DX Specialty Controls Remote DX-SCR

DX Specialty Controls Remote DX-SCR
DX Specialty Controls Remote
DX-SCR
Installation Manual
by
GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
About this Manual
This manual has been designed to help you install and configure a DX Specialty Controls
Remote (DX-SCR). The SCR is a DX Master Remote that enables full control of all
powerchair functions, communication devices, environmental controls, computers, televisions,
etc., all from the one input device.
This manual describes installation of the SCR only and must therefore be read in conjunction
with the Installation Manuals for all other DX Modules present in the system.
This manual must be read and fully understood prior to commencing installation. For more
information concerning this, or other Dynamic products, contact Dynamic Controls or an agent
as listed in Sales and Service Information.
Throughout this manual there are a few symbols that will help you quickly identify the purpose
of the paragraph that follows:
Notes:
Notes provide supporting information for the previous paragraph or
section that should be followed in order to install, configure, and use
the DX-SCR safely and efficiently.
Warnings:
Warnings provide important information for the previous paragraph
or section that must be followed in order to install, configure, and
use the DX-SCR safely and efficiently.
Do not install, maintain or operate this equipment without reading, understanding and
following this manual – including the Safety and Misuse Warnings – otherwise injury or
damage may result.
Due to continuous product improvement Dynamic reserves the right to update this manual.
This manual supersedes all previous issues, which must no longer be used.
Any attempt to gain access to or in any way abuse the electronic components and associated
assemblies that make up the powerchair system renders the manufacturer’s warranty void
and the manufacturer free from liability.
Dynamic and the Dynamic logo are trademarks of Dynamic Controls.
All other brand and product names, fonts, and company names and logos are trademarks or
registered trademarks of their respective companies.
Dynamic owns and will retain all trademark rights and Dynamic or its licensors own and will
retain all copyright, trade secret and other proprietary rights, in and to the documentation.
All materials contained within this manual, in hard-copy or electronic format, are protected by
copyright laws and other intellectual property laws.
© Copyright 2003 Dynamic Controls. All rights reserved.
Contents
1
Introduction ............................................................. 1
2
Physical Characteristics ........................................ 3
3
Installation and Testing .......................................... 5
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
4
Programming......................................................... 13
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
5
General Considerations.............................................................. 5
SCR Mounting ............................................................................ 6
SCR Wiring Connections............................................................ 7
3.3.1 DXBUS Connection ......................................................... 8
3.3.2 DXBUS Length and Voltage Drop Restrictions................ 8
3.3.3 Jack Socket Connectors .................................................. 9
3.3.4 Jack Socket Switch Monitoring Options......................... 10
3.3.5 Programmer Socket....................................................... 11
Testing...................................................................................... 12
3.4.1 Power Up Responses .................................................... 12
3.4.2 DX Remote Check Sequence ........................................ 12
Introduction............................................................................... 13
Default Programs ..................................................................... 13
Auto Download ......................................................................... 14
Programming Tools .................................................................. 15
4.4.1 Dynamic Wizard............................................................. 15
4.4.2 HHP ............................................................................... 16
DX Remote Wizard Programming ............................................ 16
DX Remote HHP Programming................................................ 17
4.6.1 Initial Operation.............................................................. 17
4.6.2 Test Driving and Saving Changes ................................. 18
4.6.3 To View / Adjust Drive Programs ................................... 18
4.6.4 To adjust the Joystick Source ........................................ 19
4.6.5 Joystick Reverse............................................................ 20
4.6.6 View/Edit Specialty Controls Remote ............................ 20
4.6.7 To Enable Technician Mode .......................................... 21
4.6.8 Joystick Calibration........................................................ 22
4.6.9 Combined Lighting Actuator Module (CLAM) Enable .... 23
4.6.10 Lighting Module (LM) Enable ......................................... 23
4.6.11 Veer Compensation ....................................................... 24
4.6.12 Load Compensation....................................................... 25
Operation ............................................................... 27
5.1
5.2
5.3
DX System Components .......................................................... 27
5.1.1 On/Off System ............................................................... 27
5.1.2 Battery Gauge Display................................................... 27
Joystick OONAPU .................................................................... 27
User Input Devices ................................................................... 28
Table of Contents
5.4
5.5
6
Batteries and Charging......................................... 35
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
7
Battery Type ............................................................................. 35
Battery Charging ...................................................................... 35
Battery Gauge .......................................................................... 36
Battery Saver............................................................................ 37
Battery Condition Warnings...................................................... 37
6.5.1 Battery High Warning Condition..................................... 37
6.5.2 Battery Low Warning Condition ..................................... 38
6.5.3 Low Capacity Warning Condition................................... 38
Accessories + Parts List ...................................... 39
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
8
Modes, Sub-modes and Functions........................................... 29
5.4.1 Modes............................................................................ 29
5.4.2 Sub-modes and Functions............................................. 31
5.4.3 Categorising Sub-modes ............................................... 32
Navigating the SCR.................................................................. 32
5.5.1 User Input Device plus Mode Switch ............................. 33
5.5.2 User Input Device Only.................................................. 34
5.5.3 Scanning Mode.............................................................. 34
Fault Display............................................................................. 39
Limp Mode................................................................................ 43
Wizard Diagnostics................................................................... 44
7.3.1 To View Diagnostics ...................................................... 44
Status Report ........................................................................... 44
7.4.1 View Status Report ........................................................ 44
7.4.2 Print Report ................................................................... 45
7.4.3 Save Report to File ........................................................ 45
Chair Log.................................................................................. 45
7.5.1 View the Chair Log ........................................................ 45
7.5.2 Erase the Chair Log....................................................... 46
7.5.3 Chair Log Codes............................................................ 46
Appendices............................................................ 49
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
Specifications ........................................................................... 49
8.1.1 Electrical Specifications ................................................. 49
8.1.2 Mechanical Specifications ............................................. 49
8.1.3 Environmental Specifications......................................... 50
Intended Use and Regulatory Statement.................................. 51
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) ....................................... 52
Maintenance............................................................................. 53
Warranty................................................................................... 54
Safety and Misuse Warnings.................................................... 55
Contact Details ......................................................................... 57
1
Introduction
The DX Specialty Controls Remote (SCR) is designed to control the function
of any single input device (Sip and Puff, Switched inputs, proportional or
switched joysticks, RIM, etc.) installed into the DX System, allowing a user of
virtually any disability to control all on-chair and off-chair functions from the
input device. All command decisions are made by the user after responding to
the user-friendly prompts displayed by the SCR=s easy-to-read Liquid Crystal
Display (LCD). These user-friendly prompts are fully and easily programmable
by either dealer or therapist to accommodate the precise needs, terminology,
language and abilities of the user.
A Battery Gauge, On /Off switch, and MODE switch are present on the
Remote, along with the standard DXBUS connector (for connection to the DX
System), an XLR type charger socket and a DX Programming socket. Three
jack sockets are also present, designated as Remote On/Off switch, Auxiliary
Input Switch and Emergency Stop.
The SCR can be mounted anywhere within the user=s field of vision, typically
using either a AGooseneck@ or ARod based@ mounting system.
Example DX System
Chapter 1 : Introduction
1
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2
Physical Characteristics
On/Off Button
Toggles the entire DX control system
between the On and Off modes.
Mode Button
Cycles through the programmed
Modes.
Battery Gauge
Battery charge level is indicated by a
set of six LEDs. These are arranged
from left to right as two red, two
orange, and two green.
LCD Display
A 4-line, 20 character backlit LCD to
ensure good visibility in all conditions,
including darkness. System faults are
indicated by the LCD and all displayed
prompts are fully customizable.
External Switch
Sockets
Three 3.5mm (1/8@) jack sockets are
supplied to allow connection of
external switches.
Reverse LED
This feature is not currently supported.
Programming
Socket
(HHP and Wizard)
A standard HHP/Wizard Programming
socket.
DXBUS Socket
For connecting the DX Remote with a
DXBUS cable to other DX compatible
modules.
Battery Charger
Socket
Standard 3-pin XLR battery charger
socket.
See Batteries and Charging for pin
details.
Chapter 2 : Physical Characteristics
3
SCR Configuration
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3
Installation and Testing
3.1
General Considerations
The minimum installation requirements of a DX-SCR system are a 24V battery
supply, motor and park brake, Power Module, a single switch input device and
a SCR. This system can be fully developed to include environmental control
devices, specific user input control methods (eg Sip and Puff), and a variety of
other peripherals (e.g. infra red, actuator or lighting modules).
Minimum SCR System
Chapter 3 : Installation & Testing
5
3.2
SCR Mounting
The SCR can be mounted on either side of the wheelchair in a position where
the display is easily viewable for the user. If the SCR is mounted with the
recommended gooseneck (DCL part no. DX-GNK-KIT), the user may make
adjustments as necessary. Rod mounting is also possible.
Ensure the SCR and mounting system does not extend beyond the
footprint of the chair.
Ensure the SCR does not impede the view of the user..
Two M4 fixing points on the base of the case are provided to attach the SCR
to the preferred mounting system. A mounting bracket for the gooseneck is
supplied along with two M4 x 10 countersink screws.
For safe installation, select a screw length that protrudes between
4mm and 10mm into the case.
Dimensions of the SCR mounting
positions are shown at right.
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Dimensions of the gooseneck mounting bracket are shown below.
If the programmer socket is required to be accessible when the SCR
is mounted, make allowance for this prior to fitting.
3.3
SCR Wiring Connections
Minimal wiring requirements of the SCR are connection to the DX system via
the DXBUS connector and a single switch for control inputs. All sockets
requiring semi-permanent connection are clustered together on the base of
the SCR to ease looming, allowing wires to be routed down the length of the
gooseneck.
Ensure all wiring is secured.
When looming, care must be taken to ensure that leads can not be
transposed.
DXBUS cables are available in a number of standard lengths. Other
cable lengths are available on request.
Do not use the frame of a wheelchair or scooter as the earth return
for any lights or actuators. Making any low resistance connection to
the frame is regarded as a possible safety hazard and not allowed
by international performance and safety standards for wheelchairs
and scooters.
Chapter 3 : Installation & Testing
7
3.3.1
DXBUS Connection
The SCR has a single DXBUS connector, which allows a DXBUS cable from
any DX Module to be used to connect the SCR into the DX System.
3.3.2
DXBUS Length and Voltage Drop Restrictions
Due to signal distortion that increases with increasing DXBUS length, the total
length of all DXBUS cable must not exceed 15 metres in any topology.
Two of the DXBUS's four cores (DXB+ and DXB-) are used to supply power to
the modules and to the loads connected to them. A Positive Temperature
Coefficient (PTC) device in the Power Module limits the total DXBUS current
to 12 A, to protect the DXBUS wiring and connectors. The topology and cable
lengths used may reduce the DXBUS's upper limit to below 12 A.
For correct DX System operation the voltage drop on the DXBUS's DXB- wire
due to return currents, must not exceed 1.0 V between any two modules
within the DX System. Use a topology and module placement that reduces
this voltage drop as low as reasonably possible.
Voltage drops occur along the DXBUS due to the return of current back to the
battery through the small but finite resistance of the DXBUS cable and
connectors.
A DXBUS connector can be modelled as:
DXBUS Cable Model
RCT = contact resistance = 5 mOhm
RCA = cable resistance = 12 mOhm / metre
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3.3.3
Jack Socket Connectors
Three 3.5mm jack sockets allow connection of external (or remote) switches.
Any normally open or closed, momentary or resistive switch may be
connected to these sockets and configured with the Wizard or HHP
programming system. Any switches connected into these sockets should be
clearly labelled as to their function.
Emergency Stop
Pressing this switch while driving will cause the chair to come to a rapid, but
safe stop. When the chair is motionless, the Emergency Stop switch will act
as a Mode Switch and cycle through the programmed modes.
On/Off Switch
Pressing a switch connected to this socket will toggle the DX System between
the On and Off states.
Auxiliary Input
The function of this switch depends upon certain programmed parameters of
the SCR.
Scanning Switch If scanning mode is enabled, pressing this switch
selects the mode, sub-mode or function shown on
the SCR display at the time.
5th Switch
If a mouse mode is active, this button acts as the
left button (click) of a mouse.
Chapter 3 : Installation & Testing
9
3.3.4
Jack Socket Switch Monitoring Options
The installer needs to carefully consider the implications of failure of any
switches plugged into any of the SCR's jack sockets. This is especially true of
the Emergency Stop and Auxiliary input, which may be safety critical for some
applications. Failure of the switch, severing or damage to the switch wiring, or
the inadvertent unplugging at the SCR can all render the switch function
useless and each need to be assessed for risk.
The SCR offers switch monitoring options for each of the Emergency Stop
and Auxiliary inputs that can be used to partially mitigate risk due to switch
failure. These options can be specified either in the Wizards SCR ‘Control
Options’ screen, or using the DX-HHP.
Monitoring of the Emergency Stop switch is selected using the panel of radio
buttons in the ‘Stop Input Setup’ area.
Monitoring of the Auxiliary switch is selected using a similar panel of radio
buttons, which appears under ‘Scanning’ whenever that driving option is
chosen.
Unmonitored switch circuit using a Standard Switch
Allows the use of a standard Normally Open or Normally Closed switch but
will NOT detect a failure in any part of the switch circuit. This option is not
recommended for safety critical functions.
To select this option set the ‘Test at Power Up?’ and ‘Resistive Monitoring?’
Wizard options to ‘No’, and set the ‘Switch normally open/closed’ as required
for the switch.
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Partially monitored circuit using a Standard switch
Allows the use of a standard Normally Open or Normally Closed switch. If this
option is selected, the SCR will require the user to press the switch each time
the chair is powered up. This will ensure the entire switch circuit is operational
at that time. Once tested the SCR will allow driving but will NOT retest the
switch circuit until the next power up. Consequently there is still an element of
risk that a switch failure is undetected between power ups.
To select this option set the ‘Test at Power Up?’ Wizard option to ‘Yes’. The
Status LED will flash if the unit is waiting for a switch to be pressed.
Continuously monitored circuit using a modified switch
This option is the most secure and is the recommended option for safety
critical applications. To use this option the switch must be modified by adding
2 resistors as shown below.
These resistors allow the switch wiring to be continuously monitored
and will ideally be as close to the actual switch as possible (e.g. inside
the switch assembly).
To select this option set the ‘Resistive Monitoring?’ Wizard option to ‘Yes’.
This option cannot test that the switch itself will operate correctly when
activated. If this is required also select ‘Test at Power Up?’ which will ensure
that the switch itself is operational every time the chair is powered up.
Warning:
It is the responsibility of the installer to perform a risk assessment
and take the necessary set-up and installation precautions to ensure
safety under all conditions.
3.3.5
Programmer Socket
The SCR has a single programming socket through which the
Wizard or HHP are used to program the SCR.
Chapter 3 : Installation & Testing
11
3.4
Testing
Ensure that all DX Modules used in your DX system have been installed as
specified in their Installation Manuals. The SCR is required to be correctly
programmed for the appropriate wheelchair prior to testing.
The SCR contains the complete wheelchair system set-up, from which all DX
Modules download their relevant information when the DX system is first
turned on. (See Auto Download for details).
3.4.1
Power Up Responses
Power up the SCR by pressing the On/Off switch.
The power up response for the SCR is:
•
SCR version is displayed on LCD display.
The first time the SCR is turned on, the LCD display will show a
fault. Turn the SCR off then on again to clear this fault. (See Auto
Download).
3.4.2
•
At least one of the LEDs on the Battery Gauge will be on.
•
The current Mode will be displayed.
DX Remote Check Sequence
Perform the following check sequence:
1. Press the On/Off switch again and check the display turns off. Press it
again to turn it on.
2. Press the Mode switches. Check that the Modes cycle as expected.
3. Check all lighting functions operate correctly (where applicable).
4. Perform the remainder of the tests as outlined in the testing sections of the
Installation Manuals of all other DX Modules used on the wheelchair.
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4
Programming
Warning:
Incorrect or inappropriate programming of a DX System can put the
wheelchair into a dangerous state. Dynamic Controls accepts no
responsibility or liability for accidents caused by incorrect
programming. This programming section, the DX-HHP Manual, and
the Dynamic Wizard Installation Sheet/On-line Help must be read
and understood before attempting to program a DX System.
Ensure that the programmed wheelchair complies with all prevailing
regulatory requirements for your country and application.
4.1
Introduction
The driving performance of the DX System is dependent on its programming.
Different features can be selected and parameters fine-tuned for a particular
application, or to suit the requirements of an individual. The SCR and the DX
Power Module are the modules most responsible for defining the driving
performance of the DX System.
4.2
Default Programs
The SCR is programmed during manufacturing with a set of factory default
settings, which are incorporated into a controlled document by Dynamic. The
default settings will not be suitable for all DX Systems and must be checked
and reprogrammed prior to connecting with a DX System.
The optimum settings for all programmable DX Modules are determined by
the wheelchair manufacturer (OEM). If more than one type of wheelchair is to
be used by the customer, each wheelchair type may have its own set of
optimum settings.
Warning:
If a wheelchair is programmed with settings other than default,
under some very rare fault conditions default settings could be
automatically restored, thereby changing driving characteristics.
This in turn could lead to a chair moving in a direction or speed
that is not intended. Programmers should consider this risk when
programming settings other than default.
Chapter 4 : Programming
13
4.3
Auto Download
The DX System has a feature called Auto Download. It is designed to
minimise the programming requirements associated with Module servicing by
downloading the correct programming to a replacement DX Module.
If a DX Module is identified as being faulty it will be replaced by a new one.
The replacement module is likely to be programmed differently to the original,
which could leave the wheelchair in a dangerous state. The DX System
automatically detects that a DX Module swap has occurred, and the
programmed data from the old module is transferred to the replacement
module.
Auto Download is achieved by the SCR containing both its own programming
and also a backup copy of the programmed data for all other DX Modules.
When a module swap is detected, or a checksum error found in a module, the
SCR automatically downloads its backup copy to the module. The Auto
Download occurs immediately on power up after the Module has been
replaced.
Warning:
When a SCR is replaced it will perform an Auto Download to all DX
Modules. This may result in incorrect and dangerous programming
for a particular wheelchair system if the wheelchair program
installed in the Remote is not suitable for that wheelchair system.
Do not attempt to drive or test the DX System before the correct and
suitable wheelchair program has been installed in the Remote using
the Wizard.
The Remote can be programmed with the Wizard using a >dummy= DX
System and/or a 24V power supply, or on the wheelchair provided driving is
prevented e.g. by disengaging the drive wheels.
After replacing any DX Module, turn the DX System off, then on again, to
initiate the Auto Download of the DX Remote backup data. When an Auto
Download has occurred, but the system needs to be cycled on and off, a
Module Fault is displayed on the LCD screen and also the Status LED of the
offending module. When the System if turned off then on again, the fault is
cleared and the Auto Download is correctly terminated.
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4.4
Programming Tools
Two programming tools are available, the Dynamic Wizard and the HHP.
4.4.1
Dynamic Wizard
The Wizard is a PC based tool suited to programming production runs of
identical wheelchairs or modules, or individual highly customised wheelchairs.
The Wizard is available in several versions:
OEM:
Generally used by the wheelchair manufacturer is
able to program a wide range of parameters.
DEALER:
Similar in function to above, but with a reduced
range of programmable options. This ensures that
options that the manufacturer wishes to keep
control of cannot be disturbed. Parameters that
may cause hazards or require special expertise to
set are not available for adjustment.
ENHANCED DEALER:
FACTORY:
As Dealer above, but with the ability to edit
parameters that relate to wheelchair accessories
(e.g. actuators)
Can only replace Standard or Custom Wheelchair
Programs. No editing or diagnostics available.
Warning:
The Wizard is a very powerful tool and as such requires well trained
operators and a disciplined approach to usage and distribution.
It is up to the wheelchair manufacturer to determine whether they
will allow distribution of Wizards to dealers. Refer to the Wizard
Documentation for further details.
The DX Remote can be programmed with the
Wizard using a 24V power supply and an optional
PM. If the Remote is connected directly to the 24V
power supply, then a DXBUS Cable can have one
end modified to connect to the power supply.
Chapter 4 : Programming
15
4.4.2
HHP
The DX Hand Held Programmer (HHP) is the standard programming tool used
by dealers, allowing easy adjustment of all commonly adjusted Drive Program
parameters.
Warning:
The DX HHP is for use only by wheelchair manufacturers, their
authorised dealers and support personnel. It is not intended to be
used by the wheelchair user.
The DX HHP Manual should be read and understood before attempting to use
it.
4.5
DX Remote Wizard Programming
The Wizard accesses a set of parameters that are programmed to define the
configuration desired by a wheelchair manufacturer.
Some parameters can be both read and written to (edited) by an OEM or a
Dealer. Other parameters can only be read but not edited. Some parameters
available to an OEM are not displayed for a Dealer.
The DX System, with the DX Remote, supports up to five user selectable
Drive Programs. The Drive Programs govern the performance of the
wheelchair, as suitable for different environmental and user conditions. Drive
Programs are also adjustable with the HHP.
Remaining parameters are related to other system functions and DX Modules,
which may, or may not, be included in your DX System.
For detailed assistance when using the Wizard, please refer to the Wizard
Online Help.
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4.6
DX Remote HHP Programming
Warning:
Do not plug the HHP Programmer in while the vehicle is in motion.
Plug in the HHP Programmer while the DX System is turned on. A
setting is saved once the ‘NEXT’ button is pressed. If the DX
System is turned off during programming, the current parameter
being modified will not be saved and the DX System will retain the
previous setting.
Plugging the DX Hand Held Programmer (HHP) into an activated DX System
gives immediate access to a set of main menu options. The length of the main
menu depends on how many DX Modules are connected to the DXBUS.
Refer to the DX HHP Manual for full details.
4.6.1
Initial Operation
1. When the HHP is plugged into the Remote’s Programmer Socket the initial
screen appears for two seconds.
Dynamic DX
Programmer
VERSION 1.xx
If a fault has occurred, the fault screen appears.
SYSTEM FAULT
5
L park brake
EXIT
The number and message displayed represents the fault. See Fault
Display for the list of faults that can be displayed.
Press EXIT to return to the main menu.
Chapter 4 : Programming
17
2. Then the main menu screen reads :
* * MAIN MENU * *
View or edit?
Program : 1 ?
NEXT
YES
Pressing NEXT cycles through the Main Menu options. These are: the
Drive Programs, Technician Mode enable / disable and View / Edit
Specialty Controls Remote.
4.6.2
Test Driving and Saving Changes
Changes can be test driven before being permanently saved as the DX
System can be driven with the HHP plugged in. Even if the HHP is
disconnected the changes will remain current unless the DX Remote is turned
off. Once turned off, the settings will return to the original values.
Changes are saved when the ‘NEXT’ button on the HHP is pressed. If the DX
Remote is turned off before the HHP is returned to the main menu, all
changes to the current parameter being modified are lost.
4.6.3
To View / Adjust Drive Programs
Pressing ‘EXIT’ at any point during the procedure will return you to the main
menu.
1. Press ‘Next’ in the main menu until the appropriate Drive Program is
shown.
* * MAIN MENU * *
View or edit?
Program : 1 ?
NEXT
YES
2. Press ‘YES’ to edit Drive Program.
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3. The screen now reads :
TUNE PROG 1 RESPONSE
Max forward speed
25 %
EXIT
NEXT
UP
DOWN
Press ‘NEXT’ to step through the adjustable parameters and press ‘UP’ or
‘DOWN’ to adjust the value (excluding Joystick Source).
These are :
4.6.4
Max forward speed
Forward Acceleration
Forward Deceleration
Max reverse speed
Reverse acceleration
Reverse deceleration
Max turning speed
Turning acceleration
Turning deceleration
Damping point
Joystick Source
Joystick Reverse
To adjust the Joystick Source
1. The Joystick Source screen reads :
TUNE PROG 1 RESPONSE
Joystick source
Local
EXIT
NEXT
SWAP
2. Pressing ‘SWAP’ toggles the parameter between :
‘Remote’ if an RJM based input device is fitted and;
’Local’ if the joystick on the Remote is to be used. As there is no ‘Local’
joystick on the SCR, this should always be set to ‘Remote’.
This setting does not affect the ACU profile (Profile 6).
Chapter 4 : Programming
19
4.6.5
Joystick Reverse
1. The Joystick Reverse screen reads:
TUNE PROG 1 RESPONSE
Joystick reverse
No
EXIT
NEXT
SWAP
2. Pressing ‘SWAP’ toggles the parameter between ‘No’ and ‘Yes’. Reverses
the direction of the controlling joystick. The controlling joystick is either the
Remote’s inbuilt joystick or an RJM based joystick, depending on whether
‘Remote’ or ‘Local’ has been selected in “Joystick Source”. This can be set
for each profile. Profile 6 will affect the ACU.
If set to ‘No’, forward and reverse joystick deflection will cause forward and
reverse motion respectively.
If set to ‘Yes’, forward and reverse joystick deflection will cause the
opposite effect. Used if the Remote is mounted in an other than standard
orientation to maintain joystick sense.
This parameter is identical to the Wizard parameter ‘Reverse Joystick
Forward/Reverse’.
4.6.6
View/Edit Specialty Controls Remote
1. Press ‘NEXT’ in the main menu until the View/Edit Specialty Controls
Remote screen is shown.
* * MAIN MENU * *
View/Edit Specialty
Controls Remote
NEXT
YES
2. Press ‘YES’ to edit settings.
3. The screen now reads:
AUX INPUT RESISTIVE
MONITORING
On
EXIT
NEXT
CHANGE
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Press ‘NEXT’ to step through the adjustable parameters and press
‘CHANGE’ to adjust the value.
Pressing ‘EXIT’ at any time will return you to the Main Menu screen.
4.6.7
To Enable Technician Mode
1. Press ‘NEXT’ until the Technician Mode screen appears :
* * MAIN MENU * *
Technician Mode
Disabled. Enable ?
NEXT
YES
2. Pressing ‘YES’ toggles this screen between Technician Mode Enabled and
Technician Mode Disabled. If disabled, press ‘YES’ to enable.
3. Press ‘YES’ and a password screen will appear. Enter the three-digit
password.
EXIT
Technician Mode
Enter Password
000
D1
D2
D3
4. Press the D1, D2 and D3 buttons to cycle each digit through to the correct
password. When the password reads correctly, press the ‘EXIT’ button.
5. The screen now reads :
* * MAIN MENU * *
Technician Mode
Enabled. Disable ?
NEXT
YES
Chapter 4 : Programming
21
4.6.8
Joystick Calibration
1. Enable the Technician Mode.
2. Press ‘NEXT’ in the main menu until the screen reads :
* * MAIN MENU * *
View or edit Remote
Module ? (Tech Only)
NEXT
YES
Press ‘YES’.
3. The display reads:
JOYSTICK CALIBRATION
EXIT
NEXT
BEGIN
Pressing ‘EXIT’ at any point during the calibration procedure will return you to
the Main Menu.
4. Press ‘BEGIN’.
JOYSTICK CALIBRATION
Rotate J/S
-> Neutral -> END
EXIT
END
5. Move the joystick around the outer physical extremities of the restrictor
plate. Ensure that all corners are pressed into.
Return the joystick to neutral.
6. Press ‘END’ to end the sequence and return to the main menu.
The calibration is saved.
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4.6.9
Combined Lighting Actuator Module (CLAM) Enable
1. Enable the Technician Mode.
2. Press ‘NEXT’ in the main menu until the screen reads :
* * MAIN MENU * *
View or edit Remote
Module ? (Tech Only)
NEXT
YES
Press ‘YES’.
3. The display reads:
CLAM
Disabled. Enable ?
EXIT
NEXT
YES
Pressing ‘YES’ toggles between CLAM enabled and CLAM disabled.
Setting this parameter to ‘enabled’ allows the CLAM or TAM to be used in
the DX System.
Pressing ‘EXIT’ at any time will return you to the Main Menu.
4.6.10
Lighting Module (LM) Enable
1. Enable the Technician Mode.
2. Press ‘NEXT’ in the main menu until the screen reads :
* * MAIN MENU * *
View or edit Remote
Module ? (Tech Only)
NEXT
YES
Press ‘YES’.
Chapter 4 : Programming
23
3. The display reads:
LIGHTING
Disabled. Enable ?
EXIT
NEXT
YES
Pressing ‘YES’ toggles between ‘Enabled’ and ‘Disabled’. Setting this
parameter to ‘Enabled’ allows a Lighting Module to be used in the DX
System. Enabling the Lighting Module will disable the lights on the CLAM.
Pressing ‘EXIT’ at any time will return you to the Main Menu.
4.6.11
Veer Compensation
1. Enable the Technician Mode.
2. Press ‘NEXT’ in the main menu until the screen reads:
* * MAIN MENU * *
View or edit Power
Module ? (Tech only)
NEXT
YES
Press ‘YES’.
3. The display reads:
VIEW/EDIT POWER MOD
Veer Compensation
RIGHT 0%
EXIT
NEXT
LEFT RIGHT
Pressing ‘LEFT’ or ‘RIGHT’ compensates for veer (as a %) in the left or
right motor.
Press ‘NEXT’ to program Load Compensation.
Pressing ‘EXIT’ at any time will return you to the Main Menu.
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
4.6.12
Load Compensation
1. Enable the Technician Mode.
2. Press ‘NEXT’ in the main menu until the screen reads:
* * MAIN MENU * *
View or edit Power
Module ? (Tech only)
NEXT
YES
Press ‘YES’.
3. Press ‘NEXT’ until the Load Compensation screen appears:
VIEW/EDIT POWER MOD
Load Compensation
95 milliohms
EXIT
NEXT
UP
DOWN
Pressing ‘UP’ or ‘DOWN’ raises or lowers the Load Compensation.
Press ‘NEXT’ to program Veer Compensation.
Pressing ‘EXIT’ at any time will return you to the Main Menu.
Chapter 4 : Programming
25
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
5
Operation
5.1
DX System Components
Warning:
The SCR will operate safely at very low temperatures, however, since
the primary user feedback is via an LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) whose
performance can be severely affected by extreme cold temperatures
(below 0°C), users need to be instructed accordingly if the display is a
critical part of the wheelchair operation (e.g. in scanner mode).
If the SCR needs to be operated in extreme cold temperatures, we
recommend the power be left on at all times and a thermal insulating
wrap applied to the SCRs metal case. This will ensure the internal selfheating of the electronics can keep the LCD warm enough to prevent
the display “freezing”.
5.1.1
On/Off System
The On/Off Buttons toggle the DX system power on or off. There are three
ways to turn the DX system On or Off. The On/Off Button on the front panel
(for attendant use) or a switch plugged into the On/Off jack socket on the base
of the SCR. If enabled, an automated ‘Sleep’ feature will automatically power
the DX System down after a programmed amount of time. It will power up
after operation of the normal user input (i.e. joystick or AUX switch if in
Scanning mode).
5.1.2
Battery Gauge Display
Battery charge level is continuously indicated by a set of six LED's. These are
arranged from left to right as two red, two orange and two green.
The Battery Gauge provides true, useable battery capacity information, and
indicates other related battery conditions. Full battery capacity is indicated by
all six LEDs on.
5.2
Joystick OONAPU
The SCR features Out Of Neutral At Power Up (OONAPU) detection. If the
system is powered up or an inhibit condition is removed while the joystick is
Chapter 5 : Operation
27
not in the neutral position, the LCD display will display a fault for either as long
as the condition persists or for a maximum of 5 seconds.
The joystick is used as an example, but this theory can be applied to any input
device interconnected with the DX System (i.e. While powering up, accidental
pressing of the Auxiliary Input switch occurs. The LCD screen displays a fault
for as long as the button is depressed or for a maximum 5 seconds).
Removing an inhibit condition occurs in situations such as changing to a
driving from a non-driving Drive Program, or removing a battery charger. If the
condition persists, after 5 seconds a DX Module Fault (Flash Code 1) is
signalled on the LCD screen. This is a latching fault and must be cleared by
powering the system down and up again (with the joystick in neutral).
An OONAPU fault will also be generated when changing the joystick source. If
the Drive Program is changed, causing a joystick swap while the joystick is
not in the neutral position a latching fault, as described above, will occur. If the
Attendant / User switch on the DX-ACU is toggled while the joystick is not in
the neutral position, the fault is non-latching and the system does not need to
be powered down to clear the fault.
OONAPU can be turned off with the Wizard if it is causing problems for a
user, but should be left on in most circumstances.
5.3
User Input Devices
As there is no input device provided by the SCR itself, a secondary remote
input module is required (unless in Scanning Mode) and must be connected
into the DX System via the DXBUS. Some of these input devices (e.g. TASH)
require an additional DX module to translate the commands into a usable
format. See below for examples of input modules.
Input Module
DCL Part #
Heavy Duty Switched
Joystick
DX-RJM-HD
TASH style switched
input devices
Requirement
DX-5SW
Compact proportional
Joystick
DX-RJM
Sip and Puff
DX-SNP
See Navigating the SCR for Input Device options and use.
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5.4
5.4.1
Modes, Sub-modes and Functions
Modes
The SCR offers the user a vast array of functions, split into a number of
different categories. Each category is referred to as a ‘Mode’. Examples of
Modes are, driving the chair, controlling on-chair ECU functions, etc. These
Modes can be accessed using any of the input devices supported by the DX
System and can be configured by the Wizard Programmer.
A conventional DX Master Remote supports a maximum of 6 Modes (5 driving
plus a seating mode), while the SCR can support up to 8 modes. A list of the
Modes currently supported is provided below.
Mode
Application
Requirement
Drive Mode 1
Drive Chair with tuned response –
e.g. indoors driving
Drive Mode 2
Drive Chair with tuned response –
e.g. outdoors driving
Drive Mode 3
Drive Chair with tuned response –
e.g. sports driving
Drive Mode 4
Drive Chair with tuned response –
etc.
Drive Mode 5
Drive Chair with tuned response –
etc.
Chapter 5 : Operation
29
Seating Control
Control of up to 5 seating functions – DX-TAM or DXe.g. seat raise, back tilt, etc.
CLAM
Lighting Control
Control of headlights, indicators and
hazard lights
DX-CLAM, DXLMZ, or DX-LMTÜV
ECU 8 Output
Control of up to 8 miscellaneous onchair devices – e.g. page turner,
communication aid, etc.
One or two DXECU
Infrared Control
Infrared control of off-chair functions, DX-IRIS
including computer mouse control
DX-PCMR for
computer mouse)
By using the Wizard, it is possible to select up to 8 of these Modes, which can
then be arranged in any order. Care should be taken when assigning Mode
‘locations’ so as to form a logical order of progression for the user as they
toggle through the Modes. An example of a typical 6 Mode selection is given
below.
30
Mode Location
Mode Selected
Mode 8
Mode Unused
Mode 7
Mode Unused
Mode 6
IRIS Mode
Mode 5
Seating Mode
Mode 4
Drive Mode 4 (Sports driving – fastest)
Mode 3
Drive Mode 3
Mode 2
Drive Mode 2
Mode 1
Drive Mode 1 (Indoor driving – slowest)
GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
5.4.2
Sub-modes and Functions
The SCR functionality is more elaborate than that of a single level structure.
Mode - Sub-mode - Function gives a framework (similar to that of a family
tree) of three full levels allowing a structure to be built around each Mode to
satisfy all possibilities of control.
A Sub-mode is a level below that of a Mode. A number of Sub-modes can
branch off a Mode, giving a second level of functionality. Below this is the
Function of that Sub-mode (if required) which enables, yet again, a greater
number of functions. For instance, the Infra Red Integrated System (IRIS) can
send infrared signals controlling a wide variety of devices, such as Televisions
and stereos, each requiring a large number of commands to be controlled.
Therefore the IRIS requires a more complex Mode structure in order to make
fully utilise its functionality.
An example of this structure is given below.
Some modes are less complex and do not require any further levels in order
to define their operation (e.g. Drive Modes).
SCR operation is based on the principle of hierarchy through which the user
can navigate using the chosen input device. The IRIS is probably the most
complex module to be controlled by the SCR but shows the full capabilities of
the DX System. Most, if not all other modules require set-up for Mode and
Function only (any Sub-modes being unnecessary), Drive Modes requiring
only Mode level.
The SCR menu tree can be customized by the Wizard for maximum versatility
for its purpose and minimum actions to perform a task. Programming options
are:
1. Number of Modes (1 to 8)
2. Mode application (e.g. drive, seat control etc.)
3. Defining the number of sub-modes and resulting functions for the IRIS.
4. Defining the number of seating functions.
Chapter 5 : Operation
31
5. Defining the number of ECU functions and whether it is latched or
momentary.
6. Customizing the text displayed on the SCR’s LCD display for each Mode,
Sub-mode and Function.
7. Defining or redefining the text for all ‘miscellaneous’ text and instructions.
5.4.3
Categorising Sub-modes
Sub-modes should be categorised so as to bring some sense to the structure.
This could be by categorising the devices by location (such as kitchen or
bedroom) or by the device type (such as lights or appliances). Every user’s
needs differ so a good knowledge of the user’s habits, environment and
preferences will be required in order to set up the SCR to an optimum level.
5.5
Navigating the SCR
The SCR allows three alternative control options for navigating through the
menu tree and operating functions. These options are configured using the
Wizard to cater for differing levels of disability. Arrows displayed on the LCD
signify the command direction to activate that function. The key for arrow
directions is:
Arrow pointing up
Arrow pointing down
Arrow pointing left
Arrow pointing right
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-
Forward
Reverse
Left
Right
5.5.1
User Input Device plus Mode Switch
This option demands the highest level of user capability, requiring the user to
be able to operate a 4-quadrant input device as well as a separate Mode
switch. Typical input devices are a joystick, Sip and Puff or a switched input
device in combination with a “Buddy Button” for the Mode control. After
configuring the SCR for this device, operation is as follows.
If a Mode option is displayed on the SCR,
each activation of the Mode button cycles through each of the modes before
wrapping back to the first mode.
In each Mode that the user input device has no effect, forward and
reverse commands of the user input device will step forwards or
backwards through the Modes.
If one of the Sub-mode or Function options is displayed,
activation of the Mode button will ‘Escape’ out of the current option and into
the parent Mode’s display. Subsequent pressing of the Mode button will cycle
through the Modes as before.
Some DX input devices already have Mode control capabilities. For
example, a ‘double soft sip’ on the DX-SNP will also result in the
Mode being advanced. If the input device has this capability, this
may be used instead of the “Buddy Button”.
Once the required Mode has been selected, the user input device is used to
negotiate through the Sub-modes and functions available for the currently
selected Mode.
If the Mode has no Sub-mode or Function,
control is automatically available as soon as it is selected. For instance, if a
Drive Mode is currently selected, the input device will now cause the chair to
move at the programmed rate for that Drive Mode.
If the Mode has a Sub-mode or Function,
perform a ‘right’ command with the user input device to select the Mode.
Successive ‘forward’ commands will cycle through the Sub-mode options.
Once the required Sub-mode has been selected, successive ‘right’ commands
will cycle through the available Functions for that Sub-mode. Once the
required Function has been selected, a ‘forward’ or ‘reverse’ command will
perform the required task. At all stages a prompt at the bottom of the LCD
screen will instruct the user as to the required action.
Chapter 5 : Operation
33
5.5.2
User Input Device Only
This option requires the user to be able to operate a 4-quadrant input device.
Typical input devices are a joystick, Sip and Puff or a switched input device.
As this method uses the input device for both selection and operation of the
Mode, conflicts would occur between selection commands and Function
commands. Therefore, a timeout is implemented so that the user input device
will revert back to a Mode selection role after a preset length of inactivity as an
operating device. After configuring the SCR for this device, operation is as
follows.
With this method of control, all mode selections take the form of questions. A
‘forward’ command will cycle through the Modes while a ‘right’ command will
select that Function. From that point, the input device will become the
operating method, in this case causing the chair to move.
The display changes to..
…where ‘Time to exit’ displays and counts down the number of seconds
remaining until the input device reverts back to a Mode selection device. The
amount of time before timeout occurs is programmable by the Wizard.
Every time the input device is used, the Time to exit is reset to the timeout
value. Once zero is reached, the display will reset to the previous level of
action (i.e. from Function to Submenu).
Alternatively, where an Emergency Stop switch is existing in the DX System,
this may be used, when the chair is stationary, to bypass the timer and reset
immediately to the previous level of action.
5.5.3
Scanning Mode
This option requires the use of a single switch only. The SCR automatically
advances through the Mode options at a Wizard programmed rate (e.g. if this
value is programmed to 2 seconds, each Mode option will display for 2
seconds before advancing to the next Mode screen). When the required Mode
is displayed, the user must hit the button to take them either to the Sub-modes
for that Mode (if any) or to the Functions for that mode. Hitting the button
again selects the current Function and the SCR begins scanning through the
control options.
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6
Batteries and Charging
6.1
Battery Type
The DX System is designed to perform optimally with either wet Lead-Acid or
Gel Cell 24 V deep cycle batteries, rated at 20 - 120 Amp hours. The
maximum average discharge rate must not exceed half the rated capacity, in
Amp hours.
High continuous discharge rates dramatically reduce the available battery
capacity. For example, at a discharge rate equal to the rated capacity, the
available capacity is 50 - 60 %. At a discharge rate of half the rated capacity,
the available capacity is 70 - 80 %.
A wheelchair that draws maximum average battery current of 20 A, requires a
battery of at least 40 Amp-hours. A battery of only 20 Amp-hours, would begin
to suffer a drop in performance at about half of its available capacity. The 40
Amp- hour battery would have a full performance range of 4.5 times greater
than the 20 Amp hour battery; a 80 Amp hour battery would only increase this
range by 2.5 when compared to a 40 Amp hour battery.
6.2
Battery Charging
The satisfactory performance of the DX system is critically dependent on the
type and state of the batteries. The battery charger used must be correctly
selected and adjusted according to the battery manufacturer’s instructions.
Failure to do so may damage or destroy the batteries, give poor range, or be
potentially dangerous. Batteries should not be abused (for example by deep
discharging or overcharging) and must be operated and maintained according
to the manufacturer's instructions.
The battery charger socket is a 3-pin XLR type with a pin configuration as
shown overleaf. Ensure that the charger used is compatible with this pin out
before connection. The safety link between B- and the Inhibit pin must be
fitted so that the wheelchair is prevented from driving when the batteries are
being charged. The Profile LED will extinguish to indicate that the wheelchair
is inhibited.
Warning:
Do not disconnect batteries or open circuit the circuit breaker during
charging. This is dangerous to both people and equipment.
Chapter 6 : Batteries and Charging
35
The inhibit pin is shorted to B- external to the DX SCR.
If the SCR is turned on while the charger is plugged in, the LCD screen will
show a message once every 10 seconds. When disconnecting the charger,
the SCR will automatically power down. To continue, press the power button
again.
6.3
Battery Gauge
The Battery Gauge provides true, useable battery capacity information. A full
battery with at least 85 % of rated capacity, is represented by all LEDs lit.
Some new batteries can start with as little as 80% capacity, developing higher
capacity in their early life (up to 110%), before slowly deteriorating over their
rated life.
As the battery voltage drops, the number of LEDs lit reduces from right to left.
When only the red LEDs are lit, the available battery capacity is typically less
than 10 %. At this level and below, the Battery Gauge flashes at 1 flash per
second to alert the user that the wheelchair is running on reserve capacity.
The battery capacity will reduce more rapidly in the reserve capacity range.
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
6.4
Battery Saver
The Battery Saver is a feature programmed into the DX Remote. When the
battery capacity drops below 21V to the reserve range (only two red LEDs lit),
the wheelchair performance is reduced. This is to preserve the life of the
battery by encouraging the user to recharge the battery before it becomes
harmfully flat.
Operating the wheelchair with more than two LEDs of the Battery Gauge lit
will generally give normal wheelchair performance. This is provided that the
battery size and the PM program settings are matched to the wheelchair.
6.5
Battery Condition Warnings
A battery warning is shown by the Battery Gauge flashing its LEDs, the
number of which depends on what it currently has lit.
6.5.1
Battery High Warning Condition
This condition occurs when the battery voltage exceeds 28V, as measured by
the Power Module.
The cause can be:
• The wheelchair is still on charge and the batteries are full or faulty.
• The batteries are overcharged.
• The wheelchair is travelling down a slope and the batteries are full or faulty.
The wheelchair will drive during this warning condition, which will reset
automatically when the battery voltage drops below 28V.
Chapter 6 : Batteries and Charging
37
6.5.2
Battery Low Warning Condition
This condition occurs when the battery voltage drops below 23.3V, when the
joystick is in neutral.
The cause can be :
If the Battery Gauge flashes with orange or green
LEDs lit, but the cause is not due to a Battery High
warning condition, the battery or battery wiring may
be faulty.
If the Battery Gauge flashes with just the left 2 or 3
LEDs after stopping the wheelchair, the battery may
be too small for the wheelchair type, or the battery
may be old or damaged.
The wheelchair will drive during this fault condition, but the flashing will
continue until the joystick is returned to neutral again.
A Battery Low warning normally coincides with a Low Capacity warning.
6.5.3
Low Capacity Warning Condition
When the calculated available battery capacity drops below 10% of full
capacity the two left most red LEDs flash.
The wheelchair will drive during this condition but it shows that the battery is in
the reserve capacity range and battery capacity will begin to reduce rapidly.
The Low Capacity warning will not stop until the batteries have been
recharged adequately.
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
7
Accessories + Parts List
DX Remote diagnostics can be examined from two platforms: from the fault
displayed on the LCD screen of the SCR (and on the HHP); and from the Wizard,
which can provide more detailed information about the fault.
7.1
Fault Display
Any fault condition on the DX system will cause the LCD screen on the SCR to
display the fault (approximately every 20 seconds). The title of the fault is also
displayed by the HHP if connected to the faulty wheelchair.
Faults that affect the safety of the chair will cause the chair to stop while less
critical ones will be indicated but allow the chair to continue driving. Some faults will
automatically clear when the fault condition is removed, in which case the fault will
no longer be displayed and the wheelchair may be driven normally. Other faults are
latched and must be cleared by turning the DX System off, waiting for five seconds,
and turning it back on again.
DX System Status
LED Flash Code
1
Likely Cause of Condition and Possible Action
DX Module Fault (see Limp Mode below)
Cause:
An Auto Download has occurred.
Action:
Turn the Remote off, leave for 5 seconds, then turn on
again.
Cause:
The Remote is not correctly programmed.
Action:
Try reprogramming the Remote.
Cause:
Connection between DX Modules may be faulty, or there
may be an internal fault in a Module.
Action:
Check DXBUS connections and replace where
necessary.
If the Status LED on another Module is flashing,
replace the Module.
An expected module may not be present (e.g. the DX
Lighting Module).
Chapter 7 : Diagnostics and Fault Finding
39
DX System Status
LED Flash Code
2
3
4
5
6
40
Likely Cause of Condition and Possible Action
DX Accessory Fault
Cause:
There is a fault in an accessory device attached to a DX
Module (excluding the PM). Examples of faults in
accessory devices may be: the clutch is, or has been,
disengaged; a light bulb is short or open circuit; an
actuator terminal is shorted to Battery +.
Action:
Check all accessory devices connected to your DX
System.
Left (M1) Motor Fault
Cause:
The connection from the PM left (M1) connector to its
associated motor, or the motor itself, is defective. The
connection is either open or short circuit.
Action:
Disconnect the left motor plug and check continuity
between the motor pins on M1.
Right (M2) Motor Fault
Cause:
The connection from the PM right (M2) connector to its
associated motor, or the motor itself, is defective. The
connection is either open or short circuit.
Action:
Disconnect the right motor plug and check continuity
between the motor pins on M2.
Left (M1) Park Brake Fault
Cause:
The M1 plug connection to its associated Park brake is
either open or short circuit.
Action:
Disconnect the M1 plug and check continuity between
the two Positronic park brake pins.
Right (M2) Park Brake Fault
Cause:
The M2 plug connection to its associated Park brake is
either open or short circuit.
Action:
Disconnect the M2 plug and check continuity between
the two Positronic park brake pins.
GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
DX System Status
LED Flash Code
7
Likely Cause of Condition and Possible Action
Low Battery Fault
Cause:
The battery charge is not sufficient to allow safe driving. It
has fallen below 17V.
Action:
Check battery connection and terminals. The battery
voltage should be similar when the battery is on
charge, and when it isn’t.
Check that fuses have not blown, or circuit breakers
tripped.
Replace battery if worn out or if capacity is insufficient
for the user’s needs.
Note: The wheelchair will behave sluggishly and the
Battery Gauge will flash indicating low battery voltage
prior to the display of this fault.
8
Over Voltage Fault
Cause:
The battery voltage has exceeded 32V.
Action:
If this fault occurs during battery charging, the battery
charger is defective or incorrectly adjusted.
Check the battery chargers open circuit voltage is in
accordance with the battery manufacturers limits, and
is less than 32V.
9
Cause:
The battery connector is making intermittent contact when
the wheelchair is stopped, or travelling down a slope.
Action:
Check that the battery wiring and terminating is
secure.
CANL Fault (see Limp Mode below)
Cause:
1. An invalid voltage has been detected on the DXBUS
CANL line.
2. Communication is not possible using the CANL wire.
Action:
Check the continuity of the DXBUS cable.
Check for shorts between DXBUS pins. An open or
short circuit on another DX Module can cause this
fault.
Chapter 7 : Diagnostics and Fault Finding
41
DX System Status
LED Flash Code
10
Likely Cause of Condition and Possible Action
CANH Fault (see Limp Mode below)
Cause:
1. An invalid voltage has been detected on the DXBUS
CANH line.
2. Communication is not possible using the CANH wire,
or the CANH and CANL wires are shorted together.
3. Hazard lights were turned on when the DX System
was turned on.
4. The CANH is used to generate a Kill signal by any DX
Module, which detects an unsafe condition, or by an
external device such as an emergency stop switch.
5. The CANH wire is pulled to either Battery + or Battery
- and causes the DX System to shut down.
Action:
Check the continuity of the DXBUS cable.
Check for shorts between DXBUS pins. An open or
short circuit on another DX Module can cause this
fault.
If the Hazard Lights were already switched on when
the DX System was turned on, Flash Code 10 and
Limp Mode (slow driving) may result.
To clear this fault, turn the Hazard Lights off, then turn
the DX System off then on again.
If generated by a Kill signal, the cause of the fault is
severe.
11
42
Stall Timeout Fault
Cause:
The motor current has been at, or close to, current limit for
longer than the Stall Timeout parameter value.
Action:
Turn the DX System off and then on again.
GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
DX System Status
LED Flash Code
12
Module Mismatch
Cause:
7.2
Likely Cause of Condition and Possible Action
There is a compatibility problem between DX Modules in
the System. The wheelchair will be disabled.
Action:
Consult your Dynamic Service Centre.
Cause:
The data held by the Remote for another DX Module is
corrupt or incompatible with that module.
Action:
Reprogramming the wheelchair system may correct
this problem.
Limp Mode
If the DX System detects some faults, it will revert to Limp Mode. This is a reduced
speed mode, which recognises problems, but allows the wheelchair user to limp
home, where the problem can be assessed.
Warning:
If the DX System is displaying a fault and the chair enters Limp
Mode, do not operate except to reach a safe environment. Proceed
with caution as the chair performance may be significantly altered.
Have the chair serviced by a Service Agent.
Chapter 7 : Diagnostics and Fault Finding
43
7.3
Wizard Diagnostics
The Wizard is used to provide diagnostics for the DX Remote.
7.3.1
To View Diagnostics
1. Enter the Wizard's Main screen as described in the Wizard Installation Sheet.
2. Select the ‘Diagnostics’ menu.
The menu displays the following options:
Status Report
Print Report
Save Report to File
View Chair Log
Erase Chair Log
Print Chair Log prints the Status Report followed by the Chair Log. These reports
should be sent along with a faulty controller to a Service Centre. Contact a
Dynamic Sales and Service Centre (refer to Sales and Service Information).
7.4
Status Report
Status report gives you the current status of the wheelchair, including faults and
other warning conditions currently active. Pressing «?» or selecting ‘Info’ will
display further information about the condition. Some conditions in the Status
Report are not caused by actual faults, but are only temporary conditions e.g. a
motor lead was not connected when the DX System was turned on and driving was
attempted, producing a Motor Fault.
7.4.1
View Status Report
1. Enter the Wizard's Main screen as described in the Wizard Installation Sheet.
2. Select the ‘Diagnostics’ menu.
3. Select ‘Status Report’.
4. From the ‘Modules Attached’ menu, select ‘UCM Remote’.
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7.4.2
Print Report
1. Enter the Wizard's Main screen as described in the Wizard Installation Sheet.
2. Select the ‘Diagnostics’ menu.
3. Select ‘Print Report’.
4. Enter any additional information required that can be printed along with the
status report.
7.4.3
Save Report to File
1. Enter the Wizard's Main screen as described in the Wizard Installation Sheet.
2. Select the ‘Diagnostics’ menu.
3. Select ‘Save Report to File’.
4. Enter any additional information required that can be saved along with the
status report.
5. Enter the location where you would like to save the text document.
7.5
Chair Log
The Chair Log displays all faults and warning conditions recorded for the
wheelchair since the Chair Log was last erased. Some conditions logged in the
Chair Log are not caused by actual faults, but are only temporary conditions e.g. a
motor lead was not connected when the DX System was turned on and driving was
attempted, producing a Motor Fault. It is recommended to erase the Chair Log
once the system is fully functional as only the previous 15 fault conditions are
recorded.
7.5.1
View the Chair Log
1. Enter the Wizard's Main Menu screen as described in the Wizard Installation
Sheet.
2. Select the ‘Diagnostics’ menu.
3. Select ‘Chair Log’.
4. From the ‘Modules Attached’ menu, select ‘UCM Remote’.
Chapter 7 : Diagnostics and Fault Finding
45
7.5.2
Erase the Chair Log
1. Enter the Wizard's Main Menu screen as described in the Wizard Installation
Sheet.
2. Select the ‘Diagnostics’ menu.
3. Select ‘Erase Chair Log’.
4. From the ‘Modules Attached’ menu, select ‘UCM Remote’.
7.5.3
Chair Log Codes
Below are listed the Chair Log codes and probable causes of these faults. If the
suggested action does not remove the fault, contact a Sales and Service Centre.
Message
Probable Cause and Action
CPU / General Fault
Cause:
Internal Fault
Action:
Replace Remote.
Consult an approved Dynamic Service Agent.
ADC Fault
Cause:
Internal Fault
Action:
Replace Remote.
Consult an approved Dynamic Service Agent.
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
Message
Probable Cause and Action
CAN Short Fault
Cause:
Short between CANL and CANH.
Action:
The short may be within a module or within a DX Cable, or the
exposed DXBUS contacts may be shorted by foreign material.
Ensure that all DXBUS contacts are clean.
Warning: Open circuit breaker or disconnect from PM before
probing around DXBUS connectors.
Disconnect any optional modules and turn on the Remote. Use
the Wizard Status Report to check if the CAN shorted fault is still
present. If possible, substitute the DXBUS Cable between the
Remote and the PM. Disconnect any unnecessary DXBUS
Cables. When the fault no longer occurs, add cables and
modules one by one until the faulty cable or module is identified.
Replace the faulty part. If the fault remains, try replacing the
Remote and the PM.
If the fault cannot be reproduced, check all cables and DX
connectors for foreign material or damage.
CANL Fault
Cause:
CANL Failure
Action:
Check for a short from CANH to another DXBUS wire, or a short
from CANL to DXBUS – or DXBUS +.
Wake-up Fault
Cause:
Action:
Incorrect voltage on CANH.
Check for a short from CANH to another DXBUS wire, or a short
from CANL to DXBUS – or DXBUS +.
Check battery wire terminations.
Chapter 7 : Diagnostics and Fault Finding
47
Message
Probable Cause and Action
JS OONAPU Occurrence
Cause:
The joystick was Out Of Neutral At Power Up. This is a fault
condition produced if the DX System is turned on while the joystick
is not in the neutral or non-driving position.
Allow the joystick to return to neutral and turn the DX System off
then on again.
Action:
Power Button Open Circuit
Cause:
The Remote On/Off switch may be short or open circuit.
Action:
Check for broken wires or faulty connections.
Turn the Remote off then on again.
Power Button Stuck
Cause:
The Remote On/Off switch may have been held down too long, or
appears to be short-circuited or a wire to the power button is broken.
Action:
Check for broken wires or faulty connections.
Turn the Remote off then on again.
Joystick Mirror Fault
Cause:
Joystick internal fault.
Action:
Replace joystick.
Consult an approved Dynamic Service Agent.
Joystick Absolute Error Fault
Cause:
Joystick internal fault.
Action:
Replace joystick.
Consult an approved Dynamic Service Agent.
Joystick Fault
48
Cause:
The joystick may need to be re-calibrated.
Action:
Consult an approved Dynamic Service Agent.
GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
8
Appendices
8.1
Specifications
8.1.1
Electrical Specifications
Parameter
Compatible with standard DXBUS
Operating voltage range
Charger rating
Quiescent Current
8.1.2
Value
18V - 32V dc
12A RMS continuous, limited by DXBUS
rating
<1mA Off, typically 100mA On
Mechanical Specifications
Parameter
Value
Weight
Dimensions
Mounting
Case material
0.8 Kg
114mm x 89mm x 55mm
As per SCR Mounting
Die-cast box, black powder coat finish
Chapter 8 : Appendices
49
8.1.3
Environmental Specifications
Parameter
Min
Max
Units
Operating ambient temperature range
Storage temperature range
Operating and storage humidity
0*
-25
10
50
70
90
°C
°C
%RH
Parameter
Value
Environmental Protection Rating
RFI Immunity
RFI Emissions
ESD
Durability
Vibration specification
IP54, ISO 7176: part 9 *
ISO 7176: part 21
CISPR 11, Class B
IEC 801-2, 8kV
ISO 7176: part 14 (pending)
BS2011: part 2Fd and BS7527: section
3.5, class 5M3
* Warning:
The SCR will operate safely at very low temperatures, however, since
the primary user feedback is via an LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) whose
performance can be severely affected by extreme cold temperatures
(below 0°C), users need to be instructed accordingly if the display is a
critical part of the wheelchair operation (e.g. in scanner mode).
If the SCR needs to be operated in extreme cold temperatures, we
recommend the power be left on at all times and a thermal insulating
wrap applied to the SCRs metal case. This will ensure the internal selfheating of the electronics can keep the LCD warm enough to prevent
the display “freezing”.
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
8.2
Intended Use and Regulatory Statement
Intended Use
The DX-SCR Speciality Controls Remote is an accessory of the DX system
intended to allow the user to interact with the DX system. The DX-SCR offers
flexibility in integrating a variety of input and output devices, and provides extensive
adaptability to meet specific user needs through optimal programmability.
Device Classification
Europe
The DX-SCR Speciality Controls Remote is a component of a Class I medical
device as detailed in the Council Directive 93/42/EEC concerning Medical Devices.
USA
The DX-SCR Speciality Controls Remote is a component of a Class II medical
device (Powered Wheelchair) as detailed in 21 CFR § 890.3860.
Compliance and Conformance with Standards
In accordance with the device classification, the DX-SCR Speciality Controls
Remote is designed to comply with the requirements of the European Medical
Device Directive and 21CFR 820.30.
The DX-SCR Speciality Controls Remote has been designed such that the
combination of the wheelchair and the controller along with accessories as
applicable, complies with the requirements of the MDD Harmonised standards EN
12182 & EN12184 and the FDA Consensus standard ISO7176 for performance.
However, final compliance of the complete wheelchair system with international
and national standards is the responsibility of the wheelchair manufacturer or
installer.
If Dynamic Controls controllers are fitted to vehicles or applications other than
wheelchairs and scooters, testing to appropriate standards for the particular
application must be completed, as ISO7176 may be inappropriate.
Chapter 8 : Appendices
51
8.3
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC)
Since EMC is dependant on a particular installation, each variation must be tested.
The guidelines in this section are written to assist with meeting EMC requirements.
Minimising Emissions
Motors:
Motor brushes generate electromagnetic emissions. It may be
necessary to fit capacitors between the brush holders and motor
case. Ensure the leads are kept as short as possible.
A suitable capacitor is 4n7, 250V Ceramic.
Wiring:
Keep wire lengths as short as practical for a tidy layout.
Minimise any wire loops, particularly loops of single wires as opposed
to wire pairs.
Endeavour to run wires in pairs or bunches.
Where practical, tie cables to wheelchair frame.
Immunity to Radiated Fields
Follow the wiring recommendations for minimising emissions.
Immunity to ESD
Follow the wiring recommendations for minimising emissions.
Ensure all vehicle sub-frames are electrically connected.
Ensure speed-setting potentiometers are electrically connected to the
vehicle frame.
Do not leave connections unnecessarily exposed.
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
8.4
Maintenance
1. All vehicle components should be regularly checked for loose, damaged or corroded
connectors, terminals, or cabling. All cables and connectors should be restrained to
protect them from damage. Damaged components should be replaced.
2. All switchable functions on the Dynamic electronics system should be regularly
tested to ensure they function correctly.
3. All Dynamic electronic components should be kept free of dust, dirt and liquids. If
necessary, wipe with a cloth dampened with warm water. Do not use solvents or
abrasive cleaners.
4. Where any doubt exists, consult your nearest service centre or agent.
5. There are no user-serviceable parts in any Dynamic electronic component. Do not
attempt to open any case, or undertake any repairs, else warranty claims will be
affected.
Warning:
If any component is damaged in any way, or if internal damage may have
occurred (for example by being dropped), have it checked by qualified
personnel before operating.
Chapter 8 : Appendices
53
8.5
Warranty
All equipment supplied by Dynamic Controls is warranted by the company to be
free from faulty materials or workmanship. If any defect is found within the warranty
period, the company will repair the equipment, or at its discretion, replace the
equipment without charge for materials and labour.
This Warranty is subject to the provisions that the equipment:
• has been thoroughly checked upon completion of installation, and all programmable
options correctly adjusted for safe operation prior to use.
• has been correctly installed.
• has been used solely in accordance with this manual.
• has been properly connected to a suitable power supply in accordance with this
manual.
• has not been subjected to misuse or accident, or been modified or repaired by any
person other than someone authorised by Dynamic Controls.
• has been used solely for the driving of electrically powered wheelchairs in
accordance with the wheelchair manufacturer's recommendations.
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
8.6
Safety and Misuse Warnings
Warnings to be included in the User Manual
The following warnings are applicable to the installer and must be passed on to the
end-user before use of the product.
• Do not install, maintain or operate this equipment without reading, understanding and
following the proper instructions and manuals, otherwise injury or damage can result.
• INDOOR USE ONLY – The design of this product is not inherently waterproof and
should be protected from water ingress as appropriate to chair usage and mounting
considerations.
• No user-serviceable parts inside.
• A warning must be conveyed to the operator that he or she has the responsibility to
ensure that the vehicle is kept in a good safe operating condition, and to ensure that
components, such as cables and connectors, are protected from damage by securing
them in optimum positions.
• A warning must be conveyed to the operator that the controller could cause the vehicle
to come to a sudden stop. In situations where this might affect the safety of the
operator, the fitting and wearing of a seat belt is required.
• Performance adjustments should only be made by professionals in the health care field
or by persons fully conversant with the adjustment process and the operator’s
capabilities. Incorrect settings could cause injury to the operator or bystanders, or
damage to the vehicle or surrounding property.
• Users and suppliers of assistive mobility products should give consideration to the
possibility of a failure to operate or an incorrect operation by the product. If an operator
is left with limited or no mobility due to equipment failure, he or she should still be able
to summon assistance to any location.
• The user should turn the system off before getting in and out of the vehicle.
• Do not operate the vehicle if it behaves erratically, or shows abnormal response,
heating, smoke or arcing. Turn the system off at once and consult your service agent.
• Do not operate the vehicle if the battery is nearly flat as a dangerous situation might
result due to loss of power in an inopportune place.
• Ensure the vehicle is turned off when not in use.
• If the vehicle drives without demand, press the Power button.
• The vehicle must not be driven with the manual park-brake release operated.
• The manual park-brake release should not be operated on a slope.
Chapter 8 : Appendices
55
• If the vehicle speed surges when going down hill, the common reason is the operation
of an over-voltage protective device. When running down hill, the braking energy from
the motor is sent to the battery, which charges it. However, if the battery is fully
charged, it cannot accept the generated energy without dramatically increasing its
voltage. If this over-voltage condition were allowed to continue, there would be a risk of
damage to the battery or an explosion. To prevent these risks, the controller forces the
vehicle to slow down until the battery voltage drops to a safe level, after which it allows
the vehicle to speed up again. To prevent speed surging with charged batteries, we
advise operators to descend hills slowly.
• Do not operate the controller outside the specified temperature range.
• A warning should be conveyed to the operator that at extreme controller temperatures,
the controller’s ability to absorb energy is restricted. Thus, operation of the controller on
steep grades, such as hills, might result in a rollaway situation.
• Operation of a vehicle on steep slopes might be hazardous.
• No connector pins should be touched, because contamination or damage due to
electrostatic discharge might result.
• Most electronic equipment is influenced by radio frequency interference (RFI). Caution
should be exercised with regard to the use of portable communications equipment in
the area around such equipment. While Dynamic Controls has made every effort to
ensure that RFI does not cause problems, very strong signals could still cause a
problem. It is the responsibility of the vehicle manufacturer to ensure that the vehicle is
tested in accordance with local EMC regulations.
• If RFI causes erratic behaviour, turn the vehicle off immediately. Turn the vehicle off
before using cell phones or portable communications devices.
• In the event of the fault indicator flashing while driving, the operator must ensure that
the system is behaving normally. If not, the system must be turned off and a service
agent contacted.
• Report any malfunctions immediately to your service agent.
Service and Configuration Warnings
The following warnings are applicable to the installation technician only.
• After the vehicle has been configured, check to make sure the vehicle performs to the
specifications entered in the programming procedure. If the vehicle does not perform to
specifications, reprogram it. Repeat this procedure until the vehicle performs to
specifications. If the intended operation cannot be achieved, contact your service agent.
• The completed installation must be thoroughly checked, and all programmable options
correctly adjusted, for safe operation prior to use.
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GBK64327 Issue 3, May 2003
8.7
Contact Details
Dynamic has a global network of sales and service centres. Please contact your
nearest Dynamic representative for Sales and/or Service advice, or contact us
directly through our web site:
Chapter 8 : Appendices
57
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