit
0: Off
Holdback type for sp rate
limit
0: Off
1: Low
2: High
3: Band
35
SPrr
CAL.S
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Controller
Display
mV.1
Input 1 measured value
202
mV.2
Input 2 measured value
208
CJC.1
Input 1 cold junction temp.
reading
215
CJC.2
Input 2 cold junction temp.
reading
216
Li.1
Input 1 linearised value
289
137
Li.2
Input 2 linearised value
290
138
Currently selected setpoint
291
139
Output Tab
Parameter Description
Tag
ID
PV.SL
Information Tab
Parameter Description
8: Ratio setpoint
9: Selected prog. number
10: Remote setpoint
Tag
ID
LoG.L
PV minimum
134
111
LoG.H
PV maximum
133
110
LoG.A
PV mean value
Time PV above threshold
level
135
112
139
116
PV threshold for timer log
Logging reset
0: Not reset
1: Reset
138
115
140
117
201
LoG.t
LoG.v
Controller
Display
RES.L
OP.Lo
Low power limit
31
30
OP.Hi
High power limit
30
29
mCt
Maximum Control Task Time
rOP.L
Remote low power limit
33
32
w.OP
SSr
Working output
PDSIO SSR status
0: Good
1: Load fail
2: Open
3: Heater fail
4: SSR fail
5: Sn fail
Remote high power limit
Output rate limit
0: Off
32
31
37
36
Forced output level
84
83
CYC.H
Heat cycle time
10
9
hYs.H
Heat Hysteresis (on/off
output)
Heat output minimum on
time
0: Auto
86
85
CYC.C
Cool cycle time
20
19
hYs.C
Cool Hysteresis (on/off
output)
Cool output minimum on
time
0: Auto
88
87
89
88
HC.db
Heat/cool dead band
(on/off op)
16
15
End.P
Power in end segment
64
63
Sb.OP
Sensor break output power
34
33
Sb.OP
On/Off Sensor Brk OP
Power
0: -100%
1: 0%
2: 100%
40
39
Information Tab
Parameter Description
Tag
Lower readout display
0: Standard
1: Load current
2: Output power
3: Status
4: Program time
5: None
6: Valve position
7: Process value 2
106
rOP.H
Oprr
FOP
ont.H
ont.C
Controller
Display
diSP
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3
78
FF.OP
Feedforward component of
output
209
P OP
Proportional component of
output
214
I OP
Integral component of output
55
d OP
Derivative component of
output
116
VP S
VP motor calibration state
0: Start
1: Waiting
2: Open valve
3: BLUp/InDn
4: Ttup
5: Overshoot
6: InUp/BLDn
7: TT down
8: Open
9: Low lim
10: Stopping
11: Raise
12: Inert up
13: Lower
14: Low lim
15: Stopping
16: Lower
17: InDn/BL
99: Abort
210
44
ID
4
79
54
6-13
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Controller
Display
6-14
2400
Miscellaneous Tab
Parameter Description
Tag
ID
Instrument Mode
199
120
Instrument Version Number
107
Instrument Ident
122
Slave Instrument Target
Setpoint
92
91
Slave Instrument Ramp Rate
93
92
Slave Instrument Sync
94
93
Remote SRL Hold
95
94
CNOMO Manufacturers ID
121
Remote Parameter
151
Error Logged Flag
73
72
Ramp Rate Disable
78
77
Maximum Input Value
548
Minimum Input Value
549
Holdback Disable
278
132
All User Interface Keys
Disable
279
133
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6.4.1
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Ramp/Dwell Programmer Data
Program Data Organisation
There are no pre-defined DeviceNet Tags in this area. To read and write programs will require Explicit Messaging. See
Section 8 for examples.
A 2400 series controller can contain multiple “programs”, each consisting of up to 16 segments. The data for each
program starts at the base tag address given by the following table:
Program
Base Address (Decimal)
Base Address (Hex)
Program 0 (Currently Running Program - changes permitted
only in hold, and are not permanently stored)
Program 1
Program 2
Program 3
Program 4
8192
2000
8328
8464
8600
8736
2088
2110
2198
2220
The parameters used to describe a program are organised into 17 blocks, each of 8 words in length, starting at the base
address for the program. There is one block for general program data, such as the units to be used for ramp and dwell
times, and 16 further blocks for the segment data itself. To obtain the tag address of the data block for a given program,
add the block offset given in the next table to the program
Contents
Offset (Decimal)
Offset (Hex)
Program General Data
Segment 1
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4
Segment 5
Segment 6
Segment 7
Segment 8
Segment 9
Segment 10
Segment 11
Segment 12
Segment 13
Segment 14
Segment 15
Segment 16
0
8
16
24
32
40
48
56
64
72
80
88
96
104
112
120
128
0
8
10
18
20
28
30
38
40
48
50
58
60
68
70
78
80
Program General Data
The offsets of each parameter within the program general data block is given by the next table:
Address Offset
Parameter
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
HoldbackType
HoldbackValue
Ramp Units
Dwell Units
Program Cycles
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
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0: None
1: Low
2: High
0: Secs
0: Secs
1: Mins
1: Mins
2: Hours
2: Hours
3: Band
6-15
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
2400
Program Segment Data
Program segment data is specified using 8 tag addresses, with the contents varying depending on the type of the
segment. The format per segment is detailed in the following table, which gives the offset from the start of a segment
data block for each item.
Address
Offset
0
1
Segment Types
STEP
DWELL
RAMP
RATE
RAMP
TIME TO
TARGET
CALL
END
Segment
Type
Target
Setpoint
Segment
Type
Segment
Type
Target
Setpoint
Rate
Segment
Type
Target
Setpoint
Duration
Segment
Type
Segment Type
Program
Number
Call Cycles
End Type
2
3
Duration
4
5
6
7
Logic O/P’s
Logic O/P’s
Logic O/P’s
Logic O/P’s
Logic O/P’s
Example Address calculations
Program 1, Segment 4, Segment Type = 8328 + 32 + 0 = 8360 (20A8 Hex)
Program 2, Holdback Value
= 8464 + 0 + 1 = 8465 (2111 Hex)
Program 4 Segment 16, End Type
= 8872 + 128 + 3 = 9003 (232B Hex)
Power Level in End Segment
This has the tag address 64 in 2400 controllers.
Summary of Programmer Enumerators
Controller Display
tYPE
End.t
6-16
Parameter Description
Current Segment Type
0: End
1: Ramp (Rate)
2: Ramp (Time to target)
3: Dwell
4: Step
5: Call
End Segment Type
0: Reset
1: Indefinite Dwell
2: Set Output
Controller Display
Hb
dwL.U
rmP.U
Parameter Description
Holdback Type
0: None
1: Low
2: High
3: Band
Dwell Units
0: Seconds
1: Minutes
2: Hours
Ramp Units
0: Seconds
1: Minutes
2: Hours
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
7. Transferring Data - 2200
A network has been set up with a 2500 base at address 25, a 2400 at address 24 and a 2200 at address 22. The baud rate
has been set at 500k.
The table below lists the factory default assignment for the Polled I/O message described in the [IO_Info] section of the
EDS file.
Default 2200 INPUT Parameters
Input Words
1
2
3
4
Parameter
Measured Value (PV)
Target Setpoint (TS)
Output Power (OP)
Summary Output Status
where the Summary Output Status bits are set according to the table below.
Summary Output Status
Bit
Description
0
Alarm 1 State
1
Alarm 2 State
2
Alarm 3 State
3
Alarm 4 State
4
Manual Mode
5
Sensor Break
6
Loop Break
7
Heater Fail
8
Load Fail
9
Ramp/Program
10
PV out of range
11
SSR Fail
12
New Alarm
13
Remote input sensor break
14
Reserved
15
Reserved
Default 2200 OUTPUT Parameters
A single user configurable output parameter is available.
Output Words
1
2
Parameter
Parameter Value
‘Address’
To write a parameter using the Polled I/O message, first enter the new Parameter Value, then the Address. To calculate
the value required for the ‘Address’, add 256 to the Attribute ID value shown in the Parameter Address Maps shown at
the end of this document.
For example, to write to the Target Setpoint – Attribute value 5 – the Address value would be 261.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
7.1
2200
Default Example 1
The 2200 parameter tables are not directly configurable so the only task is to transfer the data required. There are 4
input parameters (8 bytes) and 2 output parameters (4 bytes). The example 2200Examples.rss has been set up as follows
and the data may be used as required.
2200 parameter
Measured Value (PV)
Target Setpoint (TS)
Output Power (OP)
Summary Output Status
I/O file
I6.6
I6.7
I6.8
I6.9
To read any other parameters within the instrument the only possibility is to use explicit messaging which is described in
the section below.
There is only one write parameter, but by selecting the appropriate ID from the tables in Section 6.3 any parameter in the
instrument can be written to. Alternatively see the next section on explicit messaging.
2200 parameter
Set value
Parameter ID + 256
I/O file
O6.7
O6.8
The normal requirement is to set the address to 256 + 5 to write to the setpoint (ID = 5). The set value is then written to
the controller. There is a Custom Data Monitor showing these values in the example.
To write to a different parameter set the new value as required and its address in the same copy sequence.
e.g. set value 25 and address 272 will set the proportional band to 25.
7.2
Explicit Messaging
An example is included in the 2200Examples.rss application. This will either read 3 parameters continually or, with new
values entered into the table a ‘write-once’ sequence may be executed. The 3 parameters selected are the PID terms.
The ladder logic sequence has been done as a straight sequence, avoiding indirect addressing, error detection etc., for
simplicity and only as an example to show communication. Section 7.2.4 gives key data on Explicit Messaging in the
1747SDN Scanner Module.
7.2.1
User Parameters
N7:60 to 69 are the parameters used to send and read values from the 2200.
N7 address
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
7-2
Value
16
17
18
0
1
2
Description
Prop band ID
New value
Current Value
Integral ID
New value
Current Value
Derivative ID
New value
Current Value
Do nothing
Read continuous
Write once
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
The first 5 parameters are read and written using the
normal DeviceNet polling.
XP_*, TI_* and TD_* are the parameters taken from the
previous table.
Explicit Messaging will be used to read the current value
(CV) or to write the new value (NV). The parameters are
selected by choosing the correct Attribute ID from the
tables in 6.3. The PID parameters have IDs 16, 17, and 18.
Use EM_CONTROL to read (=1) write once (= 2) or do
nothing (=0).
Reset the WRITE_ONCE bit to write continuously.
7.2.2
Explicit Read Message
Transaction Read File – request sent to scanner M0:224. The required format is shown below. The transaction is initiated
by sending this to the M0 file and the waiting for the response in the M1 file.
N7 address
70
Description
Transaction ID
71
72
73
74
75
Port
Service (14)
Class
Instance
Attribute
Upper byte
00000001
Lower Byte
00000001
Description
Command:
Execute
00000000
00000110
Byte Size
00001110
00010110
MacID (22)
00000000
01100100
Class=100
00000000
00000001
Instance =1
Set to required parameter (from N60, 63 or 66)
Word value
257
6
3606
100
1
Note: byte size is class, instance, and attribute.
When transaction has been executed then Scanner Input file I:6/15 is set
Transaction Read File – response received from scanner M1:224
N7 address
80
Description
Transaction ID
Upper byte
00000001
Lower Byte
00000001
81
82
83
Port
Service
Value
00000000
00000110
10001111
00010110
Transfer this to N62, N65, N68
Description
Status:
OK
Byte Size
MacID (22)
Word value
257
2
Clear Transaction – sent to scanner M0:224
N7 address
84
Description
Transaction ID
Upper byte
00000001
Lower Byte
00000003
Description
Command: Execute
Word value
259
When transaction has been cleared then Scanner Input file I:6/15 is reset.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
7.2.3
2200
Explicit Write
Transaction Write File – request sent to scanner M0:224
N7 address
90
Description
Transaction ID
91
92
93
94
95
96
Port
Service (16)
Class
Instance
Attribute
New value
Upper byte
00000001
Lower Byte
00000001
Description
Command:
Execute
00000000
00001000
Byte Size
00010000
00010110
MacID (22)
00000000
01100100
Class=100
00000000
00000001
Instance =1
Set to required parameter (from N60, 63 or 66)
Get from N61, N64, N67
Word value
257
8
4118
100
1
Note: byte size is class, instance, attribute, and value
When transaction has been executed then Scanner Input file I:6/15 is set
Transaction Write File – response received from scanner M1:224
N7 address
100
Description
Transaction ID
Upper byte
00000001
Lower Byte
00000001
101
102
103
Port
Service
Value
00000000
00000010
10010000
00010110
Transfer this to N62, N65, N68
Description
Status:
OK
Byte Size
MacID (22)
Word value
257
2
Clear Transaction – sent to scanner M0:224
N7 address
104
Description
Transaction ID
Upper byte
00000001
Lower Byte
00000003
Description
Reset
Word value
259
When transaction has been cleared then Scanner Input file I:6/15 is reset.
7-4
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7.2.4
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Explicit Message Descriptions
Transaction ID – a user given number to identify the transaction. Up to 10 may be used but the 2200 example only ever
uses one.
MacID is the slave address.
Commands – used in transaction request. This example uses 1 and 3.
Command Code
0
1
2
3
4
5-255
Description
Ignore
Execute
Get status of TXID
Reset all TXID
Delete transaction TXID
Reserved
Status – in transaction response. The scanner errors are not used in this example.
Status Code
0
1
2
3 - 15
16-255
Description
Ignore
OK
In progress
Errors (See scanner documentation)
Reserved
Services. This example only uses the ‘Single’ services.
Name
Get Attribute Single
Set Attribute Single
Get Attribute All
Set Attribute All
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Code
14
16
1
2
Description
Upload single value
Download single value
Upload all value
Download all value
7-5
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
7.3
2200
2200 Class Instance &Attribute ID Table
Parameters are Read/Write (RW) which may be used as OUTPUT or INPUT parameters or Read Only (RO) which may only
be used as INPUT parameters.
Class = 100 Instance = 1 Attribute in Table.
Home List
Mn
VPoS
Parameter Name
Process Variable
Valve Position
OP
% Output Level
w.SP
Working Setpoint
Target Setpoint (SP)
Manual Mode
Load Current
Requires PDSIO
Mode 2
Lower Display
Customer Defined
Identification
Number
SP
m-A
AmPS
DiSP
C.id
Attribute
0
0h
6
6h
1
1h
2
5
8
7
2h
5h
8h
7h
Setpoint List
RO
RO
RW
RO
RW
RW
RO
1--2--3--4--HY
Lbt
Parameter Name
Alarm 1 Setpoint
Alarm 2 Setpoint
Alarm 3 Setpoint
Alarm 4 Setpoint
Alarm 1-4 Hysteresis
Loop Break Time
Loc.t
Parameter Name
Setpoint Select
Local or Remote
Setpoint Select
Setpoint 1
Setpoint 2
Remote Setpoint
Local Setpoint Trim
SP1.L
Setpoint 1 Low Limit
SseL
L-r
Sp 1
Sp 2
Rm.SP
SP1.H
139
140
8Bh
8Ch
R/W
R/W
SP2.L
SP2.H
Loc.L
Loc.H
Alarm List
Mn
Mn
Attribute
9
09h
10
0Ah
11
0Bh
12
0Ch
141
8Dh
13
0Dh
RW
RW
RW
RW
R/W
RW
SPrr
DWEL
End.t
ProG
Stat
Mn
TunE
Adc
Parameter Name
Autotune Enable
Automatic Droop
Compensation
(PD only control)
Attribute
14
0Eh
15
0Fh
RW
RW
Mn
Parameter Name
PB
Proportional Band
Ti
Td
Res
Lcb
Hcb
reL.c
FiLt
OFSt
CAL
CAL.S
AdJ
CJC
PID List
Integral Time
Derivative Time
Manual Reset %
Cutback Low
Cutback High
Relative Cool Gain
Attribute
16
10h
17
11h
18
12h
19
13h
20
14h
21
15h
22
16h
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
MV
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
19h
1Ah
1Bh
1Ch
1Dh
1Eh
1Fh
20h
21h
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
34
22h
RW
35
36
37
23h
24h
25h
RW
RW
RW
38
39
26h
27h
RW
RO
Attribute
40
28h
41
29h
42
2Ah
43
2Bh
44
2Ch
RW
RW
RW
RW
RO
45
2Dh
RO
46
2Eh
RO
Parameter Name
Low Power Limit
High Power Limit
Sensor Break Output
Heat Cycle Time
Cool Cycle Time
Heat Output
Minimum ON Time
Attribute
47
2Fh
48
30h
49
31h
50
32h
51
33h
52
34h
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
Cool Output Minimum
ON Time
Motor Travel Time
53
35h
RW
54
36h
RW
Setpoint 1 High Limit
Setpoint 2 Low Limit
Setpoint 2 High Limit
Local Setpoint Trim
Low Limit
Local Setpoint Trim
High Limit
Setpoint Rate Limit
Dwell Time
Go To State At End
of Program
Program Control
Program Status
Parameter Name
Input filter time
Process Value Offset
Calibration Type
Calibration Select
User Calibration
Adjust
Cold Junction
Compensation
Temperature
Input Millivolt Value
Output List
Mn
OP.Lo
OP.Hi
Sb.OP
CYC.H
CYC.C
ont.H
ont.C
Mtr
7-6
RW
RW
Input List
Mn
Autotune List
Attribute
23
17h
24
18h
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On/Off List
Mn
hys.H
hys.C
HC.db
Parameter Name
Heat Hysteresis
Cool Hysteresis
Heat/Cool Dead
Band
Attribute
55
37h
56
38h
57
39h
RW
RW
RW
Attribute
58
3Ah
RW
Comms List
Addr
Parameter Name
Comms Address
Misc. Status & Comms-Only Parameters
Mn
Parameter Name
Process Error
Controller Version
Number
CNOMO
Manufactures
Identifier
Controller Identifier
Instrument Mode
PV Millivolts From
Comms
Input Test Point
Enable
Sensor Break
Sourced From Test
Filter Initialization
Flag
Sensor Break Status
Flag
Acknowledge All
Alarms
Disable Keys
Attribute
143
8Fh
61
3Dh
RO
RO
62
3Eh
RO
59
60
63
3Bh
3Ch
3Fh
RO
RW
RW
64
40h
99
63h
66
42h
67
43h
RO
68
44h
RW
142
8Eh
RW
Control Status
Bit
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Description
Attribute
Control algorithm
4
04h
RW
freeze
PV input sensor broken
PV out of sensor range
Self-tune fail
PID servo signal
PID debump signal
Fault detected in closed loop behaviour (loop
break)
Freezes the integral accumulator
Indicates that a tune has completed successfully
Direct/reverse acting control
Algorithm initialization flag
PID demand has been lifted
Reserved
Auto/Adaptive tune enabled
Automatic droop compensation enabled
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
8. Transferring Data – Mini8 Controller
In the Mini8 Controller DeviceNet is implemented in one of two ways. There is a standard DeviceNet interface module
and an Enhanced DeviceNet module. Differences occur when setting addresses, baud rates, hardware interconnections
and indication of the status of the module and network. Both implementations are described in this section.
Transfer of data is the same for both options.
A network has been set up with a Mini8 controller at address 8. The baud rate has been set at 500k.
8.1
DeviceNet Interface
8.1.1
Setting Baud Rate and Address in the Standard Module
The baud rate & address are set on the Mini8 controller using the DIL switch or by iTools.
Sw
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
8.1.2
OFF
Baud rate
Baud rate
-
ON
Baud rate
Baud rate
Address 32
Address 16
Address 8
Address 4
Address 2
Address 1
8
Sw
8
7
1
OFF ↔ ON
Example shows 500k baud
rate and address 8
Baud rate
125k
250k
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
500k
ON
OFF
Use 500k unless the total
length of the DeviceNet
network is longer than 100m.
Address 0 is a valid DeviceNet address but Mini8 Controller
addresses can be set via iTools, when all switches are set to 0.
Hardware Wiring
5
1
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Pin
Mini8 controller Legend
CAN Label
Colour
5
V+
V+
Red
4
CH
CAN_H
White
3
DR
DRAIN
None
2
CL
CAN_L
Blue
1
V-
V-
Black
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
8.2
Mini8 Controller
Enhanced DeviceNet Interface
This is designed for use in the semiconductor industry. It uses a rotary switch for setting baud rate and a pair of rotary
switches for setting address.
8.2.1
Address Switch
The Node ID (address) is set via two BCD rotary switches, one for each digit.
For example, an address of 13 is configured by setting the MSD to 1 and LSD to 3.
Valid DeviceNet address range is 0 - 63. If the switches are set in the range 64 - 99
the switches will be ignored and the node address will be configured by the Mini8
Controller via iTools.
When the address is changed the DeviceNet interface will automatically restart.
8.2.2
6
5
4
7 89
0
1
3 2
6
5
4
7 89
0
1
3 2
Baud Rate Switch
500
The baud rate is selected by a single BCD rotary switch, and can be set to 125K, 250K or
500K.
Prog
The ‘Prog’ position is selected when it is required to upgrade the Mini8 Controller
firmware.
250
The O/R position is selected when it is required to set Baud Rate using iTools
configuration software.
125
When the baud rate is changed or the ‘Prog’ position is selected the instrument must be power cycled for the change to
be activated.
Make sure that the switch is set to valid positions as marked on the panel.
8.2.3
Switch Position in iTools
The value of the Baud Rate and Address is returned so that it can be read by iTools. Please note, however, that if the
DeviceNet network is unpowered for any reason, any changes to the Baud Rate and Address will NOT be seen in iTools
even though the Mini8 Controller is powered and communicating normally via the CC port or config clip.
8.2.4
Connector
The 5-way connector shown in section 8.1.2 is replaced by a ‘Micro-Connect’ circular 5-pin M12 male connector.
2
Plug
Key
1
5
3
8-2
4
View
from
front
Pin
5
Legend
CAN_L
Function
CAN_L
4
CAN_H
CAN_H
3
V-
V-
2
V+
V+
1
DR
DRAIN
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8.3
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
DeviceNet Status Indication
For DeviceNet the status of the module and the network is shown by 6 LED indicators on the front panel.
Power and State of Relays
Running and Configuration
LEDs P, A and B show power and, relay states.
LEDs RN and CC show Run state and Configuration.
Legend
P Green
A Red
B Red
Legend
RN Green
CC Green
Function
24V connected
Relay A state
Relay B state
Function
Run mode
Configuration
OFF
No power
De-energised
De-energised
OFF
Not running
--
ON
Powered
Energised
Energised
Blinking
Standby
Config traffic
ON
Running
--
☺ The Mini8 controller is
controlling normally ONLY if the
green RN LED is permanently ON.
Network Status
The status of the network is shown by the LED indicator ‘FC’.
Comms Network Status is also shown in iTools by the ‘Status’ parameter
FC LED
Green
‘Status’ Parameter
Enumeration
Meaning
On
RUNNING (0)
Network connected and running
Off
INIT (1)
Network initialising
Blinking
READY (2)
DeviceNet traffic detected but not for this address
Off
OFFLINE (3)
No DeviceNet traffic detected
The ‘Status’ parameter is found in the Comms list:-
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
8.3.1
Mini8 Controller
Status Indication for Enhanced DeviceNet
NET MOD
If an Enhanced DeviceNet module is fitted, two bi-colour LEDs are used to indicate
Module and Network status.
These two LEDs replace the single LED shown as FC on other modules. See
previous section.
8.3.2
Module Status Indication
The module status LED (MOD) has the functionality shown below:
LED State
Device State
Description
OFF
Off
No power applied to DeviceNet network.
Green/Red flashing
Self test
LED power-up test.
Regular flash: Interface module initialising. If the LED
remains in this flashing state indefinitely, check the Baud
rate switch setting.
Green ON
Operational
DeviceNet interface is operational.
Red ON
Unrecoverable fault
Mini8 Controller not powered.
Nvol checksum failure.
Red/off flashing
8.3.3
Recoverable fault
Communications error between the network and the
DeviceNet module.
Network Status Indication
The network status LED (NET) indicates the status of the Enhanced DeviceNet communications link as shown in
the table below.
Note: The final column shows the enumerated values for the ‘Comms Network Status’ parameter available in
iTools.
8-4
LED State
Network State
Description
‘Status’ Parameter
Enumerations
OFF
Off
Device is not on line
OFFLINE (10)
Green flashing
On-line, not
connected
Device is on line but has no connections
established
READY (11)
Green ON
On-line and
connected
Device is on line and has connections
established
ONLINE (12)
Red flashing
Connection timed
out
One or more connections have timed out
IO TIMEOUT (13)
Red ON
Critical link failure
Communication error that has rendered the
device incapable of communicating on the
network
LINK FAIL (14)
Green/Red
Communications
fault
Communications fault but the device has
received an Identify Communication Faulted
Request
COMM FAULT (15)
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Now the Mini8 Controller and the Scanner have to be configured to transfer parameter data.
The Mini8 Controller device parameters are divided into 3 ‘groups’:A list of instrument parameters pre-defined for selection on the INPUT or OUTPUT tables.
The actual INPUT table of parameters to be READ by the DeviceNet client.
The actual OUTPUT table of parameters to be WRITTEN by the client.
8.3.4
Table Modification
Make a list of parameters required in the input and output tables to suit the application. If the parameter is listed in the
predefined list then use the attribute number of that parameter.
To set up the controller so that
the required parameters are
available on the network
requires setting up the INPUT
and OUTPUT data assembly
tables with the IDs from the
Application Variable Object.
Mini8
Application
Variable Object
List of available
parameters
Predefined #0
Mini8 IO
Remapping
Object
USER OUTPUT assembly table
(Max 60)
to
USER INPUT assembly table
(Max 60)
#199
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 200
200
Predefined parameters #0 to #199
201 to 260
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
261 to 320
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Mini8 Controller
To set up the controller so that the desired parameters can be read and written involves setting up the INPUT and
OUTPUT tables (highlighted in the table above).
This information can be seen by inspecting the Mini8.EDS file in a text editor and is the way in which the data is displayed
in RSNetWorx Device Parameters.
This is best illustrated by four examples.
Example 1 is the default Mini8 controller DeviceNet configuration.
Example 2 uses a limited number of parameters.
Example 3 uses other parameters from the pre-defined list.
Example 4 adds parameters NOT included on the pre-defined list.
8.4
Default Example 1
As supplied new, the Mini8 controller comes with the following DeviceNet parameter setup. The value of the attributes
for the parameters on the table below are from the full listing in Section 8.8.
Item
Input Parameter
1
Loop.1.Main.PV
2
Loop.1.Main.WorkingSP
3
Loop.1.Main.ActiveOut
4
Loop.2.Main.PV
5
Loop.2.Main.WorkingSP
6
Loop.2.Main.ActiveOut
7
Loop.3.Main.PV
8
Loop.3.Main.WorkingSP
9
Loop.3.Main.ActiveOut
10
Loop.4.Main.PV
11
Loop.4.Main.WorkingSP
12
Loop.4.Main.ActiveOut
13
Loop.5.Main.PV
14
Loop.5.Main.WorkingSP
15
Loop.5.Main.ActiveOut
16
Loop.6.Main.PV
17
Loop.6.Main.WorkingSP
18
Loop.6.Main.ActiveOut
19
Loop.7.Main.PV
20
Loop.7.Main.WorkingSP
21
Loop.7.Main.ActiveOut
22
Loop.8.Main.PV
23
Loop.8.Main.WorkingSP
24
Loop.8.Main.ActiveOut
25
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus1
26
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus2
27
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus3
28
AlmSummary.General.AnAlarmStatus4
29
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus1
30
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus2
31
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus3
32
AlmSummary.General.SBrkAlarmStatus4
33
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus1
34
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus2
35
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus3
36
AlmSummary.General.CTAlarmStatus4
37
AlmSummary.General.NewAlarm
38
AlmSummary.General.AnyAlarm
39
AlmSummary.General.NewCTAlarm
40
Programmer.1.Run.ProgStatus
Total Length = 40 words x 2 = 80 bytes
8-6
Value (Attr ID)
0
1
2
14 (0EH)
15 (0FH)
16 (10H)
28 (1CH)
29 (1DH)
30 (1EH)
42 (2AH)
43 (2BH)
44 (2CH)
56 (38H)
57 (39H)
58 (3AH)
70 (46H)
71 (47H)
72 (48H)
84 (54H)
85 (55H)
86 (56H)
98 (62H)
99 (63H)
100 (64H)
144 (90H)
145 (91H)
146 (92H)
147 (93H)
148 (94H)
149 (95H)
150 (96H)
151 (97H)
152 (98H)
153 (99H)
154 (9AH)
155 (9BH)
156 (9CH)
157 (9DH)
158 (9EH)
184 (B8H)
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
In RSNetworx right click on the Mini8 controller and select properties. By looking at the properties of the Mini8
controller the default input table can be inspected.
The current value is the attribute ID of the
parameter required.
At the end of the input def part of the table the
remaining items are given the value 255 which
means not used.
A maximum of 60 parameters are possible.
Item
Output Parameter
1
Target SP – Loop 1
2
Auto/Manual – Loop 1
3
Manual Output – Loop 1
4
Target SP – Loop 2
5
Auto/Manual – Loop 2
6
Manual Output – Loop 2
7
Target SP – Loop 3
8
Auto/Manual – Loop 3
9
Manual Output – Loop 3
10
Target SP – Loop 4
11
Auto/Manual – Loop 4
12
Manual Output – Loop 4
13
Target SP – Loop 5
14
Auto/Manual – Loop 5
15
Manual Output – Loop 5
16
Target SP – Loop 6
17
Auto/Manual – Loop 6
18
Manual Output – Loop 6
19
Target SP – Loop 7
20
Auto/Manual – Loop 7
21
Manual Output – Loop 7
22
Target SP – Loop 8
23
Auto/Manual – Loop 8
24
Manual Output – Loop 8
TOTAL LENGTH 24 words x 2 = 48 bytes.
Attribute
3
7
4
17 (11H)
21 (15H)
18 (12H)
31 (1FH)
35 (23H)
32 (20H)
45 (2DH)
49 (31H)
46 (2EH)
59 (3BH)
63 (3FH)
60 (3CH)
73 (49H)
77 (4DH)
74 (4AH)
87 (57H)
91 (5BH)
88 (58H)
101 (65H)
105 (69H)
102 (66H)
By looking at the properties of the Mini8 controller the default output table can be inspected.
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Mini8 Controller
The current value is the attribute ID of the
parameter required.
At the end of the output def part of the table
the remaining items are given the value 255
which means not used.
A maximum of 60 parameters are possible.
Now the scanner has to be set up to transfer this data. On RSNetWorx right click on the Scanner and select properties.
On the Scanner properties:
‘General’ Tab – information only
‘Module’ Tab – set the Scanner module slot correctly (6
in this example)
‘Scanlist’ tab – add the Eurotherm Mini8 from ‘available’
to the scan list
‘Edit I/O parameters’ – tick Polled 80 Rx input and 48 Tx
output (shown)
‘Input’ Tab – Map the 40 input parameters to the M file
M1:6.0 to M1:6.39
‘Output’ Tab – Map the 24 output parameters to the M
file M0:6.0 to M1:6.23
Click apply to download this to the Scanner (PLC must be in program mode). Once the network is restarted the Min8 FC
LED will change from flashing to steady. Similarly the Scanner error indicator will show no error on node 8.
The 40 INPUT and 24 OUTPUT parameters are now being transferred back and forth on the network and will be available
to the plc from the memory files M1:6 and M0:6 using ‘COPY’ functions. There are too many parameters to transfer
directly into the module I/O files.
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8.5
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Example 2
In this example the input table is reduced to just the 8 loop PVs and the output table to the 8 Loop target setpoints.
Item
Input Parameter
Value (Attr ID)
1
Loop.1.Main.PV
0
2
Loop.2.Main.PV
14
3
Loop.3.Main.PV
28
4
Loop.4.Main.PV
42
5
Loop.5.Main.PV
56
6
Loop.6.Main.PV
70
7
Loop.7.Main.PV
84
8
Loop.8.Main.PV
98
Total Length = 8 words x 2 = 16 bytes
In RSNetworx right click on the Mini8 controller and select properties. By looking at the properties of the Mini8
controller the default input table can be modified.
The current value of the first 8 input defs are set
to the tribute IDs of the 8 Loop PVs.
After that the remaining items must be given the
value 255 which means not used.
Once the values have been changed ‘Download to
the Device’ to update the Mini8.
Now the output table must be modified.
Item
Output Parameter
Attribute
1
Target SP – Loop 1
3
2
Target SP – Loop 2
17
3
Target SP – Loop 3
31
4
Target SP – Loop 4
45
5
Target SP – Loop 5
59
6
Target SP – Loop 6
73
7
Target SP – Loop 7
87
8
Target SP – Loop 8
101
TOTAL LENGTH 8 words x 2 = 16 bytes.
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Mini8 Controller
The current value of the first 8 output defs are set
to the tribute IDs of the 8 Loop target setpoints..
After that the remaining items must be given the
value 255 which means not used.
Once the values have been changed ‘Download to
the Device’ to update the Mini8.
On the Scanner properties:
‘General’ Tab – information only
‘Module’ Tab – set the Scanner module slot correctly (6 in this
example)
‘Scanlist’ tab – add the Eurotherm Mini8 from ‘available’ to
the scan list
‘Edit I/O parameters’ – tick Polled, input Rx=16 and output Tx
=16 (shown)
‘Input’ Tab – Map the 8 input parameters to the module I/O
file I:6.1 to I:6.8
‘Output’ Tab – Map the 8 output parameters to the module
I/O file O:6.1 to O1:6.8.
Click apply to download this to the Scanner (PLC must be in program mode). Once the network is restarted the Min8 FC
LED will change from flashing to steady. Similarly the Scanner error indicator will show no error on node 8.
The 8 INPUT PV and 8 OUTPUT SP parameters are now being transferred back and forth on the network and will be
available in the plc in the module I/O files I:6 and O:6. Note O:6.0 must be set to 1.
8-10
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8.6
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Example 3
In this example the input table is from Example 2 has parameters from the predefined list added. The 8 actual current
inputs from the predefined list are added to the input table. Looking at the complete list of pre-defined variables in the
Mini8 controller in the table in 7.6 the CT load currents 1 to 8 have values 0f 161 to 168.
Item
Input Parameter
Value (Attr ID)
1
Loop.1.Main.PV
0
2
Loop.2.Main.PV
14
3
Loop.3.Main.PV
28
4
Loop.4.Main.PV
42
5
Loop.5.Main.PV
56
6
Loop.6.Main.PV
70
7
Loop.7.Main.PV
84
8
Loop.8.Main.PV
98
9
CT Load Current 1
161
10
CT Load Current 2
162
11
CT Load Current 3
163
12
CT Load Current 4
164
13
CT Load Current 5
165
14
CT Load Current 6
166
15
CT Load Current 7
167
16
CT Load Current 8
168
Total Length = 16 words x 2 = 32 bytes
In RSNetWorx right click on the Mini8 controller and select properties. By looking at the properties of the Mini8
controller the default input table can be modified.
The values of the input definitions are
modified to add the CT current values
after the eight PVs.
Then download to the Mini8.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
8.7
Mini8 Controller
Example 4
In this example, on the Output table, parameters will be added which are not on the predefined list. This requires
modification of the Mini8 controller itself using iTools.
The ‘Scheduler Active Set’ parameter will be added for each of the 8 loops. This will allow the plc to select the PID set to
be used for a particular task.
First the Loop.1.PID.SchedulerType has to be set to ‘Set’ and Loop.1.PID.NumSets set to 3 and similarly for Loops 2 to 8.
These parameters now have to be entered into the CommsTab tables. We will use AttributeID 192 to 199 for the eight
‘Scheduler Active Set’. From the table in 7.5 these have Modbus addresses 15808 to 15815.
So in Configuration mode, in Commstab.1, set the Destination parameter to 15808 and drag and drop the Scheduler
Active Set to the Source parameter ‘wired from’.
Similarly with Commstab.2 to .8
Return the Mini8 controller to operating mode.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Now set the output table in DeviceNet.
Item
Output Parameter
Attribute
1
Target SP – Loop 1
3
2
Target SP – Loop 2
17
3
Target SP – Loop 3
31
4
Target SP – Loop 4
45
5
Target SP – Loop 5
59
6
Target SP – Loop 6
73
7
Target SP – Loop 7
87
8
Target SP – Loop 8
101
9
Scheduler Active set Loop 1
192
10
Scheduler Active set Loop 2
193
11
Scheduler Active set Loop 3
194
12
Scheduler Active set Loop 4
195
13
Scheduler Active set Loop 5
196
14
Scheduler Active set Loop 6
197
15
Scheduler Active set Loop 7
198
16
Scheduler Active set Loop 8
199
TOTAL LENGTH 16 words x 2 = 32 bytes.
Output Def #9 to #16 values are modified from 255 according to the table above.
Download this new output definition to the Mini8.
Then update the scanner I/O to 32 bytes in and 32
bytes out.
Map the inputs to M1:6:0 to 15 or I:6.1 to 16.
(From Example 3)
Map the Outputs to M0:6:0 to 15 or O:6.1 to 16
These values will now be available in the plc at the
locations as mapped.
(Note if using IO rather set O:6.0 and I:6.0 to 1.)
Part No HA027506ENG
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07/2010
8-13
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
8.8
Mini8 Controller
Mini8 controller Class, Instance and Attribute ID Table
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 200
200
Predefined parameters #0 to #199
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 0 to 199
201 to 260
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 1 Attributes 0 to 60
261 to 320
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 2 Attributes 0 to 60
Note – all variables of type INT - 32 bit format is not supported in this instrument type. Data formats are therefore as
Tag, i.e. Scaled Integers. The scaling is based on the number of decimal point places used on the instrument display.
This is the list of 200 parameters available to be included in the input and output tables.
8-14
Parameter
Attribute ID
Process Variable – Loop 1
Working Setpoint – Loop 1
Working Output – Loop 1
Target Setpoint – Loop 1
Manual Output – Loop 1
Setpoint 1 – Loop 1
Setpoint 2 – Loop 1
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 1
Proportional Band – Loop 1 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 1 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 1 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 1 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 1 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 1 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 2
Working Setpoint – Loop 2
Working Output – Loop 2
Target Setpoint – Loop 2
Manual Output – Loop 2
Setpoint 1 – Loop 2
Setpoint 2 – Loop 2
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 2
Proportional Band – Loop 2 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 2 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 2 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 2 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 2 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 2 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 3
Working Setpoint – Loop 3
Working Output – Loop 3
Target Setpoint – Loop 3
Manual Output – Loop 3
Setpoint 1 – Loop 3
Setpoint 2 – Loop 3
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 3
Proportional Band – Loop 3 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 3 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 3 working Set
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Modbus Address
(used by CommsTab)
15616
15617
15618
15619
15620
15621
15622
15623
15624
15625
15626
15627
15628
15629
15630
15631
15632
15633
15634
15635
15636
15637
15638
15639
15640
15641
15642
15643
15644
15645
15646
15647
15648
15649
15650
15651
15652
15653
15654
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
07/2010
Mini8 Controller
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Parameter
Attribute ID
Cutback Low – Loop 3 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 3 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 3 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 4
Working Setpoint – Loop 4
Working Output – Loop 4
Target Setpoint – Loop 4
Manual Output – Loop 4
Setpoint 1 – Loop 4
Setpoint 2 – Loop 4
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 4
Proportional Band – Loop 4 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 4 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 4 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 4 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 4 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 4 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 5
Working Setpoint – Loop 5
Working Output – Loop 5
Target Setpoint – Loop 5
Manual Output – Loop 5
Setpoint 1 – Loop 5
Setpoint 2 – Loop 5
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 5
Proportional Band – Loop 5 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 5 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 5 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 5 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 5 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 5 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 6
Working Setpoint – Loop 6
Working Output – Loop 6
Target Setpoint – Loop 6
Manual Output – Loop 6
Setpoint 1 – Loop 6
Setpoint 2 – Loop 6
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 6
Proportional Band – Loop 6 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 6 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 6 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 6 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 6 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 6 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 7
Working Setpoint – Loop 7
Working Output – Loop 7
Target Setpoint – Loop 7
Manual Output – Loop 7
Setpoint 1 – Loop 7
Setpoint 2 – Loop 7
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 7
Proportional Band – Loop 7 working Set
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
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Modbus Address
(used by CommsTab)
15655
15656
15657
15658
15659
15660
15661
15662
15663
15664
15665
15666
15667
15668
15669
15670
15671
15672
15673
15674
15675
15676
15677
15678
15679
15680
15681
15682
15683
15684
15685
15686
15687
15688
15689
15690
15691
15692
15693
15694
15695
15696
15697
15698
15699
15700
15701
15702
15703
15704
15705
15706
15707
15708
8-15
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
8-16
Mini8 Controller
Parameter
Attribute ID
Integral Time – Loop 7 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 7 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 7 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 7 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 7 working Set
Process Variable – Loop 8
Working Setpoint – Loop 8
Working Output – Loop 8
Target Setpoint – Loop 8
Manual Output – Loop 8
Setpoint 1 – Loop 8
Setpoint 2 – Loop 8
Auto/Manual Mode – Loop 8
Proportional Band – Loop 8 working Set
Integral Time – Loop 8 working Set
Derivative Time – Loop 8 working Set
Cutback Low – Loop 8 working Set
Cutback High – Loop 8 working Set
Relative Cooling Gain – Loop 8 working Set
Module PV – Channel 1
Module PV – Channel 2
Module PV – Channel 3
Module PV – Channel 4
Module PV – Channel 5
Module PV – Channel 6
Module PV – Channel 7
Module PV – Channel 8
Module PV – Channel 9
Module PV – Channel 10
Module PV – Channel 11
Module PV – Channel 12
Module PV – Channel 13
Module PV – Channel 14
Module PV – Channel 15
Module PV – Channel 16
Module PV – Channel 17
Module PV – Channel 18
Module PV – Channel 19
Module PV – Channel 20
Module PV – Channel 21
Module PV – Channel 22
Module PV – Channel 23
Module PV – Channel 24
Module PV – Channel 25
Module PV – Channel 26
Module PV – Channel 27
Module PV – Channel 28
Module PV – Channel 29
Module PV – Channel 30
Module PV – Channel 31
Module PV – Channel 32
Analogue Alarm Status 1
Analogue Alarm Status 2
Analogue Alarm Status 3
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
Modbus Address
(used by CommsTab)
15709
15710
15711
15712
15713
15714
15715
15716
15717
15718
15719
15720
15721
15722
15723
15724
15725
15726
15727
15728
15729
15730
15731
15732
15733
15734
15735
15736
15737
15738
15739
15740
15741
15742
15743
15744
15745
15746
15747
15748
15749
15750
15751
15752
15753
15754
15755
15756
15757
15758
15759
15760
15761
15762
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Mini8 Controller
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Parameter
Attribute ID
Analogue Alarm Status 4
Sensor Break Alarm Status 1
Sensor Break Alarm Status 2
Sensor Break Alarm Status 3
Sensor Break Alarm Status 4
CT Alarm Status 1
CT Alarm Status 2
CT Alarm Status 3
CT Alarm Status 4
New Alarm Output
Any Alarm Output
New CT Alarm Output
Reset New Alarm
Reset New CT Alarm
CT Load Current 1
CT Load Current 2
CT Load Current 3
CT Load Current 4
CT Load Current 5
CT Load Current 6
CT Load Current 7
CT Load Current 8
CT Load Status 1
CT Load Status 2
CT Load Status 3
CT Load Status 4
CT Load Status 5
CT Load Status 6
CT Load Status 7
CT Load Status 8
PSU Relay 1 Output
PSU Relay 2 Output
PSU Digital Input 1
PSU Digital Input 2
Program Run
Program Hold
Program Reset
Program Status
Current Program
Program Time Left
Segment Time Left
User Value 1
User Value 2
User Value 3
User Value 4
User Value 5
User Value 6
User Value 7
User Value 8
User Value 9
User Value 10
User Value 11
User Value 12
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
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07/2010
Modbus Address
(used by CommsTab)
15763
15764
15765
15766
15767
15768
15769
15770
15771
15772
15773
15774
15775
15776
15777
15778
15779
15780
15781
15782
15783
15784
15785
15786
15787
15788
15789
15790
15791
15792
15793
15794
15795
15796
15797
15798
15799
15800
15801
15802
15803
15804
15805
15806
15807
15808
15809
15810
15811
15812
15813
15814
15815
8-17
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
8-18
Mini8 Controller
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
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3500
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
9. Transferring Data – 3500
A network has been set up with a 3500 at address 35. The baud rate has been set at 500k.
The 3500 DeviceNet parameters (baud rate & address) are set up in the COMMS page. The DeviceNet comms module
must be plugged in slot H. This may be ordered separately and added in the field.
Set the DeviceNet communications as required. For more information refer to the 3500 manual HA027988.
Page
COMMS
Writable
Visible
Slot
H
n/a
Level 3 only
Ident
Comms
Config only
Level 3 only
Protocol
DeviceNet
Config only
Level 3 only
Baud Rate
125k, 250k, 500k
Config only
Level 3 only
Address
35
Config & Level 3
Level 3 only
Status
Init,Offline,Ready,Running
n/a
Level 3 only
Note that Slot J can have Modbus installed so that the instrument can be on the DeviceNet network and be configured
by iTools.
Note that the Config clip will take over the Slot H comms so cannot be used at the same time as DeviceNet.
Hardware wiring is as follows:
3500 Legend
CAN
Colour
Reference
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
HA
V+
Red
HB
CAN_H
White
HC
SHIELD
None
HD
CAN_L
Blue
HE
V-
Black
07/2010
9-1
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
3500
In iTools the parameters are in the directory Comms.H
Once correctly wired to the network and with the correct DeviceNet baud rate and a unique address, communications at
the hardware level will be established. This is indicated at the controller by the flashing H indicator and the
Comms.H.Status parameter will be ‘Ready’.
Comms.H.Status
H indicator
Status
Offline
Off
No DeviceNet traffic detected
Ready
Flashing
DeviceNet traffic detected but not for this address
Running
On
DeviceNet traffic detected addressing this instrument
Now the 3500 and the Scanner have to be configured to transfer parameter data.
The 3500 device parameters (full table in Section 8.8) are divided into 3 ‘groups’
•
•
•
9-2
A list of instrument parameters pre-defined for selection on the INPUT or OUTPUT tables.
The actual INPUT table of parameters to be READ by the DeviceNet client.
The actual OUTPUT table of parameters to be WRITTEN by the client.
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
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3500
9.1
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Table Modification
Make a list of parameters required in the input and output tables to suit the application. If the parameter is listed in the
predefined list then use the attribute number of that parameter.
To set up the controller so that
the required parameters are
available on the network
requires setting up the INPUT
and OUTPUT data assembly
tables with the IDs from the
Application Variable Object.
3500
Application
Variable Object
3500 IO
Remapping
Object
USER OUTPUT
assembly table
List of available
parameters
(Max 60)
Predefined #0
to
USER INPUT
assembly table
(Max 60)
#199
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 200
200
Predefined parameters #0 to #199
201 to 260
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
261 to 320
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
To set up the controller so that the desired parameters can be read and written involves setting up the INPUT and
OUTPUT tables (highlighted in the table above).
This information can be seen by inspecting the 3500.EDS file in a text editor and is the way in which the data is displayed
in RSNetWorx Device Parameters.
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9-3
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
3500
This is best illustrated by three examples.
Example 1 is the default 3500 DeviceNet configuration.
Example 2 uses a limited number of parameters and adds a pre-defined parameter
Example 3 shows how to add parameters NOT included on the pre-defined list.
9.2
Default Example 1
As supplied new the 3500 comes with the following DeviceNet parameter setup. The value of the attributes for the
parameters on the table below are from the full listing in Section 8.5.
Item
Input Parameters
1
Loop.1.Main.PV
2
Loop.1.Main.WorkingSP
3
Loop.1.Main.ActiveOut
4
IO.Mod.1.A.Status
5
IO.Mod.1.A.PV
6
IO.Mod.1.B.PV
7
IO.Mod.1.C.PV
8
IO.Mod.2.A.Status
9
IO.Mod.2.A.PV
10
IO.Mod.2.B.PV
11
IO.Mod.2.C.PV
12
IO.Mod.3.A.Status
13
IO.Mod.3.A.PV
14
IO.Mod.3.B.PV
15
IO.Mod.3.C.PV
16
IO.Mod.4.A.Status
17
IO.Mod.4.A.PV
18
IO.Mod.4.B.PV
19
IO.Mod.4.C.PV
20
IO.Mod.5.A.Status
21
IO.Mod.5.A.PV
22
IO.Mod.5.B.PV
23
IO.Mod.5.C.PV
24
IO.Mod.6.A.Status
25
IO.Mod.6.A.PV
26
IO.Mod.6.B.PV
27
IO.Mod.6.C.PV
28
Alarm.1.Out
29
Alarm.2.Out
30
Alarm.3.Out
31
Alarm.4.Out
32
Alarm.5.Out
33
Alarm.6.Out
34
Alarm.7.Out
35
Alarm.8.Out
36
AlmSummary.NewAlarm
37
AlmSummary.AnyAlarm
38
Programmer.Run.ProgStatus
39
Programmer.Run.ProgTimeLeft
40
Programmer.Run.SegTimeLeft
Total Length = 40 words x 2 = 80 bytes
9-4
Value
0
1
3
46 (2Eh)
47(2Fh)
48 (30h)
49 (31h)
50 (32h)
51 (33h)
52 (34h)
53 (35h)
54 (36h)
55 (37h)
56 (38h)
57 (39h)
58 (3Ah)
59 (3Bh)
60 (3Ch)
61 (3Dh)
62 (3Eh)
63 (3Fh)
64 (40h)
65 (41h)
66 (42h)
67 (43h)
68 (44h)
69 (45h)
72 (48h)
73 (49h)
74 (4Ah)
75 (4Bh)
76 (4Ch)
77 (4Dh)
78 (4Eh)
79 (4Fh)
70 (46h)
71 (47h)
158 (9Eh)
152 (98h)
153 (99h)
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
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3500
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
In RSNetworx right click on the 3500 and select properties. By looking at the properties of the 3500 the default input
table can be inspected.
The current value is the attribute ID of the
parameter required.
At the end of the input def part of the table
the remaining items are given the value 255
which means not used.
A maximum of 60 input parameters are
possible.
Item
Output Parameter
Value
1
Loop.1.Main.TargetSP
2
2
Loop.1.Main.AutoMan
5
3
Loop.1.OP.ManualOutVal
40 (28h)
4
Programmer.Setup.ProgRun
140 (8Ch)
5
Programmer.Setup.ProgReset
141 (8Dh)
6
Programmer.Setup.ProgHold
142 (8Eh)
7
Loop.1.Tune.AutoTuneEnable
7
Total Length 7 words X 2 = 14 bytes
Part No HA027506ENG
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9-5
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
3500
By looking at the properties of the 3500 the default output table can be inspected.
The current value is the attribute ID of the
parameter required.
At the end of the output def part of the table the
remaining items are given the value 255 which
means not used.
A maximum of 60 output parameters are possible.
Now the scanner has to be set up to transfer this data. On RSNetWorx right click on the Scanner and select properties.
On the Scanner properties:
‘General’ Tab – information only
‘Module’ Tab – set the Scanner module slot correctly (6 in
this example)
‘Scanlist’ tab – add the Eurotherm 3500 from ‘available’ to
the scan list
‘Edit I/O parameters’ – tick Polled 80 Rx input and 14 Tx
output (shown)
‘Input’ Tab – Map the 40 input parameters to the M file
M1:6.0 to M1:6.39
‘Output’ Tab – Map the 24 output parameters to the M file
M0:6.0 to M1:6.23
Click apply to download this to the Scanner (PLC must be in program mode). Once the network is restarted the 3500 H
indicator will change from flashing to steady. Similarly the Scanner error indicator will show no error on node 35.
The 40 INPUT and 7 OUTPUT parameters are now being transferred back and forth on the network and will be available
in the plc from the files M1:6 and M0:6. There are too many parameters in the input table to transfer directly to the
module input table (I:6).
9-6
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
07/2010
3500
9.3
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Example 2
In this example the input & output tables are reduced to just the key loop parameters. One new predefined parameter
(Loop Inhibit) is added to the output list.
Item
Input Parameter
Value (Attr ID)
1
Loop.1.Main.PV
0
2
Loop.1.Main.WorkingSP
1
3
Loop.1.Main.ActiveOut
3
Total Length = 3 words x 2 = 6 bytes
In RSNetWorx right click on the 3500 and select properties. By looking at the properties of the 3500 the default input
table can be modified.
The current value of the first 3 input defs are set
to the tribute IDs of the parameters in the table
above.
After that the remaining items must be given the
value 255 which means not used.
Once the values have been changed ‘Download
to the Device’ to update the 3500.
Now the output table must be modified.
Item
Output Parameter
Attribute
1
Loop.1.Main.TargetSP
2
2
Loop.1.Main.AutoMan
5
3
Loop.1.OP.ManualOutVal
40
4
Loop.1.Main.Inhibit
6
TOTAL LENGTH 4 words x 2 = 8 bytes.
The Loop.1.Main.Inhibit attribute value of 6 is obtained from the complete table of pre-defined parameters in section 9.5.
Part No HA027506ENG
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
3500
The current value of the first 4 output defs are set
to the attribute IDs of the parameters listed above.
After that the remaining items must be given the
value 255 which means not used.
Once the values have been changed ‘Download to
the Device’ to update the 3500.
On the Scanner properties:
‘General’ Tab – information only
‘Module’ Tab – set the Scanner module slot correctly (6 in
this example)
‘Scanlist’ tab – add the Eurotherm Mini8 from ‘available’
to the scan list
‘Edit I/O parameters’ – tick Polled, input Rx=6 and output
Tx =8 (shown)
‘Input’ Tab – Map the 3 input parameters to the IO file
I:6.1 to I:6.4
‘Output’ Tab – Map the 4 output parameters to the IO file
O:6.1 to O1:6.4
Click apply to download this to the Scanner (PLC must be in program mode). Once the network is restarted the 3500 H
indicator will change from flashing to steady. Similarly the Scanner error indicator will show no error on node 35.
The 3 loop input parameters and 4 loop output parameters are now being transferred back and forth on the network and
will be available in the plc in the I/O files for the scanner module in slot 6.
9-8
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
07/2010
3500
9.4
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Example 3
This shows how to add parameters not on the pre-defined list. This requires the ‘Commstab’ redirection tables as shown
in the Mini8 controller Example 4. These tables are only available in phase 2 versions of the 3500.
The example shows the setpoint coming from a Mux8 block and the example shows how the 8 Mux8 inputs and the
selected are added to the output list. The plc can then set and select the required setpoint for a task.
The Mux8 parameters are not on the predefined list in Section 8.5 so the nine parameters will be redirected to the last
nine positions on the predefined list #191 to #199 – from the table these have Modbus addresses 15807 to 15815.
The nine Mux8 parameters have redirected to these addresses in the 3500 itself, in the CommsTab pages.
The Output table required in the scanner is shown below
Item
Output Parameter
Attribute
1
Loop.1.Main.AutoMan
5
2
Loop.1.OP.ManualOutVal
40
3
Loop.1.Main.Inhibit
6
4
Mux8.Select
191
5
Mux8.In1
192
6
Mux8.In2
193
7
Mux8.In3
194
8
Mux8.In4
195
9
Mux8.In5
196
10
Mux8.In6
197
11
Mux8.In7
198
12
Mux8.In8
199
TOTAL LENGTH 12ords x 2 = 24ytes.
This is now entered into the 3500 I/O list in the scanner as before.
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
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9-9
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
9.5
3500
3500 Class, Instance and Attribute ID Table
EDS list
Quantity
Description
1 to 200
200
Predefined parameters #0 to #199
Class 100 Instance 1 Attributes 0 to 199
201 to 260
60
Enter #<number> of required INPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 1 Attributes 0 to 60
261 to 320
60
Enter #<number> of required OUTPUT parameters
Class 102 Instance 2 Attributes 0 to 60
Note – all variables of type INT - 32 bit format is not supported in this instrument type. Data formats are therefore as
Tag, i.e. Scaled Integers. The scaling is based on the number of decimal point places used on the instrument display.
This is the list of 200 parameters available to be included in the input and output tables.
Parameter
Loop.1.Main.PV
Loop.1.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.1.Main.TargetSP
Loop.1.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.1.Diag.TargetOutVal
Loop.1.Main.AutoMan
Loop.1.Main.Inhibit
Loop.1.Tune.AutoTuneEnable
Loop.1.PID.ProportionalBand
Loop.1.PID.IntegralTime
Loop.1.PID.DerivativeTime
Loop.1.PID.RelCh2Gain
Loop.1.PID.CutbackHigh
Loop.1.PID.CutbackLow
Loop.1.PID.ProportionalBand2
Loop.1.PID.IntegralTime2
Loop.1.PID.DerivativeTime2
Loop.1.PID.RelCh2Gain2
Loop.1.PID.CutbackHigh2
Loop.1.PID.CutbackLow2
Loop.1.PID.ProportionalBand3
Loop.1.PID.IntegralTime3
Loop.1.PID.DerivativeTime3
Loop.1.PID.RelCh2Gain3
Loop.1.PID.CutbackHigh3
Loop.1.PID.CutbackLow3
Loop.1.PID.ActiveSet
Loop.1.SP.SP1
Loop.1.SP.SP2
Loop.1.SP.AltSPSelect
Loop.1.SP.AltSP
Loop.1.SP.Rate
Loop.1.SP.RateDone
Loop.1.OP.OutputLowLimit
Loop.1.OP.OutputHighLimit
Loop.1.OP.Ch1Out
Loop.1.OP.Ch2Out
Loop.1.OPRate
Loop.1.OP.SensorBreakMode
9-10
Attribute ID
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Modbus Address (used by Comms Tab)
15616
15617
15618
15619
15620
15621
15622
15623
15624
15625
15626
15627
15628
15629
15630
15631
15632
15633
15634
15635
15636
15637
15638
15639
15640
15641
15642
15643
15644
15645
15646
15647
15648
15649
15650
15651
15652
15653
15654
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
07/2010
3500
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Parameter
Loop.1.OP.SafeOutVal
Loop.1.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.1.Diag.LoopBreakAlarm
IO.PV.PV
IO.PV.Status
IO.LgcIO.LA.MeasuredVal
IO.LgcIO.LB.MeasuredVal
IO.Mod.1.A.Status
IO.Mod.1.A.PV
IO.Mod.1.B.PV
IO.Mod.1.C.PV
IO.Mod.2.A.Status
IO.Mod.2.A.PV
IO.Mod.2.B.PV
IO.Mod.2.C.PV
IO.Mod.3.A.Status
IO.Mod.3.A.PV
IO.Mod.3.B.PV
IO.Mod.3.C.PV
IO.Mod.4.A.Status
IO.Mod.4.A.PV
IO.Mod.4.B.PV
IO.Mod.4.C.PV
IO.Mod.5.A.Status
IO.Mod.5.A.PV
IO.Mod.5.B.PV
IO.Mod.5.C.PV
IO.Mod.6.A.Status
IO.Mod.6.A.PV
IO.Mod.6.B.PV
IO.Mod.6.C.PV
AlmSummary.NewAlarm
AlmSummary.AnyAlarm
Alarm.1.Out
Alarm.2.Out
Alarm.3.Out
Alarm.4.Out
Alarm.5.Out
Alarm.6.Out
Alarm.7.Out
Alarm.8.Out
Math2.1.Out
Math2.2.Out
Math2.3.Out
Math2.4.Out
Math2.5.Out
Math2.6.Out
Math2.7.Out
Math2.8.Out
Math2.9.Out
Math2.10.Out
Math2.11.Out
Math2.12.Out
Math2.13.Out
Math2.14.Out
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
07/2010
Attribute ID
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
Modbus Address (used by Comms Tab)
15655
15656
15657
15658
15659
15660
15661
15662
15663
15664
15665
15666
15667
15668
15669
15670
15671
15672
15673
15674
15675
15676
15677
15678
15679
15680
15681
15682
15683
15684
15685
15686
15687
15688
15689
15690
15691
15692
15693
15694
15695
15696
15697
15698
15699
15700
15701
15702
15703
15704
15705
15706
15707
15708
15709
9-11
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Parameter
Math2.15.Out
Math2.16.Out
Math2.17.Out
Math2.18.Out
Math2.19.Out
Math2.20.Out
Math2.21.Out
Math2.22.Out
Math2.23.Out
Math2.24.Out
Lgc2.1.Out
Lgc2.2.Out
Lgc2.3.Out
Lgc2.4.Out
Lgc2.5.Out
Lgc2.6.Out
Lgc2.7.Out
Lgc2.8.Out
Lgc2.9.Out
Lgc2.10.Out
Lgc2.11.Out
Lgc2.12.Out
Lgc2.13.Out
Lgc2.14.Out
Lgc2.15.Out
Lgc2.16.Out
Lgc2.17.Out
Lgc2.18.Out
Lgc2.19.Out
Lgc2.20.Out
Lgc2.21.Out
Lgc2.22.Out
Lgc2.23.Out
Lgc2.24.Out
Lgc8.1.Out
Lgc8.2.Out
Timer.1.Out
Timer.2.Out
Timer.3.Out
Timer.4.Out
Total.1.TotalOut
Total.2.TotalOut
Counter.1.Count
Counter.2.Count
Txdr.1.OutVal
Txdr.2.OutVal
Programmer.Setup.ProgRun
Programmer.Setup.ProgReset
Programmer.Setup.ProgHold
Programmer.Setup.EventOuts
Spare
Spare
Spare
Spare
Spare
9-12
3500
Attribute ID
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
Modbus Address (used by Comms Tab)
15710
15711
15712
15713
15714
15715
15716
15717
15718
15719
15720
15721
15722
15723
15724
15725
15726
15727
15728
15729
15730
15731
15732
15733
15734
15735
15736
15737
15738
15739
15740
15741
15742
15743
15744
15745
15746
15747
15748
15749
15750
15751
15752
15753
15754
15755
15756
15757
15758
15759
15760
15761
15762
15763
15764
Part No HA027506ENG
Issue 5
07/2010
3500
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Parameter
Spare
Spare
Programmer.Run.PSP
Programmer.Run.ProgTimeLeft
Programmer.Run.SegTimeLeft
Programmer.Run.EndOutput
Programmer.Setup.AdvSeg
Programmer.Setup.SkipSeg
Programmer.Run.CurProg
Programmer.Run.ProgStatus
UsrVal.1.Val
UsrVal.2.Val
UsrVal.3.Val
UsrVal.4.Val
UsrVal.5.Val
UsrVal.6.Val
UsrVal.7.Val
UsrVal.8.Val
UsrVal.9.Val
UsrVal.10.Val
UsrVal.11.Val
UsrVal.12.Val
UsrVal.13.Val
UsrVal.14.Val
UsrVal.15.Val
UsrVal.16.Val
Loop.2.Main.PV
Loop.2.Main.WorkingSP
Loop.2.Main.ActiveOut
Loop.2.Main.TargetSP
Loop.2.OP.ManualOutVal
Loop.2.SP.SP1
Loop.2..SP.SP2
Loop.2.SP.AltSPSelect
Loop.2.SP.AltSP
Loop.2.Main.AutoMan
Loop.2.PID.ActiveSet
Loop.2.Diag.SchedPB
Loop.2.Diag.SchedTi
Loop.2.Diag.SchedTd
Loop.2.Diag.SchedCBL
Loop.2.Diag.SchedCBH
Loop.2.Diag.SchedR2G
Programmer.2.Setup.ProgRun
Programmer.2.Setup.ProgReset
Programmer.2.Setup.ProgHold
Programmer.2.Setup.ActiveOuts
Programmer.2.Run.PSP
Programmer.2.Run.ProgTimeLeft
Programmer.2.Run.SegTimeLeft
Programmer.2.Run.CurProg
Part No HA027506ENG
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Attribute ID
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
Modbus Address (used by Comms Tab)
15765
15766
15767
15768
15769
15770
15771
15772
15773
15774
15775
15776
15777
15778
15779
15780
15781
15782
15783
15784
15785
15786
15787
15788
15789
15790
15791
15792
15793
15794
15795
15796
15797
15798
15799
15800
15801
15802
15803
15804
15805
15806
15807
15808
15809
15810
15811
15812
15813
15814
15815
9-13
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
9-14
3500
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PC3000
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
10. PC3000
To place a PC3000 as a slave on a DeviceNet network requires a DeviceNet Communications card placed in the first
available slot in the main rack – slot 1 in this example. The card uses a Hilscher sub-board which may be configured
using Hilscher’s own configuration tools. However it can also be configured by the PC3000 application program itself.
The PC3000 LCM+ requires the extra RAM3 board to take the Fieldbus downloadable function block library and the PS or
WinPS tools require the library templates.
This is a brief summary of the requirements of the PC3000 application program. Firstly an instance of the
HCOS_DRVS.Com_Table has to be created to allocate the necessary memory etc.
Then an instance of a DeviceNet slave HCOS_DRVS.DevNet_S has to be created.
In this example the slave address (Mac_ID) has been set to 11 and the Baud rate on Auto – it will set itself.
It is also necessary to calculate the exact INPUT (160 bytes) and OUTPUT (200 bytes) sizes and enter them. These sizes
MUST be multiples of 8 bytes. For this reason the maximum number of INPUT bytes is 248 and OUTPUT bytes is 248.
There must also be the corresponding instances of HCOS_VARS variables to match these byte sizes. COS_Real_8 have
been used and there are 20 set with ‘Mode’ to INPUT with addresses from 1:0:2~, 1:16:2~, 1:32:2~ up to 1:144:2~ giving
160 bytes or 80 variables.
For the OUTPUTS there are 25 with ‘Mode’ set to Output with addresses from 1:0:2~ to 1:192:2~ with this last block
limited to 4 variables (NoOfVars = 4). This gives 200 bytes or 100 variables.
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10-1
eviceNet Communications Handbook
PC3000
The INPUT bytes to PC3000 are OUTPUT bytes
(Tx) from the plc and vice versa as shown in
the scanner I/O configuration shown.
The final task is a short sequence to auto configure the DeviceNet card on power up.
S
DNet11.init := 1 (*On*);
PCS_State.StartUpFlag := 0 (*Off*);
DNet11.init = 0 (*Off*);
DNet11.RunState := 1 (*On*);
PCS_State.StartUpFlag = 1 (*On*);
The first step tells the slave to configure itself with the data in the driver block. When this is complete it resets the init
flag and step 2 puts the slave in run mode. On power up the startup flag ensures the initialisation is repeated. Because
the slave board is separate from the PC3000 LCM itself it does not affect the DeviceNet network if the PC3000 is not in
Run mode. This means you can build and download without disturbing the network.
Finally with this number of parameters the data would be transferred using the M files.
Note that the PLC output parameters are written all the time – this means
that any values in PC3000 INPUT variables will be over written as soon as
communications is established.
10-2
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Issue 5
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Explicit Message Block Read/Write
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
11. Explicit Message Block Read/Write
First see Section 6.2 on the use of Explicit Messaging to read and write individual parameters on the 2200 controller.
Explicit messaging will work on any slave given the CLASS, INSTANCE and ID of the required parameter. It can therefore
also be used with the 2400, 2500, 2600 or 2700.
Explicit messaging involves sending a precisely formatted file to the Scanner file M1:224 and the response is picked up
from M0:224. See the scanner’s supporting documentation for details and Section 7.2 for a basic example with the 2200.
This block mode uses a Tag Access Application Variable to read/write 2400, 2500, 2600 or 2700 controller variables in
blocks of up to 32 bytes starting at a 16 bit Tag address. This is usually 16 analogue values, but can be 8 32 bit values
including single precision floating point data. Most often used to download recipe values or ramp/soak programs to
controllers. It is not available in 2200 or PC3000.
The examples will be a read block and a write block where the start address and block size are integers which can be set
to suit.
A further example will read and write a specific program to a 2700.
This uses the Tag Access Application Variable Object in the 2400, 2500 and 2600/2700 device parameter list.
Class is 101, Instance is 1
Attribute ID
Variable
Description
1
Tag Address
Base Tag for the Block access
2
Block Size
Size of Block in 16 bit words
3
Block Data
Actual data values
4
Read or Write
Selects read or write operation
5
Trigger Request
Triggers request
6
Request Status
Write value of 0 to clear.
Read values:
0: Complete
1: Request Pending
3: Error in read/write request
(for example write data is out of range).
The flowchart shows how these variables are used.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Explicit Message Block Read/Write
11.1 Flow Chart
1) Write 0 to ‘Request Status’
2) Write desired tag to Tag Address
3) Set Block Size to required length
Yes
1) Set ‘Read or
Write’ to 0
Yes
Read
Request?
No
2) Set ‘Read or Write’ to 1
3) Set Block Data to desired values
4) Set ‘Trigger
Request’ to 1
Is Request
Status set to 1?
No
Is Request
Status set to 0?
No
Yes
Error in read or
write (e.g. data
out of range).
k
i
Complete – data
available in ‘Block
Data’ for Read, or has
been written for Write
11.2 Implementation – 2700 Read Block
The flowchart is implemented in the follow order in the plc. 2700 address is 27.
11-2
Order
Action.
Value
Transaction Table
0
Clear all transactions in Scanner
Write Reset Command to
Scanner
Request
Response
1
Clear sequence in 2700
Write 0 to ID 6
N9:0
N9:8
2
Write Base Tag address
Write <addr> to ID 1
N9:16
N9:24
3
Write Block Size
Write <size> to ID 2
N9:32
N9:40
4
Set mode to Read
Write 0 to ID 4
N9:48
N9:56
5
Execute instruction
Write 1 to ID 5
N9:64
N9:72
6
Check result
Read ID 6
N9:80
N9:88
7
If result is OK transfer data
Read ID 3
N9:96
N9:104
Back to 6
If result is error repeat Execute
Back to 1
Back to the start after time delay
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Explicit Message Block Read/Write
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
This is the N9 data file as set up. With
8 columns each line represents an EM
request followed by an EM response.
The N9 table addresses are the start of
each transaction block. These expand
to the following data table.
The tables below show how the
transaction requests are built up and
the expected responses.
1a. Request to clear sequence in instrument
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
0
Transaction ID=1
00000001
00000001
Command:
257
Execute
1
Port
00000000
00001000
Byte Size
8
2
Service (16)
00010000
00011011
MacID (27)
4123
3
Class=101
101
4
Instance =1
1
5
ID = 6
6
6
0 = clear
0
= write
Byte size is Class, Instance, Attribute and Value
1b. Response to clear request
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
8
Transaction ID=1
00000001
00000001
Status: OK
257
1c. Delete transaction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
7
Transaction ID=1
00000001
00000004
Command:
260
Delete transaction
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11-3
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Explicit Message Block Read/Write
2a. Request to write block base address (=12313 the first half of segment 1 in program)
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
16
Transaction ID=2
00000010
00000001
Command:
513
Execute
17
Port
00000000
00001000
Byte Size
8
18
Service (16)
00010000
00011011
MacID (27)
4123
19
Class=101
101
20
Instance =1
1
21
ID = 2
2
22
Value
0
= write
Byte size is Class, Instance, Attribute and Value
2b. Response to write block request
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
24
Transaction ID=2
00000010
00000001
Status: OK
513
Description
Word value
Command:
516
2c. Delete transaction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
23
Transaction ID=2
00000010
00000004
Delete transaction
3a. Request to write block size (=16)
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
32
Transaction ID=3
00000011
00000001
Command:
769
Execute
33
Port
00000000
00001000
Byte Size
8
34
Service (16)
00010000
00011011
MacID (27)
4123
35
Class=101
101
36
Instance =1
1
37
ID = 2
2
38
Value
16
= write
Byte size is Class, Instance, Attribute and Value
3b. Response to write block size request
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
40
Transaction ID=3
00000011
00000001
Status: OK
769
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Explicit Message Block Read/Write
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
3c. Delete transaction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
39
Transaction ID=3
00000011
00000004
Command:
772
Delete transaction
4a. Request to set mode to READ (=0)
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
48
Transaction ID=4
00000100
00000001
Command:
1025
Execute
49
Port
00000000
00001000
Byte Size
8
50
Service (16)
00010000
00011011
MacID (27)
4123
51
Class=101
101
52
Instance =1
1
53
ID = 4
4
54
Value
0
= write
Byte size is Class, Instance, Attribute and Value
4b. Response to mode READ request
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
56
Transaction ID=4
00000100
00000001
Status: OK
1025
4c. Delete transaction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
55
Transaction ID=4
00000100
00000004
Command:
1028
Delete transaction
5a. Request to write Execute instruction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
64
Transaction ID=5
00000101
00000001
Command:
1281
Execute
65
Port
00000000
00001000
Byte Size
8
66
Service (16)
00010000
00011011
MacID (27)
4123
67
Class=101
101
68
Instance =1
1
69
ID = 5
5
70
Value
1
= write
Byte size is Class, Instance, Attribute and Value
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Explicit Message Block Read/Write
5b. Response to write Execute instruction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
72
Transaction ID=5
00000101
00000001
Status: OK
1281
Description
Word value
Command:
1284
5c. Delete transaction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
71
Transaction ID=5
00000101
00000004
Delete transaction
6a. Request to Check Status (0 = Block read OK, 3 = Error)
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
80
Transaction ID=6
00000110
00000001
Command:
1537
Execute
81
Port
00000000
00000110
Byte Size
6
82
Service (14)
00001110
00011011
MacID (27)
3611
83
Class=101
101
84
Instance =1
1
85
ID = 6
6
= read
Byte size is Class, Instance, Attribute and Value
6b. Response to Check status request
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
88
Transaction ID=6
00000110
00000001
Status: OK
1537
Byte Size
2
0 = action completed OK
0
Description
Word value
Command:
1540
89
90
91
Value returned
6c. Delete transaction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
87
Transaction ID=6
00000110
00000004
Delete transaction
7a. Request to read all block values
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
96
Transaction ID=7
00000111
00000001
Command:
1793
Execute
97
Port
00000000
00000110
Byte Size
6
98
Service (14)
00001110
00011011
MacID (27)
4123
99
Class=101
101
100
Instance =1
1
101
ID = 3
5
= read
Byte size is Class, Instance, Attribute and Value
11-6
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Explicit Message Block Read/Write
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
7b. Response to write Execute instruction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
Description
Word value
104
Transaction ID=7
00000111
00000001
Status: OK
1793
Byte Size
32
105
106
107
Value_0
To
Value_15
122
7c. Delete transaction
N9 address
Description
Upper byte
Lower Byte
103
Transaction ID=7
00000111
00000004
Description
Word value
Command:
1796
Delete transaction
The N9 data file after the sequence
has been run.
Each transaction has been
successful as the first value is the
same as the sent value (257, 5123,
769 etc.)
The 16 values are 0, 0, 640, 32768, 128 etc.
The application is in the ladder 2700RD and the bits B3:2/0 to 15 are used to control it. B3:2/15 starts the sequence. It
repeats every 2 seconds based on timer T4:0. It was found necessary to add timer T4:1 to provide a short 50mS delay
between each transaction otherwise the Scanner was liable to get overloaded and fault.
Part No HA027506ENG
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11-7
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Explicit Message Block Read/Write
11.3 Implementation – 2700 Write Block
The flowchart is implemented in the follow order in the plc.
Order
Action.
Value
Transaction Table
0
Clear all transactions in Scanner
Write Reset Command to
Scanner
Request
Response
1
Clear sequence in 2700
Write 0 to ID 6
N10:0
N10:8
2
Write Base Tag address
Write <addr> to ID 1
N10:16
N10:24
3
Write Block Size
Write <size> to ID 2
N10:32
N10:40
4
Set mode to Write
Write 1 to ID 4
N10:48
N10:56
5
Trnsfer Data
Write <values> to ID3
N10:64
N10:88
6
Execute instruction
Write 1 to ID 5
N10:96
N10:104
7
Check result
Read ID 6
N10:112
N10:120
If result is error set flag
Back to 0
B3:1/14
Back to the start after time delay
This N10 data file is made up in exactly
the same way as the read table in the
previous example.
With 8 columns each line represents an
EM request followed by an EM response.
In this case the 16 values to be written
are in N10:70 to 85
11-8
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Explicit Message Block Read/Write
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
After the ladder is run the results
are as shown.
Each transaction was successful as
the response was the same as the
request (257, 513, 769 etc).
The values written were the 3 loop
setpoints for segment 1 of the
program and are Loop 1 = 666
(N10:72) Loop 2 = 222 (N10: 74)
Loop 3 = 33 (N10:81)
N10:123 shows that the write was
successful.
The application is in the ladder 2700WR and the bits B3:3/0 to 15 are used to control it. B3:3/15 starts the sequence. It
repeats every 2 seconds based on timer T4:2. It was found necessary to add timer T4:3 to provide a short 50mS delay
between each transaction otherwise the Scanner was liable to get overloaded and fault.
A custom data monitor shows the key variables for this and the previous READ example. The RD_TAG_ADDR and
W_ADDR are set to the start of the first segment of the programmer.
Part No HA027506ENG
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11-9
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
Explicit Message Block Read/Write
11.4 Implementation – 2600 Programmer Upload/Download
This follows on from the previous example. It requires a 2600 (or 2700) at address 26 to be mapped into the scan list.
Sequence for Upload (Block READ)
Order
Action.
Value
0
Clear all transactions in Scanner
Write Reset Command to Scanner
1
Clear sequence in 2600
Write 0 to ID 6
2
Set mode to Read
Write 1 to ID 4
3
Write Block Size
Write <size> to ID 2
1st
4
Write
Base Tag address
Write <addr> to ID 1
5
Execute instruction
Write 1 to ID 5
7
Check result
Read ID 6
8
If result is error set flag
9
Get Data 1
10
Transfer data
Back to 4
Write 2nd Base Tag address
Write <addr> to ID 1
Execute instruction
Write 1 to ID 5
Check result
Read ID 6
Read <values> on ID3
If result is error set flag
Get Data 2
Read <values> on ID3
Transfer data
Back to 4
Write 3nd Base Tag address
Write <addr> to ID 1
Etc
Sequence for Download (Block WRITE)
Order
Action.
Value
0
Clear all transactions in Scanner
Write Reset Command to Scanner
1
Clear sequence in 2600
Write 0 to ID 6
2
Set mode to Write
Write 1 to ID 4
3
Write Block Size
Write <size> to ID 2
4
Write 1st Base Tag address
Write <addr> to ID 1
5
Transfer Data 1
Write <values> to ID3
6
Execute instruction
Write 1 to ID 5
7
Check result
Read ID 6
If result is error set flag
Back to 4
Write 2nd Base Tag address
Write <addr> to ID 1
Transfer Data 2
Write <values> to ID3
Execute instruction
Write 1 to ID 5
Check result
Read ID 6
If result is error set flag
Write 3nd Base Tag address
Write <addr> to ID 1
Etc
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Explicit Message Block Read/Write
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
The 2600 programmer Tag address map is laid out as outlined in the table below.
Start Tag Address
Length
Description
12288
24
Program details
12312
32
Segment 1 details
12328
32
Segment 2 details
12344
32
Segment 3 details
… etc up to a max of 100 segments
The application only downloads blocks of 16 parameters so the program details are written 16 from the base address and
then 16 from the base address + 8. The segments are then each written with 2 blocks of 16.
In the application all the data is mapped directly onto file N9. With this set at a max of 256 elements it allows all the
data of a 7 segment program to be uploaded. (Program is 24 words + 7 x 32 segments = 248 words).
The data may then be modified and downloaded. The application is controlled through a Custom Data Monitor.
Set P_NUMBER to the program number that is to be
up or downloaded.
(Wait until the new number has been downloaded).
Set S_END to the last segment number required (max 7
in this example)
Set BLK_UPLOAD to upload a program.
(It resets when complete)
Set BLK_DOWNLD to download the program but be
. sure N9 has valid data.
(It resets when complete).
LOAD_ERR is set if there is a response from the 2600 says that the last sequence was in error. This never occurred in
uploads but did occasionally in downloads although the data was written correctly. There are two actions.
Firstly set the parameter at Tag address 12753to 1 (instrument must be in configuration mode). This only ever has to be
done once.
Setting IGNORE_WR_ERROR allows the sequence to continue regardless of the reported error.
The plc program has 3 ladder files – a main ladder (2600) and two subroutines one for explicit message write and one for
explicit message read.
The Program Number can be changed and is immediately written. Then Bit B3:2/0 initiates an upload and B3:2/1 a
download. Note that the new data must be ready before invoking the download. Bit words B3:0 and 3:1 are used to
control the sequences.
File N7 is used to set up the explicit message requests and receive the responses. Writes start at N7:0 and reads at N7:40.
Timers have been included to introduce a delay between transactions. These may not be necessary but it was found that
the scanner occasionally faulted without them.
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
11-12
Explicit Message Block Read/Write
Part No HA027506ENG
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References
DeviceNet Communications Handbook
12. References
http://www.eurotherm.co.uk/
TAG ADDRESSES
Books: Series 2000 Communications Handbook HA 026230, Mini8 controller Engineering Handbook HA028581, 3500 Engineering
Handbook HA 027988
ELECTRONIC DATA SHEETS
Files: 2200.eds 2400.eds 2500.eds 2600.eds 2700.eds 3500.eds mini8.eds
www.Eurotherm.com or iTools CD
The PC3000 file PC3kDNS.eds is supplied with the PC3000 DeviceNet Module and Function Block Library.
SLC500 LADDER EXAMPLES.
File 2400Example2.RSS, 2200Examples.RSS, 2700ReadWrite.RSS, 2600PROGRAMMERv2.RSS
NOTE: These files are to show typical applications and as such come with no guarantees. If any part is
used in any way in real applications the application will require full functional testing in the situation
where it is used.
VERSIONS
CPU SLC500/03 1747-L531 OS302
Scanner : 1747SDN/B
Rev 4.026
Interface: 1770KFD
Rev 1.004
RSLinx
2.30.01
RSNetWorx
2.22.18.0
RSLogix500
4.50.00
The above products are all from Allen-Bradley, a Rockwell Automation Business.
Allen-Bradley Headquarters
1201 South Second Street
Milwaukee
WI 53204 USA
Mini8 controller
v1.04
3500
v1.12
2700
v5.00
2600
v3.00
2500
v3.30
2400
U4.09
2200
U3.03
The products above are manufactured by Eurotherm Ltd, an Invensys Business.
Eurotherm Ltd
Faraday Close
Worthing
BN13 3PL
UK
Part No HA027506ENG
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DeviceNet Communications Handbook
12-2
References
Part No HA027506ENG
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Eurotherm: International sales and service
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Telephone (+91 44) 2496 1129
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E-mail [email protected]
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E-mail [email protected]
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Telephone (+41 44) 787 1040
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E-mail [email protected]
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Telephone (+44 1903) 268500
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U.S.A Ashburn VA
DENMARK Copenhagen
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Telephone (+45 70) 234670
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E-mail [email protected]
Eurotherm Inc.
Telephone (+1 703) 724 7300
Fax (+1 703) 724 7301
E-mail [email protected]
ED60
©Copyright Invensys Eurotherm Limited 2010
Invensys, Eurotherm, the Invensys Eurotherm logo, Chessell, EurothermSuite, Mini8, EPower, nanodac, Eycon, Eyris and Wonderware are trademarks of
Invensys plc, its subsidiaries and affiliates. All other brands may be trademarks of their respective owners.
All rights are strictly reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, modified or transmitted in any form by any means, neither may it be stored in
a retrieval system other than for the purpose to act as an aid in operating the equipment to which the document relates, without the prior written permission of Invensys Eurotherm Linited.
Invensys Eurotherm Limited pursues a policy of continuous development and product improvement. The specifications in this document may therefore be
changed without notice. The information in this document is given in good faith, but is intended for guidance only. Invensys Eurotherm Limited will accept
no responsibility for any losses arising from errors in this document.
Represented by:
HA027506ENG/5 (CN26546)
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