SuSE Linux / eMail Server (de)

SuSE Linux / eMail Server (de)
SuSELinux
Openexchange Server 4
Administration
1st Edition 2002
Copyright ©
This publication is intellectual property of SuSE Linux AG.
Its contents can be duplicated, either in part or in whole, provided that a copyright
label is visibly located on each copy.
All information found in this book has been compiled with utmost attention to detail. However, this does not guarantee complete accuracy. Neither SuSE Linux AG,
the authors, nor the translators shall be held liable for possible errors or the consequences thereof.
Many of the software and hardware descriptions cited in this book are registered
trademarks. All trade names are subject to copyright restrictions and may be registered trade marks. SuSE Linux AG essentially adheres to the manufacturer’s spelling.
Names of products and trademarks appearing in this book (with or without specific
notation) are likewise subject to trademark and trade protection laws and may thus
fall under copyright restrictions.
Please direct suggestions and comments to documentation@suse.de
Authors:
Translators:
Editors:
Layout:
Setting:
Ralf Haferkamp, Carsten Höger, Thomas Siedentopf, Robert Simai
Edith Parzefall, Rebecca Walter
Roland Haidl, Edith Parzefall, Jana Jaeger, Rebecca Walter
Manuela Piotrowski, Thomas Schraitle
LATEX
This book has been printed on 100 % chlorine-free bleached paper.
Contents
1 The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
1
2 Support and Services
3
Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
Product Support for SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 . . . . . . . .
3
Maintenance for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 . . . . . . . .
4
Getting Help Fast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
Support Team Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
3 Preparing for Installation
7
Choosing a Host Name and Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
Migrating from SuSE Linux eMail Server 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
Backing Up Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Install . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
Restoring Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
DHCP and Installating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
4 Scenarios
15
One Network Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
Internet Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
Intranet Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
Intranet with a Router to the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
In the DMZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
Two Network Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Permanent Connections to the Internet and Intranet
. . . . . . . .
18
Dial-up Internet Connection and Permanent Intranet Connection .
18
In the DMZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
5 Installing with YaST2
21
Booting from the CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Computer Does Not Boot from CD-ROM
21
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
Welcome Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
Other Options
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
Language Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Installation Proposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Keyboard Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
The Partitioner of YaST2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Partitioning Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
System Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Time Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Starting the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Configuring the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Root Rassword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
Screen Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
Static Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32
Basic Configuration for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server . . . . . .
33
Part One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
Part Two . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
Part Three . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
YaST2 Takes Over
iv
18
Contents
6 The Administrative Interface
35
The Start Page in the Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
The System Administrator cyrus
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
User Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Creating a New User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Modifying User Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Changing the Password for cyrus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Changing the Administrator’s Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Creating a Virtual User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Editing a Virtual User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Access Permissions for New Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
Groups and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
Creating a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
42
Editing Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
42
Creating a Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
Permission Management for Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
Editing Folders and Changing Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
Direct Mail Delivery — Mailing Lists via Folders . . . . . . . . . .
44
Virtual Domains and Multiple Domain Capability . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
Creating and Editing Virtual Domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
Adding Clients to the Name Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
Removing a Client from the Name Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Configuring Mail Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Postfix: Basic Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Postfix: Advanced Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
IMAP Configuration: Client Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Fetch mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
Monitoring the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
Online Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
Mail Queue: the Mail Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
Additional Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
LDAP Browser: Edit the LDAP database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
v
Mail to All: Messages from the Administrator . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
Edit Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
Global Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
SSL Configuraton: Encrypted Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
CA Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
55
Resource Management for the Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
Resources: Creating and Deleting Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
Creating Resource Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
Editing and Deleting Resource Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as a Windows Server . . . . . . . . .
57
Activating the Windows Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58
Authenticating Windows Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58
7 Administration as a User
vi
61
Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
Entering and Changing Personal Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
Changing the Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
Downloading a Certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63
Managing Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63
Creating a New Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
SIEVE: The Mail Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
Mail Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66
Creating Filter Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66
SPAM: Filter for Unsolicted Commercial E-Mail . . . . . . . . . . .
68
Vacation Notice: Automatic Reply During Absence . . . . . . . . .
68
SIEVE Editor: Writing Custom Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
Changing the Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
Contents
8 Configuring External Mail Programs
71
Preparations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
Netscape Communicator Version 4.7x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
Configuring the IMAP Mail Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72
Configuring the LDAP Address Book
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
Netscape Communicator Version 6.x and Mozilla 0.9x . . . . . . . . . .
76
Configuring IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
Configuring the LDAP Address Book
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
KMail Version 1.3 or Higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
78
Pine Version 4.33 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
Configuring the IMAP Mail Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
Configuring the LDAP Address Book
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83
Outlook Express Version 5.x and 6.0 and Outlook 2000 . . . . . . . . . .
85
Configuring the IMAP Mail Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85
Configuring the LDAP Address Book
87
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A YaST and SuSE Linux License Terms
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
89
vii
1
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4 is a comprehensive communication
and groupware solution. It is useful for administration, work groups, small
and middle-sized businesses, and even enterprises with thousands of work
places. Users have the most possible independance, as they can access the full
groupware functionality over the Internet or company LAN with any e-mail
client.
The funtional range is centered around what businesses and their users need
today:
Professional communications based on open standards
Access to all functionalities over the Internet
Independance from the client’s operating system
Intuitive user interface
Creation of a homogenous and ergonomical platform for the communication
stable, secure, and powerful
This manual provides information about the installation, configuration, and use
of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. One chapter explains the installation
of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4 using YaST2. Other chapters describe
the server administration over the administration web interface, use and configuration of the Groupware, and the configuration of external e-mail clients.
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
Information about the SuSE Linux Enterprise Server can be found on the CD in
the doku directory.
We especially wish to thank the technical project leader Remo Behn and the
developers of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server: Carsten Höger and Ralf
Haferkamp. Our thanks also go to all participants and beta testers: Nico Lumma,
Johannes Meixner, Jochen Röder, Thomas Siedentopf, Robert Simai, Arnim
Wiezer, and the product manager Alexander Vierschrodt.
Furthermore, we want to heartily thank the employees of the Netline IS GmbH
Frank Hoberg and Micheal Pawlak as well as the leader of development, Martin
Kauss, and the programmers Stefan Preuß, Markus Klein, Bejamin Otterbach,
Marianne Schröder, Sebastian Kotyrba, Manuel Kraft, Sebastian Kauss, and
Leonardo Di Lella for the excellent team work
2
2
Registration
To ensure optimal product support, we only answer requests from registered
users. Register online through our web server using the form at https:
//support.suse.de/en/register/.
Find the product’s serial number on the back of the CD case. This code is unique
and is used to verify that you own an original SuSE product. Only owners of the
original product are entitled to support.
Product Support for SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0
The purchase of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 includes product
support for thirty days after registration. This product support covers the
services listed below. It is intended to help with the basic installation of the
system.
Scope of the Product Support
Product support covers the installation of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
4.0 on hardware (one computer) supported by the basic system. This support
includes the installation of the basic hardware and the following devices using
the configuration tool YaST2:
graphics card (without 3D support, without TV in/out)
Support and Services
Support and Services
a network adapter (ethernet)
DSL (PPP over ethernet)
ISDN adapter or modem for dial-up connections to a provider (IP)
Support for configuring the following items is included:
Basic configuration of external mail clients
. KMail beginning with Version 1.3.1
. Mozilla Mail beginning with Version 1.0
. Netscape Messenger beginning with Version 4.7 and Mail 6.1
. Microsoft Outlook 2000
. Microsoft Outlook Express beginning with Version 5.5
. Pine beginning with Version 4
Basic configuration of the integrated name service (one zone)
Basic configuration for protecting against unsolicted commercial e-mail
(SPAM)
Configuration for the servers to use SMTP-AUTH (as server and client)
Support for the installation of a virus scanner (AMaViS or AVMailGate)
Support for the setup of a content filter based on file suffixes (attachment
filter) using Postfix
Support for changing the host name and the IP address
Hints for using functions offered by the web front-end
Maintenance for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0
The included maintence for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 is an active
maintenance contract and offers preventive support to satisfy your IT demands.
You obtain the following services to guarantee a maximum of comfort and a
state-of-the-art system:
4
Maintenance for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0
Every patch contains detailed documentation.
You will be informed about patches by the SuSE Enterprise Support
Services by e-mail.
The patches will be uploaded to a secure web server for your use.
Support for installing the patches by the SuSE Enterprise Support Services.
Optionally, extend the maintenance through our update service. You will then
receive all our patches and fixes for our SuSE Linux product quarterly on a CD.
2
Support and Services
Fixes and patches for all packages included on the installation medium to
correct critical defects (security, data loss) of the SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server 4.0.
By registering, you also obtain SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 maintenance
for a duration of 12 months. That way, you will have a stable and well-tested
system at all times.
Getting Help Fast
Register your product online on our website at https://support.suse.de/
en/register and send your request by e-mail to imap-support@suse.de.
Provide your customer data before describing your problem. Use the appropriate
case so your e-mail can be processed automatically. File 1 is an example. Do not
use unnecessary attachments. Insert configuration files directly in ASCII format
into the request form, if needed.
FIRSTNAME: John
LASTNAME: Doe
COMPANY: Example, Inc.
STREET: Hypothetical Drive 7
CITY: Example City
ZIP: 12345
COUNTRY: USA
REGCODE: <Registration code>
EMAIL: doe@example.com
My Problem: Problem description ...
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
5
My Hardware: Hardware description ...
<doe@example.com>
File 1:
Support Request by E-Mail
Support Team Availability
You can reach the support team by the following means at the specified times:
by e-mail: imap-support@suse.de
Processing: work days
by WWW (e-mail): http://support.suse.de
Processing: work days
by phone (call center of the Enterprise Support Services):
Telephone: +49 (0) 421 526 23 30
Processing: Mondays to Fridays from 9 AM to 6 PM (except public
holidays)
by fax: +49 (0) 911 740 53 477
Processing: workdays
by mail:
SuSE Linux AG
Support
Deutschherrenstr. 15-19
D-90429 Nürnberg
Information about our extended support offerings may be found at http:
//support.suse.de. Our support database at http://sdb.suse.de
contains many solutions to known problems.
6
Support Team Availability
3
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0, is a powerful product based on the
SuSE Linux Enterprise Server. It is designed to provide a powerful and complete
e-mail server without requiring intensive configuration. It is important, however,
to plan the system before installing. This allows for a smooth installation and
prevents problems in the future.
Choosing a Host Name and Domain . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating from SuSE Linux eMail Server 3.1 . . . . . . . .
DHCP and Installating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
8
12
Preparing for Installation
Preparing for Installation
Choosing a Host Name and Domain
Consider the name of your SuSE Linux Openexchange Server carefully. Changing
the host name or the domain name after installation is very time-consuming.
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server can also function as a name server for
your intranet. A correctly configured name service (DNS) is vital for the faultless
functioning of the mail server.
Even if your domain is not directly reachable from the Internet, assign your
intranet a sensible domain name. Names like “company.local” are not sensible
choices, because an e-mail sent to user@company.local from outside the
system cannot be delivered. A domain like company.com has the advantage
that nothing stands in the way of your business’s new web presence. Make
sure the name chosen is not already used by someone else. Use a web browser
to check whether the chosen domain exists already by simply entering it in
the address bar of your browser (it may need a prefix of www.). Additional
information can be found in the respective databases. Refer to http://www.
internic.com/whois.html.
Migrating from SuSE Linux eMail Server 3.1
Caution
You cannot adopt the data of your old SuSE Linux eMail Server Version
3.1 using the SuSE Linux Update mechanism into your new SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server 4.0. To transfer the data and configuration to the
new SuSE Linux Openexchange Server, follow the instructions below. The
partially automated update described here is only possible when applied
to the SuSE Linux eMail Server 3.1. SuSE is not responsible for data lost
during the system update. Save all data to an external medium before
installing the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server.
Caution
Updating to the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 is a four step process:
1. backup data
2. install
3. apply available patches
4. restore data
8
Choosing a Host Name and Domain
Caution
When updating to SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0, ensure that
enough space will be available after the installation in the temporary directory. At least as much space is required as the original data occupies.
Caution
Most of the space is used by the e-mails of the IMAP server. To find the
approximate size, use the following command:
3
Preparing for Installation
When restoring the data, it is not copied unmodified. It must be converted for the
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 using the provided restore.sh script.
For this to work, the data must first be copied unmodified to the temporary
directory /tmp of the newly installed SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0. In a
second step, it is converted and moved to its final location.
du -skc /var/imap /var/spool/imap
You should see output like the following:
405
181178
181583
/var/imap
/var/spool/imap
total
The disk space is given in kilobytes. In the example above, the mails use
approximately 177 megabytes (181178 KB/1024 = 177 MB).
The following assumes the default directory /tmp is used as the temporary
directory.
Backing Up Data
Before installing the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0, log in as the user
root on the old SuSE Linux eMail Server. Insert the first CD (CD 1) of the SuSE
Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 and mount it by typing mount /cdrom. Copy
the backup program with the following command:
cp /cdrom/backup.sh /tmp/backup.sh
Make it executable by typing chmod u+rx /tmp/backup.sh. Usually, the
external medium used to save the backup is a streamer. For the first SCSI
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
9
streamer /dev/st0, use the following command:
/tmp/backup.sh -tz /dev/st0
After the backup is complete, the streamer rewinds the tape. Check whether
the backup is readable by typing:
tar tzf /dev/st0
If you cannot access a streamer directly, you can put the backup into your
temporary directory under the file name /tmp/backup.tar.gz and later
save this file to another convenient medium. To do this, run the script as follows:
/tmp/backup.sh -tz /tmp/backup.tar.gz
Note
The command line option -t allows passing further options to the
tar command called by the backup script, e. g., option -tzv creates
a gzip-compressed (option z) tar archive in verbose mode (option v).
Without the -tz option, the tar archive will not be compressed.
Note
After saving the data to an external medium and checking the backup, you
are now ready to install the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0 in place of
its predecessor.
Install
When installing the new SuSE Linux Openexchange Server 4.0, pay close attention to the following three items:
Reformat the old eMail server partitions during the installation. Otherwise, this may lead to problems. If you saved the backup on another
partition solely used for this purpose, make sure you do not format it.
The host name must be exactly the same as with the SuSE Linux
eMail Server 3.1, including the domain part. If your old SuSE Linux
eMail Server was called mail.company.com, call the new server
mail.company.com.
The LDAP BaseDN must also be exactly the same as in the old SuSE
Linux Openexchange Server, otherwise your old data cannot be integrated properly.
10
Migrating from SuSE Linux eMail Server 3.1
3
Note
Note
Restoring Data
After the installation, start the script
/usr/share/doc/packages/imapweb32/tools/restore.sh without arguments. This gives output like:
/usr/share/doc/packages/imapweb32/tools/restore.sh -x file.tgz [-t flags]
-x extract
-t with additional flags "flags" for tar
or
Preparing for Installation
Before restoring all data, apply all patches.
/usr/share/doc/packages/imapweb32/tools/restore.sh [-i] [-p]
[-l] [-f] [-c] [-g] [-n] [-a]
-i restore only imap folder
-s restore only sieve mail filter rules
-l restore only ldap directory
-f restore only fetch accounts
-c restore only CA and certs
-g restore only Groupware data
-n restore only DNS data
-a restore all
Output 1: Output of restore.sh
First, store your backup using the -x option and the -t option with
which you created the backup (usually tz) in the temporary directory
/tmp/imapbak from which the data will be converted and, in a second step,
restored in its proper directory. This requires sufficient disk space in the temporary directory.
If the backup file was saved on a streamer that is directly accessible, insert
the tape into the streamer. For the first SCSI streamer /dev/st0, use the following command:
/usr/share/doc/packages/imapweb32/tools/restore.sh -x /dev/st0 tz
If you cannot access a streamer directly, copy the backup file to the file
/tmp/backup.tar.gz. Recreate the backup with:
/usr/share/doc/packages/imapweb32/tools/restore.sh -x /tmp/backup.tar.gz
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
11
-tz
In this case, you need enough disk space in the temporary directory to both
hold the backup file /tmp/backup.tar.gz and to recreate the backup.
A few options are available for converting and restoring the old data. Recreating some areas can take a considerable amount of time.
Explanation of the options:
-i Only e-mails and the user structure of the “cyrus-impad” are restored.
This includes all folders and subfolders of each user and the quota information.
-s Only mail filters, vacation notices, and manually written SIEVE scripts are
restored.
-l Only data of the LDAP directory is restored. For this to work, you must
enter the password for the user cyrus. If you enter the wrong password, run restore again giving the option -l.
-f Restore the data of the “Fetch Mail” interface
-c Restore the CA and certificates
-g The groupware data (appointments, jobs, address books) are converted
and adapted to the new groupware. For this step, the password for the
administrator (cyrus) is needed as well.
-n Restores the name server’s (DNS) configuration
-a All steps mentioned above are performed one after another.
In Case of Problems
If some information was not correctly restored, you can use the backup file
created by backup.sh. The data needs to be transferred manually. The
backup file is a compressed tar archive and can be accessed directly with
the tar command.
DHCP and Installating
IP address and host name for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server can be
assigned during installation via DHCP. This only works if the DHCP server
12
DHCP and Installating
Note
The name of your SuSE Linux Openexchange Server may not change.
Additionally, the server will not work correctly if the DHCP server
cannot be contacted while booting or if it assigns a different host or
domain name to the server.
Note
If the clients are configured via DHCP as well, the DHCP server or a configured DNS server must perform the name resolution for the local network. It
must also be known to the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as name server.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
3
Preparing for Installation
additionally transmits, as well as the IP addess, the complete host name including the domain.
13
4
Scenarios
Scenarios
Review your network layout before beginning the installation. The following
is an overview of possible topologies, which can assist in making appropriate
selections during installation. A network interface can be an ethernet connection (network card) or a PPP connection (modem or ISDN). Configurations
other than those listed are also possible.
One Network Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Two Network Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
18
One Network Interface
The following are options for operating the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
with only one network interface.
Internet Only
The eMail server is connected to the Internet with a dedicated line and has a
public IP address. Figure 4.1 shows this layout.
Your provider can supply the address of the default gateway. Usually, the
eMail server runs its own name server. If desired, instead specify another
accessible DNS (ask your provider). The publicly-reachabe DNS must contain
an mx record that points to your SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. In this
scenario, no relay host is needed.
Openexchange
Server
Internet
Figure 4.1: SuSE Linux Openexchange Server Connected Only to the Internet
Intranet Only
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server is only available in the local network
and was not assigned a public IP address. No mail should be sent to other
networks. This setup is shown in Figure 4.2.
Because you will not connect to another network, you do not need a default
gateway. For contacting another network segment, the router between the
networks is the default gateway. Use the eMail server as DNS for your local
network or use an existing name server. No relay host is needed.
Openexchange
Server
local net
other
local net
router
optional
Figure 4.2: SuSE Linux Openexchange Server in the Intranet Only
16
One Network Interface
4
Intranet with a Router to the Internet
The default gateway in this example is the router’s address. Either use the
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as DNS or another DNS in your local network. Additionally, it is reasonable to add a second DNS as “forwarder”
in the /etc/named.conf — either one that can resolve other external addresses or simply the provider’s name server. Usually, you must enter the
provider’s relay host to send mail to the Internet. Configure your router accordingly.
Internet
Router
local net
Scenarios
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server is only available in the local network
and has a private IP address. It can connect to the Internet via an accessible
router in the local network. This layout is shown in Figure 4.3.
Openexchange
Server
Figure 4.3: SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server Connected to the Internet via a Router
In the DMZ
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server is part of a DMZ (DeMilitarised Zone)
and is protected by a firewall. This layout is shown in Figure 4.4.
Internet
Firewall
local net
DMZ
Openexchange
Server
Figure 4.4: SuSE Linux Openexchange Server in a DMZ
Use, for example, the SuSE Firewall on CD to operate the SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server in a DMZ. The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
should have its own IP address. In this case, you must configure the firewall to enable forwarding of data from and to the eMail server. The default
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
17
gateway can, for example, be the firewall server. SuSE Firewall on CD comes
with an SMTP proxy server as well.
Two Network Interfaces
If the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server is fitted with two network interfaces,
one of the following configurations for your network is possible.
Permanent Connections to the Internet and Intranet
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server can be reached from both the Internet
and the local network. The layout is diagrammed in Figure 4.5.
The default gateway is usually specified by your provider. It is advisable to
use the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as DNS and add the provider’s
DNS (if available) to /etc/named.conf as “forwarder”. It may be necessary to specify a relay host; ask your provider.
Openexchange
Server
Internet
local net
Figure 4.5: SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
Connected to the Local Network and the Internet
Dial-up Internet Connection and Permanent Intranet Connection
You use a network interface to connect to your local network and a second
interface to dial-up to the Internet. When connecting, you are assigned an IP
address dynamically. The layout is shown in Figure 4.6 on the facing page.
The default gateway is the “Point to Point Partner” specified when configuring the ISDN card. This address is replaced on dial-up by your provider with
a public IP address. Choose a local address for your DNS. Additionally, add
at least one DNS of your provider as a forwarder in /etc/named.conf. If
the provider’s DNS is transmitted while connecting, you do not need to specify an additional name server. Usually, you also need to specify a relay host;
ask your provider.
18
Two Network Interfaces
ISDN
local net
Figure 4.6: SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
with an ISDN Connection to the Internet
4
Scenarios
Internet
Openexchange
Server
In the DMZ
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server is connected to both an internal and
external firewall by two different network interfaces. You may choose the
external firewall as the default gateway and configure it accordingly (forwarding) so the local network is accessible as well. This setup is shown in
Figure 4.7.
Internet
DMZ
int. Firewall
ext. Firewall
local net
Openexchange
Server
Figure 4.7: SuSE Linux Openexchange Server with
Connections to the Internal and External Firewall
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
19
5
The following pages describe how to install and configure the SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server with YaST2.
Booting from the CD-ROM
Insert your CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive and boot the computer. SuSE
Linux should now be loaded for installation.
Computer Does Not Boot from CD-ROM
If the computer does not boot from the CD-ROM, change the computer’s
BIOS settings. Do the following:
For an EIDE (ATAPI) CD-ROM Drive
On boot, the hardware is initialized by the BIOS. Among other things, the
computers memory is checked. During this process, identifiable by the count
of system memory, it is possible to enter the BIOS setup. At the lower border
of the display, directions for entering the BIOS Setup are shown. Usually, ac cess the setup by pressing either Del or F1 . Press the corresponding key to
enter the BIOS setup.
If your computer has an AWARD BIOS, the entry to choose is called BIOS
FEATURES SETUP. Other manufacturers use similar entries, such as ADVANCED CMOS SETUP. Choose the corresponding entry and confirm your
selection by pressing ↵ . An entry with a name like ‘Boot Sequence’ details
the drive’s starting order. The default is often C, A or A, C. In the first case,
Installing with YaST2
Installing with YaST2
the computer look for the operating system first on the hard disk (C) then on
the floppy disk (A).
Choose ‘Boot Sequence’ and press Page ↑ or Page ↓ (or something similar,
depending on your BIOS) until you see a sequence in which the CD-ROM
is searched before the hard disk, e. g., A, CDROM, C. Press Esc to leave the
menu. To save your changes. choose ‘SAVE & EXIT SETUP’ or press F10 .
You will then be asked whether you want to leave the BIOS setup and save
the settings.
Note
An American keyboard layout is normally used in the BIOS.
Note
For a SCSI CD-ROM drive
During boot, the hardware is initialized by the BIOS. Among other things,
the computer’s memory is checked and counted. Then the SCSI host adapter
is initialized. Access its BIOS by pressing the required key, which is displayed on the screen. For an Adaptec host adapter, the key combination is
usually Ctrl +
A
.
Choose ‘Disk Utilities’. The system will check then display the available
hardware. Note the SCSI ID of your CD-ROM drive. Press Esc to exit the
menu. Next, choose ‘Configure Adapter Settings’. In ‘Additional Options’,
find the ‘Boot Device Options’. Choose that and press ↵ . Enter the ID of
Esc twice to reach the start menu
your CD-ROM drive then press ↵ . Press of the SCSI BIOS. Exit and save the settings. The computer will now reboot.
The welcome screen opens and the installation begins.
Welcome Screen
Initially, you will see the welcome screen. Unless a key is pressed, the default
selection ‘Installation’ starts after a few seconds. A minimal Linux system is
loaded into your computer’s main memory. The rest of the installation runs
on this system. On the screen, some messages and copyright notices appear.
After loading the system, YaST2 is started and its graphical interface appears
in SVGA (800x600) graphics. If it encounter problems, abort the process and
reboot. In this case, you should choose another option instead of the default
selection.
22
Welcome Screen
5
Other Options
Different Graphics Modes for YaST2
Use the function keys to choose the VGA (640x480) graphics mode, which
should work with any graphics card. If all else fails, choose the text mode.
In the text mode of YaST2, move from menu item to menu item by pressing
. Pressing ↵ continues
and . Inside a menu, select an entry with ↓
↑
Tab to the next menu.
Installing with YaST2
If you press anything during the idle time, nothing is started automatically.
These other options are usually needed only if you have problems with the
graphical display.
Kernel Parameters
Enter the specific kernel parameters, which are usually needed only for special hardware components, next to the ‘boot:’ entry after the name of the system to boot.
Further Options
With and , choose from additional options. If you choose ‘Manual In↑
↓
stallation’, a text-based version of YaST2 is started. This is usually only necessary if the computer has less than 64 MB of main memory. ‘Rescue System’
starts a rescue system that can help recover a damaged system.
YaST2 Takes Over
Now the actual installation with the installation program YaST2 begins. It
will guide you through the installation procedure. The menus of YaST2 follow a consistent pattern: all text fields, choices, and buttons of the YaST2
screens can be controlled with the mouse.
If your cursor does not move, your mouse was not detected automatically.
Use the keyboard in this case. When navigating with the keyboard, use the
arrow keys to move within a selection area. Use Tab to move from one se lection area, field, or button to the next. Press ↵ to activate a selected button.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
23
Language Selection
Select your preferred language to use during the installation and in the installed system. This can be changed later, if needed. YaST2 uses this setting
to select a default keyboard layout and time zone. These settings can also be
adjusted.
Installation Proposal
After the hardware detection, information about the detected hardware and
suggestions on the installation and partitioning are displayed in the proposal window. To change a setting, click the module. After completing the
changes, YaST2 returns you to the proposal window and displays the new
values. If the mouse does not work, you can now select the mouse configuration. The following sections detail the configuration possibilities.
Mode
This should always be set to ‘New installation’. Do not make changes here.
Keyboard Layout
Z
,
Choose the desired keyboard layout in this form. Test special characters, and Y
to verify that the layout is correct. Click ‘Next’ to return to the proposals.
Mouse
If YaST2 did not detect your mouse correctly, move the focus with Tab until
‘Change’ is highlighted. Next, press Space and use the arrow keys to select
‘Mouse’. Press ↵ to open the mouse configuration window, shown in Figure 5.1 on the facing page.
and . Refer to your mouse documentation
To select the mouse type, use ↑
↓
for details. Confirm the selection by pressing Alt +
T
or by pressing Tab then ↵ .
Test the mouse. If the mouse cursor now follows the mouse movements, this
installation step was successful. If the cursor still is not moving, choose another type and retry.
24
Language Selection
5
Installing with YaST2
Figure 5.1: Choosing a Mouse Type
Partitioning
During the installation, divide the available disk space into sections, called
“partitions”. This process is called “partitioning”.
The Partitioner of YaST2
It is sensible to partition the hard disks manually when installing the SuSE
Linux Openexchange Server, because YaST2, for example, does automatically place /var on its own partition. If you use the automatic partitioning
of YaST2, YaST2 will create boot, root, and swap partitions with sensible partition sizes. All existing data on the hard disk will be deleted so the entire
disk space is available for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. A suggestion for how to simply partition the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server can be
found in the A Suggestion for Partitioning on page 28.
When opening the ‘Partitioning’ module, you will first be offered to modify
the suggestions of YaST2 or create a new partitioning scheme. In ‘Partition
according to your own wishes’, all hard disks found in the system are listed.
Select the hard disk on which to install the system. See Figure 5.2 on the following page.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
25
Figure 5.2: Choosing the Installation Disk
YaST2 lists all partitions for the found hard disks as shown in Figure 5.3 on
the next page. Create, edit, or delete partitions manually. It is also possible
to configure the LVM (logical volume manager) to create a software RAID.
Partitioning Manually
With the partitioner, shown in Figure 5.3 on the facing page, you can manually change the partitioning of your hard disks. You may add, delete, and
edit partitions.
After choosing ‘Partitioning’ from the suggestion screen and, in the next window, ‘Partitioning based on the suggestion’, the partitioner lists the hard
disks and all current partitions or suggested partitions respectively. Disks
are the devices without a number, such as /dev/hda or /dev/sda. Partitions are listed as parts of these devices, such as /dev/hda1 or /dev/sda1.
The size, type, file system and mount point for disks and partitions are listed.
The mount point describes where the partitions are attached in the Linux directory structure.
Creating a Partition
To create a new partition:
26
Installation Proposal
5
Installing with YaST2
Figure 5.3: The Partitioner
1. Click ‘Create’. If more than one disk is available, choose the appropriate disk now.
2. After choosing a disk, a dialog asks for the partition type. You may
create up to four primary partitions or three primary partitions and one
extended partition. In the extended partition, you may create several
“logical” partitions.
3. Next, select the file system to use for formatting the partition and a
mount point. YaST2 will suggest a mount point for every new partition.
4. Click ‘OK’.
The new partition is now listed in the partition table. Click ‘Next’ to confirm
your choices.
Parameters for Partitioning
To integrate a new partition in the file system tree, set the parameters for the
partitioner by performing the following steps:
1. Choosing a partition
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
27
2. ‘Edit’ the partition and specify a few parameters:
File System ID For a partition type, select from Linux swap, Linux,
Linux LVM, or Linux RAID.
File system Set the file systems according to your needs. The most
widely used file systems currently are ext2, ext3, and reiser.
The ext2 file system has the longest history in Linux and is known
to be a well-tested and stable file system. With a larger volume of
data and larger hard disks, it is usually advisable to use a journaling file system like ext3 or reiser. ext3 is useful for a small amount
of large files while “reiser” excels with a large amount of small
files, both in memory usage and speed.
Mount point Specifies the directory below which the partition should
be mounted in the file system tree.
3. Choose ‘Next’ to save the settings for your partitions.
A Suggestion for Partitioning
Dividing the disks in the following partitions has proved itself useful:
A boot partition of approximately 20 MB on which files needed to boot
the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server can be saved. Use /boot as its
mount point.
A swap partition twice the size of your main memory, which can be
used to swap out data from the main memory as needed. This partition
must be formatted as a swap partition.
A root partition on which to store all system data, such as programs
and configuration files. A minimum of 1.5 GB is required for the SuSE
Linux Openexchange Server, as approximately 1 GB of software will be
installed and enough disk space for temporary files is needed. Use / as
the mount point.
A separate partition for /var is recommended. The SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server saves all mails and user data in the /var directory. Placing this on a separate partition prevents a sudden increase in
mail load from influencing the function of the basic system. It can also
be advisable to break /var into multiple partitions, for example:
/var/spool/imap Below this directory, all users’ mail is placed. Make
sure this partition is large enough. Stored mail can quickly
amount to several gigabytes with several users.
28
Installation Proposal
/var The LDAP server’s data is placed here.
Software
The software for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server is preselected. You
cannot make changes here.
5
Installing with YaST2
/var/log The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server places the log files of
the different services here.
System Start
If desired, enter custom settings for the boot loader GRUB here. For a standard installation, no changes are needed.
Time Zone
In this dialog, illustrated in Figure 5.4 on the next page, first select the time
zone for your system from the list of countries. Then, select the time setting
in the field ‘Set system clock to’ based on your BIOS clock. If you choose
GMT instead of Local time, SuSE Linux ensures proper correction is made
for the local time zone.
Starting the Installation
Click ‘Next’ to accept the proposal with all your changes. In the green confirmation dialog that opens, select ‘yes’ to begin installing the system. The
installation will take, depending on the software selection and the speed of
the system, between fifteen and thirty minutes. During the installation, additional information about SuSE products is displayed. Click ‘Details’ to view
information about the installation instead.
Configuring the System
After installing the software packages, make some important settings for the
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
29
Figure 5.4: Selecting the Time Zone
Root Rassword
root is the system’s administrator or superuser. Only this user can modify
the system, install new programs for all users, or add new hardware. root
also has the power to change passwords for users or assist with other problems.
Only log in as root to perform administrative tasks, like maintenance and
repair. For day to day use, this is not recommended. As root can easily
make changes that could damage the system, logging in as root for regular
use is a security risk.
Enter the password for root twice as shown in Figure 5.5 on the facing
page. As this password cannot be retrieved or viewed at a later time, remember it carefully.
Caution
Administrative tasks can only be performed as root. The password is
required before any changes can be made.
Caution
30
Configuring the System
5
Installing with YaST2
Figure 5.5: Entering a Password for root
Screen Configuration
Information about the graphics card and screen are displayed along a reasonable configuration for both. In most cases, accept the suggestion. If preferred,
specify color depth, resolution, and refresh rate manually. If you change the
proposal, test the new settings before writing the configuration to the disk.
Click ‘Edit’ to configure the graphical interface. This starts the program SaX2.
Network Configuration
After configuring your graphics card, continue to a screen like that shown
in Figure 5.6 on the next page. Set up your computer’s hardware, such as
network interfaces and printer, here. Click a component to start the hardware
configuration.
To configure the network device, click ‘Network interfaces’. Usually, YaST2
detects the network interface automatically and creates a basic configuration
with automatic address assignment via DHCP. This only works for the SuSE
Linux Openexchange Server if there is a DHCP server present in the network
that is configured to assign the same IP address and host name to the SuSE
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
31
Figure 5.6: Configuring the System Components
Linux Openexchange Server every time. Just having a DHCP server is not
enough.
Static Network Configuration
Use of a static IP address is advised. Click ‘Change’ and choose the network
interface from the next screen and click ‘Edit’. In the dialog that opens, click
‘Configuring the static address’ and enter the corresponding values in ‘IP address’ and ‘Subnet mask’.
Next, click ‘host name and name server’ to enter the host and domain name
of your SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. Entering values for the name
server and domain search list is not necessary, as the system will be configured to use the local name server.
Click ‘Next’ to save the settings.
In ‘Routing’, enter the IP address of your default gateway. Click ‘Next’ to
continue configuration.
32
Network Configuration
5
Installing with YaST2
Figure 5.7: Configuring the Network Address
Basic Configuration for the SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server
Part One
To set up the server for use by Windows clients, activate ‘Install a Samba
server’ and enter the desired workgroup’s name. Additional information
about this is available in SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as a Windows Server
on page 57.
Part Two
Leave the default value for the ‘LDAP BaseDN’. The default setting is the
domain name entered during the network configuration.
The administrator’s password is not the root password entered previously.
The password set here is used for administering the mail system of the
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. The mail administrators are cyrus and
mailadmin. The same password is used for both.
Part Three
Enter the company name and select the country.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
33
Figure 5.8: Configuring Host Name and Name Server
After you click ‘Finish’, the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server basic configuration is created. If you chose ‘Install a Samba Server’, some software packages are additionally installed. Insert the appropriate CDs when prompted.
After finishing the configuration, the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server is
started in its final state. On the screen, view the corresponding messages.
34
Basic Configuration for the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
6
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server provides a convenient web front-end
for configuration and administration. Use it to manage users, groups, folders, and access permissions. Also use it to configure the various services provided by the server.
The Start Page in the Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The System Administrator cyrus . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Groups and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Virtual Domains and Multiple Domain Capability . . . .
Configuring Mail Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resource Management for the Calendar . . . . . . . . . .
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as a Windows Server
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
36
36
37
41
45
47
51
51
54
56
57
The Administrative Interface
The Administrative Interface
The Start Page in the Browser
First, check whether you can access the web front-end using your browser.
Open a browser on one of your client PCs and enter the URL http://
serverIP. You should then see the starting page as in Figure 6.1.
Figure 6.1: The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server’s Start Page
If your client can resolve the name of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
via DNS (Domain Name Service), instead enter the server name complete
with the domain name as the URL in the format http://server.domain.
com.
The System Administrator cyrus
To manage the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as the mail administrator, log in with the user name cyrus and your administration password.
You can modify nearly every parameter used to configure the SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server.
Navigating the configuration menu is deliberately kept easy and efficient.
The menu consists of a range of tabs. Where needed, a second range appears
as a submenu. Clicking a submenu opens the respective form.
To change the language, click the ‘Language’ icon. Click the question mark at
the upper right edge of a dialog window to open relevant help texts. Click
‘Logout’ to close your session. You must then log in again with the user
name and password to make additional changes.
36
The Start Page in the Browser
6
Note
Note
User Management
After installing your eMail server, add all users. Already present are the user
cyrus, who may configure the eMail server, and the user mailadmin, who
can read all mails sent to the administrator.
The Administrative Interface
To administer the server, log in as root, but the basic configuration
of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server must be handled using the
web front-end and a browser. As root, you can make settings concerning the operating system, but never change values regarding the
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. Most importantly, do not use YaST2
to add new users.
Creating a New User
Select ‘user’ ➝ ‘New’ to create the first user. A dialog like Figure 6.2 on the
following page opens. Fill in the form starting with the user name (UID). The
UID may only contain lowercase letters and may not contain special characters or blanks. It must be unique in the system.
If users want to have their real name as their e-mail address, simply use
the e-mail alias of the address. This is created by default in the form
first\protect\T1\textunderscorename.last\protect\T1\
textunderscorename@domain.com. Additional aliases can later be added
in the ‘Edit’ menu.
The administrator must assign a password to the new user. This need not be
a very secure one as the user should change it after the first login. Choose
which type of encryption to use when saving the password. The older
“crypt” encryption allows for a password length of five characters. “SMD5”
allows up to 255. Choose the primary group to which this user should belong. Additional groups can be assigned using the ‘Groups/Folders’ menu.
If you did not create any groups, only Users is available.
Optionally, grant the new user write access to the public address book. Consider the value for the Quota. This value specifies the maximum disk space
the user may use to store mail on the eMail server. If this space is filled completely, the user cannot receive mail. Old mails must then be deleted to make
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
37
Figure 6.2: Creating a New User
more space available. This value may also be changed later. If no quota is
desired for a user, delete the value and leave the field empty. Change the default value in ‘Mail’ ➝ ‘IMAP configuration’.
To enter other personal data, such as address and telephone number, for the
user, open a list of all attributes by clicking ‘long attribute list’. Now inform
the new user of his user name and password. The user may log in to the
web front-end of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server and should immediately change his password. There is no reason for the administrator to know
the user’s password. The administrator can assign a new password without
knowing the old one.
After the user has been created, proceed automatically to the Groupware’s
permission management. Specify which permissions this user has in the
Groupware. Checking the check box in the ‘Assign permission’ column gives
the user read and write access to the corresponding area. It is also possible to
create profiles of common access permission combinations.
Modifying User Data
First, click ‘Edit’. Next, specify which users to display. If you only have a
few users, click ‘apply filter’ without changing the value ‘*’ of the ‘Filter’
text field to list all users. Choose the user to edit by clicking it. The functions
38
User Management
‘Delete’ Completely removes the chosen user from the server. Use this function cautiously. All this user’s mail and data will be irretrievably lost.
‘De/Activate’ When you deactivate a user, no data is deleted. The user cannot log in or receive mail. Mail addressed to this user is rejected by the
server. Deactivated users are marked with an ‘*’.
‘Create/revoke certicifate’ Create a certificate for a user here if you created
a “CA” (Certification Authority). Creating a user certificate is similar
to creating a server certificate, explained in CA Management on page 55.
First, enter the password for the CA. In the following fields, enter the
password to assign this certificate twice. Confirm all entries by clicking
‘sign’.
6
The Administrative Interface
‘Delete’, ‘De/Activate’, and ‘modify access permissions’ can be performed for
multiple users the same time. Simply choose multiple entries from the list.
The names of the chosen users are highlighted. Find buttons for all functions
along the right border:
‘Add to group’ Assign this user to one or more secondary groups. Use your
mouse to select one or more of the available groups.
‘Edit user data’ This form resembles the form used for user creation. You
may change all values. Additionally, you have the possibility to assign
aliases to the user. Enter a list of all additional names that can be used
to reach the user, separated by blanks, in ‘EMail aliases’.
‘Permission management Groupware’ Change the permissions inside the
Groupware.
‘Modify access permissions’ In this form, limit the write access a user has
to his personal data in the system’s address book. View a list of all
fields present in the system’s address book. Choose the fields the user
may change. You may also create a template defining the access permissions each newly created user has by default. Refer to Access Permissions for New Users on page 41.
‘Vacation note’ Create a vacation note for the user here.
‘Change password’ Assign a new password to the user.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
39
Changing the Password for cyrus
Enter cyrus in ‘Filter’ and click ‘apply filter’. Choose the user and click
‘Change password’. Enter the old password and the new one twice as shown
in Figure 6.3). Remember the password well. Without it, you have no way of
administering the server. This password also applies for mailadmin.
Figure 6.3: Changing the Administrator’s Password
Changing the Administrator’s Data
Follow the same process described above to locate the user. Then click
‘Change user data’.
Creating a Virtual User
After creating at least one virtual domain, you may create new virtual users
by choosing ‘New’. This opens a dialog as shown in Figure 6.4 on the facing
page). Enter a ‘virtual e-mail address’ and choose one of the virtual domains.
Click ‘Apply filter’ to see a list of all available users. Limit the search by entering a search filter in ‘Filter’. Select the user or users that should receive
mail sent to this virtual address. Click ‘Create’.
Editing a Virtual User
To change what user receives mail sent to a virtual user, click ‘Edit’ and
choose the address to change. Assign the virtual address to another real address. Virtual addresses can also just be deleted.
40
User Management
6
The Administrative Interface
Figure 6.4: Creating a Virtual User
Access Permissions for New Users
With ‘Default ACI’, define a template of access permissions. This template is
used to initialize the access permissions a newly created user has to his personal data (first and last name, address, etc.) in the system’s address book.
All settings made here are only be applied to users created later. They will
not affect existing users. To learn how to change the permissions of existing
users, refer to Modifying User Data on page 39.
To delete an existing template, choose ‘remove default ACI’. If no template
exists, all new users are given full access to their personal data.
Groups and Folders
You may assign users to groups, for example, to make the permission management of folders easier or to create a mailing list. Shared folders for multiple users or groups are also available. Using the ‘direct mail delivery’ feature, e-mails can be delivered to users using POP instead of IMAP, who
would otherwise not have access to shared folders. Using this functionality,
a mailing list can also be created easily.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
41
Creating a Group
Use ‘Groups’ ➝ ‘New’ to create a new group. The corresponding dialog is
shown in Figure 6.5). Choose a unique group name. Use only lowercase letters. No blanks and special characters are allowed in group names.
Figure 6.5: Creating a Group
Enter a meaningful description for the group. To assign users to the group,
first request a list of existing users. Click ‘apply filter’ without changing the
value of the field ‘Filter’ to see a list of all users or limit the search by entering a value in ‘Filter’. Next, choose one or more users that should be members of the group. Chosen users are highlighted. By clicking ‘Create’, create
the group with the selected members.
Editing Groups
Edit or delete existing groups or change their descriptions. Choose a group
then click ‘Edit’ to see or modify the list of all group members. See Figure 6.6 on the next page.
Choose ‘apply filter’ to see a list of all system users. Members of the group
are highlighted. Change the assignment using the mouse. Click ‘Update’ to
stop editing and save all changes.
42
Groups and Folders
6
The Administrative Interface
Figure 6.6: Editing a Group
Creating a Folder
To create a new folder, choose ‘create shared folder’ from the menu and enter
the folder’s name. Only use lowercase letters. Do not use special characters
or blanks. Next, enter a meaningful description for the folder. If the folder
should have an e-mail address assigned to it, leave the corresponding option activated. After you click ‘Create’, define the access permissions for this
folder.
Permission Management for Folders
In the form’s upper part, view the permissions already assigned. The creator
of the folder has all access permissions to it. This should not be changed. To
assign additional permissions to others, request a user list. Click ‘apply filter’
or limit the display by entering a value in ‘Filter’. Choose a user. You may
also give access to an entire group. It is advisable to combine users in groups
and assign permissions to groups. This makes future administration tasks
easier. Clicking ‘Set’ adds the newly created permission settings to the upper
list. You may continue defining rights or leave this form.
The permissions in detail are:
(l)ookup The folder is visible — it can be listed.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
43
(r)ead The folder and mails it contains can be viewed.
(s)tore Keep the states new and read across different sessions.
(w)rite Changing the message flags (new, answered, or draft) is permitted.
(i)nsert Inserting messages is allowed.
(p)ost Sending a message to this folder’s address is possible.
(c)reate The user may create and delete subfolders.
(d)elete It is possible to delete single messages or the entire folder.
(a)dminister It is possible to administer this folder (manage permissions).
The following combinations have proved useful in practice:
Read (lrs) Listing the folder and reading its content.
Add (lrsip) It is additinally allowed to add new messages.
Write (lrswipcd) The user may also create and delete subfolders as well as
the actual folder.
Administer (lrswipcda) This contains all permissions including the possibility to assign permissions to other users or groups.
Editing Folders and Changing Permissions
It is possible to change the attributes of an existing folder. First, choose
the folder with your mouse. The chosen folder is highlighted. Click ‘edit
shared folder’ to change the folder’s description or whether it ‘receives mail’.
Choose ‘set permissions’ to change the permission settings. Clicking ‘Delete’
deletes the entire folder and all its mails irretrievably.
Direct Mail Delivery — Mailing Lists via Folders
A special characteristic of folders is the “Direct mail delivery”. Choose ‘Direct mail delivery for users’ to deliver mail sent to this folder to the inbox of
the selected. This is necessary for users who access the server via POP. With
POP, no access to folders is possible.
Choose ‘apply filter’ to see a list of all system users or limit it by entering a
value in ‘Filter’. Selected users are highlighted. Use your mouse to change
44
Groups and Folders
‘Direct mail delivery for groups’ works the same way. All members of the
group receive a copy of the incoming mail. With this function, it is very easy
to create mailing lists. Simply place all members of the mailing list in one
group and assign this group to receive mail directed to a folder.
Virtual Domains and Multiple Domain Capability
Often a company uses more than one domain, for example, company.com
might be the primary domain with virtual domains like company.de and
my-company.com. Usually, the only functional purpose of the additional domains is to render the web presence in different languages. The SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server supports an arbitrary number of virtual domains and
users. It can also differentiate between users of all domains — mails sent to
a user in a virtual domain (for example, sales@my-company.com) are redirected to a real user in the primary domain, like sales@company.com.
6
The Administrative Interface
the selection and complete your entry by clicking ‘Save’. Click ‘Reset’ to recover the list. With ‘Back to folder selection’, choose another folder for editing.
You may use the same local part of an e-mail address (in the example,
sales) in the primary domain as well as in the virtual domain. The eMail
server can differentiate between the two with the domain name. If needed,
assign the real addressee the virtual e-mail address as the sending address.
This gives domain-specific user management.
Creating and Editing Virtual Domains
Before you can create a virtual user, you must create the corresponding virtual domain. Click ‘Host/Domain’ ➝ ‘virtual domains’. Create a new domain by entering its name in ‘New domain’. Confirm all settings by clicking
‘Add’. See Figure 6.7 on the following page. This way, add the desired domains.
If you do not have a name server in your network that handles these domains, the eMail Server can do so. A configuration for the name service
(BIND9) is created by default during the install process. Creating or deleting a virtual domain has no direct impact on the name server configuration.
To add an existing domain to the name server’s configuration, click ‘Export’.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
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Figure 6.7: Creating and Editing Virtual Domains
Note
The file /etc/named.conf and the zone files for the Domain
Name Service in /var/named will be overwritten in the process.
To add special options to /etc/named.conf, use the template
/etc/named.conf.in. You can add all additional options needed
for your name service here.
Note
To add your own zone data to the automatically generated files, simply give
them names differing from those generated by the SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server. The zone files are named according to the following scheme. For the
“forward mapping”, the file name should follow the pattern /var/named/
company.com.zone. For “reverse mapping”, the “IN-ADDR.ARPA” address
is added to the file name.
Adding Clients to the Name Server
With ‘DNS: add host’, the eMail server can be used as the name server for
the local network. This is advisable if you do not use another name service.
Entering the providers DNS is ineffective as it cannot resolve your clients. To
add a new client, enter its host name and IP number and confirm the settings
by clicking ‘Create’.
46
Virtual Domains and Multiple Domain Capability
6
Note
Note
Removing a Client from the Name Server
To remove a client from the local network, select ‘DNS: remove host’. Even
if only the IP address of a client changes, you must first remove it then add
it again. The changes only become effective if you confirm with ‘virtual domains’ ➝ ‘Export’.
The Administrative Interface
The new entry will not be immediately added to the configuration
files. To create the new configuration files, choose ‘Virtual domains’ ➝
‘Export’.
Configuring Mail Components
Using the entry ‘MAIL’, the entire mail system can be set up. Essential settings that affect the eMail Server’s operation can be modified here. Only
change these values if you know the consequences of the changes.
Postfix: Basic Functionality
This dialog is shown in Figure 6.8 on the next page. Using the Postfix interface, configure the following functions:
Name of relay host Enter the mail relay supplied by your provider. This is
usually needed if you are not connected to the Internet by a dedicated
line.
Dial-on-Demand If you use a dial-up line, such as ISDN, specify whether
the server may initiate a dial-up if needed.
SASL Activate this field if users may log in using “authenticated SMTP”.
TLS This option is only visible if you created a “CA”. Activate it to use an
encrypted transmission of mails and certificate-based relaying.
SPAM Filter Activate this option to check whether mail arriving over STMP
is an unsolicited commercial mail. Mails detected as such are tagged,
adding certain information to the headers. No other action is taken.
Users may decide themselves what to do with a mail marked as SPAM.
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Figure 6.8: Basic Postfix Configuration
Postfix: Advanced Configuration
In this form, nearly every Postfix parameter can be edited, removed, or
added. See Figure 6.9 on the facing page.
Caution
Changing values in this form without detailed knowledge about the
configuration of Postfix can render your server inoperable. Only
change something if you are absolutely sure of the consequences.
Caution
IMAP Configuration: Client Access
You may specify some fundamental settings that affect how the SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server handles clients. With ‘Set default quota size’, the value
for the suggested quota limit when creating a user. With ‘After the expiration of this time, idle IMAP users will automatically be logged out’, specify
how much idle time is allowed before a user is logged out. Automatic logout is useful if a user forgot to log out before leaving. Set this for accesses
via POP3 by entering a value for ‘After the expiration of this time, idle POP3
users will automatically be logged out’. This mainly closes open connections
to the server as POP clients authenticate themselves each time they fetch
mail.
Decide what happens if mail is delivered to a user that exceeded his
quota limit. By default, the mail is accepted and the server repeatedly tries to deliver it in a time frame of five days, as long as Postfix’s
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Configuring Mail Components
6
The Administrative Interface
Figure 6.9: Advanced Postfix Configuration
maximal_queue_lifetime parameter was not changed. If the e-mail still
cannot be delivered when this expires, it is discarded and the sender is sent a
warning. If you set ‘Mail will be rejected immediately when the quota limit
is exceeded’ to yes, the mail is discarded instantly and a warning is sent to
the sender.
If desired, specify a local user that receives all undeliverable mail. Usually,
mails to nonexistent local users are rejected and a warning with an appropriate message is sent to the sender. If you enter a local user in this field, mail
addressed to nonexistent users is sent to the specified user. In this case, the
sender will not receive a notification.
Note
Only enter local users here. For example, enter mailadmin. Do not
append a domain.
Note
Fetch mail
If your server has a consolidated, official IP address and your mail server
it “responsible” for your domain (i. e., there is a “mx-record” present in an
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
49
official name server), you will not need this functionality. Use “Fetch Mail”
if e-mail accounts from a provider must be accessed. Choose ‘New’ to add a
new entry or ‘Edit’ to modify an existing entry. See Figure 6.10.
Figure 6.10: Fetch Mail
Enter the necessary data for logging in to the remote mail server. The “Delivery address” is a complete e-mail address of a local user. This user will
receive all fetched mail.
The “Protocol” is either POP or IMAP. Usually, the provider offers POP. You
might need to ask whether IMAP is possible. If this is a multidrop account
(mail to different users on the same domain are placed in the same e-mail account), activate the correponding option. In this case, you need not specify a
“Delivery address” as the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server delivers the mail
itself. If (and only if) your provider uses QMail there is a peculiarity regarding the delivery addresses. Someone sends a mail to your company, for example, to user@company.com. The provider’s QMail server puts something
like “Delivered-To: multidrop-user@company.com” in the header. In this example, the QMail prefix would be “multidrop-”. Ask your provider about the
QMail prefix and, if needed, enter it in the corresponding field.
With the buttons ‘On the following days’, limit the requests to certain days.
The interval of the requests plays an important part for “Dial-on-Demand”
connections (e. g., using ISDN). To restrict costs, extend the interval duration
because the eMail server must dial-up for each request.
50
Configuring Mail Components
Monitoring the System
With ‘Who is online?’, see an overview of which users are currently online using the web front-end. These are only the SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server internal sessions. POP and IMAP connections are not listed. Clicking
a user ID deletes this user’s session. You cannot delete your own session.
The Administrative Interface
Online Users
6
Figure 6.11: Online User Overview
Mail Queue: the Mail Monitor
In this form, see a list of all mails Postfix is currently processing. Enter the
refresh rate in seconds (e. g., 5 seconds) and press Enter . The form will be repeatedly updated at that interval. To turn off the automatic updating, select
‘Mail Queue’ again. Usually, no mails are listed here. If the Postfix system
was stopped or is for some other reason unable to deliver mails, mails awaiting delivery are listed. Use ‘empty queue’ to provoke Postfix to process the
mails immediately. To delete a mail from the list, click the Queue ID of the
respective mail. The mail is irretrievably lost when deleted.
Additional Utilities
LDAP Browser: Edit the LDAP database
Using the LDAP Browser, directly access the LDAP database. Nearly all user
information is placed there. Only make changes here if you are absolutely
sure about what you are doing. Otherwise, you may render the eMail server
inoperable.
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51
Mail to All: Messages from the Administrator
It might be useful for the mail administrator (mailadmin) to write a message
to every user of the system, for example, if the eMail server goes offline for
maintenance. Enter the subject and message text as in Figure 6.12. The mail
will be delivered to all users regardless of their quotas.
Figure 6.12: A Mail from the Administrator
Edit Configuration Files
You may edit some important configuration files here. Most services must be
restarted or reloaded to incorporate changes.
Global Configuration
Use this to make settings that affect the web-based configuration and some
components of the system. The corresponding configuration file can be found
on the server in the file /etc/imap/globals.conf.
GENERAL
EnableSamba Activate or deactivate the PDC functionality.
52
Additional Utilities
EnableSieveEditor Activate or deactivate the SIEVE filter editor in the
user’s filter settings.
MonitorResolveAddr Set whether IP addresses should be resolved in
the online monitor.
DelUserNoAcl If a user is deleted, all IMAP folders are examined to
check whether the user had access to them. This is done to prevent inconsistencies. The down side is that this action can take a
considerable amount of time. For deleting many users at the same
time, it is advisable to set this option to true.
SESSIOND
SessionTimeout Specify a time-out after which a user is automatically
logged out.
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The Administrative Interface
EnableUserSpamFrontend Enable or disable the SPAM filter front-end
in the filter settings of each user.
The options ‘SessiondHost’, ‘SessiondPort’, ‘SSL_key_file’,
‘SSL_cert_file’, and ‘SSL_ca_file’ are currently not in use. They are necessary in case the administrative web front-end is installed and used on
a different computer.
SECURITY
UseCookie The options ‘UseCookie’ and ‘CheckClientIP’ prevent
someone from “stealing” a session by somehow obtaining the session ID of a user. ‘UseCookie’ is the safest. An additional ID is
saved in the browser of the user.
CheckClientIP CheckClientIP prevents a session from being stolen
by checking whether all accesses to the web front-end originate
from the same computer. Because an IP address can be faked or a
user might access the front-end from behind a proxy cluster that
uses varying IP addresses, this option is less useful than that using
cookies.
DefaultPasswordHash Specify the default method of encrypting users’
passwords.
FETCHD
debug If you set this option to a value greater than 0 and restart the
“fetchd” by entering rcfetchd restart, you will receive debug
information.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
53
keeponserver If you activate this option, mails fetched from the server
are not deleted from the server. Usually, deactivate this option as
ALL mails must be fetched when mail is fetched from the server.
unixsocket This socket is used for the communication between the
web client and fetchd.
ldaphost Specify the computer name or IP address of the LDAP server
fetchd uses to save data about the user’s mail boxes.
ldap_reconnect_interval fetchd uses a permanent connection to the
LDAP server. If this connection is closed or becomes invalid, it
will be reestablished after this interval, set in seconds.
ldap_max_reconnect Enter the maximum number of times fetchd
should retry establishing a broken connection to the LDAP server.
mailadmin The name of the local mail box in which administrative
messages should be saved.
append_fetch_header Set whether a header be attached to every mail
fetched by fetchd.
thread_max fetchd contains a rudimentary scheduler, which starts,
at most, as many processes as specified here. Do not specify too
high a value for this option, because a process might use a lot of
memory.
priority_granularity This value should be at least twice as high as the
value of ‘thread_max’.
Security
SSL Configuraton: Encrypted Access
Basic Apache SSL Configuration
With ‘activate SSL’, enable a secure connection from your clients to the server.
This is only available if you created a CA and a server certificate.
Choose the type of verification:
none Certificates are not verified at all.
optional Presence of a certificate will be checked. However, access is
granted even if no certificate is present.
require Access is only granted if the client presents a valid certificate.
54
Security
optional_no_ca A certificate must be present, but it need not be valid.
Basic Cyrus IMAPD SSL Configuration
Activate SSL for IMAP and POP3. Every time you activate or deactivate SSL
for POP3 and IMAP, the server must be restarted. This causes connection loss
for all clients currently connected to the server.
Basic OpenLDAP SSL Configuration
The Administrative Interface
CAs can be hierarchical — a CA can be validated by another CA. The validity of the second CA, in turn, can be validated by another CA that is “nearer
to the top”. The ‘verification depth’ specifies for how many steps Apache
should trace the verification chain before rejecting a certificate. The default
is one. This only trusts the CA that signed your certificate. Normally, this
should not be changed.
6
The LDAP server must also be restarted when you change the SSL settings.
CA Management
This front-end, shown in Figure 6.13 on the next page, is used when creating
your own CA (Certification Authority) or when importing a signed certificate from a trust center. This last option can have a fee associated and is not
necessary for proper operation of your mail server.
‘Create your own certificate’: Choose this to use the eMail server as your CA.
Complete the needed fields. The password will be needed later to create the
client certificates. The password cannot be changed.
In the next form, create the server certificate, which is signed by the newlycreated CA. If possible, assign a different password here. ‘Host name of the
web server’ refers to the name of your eMail Server. If the name written in
the server certificate does not match the name of the server, some browsers,
like Netscape, will doubt this certificate when establishing a secure connection. After creating a server certificate, create certificates for your users. Additionally, you may now activate the SSL functionality of the Apache and
Postfix.
If you have already created a server certificate, you only have the possibility
to remove it. To remove the certificate, you must know its password. After removing the certificate, you can use this form to create a new one. You
again have the choice to import an external one or create your own. When
creating a new one, either use the old CA or recreate that as well.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
55
Figure 6.13: CA Management
Note
If you remove or recreate your CA, existing client certificates lose their
validity.
Note
Resource Management for the Calendar
You may define resources that can be managed using the appointment manager of the groupware. Resources can include rooms, company cars, or hardware.
Resources: Creating and Deleting Resources
First, choose ‘Resources’. Using ‘new’, define new resources as shown in Figure 6.14 on the facing page. Entries are saved if you click ‘Confirm’.
Creating Resource Groups
Gather resources into useful groups, which makes the administration and
selection in SKYRiXgreen easier. To do so, first enter the resource group’s
name. Existing resources can now be selected and added to the new group.
When finished, click ‘Confirm’. See Figure 6.15 on page 58.
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Resource Management for the Calendar
6
The Administrative Interface
Figure 6.14: Creating and Deleting Resources
Editing and Deleting Resource Groups
Modify resource groups by choosing ‘Edit resource group’. Remove and add
resources by selecting or deselecting entries. Save the changes by clicking
‘Confirm’.
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as a Windows Server
If you chose to set up a Samba server during the installation, some additional menu entries are available. Add or remove Windows computers under
‘Hosts/Domains’. Use either ‘SMB:add host’ or ‘SMB:edit host’. If desired,
insert users into your windows network or remove them. If a user is given a
Samba account, his home directory is created in /home.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
57
Figure 6.15: Creating and Deleting Resource Groups
Activating the Windows Server
To activate the Windows server functionality after installation, first execute
a script. Log in to your server, for example, using ssh, as user root. Switch
to the directory /usr/share/doc/packages/imapweb32/tools and run
the script smbactivate.sh by entering ./smbactivate.sh and following the
directions. Next, log in to the web front-end as cyrus and select ‘Tools’ ➝
‘global configuration’. Change ‘EnableSamba’ to true then click ‘Save’. The
additional menus should now be available.
Authenticating Windows Clients
To use the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as PDC (Primary Domain Controller) for your Windows clients, the corresponding machines must log in
to the system. To make this possible, a machine account must be created for
each workstation. The following shortly describes the procedure for the different Windows versions.
The first steps are the same for all Windows versions. First, log in as
Administrator. Next, start Internet Explorer. Log in to the server as
58
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server as a Windows Server
Note
For the name resolution of your computer to work, select ‘Virtual Domains’ ➝ ‘Export’.
Note
Now, your Windows client has an account on your SuSE Linux Openexchange Server and you can log in to your domain in the next step.
Windows 2000
Right-click ‘My Computer’ on your desktop and choose ‘Settings’. Activate
‘Network identification’ and click ‘Settings’.
6
The Administrative Interface
cyrus and choose ‘Hosts/Domains’. Choose ‘SMB:Add host’. The name of
your Windows computer should have already been entered in ‘Netbios name
of the Host’. Next, click ‘Execute admission’ to create an account for your
computer. This then redirects you to the ‘DNS:add host’ menu. This computer should now be available on the DNS as well.
In the new window, activate ‘Member of’ ➝ ‘Domain’ and enter the name of
your Windows domain in the text field.
Click ‘OK’. Enter the user name root and the administrator password (for
cyrus). After restarting, you should be able to log in as an SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server user.
Windows XP
First, you must make some changes in the registry. Copy the file /usr/
share/doc/packages/imapweb32/tools/XP-Registry-Changes.reg
to your Windows client and execute it by double-clicking it. Alternatively, start the program regedt32 by entering its name in the ‘Run’ dialog in the ‘Start’ menu. Next, set the value [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\
SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Netlogon\Parameters\
requiresignorseal] to dword:00000000.
Before continuing, ensure that there is no open connection between your Windows XP client and the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. Then open the
‘Start’ menu, right-click ‘My Computer’, and choose ‘Settings’.
In the following window, activate ‘computer name’ and choose ‘Change’.
In the new window, activate ‘Member of’ ➝ ‘Domain’ and enter the name of
your Windows domain in the text field.
Click ‘OK’. Enter the user name root and the password for the administrator cyrus. After restarting, you should be able to log in as a SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server user.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
59
7
As a user, you can access the configuration panel for personal options using
the ‘Setup’ link in the Groupware’s menu. The following sections contain
explanations for particular menu options. Configuration options include personal data, folders, filters, and a vacation notice.
Settings . . . . . . . . .
Managing Folders . . .
SIEVE: The Mail Filter .
Changing the Language
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70
Administration as a User
Administration as a User
Settings
This menu offers options for changing your personal data, such as address
and phone number, and your password. It also has an option for downloading a personal certificate.
Entering and Changing Personal Data
Depending on your write access, you can change the personal data stored in
the system’s address book, as shown in Figure 7.1. If you do not have write
access to some fields, they cannot be modified.
Set the number of days a job or appointment is shown in advance using ‘Display Tasks on the starting page of the groupware’ and ‘Display appointments
on the starting page of the groupware’. Save your changes with ‘Update’.
Figure 7.1: The User’s Personal Data
Changing the Password
Change your password occasionally for security reasons. To do so, first enter
your old password then your new password twice in the designated fields.
See Figure 7.2 on the next page. Also choose how to save the new password.
The following options are available:
62
Settings
SMD5: Using the SMD5 mechanism allows significantly longer passwords
than the CRYPT algorithm. Up to 255 characters are allowed. The “encryption” applied here is considered superior to the mechanism applied
by the “CRYPT” method by security experts.
By default, the mechanism used to save the old password is applied.
7
Administration as a User
CRYPT: When using the CRYPT mechanism, the maximum length of the
password is set to eight characters. This is the standard mechanism for
most Unix systems.
Figure 7.2: Changing Your Password
If you forget your password, contact your administrator. The administrator
can create a new password for you without knowing your old one.
Downloading a Certificate
If your administrator has created a certificate for you, download it under
‘Certificate’ and import it into your browser. Information about importing a
certificate into your browser can be found in your browser’s documentation.
Managing Folders
The SuSE Linux Openexchange Server places your mails in folders. Create,
rename, and delete folders and administer other users’ access permissions to
your folders in the ‘Folder’ menu. This is one of the advantages of the IMAP
protocol. This is not possible when using POP.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
63
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server has hierarchically structured folders. The
top folder is the INBOX. All other folders are created in it. The following
folders are created for every user by default:
INBOX If no mail filters are defined, all incoming mails are stored here.
INBOX.drafts Here, store unsent drafts of e-mails.
INBOX.sent-mail All e-mails sent are stored here.
INBOX.spam This folder is used when you activate the filter for unsolicited
commercial e-mail, commonly called SPAM. You can have the system
store all e-mails recognized as SPAM here. For details about the SPAM
filter, see SPAM: Filter for Unsolicted Commercial E-Mail on page 68 and
Postfix: Basic Functionality on page 47.
INBOX.trash By default, the web mail program saves copies of deleted
mails in this folder.
These folders are needed by the system and should not be deleted. Deleting
the entire INBOX is impossible.
Creating a New Folder
Create new folders in the submenu ‘New’. On the left, all available folders
are shown. To add a new folder, click its parent folder. Enter the name of the
new folder. See Figure 7.3 on the facing page.
By clicking ‘New’, a new folder is created. The name of the new folder is,
for example, INBOX.subfolder. You can create a new folder in it, for example, another_folder. This folder’s name is then INBOX.subfolder.
another_folder.
Note
The dot in the folder’s name has an important meaning. A dot is used
as a hierarchy separator, like the ‘/’ (slash) in the directory structure.
For example, creating a folder marketing.purchasing is comparable
to creating a directory marketing containing a file purchasing. If
you now create another folder marketing.sales, you have a directory containing two files. If you did not create the folder marketing,
no mail can be stored there.
Note
64
Managing Folders
7
Administration as a User
Figure 7.3: Creating a New Folder
Rename and delete existing folders and change the access permissions of
other users to these folders in the ‘Edit’ submenu. To delete a folder, select
it from the list to the left and click ‘Delete’.
Caution
When deleting a folder, all mail it contains is lost. All its subfolders
and their contents are also removed.
Caution
To change the name of an existing folder, select it from the list. Then enter
the new name in the corresponding field and click ‘Rename’. Figure 7.4 on
the next page shows the relevant dialog.
You can assign rights for user folders. Clicking ‘set permissions’ opens a
form identical to that used for shared folders. A complete description of
assigning permissions can be found in Permission Management for Folders on
page 43. As owner of the folder, you have all permissions for that folder.
You should not change this. When creating subfolders, remember that subfolders inherit the permissions of the parent folder.
SIEVE: The Mail Filter
By using the SIEVE-based mail filter system of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server, automatically process incoming mails. A detailed description
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
65
Figure 7.4: Editing Folders
of SIEVE can be found in RFC 3028, available at http://www.ietf.org/
rfc/rfc3028.txt.
Mail Filter
With mail filters, control processing of incoming mails. Select mails based on
custom criteria then file them into specific folders. Mails can also be automatically refused or forwarded to other e-mail addresses.
Selecting ‘Mail Filter’ opens an overview of current filters. This is initially
empty.
Creating Filter Rules
To create a new rule for a filter, click ‘Enter filter rule’. Creating a new rule
for a filter is divided into a few steps. The first step is to define all filter conditions. The following properties of an e-mail can be evaluated:
Size: Check whether the size of a mail is larger or smaller than a certain
value.
Header fields and Envelope fields: The content of the header and the envelope fields can be checked. These fields contain, for example, the
sender, recipient, and topic of an e-mail.
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SIEVE: The Mail Filter
7
Administration as a User
The second step is defining an action that is executed if the filter conditions
match. If more than one condition is entered, choose how the conditions are
linked. AND means that all filter conditions must apply for the action to take
place. OR means that only one condition must apply.
The following example demonstrates configuration of the mail filter. A
friend sends you e-mail regularly, but you do not want to receive all of
these mails. You want to sort out those larger than one megabyte sent by
friend@domain.com. Those e-mails should be refused and the sender informed.
Figure 7.5: Setting Size Limits
Select ‘insert filter rule’. Click ‘Size limit’. Insert the desired value (see
fig. 7.5). For our example, this is ‘larger than 1 Megabyte’. Confirm with
‘OK’. Afterwards, select ‘Filter of header fields’. Insert ‘From contains
friend@domain.com’ and confirm with ‘OK’. This defines the conditions for
this example.
‘Next’ continues to the dialog for selecting an action. Select ‘reject message
with the explanation’ and enter a meaningful text, such as “Your mail is too
big. Please do not send such bulky messages to me.” The filter action dialog
is shown in Figure 7.6 on the following page. To apply another filter to this
mail, if desired, click ‘Continue processing this mail’. Save the changes.
If you now reopen ‘Mailfilter’, see the new rule in form of a sentence. You
have the possibility to edit the filter (the icon with the paper and pen), to
disable or enable it without changing the data (the red X or green check) or
to delete the filter (recycling bin icon). To create another filter, click ‘Insert
new filter’. By default, the new filter is created after existing filters. Modify
‘in position’ to select another location. In some cases, the order of the filters
is important.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
67
Figure 7.6: Setting Mail Filter Actions
SPAM: Filter for Unsolicted Commercial E-Mail
If the system is configured for detecting and marking SPAM mail, set up
rules for what to do with mails marked as SPAM. The following options are
available:
Save to a folder: If this option is activated, enter the folder in which to store
SPAM mail.
Delete: Every mail recognized as SPAM is deleted upon arrival. Use this
option with caution. Under some conditions, e-mail that is not SPAM
may be recognized as such, because it contains several characteristics of
SPAM.
Nothing: No special treatment of mails recognized as SPAM.
Vacation Notice: Automatic Reply During Absence
Using the vacation notice, configure the server to answer incoming mails automatically. Click ‘Create’ to configure a vacation notice. Enter a subject and
text for the automatic reply as shown in Figure 7.7 on the next page.
To import the subject from the received mail, leave the ‘Subject’ field empty.
If someone sends an e-mail while the vacation notice is activated, he will receive your reply. If the sender sends another e-mail within the time frame
specified in ‘Repetition interval’, he will not receive the answer again. If desired, specify an address to which to forward your incoming mails in ‘Forward to’. This address may either be internal (e. g., if a colleague takes over
68
SIEVE: The Mail Filter
7
Administration as a User
Figure 7.7: Creating a Vacation Notice
your work) or external (e. g., a mail account you can reach from home). If
you created a vacation notice, this is shown when selecting the submenu.
Activate or deactivate it without changing the settings by clicking the green
check or the red X.
SIEVE Editor: Writing Custom Scripts
The SIEVE editor offers the possibility of writing your own scripts for automatic processing of e-mails or inserting existing scripts. Be careful here. An
incorrect script can completely block the automatic processing.
Note
After defining your own filter rules with the SIEVE editor, it is no
longer possible to use ‘Mailfilter’, ‘SPAM’, and ‘Vacation notice’.
Note
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
69
Figure 7.8: The SIEVE Editor for Writing Custom Scripts
Changing the Language
Use ‘Language’ to select your preferred language. Simply select the language
and click ‘Set language’ to make it your default.
70
Changing the Language
8
Your users can interact with the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server using external mail programs as well as the built-in web-based interface. The mail
program must support IMAP or POP3 mail servers, however. For access to
the global address book, the program needs to be able to query LDAP directory services. Netscape Communicator in versions 4.7x and 6.x and the
mail client in Mozilla are compatible and are available for almost any operating system. For Linux users, the KDE program KMail and the console-based
program Pine are good choices. On Microsoft platforms, Outlook 2000 or
Outlook Express can be used. Other programs are also available, but only
those mentioned are described in this text,
Preparations . . . . . . . . . . .
Netscape Communicator Version
Netscape Communicator Version
KMail Version 1.3 or Higher . .
Pine Version 4.33 . . . . . . . . .
Outlook Express Version 5.x and
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7x . . . . . . . . . .
6.x and Mozilla 0.9x
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.0 and Outlook 2000
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
72
72
76
78
81
85
Configuring External Mail Programs
Configuring External Mail Programs
This text describes configuration with IMAP and LDAP, if available. You
may also configure clients to use the POP3 protocol, but that does not offer the entire functional range of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. Using POP3, you cannot access shared folders. Also, your personal e-mails are
downloaded to your computer. For this reason, the POP3 configuration is not
described here.
Preparations
Beforing setting up your e-mail client, obtain the following information. This
information can be obtained from the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server administrator. For configuring IMAP, the following details are essential:
login name (UID)
password
e-mail address
complete host name of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
To configure the LDAP address book, you must have:
entire host name of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
search base or server root (LDAP base DN)
Netscape Communicator Version 4.7x
Configuring the IMAP Mail Client
To configure the IMAP mail client of the Netscape Communicator Version
4.7x, select ‘Edit’ ➝ ‘Preferences . . . ’. In the configuration dialog that opens,
expand the category ‘E-Mail & Newsgroups’ by clicking the arrow in front of
it. Next, select ‘Identity’ and enter the values for the user into the respective
fields. This dialog is shown in Figure 8.1 on the facing page.
Select ‘Mail server’ and enter a new entry for the IMAP server by clicking
‘Add . . . ’. Enter the full name of your SuSE Linux Openexchange Server in
‘Server name’ and select IMAP as the ‘Server type’. Enter the login name
(UID) of the user in ‘user name’. If desired, check ‘Remember password’ to
72
Preparations
8
Configuring External Mail Programs
Figure 8.1: Identity and User Settings
have Netscape save the password. Refer to Figure 8.2 on the next page. To
finish the configuration, select ‘Advanced’ and deactivate ‘Show only subscribed folders’ to see all available folders of the SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server.
Leave this dialog by clicking ‘OK’. Enter the full host name of the SuSE
Linux Openexchange Server and your user name (UID) in the corresponding
fields in ‘Outgoing Server’. See Figure 8.3 on page 75.
Close the configuration dialog by clicking ‘OK’. You can now connect to the
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server with Netscape Messenger.
Configuring the LDAP Address Book
To access the global LDAP address book of the SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server with Netscape Communicator, perform the following configuration.
Start Netscape and select ‘Communicator’ ➝ ‘Address book’. In address
book, choose ‘File’ ➝ ‘new directory . . . ’ to add a new entry for a directory server. In the dialog that opens, enter the name of your organization
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
73
Figure 8.2: IMAP Server Configuration
in ‘description’. As ‘LDAP server’, enter the full name of your SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server. As ‘server root’, enter the LDAP BaseDN for the SuSE
Linux Openexchange Server. See Figure 8.4 on the next page. Close and save
by clicking ‘OK’.
Use ‘Search for . . . ’ to query the address book of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server.
74
Netscape Communicator Version 4.7x
8
Configuring External Mail Programs
Figure 8.3: Mail Server Configuration
Figure 8.4: Directory Information
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
75
Netscape Communicator Version 6.x and
Mozilla 0.9x
Configuration of Netscape Communicator version 6.x and the Open Source
browser Mozilla work identically as both browsers use the same “engine” to
display web pages. The configuration description uses Netscape Communicator only, but it is completely analogous to Mozilla’s configuration. Because of
ongoing development, your version may vary slightly from the screen shots
here.
Configuring IMAP
To configure IMAP, start the program. Enter the mail client by choosing
‘Tasks’ ➝ ‘E-Mail’. If no configuration for an e-mail account is present, a configuration assistant opens automatically. Otherwise open the assistant manually with ‘Edit’ ➝ ‘Mail/Forum account settings . . . ’ and clicking ‘new account’.
Figure 8.5: Netscape V.6 Server Information
Choose the account type in ‘ISP or Provider e-mail’ and click ‘Next’ to continue. In the ‘Identity’ window, enter the complete user name and e-mail address into the respective fields.
Click ‘Next’ to confirm the settings and continue to the server information
configuration. Enter the full name of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server
as the incoming and outgoing server. As server type for the incoming mail
server, select IMAP. Also see Figure 8.5.
76
Netscape Communicator Version 6.x and Mozilla 0.9x
Select ‘Edit’ → ‘E-Mail/Forum account settings . . . ’ and choose ‘Server settings’ from the list to the left. Click ‘Advanced’ to access the advanced IMAP
settings. Deactivate ‘Show only subscribed folders’. This dialog is shown in
Figure 8.6. Close the window by clicking ‘OK’.
8
Configuring External Mail Programs
The next step of the configuration is the ‘Username’ window. Enter the login
name (UID) of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server user in the corresponding field. Enter the name under which it should be listed in the client in ‘Account name’. A short summary of the account details is then displayed. To
save the account, click ‘Finish’.
Figure 8.6: Netscape V.6 Advanced IMAP Server Settings
Select ‘Server for outgoing Mail (SMTP)’ and check that the entry matches
the full name of your SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. Also verify that the
setting for using your name and password are deactivated. See Figure 8.7 on
the following page.
Confirm the dialog with ‘OK’, which returns you to the main menu of
Netscape’s mail client. There, configure an overview of folders. Select ‘file’
→ ‘subscribe . . . ’ from the menu bar to view all available folders. Make your
choice of folders you want to monitor on the main screen. The configuration is completed and the mail client is ready to be used with the SuSE Linux
Openexchange Server.
Configuring the LDAP Address Book
Netscape Communicator Version 6.x and Mozilla Version 0.9x do not support
the LDAP address book.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
77
Figure 8.7: Netscape V.6: Outgoing Mail Server Settings
KMail Version 1.3 or Higher
KMail, a power e-mail client for Linux, was developed in the scope of the
KDE project and can (starting from version 1.3) be used to access IMAP mail
boxes. Accessing an LDAP directory is not yet possible.
Start KMail by clicking its icon or entering kmail in a terminal window.
When KMail is started for the first time, the mail directory is created in your
home directory. Confirm this by clicking ‘OK’. The local mail folder is usually not required for IMAP, but KMail saves sent mail there. Click ‘Settings’
➝ ‘Configure KMail’ to configure the program. Choose ‘Identity’ from the
left column and fill in the needed fields. The dialog is shown in Figure 8.8
on the next page.
Select ‘Network’ from the left column. Click ‘Add’. Select ‘IMAP’ as the account type and click ‘OK’. In the next window, enter the needed information
for the IMAP mail box as shown in Figure 8.9 on the facing page.
Click ‘OK’ to continue to the dialog in which to specify all settings for sending and receiving mails, shown in Figure 8.10 on page 80. Leave the settings
for ‘Port’ and ‘folder prefix’. Choose ‘Show hidden folder’ and ‘Save IMAP
password’, if desired. Confirm the settings by clicking ‘OK’ then specify the
SMTP server for outgoing mails. The port should be 25.
Confirm the settings by clicking ‘OK’. The configuration is completed and
you can now use KMail with the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server.
78
KMail Version 1.3 or Higher
8
Configuring External Mail Programs
Figure 8.8: KMail Personal Information
Figure 8.9: Creating a KMail IMAP Mail Box
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
79
Figure 8.10: E-Mail Settings
80
KMail Version 1.3 or Higher
8
Pine Version 4.33
All options of the mail program Pine are specified in its configuration file
.pinerc in your home directory. The configuration file is a simple ASCII
text file that can be modified with any text editor. Only use an editor that
does not automatically insert line breaks, for example, the Midnight Commander editor (mcedit) or vi.
Configuring External Mail Programs
Configuring the IMAP Mail Client
Figure 8.11: Pine’s Main Menu
If the user has not started Pine before, no configuration file has been created yet in the home directory. Pine only creates it when first starting. Start
Pine and exit the welcome screen by pressing E
. This continues to the main
menu, shown in Figure 8.11, where you can quit the program by pressing Q
and confirm by pressing Y
. The configuration file has been created.
Now edit the configuration file .pinerc. To ensure access to the IMAP folders on the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server, look for the following options
and change them according to your setup. Next to every option, view a short
explanation, marked with the comment symbol ‘#’.
personal-name=John Q. Public
# The user’s complete name
smtp-server=imapserver.suse.de
# The full name of your SuSE Linux Openexchange Server ,
# used to send your e-mail
default-fcc={imapserver.suse.de/user=tux}INBOX.sent-mail
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
81
#
#
#
#
The IMAP folder in which copies of sent mail should be stored.
It consists of the complete server name and the user’s login name
on the EMail server. In our example, these are
Server name=imapserver.suse.de and the login name (UID)=tux
incoming-folders={imapserver.suse.de/user=tux}INBOX
# The user’s incoming folder. This entry also consists of
# the complete server name and the user’s login name on
# the eMail server. In our example, these are
# Server name=imapserver.suse.de and the login name (UID)=tux
folder-collections="SuSE IMAP folders" {imapserver.suse.de/user=tux}[*],
"personal IMAP folders" {imapserver.suse.de/user=tux}INBOX.[*]
# This entry creates two parent folders in Pine that will contain
# the publicly accessible folders (SuSE IMAP folders) and your
# personal folders (personal IMAP folders) on the eMail server.
# This entry also consists of
# the complete server name and the user’s login name on
# the eMail server. In our example, these are
# Server name=imapserver.suse.de and the login name (UID)=tux
# You can enter any folder name (SuSE IMAP folders and personal folders), but
# these should reflect the real folders on the SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server
rsh-open-timeout=0
# Until this time-out has elapsed, Pine will try to establish
# an rsh connection to the eMail server. It is not needed
# in the configuration and can be turned off by entering
# 0.
disable-these-authenticators=CRAM-MD5
# List of authentication methods that pine should not use.
# In this case, CRAM-MD5.
File 2: Configuration file .pinerc
When performing the changes detailed above, pay attention to the correct
positions of the curly braces and square brackets as well as the case of the
folder names. Save the file and start Pine by entering pine. Press L
in
Pine’s main menu to reach the ‘Collection List’, which shows all folders in
Pine.
Highlight a folder with the arrow keys and enter it by pressing ↵ . Enter
your password to reach the IMAP folders on the SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server. See Figure 8.12 on the next page and Figure 8.13 on the facing page.
In the folder view, Pine differentiates incoming, public, and other personal
folders. For this reason, your IMAP inbox will not be found in the folder
82
Pine Version 4.33
8
Configuring External Mail Programs
Figure 8.12: Collection List: Entering the Password
Figure 8.13: Personal IMAP folders
overview. Instead, it is located below the Collection List in ‘Incoming folders’.
Configuring the LDAP Address Book
To access the global address book of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server,
you need to add another entry to .pinerc. Open the file as described in 8
on page 81 and change the following options according to the example.
ldap-servers=imapserver.suse.de:389 "/base=dc=suse, dc=de/nick=
SuSE GmbH Nuremberg"
# Specify the LDAP server and the address book’s name as it should
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
83
#
#
#
#
#
appear in Pine (SuSE GmbH Nuremberg). The entry consists of
the complete server name (imapserver.suse.de) with the port
number and the BaseDN (dc=suse, dc=de).
The setting nick=SuSE GmbH Nuremberg
specifies the address book’s name.
File 3: Address Book Configuration in .pinerc
After these final changes in .pinerc, you can access the global address book
in Pine by pressing A
in Pine’s main menu. Navigate it using the arrow
. See Figure 8.14.
keys and ↵ Figure 8.14: Querying the LDAP Address Book
Start a detailed query in the address book by pressing Ctrl +
T
. See Figure 8.15.
Figure 8.15: Advanced Search in the Address Book
84
Pine Version 4.33
Configuration in the Microsoft mail programs Outlook Express and
Outlook 2000 is guided by an assistant, which is nearly identical in both versions. The following screen shots were taken in Outlook Express Version 6.0.
Configuring the IMAP Mail Client
After starting Outlook, select ‘Tools’ ➝ ‘Accounts . . . ’ to reach the configuration dialog of the usable Internet accounts. Next, click ‘Add’ then select
‘E-Mail’ to start the assistant.
In Outlook Express, you have the additional possibility to use ‘File’ ➝ ‘Identities’ ➝ ‘Add new identities . . . ’. In the emerging window, enter a name for
the identity and, if desired, a password. Change to the new identity by confirming the change.
8
Configuring External Mail Programs
Outlook Express Version 5.x and 6.0 and
Outlook 2000
Figure 8.16: The eMail Server’s name
Enter the user name when prompted and, in the next step, the e-mail address. In the ‘EMail server name’ dialog, choose ‘IMAP’ from the list and
enter the name of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server in ‘Server for incoming mail’ and ‘Server for outgoing mail’. Refer to Figure 8.16.
Complete the configuration in the following dialog — ‘Internet Mail Logon’.
Enter the login name on the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server in ‘Account
name’. For Outlook to save your password, check ‘Save password’ and enter
it in ‘Password’. See Figure 8.17 on the next page.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
85
Figure 8.17: Internet Mail Logon
If you use Outlook 2000, a dialog appears after ‘Internet Mail Logon’ in
which to choose the type of Internet connection to use when accessing the
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. This choice depends on several factors in
your network. Contact the administrator of the SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server if problems occur. Click ‘Next’ to reach the next dialog.
After completing the configuration, you will see a note that all folders of the
newly created e-mail accounts are hidden. It asks whether you want to see
a list of these folders. Select ‘Yes’ to open the ‘Show/Hide IMAP folders’ dialog in which to make the desired folders visible. See Figure 8.18. If a subfolder does not appear in the list, click ‘Reset’ to refresh the list of accesible
folders.
Figure 8.18: Show/Hide IMAP Folders
This dialog can also be reached with ‘Tools’ → ‘IMAP folder’.
86
Outlook Express Version 5.x and 6.0 and Outlook 2000
Configuring the LDAP Address Book
Figure 8.19: Internet Accounts
Configuring External Mail Programs
To use the LDAP address book of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server in
Outlook, open the ‘Address book’ from the ‘Tools’ menu. In the following
dialog, click ‘Tools’ ➝ ‘Accounts’. The dialog that opens is shown in Figure 8.19. Click ‘Add’ and enter the name of your SuSE Linux Openexchange
Server in ‘Directory server (LDAP)’. Close the assistant by clicking ‘Next’
then ‘Finish’.
8
In the list of available directory service accounts, select the entry for your
SuSE Linux Openexchange Server. Then select ‘Settings’ from the right pane.
Under ‘Advanced’, enter the LDAP BaseDN in ‘Search base’. Refer to Figure 8.20 on the following page. These values can be obtained from the administrator of the SuSE Linux Openexchange Server.
This example uses the domain suse.de and the BaseDN dc=suse,dc=de.
Usually, the BaseDN matches the domain. The UID (login name) in this example is the user with the mail address user@suse.de.
There are three address books:
the system address book:
The BaseDN for the configuration in this case is dc=suse,dc=de. You
can log in anonymously.
the public address book:
The BaseDN is in this case o=addressbook,dc=suse,dc=de. Logging in can also be done anonymously.
The user’s private address book:
The BaseDN in our example is ou=addr,uid=user,dc=suse,dc=de.
Log in with your user name and password here. In this example, the
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
87
Figure 8.20: Advanced Settings of the Directory Service Account
user name is uid=user,dc=suse,dc=de. The password is your usual
password.
88
Outlook Express Version 5.x and 6.0 and Outlook 2000
A
YaST Copyright (c) 1995-2001 SuSE GmbH, Nürnberg (Germany)
The object of this license is the YaST (Yet another Setup Tool) program, the
name “YaST”, SuSE Linux the Linux Distribution of SuSE GmbH, all other
programs of SuSE GmbH under this license, all programs derived from YaST or
another program under this license, and all works or names derived in full or
in part thereof together with the use, application, archiving, reproduction,
and distribution of a program under this license, all programs derived from
a program under this license, and all works derived in full or in part thereof.
The YaST program, any other program under this license, and all sources are
the intellectual property of SuSE GmbH within the meaning of the Copyright
Law. The name YaST is a registered trademark of SuSE GmbH. In the following, SuSE GmbH is the licensor and every user or processor of YaST or any
other program under this license, works derived in full or in part thereof, together with every person who reproduces, distributes, or archives YaST, SuSE
Linux, or any other program under this license is the licensee of SuSE GmbH.
The following license terms are recognized as a result of the processing, use,
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Only this license gives the Licensee the right to use, reproduce, to distribute,
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recognized. If this license is recognized and complied with in full, it is also
valid even without the written consent of the Licensee.
1. Usage
YaST and SuSE Linux License Terms
YaST and SuSE Linux
License Terms
YaST, SuSE Linux, and any other program under this license may be used
for personal and commercial purposes if the copyright and license
terms of the installed packages and programs are observed. The use
of YaST or any other program under this license, even if a modified version
is used, does NOT exempt in particular the Licensee from the duty to
take due care with regard to the license terms of the packages or programs installed through YaST, any other program under this license, or
works based on it.
2. Processing
All programs derived from YaST, any other program under this license and
all works derived thereof, in full or parts thereof, are to be provided
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Moreover, the operator must give his name on the opening screen,
stating that SuSE GmbH is not providing any support for the “Modified Version” and is excluded from any liability whatsoever. Every
amendment to the sources not conducted by SuSE GmbH are deemed
a “Modified Version”. The Licensee is entitled to change his copy from
the sources of YaST or any other program under this license, whereby a
work based on one of these programs is created, provided that the following conditions are satisfied.
(a) Every amendment must have a note in the source with date and
operator. The amended sources must be made available for the
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(b) The Licensee is obliged to make all work distributed by him derived as a whole or in part from a program under this license or parts
thereof to third parties as a whole under the terms of this license
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(c) The amendment of this license by a Licensee, even in part, is forbidden.
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90
All programs derived from programs under this license and all works
derived thereof as a whole or parts thereof may only be disseminated with the amended sources and this license in accordance with
2b). Making YaST, any other program under this license, or works derived thereof available free of charge together with SuSE Linux on FTP
Servers and mailboxes is permitted if the licenses on the software are
observed.
4. Guarantee
No guarantee whatsover is given for YaST, any other program under this
license works derived thereof, and SuSE Linux. The SuSE GmbH guarantee
only covers fault-free data carriers.
SuSE GmbH will provide every program under this license and SuSE
Linux AS IS, without any guarantee whatever that it is fit for a specific purpose or use. In particular, SuSE is not liable for lost profit,
savings not made, or damages from the claims lodged by third parties
against the Licensee. SuSE GmbH is not liable for other direct or indirect consequential losses, in particular not for the loss or production of
recorded data.
A
YaST and SuSE Linux License Terms
of SuSE GmbH or SuSE Linux. Distribution of programs under this license, their sources, whether amended or unamended in full or in part
thereof, and the works derived thereof for a charge require the prior
written consent of SuSE GmbH.
The observance of the respective licenses and copyrights of the installed
software is incumbent solely upon the user of the relevant program and
SuSE Linux.
5. Rights
No other rights to YaST, any other program under this license, or to SuSE
Linux are granted other than negotiated in this license. An infringement against this license automatically terminates the rights of the Licensee. However, the right of third parties who have received copies or
rights under this license from the Licensee are not terminated as long
as all parts of his license are recognized and observed. If the Licensee
is subject to conditions or obligations as a result of a court judgement,
patent terms, license terms, or another reason, and these conditions or
obligations contradict this license as a whole or in part, the Licensee
shall only be exempted in full or in part from this license and its terms
with the express prior written consent of SuSE. SuSE is entitled to withhold its consent without giving reasons.
SuSE Linux – Openexchange Server 4
91
6. Additional restrictions
If the distribution or use of YaST, any other program under this license,
and SuSE Linux or parts of SuSE Linux is restricted in a state either by
patents or by interfaces protected by copyright, SuSE GmbH can specify an explicit geographic restriction of the distribution of the concerned
program or parts of SuSE Linux, in which these states are fully or partially excluded from distribution. In such a case, this license includes
the whole or partial restriction as if it were written in this license.
92
Index
A
C
administering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–59
- administrator data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
- configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
- cyrus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
- domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45–47
- fetching mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
- folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
- groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41–42
- IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48–49
- language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
- login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
- logout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
- name server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45–47
· adding clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
· removing clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
- resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56–57
- start page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
- users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37–41
· creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
· editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
· passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
- Windows server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57–59
Apache
- SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
CAs
B
D
backups
- eMail Server 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
- restoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
booting
- CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
- configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
- kernel parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
DNS
- creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55–56
- CAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
- downloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
- server
· creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
· removing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
- users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
- verifying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
configuration files
- editor for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
- global.conf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
- named.conf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
configuring . . . . . . . . 30–33, see administering
- display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
- network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
- user, as . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60–70
· folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
· language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
· personal data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
· SPAM filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
· vacation notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
cyrus
- administering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
- password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
- adding clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
- configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45–47
- removing clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
- zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
domains
- multiple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45–47
- selecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
- virtual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45–47
· creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
KMail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
- IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
L
E
e-mail
- aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
- clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71–89
· KMail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
· Mozilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76–77
· Netscape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72–77
· Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85–89
· Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81–84
- fetching from remote servers . . . . 49
- filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65–69
- protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
- users
· mailing all . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
F
filters
folders
-
SPAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41–45
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 64
editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
mailing lists, as . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
managing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
· changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
- permissions for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
G
groups
-
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41–42
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
70
32
51
55
M
mailadmin
- mailing all users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
mailing lists
- creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
- folders as . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
- mail queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
- users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
mouse
- configuring in YaST2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Mozilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76–77
- IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
- LDAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
N
name servers
- configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
- eMail server as . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
- zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Netscape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72–77
- IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72, 76
- LDAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 77
network
- configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
- topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15–19
H
O
host names
- configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
- selecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85–89
- IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
- LDAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
I
P
IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48–49
installing
- DHCP and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
- preparing before . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–13
- YaST2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21–33
partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25–28
passwords
- administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32, 40
- changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
- changing for users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
- encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
- length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
- root . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
permissions
K
keyboard
- configuring in YaST2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
94
language
- changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LDAP
- BaseDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
- editing database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
- SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index
- default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
- folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 65
- managing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
- user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81–84
Postfix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47–48
- queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
- SPAM filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
- problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
users
-
Q
quotas
- setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
R
resources
- creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
- deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
- groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
- managing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56–57
certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
cyrus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 36
deactivating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
deleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
mailadmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
mailing all . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
managing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37–41
monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
personal data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
quotas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
root . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
virtual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
S
V
Samba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57–59
- activating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
scripts
- backup.sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
- restore.sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 11
- smbactivate.sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54–56
- encrypting access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
- IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
- LDAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
- POP3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
SIEVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65–69
- scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
SPAM
- filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 68
support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–6
- contacting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
- database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
- included . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
- maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
- requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
vacation notice
- configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
U
updating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
- eMail Server 3.1, from . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
W
Windows
- authenticating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
- server for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57–59
- serving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Y
YaST2
-
booting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
configuring the system . . . . . . . . . . . 30
graphics modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
installation mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
installing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21–33
kernel parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
keyboard configuration . . . . . . . . . . . 24
language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
mouse configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
partitionieren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25–28
software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
time zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Article Nummer: HB2118-1ADMIN-INT
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