XM-500 XM to Ethernet Gateway Module Users Guide

XM-500 XM to Ethernet Gateway Module Users Guide
XM-500
XM to Ethernet Gateway
Module
Users Guide
Important User Information
Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of
electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines for the Application, Installation and
Maintenance of Solid State Controls (Publication SGI-1.1 available from your local
Rockwell Automation sales office or online at http://www.ab.com/manuals/gi)
describes some important differences between solid state equipment and hard-wired
electromechanical devices. Because of this difference, and also because of the wide
variety of uses for solid state equipment, all persons responsible for applying this
equipment must satisfy themselves that each intended application of this equipment is
acceptable.
In no event will Rockwell Automation, Inc. be responsible or liable for indirect or
consequential damages resulting from the use or application of this equipment.
The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for illustrative purposes.
Because of the many variables and requirements associated with any particular
installation, Rockwell Automation, Inc. cannot assume responsibility or liability for
actual use based on the examples and diagrams.
No patent liability is assumed by Rockwell Automation, Inc. with respect to use of
information, circuits, equipment, or software described in this manual.
Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part, without written
permission of Rockwell Automation, Inc. is prohibited.
Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations.
WARNING
IMPORTANT
ATTENTION
Identifies information about practices or circumstances
that can cause an explosion in a hazardous environment,
which may lead to personal injury or death, property
damage, or economic loss.
Identifies information that is critical for successful
application and understanding of the product.
Identifies information about practices or circumstances
that can lead to personal injury or death, property
damage, or economic loss. Attentions help you:
• identify a hazard
• avoid a hazard
• recognize the consequence
SHOCK HAZARD
Labels may be located on or inside the drive to alert
people that dangerous voltage may be present.
BURN HAZARD
Labels may be located on or inside the drive to alert
people that surfaces may be dangerous temperatures.
XM is a registered trademark of Entek IRD International Corporation, a Rockwell Automation company.
RSLinx, RSNetWorx for DeviceNet, and RSMACC are trademarks of Rockwell Software, Inc.
DeviceNet is a trademark of Open DeviceNet Vendor Association (ODVA), Inc.
EtherNet/IP is a trademark of ControlNet International LTD.
Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders and are hereby acknowledged.
European Communities (EC)
Directive Compliance
If this product has the CE mark it is approved for installation within the European
Union and EEA regions. It has been designed and tested to meet the following
directives.
EMC Directive
This product is tested to meet the Council Directive 89/336/EEC Electromagnetic
Compatibility (EMC) by applying the following standards, in whole or in part,
documented in a technical construction file:
• EN 50081-2 EMC — Generic Emission Standard, Part 2 — Industrial
Environment
• EN 61000-6-2 EMC — Generic Immunity Standard, Part 6-2 —
Industrial Environment
This product is intended for use in an industrial environment.
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction
Introducing the XM-500 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Features of the XM-500 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
DeviceNet Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Ethernet Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
XM-500 Hardware Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Using this Manual. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Organization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Document Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Customer Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Chapter 2
Installing the XM-500 Module
Mounting the XM-500 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Installing the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Removing the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Connecting Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Connecting to DeviceNet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Connecting the Module to the DeviceNet Network . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Node Address and Baud Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Electronic Data Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Connecting the Serial Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Connecting to Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Wiring the RJ45 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Connecting the Module to the Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Module Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Gateway Status Indicator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Module Status Indicator (DeviceNet). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Network Status Indicator (DeviceNet). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Activity Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Link Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Network Status Indicator (Ethernet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Module Status Indicator (Ethernet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
XM-500 Module Power Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Chapter 3
Configuring the XM-500 for Your
EtherNet/IP Network
v
MAC Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Setting the IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
On-board DIP Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
XM-500 Module Web Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
DHCP/BootP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
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Table of Contents
vi
Chapter 4
Setting Up an Ethernet Driver in
RSLinx
Registering the EDS File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Using RSLinx to Configure Your Ethernet Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Chapter 5
Configuring the XM-500 using the
Enterprise Online Configuration
Utility
Browsing the Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Setting the Node Address and Baud Rate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Configuring the DeviceNet Scanlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Configuring Automatic Device Replacement (ADR). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Event Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Chapter 6
Configuring the XM-500 using
RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
Browsing the Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Setting the Node Address and Baud Rate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Configuring the DeviceNet Scanlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Configuring Automatic Device Replacement (ADR). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Chapter 7
I/O Data
Understanding the Data Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
EtherNet/IP Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
I/O Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Explicit Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
DeviceNet Assembly Object Instance Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
COS Assembly Instance Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Poll Assembly Instance Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Input and Output Data Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Output Data Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Input Data Format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
I/O Data Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Request COS data from an XM-120 at node address 10 . . . . . . . . 65
Request Poll data from an XM-120 at node address 11. . . . . . . . . 65
Appendix A
Specifications
Technical Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Appendix B
Modbus/TCP
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Supported Modbus Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Supported Exception Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Modbus/TCP Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Output Addressing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Input Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Data Register Addressing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Register Data Format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Data Endian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Table of Contents
vii
Examples of Using Modbus Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Request COS data from XM-120 at Node Address 10 . . . . . . . . . 72
Request relay 1 status (in COS data) from XM-120 at node
address 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Request poll data from XM-120 at node address 11 . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Appendix C
Upgrading the XM-500 Firmware
Installing the ControlFLASH Firmware Upgrade Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Upgrading the Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Glossary
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Index
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
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viii
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Chapter
1
Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of the XM-500 XM to Ethernet Gateway
module, its primary features, and a description of the hardware. It also
discusses using the manual and Customer Support.
For information about
Introducing the XM-500
Module
See page
Introducing the XM-500 Module
1
Features of the XM-500 Module
2
System Requirements
3
XM-500 Hardware Description
4
Using this Manual
5
Customer Support
6
The XM-500 XM to Ethernet Gateway module connects Information or
Control level networks to your XM® DeviceNet network.
Figure 1.1 XM DeviceNet network
1440-VST02-01RA
DYNAMIC MEASUREMENT
1440-TSP02-01RB
POSITION
1440-RMA00-04RC
MASTER RELAY
1440-REX00-04RD
EXPANSION RELAY
Ethernet Gateway
EtherNet/IP Network
The XM-500 provides DeviceNet Master functionality establishing
connections to collect measurement and alarm/relay data from XM modules.
If it is configured for Input Sharing, the XM-500 listens for the measurement
and alarm/relay data on the connections set up by the Primary Master.
The XM-500 allows connectivity to 63 XM slave devices and provides an
Ethernet TCP/IP interface that supports IT protocols such as SMTP, FTP,
HTTP, and control protocols such as EtherNet/IP and Modbus/TCP.
1
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
2
Introduction
Examples of XM-500 XM to Ethernet Gateway applications:
• XM-500 can be used as a gateway to connect information or control
level networks to XM measurement and relay modules for
configuration, control, or data collection.
• XM-500 can provide router functionality to connect EtherNet/IP to an
XM DeviceNet network.
The XM-500 is a member of the Entek XM Series, a family of DIN rail
mounted condition monitoring and protection modules that operate both in
stand-alone applications or integrate with Programmable Logic Controllers
(PLCs) and control system networks.
Features of the XM-500
Module
The section describes the features available in the XM-500 module. For more
information on DeviceNet and EtherNet/IP, visit the ODVA web site at
http://www.odva.org.
DeviceNet Features
• DeviceNet Master Scanner functionality supporting up to 63 XM slave
devices.
• Supports Explicit Messages, Polling, Change of State (COS), and Bit
Strobe I/O messaging.
• Baud rates 125, 250, and 500 kbps.
• Automatic Address Recovery may be configured to replace a faulted
slave device with a replacement device at the same node address.
• Configuration Recovery may be configured so that a newly replaced
slave can be configured to the same settings of the device it replaces.
This feature combined with Automatic Address Recovery is known as
Automatic Device Recovery (ADR).
• Supports 8K bytes of Input only (data from the XM modules). Data is
not sent to the XM modules.
• Event Logging captures time-stamped records of important changes
that occur in the XM-500 or in the XM slave devices.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Introduction
3
Ethernet Features
• Supports the EtherNet/IP protocol, Adapter Class with I/O Server,
Message Client, Message Server, and CIP Message Routing.
• Supports the Modbus/TCP protocol with up to eight simultaneous
connections. Conforms to the Modbus/TCP specification 1.0.
• Features UPD and TCP/IP protocol stack.
• Supports DHCP/BootP and ARP for IP address configuration.
System Requirements
You need the following the hardware and software components to use the
XM-500 module.
Hardware
•
•
•
•
XM-500 XM to Ethernet Gateway module
DeviceNet and Ethernet cabling
PC or other controller with access to Ethernet network
PC to configure the XM-500 module
Software
• EtherNet/IP protocol communication software
• RSLinx™ 2.40 or later; this is the communication software for the
XM-500 module
• XM Emonitor® Gateway, RSMACC Enterprise Online Condition
Monitor, or RSNetWorx™ for DeviceNet™ version 3.00 or later; this is
the configuration tool for the XM-500 module.
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4
Introduction
XM-500 Hardware
Description
Figure 1.2 shows the components of the XM-500 module.
Figure 1.2 XM-500 Ethernet Gateway module
Located at the bottom of the XM-500 are connectors for the power supply,
DeviceNet, Ethernet, and RS232. There is also an eight position dip switch to
set a portion of a default IP address that may be used to establish an intranet
connection.
On the front of the XM-500 are seven LED indicators (Figure 1.3), which
include four Ethernet status indicators, two DeviceNet status indicators, and a
general operation status indicator (Gateway Status).
Figure 1.3 XM-500 Status LEDs
On the back is a mounting bracket to mount the module on a 35 mm steel
DIN rail.
Refer to Chapter 2 for details on installing and using the XM-500 module, and
for interpreting the LED status indicators.
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Introduction
Using this Manual
5
This manual introduces you to the XM-500 XM to Ethernet Gateway module.
It is intended for anyone who installs, configures, or uses the XM-500 to
connect a control level network to an XM DeviceNet network.
We assume you have a good understanding of Ethernet and TCP/IP protocol.
Organization
To help you navigate through this manual, it is organized in chapters based on
these tasks and topics.
Chapter 1 “Introduction” contains an overview of this manual and using
Rockwell Automation Integrated Condition Monitoring Technical Support
services.
Chapter 2 “Installing the XM-500 Module” describes how to install and use
the XM-500 module. It also describes the LED status indicators.
Chapter 3 “Configuring the XM-500 for your EtherNet/IP Network:”
explains how to assign an IP address to the XM-500 module.
Chapter 4 “Setting Up an Ethernet Driver in RSLinx” describes the steps to
register the module’s EDS file and to configure the RSLinx Ethernet
communication driver.
Chapter 5 “Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online
Configuration Utility” provides instructions to help you configure the XM-500
using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility software.
Chapter 6 “Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet”
provides instructions to help you configure the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for
DeviceNet software.
Chapter 7 “I/O Data” explains how to read I/O data from the XM DeviceNet
devices through the XM-500.
Appendix A “Specifications” lists the technical specifications for the XM-500
module.
Appendix B “Modbus/TCP” provides a list of Modbus/TCP commands and
exception codes supported by the XM-500 module.
Appendix C “Upgrading the XM-500 Firmware” describes how to upgrade the
XM-500 firmware with the ControlFLASH program.
For definitions of terms used in this Guide, see the Glossary at the end of the
Guide.
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6
Introduction
Document Conventions
There are several document conventions used in this manual, including the
following:
The XM-500 XM to Ethernet Gateway module is referred to as XM-500,
XM-500 module, module, or device throughout this manual.
TIP
EXAMPLE
Customer Support
A tip indicates additional information which may be
helpful.
This convention presents an example.
If you are under warranty or have an active ESAFE Agreement, Rockwell
Automation Integrated Condition Monitoring Technical Support provides a
variety of customer support services for Entek products. In the United States
you can reach the Technical Support Hotline by dialing 1-800-368-3547
Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m. eastern time. You can send a fax
detailing your questions or comments 24 hours a day by dialing (513)
576-4213. Please address the fax to the Technical Support department. You
can also reach Technical Support from your computer.
• Send questions or comments to raenteksupport@ra.rockwell.com.
• Visit our web site at http://support.rockwellautomation.com/entek/.
For support outside of the United States, please contact your local Rockwell
Automation office. You can find worldwide contact information at
http://www.rockwellautomation.com. If your local support representative is
not available, please contact the U.S. Technical Support department.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Chapter
2
Installing the XM-500 Module
This chapter discusses how to install the XM-500 module. It also describes the
LED status indicators.
For information about
See page
Mounting the XM-500 Module
8
Connecting Power
9
Connecting to DeviceNet
10
Connecting the Serial Port
12
Connecting to Ethernet
12
Module Indicators
13
XM-500 Module Power Up
16
ATTENTION
Environment and Enclosure
This equipment must be mounted within an enclosure that is
suitably designed for those specific environmental conditions
that will be present, and appropriately designed to prevent
personal injury resulting from accessibility to live parts. The
interior of the enclosure must be accessible only by the use of a
tool. Subsequent sections of this publication may contain
additional information regarding specific enclosure type ratings
that are required to comply with certain product safety
certifications.
See NEMA Standards publication 250 and IEC publication
60529, as applicable, for explanations of the degrees of
protection provided by different types of enclosures.
7
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8
Installing the XM-500 Module
Mounting the XM-500
Module
The XM-500 module should be mounted on a standard 35 mm steel DIN rail.
Installing the Module
Follow these steps to mount the XM-500 onto the DIN rail.
1. Hook the mounting bracket over the 35 x 7.5 mm DIN rail.
Figure 2.1 Mounting the module
DIN
Rail
Side
View
2. While pressing the module against the rail, snap the module into
position.
Removing the Module
If you need to remove the XM-500 module from the DIN rail, press the
module (on the spring side) against the DIN rail and lift up.
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Installing the XM-500 Module
9
The XM-500 module requires 24 volts DC power. The power connection is a
2-pin terminal block. The female terminal block connector is shipped with
your module.
Connecting Power
1. Wire the female connector as shown.
Figure 2.2 Wiring the power connector
2. Insert the connector into the 2-pin socket immediately left of the 9-pin
D shell at the bottom of the module.
Figure 2.3 Connecting the module to the power supply
Power Supply
The module will start immediately when power is applied.
TIP
There is no On/Off switch on the module itself.
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10
Installing the XM-500 Module
Connecting to DeviceNet
Connecting the Module to the DeviceNet Network
A 5-pin linear (screw terminal) plug is used to connect the XM-500 module to
the DeviceNet network. The female connector is shipped with your XM-500.
1. Wire the DeviceNet cable to the female connector as shown.
Figure 2.4 Wiring the DeviceNet cable
ATTENTION
You must ground the DeviceNet shield at only one
location. Connecting the Shield will ground the DeviceNet
shield at the XM-500 module. If you intend to terminate
the shield elsewhere, do not connect the XM-500
DeviceNet shield.
2. Insert the connector into the 5-pin socket to the left of the power
connector at the bottom of the module.
Figure 2.5 Connecting the module to DeviceNet
DeviceNet
Connector
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Installing the XM-500 Module
IMPORTANT
11
In systems where no DeviceNet power is supplied, the
DNet V+ and DNet V- terminals may be strapped to the +
and - terminals (respectively) of the 2-pin power connector.
However, care must be taken to ensure that DNet V- is
connected to earth ground in only one location.
In some applications, it may be required to add a termination resistor (120
ohm resistor) across the Blue (CAN Low) and White (CAN High) wires. For
more information on DeviceNet installation, refer to the DeviceNet Cable System
Planning and Installation Manual (Publication DN-6.7.2).
Node Address and Baud Rate
The XM-500 is shipped from the factory with the network node address
(MAC ID) set to 63 and the baud rate set to 125k baud. Network configuration
software such as the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility or RSNetWorx
for DeviceNet can be used to change the node address and baud rate settings.
The new settings are saved in non-volatile memory and used on subsequent
power ups or resets.
Refer to Setting the Node Address and Baud Rate on page 36 for instructions
on setting the node address and baud rate using the Enterprise Online
Configuration Utility. Refer to Setting the Node Address and Baud Rate on
page 47 for instructions on setting the node address and baud rate using
RSNetWorx for DeviceNet.
Electronic Data Sheets
Electronic Data Sheet (EDS) files are simple text files used by network
configuration tools such as the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility or
RSNetWorx for DeviceNet to help you identify products and easily
commission them on a network. The EDS files describe a product’s device
type, product revision, and configurable parameters on a DeviceNet network.
The EDS files for the XM modules are installed on your computer with the
XM configuration software. The latest EDS files can also be obtained at
http://www.ab.com/networks/eds/ or by contacting your local Rockwell
Automation representative. Refer to Registering the EDS File on page 27 for
instructions on registering the module’s EDS file.
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12
Installing the XM-500 Module
Connecting the Serial Port
The XM-500 module includes a serial port connection that allows you to
connect a PC to it.
The pinout for the serial port connection is shown below.
Connecting to Ethernet
Pin
Signal
1
NC
2
Receive
3
Transmit
4
NC
5
NC
6
NC
7
NC
8
NC
9
NC
Wiring the RJ45 Connector
Use an RJ45 connector to connect the module to the EtherNet/IP network.
The pinout for the connector is shown below.
Pin
Signal
1
TD+
2
TD-
3
RD+
4
Termination
5
Termination
6
RD-
7
Termination
8
Termination
IMPORTANT
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
If you are connecting to the XM-500 module through a
hub, you can use a standard Ethernet patch cable. If you are
connecting directly to the XM-500 module from your
computer, you need to use an Ethernet crossover cable.
Installing the XM-500 Module
13
Connecting the Module to the Network
ATTENTION
If you connect or disconnect the Ethernet cable with
power applied to the adapter or any device on the network,
an electrical arc can occur. This could cause an explosion in
hazardous location installations. Be sure that power is
removed or the area is nonhazardous before proceeding.
1. Insert the RJ45 connector into the Ethernet socket below the 9-pin D
shell.
Figure 2.6 Connecting the module to the network
Ethernet Connector
2. Connect the other end of the network cable to the network port.
Both 10Mbit and 100Mbits baud rates are supported. The proper rate is
auto-detected.
Module Indicators
The XM-500 has seven LED indicators, which are located on the front of the
module. The left four indicators are the Ethernet status indicators. The right
three indicators are the DeviceNet and general module status indicators.
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Installing the XM-500 Module
Figure 2.7 LEDs on the Front of XM-500
The following tables describe the states of the LED status indicators.
Gateway Status Indicator
The Gateway Status LED indicates the general operating state of the module.
Color
State
Description
No color
Off
No power applied to the module.
Green
Flashing
Normal operation.
Orange
Solid
Firmware download is currently in progress.
Red
Flashing
A fault has occurred.
Module Status Indicator (DeviceNet)
The DeviceNet Module Status LED indicates the operational state of
DeviceNet.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Color
State
Description
No color
Off
No power applied to the module.
Green
Solid
Normal operation.
Red
Flashing
A recoverable fault has occurred.
Solid
An unrecoverable fault has occurred. The module may
need to be repaired or replaced. Contact Customer
Support.
Installing the XM-500 Module
15
Network Status Indicator (DeviceNet)
The DeviceNet Network Status LED indicates the state of the DeviceNet
network.
Color
State
Description
No color
Off
No power applied to the module.
Green
Flashing
Module is online but no connections are currently
established.
Solid
Module is online with connections currently
established.
Flashing
One or more I/O connections are in the Timed-Out
state.
Solid
Failed communications (duplicate node address or
bus-off).
Red
Activity Indicator
The Activity LED indicates the activity of the Ethernet connection.
Color
State
Description
No color
Off
No activity.
Green
Flashing
Module is communicating over the network.
Link Indicator
The Link LED indicates that the module is connected to an Ethernet network.
Color
State
Description
No color
Off
Module is not connected to an Ethernet network.
Green
Solid
Module is connected to an Ethernet network.
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Installing the XM-500 Module
Network Status Indicator (Ethernet)
The Ethernet Network Status LED indicates the state of the Ethernet
network.
Color
State
Description
No color
Off
No power applied to the module or the module does
not have an IP address.
Green
Flashing
Module has obtained an IP address, but has no
established connections.1
Solid
Module has an IP address and at least one established
connection.1
Flashing
One or more of the connections in which the module is
the target has timed out.
Solid
Module has detected that its IP address is already in
use.
Flashing
Module performing power-up self test.
Red
Red/Green
1
Not affected by Modbus/TCP connections.
Module Status Indicator (Ethernet)
The Ethernet Module Status LED indicates the operational state of the
Ethernet portion of the module.
Color
State
Description
No color
Off
No power applied to the module.
Green
Flashing
The module has not been initialized.
Solid
Normal operation.
Flashing
An internal fault has occurred.
Solid
A recoverable fault has occurred.
Red
XM-500 Module Power Up
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
When power is applied to the XM-500, the module performs a self-test. Upon
successful completion of the self-test, the XM-500 is ready to communicate.
Use your configuration software to change the DeviceNet node address and
baud rate and to set the Ethernet IP address.
Chapter
3
Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP
Network
Before you can use the XM-500 in an EtherNet/IP network, you must
configure it with an IP address. This chapter explains how to assign the
module’s IP address.
For information about
MAC Address
See page
MAC Address
17
Setting the IP Address
18
On-board DIP Switch
18
XM-500 Module Web Pages
19
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
23
DHCP/BootP
25
The MAC address (also known as Ethernet address, physical address, or
hardware address) is a unique identifier assigned to the XM-500 at the factory.
The address is a 12-byte hexadecimal number (e.g. 080007A92BFC) and it is
printed on the label on the back of the XM-500.
Depending on the IP address assignment method, it may be necessary to enter
the MAC address of your module.
IMPORTANT
17
If you change or replace the XM-500 module, you must
enter the new MAC address of the module when you set up
the module.
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Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
Setting the IP Address
Before you can use the XM-500 in an EtherNet/IP network, you must
configure it with an IP address. The IP address identifies each node on the IP
network (or system of connected networks). Each TCP/IP node on a network
must have a unique IP address. There are several ways to set up the module’s
IP address:
•
•
•
•
Using the on-board dip switch
Using the module’s web page
Using the arp -s command
Using DHCP/BootP (Configuration by network)
The default Subnet Mask and Gateway Address values are as follows:
Subnet mask:
255.255.255.0
Gateway address:
0.0.0.0 (no gateway set)
These values can be changed using the XM-500 configuration web page. Refer
to XM-500 Module Web Pages on page 19.
On-board DIP Switch
The last byte in the 4-byte IP address can be set with the on-board DIP switch
(address 1-255 available). The value of the switch will be used to form the IP
address if DHCP/BootP is not enabled or a DHCP (Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol) or BootP server is not found and the dip switch is
non-zero when the module is powered up.
The settings below are used with the DIP switch.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
IP address:
192.168.0.n (where n is replaced by the switch value)
Subnet mask:
255.255.255.0
Gateway address:
0.0.0.0
Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
19
EXAMPLE
The switches are set to 00010100 (20 decimal). The IP
address of the module will be set to 192.168.0.20. Note
0=Off and 1=On.
Note: The numbers above the switches do NOT
correspond to bit locations in the address value. In fact,
they are reversed, that is, bit 0 is set by switch 8.
This IP address is a private address and can be used only on a local intranet.
Note that the local intranet and the XM-500 must be on the same subnet. If
the network settings are configured correctly, a web browser can then be used
to access the module’s configuration web page to change the IP address,
Subnet mask, and Gateway address settings. Refer to XM-500 Module Web
Pages on page 19.
IMPORTANT
If the switch IP is not used, make certain all the DIP
switches are set to zero (off). Otherwise, the value of the
switch will be used to form the IP address at power up.
XM-500 Module Web Pages
The XM-500 web pages can be used to change the IP address, Subnet mask,
and Gateway address settings, and to enable and disable DHCP/BootP. The
web pages are accessed using a Web browser such as Microsoft’s Internet
Explorer.
To change the IP address and enable/disable DHCP/Bootp
1. Open the Web browser and enter the URL location as
http://<ip address>.
EXAMPLE
http://192.168.0.20
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Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
The XM-500 Ethernet Gateway web page appears
2. Click IP Configuration. The Enter Network Password dialog box
appears.
3. Enter the User Name (Administrator) and Password (default blank
field) and click OK. See page 21 to change the web password.
The IP Configuration web page appears
4. Enter the IP Address, Subnet Mask, and Gateway you want to assign
to the module.
5. Check the DHCP enabled check box to obtain a dynamic IP address
from a DHCP/BootP server. Clear the check box to disable DHCP. A
permanent address is assigned to the module. The default is DHCP
enabled. If you are not sure whether to enable/disable DHCP, consult
with your network administrator.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
21
6. Click Submit Values to save the settings to the XM-500. The following
screen appears.
7. The DIP switches must be set to zero (off) and the XM-500 must be
reset (power cycled) before the new settings will take effect. When ready,
click Reset Module to power cycle the module from the web page.
IMPORTANT
All the DIP switches must be set zero (off) so that the value
of the switch will not be used to form the IP address.
To change the web password
1. Open the Web browser and enter the URL location as
http://<ip address>.
EXAMPLE
http://192.168.0.20
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Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
The XM-500 Ethernet Gateway web page appears
2. Click Security. The Enter Network Password dialog box appears.
3. Enter the User Name (Administrator) and Password (default blank
field) and click OK.
The Set Web Security Password web page appears.
4. Enter the new Password and click Set Password. A confirmation
message appears on the screen.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
23
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is a protocol for mapping an IP address to
a physical machine address that is recognized in the local network. The
module’s IP address can be changed using the arp -s (Set) command from a
PC. The new address will be stored in non-volatile memory.
This method can be used to reconfigure a module that has been previously
configured, or even to reconfigure modules outside the host’s subnet.
IMPORTANT
IMPORTANT
TIP
TIP
ARP requires the Ethernet MAC address. The address is
printed on the label on the back of the module. If you
change or replace the XM-500 module, you must enter the
new MAC address of the module when you set up the
module.
All the DIP switches must be set zero (off) so that the value
of the switch will not be used to form the IP address.
ARP cannot be used to change the Subnet mask and
Gateway address of the XM-500. These values can be
configured using the XM-500 configuration web page.
Refer to XM-500 Module Web Pages on page 19.
ARP resets the Subnet mask to the default value, which is
255.255.255.0.
1. On a PC connected to the same Ethernet network as the XM-500, start
an MS DOS™ window. For example in Windows, select MS-DOS
Prompt from the Start/Programs menu.
IP address of
the XM-500
MAC address of
the XM-500
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Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
2. At the prompt, type arp -s <IP address> <MAC address> and press
Enter. This will store the module’s IP and MAC addresses in the PC’s
ARP table.
EXAMPLE
arp -s 10.84.21.250 00-30-11-02-00-A3
10.84.21.250 = IP address
00-30-11-02-00-A3 = MAC address
3. Type arp -a to verify. This command displays all entries in the ARP
table.
4. Type ping <IP address> and press Enter.
EXAMPLE
ping 10.84.21.250
The PC sends the information to the XM-500. The module detects that
it was addressed with the correct MAC address and adopts the IP
address sent by the PC.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
25
5. (optional) Type arp -d <ip address> and press Enter to remove the
static route from the ARP table.
EXAMPLE
arp -d 10.84.21.250
DHCP/BootP
When DHCP/BootP is enabled and a DHCP or BootP server is found, the IP
address, Subnet mask, and Gateway address is automatically configured by the
DHCP/BootP server. If you are not sure if a DHCP or BootP server is
providing addresses, consult with your network administrator.
DHCP/BootP can be enabled or disabled using the XM-500 IP Configuration
web page. The XM-500 is shipped with DHCP enabled. Refer to XM-500
Module Web Pages on page 19.
IMPORTANT
All the DIP switches must be set zero (off) so that the value
of the switch will not be used to form the IP address.
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Configuring the XM-500 for Your EtherNet/IP Network
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Chapter
4
Setting Up an Ethernet Driver in RSLinx
This chapter describes how to register the module’s EDS file and configure the
RSLinx Ethernet communication driver.
For information about
See page
Registering the EDS File
27
Using RSLinx to Configure Your Ethernet Driver
29
IMPORTANT
Registering the EDS File
Make certain the XM-500 is connected to the DeviceNet
network and power is applied to the module. Refer
to Connecting to DeviceNet on page 10.
Electronic Data sheets (EDS) files are simple text files used by network
configuration tools such as the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility or
RSNetWorx to configure the XM-500 module. The EDS and icon files are
installed on your computer with the XM configuration software, or they can be
obtained at http://www.ab.com/networks/eds/.
TIP
The EDS file must be registered before you configure the
RSLinx Ethernet communication driver.
To register the XM-500 EDS file, perform the following steps.
1. From the Start menu, choose Programs > Rockwell Software >
RSLinx Tools > EDS Hardware Installation Tool. The Rockwell
Software - Hardware Installation Tool screen appears.
27
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Setting Up an Ethernet Driver in RSLinx
2. Click Add to launch the EDS Wizard and register the EDS file. The
following screen appears.
3. Click Register a Single File and enter the location of the EDS file for
the XM-500 module.
4. Click Next. The EDS Wizard displays the test results.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Setting Up an Ethernet Driver in RSLinx
29
5. Click Next to continue. The following screen appears
Graphic image for
the XM-500 module
6. Click Next to display the Final Task Summary, and then click Next
again to accept it.
7. Click Finish.
TIP
Using RSLinx to Configure
Your Ethernet Driver
You can also launch the EDS Wizard from RSNetworx for
DeviceNet.
In order to communicate with your XM-500 module over your network, you
must configure the RSLinx Ethernet communication driver. You configure the
Ethernet driver by entering the IP address of the XM-500 in the RSLinx
software (version 2.40.01 Build 16 or later).
IMPORTANT
RSLinx OPC Server requires version 2.40.01 Build 16.6 or
later.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
30
Setting Up an Ethernet Driver in RSLinx
1. From the Start menu, choose Programs > Rockwell Software >
RSLinx > RSLinx.
2. From the Communications menu, click Configure Drivers. The
Choose Drivers screen appears.
3. Under Available Driver Types, select Ethernet devices and click the
Add New button. The Add New RSLinx Driver dialog box appears.
4. Select the default driver name (for example, AB_ETH-4) or type in your
own name and click OK.
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Setting Up an Ethernet Driver in RSLinx
31
The Configure driver dialog box appears with the Station Mapping
page open.
5. Type the IP address of the XM-500 module.
Type IP address of the
XM-500 module
6. Click OK to close the Configure driver dialog box.
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Setting Up an Ethernet Driver in RSLinx
The new driver appears in the list of configured drivers as illustrated
below.
7. Click Close to return to the RSWho screen.
8. Close RSLinx.
You are now ready to configure your XM-500 module. For information on
how to configure the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration
Utility, refer to Chapter 5. For information on how to configure the XM-500
using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet, refer to Chapter 6.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Chapter
5
Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise
Online Configuration Utility
This chapter describes how to configure the XM-500 module using the
Enterprise Online Configuration Utility. The Enterprise Online Configuration
Utility is started from either RSMACC Enterprise Online Condition Monitor
or from XM Emonitor Gateway.
Please use the documentation for the software program as the primary
reference and use the contents of this chapter only as a reference guide.
For information about
See page
Browsing the Network
34
Setting the Node Address and Baud Rate
36
Configuring the DeviceNet Scanlist
37
Configuring Automatic Device Replacement (ADR)
40
Event Log
43
IMPORTANT
33
Make certain the Ethernet communication driver has been
configured in RSLinx. Refer to Chapter 4 for details.
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Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
Browsing the Network
The Enterprise Online Configuration Utility allows browsing on the network
to identify devices. You can browse either the DeviceNet network or the
Ethernet network (if the XM-500 is directly connected to the EtherNet/IP
network) to locate all the devices. The instructions in this manual describe how
to browse on the Ethernet network. See the documentation for the Enterprise
Online Configuration Utility software for assistance in browsing on the
DeviceNet network.
1. Click the
button on the XM Emonitor Gateway or RSMACC
Enterprise Online Condition Monitor toolbar to start the Enterprise
Online Configuration Utility program.
2. In the XM Network View screen, select the XM Ethernet Network.
Then click Select Driver from the Setup menu. The Select DeviceNet
Driver dialog box appears.
3. Select the Ethernet devices driver (e.g. XM-500 in window above) you
configured in RSLinx and click OK. The driver appears in the XM
Network View screen under the XM Ethernet network.
Publication October - October 2004
Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
35
4. Make certain the Ethernet devices driver is highlighted. If the Enterprise
Online Configuration Utility is not already online, click Go Online from
the Network menu or click the
button to browse the Ethernet
network to locate the XM-500 module. Otherwise, click Refresh
Network from the Network menu to browse the network.
5. When complete, the XM-500 Gateway module appears on the screen, as
illustrated below.
6. Select the XM-500 module and click Refresh Network from the
Network menu to browse the DeviceNet network for connected XM
devices.
When complete, a hierarchical representation of the selected network
appears on the screen, as illustrated below.
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Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
Setting the Node Address
and Baud Rate
Choose and set a DeviceNet node address and baud rate for the XM-500. The
node address must be in the range 00-63. The default address is 63. We
recommend that you do not use node address 63 because all new devices use it
as the default address.
The XM-500 module supports the following baud rates: 125kb, 250kb, or
500kb. The XM-500 defaults to 125kb.
IMPORTANT
TIP
All devices on a DeviceNet network must use the same
baud rate.
Maximum baud rate is limited by cable types and lengths.
Refer to the DeviceNet Cable System Planning and Installation
Manual (Publication DN-6.7.2).
1. In the XM Network View screen, select the XM-500 device icon and
click Node Commissioning from the Tools menu. Or, right-click the
icon and click Node Commission from the menu. The Node
Commissioning dialog box appears.
2. Under New Setting, enter the desired Node Address and/or Baud
Rate and click Apply. When the new node address/baud rate has been
successfully applied, a confirmation message displays on the screen.
3. Click OK.
Publication October - October 2004
IMPORTANT
The XM-500 module will restart when a new address is
entered.
IMPORTANT
The new baud rate will not take effect until power is
recycled.
Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
IMPORTANT
37
The XM-500 scanlist will clear when a new address is
entered.
4. From the Network menu, click Refresh Network to verify the node
address change.
Configuring the DeviceNet
Scanlist
The scanlist must be configured if the XM-500 is to serve data via the RSLinx
OPC Service, or if Automatic Device Replacement or Event Logging is to be
enabled. In addition, it may be more efficient to configure the scanlist if other
DeviceNet devices, such as PanelView displays, will be accessing XM data on
the network. The devices may be configured to “listen” for its required data as
it is served to the scanlist rather than have each device explicitly request its
own data.
The scanlist is not used, or necessary, if the XM-500 is used only to link higher
level applications directly to XM devices on the DeviceNet network.
TIP
IMPORTANT
When selecting devices to include in the scanlist, the
Enterprise Online Configuration Utility can map the data
of all the selected devices automatically. When you use the
automatic mapping feature, you should not have to edit any
of the parameters that appear on the Input property page.
This manual describes the automatic mapping procedure.
The XM-500 is an input device. This means the XM
measurement and relay modules only produce (send) data
and do not consume any data from the XM-500.
To set up the scanlist in the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility, perform
the following steps:
1. Make sure that the configuration is synchronized with the online devices
(click Upload from Network from the Network menu).
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Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
2. In the XM Network View screen, double-click the XM-500 device icon,
or right-click the icon and click Advanced Setup from the menu. The
following screen appears.
3. Unless you did an Upload from Network, you will need to upload the
device’s configuration by clicking the Upload button.
4. Click the Scanlist tab. The Scanlist property page appears.
List of available
devices
TIP
XM measurement modules (slaves) that are already
scanned by another master (e.g. XM-440) appear in
the Available list box with this icon
. Note that a
slave device can only have one primary master.
5. Under Available Devices, select the XM module(s) you want to include
in the scanlist and click the
Publication October - October 2004
or
(all devices) button.
Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
39
The XM module(s) will appear in the Scanlist in the right panel as
illustrated below.
List of devices in
the XM-500
scanlist
6. Click the Input tab to view input data mapped to the XM-500.
List of devices the
XM-500 receives
input data from
Input Table map shows
the order of the input
data received from the
devices and stored in
the XM-500
TIP
If you need to change mapping, click Advanced and
change the settings.
7. Click Download to download the scanlist to the XM-500.
8. A confirmation message appears. Click OK to download the settings to
the module.
9. Click Close to close the dialog box.
The XM-500 starts scanning as soon as it finds entries in its scanlist.
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Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
Configuring Automatic
Device Replacement (ADR)
The XM-500 supports Automatic Device Replacement (ADR). ADR is a
feature that automates the replacement of a failed slave device on a DeviceNet
network with a new unit. Upon replacing a failed device with a new unit, the
ADR scanner automatically downloads the configuration data to the
replacement device and sets the node address. ADR has two components:
Configuration Recovery (CR) and Auto-Address Recovery (AAR).
Configuration recovery allows the storage of a device configuration in the
ADR scanner. Whenever the ADR scanner loses communications with a slave
device and then re-establishes communications, the device’s configuration is
suspect and the ADR scanner sends the slave device the configuration settings
it has stored for the device.
Auto-address recovery allows the ADR scanner to change the replacement
device’s node address from 63 to that of the replaced device.
Important Considerations
• ADR is intended for use in primary-master environments. The ADR
and shared input functions cannot be used together.
• The CR and AAR features can only be used with devices that are in the
scanner’s scanlist.
• The AAR feature can only be enabled for a device if the CR feature is
also enabled.
• The XM device must be in Run mode when the XM-500 copies the
configuration from the device so that the device is restored to Run
mode after the configuration is downloaded.
• The XM device must be in Program mode when the XM-500 establishes
connection to the device or else the download of the saved
configuration will fail. (Configuration parameters cannot be set while
the device is in Run mode.) This means that the XM configuration
should not be saved to non-volatile memory so that the device boots to
Program mode. See the XM Module User’s Guide for information on
how to delete a saved configuration.
• The ADR scanner saves and restores only the configuration parameters
contained in the module’s EDS file. Some XM parameters are not
included in the EDS file because they are not supported by either the
EDS specification or RSNetWorx for DeviceNet. Examples of XM
configuration parameters that are not included in the EDS file include
the Name parameters (Channel, Alarm, and Relay Name) and the Trend
parameters. These configuration parameters will not be restored with
ADR.
• The ADR and trigger group functions cannot be used together. A
module can have only one primary master so a module cannot be both
configured for ADR and included in a trigger group. The ADR scanner
must be the primary master for the modules configured for ADR. The
XM-440 Master Relay module must be the primary master for modules
included in a trigger group.
Publication October - October 2004
Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
41
To configure ADR in the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility, perform the
following steps:
1. Make certain to configure each device on the network. If online, make
sure that the configuration is synchronized with the online devices (click
Upload from Network from the Network menu).
2. In the XM Network View screen, double-click the XM-500 device icon,
or right-click the icon and click Advanced Setup from the menu. The
following screen appears.
3. Unless you did an Upload from Network, you will need to upload the
device’s configuration by clicking the Upload button.
4. Click the ADR tab. The ADR property page appears.
List of devices in
the XM-500’s
scanlist
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Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
5. Under Available Devices, select the device you want to be configured
for ADR and click Add. The ADR Edit dialog box appears.
6. Click the Configuration Recovery checkbox.
7. Click the Auto Address Recovery checkbox, if desired.
8. Click OK.
9. Click Download to download the changes to the XM-500.
TIP
Download the ADR for one device at a time. Then if
one device causes a problem, the error code will
apply to that device.
10. Repeat steps 5-9 for each desired XM module.
The Configuration Recovery and Auto Address Recovery columns
display the ADR settings currently configured for the device. They can
be either enabled or disabled. The Memory Size (Bytes) column displays
the number of recovery memory (bytes) used for the device.
ADR setting currently
configured for the device
11. When finished, click Close.
Publication October - October 2004
Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
Event Log
43
The Event Log in the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility contains records
of the 64 most recent events that occurred in the XM-500 or in a device that is
in the XM-500 scanlist. Event records may include:
•
•
•
•
alarm status changes
relay status changes
setpoint multiplier activation
changes made to the XM-500 configuration
To display the Event Log, perform the following steps:
1. In the XM Netview View screen, double-click the XM-500 device icon,
or right-click the icon and click Advanced Setup from the menu. The
following screen appears.
2. Click the Event Log tab. The Event Log property page appears. Below
is an example of an Event Log.
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Configuring the XM-500 using the Enterprise Online Configuration Utility
The events are listed so that the most recently generated event is at the
top of the list and the oldest is at the bottom. The events consist of five
parts:
•
•
•
•
•
a timestamp that displays the date and time the event occurred
a description of the event
the node address of the device where the event occurred
the alarm or relay that changed status (if applicable)
the new status of the alarm/relay (if applicable).
The log can store at least 64 events. New log entries after the 64th event
over-write old entries one entry at a time.
3. Click Refresh to refresh the information in the Event Log. The
Enterprise Online Configuration Utility uploads the information from
the XM-500 and displays the most recently generated event(s) at the top
of the list.
IMPORTANT
Publication October - October 2004
The Event Log will be cleared when module power is
cycled.
Chapter
6
Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for
DeviceNet
This chapter describes how to configure the XM-500 module using
RSNetWorx for DeviceNet (version 3.00 or higher). Please use the user’s
manual for the configuration tool as the primary reference and use the
contents of this chapter only as a reference guide.
For information about
See page
Browsing the Network
46
Setting the Node Address and Baud Rate
47
Configuring the DeviceNet Scanlist
50
Configuring Automatic Device Replacement (ADR)
54
IMPORTANT
TIP
45
Make certain the Ethernet communication driver has been
configured in RSLinx. Refer to Chapter 4 for details.
RSNetWorx for DeviceNet (version 3.00) is used for
examples in this chapter. Different versions may differ in
appearance and procedures.
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
Browsing the Network
RSNetWorx allows browsing on the network to identify devices.
1. From the Start menu, choose Programs > Rockwell Software >
RSNetWorx > RSNetWorx for Device.
2. From the Network menu, click Online or click the
Browse for Network dialog box appears.
button. The
3. Click the plus (+) symbol next to the Ethernet devices driver you
configured in RSLinx.
4. Click the plus (+) symbol next to the IP address for the XM-500 device.
5. Click on DeviceNet, DeviceNet and click OK.
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
47
6. You will be prompted to upload/download devices before viewing their
online configuration. Click OK to continue. When complete, a graphical
representation of the selected network appears on the screen, as
illustrated below.
Setting the Node Address
and Baud Rate
Choose and set a DeviceNet node address and baud rate for the XM-500. The
node address must be in the range 00-63. The default address is 63. We
recommend that you do not use node address 63 because all new devices use it
as the default address.
The XM-500 module supports the following baud rates: 125kb, 250kb, or
500kb. The XM-500 defaults to 125kb.
IMPORTANT
TIP
All devices on a DeviceNet network must use the same
baud rate.
Maximum baud rate is limited by cable types and lengths.
Refer to the DeviceNet Cable System Planning and Installation
Manual (Publication DN-6.7.2).
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
1. From the Tools menu, click Node Commissioning. The Node
Commissioning dialog box appears.
2. Click Browse. The Device Selection dialog box appears.
3. Click the plus (+) symbol next to the Ethernet devices driver for the
XM-500 module.
4. Click the plus (+) symbol next to the IP address for the XM-500
module.
5. Click the plus (+) symbol next to the DeviceNet network. The devices
on the network will appear in the right panel of the dialog box.
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
49
6. Select the XM-500 module in the right panel, and click OK. The Node
Commissioning screen will have the Current XM-500 EtherNet/IP
Gateway Settings entries filled in as shown below.
7. Under New XM-500 EtherNet/IP Gateway Settings, enter the desired
Node Address and/or baud rate (Data rate) and click Apply. When the
new node address/baud rate has been successfully applied, the Current
Settings section will be updated.
IMPORTANT
The XM-500 module will restart when a new address is
entered.
IMPORTANT
The new baud rate will not take effect until power is
recycled.
IMPORTANT
The XM-500 scanlist will clear when a new address is
entered.
8. Click Close to close the dialog box.
9. Click Single Pass Browse from the Network menu to verify the node
address change.
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
Configuring the DeviceNet
Scanlist
The scanlist must be configured if the XM-500 is to serve data via the RSLinx
OPC Service, or if Automatic Device Replacement is to be enabled. In
addition, it may be more efficient to configure the scanlist if other DeviceNet
devices, such as PanelView displays, will be accessing XM data on the network.
The devices may be configured to “listen” for its required data as it is served to
the scanlist rather than have each device explicitly request its own data.
The scanlist is not used, or necessary, if the XM-500 is used only to link higher
level applications directly to XM devices on the DeviceNet network.
TIP
IMPORTANT
IMPORTANT
When selecting devices to include in the scanlist,
RSNetWorx can map the data of all the selected devices
automatically. When you use the automatic mapping
feature, you should not have to edit any of the parameters
that appear on the Input property page. This manual
describes the automatic mapping procedure.
The XM-500 is an input device. This means the XM
measurement and relay modules only produce (send) data
and do not consume any data from the XM-500.
If the XM-500 and an XM-440 are scanning the same XM
measurement module (slave), the XM-500 is the primary
master and the XM-440 is to share the XM slave. A slave
can only have one primary master.
For more information on configuring the XM-440 module,
refer to the XM-440 Master Relay Module User’s Guide.
To set up the scanlist in RSNetWorx, perform the following steps:
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
51
1. In the RSNetWorx for DeviceNet configuration screen, double-click the
XM-500 device icon, or right-click the icon and click Properties from
the menu. The XM-500 EtherNet/IP Gateway dialog box appears.
2. Click the Scanlist tab. You will be prompted to upload or download the
configuration.
3. Click Upload. After uploading, the Scanlist property page appears.
List of available
devices
4. Under Available Devices, select the XM module you want to include in
the scanlist and click the
button.
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
The XM module will appear in the Scanlist in the right panel as
illustrated below.
List of devices in the
XM-500 scanlist
Check this check box
(for each device) to
include the device in the
I/O cycle
5. Under Scanlist, select the XM module and click Edit I/O Parameters.
The Edit I/O Parameters dialog box appears.
6. Verify that the Polled Input Size is correct.
IMPORTANT
You can change the default size of the I/O Poll response
for some of the XM measurement modules (e.g. XM-120,
XM-360). The Polled Input Size must be the same number
of bytes as the XM module’s Poll size. Refer to the XM
Module User’s Guide for more information.
7. Click OK when finished. A warning message appears. Click Yes to
continue.
8. Repeat steps 4-7 for each desired XM module.
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
53
9. Click the Input tab. The simplest way to map the input data to the
XM-500 is to click Automap. RSNetWorx will map the inputs to the
discrete area of the XM-500. Once mapped, the screen appears as
follows.
List of devices the
XM-500 receives
input data from
Input Table map shows
the order of the input
data received from the
devices and stored in
the XM-500
TIP
If you need to change mapping, click Advanced and
change the settings. Click Help for assistance.
10. Click OK. You will be prompted to download your changes.
11. Click Yes to download the changes to the XM-500.
12. Click OK to close the dialog box and return to RSNetWorx for
DeviceNet window.
The XM-500 starts scanning as soon as it finds entries in its scanlist.
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
Configuring Automatic
Device Replacement (ADR)
The XM-500 supports Automatic Device Replacement (ADR). ADR is a
feature that automates the replacement of a failed device on the DeviceNet
network with a new unit. Upon replacing a failed device with a new unit, the
ADR scanner automatically downloads the configuration data to the new
device and sets the node address. ADR has two components: Configuration
Recovery (CR) and Auto-Address Recovery (AAR).
Configuration recovery allows the storage of a device configuration in the
ADR scanner. Whenever the ADR scanner loses communications with a slave
device and then re-establishes communications, the device’s configuration is
suspect and the ADR scanner sends the slave device the configuration settings
it has stored for the device.
Auto-address recovery allows the ADR scanner to change a device’s node
address from 63 to that of the lost device.
Important Considerations
• ADR is intended for use in primary-master environments. The ADR
and shared input functions cannot be used together.
• The CR and AAR features can only be used with devices that are in the
scanner’s scanlist.
• The AAR feature can only be enabled for a device if the CR feature is
also enabled.
• The XM device must be in Run mode when the XM-500 copies the
configuration from the device so that the device is restored to Run
mode after the configuration is downloaded.
• The XM device must be in Program mode when the XM-500 establishes
connection to the device or else the download of the saved
configuration will fail. (Configuration parameters cannot be set while
the device is in Run mode.) This means that the XM configuration
should not be saved to non-volatile memory so that the device boots to
Program mode. See the XM Module User’s Guide for information on
how to delete a saved configuration.
• The ADR scanner saves and restores only the configuration parameters
contained in the module’s EDS file. Some XM parameters are not
included in the EDS file because they are not supported by either the
EDS specification or RSNetWorx for DeviceNet. Examples of XM
configuration parameters that are not included in the EDS file include
the Name parameters (Channel, Alarm, and Relay Name) and the Trend
parameters. These configuration parameters will not be restored with
ADR.
• The ADR and trigger group functions cannot be used together. A
module can have only one primary master so a module cannot be both
configured for ADR and included in a trigger group. The ADR scanner
must be the primary master for the modules configured for ADR. The
XM-440 Master Relay module must be the primary master for modules
included in a trigger group.
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
55
To configure ADR in RSNetWorx, perform the following steps:
1. Make certain to configure each device on the network. If online, make
sure that the configuration is synchronized with the online devices (click
Upload from Network from the Network menu).
2. In the RSNetWorx for DeviceNet configuration screen, double-click the
XM-500 device icon, or right-click the icon and click Properties from
the menu. The XM-500 EtherNet/IP Gateway dialog box appears.
3. Click the ADR tab. Unless you did an Upload from Network, you will
be prompted to upload or download the configuration.
4. Click Upload. After uploading, the ADR property page appears.
List of devices in
the scanlist
Displays the number
of recovery memory
(in bytes) used
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Configuring the XM-500 using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet
5. Under Available Devices, select the device you want to be configured
for ADR, and click Load Device Config. This will load the
configuration of the selected device.
TIP
If you are online but did not upload the network, the
configuration retrieved for the device may not be
what is actually used online.
6. Click the Configuration Recovery checkbox.
7. Click the Auto-Address Recovery checkbox, if desired.
8. The Enable Auto-Address Recovery checkbox must be checked in
order for AAR to work.
9. Click Download to Scanner to download the changes to the XM-500.
TIP
Download the ADR for one device at a time. Then if
one device causes a problem, the error code will
apply to that device.
10. Repeat steps 5-9 for each desired XM module.
The ADR column displays the ADR setting currently configured for the
device. It can be either Configuration or Both. Configuration means that
the device is only configured for configuration recovery. Both means
that the device is configured for both configuration recovery and
auto-address recovery.
ADR setting currently
configured for the device
11. When finished, click Apply or OK.
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Chapter
7
I/O Data
This chapter explains how to read I/O data from the XM DeviceNet devices
through the XM-500 and onto Ethernet. It also explains how to use the
module’s own Ethernet I/O data.
For information about
Understanding the Data
Transfer
See page
Understanding the Data Transfer
57
EtherNet/IP Interface
59
DeviceNet Assembly Object Instance Numbers
62
Input and Output Data Formats
63
I/O Data Examples
65
The XM-500 module is designed to transfer data from the XM slave devices to
a high level network (Ethernet or Modbus/TCP). The data produced by the
XM slaves is collected in the DeviceNet input table of the XM-500. This input
table is capable of holding up to 8K bytes of input data. However, the I/O
connections supported by the XM-500 to these high level networks allow only
up to 508 bytes of data to be transferred. The XM-500 uses multiplexing to
overcome this limitation and to make all the DeviceNet input data available to
the higher level network.
I/O multiplexing allows an Ethernet client to request which XM slave’s
Change of State (COS) or Poll data is to be transferred through the XM-500.
The I/O multiplexing transfer process is illustrated in Figure 7.1.
57
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58
I/O Data
Figure 7.1 Multiplexing transfer process
3
1
Ethernet client writes output data to XM-500
2
1. The Ethernet client writes to the EIP Output Table in the XM-500
requesting the COS or Poll data of a desired XM slave.
2. The XM-500 copies the requested COS or Poll data from the
DeviceNet Input Table to the EIP Input Table.
3. The Ethernet client then reads the COS or Poll data from the EIP Input
Table.
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I/O Data
EtherNet/IP Interface
59
The Ethernet client can communicate with the XM-500 using either I/O
(implicit) or explicit messaging to perform the data transfer.
I/O Messaging
For I/O messaging, the Ethernet client is the Originator and the XM-500 is the
Target. The Ethernet client should open an I/O connection with the following
connection parameters:
O-T (Originator to Target) Size
6 bytes
O-T Connection Point
150
T-O (Target to Originator) Size
4 + maximum size of XM slave Poll response (e.g.
4 + 120 = 124) up to 500 bytes
T-O Connection Point
100
ControlLogix Configuration
To interface the XM-500 to a ControlLogix processor, you must add a generic
Ethernet module to the processor’s I/O configuration using RSLogix 5000
software. The generic ethernet module is added as a child of an Ethernet
Bridge such as the 1756-ENET/B or 1756-ENBT/A. Figure 7.2 shows a
typical I/O configuration for the XM-500.
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60
I/O Data
Figure 7.2 I/O connection setup
Parameter Description
Name: Name of the XM-500. Tags will be created in
RSLogix 5000 based on this name.
Comm Format: The format of the data. Select Data-SINT which
will represent the data in the XM-500 as a field of
8-bit bytes.
IP Address: IP address of the XM-500 module.
Input Assembly Instance: The T-O connection point. Enter 100.
Input Size: The T-O connection size. Enter 4 + maximum size
of XM slave Poll response (e.g. 4 + 120 = 124) up
to 500 bytes.
Output Assembly Instance: The O-T connection point. Enter 150.
Output Size: The O-T connection size. Enter 21.
Configuration Assembly Instance: The XM-500 does not support the configuration
assembly instance, but RSLogix requires a value.
Enter any non-zero value.
Configuration Size: The XM-500 does not support the configuration
assembly instance, but RSLogix requires a value.
Enter 0 (zero).
1
The actual output size is six bytes but the ControlLogix processor automatically includes the first four bytes
(Command Register) in the output.
After adding the XM-500 to the I/O Configuration, RSLogix creates
controller tags for the module to use in the processor’s ladder logic program.
To view the XM-500 controller tags, expand the Controller folder and
double-click on Controller Tags.
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I/O Data
61
Figure 7.3 Controller tags
Tags associated with
input connections
Tags associated with
output connections
The ladder logic program must write an Assembly instance number into the
output connection. Then the data from the corresponding XM measurement
module can be read in the input connection. Refer to DeviceNet Assembly
Object Instance Numbers on page 62 for information on the Assembly
instance numbers. For more information on the RSLogix, see the software’s
online help.
Explicit Messaging
For explicit messaging, the Ethernet client can use the Set_Attribute_Single
service to write the output data to Assembly Object (Class ID 0x4), Instance
150 (0x96), Data Attribute (3). Then the Ethernet client can use the
Get_Attribute_Single service to read the input data from Assembly object
(Class ID 0x4) Instance 100 (0x64), Data attribute (3).
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62
I/O Data
DeviceNet Assembly
Object Instance Numbers
Each possible XM slave’s COS and Poll data is associated with an Assembly
object instance number on the DeviceNet side of the XM-500. This Assembly
instance number is sent in the Ethernet client’s output data to the XM-500.
The Assembly instance number specifies which XM slave’s COS/Poll data is
to be returned to the Ethernet client.
COS Assembly Instance Numbers
The COS data is used by the XM modules to produce the Alarm and Relay
status. The Ethernet client requests COS data from XM slaves using Assembly
Instance Numbers 0x0300 + Node Address of the XM slave (see table below).
For example, the COS Assembly instance number for node address 10 is
0x030A.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Node Address
Assembly Instance Number
0
0x0300
1
0x0301
2
0x0302
3
0x0303
...
...
10
0x030A
11
0x030B
...
...
60
0x033C
61
0x033D
62
0x033E
I/O Data
63
Poll Assembly Instance Numbers
The Poll data is used by the XM modules to produce measured values. The
Ethernet client requests Poll data from XM slaves using Assembly Instance
Numbers 0x033F + Node Address of the XM slave (see table below). For
example, the Poll Assembly instance number for node address 11 is 0x034A.
Input and Output Data
Formats
Node Address
Assembly Instance Number
0
0x033F
1
0x0340
2
0x0341
3
0x0342
...
...
10
0x0349
11
0x034A
...
...
60
0x037B
61
0x037C
62
0x037D
Output Data Format
The Ethernet client sends output by writing output data to the EIP Output
Table in the XM-500 module. The output data consists of a 4 byte command
register and the 2 byte assembly instance number of the desired XM slave’s
data. The XM-500 then copies the requested COS or Poll data from the
DeviceNet Input Table to the EIP Input Table.
The format for the Output Data is defined in the table below.
Byte Offset Item
Description
0
Command Register
Byte 0 - 3
This 32-bit register consists of several bits that
affect a module’s behavior on the network. See
the following table for the bit definition.
4
Instance-L
Low byte of assembly instance number of the
requested COS/poll data.
5
Instance-H
High byte of assembly instance number of the
requested COS/poll data.
1
2
3
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I/O Data
Model Command Register Bit Definition
The bits for the module command register are defined in the table below.
Bit
Description
0
Run/Idle (not used on the XM-500)
1-3
not used
4
1 reset module
5 - 31
not used
Input Data Format
The Ethernet client receives input data by reading from the EIP Input Table in
the XM-500 module. The input data consists of a header that specifies which
slave’s data is being sent, the status of the slave, and the requested slave’s
COS/Poll data.
The format for the Input Data is defined in the table below.
Byte Offset
Item
Description
0
Instance-L
Low byte of assembly instance number of the
returned COS/poll data.
1
Instance-H
High byte of assembly instance number of the
returned COS/poll input data.
2
Status
Node status of the associated XM slave.
Bit 0 =
1 Module is in the XM-500 scanlist.
0 Module is not in the XM-500
scanlist.
Bit 1 =
1 Module is idle (no data).
Bit 2 =
1 No communication.
Bits 3-7
Reserved.
The XM module must be in the scanlist for bits 1
and 2 to be correct.
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3
Length
The number of bytes of the COS or poll data for
the XM slave. Note that this is 0 when the
requested data does not exist.
4
Data
First byte of the input data.
...
...
...
length + 3
Data
Last byte of the input data.
I/O Data
65
Refer to the XM Module User’s Guide for the size and
format of the COS/Poll messages.
TIP
This section shows examples of how the Ethernet client requests and receives
COS and Poll data from the XM-500 module. All data in the following
examples is shown with byte 0 first, byte 1 next, etc. All data is shown in
hexadecimal.
I/O Data Examples
Request COS data from an XM-120 at node address 10
1. Write the output data to the XM-500 to select instance 0x030A (0x0300
+ node 10).
ControlLogix Transmission:
Low Byte
High Byte
0A
03
Generic Ethernet Transmission:
Command Register
00
00
00
00
Low Byte
High Byte
0A
03
2. Read the input data from the XM-500.
Response:
Low Byte
High Byte
Node Status
Length
Input Data
0A
03
01
08
8 bytes of data
Request Poll data from an XM-120 at node address 11
1. Write the output data to the XM-500 to select instance 0x034A (0x033F
+ node 11).
ControlLogix Transmission:
Low Byte
High Byte
4A
03
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66
I/O Data
Generic Ethernet Transmission:
Command Register
00
00
00
00
Low Byte
High Byte
4A
03
2. Read the input data from the XM-500.
Response:
Low Byte
High Byte
Node Status
Length
Input Data
4A
03
01
78
120 bytes of data
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Appendix
A
Specifications
The Appendix lists the technical specifications for the XM-500 module.
XM-500 Technical Specifications
Product Feature
Specification
Communications
DeviceNet Standard DeviceNet protocol for all
functions
Available Electronic Data Sheet (EDS) file
provides support for most DeviceNet
compliant systems
Baud rate: 125kb, 250kb, 500kb
Ethernet Baud rate: 10/100Mbps
Indicators
7 LEDs Gateway Status - red/orange/green
DeviceNet Module Status - red/green
DeviceNet Network Status - red/green
Activity - green
Link - green
Ethernet Network Status - red/green
Ethernet Module Status - red/green
Power
Module +7 to +32V dc
Consumption Maximum: 150mA
Typical: 135mA
Heat Production Maximum: 3.6 Watts (12.3 BTU/hr)
Typical: 3.24 W (11 BTU/hr)
All power ratings are for an input of 24V dc.
Environmental
Operating Temperature 0 to +70°C (-4 to +149°F)
Storage Temperature -40 to 85°C (-40 to 185°F)
Relative Humidity 95% non-condensing
Physical
Dimensions Height: 1.65in (42mm)
Width: 4.3in (110mm)
Length: 4.96 (126mm)
67
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Specifications
XM-500 Technical Specifications
Product Feature
Approvals
(when product or packaging is marked)
Specification
UL
UL Listed for Ordinary
Locations
UL
UL Listed for Class I, Division 2
Group A, B, C, and D Hazardous
Locations
CSA
CSA Certified Process Control
Equipment
CSA
CSA Certified Process Control
Equipment for Class I, Division
2 Group A, B, C, and D
Hazardous Locations
EEX*
European Union 94/9/EEC ATEX
Directive, compliant with EN
50021; Potentially Explosive
Atmospheres, Protection “n”
CE*
European Union 89/336/EEC
EMC Directive
C-Tick*
Australian
Radiocommunications Act,
compliant with:
AS/NZS 2064, Industrial
Emissions
See www.rockwellautomation.com for
Declarations of Conformity, Certificates and
other certification details.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Appendix
B
Modbus/TCP
The XM-500 module supports Modbus/TCP commands. The implementation
of the Modbus/TCP server is done according to the Modbus/TCP
specification 1.0. The module implements all the Modbus commands
according to class 0 and class 1 and a subset of the commands in class 2.
The module can handle eight simultaneous connections.
We assume that you are familiar with Modbus communications. The
information provided in this document is general, rather than specific. For
more information about Modbus protocol, see the Modbus Protocol
Specification (available from http://www.modbus.org).
The table below lists the Modbus/TCP commands supported by the XM-500.
Supported Modbus
Commands
69
Function Code
Function Name
Class
Affects Area
Address Method
1
Read Coils
1
IN/OUT
Bit
2
Read Input Discrete
1
IN/OUT
Bit
3
Read Holding Registers
0
IN/OUT
Word
4
Read Input Registers
1
IN/OUT
Word
5
Write Single Coil
1
OUT
Bit
6
Write Single Register
1
OUT
Word
15
Write Multiple Coils
2
OUT
Bit
16
Write Multiple Registers
0
OUT
Word
22
Mask Write Registers
2
OUT
Word
23
Read/Write Registers
2
IN/OUT
Word
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Modbus/TCP
Supported Exception Codes
An exception code is returned in the response when the XM-500 is unable to
service a Modbus request. The table below lists the exception codes supported
by the XM-500.
Exception Code
Name
Description
01
Illegal Function
The module does not support the function code in the query.
02
Illegal Data Address
The data address received in the query is outside the
initialized memory area.
03
Illegal Data Value
The data in the request is illegal.
Modbus/TCP Addressing
The module’s Input (EIP IN) and Output (EIP OUT) areas are set to a
maximum size of 512 bytes each. When accessing these areas (with Modbus
commands), the addressing is done according to the tables below.
Refer to Understanding the Data Transfer on page 57 for more information
about the XM-500 Input and Output tables.
Output Addressing
The XM-500 uses only 2 bytes of the output table. To write to the XM-500
output table, use address 402h.
Word
Bit Address
402h
4020h
4021h
Input Addressing
To read from the XM-500 Input table, you can use either the word or bit
address. For example, to read the first word of the XM-500 Input table, use
address 000h. To read the 15th bit of the Input table, use address 000Eh.
Word
Bit Address
000h
0000h
0001h
0002h
0003h
0004h
0005h
0006h
...
000Eh
000Fh
001h
0010h
0011h
0012h
0013h
0014h
0015h
0016h
...
001Eh
001Fh
0FF0h
0FF1h
0FF2h
0FF3h
0FF4h
0FF5h
0FF6h
...
0FFEh
0FFFh
...
0FFh
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Modbus/TCP
71
The I/O data in the XM-500 is accessed using the Modbus protocol by
reading and writing to the corresponding Modbus registers. The table below
shows the register addressing used by the XM-500.
Data Register Addressing
Register Number
(decimal)
Register Address
(hexadecimal)
Input Registers
30001
30002
...
30015
30016
30017
...
30256
000h
001h
...
00Eh
00Fh
010h
...
0FFh
Output (Holding) Register
41025
41026
41027
400h
401h
402h
Each register is a 16-bit word.
Register Data Format
Output Data
Register
Register Address
Description
41025
400h
Command Register - low word
41026
401h
Command Register - high word
41027
402h
The assembly instance number of the requested
COS/poll data (Little Endian Format). Refer
to DeviceNet Assembly Object Instance Numbers on
page 62.
Input Data
Register
Register Address
Description
30001
000h
Assembly instance number of the requested
COS/poll data (Little Endian format).
30002
001h
Low byte: Length in bytes of the COS or poll data for
the XM slave.
High byte: Node status of the associated XM slave.
30003
002h
Input data - first word (Little Endian format).
...
...
...
length/2 + 30002
003h - 0FFh
Input data - last word.
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Modbus/TCP
Refer to the XM Module User’s Guide for the size and
format of the COS/poll messages.
TIP
Data Endian
Modbus is a Big Endian network. This means that Modbus assumes that all
data is stored and transferred most significant byte first. However, DeviceNet
is a Little Endian network, hence all data stored in the XM-500 I/O tables is
stored in Little Endian format (least significant byte first). The Modbus
controller must byte swap the data that is transferred to and from the XM-500.
Examples of Using Modbus
Functions
This section shows examples of Modbus protocol Query/Response
transmission to/from the XM-500. All data is shown in hexadecimal.
Request COS data from XM-120 at Node Address 10
1. Set the Output Register 41027 (register address 402h) in the XM-500 to
assembly instance 0x030A (0x0300 + node 10) using function code 6
Refer to COS Assembly Instance Numbers on page 62
for an explanation of the COS assembly instance
number.
TIP
Transmission:.
Function Address
Code
Register Hi
Address
Register Lo
Data Value
Lo
Data Value
Hi
06
02
0A
03
Function Address
Code
Register Hi
Address
Register Lo
Data Value
Lo
Data Value
Hi
06
02
0A
03
04
Response:
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Modbus/TCP
73
2. Request the contents of 6 Input Registers starting at Register 30001
using function code 4.
Transmission:
Function Address
Code
Register Hi
Address
Register Lo
Number of
Registers Hi
Number of
Registers Lo
04
00
00
06
00
Response:
Function Byte Count
Code
(2 x Qty of
Reg)
Data Input
Reg Hi
30001
Data Input
Reg Lo
30001
Data Input
Reg Hi
30002
Data Input
Reg Lo
30002
Data Input
Reg Hi
30003
Data Input
Reg Lo
30003
04
0A
03
01
08
92
8A
Data Input
Reg Hi
30004
Data Input
Reg Lo
30004
Data Input
Reg Hi
30005
Data Input
Reg Lo
30005
Data Input
Reg Hi
30006
Data Input
Reg Lo
30006
89
89
8A
08
11
09
0C
TIP
Refer to Register Data Format on page 71 for the
format of the response.
TIP
Refer to the XM Module User’s Guide for the format
of the COS message.
Request relay 1 status (in COS data) from XM-120 at node
address 10
1. Set the Output Register 41027 in the XM-500 to assembly instance
0x030A (0x0300 + node 10) using function code 6.
Transmission:
Function
Code
Address
Register Hi
Address
Register Lo
Data Value
Lo
Data Value
Hi
06
04
02
0A
03
Response:
Function
Code
Address
Register Hi
Address
Register Lo
Data Value
Lo
Data Value
Hi
06
04
02
0A
03
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Modbus/TCP
2. Read the first bit (relay 1 status) of the first byte of the COS message
using function code 2.
Refer to the XM Module User’s Guide for the format
of the COS message.
TIP
Transmission:
Function
Code
Start Address
Hi
Start Address
Lo
Qty of Inputs
Hi
Qty of Inputs
Lo
02
00
20
00
01
Response:
Function
Code
Byte
Count
Inputs
Data
02
01
01
Request poll data from XM-120 at node address 11
1. Set the Output Register 41027 in the XM-500 to assembly instance
0x034A (0x033F + node 11) using function code 6.
Refer to Poll Assembly Instance Numbers on page 63
for an explanation of the poll assembly instance
number.
TIP
Transmission:
Function Address
Code
Register Hi
Address
Register Lo
Data Value
Lo
Data Value
Hi
06
02
4A
03
Function Address
Code
Register Hi
Address
Register Lo
Data Value
Lo
Data Value
Hi
06
02
4A
03
04
Response:
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04
Modbus/TCP
75
2. Read the contents of 12 Input Registers starting at Register 30001 using
function code 4.
Transmission:
Function Address
Code
Register Hi
Address
Register Lo
Number of
Registers Hi
Number of
Registers Lo
04
00
00
0C
00
Response:
Function Byte Count
Code
(2 x Qty of
Reg)
Data Input
Reg Hi
30001
Data Input
Reg Lo
30001
Data Input
Reg Hi
30002
Data Input
Reg Lo
30002
Data Input
Reg Hi
30003
Data Input
Reg Lo
30003
04
4A
03
00
78
34
95
Data Input
Reg Lo
30011
Data Input
Reg Hi
30012
Data Input
Reg Lo
30012
40
EF
39
18
Data Input
Reg Hi
30004
Data Input
Reg Lo
30004
...
Data Input
Reg Hi
30011
96
40
...
55
TIP
Refer to Register Data Format on page 71 for the
format of the response.
TIP
Refer to the XM Module User’s Guide for the format
of the poll message.
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76
Modbus/TCP
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Appendix
C
Upgrading the XM-500 Firmware
Appendix C describes how to upgrade the XM-500 firmware with the
ControlFLASH program.
ATTENTION
Installing the ControlFLASH
Firmware Upgrade Kit
During the upgrade, the module is unable to perform its
normal functions.
Use the following steps to install the ControlFLASH Firmware Upgrade Kit.
1. Locate the new folder to which you extracted the .zip files or insert and
open Disk 1, and double-click the setup.exe file to run the
ControlFLASH setup wizard.
2. Follow the setup wizard directions to complete the installation.
3. When the installation completes, you can launch the ControlFLASH
program by selecting the Yes, I want to launch ControlFLASH
checkbox. If you do not want to launch ControlFLASH at this time,
clear the checkbox.
4. Click Finish.
Upgrading the Device
Use the following steps to use ControlFLASH to upgrade the XM-500
firmware.
1. Launch the ControlFLASH tool by:
• Clicking the Yes, I want to launch ControlFLASH checkbox from
the ControlFLASH setup wizard, or
• From the Start menu, choose Programs > Flash Programming
Tools > ControlFLASH.
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78
Upgrading the XM-500 Firmware
The Welcome screen appears. Before you start the upgrade, make sure
you have the firmware revision number.
2. Click Next. The Catalog Number screen appears.
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Upgrading the XM-500 Firmware
79
3. Select the XM-500 module and click Next. The devices screen appears.
4. Navigate to the XM-500 that you want to upgrade, select it and click
OK. The Firmware Revision screen appears.
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80
Upgrading the XM-500 Firmware
5. Select the correct revision number and click Next. The ControlFLASH
Summary screen appears.
The screen shows the
module, current
firmware and new
firmware
ATTENTION
Make sure that this update is the correct one to make
for your device. Upgrading the XM-500 with
incompatible firmware can result in erratic operation
or device failure.
6. If the information is correct, click Finish. A ControlFLASH prompt
appears to make sure you want to begin the upgrade.
7. Click Yes. The Progress screen appears.
After the firmware update is finished, the Update Status screen
appears.
The Status box is
green if the update
is successful
8. Click OK. The Welcome screen reappears.
9. Click Next to upgrade another XM-500 module, or click Cancel to exit
the program.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Glossary
Automatic Device Replacement (ADR)
A means for replacing a malfunctioning device with a new unit, and having the
device configuration data set automatically. The ADR scanner (XM-500)
uploads and stores a device’s configuration. Upon replacing a malfunctioning
device with a new unit (MAC ID 63), the ADR scanner automatically
downloads the configuration data and sets the MAC ID (node address).
baud rate
The baud rate is the speed at which data is transferred on the DeviceNet
network. The available data rates depend on the type of cable and total cable
length used on the network:
Maximum Cable Length
Cable
125K
250K
500K
Thick Trunk Line
500m (1,640ft.)
250m (820ft.)
100m (328ft.)
Thin Trunk Line
100m (328ft.)
100m (328ft.)
100m (328ft.)
Maximum Drop Length
6m (20ft.)
6m (20ft.)
6m (20ft.)
Cumulative Drop Length
156m (512ft.)
78m (256ft.)
39m (128ft.)
You must set the XM-500 module baud rate to 125kb, 250kb, 500kb.
BootP
BootP (Bootstrap Protocol) is a low-level protocol that provides configuration
to other nodes on a TCP/IP network. BootP configuration files let you
automatically assign IP address to an Ethernet module (you can also obtain
subnet masks and gateway addresses from BootP).
bus off
A bus off condition occurs when an abnormal rate of errors is detected on the
Control Area Network (CAN) bus in a device. The bus-off device cannot
receive or transmit messages on the network. This condition is often caused by
corruption of the network data signals due to noise or baud rate mismatch.
CIP
Control and Information Protocol, the EtherNet/IP application layer. CIP
uses the “producer/consumer” networking model. In this model one producer
broadcasts (multicasts) the data once to all the consumers. All consumers see
the data simultaneously, and may choose whether to consume (receive) the
data or not. Delivery time is consistent, no matter how many consumers there
are.
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Glossary
82
Change of State (COS)
DeviceNet communications method in which the XM module sends data
based on detection of any changed value within the input data (alarm or relay
status).
connection originator
Source for I/O connection or message requests. Initiates an I/O connection
or explicit message connection.
consumer
A destination device in the CIP networking model. See CIP.
ControlFLASH
Utility software that can be used to update the XM-500 firmware with the
most current Boot and application code.
cyclic
DeviceNet communications method in which the XM module sends data
cyclically based on a configured time value.
DeviceNet network
A DeviceNet network uses a producer/consumer Controller Area Network
(CAN) to connect devices (for example, XM modules). A DeviceNet network
can support a maximum of 64 devices. Each device is assigned a unique node
address (MAC ID) and transmits data on the network at the same baud rate.
A cable is used to connect devices on the network. It contains both the signal
and power wires. General information about DeviceNet and the DeviceNet
specification are maintained by the Open DeviceNet Vendor’s Association
(ODVA). ODVA is online at http://www.odva.org.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). An Internet protocol used to
assign dynamic IP addresses to devices residing on a network.
DNS
The Domain Name System (DNS) is a hierarchical, distributed method of
organizing the name space of the Internet. The DNS administratively groups
hosts into a hierarchy of authority that allows addressing and other
information to be widely distributed and maintained. A big advantage to the
DNS is that using it eliminates dependence on a centrally-maintained file that
maps host name to addresses.
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Glossary
83
EEPROM
Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory. See NVS
(Non-Volatile Storage).
Electronic Data Sheet (EDS) Files
EDS files are simple text files that are used by network configuration tools
such as RSNetWorx for DeviceNet to describe products so that you can easily
commission them on a network. EDS files describe a product device type,
revision, and configurable parameters.
Ethernet
A physical layer standard using Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision
Detection (CSMA/CD) methods.
Ethernet network
A local area network designed for the high-speed exchange of information
between computers and related devices.
EtherNet/IP
Ethernet Industrial Protocol. EtherNet/IP applies a common application layer
(CIP) over Ethernet by encapsulating messages in TCP/UDP/IP.
explicit messaging
Non-time critical messaging used for device configuration and data collection,
such as downloading programs or peer-to-peer messaging between PLCs and
XM modules.
gateway
A module or set of modules that allows communications between nodes on
dissimilar networks.
gateway address
The address of a gateway that provides connection to another IP network. A
gateway address of all zeros indicates that no gateway has been configured.
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Glossary
84
Help window
A window that contains help topics that describe the operation of a program.
These topics may include:
•
•
•
•
An explanation of a command.
A description of the controls in a dialog box or property page.
Instructions for a task.
Definition of a term.
implicit (I/O) messaging
Real time messaging used for high priority I/O control data; for example, COS
and poll data.
intranet
An intranet is a private network inside a company or organization that uses the
same kind of software that you would find on the public internet but is only
for internal use.
IP
Internet Protocol that provides the routing mechanism for messages. All
messages contain not only the address of the destination station, but the
address of a destination network, which allows messages to be sent to multiple
networks within an organization or around the world.
IP address
32-bit identification number for each node on an Internet Protocol network.
The IP address is represented as four sets of 8-bit numbers (numbers from 0
to 255), with periods between them. Each node on the network must have a
unique IP address.
MAC address
Media Access Control address. This is the physical address of an individual
hardware unit connected to the Ethernet network. This address is also known
as an Ethernet address.
MAC ID
See node address.
master device
A device which gathers and distributes I/O data with other devices. The
XM-500 Ethernet Gateway module is a master device.
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Glossary
85
node address
A DeviceNet network can have as many as 64 devices connected to it. Each
device on the network must have a unique node address between 0 and 63.
Node address 63 is the default used by uncommissioned devices. Node
address is sometimes called “MAC ID.”
NVS (Non-Volatile Storage)
NVS is the permanent memory of an XM module. Modules store parameters
and other information in NVS so that they are not lost when the module loses
power (unless Auto Save is disabled). NVS is sometimes called “EEPROM.”
online help
Online help allows you to get help for your program on the computer screen
by pressing F1. The help that appears in the Help window is context sensitive,
which means that the help is related to what you are currently doing in the
program.
Polled
DeviceNet communications method in which the module sends data in
response to a poll request from a DeviceNet master.
producer
The source of information in the CIP networking module. See CIP.
scanlist
The list of XM modules with which the XM-500 Ethernet Gateway module is
configured to exchange I/O data.
shared inputs
A function of a master/scanner that allows it to listen to devices that are in
another master/scanner’s scanlist.
slave device
A device that receives and responds to messages from a DeviceNet master but
does not initiate communication. Slave devices include the XM measurement
modules, such as the XM-120 Dynamic Measurement module and the XM-320
Position module.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Glossary
86
subnet mask
An extension of the IP address that allows a site to use a single net ID for
multiple networks. A subnet mask of all zeros indicates that no subnet mask
has been configured.
target
Destination for I/O connection or message requests. Can only respond to a
request, cannot initiate an I/O connection or message.
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
Index
A
Activity Indicator 15
ARP protocol 23
Assembly instance numbers
COS data 62
poll data 63
Assembly object instance number 62
Automatic Device Replacement (ADR) 40, 54
configuring
using Enterprise Online Configuration Utility 41
using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet 55
considerations 40, 54
baud rate 11, 36, 47
browsing network 34, 46
configure Ethernet driver 29
configuring ADR 41, 54
connecting module to network 10
create scanlist 37, 50
EDS files 11, 27
Event Log 43
node address 11, 36, 47
DHCP 25
document conventions 6
E
B
baud rate 11
changing
using Enterprise Online Configuration Utility 36
using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet 47
BootP 25
C
changing web password 21
configure the Ethernet driver 29
configuring the XM-500
ARP 23
DHCP/BootP 25
on-board DIP switch 18
using Enterprise Online Configuration Utility 33
using RSLinx 29
using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet 45
web pages 19
connecting wiring
DeviceNet 10
Ethernet 12
power supply 9
serial port 12
ControlFLASH
installing Upgrade Kit 77
upgrading firmware 77
COS Assembly instance numbers 62
Customer Support 6
D
Data Endian 72
DeviceNet connection 10
DeviceNet features 2
DeviceNet network
Electronic Data Sheet (EDS) files
definition 11
registering 27
Enterprise Online Configuration Utility 33
browsing the network 34
configuring ADR 41
configuring the scanlist 37
Event Log 43
setting the baud rate 36
setting the node address 36
ESAFE Agreement 6
Ethernet connection 12
Ethernet features 3
Ethernet network
ARP 23
assign IP address 18
connecting module to network 13
DHCP/BootP 25
Gateway address 18
MAC address 17
on-board DIP switch 18
RJ45 connector 12
Subnet mask 18
web pages 19
Event Log 43
G
Gateway Address 18
Gateway Status Indicator 14
H
hardware description 4
hardware requirements 3
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
88
Index
I
I/O data 57
Assembly object instance numbers 62
data transfer 57
examples 65
I/O multiplexing 57
input data format 64
output data format 63
I/O multiplexing 57
indicators 13
Activity 15
Gateway Status 14
Link 15
Module Status (DeviceNet) 14
Module Status (Ethernet) 16
Network Status (DeviceNet) 15
Network Status (Ethernet) 16
input data format 64
IP address 18
L
O
on-board DIP switch 18
output data format 63
P
Poll Assembly instance numbers 63
power supply 9
R
register an EDS file 27
removing the module 8
RJ45 connector 12
RSLinx
using to configure the Ethernet driver 29
RSNetWorx for DeviceNet 45
browsing the network 46
configuring ADR 55
configuring the scanlist 50
setting the baud rate 47
setting the node address 47
Link Indicator 15
S
M
MAC address 17
Modbus/TCP 69
addressing 70
commands 69
Data Endian 72
examples 72
exception codes 70
register addressing 71
Module Status Indicator
DeviceNet 14
Ethernet 16
mounting the module 8
N
Network Status Indicator
DeviceNet 15
Ethernet 16
node address 11
configuring
using Enterprise Online Configuration Utility 36
using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet 47
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
scanlist
configuring
using Enterprise Online Configuration Utility 37
using RSNetWorx for DeviceNet 50
serial port connection 12
serial port pinout 12
setting IP address
ARP 23
DHCP/BootP 25
on-board dip switch 18
web page 19
software requirements 3
Subnet Mask 18
system requirements
hardware 3
software 3
U
upgrading firmware 77
W
Web browser 19
web pages 19
IP Configuration 20
Index
Set Web Security Password 22
XM-500 Ethernet Gateway 20, 22
wiring connections
DeviceNet 10
Ethernet 12
power supply 9
serial port 12
X
XM-500 Ethernet Gateway module
browsing the DeviceNet network 34, 46
changing web password 21
configuring
ADR 40, 54
Ethernet driver 29
scanlist 37, 50
connecting
serial port 12
to DeviceNet 10
89
to Ethernet 13
to power 9
Event Log 43
features 2
hardware description 4
I/O data 57
indicators 13
introduction 1
Modbus/TCP 69
mounting 8
register EDS file 27
setting
baud rate 36, 47
IP address 18
node address 36, 47
system requirements 3
technicall specifications 67
upgrading firmware 77
Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004
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Publication ENMON-UM500C-EN-P - October 2004 91
Supersedes Publication ENMON-UM500B-EN-P - May 2004
Copyright © 2004 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.
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