Teacher`s Manual | Volume 1 - Center for the Collaborative Classroom

Teacher`s Manual | Volume 1 - Center for the Collaborative Classroom
sample lesson
Teacher’s Manual | Volume 1
DSC Collaborative Literacy
Being a Writer
™
SECOND EDITION
3
GRADE
Being a Writer™ Sample Lesson, Grade 3
© Developmental Studies Center Explore the new digital resources!
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Week 1
OVERVIEW
Tacky the Penguin
by Helen Lester, illustrated by Lynn Munsinger
A one-of-a-kind penguin saves the day.
If You Were a Writer
by Joan Lowery Nixon, illustrated by Bruce Degen
Melia wants to be a writer like her mother, but she is not sure what writers do.
Online Resources
Visit the DSC Learning Hub (teach.devstu.org) to find your online resources for this week.
Whiteboard Activities
•
WA1–WA3
Assessment Forms
•
“Class Assessment Record” sheets (CA1–CA2)
•
“Conference Notes: Focus 1” record sheet (CN1)
Professional Development Media
210
•
“Cooperative Structures Overview” (AV9)
•
“Using ‘Turn to Your Partner’ ” (AV11)
•
“Using ‘Think, Pair, Share’ ” (AV13)
•
“Introducing Vocabulary During a Read-aloud” (AV30)
•
“Conferring About Fiction” (AV43)
•
“Exploring Fiction” (AV44)
•
“Creating a Class Blog” tutorial (AV76)
Being a Writer™ Teacher’s Manual, Grade 3
Being a Writer™ Sample Lesson, Grade 3 © Developmental Studies Center devstu.org
TeAcHeR As WRiTeR
Writing Focus
Students hear and discuss fiction.
• Students informally explore elements of fiction.
• Students generate and quick-write ideas for fiction.
• Students draft fiction pieces.
•
social Development Focus
Teacher and students build the writing community.
Students cultivate a relaxed attitude toward writing.
• Students express interest in and appreciation for one another’s
writing.
•
•
DO AhEAD
✓ Consider reading this unit’s read-aloud selections with your English
Language Learners before you read them to the whole class.
Stop during the reading to discuss vocabulary and to check for
understanding. Or, do a picture walk and have partners who speak
the same primary language talk to each other in that language about
what they see in the illustrations.
“My writing is full of lives I might
have led. A writer imagines what
could have happened, not what
really happened.”
— Joyce Carol Oates
The work of the fiction writer is
to invent new worlds. This week,
imagine a life you might have
led, and write your “memories”
of this fictitious life. Perhaps you
were born into a different culture,
grew up in a different family,
or chose a different profession.
How do you imagine that these
life experiences have shaped
you? As you write, include your
feelings and perspectives, and
invent details to make that life
seem real.
✓ Prior to Day 1, decide how you will randomly assign partners to work
together during this unit. For suggestions about
assigning partners, see “Random Pairing” on page xxix
and “Considerations for Pairing ELLs” on page lii.
For more information, view “Cooperative Structures
Overview” (AV9).
✓ Prior to Day 2, make a copy of the “Class Assessment Record”
sheet (CA1) on page 54 of the Assessment Resource Book.
✓ Prior to Day 3, make a copy of the “Class Assessment Record”
sheet (CA2) on page 55 of the Assessment Resource Book.
✓ Prior to Day 5, make a class set of the “Conference Notes: Focus 1”
record sheet (CN1) on page 67 of the Assessment Resource Book.
Fiction Genre Week 1
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Day 1
exploring Fiction
Materials
•
•
•
•
•
in this lesson, the students:
Tacky the Penguin
•
Work with new partners
She Come Bringing Me That Little
Baby Girl from Unit 1
•
Hear and discuss fiction
•
Informally explore the elements of fiction
•
Write freely about things that interest them
Grandpa’s Face from Unit 1
The Pain and the Great One from
Unit 1
ImmersIon In anD DraftInG of fIctIon
Chart paper and a marker
In a fiction story, something happens to someone somewhere in time. In this unit,
the students build this understanding in stages over a six-week period.
The first half of this unit immerses the students in stories, stimulating
their imaginations and developing their dispositions for creativity and
experimentation. The students hear, enjoy, and make observations about
different examples of fiction. Having heard some examples, they begin drafting
fiction and continue to learn about the genre. Skills and conventions are taught
later in the unit so that the students can focus first on the big ideas: inventing
interesting characters, describing believable settings, and building imaginative
plots that make sense.
Teacher note
For more information
about fiction writing,
view “Exploring
Fiction” (AV44).
GeTTinG ReADy To WRiTe
1 Pair Students and Discuss Working Together
Randomly assign partners and make sure they know each other’s names
(see “Do Ahead” on page 211). Gather the class with partners sitting
together, facing you.
Teacher note
The partners you assign today will stay
together for the unit. If necessary, take a
few minutes at the beginning of today’s
lesson to let them get to know each
other better by talking informally in a
relaxed atmosphere.
Explain that over the next six weeks, partners will work together to
explore writing fiction. They will hear and discuss fiction stories and
learn how to write engaging stories that grab the reader’s attention.
Have partners take a few minutes to talk about some of the things
they have written so far this year. Signal for their attention and ask:
Q What did you learn about the writing your partner has done this year?
Teacher note
If you are teaching other programs
from Developmental Studies Center,
the students can work within
partnerships already established, or
you may assign new partners for the
writing lessons.
2 Introduce Fiction
Show the covers of She Come Bringing Me That Little Baby Girl, Grandpa’s
Face, and The Pain and the Great One. Remind the students that they
heard these fiction stories at the beginning of the year. Ask and
briefly discuss:
Q What do you think you know about fiction?
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Students might say:
“Fiction is made up. It’s make-believe.”
“Fiction has characters. Sometimes characters can be talking animals.”
“Fiction can be funny or serious or scary.”
“Some fiction stories are based on the author’s life.”
Record the students’ ideas on a sheet of chart paper titled “Notes About
Fiction.” Post the chart and tell the students that you will continue to
add ideas to the chart as they learn more about fiction in the
coming weeks.
Point out that fiction writers try to tell stories that capture the interest
and imagination of their readers. Explain that by the end of the unit, the
students will have learned and practiced different techniques for writing
a good fiction story and will have published their own stories for the
class library.
3
Teacher Note
Save the “Notes About Fiction” chart to
use in Day 2 and throughout the unit.
Teacher Note
Show the cover of Tacky the Penguin and read the title and the names
of the author and illustrator aloud. Invite the students to think as they
listen about what it might be like to write such a story themselves.
Your students may be familiar with
some of the read-alouds in this program.
Encourage them to listen to the readalouds as writers, noticing what the
author is trying to do and thinking about
what they could try in their own writing.
Read the story aloud slowly and clearly, showing the illustrations and
clarifying vocabulary as you read.
Teacher Note
Read Tacky the Penguin Aloud
To review the procedure for defining
vocabulary during the read-aloud,
see Unit 1, Week 2,
Day 2 (page 29). For
more information,
view “Introducing
Vocabulary During a
Read-aloud” (AV30).
Suggested Vocabulary
companions: friends (p. 3)
in the distance: far away (p. 14)
switch: branch or stick used for hitting something (p. 17)
ELL Vocabulary
English Language Learners may benefit from hearing additional
vocabulary defined, including:
odd: strange, different (p. 5)
splashy cannonballs: jumps that spray a lot of water (p. 11)
blared: yelled (p. 22)
puzzled: confused (p. 25)
dreadfully: unpleasantly, terribly (p. 28)
Teacher Note
The discussion prompts are:
4 Discuss the Story
•
Ask and briefly discuss the questions that follow. Remind the students
to use the discussion prompts to help them listen and build on one
another’s thinking. Be ready to reread from the text to help the students
recall what they heard.
•
•
“I agree with
because . . .”
“I disagree with
because . . .”
“In addition to what
I think . . .”
Fiction Genre Week 1 Day 1
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213
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Q What makes Tacky a fun character to read about?
Q If you were going to create a character like Tacky for a story, what odd
things might you have that character do?
students might say:
“Tacky is an odd bird. He doesn’t do anything like anybody else.”
“I agree with [Pete] because, instead of saying ‘hello’ politely, he says,
‘What’s happening?’ ”
“In addition to what [Kim] said, he does huge cannonballs in the water.”
Teacher note
“I would make a character that blows giant bubbles with bubble gum.”
Note that on Days 1 and 2 of this week,
the students may write fiction or
anything else they choose. On Day 3,
after exposure to another example of
fiction, all of the students will be asked
to begin writing in this genre.
Point out that some things that happen in fiction stories could actually
happen in real life, while other things (like talking penguins) could happen
only in the imagination. Invite the students to think about both kinds of
events as they write freely today.
WRiTinG TiMe
E ell note
5 Write Independently
English Language Learners may benefit
from drawing their ideas before they
write. Encourage them to draw what
they want to write about and then talk
quietly with you or their partners about
their drawings. If necessary, write down
key words and phrases they want to use
so that they can copy them into their
writing.
Have students get their notebooks and pencils, sit together at desks
with partners, and write silently for 20–30 minutes. During this time
they may write about anything they choose. Remind them that they
should write double-spaced in their notebooks and that there should be
no talking, whispering, or walking around. Join the students in writing
for a few minutes; then walk around the room and observe, assisting
students as needed.
Signal to let the students know when Writing Time is over.
sHARinG AnD ReFlecTinG
6 Briefly Share Writing and Reflect
Ask partners to talk briefly about what they wrote today. After a
moment, signal for their attention and ask questions such as:
Q What did your partner write about today?
Q What did you and your partner do to work well together when you were
talking and sharing your writing?
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TecHnoloGy exTension
Read an Interview with helen Lester
Teacher note
Helen Lester, the author of Tacky the Penguin, has written and illustrated
many books for children. To learn more about the author and her
work, have the students read an interview with her. To find a print
interview with the author, search online with her name and the keyword
“interview.” After the students read the interview, have them discuss
what they learned about the author’s life and her thoughts about
writing.
An interview with Helen Lester
is available on Developmental
Studies Center’s website
(devstu.org/helen-lester).
Day 2
exploring Fiction
Materials
in this lesson, the students:
•
Cultivate a relaxed attitude toward writing
•
•
Hear and discuss fiction
•
•
Informally explore the elements of fiction
•
Write freely about things that interest them
•
If You Were a Writer
“Notes About Fiction” chart
from Day 1
“Class Assessment Record”
sheet (CA1)
the Importance of attItuDe In WrItInG
To get enough practice writing during the elementary school years, it is
extremely important that students learn to start writing fairly quickly after
they sit down, and to write freely, abundantly, and without fear. This requires
a relaxed attitude, free from inhibitions, especially during the early drafting
stages. In this lesson, the students hear the first half of a story that includes
some fanciful, far-fetched situations. The intent is to inspire their imaginations
and help them know that writing can be lighthearted and about anything.
Regularly remind the students that they are writing primarily for themselves.
Encourage them to be willing to write something that is less than perfect. The
important thing is to repeatedly practice getting their ideas on paper.
GeTTinG ReADy To WRiTe
1 Add to “Notes About Fiction” Chart
Gather the class with partners sitting together, facing you. Review that
yesterday the students began exploring fiction, or invented stories.
Remind the students that some fiction could happen in real life and some
fiction could happen only in the imagination. Add this to the “Notes About
Fiction” chart.
Fiction Genre Week 1 Day 2
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Explain that today they will hear another example of fiction and do
more writing.
2 Discuss Writing Attitude
Point out that learning to write is like learning any new sport, musical
instrument, or skill; you must practice over and over to become good
at it. Ask:
Q What can be hard about starting to write, or continuing to write, for the
whole Writing Time?
students might say:
“It’s hard to start writing when I don’t know what to write.”
“I stop writing if I don’t know how to spell something.”
Explain that you expect the students’ writing to have spelling errors and
to be imperfect and incomplete. This is natural for young writers. Assure
them that practicing by writing many, many imperfect pieces is more
important than writing just a few perfect pieces.
Encourage the students to try to bring a fun, relaxed attitude to their
writing today.
3 Read the First half of If You Were a Writer Aloud
Show the cover of If You Were a Writer and read the title and the names
of the author and illustrator aloud. Tell the students that you will read
the first half of the book today and the second half tomorrow. Invite
the students to think as they listen about what they learn about being
a writer.
Read pages 5–13 of If You Were a Writer aloud, showing the illustrations
and stopping as described below. Clarify vocabulary as you read.
suggested vocabulary
fragrance: smell; aroma (p. 7)
wedge: slice (p. 7)
ell vocabulary
English Language Learners may benefit from hearing additional
vocabulary defined, including:
typewriter: writing machine used before home computers became
popular (p. 5; see illustration on p. 4)
an evil spell: magic (p. 5)
Stop after:
p. 13
216
“ ‘Then they could slip between the sheets to snore and sleep!’
she said.”
Being a Writer™ Teacher’s Manual, Grade 3
Being a Writer™ Sample Lesson, Grade 3 © Developmental Studies Center devstu.org
4 Discuss the Story and Generate Ideas
Ask and briefly discuss:
Q What did you find out about being a writer?
Q In Tacky the Penguin, the events in the story are not realistic. In other
words, they could not happen in real life. Are the events in today’s story
realistic? Explain your thinking.
students might say:
“Sometimes writers need to think about what to write next, like
Melia’s mom.”
“I agree with [Zeke]. Also, writers use interesting words like stamp and
twirl and droop.”
“Today’s story could happen in real life. There’s a mom having
breakfast with her kids. That’s realistic.”
“In addition to what [Ellie] said, Melia’s uncle comes to visit. That part
could really happen, too.”
Use “Think, Pair, Share” to discuss:
Teacher note
Q What realistic or imaginary things might you write about today? [pause]
Turn to your partner.
Remember to pause for 10 seconds
for the students to think before you
say “Turn to your partner.” To review
the procedure for “Think, Pair, Share,”
see Unit 1, Week 2,
Day 2 (page 29). To
see an example, view
“Using ‘Think, Pair,
Share’ ” (AV13).
Have volunteers share their ideas with the class.
students might say:
“I could write a funny story about when our new puppy ran around the
house with my only clean pair of socks.”
“I might write about a race-car driver who wins a big race.”
“It might be fun to write about a kid who can fly.“
Explain that during Writing Time today, the students may write
about realistic or imaginary situations, or anything else they choose.
Encourage them to relax and write as freely and imaginatively as
possible.
WRiTinG TiMe
5 Write Independently
Ask the students to return to their seats and write silently
for 20–30 minutes. Join the students in writing for a few
minutes; then walk around the room and observe, assisting
students as needed.
Fiction Genre Week 1 Day 2
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c l Ass Ass e ss Me n T n oT e
Observe the students and ask yourself:
Are the students staying in their seats and writing silently?
• Are they double-spacing their writing?
• Do they seem to be writing with a relaxed and free attitude?
•
If necessary, remind the students to double-space their writing. If you
notice many students having difficulty starting to write, call for the class’s
attention and have partners talk about what they might write. Have a few
volunteers share their ideas with the class; then have the students resume
silent writing.
Record your observations on the “Class Assessment Record” sheet (CA1);
see page 54 of the Assessment Resource Book.
Signal to let the students know when Writing Time is over.
sHARinG AnD ReFlecTinG
6 Reflect on Writing Attitude
Talk briefly as a class about the students’ attitudes as they wrote today.
Ask questions such as:
Q Were you able to relax and write freely today without getting stuck? If so,
what happened? If not, what made you feel stuck? What did you do to try
to get unstuck?
Explain that the students will continue to focus on developing a relaxed
attitude toward their writing.
exTension
Realistic and Imaginary Fiction Stories
Give the students more experience with distinguishing between
realistic and imaginary stories in fiction by having them share about
fiction stories they are reading independently. As a class, discuss
questions such as:
Q What’s happening in your story?
Q Could that story happen in real life? Why or why not?
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TecHnoloGy exTension
Use a Class Blog for Reflection
Technology Tip
Create a class blog and invite the students to reflect on their writing
attitude as they draft and revise their stories in the coming weeks.
Post reflection questions such as those in Step 6 on the previous page.
After discussing the questions as a class, have interested students
post their comments. Review the comments periodically and, with the
respondents’ permission, discuss comments with the class.
For information
about setting up
and maintaining a
class blog, view the
“Creating a Class
Blog” tutorial (AV76).
Day 3
Drafting Fiction
in this lesson, the students:
Materials
•
Hear, discuss, and draft fiction
•
•
Generate and quick-write ideas for fiction
•
•
Cultivate a relaxed attitude toward writing
•
GeTTinG ReADy To WRiTe
•
If You Were a Writer from Day 2
“Notes About Fiction” chart
from Day 2
“Writing Time” chart (WA1)
“Class Assessment Record”
sheet (CA2)
1 Read the Second half of If You Were a Writer Aloud
Have the students bring their notebooks and pencils and gather with
partners sitting together, facing you.
Review that the students are hearing examples of fiction and thinking
about what fiction can be. Explain that today they will hear the second
half of If You Were a Writer and begin drafting a fiction story.
Tell the students that you will stop several times during today’s reading
to have partners talk about what they heard. Read pages 15–30 of If
You Were a Writer aloud slowly and clearly, showing the illustrations and
stopping as described on the next page. Clarify vocabulary as you read.
suggested vocabulary
alley: narrow street or passageway, usually between two buildings (p. 22)
ell vocabulary
English Language Learners may benefit from hearing additional
vocabulary defined, including:
in disguise: wearing a costume to hide who you are (p. 17)
Fiction Genre Week 1 Day 3
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Stop after:
p. 17
“What if the boy is really a detective in disguise? What would
happen then?”
Teacher note
Ask:
To review the procedure for “Turn to
Your Partner,” see
Unit 1, Week 1, Day 3
(page 13). To see
an example, view
“Using ‘Turn to Your
Partner’ ” (AV11).
Q What could happen then? Turn to your partner.
Have partners discuss the question for a few moments; then signal for
their attention. Without stopping to discuss as a class, reread the last
sentence and continue reading to the next stopping point:
p. 22
“ ‘What dog?’ Veronica asked. ‘What monster? Tell me!’ ”
Ask:
Q What could happen next in this story? Turn to your partner.
Have partners discuss the question for a few moments; then signal for
their attention. Without stopping to discuss as a class, reread the last
sentence and continue reading to the end of the story.
2 Briefly Discuss the Story and Quick-write:
Interesting People
Facilitate a brief class discussion using the questions that follow. Be
ready to reread from the story to help the students recall what
they heard.
Q What more did you find out about being a writer?
Q What are some things that happen to Melia that give her ideas for
writing?
students might say:
“Melia and her mom see a boy running with a dog, and they make up a
story from that.”
“Melia also makes up a story about the missing jar of honey. In her
story, a bear comes in and eats it.”
Point out that Melia uses interesting people and situations in her own
life to help her make up stories. Use “Think, Pair, Share” to have the
students discuss:
Q What interesting people do you know outside of school whom you could
make up a story about? [pause] Turn to your partner.
Without discussing the question, have the students open their
notebooks to the next blank page of the writing ideas section, label it
“Interesting People I Know,” and write a list of interesting people they
know outside of school about whom they could write a story. Stop them
after 3–4 minutes and have partners share and discuss their lists with
each other. Then have them resume listing for a few more minutes.
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Explain that during Writing Time, you would like all of the students to
try writing a fiction story. They may make up a story about one of the
interesting people on their list, or they may write any other made-up
story. Remind them to double-space their writing and to look at the
“Notes About Fiction” chart to help them get more ideas.
WRiTinG TiMe
3 Begin Drafting Fiction Pieces
Have the students get their notebooks and pencils, and sit at desks with
partners together. Display the “Writing Time” chart ( WA1) and have
the students write silently for 20–30 minutes.
WA1
Writing Time
• Make
up a story about an interesting person outside of school.
• Continue
• Start
a fiction story you started earlier.
any new fiction story.
Teacher note
The students are just beginning to
generate ideas for fiction. They are
not expected to know or incorporate
specific features of the genre into their
writing at this point. They will build their
understanding as they explore the genre
over the coming weeks.
Teacher note
The students will write all first drafts,
double-spaced, in their notebooks. In
Week 4, they will select one of the drafts
to develop and publish. Double-spacing
now allows space for revision later. The
students will write their final versions
in Week 6 on loose, lined paper (or on
computers, if available).
Join the students in writing for a few minutes; then walk around the
room and observe, assisting students as needed.
c lA ss A ssessM enT n oT e
Observe the students and ask yourself:
• Are the students staying in their seats and writing silently?
• Are they double-spacing their writing?
• Do they seem to be writing with a relaxed and free attitude?
If necessary, remind the students to double-space their writing. If you
notice many students having difficulty starting to write, call for the class’s
attention and have partners talk to each other about what they might
write. Have a few volunteers share their ideas with the class; then have the
students resume silent writing.
Record your observations on the “Class Assessment Record” sheet (CA2);
see page 55 of the Assessment Resource Book.
Signal to let the students know when Writing Time is over.
Fiction Genre Week 1 Day 3
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sHARinG AnD ReFlecTinG
4 Reflect on Writing Process and Attitude
Briefly discuss questions such as:
Q Were you able to make up a story about an interesting person you know?
Tell us about it.
Q What other fictional ideas did you write about today?
Q (Point to the “Notes About Fiction” chart.) Which notes did you think
about as you started writing today?
Help the students reflect on their attitudes toward writing by asking:
Q How did you feel as you wrote today? If you got stuck, what happened?
What do you want to try tomorrow to help you in your writing?
Explain that the students will continue to read and draft fiction for the
next couple of weeks. They will eventually select one of their fiction
drafts to develop and publish as a book for the class library.
exTension
Conduct Interviews with Interesting People
Some students may be interested in learning more about the interesting
people about whom they are writing. Have your students compose a list
of questions to ask and then arrange to interview the people they have
selected. Once the interviews are completed, have the students write
stories based on the information they collected in their interviews.
These stories may be fiction or nonfiction.
Day 4
Drafting Fiction
Materials
•
•
in this lesson, the students:
If You Were a Writer from Day 3
•
Review If You Were a Writer
“Notes About Fiction” chart
from Day 3
•
Quick-write “What if?” questions
•
Draft fiction
•
Cultivate a relaxed attitude toward writing
•
Chart paper and a marker
•
“Writing Time” chart (WA2)
GeTTinG ReADy To WRiTe
1 Add to “Notes About Fiction” Chart
Have the students bring their notebooks and pencils and gather with
partners sitting together, facing you. Review that yesterday they heard
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the second part of If You Were a Writer. Remind the students that Melia
uses people and situations in her own life to help her make up stories.
Add can be made-up stories about people and situations in our own lives
to the “Notes About Fiction” chart. Add any other ideas about fiction
that the students heard in the reading.
2 Review If You Were a Writer
Explain that today the students will explore another way that fiction
writers think of ideas for stories. Show pages 14–15 of the story, and
point out to the students that Melia’s mother suggests asking the
question “What if?” to get ideas for stories.
Tell the students that you will reread some passages from the story. Ask
them to think as they listen about “What if?” questions they could ask.
Read aloud pages 15–17, starting with “ ‘Maybe the dog and the boy
could turn into an idea,’ Mother said.” Continue reading through the end
of page 17.
Without pausing to discuss, turn to page 18 and read aloud the
paragraph that begins: “Melia thought about the missing jar of honey.”
3 Generate “What If?” Questions
Explain that authors may get ideas for stories by asking themselves
“What if?” questions. Direct the students’ attention to the “Notes About
Fiction” chart and add What if? to it. Ask:
Q What “What if?” questions can you think of that might lead to an
interesting story?
As the students report their ideas, record them on another sheet of
chart paper titled “What if
?”
students might say:
“What if a monkey got loose from the zoo and ended up in my
backyard?”
“What if I became the president of the United States?”
“What if someone finds out she can read people’s minds?”
“What if a boy’s parents forgot who he was?”
4 Quick-write: What If?
Ask the students to select one of the charted “What if?” questions and
write in their notebooks for a few minutes about imaginative ways to
answer it. Encourage them to imagine things that could happen in real
life, as well as things that could not. Stop them after 3–4 minutes of
writing and have partners discuss their thinking; then have the students
write for a few more minutes.
If you notice many students having difficulty quick-writing about a
“What if?” question, call for the students’ attention and write the first
Fiction Genre Week 1 Day 4
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few sentences together as a class. (For example, you might write: What
if a monkey got loose from the zoo and ended up in the backyard? We heard
screeching and got up from our dinner to see what was happening. We found
the monkey swinging wildly from the swing set. We decided it was hungry, so
we brought it inside and fed it a plate of spaghetti.)
Signal for the students’ attention and ask a few volunteers to share the
“What if?” question they selected and the ideas they wrote.
Explain that during Writing Time today, the students may continue the
“What if?” story they started, list other “What if?” questions, or work
on any other fiction story. Assure them that it is perfectly fine to leave
drafts incomplete and start new ones. Encourage them to relax and use
their imaginations as they write today.
Teacher note
Save the “What if
use on Day 5.
?” chart to
WRiTinG TiMe
5 Draft Fiction Pieces
Ask the students to return to their seats. Display the “Writing Time”
chart ( WA2) and have the students write silently for 20–30 minutes.
Invite them to refer to the posted “What if
?” chart, if
they wish.
Writing Time
WA2
• Continue
the “What if?” story you started during
the quick‑write.
• Start
• List
a new “What if?” story.
“What if?” questions in your writing ideas section.
• Work
on any other fiction story.
Join the students in writing for a few minutes; then walk around the
room and observe, assisting students as needed.
Signal to let the students know when Writing Time is over.
sHARinG AnD ReFlecTinG
6 Reflect on Writing Process and Attitude
Briefly discuss questions such as:
Q Who wrote a “What if?” story? Tell us about it.
Q What other fictional ideas did you write about today?
Q (Point to the “Notes About Fiction” chart.) Which notes did you think
about as you started writing today?
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Help the students reflect on their attitudes toward writing by asking:
Q How did you feel as you wrote today? If you got stuck, what happened?
What do you want to try tomorrow to help you in your writing?
Remind the students that they will continue to focus on developing a
relaxed attitude toward their writing practice and that they will continue
to read and draft fiction for the next couple of weeks.
WRiTinG ABouT ReADinG
Make Connections to If You Were a Writer
Materials
Show the cover of If You Were a Writer and remind the students that they
heard this story earlier. Ask:
•
If You Were a Writer from Day 4
Q What do you remember about the story If You Were a Writer?
Have a few volunteers share their thinking. After they have shared, ask:
Q How does this story remind you of your own life?
students might say:
“This story reminds me of my own life because Melia wants to do what
her mom does. I want to do what my aunt does—she’s an architect.”
“I like learning cool new words, just like Melia does.”
“Melia has lots of good talks with her mom. That reminds me of having
good talks with my grandpa.”
Explain that when you write or talk about how a story reminds you of
your own life, you are making a connection to the story. Explain that
making connections to stories helps us enjoy and remember them. Ask
the students to watch as you model writing about how If You Were a
Writer reminds you of your life.
you might say:
“I want to write about how If You Were a Writer reminds me of my own
life. I’ll start by writing: In If You Were a Writer by Joan Lowery Nixon,
Melia wants to be a writer, just like her mom. Notice that I put the title
of the book and the author’s name in the opening sentence. Now I’ll
explain how the book reminds me of my own life. I’ll write: When I was
growing up, my favorite person in the whole world was my aunt Sophie.
She was a teacher. Just like Melia wants to be a writer like her mom, I
wanted to be a teacher like my aunt. Aunt Sophie and I had many inspiring
talks, just like Melia and her mom have in the book. Now I’ll write a
closing sentence to wrap up my paragraph: Reading this book makes
me remember how important Aunt Sophie was in my life.”
Explain that the students will now write about how If You Were a Writer
reminds them of their own lives. Have the students begin writing about
their connections to the story. If time permits, invite the students to
share their writing with the class.
Fiction Genre Week 1 Day 4
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Day 5
Drafting Fiction and
Pair conferring
Materials
•
•
•
•
in this lesson, the students:
“Notes About Fiction” chart
from Day 4
“What if
from Day 4
?” chart
•
Quick-write more “What if?” questions
•
Draft fiction
•
Practice procedures for pair conferences
•
Express interest in and appreciation for one another’s writing
“Writing Time” chart (WA3)
Class set of “Conference
Notes: Focus 1” record
sheets (CN1)
GeTTinG ReADy To WRiTe
1 Gather and Briefly Review Fiction
Have the students bring their notebooks and pencils and gather with
partners sitting together, facing you. Review that they have been
exploring fiction. Ask and briefly discuss:
Q What makes fiction writing different from other kinds of writing?
If necessary, review the “Notes About Fiction” chart to help the students
remember what they have learned. Add any new ideas they mention.
2 Generate More “What If?” Questions
Remind the students that authors often get ideas for stories by asking
themselves “What if?” questions. Direct the students’ attention to the
“What if
?” chart from Day 4. Ask:
Q What other “What if?” questions can you think of that might lead to an
interesting story?
As the students report their ideas, add them to the chart.
students might say:
“What if cats and dogs ruled the world?”
“What if some kids started their own restaurant?”
“What if my family moved to the South Pole?”
“What if I became the youngest-ever Olympic athlete?”
3 Repeat Quick-write: What If?
Ask the students to select a different charted “What if?” question and
write in their notebooks for a few minutes about imaginative ways to
answer it. Encourage them to imagine things that could happen in real
life, as well as things that could not. Stop them after 3–4 minutes of
writing and have partners discuss their thinking; then have them write
for a few more minutes.
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Signal for the students’ attention. Ask a few volunteers to share the
“What if?” question they selected and the ideas they wrote.
Explain that during Writing Time today, the students may continue the
“What if?” story they started, begin a new “What if?” story, or work on
any other fiction story. Remind them that it is perfectly fine to leave
drafts incomplete and start new ones.
WRiTinG TiMe
4 Draft Fiction Pieces
Have the students get their notebooks and pencils and sit at desks with
partners together. Display the “Writing Time” chart ( WA3) and have
the students write silently for 20–30 minutes.
WA3
Writing Time
Teacher note
You may want to shorten today’s Writing
Time to leave more time for the pair
conferences in Step 5.
• Continue
the “What if?” story you started during
the quick‑write.
• Start
a new “What if?” story.
• Work
on any other fiction story.
Join the students in writing for a few minutes; then begin conferring
with individual students.
T eAcHeR conFeR en c e n oT e
Over the next three weeks, confer with individual students to get an idea
of their thinking as they write fiction drafts. Ask each student to show
you a piece of her writing and read some of it aloud to you. Hold off on
any feedback about grammar or spelling. Instead, focus on clarifying the
student’s ideas about the story she is writing. Ask questions such as:
Teacher note
To see an example of
a teacher conferring
with individual
students, view
“Conferring About
Fiction” (AV43).
Q What is this story about?
Q Who [is/are] the character(s)? What’s interesting about
[him/her/them]?
Q What do you imagine might happen to [him/her/them]?
Q When and where do you imagine this story takes place?
Q What part are you going to work on next?
Document your observations for each student on a “Conference Notes: Focus 1”
record sheet (CN1); see page 67 of the Assessment Resource Book.
Signal to let the students know when Writing Time is over.
Fiction Genre Week 1 Day 5
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SHARING AND REFLECTING
5 Confer in Pairs About Fiction Drafts
Explain that partners will each read one of their fiction drafts to the
other and confer about both partners’ drafts today. Briefly review the
procedure you established for pair conferring (see Unit 1, Week 3, Day 2,
Step 4 on page 54). Remind the students that conferring means not only
reading their writing to each other, but talking about it as well. Explain
that today partners will tell each other one thing they like about the
other’s draft. Ask and briefly discuss:
E ELL Note
Q What would you like your partner to do to show that he or she is interested
in your writing and your creative ideas?
You might provide the prompt “I would
like my partner to . . .” to your English
Language Learners to help them
verbalize their answers to this question.
Students might say:
“I would like my partner to listen as I read my story.”
“I would like my partner to ask me questions about the story.”
“I would like my partner to tell me the part he likes.”
“I would like my partner to say something nice about my story, like
‘I really want to read your story.’ ”
Teacher Note
Consider having pairs spread out so that
partners can better hear each other. If
necessary, signal about halfway through
the sharing time so that partners can
switch roles if they have not yet done so.
Have partners share their writing. Scan the class without intervening,
providing sufficient time for both partners to share their writing before
you signal for their attention.
6 Reflect on Pair Conferences
Help partners reflect on their work together by asking:
Q What did your partner do to show interest in your writing and
creative ideas?
Q What did you like about your partner’s writing?
Explain that the students will continue to write fiction drafts during the
coming two weeks. Remind the students that they will eventually select
one of their fiction drafts to develop and publish as a book for the
class library.
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Being a Writer™ Sample Lesson, Grade 3 © Developmental Studies Center devstu.org
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