linear systems design guide

linear systems design guide
LINEAR SYSTEMS
DESIGN GUIDE
P E E R L E S S L E D L U M I N A R I E S I N T E G R AT E D W I T H C O N T R O L S
Contents
Steps to Create a Complete Lighting & Controls Design............................4
Fixture connections and wiring by type......................................................8
Overview - Determine your specified fixture type
Integral driver/single circuit diagrams
Integral driver/dual circuit diagrams
Remote driver/single circuit diagrams
Remote driver/dual circuit diagrams
Application Examples...................................................................................36
Classroom – occupancy sensors only
Open office – dual sensors in fixture rows parallel to window
Open office – dual sensors in fixture rows perpendicular to window
Appendices.................................................................................................... 39
Appendix 1 - Energy savings and system life benefits of dimming
• Lumen management
• Manual dimming and overrides
• Occupancy sensing savings
• Daylight sensing savings
• Multiplier effect
Appendix 2 - Daylighting standards and codes
Appendix 3 – Acuity Brands devices and product capabilities
• Occupancy sensor
• Daylight sensor
• Driver
• Embedded controller
• CAT-5e cables and splitters
Appendix 4 - Basic wiring examples with Peerless luminaires
Appendix 5 - Basic installation components at the ceiling with Peerless luminaires
Appendix 6 – Overview of integration into a larger nLight building system
2
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Introduction
Specifying Peerless® Lighting LED luminaires with Controls from Acuity Brands® gives you a tremendous amount
of flexibility and control when lighting a space. There are many different options depending on the desired
outcomes. This design guide demonstrates how the different Acuity Brands components work together and how
to make the best design decisions by referencing best practice examples – giving you the tools to specify an Acuity
Brands linear lighting and controls solution with confidence.
How to Use this Guide
This Guide is designed to demonstrate how Peerless linear suspended fixtures are configured with Acuity
Controls nLight® digital lighting system, and help you determine what you need on your projects. With so many
variations and options to choose from, a conceptual framework, examples can go a long way to helping you make
specification decisions.
Once you choose a specific Peerless luminaire, you can review wiring and connections, nLight component
functionality, and reference examples of typical fixture runs.
The Guide is organized so you:
• Get an overview of the process of lighting and controls design
• Review your fixture type and options to find the appropriate fixture connection diagram and explanation
• See application examples for cues to laying out fixtures and controls in a space
• Can access technical references and information on products and components in the Appendices
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
3
STEPS TO CREATE A COMPLETE LIGHTING AND CONTROLS DESIGN
Steps to a Complete Linear Lighting and Controls Design
Design CheckList
1. Describe what needs to
happen in the space
2. Lay out the fixtures
3. Determine whether you need
lumen management
4. Check code compliance
requirements
5. Determine sensor needs
and locations
6. Lay out sensors and
nLight devices
1. Describe the intent with a narrative
description of what you want to happen
A controls design begins with a description
of how you want the system to operate,
called the Sequence of Operations. A
verbal narrative defines the issues and
clarifies the benefits. It provides the
basis for determining the components
and connections that will be needed
(see Applications section for examples).
2. Lay out the fixtures to
achieve your lighting goals
The fixture layout responds to the design
intentions, and relates to the overall space,
the windows and the tasks. The fixture
type, quantity, mounting height above the
floor, and row spacing all determine the
illuminance levels at the workplane and on
other surfaces, as well as the gradient of
brightnesses in the space.
4
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
3. Determine whether your design
includes a driver with lumen maintenance
Lumen maintenance programs the driver to maintain a dim level
of 80% over the life of the lighting system. It prevents
over lighting and overuse of energy at initial installation.
(See “Lumen Management” in Appendix #1 for discussion on
savings with Lumen Maintenance.)
4. Comply with required codes
Various energy codes and guidelines are in effect to reduce energy
consumption of lighting in buildings. Daylight harvesting allows for
daylight entering a space to trigger dimming of electric lights and
reduce energy consumption. Occupancy sensors dim or switch lights off
when the space is vacant. Be sure to check your local requirements.
5. Layout occupancy sensors for good coverage
Occupancy sensors pick up signals within a proscribed range.
Coverage patterns determine where sensors should be located
so that all spaces that need to be monitored for occupancy can be
sensed. Aim for sensor locations at the end of fixtures or fixture runs.
Overlapping coverage is OK, but minimize overlap for efficiency.
6. Layout daylight sensors to control zones
Daylight sensors respond to light falling on an area on the surface
beneath the sensor primarily by sensing the reflected light off
that surface (and sensing some of the other light in the space.)
It senses the total light on that surface, which may include both
daylight and light from fixtures. The location of the sensor should
include daylight and a full “view” of the incoming light, without
interior or exterior obstructions, for best accuracy. This usually
means locating the sensor in a fixture near the center of a set of
windows or near a skylight or clerestory window.
You may want an additional daylight zone(s) relative to the window
wall where daylight enters to comply with codes or to create
a more refined design. This secondary zone can have its own
daylight sensor to control fixtures in that zone. Alternatively, a
single input from the daylight sensor in the primary zone can
dim both zones through commissioning the primary zone to
one level; and a secondary zone further from the daylight to
another (usually brighter) level. (See Figure 1.) Commissioning
involves programming the nLight device that dims fixtures in the
secondary zone to a pre-determined offset of the first zone, such
as 20% brighter. This allows for multiple daylight zones.
0’
primary daylight zone
10’
secondary daylight zone
Electric Lighting Zone
20’
electric lighting zone
30’
Figure 1
This example shows two control zones that have been created
where there is ample daylight contribution, and one zone
using a standard sensor where daylight is minimal. As daylight
contribution increases, sensors automatically and gradually
reduce electric light output to save energy.
Determine where the sensors are needed on the luminaires
With nLight enabled fixtures, the sensor controls either a single
fixture or run of fixtures, or it controls a networked set of fixtures.
When the fixture is specified with a sensor for standalone
operation, it controls and dims a single 4-, 8-, or 12ft fixture
for example, or a connected run of fixtures up to a maximum
allowable number of drivers. The maximum number of drivers an
nLight device can control is 15 drivers in most instances. ((15) 4’
single-driver fixtures or (6) 4’ double-driver fixtures.) A networked
nLight enabled fixture with a sensor can provide a signal to any
number of networked fixtures through the CAT-5e cables. A big
advantage of networked fixtures is that they can be addressed
individually or as sets over a network.
Determine where controllers are needed
A few simple guidelines determine where
controllers are required. First, every fixture
with a sensor needs an controller/power
pack. When the driver is integral to the
fixture, an embedded nLight controller is
automatically provided. Every fixture or set
of fixtures that is controlled (dimmed) by a
networked signal from elsewhere needs an
embedded controller, and a CAT-5e cable
dropped to the suspended fixture for the
communication signal.
When the driver is remote, the nLight controller
is located next to the driver enclosure in the
ceiling or in a remote location, and there is
only a CAT-5e cable drop if there is a sensor.
For a different dimmed response in a zone
of fixtures within a single run of fixtures,
each zone needs an additional controller
and a CAT-5e cable connection. The various
zoned responses are programmed when the
system is commissioned. In fixtures with
integral drivers, the signal to other fixtures
in the zone is carried through 0-10V wires
that are provided within the fixtures and
connect with plug-in electrical connectors
at the joints. For remote-driver fixtures, the
dimming signal is carried between drivers
via 0-10V wires provided by others, starting
from the driver enclosure with the nLight
device to other drivers in the zone or other
drivers in the complete fixture run. (The
dimming signal can be communicated via
CAT-5e cable to other fixtures in the zone
or fixture run if they each have an nLight
device, available by special request.)
STEPS TO CREATE A COMPLETE LIGHTING AND CONTROLS DESIGN
Daylight Zones
When using an nLight networked system, individual fixtures
within runs of fixtures perpendicular to the window can be
addressed and dimmed according to the daylight zone they are
in. (see layout #3 in Applications section) Note: With Peerless
luminaires, sensors are located at the end of an individual fixture
or at the end of a fixture run unless otherwise requested.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
5
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Understanding Fixture and Controls Connections – an Overview
This section includes a set of Fixture Connection diagrams, each with a similar format: a unique conceptual diagram
that describes the location and relationships of the power and control feeds, junction boxes, nLight devices, sensors
and a suspended 8 ft. linear fixture; a written description of the connections; and a real-life example of a typical
submittal drawing layout for a 40’ fixture run. There are a huge number of variations and options for Peerless fixtures,
but the most typical are addressed here.
To find the right fixture connection page, you should answer to the following questions, then look up the figure you need.
The Fixture Connection pages are grouped into 4 categories: integral driver-single circuit, integral driver-dual
circuit, remote driver-single circuit, and remote driver-dual circuit.
The first 2 questions help you determine in which category your fixture falls.
Does my fixture have integral
drivers or remote drivers?
Most Peerless LED fixtures such as Bruno,
Staple, Cerra7, Round, and Square have integral
drivers, but others such as Vellum and Open
have remote drivers with different wiring.
Whether remote mounted or mounted within
the fixture, the nLight devices and the drivers
function the same, but the placement and wiring
of the devices depends on their configuration.
Does my fixture have a single
or dual set of controls?
Switching SCT or DCT – Some Peerless I/D
luminaires allow you to control the indirect
light separately from the direct light. You have
the option of controlling the up and down light
together as a single circuit (SCT), or separately
as a dual circuit (DCT). Examples of fixtures
that have the option of selecting dual circuit
control are Square and OPEN.
Which driver type? nLight enabled dimming/networked dimming
or standard dimming?
Each 4’ section in Peerless LED luminaires has one or more EldoLED
drivers to power the LED boards in a single-circuit fixture, and will
have two or more drivers in a dual-circuit fixture.
(see Driver in Appendix 3 - Acuity Brands devices and product
capabilities for more details)
Driver Type “ENNB” An nLight enabled fixture has an nLight
device that controls the light output. The nLight controller is
part of the fixture, mounted either internally (an “embedded
controller”) for integral-driver type fixtures OR externally,
near the remote driver. The remote location could be
either just above a hard ceiling or some distance away.
(see maximum distances per wire gauge in fixture
installation instructions). The nLight device is typically
also a power-pack and can provide power to a local sensor*.
The subsequent questions address features of
the fixture and are options on the spec sheet
you will need to specify. They will help you find
the appropriate Fixture Connection page for
your specific fixture type.
Peerless square with embedded sensor
6
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Driver Type “EZB” Fixtures come standard with purple/gray
low-voltage control wires and can be controlled with a 0–10V
dimming signal from an independent source. This signal
can come from a simple 0 – 10V wallbox dimmer, from an
external nLight device such as a sensor mounted remotely,
or any other device that can connect via 0 - 10V signal wires
to the driver.
* Some nLight Emergency controllers are powered from
elsewhere in emergency fixtures.
Should I specify a fixture-integrated daylight or occupancy sensor?
Whenever there is an integrated sensor, there is an nLight
controller either embedded in the fixture (for integral driver types)
or in a remote location next to the driver (for remote location types)
which provides low voltage “bus” power to the sensor. When the
system is networked (Dimming Driver selection is ENNB), the
dimming level determined by the sensor can communicate to any
fixtures in the networked nLight system, anywhere in the room or
even to other rooms.
Integrated Sensor Type “MSD7DSC”
or “MSD7DSNL” (daylight sensing plus
occupancy sensing) - The occupancy
sensor dims to dark when no one is
present, after a pre-set amount of
time. The sensors in Peerless fixtures
have a factory default of a 10 minute
time delay – after 10 minutes of not
detecting an occupant, lights dim to
dark. The sensor can be specified
and programmed with either or both
functions. (see Sensors in Appendix
3 - Acuity Brands devices and product
capabilities for details.)
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
All connections to nLight devices are via a CAT-5e cable,
which includes an independent cable drop to the fixtures
when the drivers are integral. They are provided as part of
the fixture by the factory (see components for specifics).
The CAT-5e cable connects devices in any order and is
completely expandable. The dimmed responses to each set
of fixtures are programmed via software by Acuity Controls
through commissioning, either at the fixture or through
SensorView®. All fixtures that are networked and “talk” to
each other must have an nLight device and an ENNB driver.
Fixtures that have Lumen Management can either have an
nLight controller or not.
Is there an emergency section
in the run of fixtures? Is there a nightlight?
An emergency circuit or emergency battery
pack requires a separate power feed to the
emergency section. An individual segment
of a fixture run can be designated and wired
for additional use as an emergency light, and
will come to full light output (100%) when
power fails. This is an option for all Peerless
luminaires. A light that remains on 24/7 serves
as a nightlight.
Without networking it is a standalone system, (Dimming Driver
selection is EZB), the dimming level from the sensor controls only
that fixture, as well as other fixtures in that the fixture run.
Integrated Sensor Type “DSCC” or “DSCNL” (daylight sensing) Many Peerless fixtures have sensors that respond to
conditions in order to save energy when lights are not
needed. The daylight sensor dims in response to daylight so
pre-determined light levels are maintained.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
7
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Peerless fixture connections
The diagrams on the next few pages show the conceptual relationships between types of linear suspended fixtures and
controls, including: basic nLight components, sensors, feeds and power supplies. Some show an Emergency Circuit (EC)
on a 4’ section of the fixture.
Each Fixture Connection example represents a certain fixture type, identified in a box at the top of the page. It shows
a conceptual diagram of a 16’ fixture with (2) 8’ sections, a brief description, typical example of the nomenclature and
layout of a real fixture in a 40’ run.
Definitions are noted on the following page.
Figure Legend
DR
n
8
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Support with power feed
Low voltage
Cable support
Support only
0-10V Low Voltage
Sensor
Power feed, internal
DC Feed to LEDs
Driver(s) location
CAT-5e Cable
0-10V Control Wires
embedded nLight device
Emergency Section
0-10V Control
Line voltage
Emergency power
DR encl
Driver enclosure
Line Voltage – also called “commercial
Emergency module – a 4’ run of fixture
power”. Electrical power normally used.
wired to provide light at full light output
Wires typically hot (black), neutral (white)
when the line voltage power fails. In dual-
and ground (green). In dual-circuit (DCT)
circuit fixtures, only the downlight portion of
wiring, there is a second hot (red), and
a 4’ module is emergency.
neutral and ground are shared.
Emergency circuit – power provided by a
generator, always available, used when
normal power fails. Wires typically hot,
neutral, ground.
on/off control device that operates with
our LED drivers. Powered by the driver,
or through CAT-5e cable from other
nLight controllers. May be providing
CAT-5e cable – type of CAT5 cable used
power to other nLight devices, depending
to connect nLight system in a daisy chain.
on type. Dimming control signal can be
Connections are with snap-in
communicated to other nLight devices
RJ-45 connectors at ends.
thorough CAT-5e cable or via 0-10V control
DC
J-box
J-box – junction box where wires connect,
DR
Driver enclosure – metal box where drivers
usually at ceiling.
reside. Number of drivers is determined by
the number of circuits and load. The AC and
dimming input connections are behind an
wires to establish dimming level of drivers
in a fixture run or zone.
DC feed to LEDs – also frequently called
“low voltage power”. Carries power from
driver DC (direct current) output to LEDs to
provide light. In remote-driver fixtures, DC
access plate.
feed to LEDs is within a provided cord.
0-10V controls – also frequently called
Support with power feed – location of
“low voltage” “or low voltage Class 2” or
power feed or CAT-5e feed on suspended
+/- wires, but here specifically for controlling
fixture, along with an aircraft cable
dimming signal. They are typically
mounting kit.
purple/gray for first circuit. In dual-circuit,
first uses purple/gray wires, and second
uses blue/blue-white wires.
Splitter
(Provided)
n
nLight controller device – a dimming or
Splitter – small device for connecting
3 RJ-45 cable inputs in daisy chain.
Sensor – device for sensing occupancy/
Cable support – an aircraft cable mounting kit
only location.
(uplight) Uplight – indirect light from the fixture.
Controlled separately in dual-circuit fixtures.
(downlight) Downlight – direct light from the fixture.
vacancy and/or daylight so appropriate
Controlled separately in dual-circuit fixtures.
control can be initiated, usually dimming to
“Provided” – parts that come as standard.
black or dimming to a predetermined level.
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Description of terms used in diagrams
In this Guide, sensors are embedded in the
“By others” – parts that do not come
linear fixtures.
standard. Contractor or others must provide.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
9
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/single circuit
This diagram explains the functionality
and wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures
with integral driver, no sensors, no
networking (not nLight enabled) and no
emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
Description of Connections
Fixtures are connected with normal power
feed to an integral driver at the J-box at the
beginning of the fixture run. The 0 – 10V
purple/gray wires that control the dimming are
provided as standard and typically connect to
the driver at the same location. The wires are
bundled into a single cord.
Legend
Support with power feed
Line voltage
Support only
Low voltage
Cable support
Figure 1
Line voltage
0-10 V control
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
± purple/gray
Ceiling
Single Cord
8’ Section
8’ Section
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
10
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
This diagram explains the functionality
and wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures
with integral driver, no sensors, no
networking (not nLight enabled) and with
emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Fixtures that are connected with normal power
feed to the driver at the J-box at the beginning
of the fixture run. The 0 – 10V purple/gray
wires that control the dimming are provided as
standard and typically connect to the driver at
the same location. The wires are bundled into a
single cord.
The dedicated emergency circuit powers the 4’
emergency LED module sections independently
from the rest of the fixture. During normal
operation, the dimming level from the 0-10V
signal dims both the emergency section as
well as the rest of the fixture sections. When
the power fails, the signal powers off, and the
emergency section(s) goes to full light output.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/single circuit
Legend
Cable support
Support with power feed
Low voltage
Support only
Emergency Section
Line voltage
Emergency power
Figure 2
Line voltage
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
24/7 Emergency circut
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
± purple/gray
0-10 V Control
Ceiling
8’ Section
8’ Section
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
11
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/single circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures with
integral driver, with or without sensors,
networked operation (nLight enabled) and no
emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Fixtures that are nLight enabled are
connected with normal power feed to an
integral driver at the J-box at the beginning
of the fixture run. CAT-5e cables that
control (dim) the circuit connect to the RJ45 connector on the fixture, typically at the
other end of the fixture section from the
power feed. It requires an embedded nLight
controller (provided) for that fixture or set
of fixtures.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
Legend
n
Sensor
Support with power feed
Line voltage
Support only
CAT-5e Cable
embedded nLight device
Cable support
The same connections are for a fixture
run either with or without a sensor.
The embedded nLight controller is in the
same fixture section as the sensor since it
supplies power to it.
Figure 3
Both line voltage and signal wires connect
with plug-in connectors (provided) at fixture
joints along the run.
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
Line voltage
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
Splitter
(Provided)
To other nLight devices
Ceiling
CAT-5e cable
(provided)
8’ Section
8’ Section
n
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
12
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures with
integral driver, with or without sensors,
networked operation (nLight enabled) and
with an emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Fixtures that are nLight enabled are connected
with normal power feed to an integral driver
at the J-box at the beginning of the fixture run.
CAT-5e cables that control (dim) the circuit
connect to the RJ-45 connector on the fixture,
typically at the other end of the fixture section
from the power feed. It requires an embedded
nLight controller (provided) for that fixture or
set of fixtures.
The same connections are for a fixture run
either with or without a sensor. The embedded
nLight controller is in the same fixture section
as the sensor since it supplies power to it.
Fixture Type
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
Legend
n
Support with power feed
CAT-5e Cable
Cable support
embedded nLight device
4” Emergency Module
Line voltage
Emergency power
Sensor
(Note: Same layout
with or without sensor)
Both line voltage and signal wires connect with
plug-in connectors (provided) at fixture joints
along the run.
The dedicated emergency circuit powers the 4’
emergency LED module sections independently
from the rest of the fixture. During normal
operation, the dimming signal from an nLight
device dims both the emergency section(s) as
well as the rest of the fixture sections. When
the power fails, the nLight dimming device
powers off, and the emergency section goes to
full light output.
Integral driver
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/single circuit
Figure 4
Line voltage
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
Emergency circuit
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
Splitter
(provided)
Ceiling
CAT-5e cable
(provided)
8’ Section
DR
8’ Section
n
DR
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
13
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/dual circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures with
integral driver, no sensors, no networking (not
nLight enabled) and no emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures are connected with
normal power feed to an integral drivers at
the J-box at the beginning of the fixture run.
The 2 circuits share neutral and ground wires,
and have separate hot wires, all contained
within a single cord. There are 2 sets of 0–10V
wires to control the uplight independently
of the downlight. One set of control wires
is purple/gray and the other is blue/whiteblue, and both are provided as standard with
connections at the drivers. They typically
connect at the end of the fixture run opposite
the power feed.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Single circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Networked
No EC
With emergency
Legend
Support with power feed
Line voltage
Support only
Cable support
Figure 5
Line voltage 1
Hot-black (uplight)
Line voltage 2
Hot-red (downlight)
Shared
Neutral - white
Ground - green
0-10V Controls Up (purple/gray)
0-10V Controls DN (blue/blue-white)
Ceiling
Single Cord
8’ Section
8’ Section
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Dual circuit
Not networked
Both line voltage and signal wires connect
with plug-in connectors (provided) at fixture
joints along the run.
14
Remote driver
0-10V Control Wires
This diagram explains the functionality
and wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures
with integral driver, no sensors, no
networking (not nLight enabled) and with
an emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures that are connected with
normal power feed to integral drivers at the
J-box at the beginning of the fixture run. The
2 circuits share neutral and ground wires,
and have separate hot wires, all contained
within a single cord. There are 2 sets of 0–10V
wires to control the uplight independently
of the downlight. One set of control wires
is purple/gray and the other is blue/whiteblue, and both are provided as standard with
connections at the drivers. They typically
connect at the end of the fixture run opposite
the power feed.
The dedicated emergency circuit powers
the 4’ downlight emergency section
independently from the rest of the fixture.
Separate feed drop for each emergency
section is required for most local codes.
During normal operation, the dimming
level from the 0-10V signal dims both the
emergency section as well as the rest of
the fixture sections. When the power fails,
the dimming signals powers off, and the
emergency section goes to full light output.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Single circuit
Remote driver
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/dual circuit
Legend
Support with power feed
Line voltage
Cable support
Support only
Emergency power
0-10V Control Wires
Figure 6
Line Voltage 1
Hot-black (uplight)
Line Voltage 2
Hot-red (downlight)
Shared
Neutral - White
Ground - Green
0-10V Controls 1
UP (purple/gray)
0-10V Controls 2
DN (blue/blue-white)
Emergency circuit
hot-black
neutral-white
ground-green
Ceiling
Both line voltage and signal wires connect
with plug-in connectors (provided) at fixture
joints along the run.
8’ Section
8’ Section
(uplight)
(downlight)
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
15
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/dual circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures with
integral driver, with or without sensors,
networked operation (nLight enabled) and no
emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Remote driver
Dual circuit
Single circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Networked
Not networked
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures that are nLight enabled
are connected with a single normal power
feed to integral drivers at the J-box at the
beginning of the fixture run. A single CAT-5e
cable carries control signals to both
embedded nLight controllers (connected
internally), to the uplight driver and the
downlight driver independently. The cable
connects via an RJ-45 connector on the
fixture, typically at the other end of the
fixture section from the power feed.
The same connections shown here are for a
fixture run either with or without a sensor.
There is an embedded nLight controller in
the same fixture section as the sensor since
it supplies power to it.
Both line voltage and signal wires connect
with plug-in connectors (provided) at fixture
joints along the run.
No EC
With emergency
Legend
Support with power feed
n
Support only
embedded nLight device
CAT-5e Cable
Line voltage
Cable support
Figure 7
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
Line voltage
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
Splitter
(provided)
to other nLight devices
Ceiling
CAT-5e cable
(provided)
8’ Section
8’ Section
(uplight)
n
(downlight)
n
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
16
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
This diagram explains the functionality
and wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures
with integral driver, no sensors, networked
operation (nLight enabled) and with an
emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures that are nLight enabled are
connected with a single normal power feed to
integral drivers at the J-box at the beginning of
the fixture run. A single CAT-5e cable carries
control signals to both embedded nLight
controllers (connected internally), to the uplight
driver and the downlight driver independently.
The cable connects via an RJ-45 connector
on the fixture, typically at the other end of the
fixture section from the power feed.
The same connections shown here are for
a fixture run either with or without a sensor.
There is an embedded nLight controller must
be is in the same fixture section as the sensor
since it supplies power to it.
The dedicated emergency circuit powers the
4’ downlight emergency LED module sections
independently from the rest of the fixture.
During normal operation, the CAT-5e signal
from an nLight device dims both the emergency
section(s) as well as the rest of the fixture
sections. When the power fails, the nLight
dimming device powers off, and the emergency
section goes to full light output.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Single circuit
Remote driver
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/dual circuit
Legend
n
Support with power feed
CAT-5e Cable
Cable support
embedded nLight device
Emergency Section
Sensor
Line voltage
Emergency power
Figure 8
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
Line voltage
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
Splitter
(provided)
Emergency circut
hot-black
neutral-white
ground-green
Ceiling
Both line voltage and signal wires connect with
plug-in connectors (provided) at fixture joints
along the run.
CAT-5e cable
(provided)
8’ Section
8’ Section
n
n
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
17
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Integral driver/dual circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures with
integral drivers, sensors, no networking, and
with an emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Sensors
Not networked
No EC
If the sensor is for on-off occupancy sensing,
the 0 – 10V purple/gray wires can control the
dim level of the fixture when the fixture is on.
Typically, when there is daylight sensing, the
dim level is determined by the sensors, and
manual dimming control is disabled.
The dedicated emergency circuit powers the
4’ downlight emergency section independently
from the rest of the fixture. During normal
operation, the dimming level from the sensor
signal (typically) dims both the emergency
section as well as the rest of the fixture
sections. When the power fails, the dimming
signals powers off, and the emergency section
goes to full light output.
Both line voltage and signal wires connect
with plug-in connectors (provided) at fixture
joints along the run.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Networked
With emergency
Legend
Support with power feed
Line voltage
Cable support
Support only
Emergency power
0-10V Low Voltage
Fixtures that have sensors have an
embedded nLight controller in the fixture. A
non-networked system (called standalone
operation) means that internally the sensor
communicates and controls only the fixture or
set of fixtures where it is embedded.
18
Dual circuit
Single circuit
No sensors
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures are connected with normal
power feed to integral drivers at the J-box at
the beginning of the fixture run. The 2 circuits
share neutral and ground wires, and have
separate hot wires, all contained within a single
cord. There are 2 sets of 0–10V wires to control
the uplight independently of the downlight. One
set of control wires is purple/gray and the other
is blue/white-blue, and both are provided as
standard with connections at the drivers. They
typically connect at the end of the fixture run
opposite the power feed.
Remote driver
Figure 9
Line voltage 1
hot-black (uplight)
Line voltage 2
hot-red (downlight)
Shared
neutral - white
ground - green
0-10V Controls up
± purple/gray
0-10V Controls DN
± blue/blue-white
Ceiling
8’ Section
8’ Section
(uplight)
(downlight)
Plug-in Electrical
Connectors at joints
(provided)
24/7 Emergency
circut
black
white
green
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures with a
remote driver, no sensors, no networking (not
nLight enabled) and no emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Single circuit
Description of Connections
Fixtures are connected to normal power at
each remote driver, located either just above
the canopy over the ceiling plane or in a
remote location. There is one driver within a
driver enclosure per fixture section, either 4’
or 8’ long. The 0–10V wires (purple/gray) that
control the dimming are provided as standard
at the drivers, accessible behind an access
plate at the driver enclosure box.
At the beginning of each fixture section, there
is a direct current (DC) feed from the J-box to
the LEDs in the suspended fixture (provided).
Remote driver
Integral driver
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/single circuit
Legend
Support with power feed
DC Feed to LEDs
Support only
Cable support
Line voltage
Driver enclosure
DR encl
0-10V Control
Figure 10
Line Voltage
Hot-Black
Neutral - White
Ground - Green
0-10V Controls
DC
DR encl
8’ Section
DC
± Purple/Gray
DR encl
8’ Section
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
19
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/single circuit
This diagram explains the functionality
and wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures
with remote driver, no sensors, no
networking (not nLight enabled) and
with an emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Remote driver
Integral driver
Description of Connections
Fixtures are connected to normal power at
each remote driver, located either just above
the canopy over the ceiling plane or in a
remote location. There is one driver within
a driver enclosure per fixture section, either
4’ or 8’ long. The 0–10V wires (purple/gray)
that control the dimming are provided as
standard at the drivers, accessible behind
an access plate at the driver enclosure box.
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
With emergency
No EC
Legend
The dedicated emergency circuit and
powers the 4’ emergency LED module
sections independently from the rest of the
fixture, and connects at its driver enclosure.
During normal operation, the dimming level
originating from the nLight signal dims both
the emergency section as well as the rest of
the fixture sections. When the power fails,
the signal powers off, and the emergency
section(s) goes to full light output.
Support with power feed
DC Feed to LEDs
Line voltage
4’ Emergency module
0-10V Low Voltage
Emergency power
Cable support
DR encl
Driver enclosure
Figure 11
At the beginning of each fixture section, there
is a direct current (DC) feed from the J-box to
the LEDs in the suspended fixture (provided).
Line voltage
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
0-10V Controls
± purple/gray
Emergency circuit
DC
DR encl
8’ Section
20
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
DC
DR encl
8’ Section
DC
DR encl
hot-orange
neutral-white-orange
ground-green
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures with
remote driver, no sensors, networked operation
(nLight enabled) and an emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Remote driver
Integral driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Description of Connections
Fixtures that are nLight enabled are connected
to normal power at each remote driver, located
either just above the canopy over the ceiling
plane or in a remote location. There is one
driver within a driver enclosure per fixture
section, either 4’ or 8’ long. In a networked
system, CAT-5e cables connect the nLight
devices located alongside the driver enclosures,
and control the dim level of that fixture section.
For all the fixtures in a run to dim to the level
signaled by the nLight device, low-voltage Class
2 wires (by others) connect the remote drivers
in that run (shown here).
Sensors
Networked
Not networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/single circuit
Legend
n
Support with power feed
Line voltage
CAT-5e Cable
Support only
Low Voltage Class
2 Wires
Cable support
embedded nLight device
DR encl
Driver enclosure
DC Feed to LEDs
If you have multiple dimming zones in a long
linear run, then each zone has its own nLight
device, located alongside the driver. For even
finer control, you can specify that each driver
has an associated nLight device (by special
request), connected with CAT-5e cable.
Figure 12
Line voltage
At the beginning of each fixture section, there
is a direct current (DC) feed (provided) from the
J-box to the LEDs in the suspended fixture.
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
to other nLight devices
Low voltage class 2 wires
(by others)
n
DC
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
DR encl
8’ Section
DC
DR encl
8’ Section
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
21
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/single circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures with
remote driver, no sensors, networked operation
(nLight enabled) and an emergency circuit.
Remote driver
Integral driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Description of Connections
Fixtures that are nLight enabled are
connected to normal power at each remote
driver, located either just above the canopy
over the ceiling plane or in a remote location.
There is one driver within a driver enclosure
per fixture section, either 4’ or 8’ long. In a
networked system, CAT-5e cables connect the
nLight devices located alongside the driver
enclosures, and control the dim level of those
fixture sections. For all the fixtures in a run to
dim to the level signaled by the nLight device,
low-voltage Class 2 wires (by others) connect
the remote drivers in that run (shown here).
If you have multiple dimming zones in a long
linear run, then each zone has its own nLight
device, located alongside the driver. For even
finer control, you can specify that each driver
has an associated nLight device (by special
request), and connections between nLight
devices will be with CAT-5e cable (by others)
instead of low-voltage wires.
The dedicated emergency circuit powers
the 4’ emergency LED module sections
independently from the rest of the fixture,
and connects at its driver enclosure. During
normal operation, the dimming level
originating from the nLight signal dims both
the emergency section as well as the rest of
the fixture sections. When the power fails,
the signal powers off, and the emergency
section(s) goes to full light output.
At the beginning of each fixture section, there
is a direct current (DC) feed (provided) from the
J-box to the LEDs in the suspended fixture.
22
Fixture Type
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
Legend
n
Support with power feed
DC Feed to LEDs
nLight device
CAT-5e Cable
Line voltage
Emergency Section
Low voltage class 2 wires
Emergency power
Cable support
DR encl
Driver enclosure
Figure 13
Line voltage
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
Emergency circut
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
to other nLight devices
Low voltage class 2 wires
(by others)
n
DC
hot-orange
neutral - orange-white
ground - green
DR encl
8’ Section
DC
DR encl
8’ Section
DC
DR encl
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures with
remote driver, sensors, networked operation
(nLight enabled) and no emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Fixtures are connected to normal power
at each remote driver, located either just
above the canopy over the ceiling plane or
in a remote location. There is one driver
within a driver enclosure per fixture section,
either 4’ or 8’ long. Any fixture with an
embedded sensor has an nLight device
alongside its remote driver and connects via
CAT-5e cable from the driver enclosure to
the RJ-45 connector at the sensor location.
For all the fixtures in a run to dim to the
level signaled by the sensor through the
nLight device, low-voltage Class 2 wires (by
others) connect the remote drivers in that
run (shown here) and can connect to other
controls as well.
Fixture Type
Remote driver
Integral driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/single circuit
Legend
Support with power feed
0-10V Low Voltage
Cable support
Support only
DC Feed to LEDs
Sensor
Line voltage
CAT-5e Cable
In a networked system, CAT-5e cables
connect the nLight devices located
alongside the driver enclosure to other
nLight devices in the space. Since the nLight
device has only 2 connectors, a splitter is
provided to continue the CAT-5e daisy-chain.
DR encl
Driver enclosure
Figure 14
Line voltage
At the beginning of each fixture section, there
is a direct current (DC) feed (provided) from the
J-box to the LEDs in the suspended fixture.
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
DC
DR encl n
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
to other nLight devices
Low voltage class 2 wires
(by others)
DC
DR encl
CAT-5e to
Sensor provided
(up to 10’)
8’ Section
8’ Section
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
23
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/single circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of single-circuit linear fixtures with
remote driver, sensors, networked operation
(nLight enabled) and an emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Fixtures that are nLight enabled are connected
to normal power at each remote driver, located
either just above the canopy over the ceiling
plane or in a remote location. There is one
driver within a driver enclosure per fixture
section, either 4’ or 8’ long. Any fixture with
an embedded sensor has an nLight device
alongside its remote driver and connects via
CAT-5e cable from the driver enclosure to the
RJ-45 connector at the sensor location. For all
the fixtures in a run to dim to the level signaled
by the sensor through the nLight device,
low-voltage Class 2 wires (by others) connect
the remote drivers in that run (shown here).
(Dimming signal can be passed to other drivers
in the run via CAT-5e cable but require more
nLight devices. Available by special request.)
Fixture Type
Single circuit
The dedicated emergency circuit powers
the 4’ emergency LED module sections
independently from the rest of the fixture,
and connects at its driver enclosure. During
normal operation, the dimming level
originating from the nLight signal dims both
the emergency section as well as the rest of
the fixture sections. When the power fails,
the signal powers off, and the emergency
section(s) goes to full light output.
24
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
Legend
n
Sensor
Support with power feed
CAT-5e Cable
embedded nLight device
4’ Emergency module
Line voltage
Emergency power
DC Feed to LEDs
Cable support
In a networked system, CAT-5e cables
connect the nLight devices located alongside
the driver enclosure to other nLight devices
in the space. Since the nLight device has
only 2 connectors, a splitter is provided to
continue the CAT-5e daisy-chain.
At the beginning of each fixture section, there
is a direct current (DC) feed (provided) from the
J-box to the LEDs in the suspended fixture.
Remote driver
Integral driver
DR encl
Driver enclosure
0-10V Control
Figure 15
Line voltage
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
hot-orange
neutral-white-orange
ground-green
Emergency circut
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
Splitter
(provided)
Low voltage
Class 2 wires
(by others)
n
DC
DR encl
DC
DR encl
CAT-5e to
Sensor provided
(up to 10’)
8’ Section
8’ Section
DC
DR encl
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures with
remote drivers, no sensors, no networking
(not nLight enabled) and no emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures are connected with normal
power feeds to remote drivers, located in a
driver enclosure either just above the canopy
over the ceiling plane or in a remote location.
There are two or more drivers within a driver
enclosure per fixture section, either 4’ or 8’
long. The 2 circuits share neutral and ground
wires, and have separate hot wires. There are
2 sets of 0–10V wires to control the uplight
independently of the downlight. One set of
control wires is purple/gray and the other is
blue/white-blue, and both are provided as
standard with connections at the remote driver
enclosures, accessible behind an access plate.
Integral driver
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/dual circuit
Legend
Support with power feed
DC Feed to LEDs
Support only
Cable support
Line voltage
DR encl
Two direct current (DC) feeds from the
remote drivers drop in a single cord to the
fixture and power the LEDs in the uplight
and downlight components of the suspended
fixture independently.
0-10V Control Wires
Driver enclosure
Figure 16
DC
Line voltage 1
hot-black (uplight)
Line voltage 2
hot-red (downlight)
0-10V controls UP
± purple/gray
0-10V controls DN
± blue/blue-white
DR encl
8’ Section
DC
Shared
neutral-white
ground-green
DR encl
8’ Section
(uplight)
(downlight)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
25
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/dual circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures with remote
drivers, no sensors, no networking (not nLight
enabled) and an emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures are connected with
normal power feeds to remote drivers,
located in a driver enclosure either just
above the canopy over the ceiling plane
or in a remote location. There are two or
more drivers within a driver enclosure per
fixture section, either 4’ or 8’ long. The 2
circuits share neutral and ground wires,
and have separate hot wires. There are 2
sets of 0–10V wires to control the uplight
independently of the downlight. One set of
control wires is purple/gray and the other
is blue/white-blue, and both are provided
as standard with connections at the remote
driver enclosures, accessible behind an
access plate.
Fixture Type
26
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
With emergency
No EC
Legend
Support with power feed
4’ Emergency Section
Line voltage
Emergency power
DC Feed to LEDs
Cable support
Two direct current (DC) feeds from the
remote drivers drop in a single cord to
the fixture and power the LEDs in the
uplight and downlight components of the
suspended fixture independently.
The dedicated emergency circuit powers
the 4’ downlight emergency LED module
sections independently from the rest of the
fixture, and connects at its driver enclosure.
During normal operation, the dimming
level from the 0-10V signal dims both the
emergency section as well as the rest of
the fixture sections. When the power fails,
the signal powers off, and the emergency
section(s) goes to full light output.
Integral driver
DR encl
Driver enclosure
0-10V Control Wires
Figure 17
Line voltage 1
hot-black (uplight)
Line voltage 2
hot-red (downlight)
0-10V controls UP
± purple/gray
0-10V controls DN
± blue/blue-white
Emergency circut
DC
DR encl
DC
DR encl
DC
Shared
neutral-white
ground-green
hot-orange
neutral-white-orange
ground-green
DR encl
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures with remote
drivers, no sensors, networked operation
(nLight enabled) and no emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures that are nLight enabled
are connected to with a single normal power
feed to remote drivers, located in a driver
enclosure either just above the canopy over
the ceiling plane or in a remote location.
There are two or more drivers within a driver
enclosure per fixture section, either 4’ or 8’
long. In a networked system, CAT-5e cables
(by others) connect to the two nLight devices
located alongside the driver enclosures of
the first fixture at the beginning of a run
(with up to 10’ CAT-5e cable provided).
All connections are via a set of RJ-45
connectors at the nLight device. Two sets
of low-voltage Class 2 wires (by others)
connect the first remote driver enclosure to
the other driver enclosures of the run to dim
both the uplight and the downlight to the
levels signaled by the nLight devices.
At the beginning of each fixture section, two
direct current (DC) feeds from the J-box drop
in a single cord to the suspended fixture and
power the LEDs in the uplight and downlight
components independently.
Sensors
Networked
Not networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/dual circuit
Legend
n
Cable support
Support with power feed
Line voltage
Support only
DC Feed to LEDs
embedded nLight device
CAT-5e Cable
DR encl
Driver enclosure
0-10V Controls
(separate for uplight
vs downlight)
Figure 18
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
Line voltage
Provided
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
n n
Up
DC
Dn
DR encl
8’ Section
to other nLight devices
UP (purple/gray)
0-10V controls
DN (blue/blue-white)
(by others)
DC
DR encl
8’ Section
(uplight)
(downlight)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
27
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/dual circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures with remote
drivers, no sensors, networked operation
(nLight enabled) and an emergency circuit.
Fixture Type
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures that are nLight enabled
are connected with a single normal power
feed to remote drivers, located in a driver
enclosure either just above the canopy over
the ceiling plane or in a remote location.
There are two or more drivers within a driver
enclosure per fixture section, either 4’ or 8’
long. In a networked system, CAT-5e cables
(by others) connect to the two nLight devices
located alongside the driver enclosures of
the first fixture at the beginning of a run
(with up to 10’ CAT-5e cable provided).
All connections are via a set of RJ-45
connectors at the nLight device. Two sets
of low-voltage Class 2 wires (by others)
connect the first remote driver enclosure to
the other driver enclosures of the run to dim
both the uplight and the downlight to the
levels signaled by the nLight devices.
At the beginning of each fixture section, two
direct current (DC) feeds from the J-box
drop in a single cord to the suspended
fixture and power the LEDs in the uplight
and downlight components independently.
The a dedicated emergency circuit powers
the 4’ downlight emergency LED module
sections independently from the rest of the
fixture, and connects at its driver enclosure.
During normal operation, the dimming level
originating from the nLight signal dims both
the emergency section as well as the rest of
the fixture sections. When the power fails,
the signal powers off, and the emergency
section(s) goes to full light output.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
Legend
n
Support with power feed
CAT-5e Cable
embedded nLight device
4’ Emergency Module
Line voltage
Emergency power
DC Feed to LEDs
Cable support
DR encl
Driver enclosure
0-10V Control Wires
(separate for uplight
vs downlight)
Figure 19
Line Voltage
Hot-Black
Neutral - White
Ground - Green
Emergency circut
Provided
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
0-10V controls
n n
Up
DC
hot-orange
neutral-white-orange
ground-green
to other nLight devices
Dn
DR encl
8’ Section
(uplight)
(downlight)
28
Integral driver
UP (purple/gray)
DN (blue/blue-white)
(by others)
DC
DR encl
8’ Section
DC
DR encl
This diagram explains the functionality and
wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures with
remote drivers, sensors, networked operation
(nLight enabled) and no emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures that are nLight enabled
are connected with a single normal power
feed to remote drivers, located in a driver
enclosure either just above the canopy over
the ceiling plane or in a remote location.
There are two or more drivers within a
driver enclosure per fixture section, either
4’ or 8’ long. Any dual-circuit fixture with an
embedded sensor has two nLight devices
alongside its remote driver enclosure and
one connects via CAT-5e cable to the RJ-45
connector at the sensor location (with up
to 10’ CAT-5e cable provided). For all the
fixtures in a run to dim to the level signaled
by the sensor, two sets of low-voltage
Class 2 wires (by others) connect the first
remote driver enclosure to the other driver
enclosures of the run to dim both the uplight
and the downlight to the levels signaled by
the nLight devices. (Dimming signal can be
passed to other drivers in the run via CAT-5e
cable but require more nLight devices.
Available by special request.)
In a networked system, CAT-5e cables
connect the nLight devices located
alongside the driver enclosure to other
nLight devices in the space. Since the nLight
device has only 2 connectors, a splitter is
provided to continue the CAT-5e daisy-chain.
At the beginning of each fixture section, two
direct current (DC) feeds from the J-box
drop in a single cord to the suspended
fixture and power the LEDs in the uplight
and downlight components independently.
Fixture Type
Integral driver
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/dual circuit
Legend
n
Support with power feed
DC Feed to LEDs
Support only
CAT-5e Cable
embedded nLight device
Cable support
Line voltage
Sensor
DR encl
Driver enclosure
0-10V Control Wires
(separate for uplight
vs downlight)
Figure 20
Line voltage
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
Provided
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
Splitter
n n
Up
DC
Dn
DR encl
to other nLight devices
UP (purple/gray)
0-10V controls
DN (blue/blue-white)
(by others)
DC
DR encl
CAT-5e to
sensor provided
(up to 10’)
8’ Section
8’ Section
(uplight)
(downlight)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
29
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver/dual circuit
This diagram explains the functionality and wiring of dual-circuit linear fixtures
with remote drivers, sensors, networked operation (nLight enabled) and an
emergency circuit.
Description of Connections
Dual-circuit fixtures that are nLight enabled are connected with a single normal power
feed to remote drivers, located in a driver enclosure either just above the canopy
over the ceiling plane or in a remote location. There are two or more drivers within a
driver enclosure per fixture section, either 4’ or 8’ long. Any dual-circuit fixture with an
embedded sensor has two nLight devices alongside its remote driver enclosure and
one connects via CAT-5e cable to the RJ-45 connector at the sensor location (with up
to 10’ CAT-5e cable provided). For all the fixtures
in a run to dim to the level signaled by the
sensor, two sets of low-voltage Class 2 wires (by
others) connect the first remote driver enclosure
Support with power feed
to the other driver enclosures of the run to dim
both the uplight and the downlight to the levels
n embedded nLight device
signaled by the nLight devices. (Dimming signal
can be passed to other drivers in the run via
Line voltage
CAT-5e cable but require more nLight devices.
DC Feed to LEDs
Available by special request.)
In a networked system, CAT-5e cables
connect the nLight devices located
alongside the driver enclosure to other
nLight devices in the space. Since the nLight
device has only 2 connectors, a splitter is
provided to continue the CAT-5e daisy-chain.
At the beginning of each fixture section, two
direct current (DC) feeds from the J-box
drop in a single cord to the suspended
fixture and power the LEDs in the uplight
and downlight components independently.
The dedicated emergency circuit and powers the
4’ downlight emergency LED module sections
independently from the rest of the fixture, and
connects at its driver enclosure. During normal
operation, the dimming level originating from the
nLight signal dims both the emergency section
as well as the rest of the fixture sections. When
the power fails, the signal powers off, and the
emergency section(s) goes to full light output.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Integral driver
Remote driver
Single circuit
Dual circuit
No sensors
Sensors
Not networked
Networked
No EC
With emergency
Legend
Sensor
CAT-5e Cable
Emergency Section
DR encl
Driver enclosure
0-10V Control Wires
(separate for uplight
vs downlight)
Emergency power
Cable support
Figure 21
Line voltage
hot-black
neutral - white
ground - green
to other nLight devices
Splitter
n n
Up
Dn
DR encl
0-10V controls
(by others)
DC
UP (purple/gray)
DN (blue/blue-white)
DR encl
CAT-5e to
Sensor provided
(up to 10’)
8’ Section
hot-orange
neutral-white-orange
ground-green
Emergency circuit
Provided
CAT-5e cable
(by others)
DC
30
Fixture Type
8’ Section
DC
DR encl
Example fixture shown – 40’ fixture run with BRUNO LED
Integral driver, single circuit, no sensors, non-networked (0 – 10V controls) (diagram in Figure 1)
#18/5 CORD
BRM9L
HI*1 *2 SSH 40FT R8 120 SCT EZB *3 LPxxx*4
FEED NORMAL
#18/5 CORD
8’–0’
FEED NORMALSUPPORTS
#18/5 CORD
#18/5
CORD8’–0’
FEED
NORMAL
FEED NORMAL
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
40’–1 1/4” O.A.
8’–0’
40’–1 1/4”
8’–0’ O.A.
40’–1 8’–0’
1/4” O.A.
40’–1 1/4” O.A.
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Linear Layout Examples – Integral Driver/Single Circuit
Integral driver, single circuit, no sensors, non-networked with EC (0 – 10V controls) (diagram in Figure 2)
CORD
#16/3 CORD
#18/5
CORD
*2
BRM9L HI*1FEED
SSH
40FT R8#16/3
120EMER.
3SE EC SCT EZB*3 LPxxx*4
NORMAL
FEED
FEED EMER.
0–10V
DIMMING
0–10V
WITH EC
DIMMING
0–10V
0–10V
WITH
EC
DIMMING
DIMMING
WITH EC
WITH EC
8’–0’ #16/3 CORD
#18/5 CORD
FEED NORMALSUPPORTS
FEED EMER.
#16/3 CORD
#18/5 CORD 8’–0’
#16/3EMER.
CORD
#18/5
CORD
FEED
NORMAL
FEED
SUPPORTS
FEED NORMAL8’–0’
FEED EMER.
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’ #16/3 CORD
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
FEED EMER.
#16/3
CORD
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
#16/3EMER.
CORD
FEED
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS FEED EMER.
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
SEPARATE FEED DROP FOR EACH EMERGENCY SECTION IS REQUIRED FOR MOST LOCAL CODES
8’–0’
8’–0’1/4” O.A.
8’–0’
40’–1
SEPARATE FEED DROP FOR EACH EMERGENCY SECTION IS REQUIRED FOR MOST LOCAL CODES
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’FEED DROP FOR EACH EMERGENCY
8’–0’
8’–0’
40’–1 1/4”
O.A. IS REQUIRED FOR MOST LOCAL
SEPARATE
SECTION
CODES
SEPARATE FEED DROP FOR EACH EMERGENCY SECTION IS REQUIRED FOR MOST LOCAL CODES
#16/3 CORD
FEED EMER.
8’–0’ #16/3 CORD
SUPPORTS
FEED EMER.
#16/3 CORD
8’–0’
#16/3EMER.
CORD
FEED
SUPPORTS FEED EMER.
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
40’–1 1/4” O.A.
40’–1 1/4” O.A.
Integral driver, single circuit, with or without sensors, networked (sensor not shown) (diagram in Figure 3)
BRM9L HI *1 *2 SSH 40FT R8 120 SCT ENNB *3 LPxxx*4
#16/3 CORD
CAT-5e FEED
FEED NORMAL
#16/3 CORD
8’–0’
CAT-5e FEED
FEED NORMALSUPPORTS
#16/3 CORD
#16/3
CORD8’–0’
CAT-5e FEED
FEED
NORMAL
CAT-5e FEED
FEED NORMAL
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
40’–1 1/4” O.A.
8’–0’
40’–1 1/4”
8’–0’ O.A.
40’–1 8’–0’
1/4” O.A.
40’–1 1/4” O.A.
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
Integral driver, single circuit, with or without sensors, networked with EC (sensor shown) (diagram in Figure 4)
BRM9L HI *1 *2 SSH 40FT R8 120 2SE EC SCT ENNB *3 (MSD7DSNL)*5 LPxxx*4
#16/3 CORD
CAT-5e FEED
FEED NORMAL
#16/3 CORD
8’–0’
CAT-5e FEED
FEED NORMALSUPPORTS
#16/3 CORD
#16/3
CORD8’–0’
CAT-5e FEED
FEED
NORMAL
CAT-5e FEED
FEED NORMAL
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
#16/3 CORD
FEED EMER.
8’–0’ #16/3 CORD
SUPPORTSFEED EMER.
#16/3 CORD
8’–0’
#16/3EMER.
CORD
FEED
SUPPORTS
FEED EMER.
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
40’–1 1/4” O.A.
8’–0’
40’–1 1/4”
8’–0’ O.A.
40’–1 8’–0’
1/4” O.A.
40’–1 1/4” O.A.
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
#16/3 CORD
FEED EMER.
8’–0’ #16/3 CORD
SUPPORTS
FEED EMER.
#16/3 CORD
8’–0’
#16/3EMER.
CORD
FEED
SUPPORTS
FEED EMER.
8’–0’
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
SUPPORTS
8’–0’
8’–0’
8’–0’
Notes for all layouts above:
*1 In these examples, lumen output does not change this layout. (Other layouts, voltages, or outputs may affect the
number of power feeds in a fixture run.)
*2 Standard (70/30) (blank) distribution or any other distribution does not change this layout.
*3 The additional of Lumen Management (LMES20) does not change this layout. It is a driver setting.
*4 LED color temperature (LPxxx) does not change this layout.
*5
The layout is the same with or without sensor.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
31
®
SQUARE UP/DOWN DCT FIXTURE RUNS
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Lighting for People
PeerlessLighting.com
®
Linear Layout Examples – Integral Driver/Dual Circuit
Example fixture shown – 40’ fixture run with Square I/D
®
SQUARE UP/DOWN DCT FIXTURE RUNS
Integral
Lighting
for People
driver, dual circuit, no sensors, non-networked (0 – 10V controls) (diagram in Figure 5 and Figure 9)
SQM4 LO/HI *1 40FT R8 120 EZB DCT *2 LPxxx*3
PeerlessLighting.com
®
#16/4 CORD
A/B POWER
#18/4 CORD
A/B DIM CTRL
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
0-10V
DIMMING
DCT
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
A = UP-LIGHT
B = DOWN-LIGHT
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
8'-0"
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
8'-0"
40'-2" O.A. RUN
Integral driver, dual circuit, no sensors, non-networked (0-10V controls) emergency circuit (diagram in Figure 6)
*2
*3
SQM4 LO/HI *1 40FT R8 120 EZB
DCTUP/DOWN
2SE ECDCT
LPxxx
SQUARE
FIXTURE
RUNS
®
Lighting for People
®
#16/4 CORD
A/B POWER
nLIGHT
CONTROL
DCT
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
A
#16/3 CORD
EMER POWER
#16/3 CORD
EMER POWER
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
8'-0"
8'-0"
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
8'-0"
PeerlessLighting.com
#18/4 CORD
A/B DIM CTRL
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
B
8'-0"
A = UP-LIGHT
B = DOWN-LIGHT
8'-0"
40'-2" O.A. RUN
nLIGHT POWER-PACKS AND CAT-5e DROP MUST BE INSTALLED IN THE SAME FIXTURE SECTION.
SINGLE CIRCUIT ZONE SHOWN. FOR MULTIPLE CONTROL ZONES, EACH ZONE REQUIRES SEPARATE POWER-PACKS AND CAT5 DROP.
Integral driver, dual circuit, with or without sensors, networked (diagram in Figure 7)
SQM4 LO/HI *1 40FT R8 120 ENNB DCT *2 (MSD7DSNL) *4 Pxxx*3
®
nLIGHT SENSOR
NETWORK CONTROL
®
Lighting for People
DCT
#16/3 CORD
NORMAL FEED
A
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
CAT-5e FEED DCT FIXTURE RUNS
SQUARE UP/DOWN
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
PeerlessLighting.com
nEPS 60 IO EZ LC N100
B
A = UP-LIGHT
B = DOWN-LIGHT
8'-0"
8'-0"
8'-0"
PAGE 1
40'-2" O.A. RUN
PDT1 SENSOR
nLIGHT SENSOR, POWER-PACKS AND CAT-5e DROP MUST BE INSTALLED IN THE SAME FIXTURE SECTION.
SINGLE CONTROL ZONE SHOWN. FOR MULTIPLE CONTROL ZONES, EACH ZONE REQUIRES SEPARATE POWER-PACKS AND CAT-5e DROP.
SINGLE CIRCUIT ZONE SHOWN, FOR MULTIPLE CONTROL ZONES, EACH ZONE REQUIRES SEPARATE POWER-PACKS AND CAT-5e DROP.
Integral driver, dual circuit, with or without sensors, networked with EC (diagram in Figure 8)
SQM4 LO/HI *1 40FT R8 120 ENNB DCT 2SE EC *2 Pxxx*3
PAGE 2
#16/4 CORD
A/B POWER
nLIGHT
CONTROL
DCT/EC
A = UP-LIGHT
B = DOWN-LIGHT
CAT-5e FEED
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
#16/3 CORD
EMER. POWER
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
#16/3 CORD
EMER. POWER
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
8'-0"
8'-0"
8'-0"
8'-0"
SEPARATE FEED DROP FOR EACH EMERGENCY SECTION IS REQUIRED FOR MOST LOCAL CODES
Notes for all layouts above:
*1 This LO/HI distribution or any other option for distribution does not change this layout.
*2
The additional of Lumen Management (LMES20) does not change this layout. It is a driver setting.
*3
LED color temperature (LPxxx) does not change this layout.
*4
The layout is the same with or without sensor.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
8'-0"
40'-2" O.A. RUN
FIXTURE-SECTION WITH
DOWN-LIGHT LED BOARD
ON EMERGENCY CIRCUIT
32
8'-0"
SUPPORTS
nEPS 60 EZ IO LC N100
nEPS 60 EZ IO LC N100
PAGE 3
®
Example fixture shown – 40’ fixture run with Vellum linear
Remote driver, single circuit, no sensors, non-networked (0 – 10V controls) (diagram in Figure 10)
VMM9 HI*1 *2 40FT R8 120 SCT EZB *3 LPxxx*4
Remote driver, single circuit, no sensors, non-networked with EC (0 – 10V controls) (diagram in Figure 11)
VMM9 HI*1 *2 40FT R8 120 1SE EC SCT EZB *3 LPxxx*4
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Linear Layout Examples – Remote Driver/Single Circuit
0-10V
DIMMING
EACH CONTROL ZONE REQUIRES A SEPARATE nLIGHT POWER-PACK, CAN BE CAT-5e CABLE LINKED TO SINGLE OR MULTIPLE CONTROL HUBS.
EACH FIXTURE SECTION REQUIRES A SEPARATE LOW-VOLTAGE LED FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO REMOTE DRIVER BOX ABOVE THE CEILING.
Remote driver, single circuit, sensors, networked (diagram in Figure 12) – shown here with the multiple nLight device option
VMM9 HI*1 *2 40FT R8 120 SCT ENNB MSD7DSNL *3 LPxxx*4
®
LOW-VOLTAGE LED
& CAT-5e CABLE DROP
®
nLIGHT SENSOR
NETWORK CONTROL
EACH CONTROL ZONE REQUIRES A SEPARATE nLIGHT POWER-PACK, CAN BE CAT-5e CABLE LINKED TO SINGLE OR MULTIPLE CONTROL HUBS.
EACH FIXTURE SECTION REQUIRES A SEPARATE LOW-VOLTAGE LED FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO REMOTE DRIVER BOX ABOVE THE CEILING.
nLIGHT SENSOR AND CAT-5e CABLE DROP MUST BE INSTALLED AT THE SAME LOCATION.
Remote driver, single circuit, sensors, networked with EC (diagram in Figure 13) – shown here with the multiple nLight device option
VMM9 HI*1 *2 40FT R8 120 2SE EC SCT ENNB MSD7DSNL *3 LPxxx*4
LOW-VOLTAGE LED
& CAT-5e CABLE DROP
nLIGHT SENSOR
NETWORK CONTROL
WITH EC
EACH FIXTURE SECTION REQUIRES A SEPARATE LOW-VOLTAGE LED FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO REMOTE DRIVER BOX ABOVE THE CEILING.
EACH CONTROL ZONE REQUIRES A SEPARATE nLIGHT POWER-PACK, CAN BE CAT-5e CABLE LINKED TO SINGLE OR MULTIPLE CONTROL HUBS.
EACH EMERGENCY SECTION REQUIRES A SEPATATE LOW-VOLTAGE LED FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO EMERGENCY DRIVER BOX.
nLIGHT SENSOR AND CAT-5e CABLE MUST BE INSTALLED AT THE SAME LOCATION.
Notes for all layouts above:
*1 In these examples, lumen output does not change this layout. (Other layouts, voltages, or outputs may affect the
number of power feeds in a fixture run.)
*2
Standard (60/40) (blank) distribution or any other distribution does not change the layout.
*3
The additional of Lumen Management (LMES20) does not change the layout. It is a driver setting.
*4
LED color temperature (LPxxx) does not change the layout.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
33
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Linear Layout Examples – Remote Driver/Single Circuit
Example fixture shown – 40’ fixture run with Vellum linear
Remote driver, single circuit, sensors, networked (diagram 14) – shown here with the multiple nLight device option
VMM9 HI*1 *2 40FT R8 120 SCT ENNB MSD7DSNL *3 LPxxx*4
LOW-VOLTAGE LED
& CAT-5e CABLE DROP
nLIGHT SENSOR
NETWORK CONTROL
EACH CONTROL ZONE REQUIRES A SEPARATE nLIGHT POWER-PACK, CAN BE CAT-5e CABLE LINKED TO SINGLE OR MULTIPLE CONTROL HUBS.
EACH FIXTURE SECTION REQUIRES A SEPARATE LOW-VOLTAGE LED FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO REMOTE DRIVER BOX ABOVE THE CEILING.
nLIGHT SENSOR AND CAT-5e CABLE DROP MUST BE INSTALLED AT THE SAME LOCATION.
Remote driver, single circuit, sensors, networked with EC (diagram in Figure 15) – shown here with the multiple nLight device option
VMM9 HI*1 *2 40FT R8 120 1SE EC SCT ENNB MSD7DSNL *3 LPxxx*4
nLIGHT
CONTROL
®
®
Notes for all layouts above:
*1 In these examples, lumen output does not change this layout. (Other layouts, voltages, or outputs may affect the
number of power feeds in a fixture run.)
*2
Standard (60/40) (blank) distribution or any other distribution does not change the layout.
*3
The additional of Lumen Management (LMES20) does not change the layout. It is a driver setting.
*4
LED color temperature (LPxxx) does not change the layout.
®
®
Linear Layout Examples – Remote Driver/Dual Circuit
Example fixture shown – 40’ fixture run with OPEN I/D
Remote driver, dual circuit, no sensors, non-networked (0 – 10V controls) (diagram in Figure 16)
Example: OPM4 HI/HI *1 40FT R8 120 DCT EZB *2 LPxxx*3
Remote driver, dual circuit, no sensors, non-networked with EC (0 – 10V controls) (diagram in Figure 17)
Example: OPM4 HI/HI *1 40FT R8 120 2SE EC DCT EZB *2 LPxxx*3
0-10V
DIMMING
DCT EC
EACH CONTROL ZONE REQUIRES A SEPARATE nLIGHT POWER-PACK, CAN BE CAT-5e CABLE LINKED TO SINGLE OR MULTIPLE CONTROL HUBS.
EACH FIXTURE SECTION REQUIRES A SEPARATE LOW-VOLTAGE FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO REMOTE DRIVER BOX ABOVE THE CEILING.
EACH REMOTE DRIVER BOX CONTAINS TWO LED DRIVERS, ONE FOR UP-LIGHT, ONE FOR DOWN-LIGHT.
nLIGHT CONTROL POWER-PACKS ARE ATTACHED TO OUTSIDE OF DRIVERS BOXES, WITH CAT-5e PLUG ON EACH END.
34
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
®
®
CEILING TILE
®
nLIGHT SENSOR
NETWORK CONTROL
DCT
CAT-5e CABLE &
LOW-VOLTAGE
LED CORD
®
EACH CONTROL ZONE REQUIRES A SEPARATE nLIGHT POWER-PACK, CAN BE CAT-5e CABLE LINKED TO SINGLE OR MULTIPLE CONTROL HUBS.
EACH FIXTURE SECTION REQUIRES A SEPARATE LOW-VOLTAGE FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO REMOTE DRIVER BOX ABOVE THE CEILING.
EACH REMOTE DRIVER BOX CONTAINS TWO LED DRIVERS, ONE FOR UP-LIGHT, ONE FOR DOWN-LIGHT.
nLIGHT CONTROL POWER-PACKS ARE ATTACHED TO OUTSIDE OF DRIVERS BOXES, WITH CAT-5e PLUG ON EACH END.
Remote driver, dual circuit, no sensors, networked with EC (diagram in Figure 19)
Example: OPM4 HI/HI *1 40FT R8 120 2SE EC DCT ENNB *2 LPxxx*3
PEERLESS FIXTURE CONNECTIONS
Remote driver, dual circuit, no sensors, networked (diagram in Figure 18)
Same layout for with sensor and networked when nLight device at sensor section connects to other nLight devices in network.
Example: OPM4 HI/HI *1 40FT R8 120 DCT ENNB *2 LPxxx*3
nLIGHT
CONTROL
DCT/EC
Remote driver, dual circuit, sensors, networked (diagram in Figure 20)
Example: OPM4 HI/HI *1 40FT R8 120 DCT ENNB MSD7DSNL *2 LPxxx*3
nLIGHT SENSOR
NETWORK CONTROL
DCT
EACH CONTROL ZONE REQUIRES A SEPARATE nLIGHT POWER-PACK, CAN BE CAT-5e CABLE LINKED TO SINGLE OR MULTIPLE CONTROL HUBS.
EACH FIXTURE SECTION REQUIRES A SEPARATE LOW-VOLTAGE FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO REMOTE DRIVER BOX ABOVE THE CEILING.
EACH REMOTE DRIVER BOX CONTAINS TWO LED DRIVERS, ONE FOR UP-LIGHT, ONE FOR DOWN-LIGHT.
nLIGHT CONTROL POWER-PACKS ARE ATTACHED TO OUTSIDE OF DRIVERS BOXES, WITH CAT-5e PLUG ON EACH END.
Remote driver, dual circuit, sensors, networked with EC (diagram in Figure 21)
Example: OPM4 HI/HI *1 40FT R8 120 2SE EC DCT ENNB MSD7DSNL *2 LPxxx*3
CEILING TILE
nLIGHT SENSOR
NETWORK CONTROL
DCT/EC
CAT-5e CABLE &
LOW-VOLTAGE
LED CORD
EACH CONTROL ZONE REQUIRES A SEPARATE nLIGHT POWER-PACK, CAN BE CAT-5e CABLE LINKED TO SINGLE OR MULTIPLE CONTROL HUBS.
EACH FIXTURE SECTION REQUIRES A SEPARATE LOW-VOLTAGE FEED DROP TO CONNECT TO REMOTE DRIVER BOX ABOVE THE CEILING.
EACH REMOTE DRIVER BOX CONTAINS TWO LED DRIVERS, ONE FOR UP-LIGHT, ONE FOR DOWN-LIGHT.
nLIGHT CONTROL POWER-PACKS ARE ATTACHED TO OUTSIDE OF DRIVERS BOXES, WITH CAT-5e PLUG ON EACH END.
Notes for all layouts above:
*1 In these examples, lumen output does not change this layout.
(Other layouts, voltages, or outputs may affect the number of power feeds in a fixture run.)
*2
Standard (60/40) (blank) distribution or any other distribution does not change the layout.
*3
The additional of Lumen Management (LMES20) does not change the layout. It is a driver setting.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
35
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
Classroom Application
Occupancy sensors/networked – any sensor triggers lights on and keeps them on
Peerless linear suspended luminaires and nLight controls work together to create environments that allow for
daylight and occupancy sensing, and dimming control.
• Classroom size: 30’ x 30’
• Ceiling height: 10’
• Mounting height of fixtures and sensors: 8’
• Rows are 14’ OC
Schedule of operations
In this typical classroom, project requires
on-off lighting control at entry door into the
room. Once switched on, lighting controls
sense occupancy and lights turn on. As
long as any occupancy is sensed, lights
remain on. If room is vacated, lights turn
off after programmed amount of time
(default is 10 minutes).
The teacher can control lights and
dimming level from a dimmer/switch
near teacher’s desk.
sensor
controller
$ wall switch
$Ddimmer
$D
DESK
C1
S1
C3
S3
C2
S2
C4
S4
Window
$
Solution
• Circle shows range of sensing small motion for each fixturemounted sensor
• The diameter of the coverage pattern for small motion using
nLight occupancy sensors embedded in the fixture is about 20’ for
ceiling height.
• Walking movement coverage pattern is larger
• Occupancy sensors are located in fixture run to cover classroom
area completely
36
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
Open Office Application
Occupancy sensors/daylight harvesting
• Open Office room size: 60’ x 40’
• Ceiling height: 15’
• Mounting height of fixtures and sensors: 12’ aff
• Rows are 14’ oc
Window
S1
DAYLIGHT ZONE #1
C1
S2
Schedule of Operations
A typical large, open office project requires
occupancy sensing and dimming in
response to daylight. When occupancy is
sensed, lights switch on and stay on until
occupancy is no longer sensed. Lights switch
off after a pre-set amount of time.
In this project, code requires two zones of
daylighting response—one zone near the
window, and one adjacent to that zone,
a little further from the window. Lights
beyond these two zones do not need to
be controlled by the daylight sensor.
The project also requires manual dimming,
which can range from dark up to the level
set by the daylighting sensor for each zone.
Solution
• Circle shows range of sensing small
motion for each fixture-mounted
sensor. Walking motion coverage
pattern is larger
• Occupancy sensors are located in fixture
run to cover open office area completely
• For this fixture height, the diameter of the
coverage pattern for small motion using
nLight occupancy sensors embedded in
the fixture is about 20’. Sensors S1 thru
S7 provide coverage. Walking movement
coverage pattern is larger
DAYLIGHT ZONE #2
ZONE WITH NO
DAYLIGHT RESPONSE
C2
S4
C4
S3
S4
C3
C4
S6
C7
S7
C8
C5
S5
C6
• Daylight sensing is provided by S1 which provides a single reading of light
provided by daylight from the long window on north wall
• Signal from S1 controls dimming level of all fixtures in Daylight Zone
#1 with networked zone response
• Signal from S1 controls dimming level of all fixtures in Daylight Zone
#2 with a different networked zone response
• Embedded controllers needed at each sensor to provide power, so C1
(Controller 1) is embedded in fixture next to Sensor 1, C2 is next to
S2, etc.
• Embedded controller needed for each independently controlled
dimming zone. (3rd row from window), embedded controller C5 is
needed to dim row
• Zones with no daylight response (3rd and 4th from the window) can be
manually dimmed from, for instance, a wallbox dimmer
• Lights respond to the multiple signals received and dim to the lowest
dimming level. All zones of light can be manually dimmed up to the
allowable daylight dimming level programmed into the sensors
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
37
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
Office Application
Occupancy sensors/daylight sensing/ fixtures perpendicular to the window/networked
• Open Office room size: 60’ x 40’
• Ceiling height: 15’
• Mounting height of fixtures and sensors: 12’ aff
• Rows are 14’ oc
window
DAYLIGHT ZONE #1
S1
C1
ZONE #2
C2
S2
C3
S4
C6
S6
C8
C4
S3
C5
S5
C7
S7
C9
S8
C10
Schedule of Operations
This typical large open office project requires occupancy sensing
and dimming in response to daylight in a single zone only.
Occupancy sensing operates similar to the classroom – when
occupancy is sensed, the lights switch on and stay on until
occupancy is no longer sensed. Lights switch off after a pre-set
amount of time.
In this project, code requires only one zone of daylighting
response, near the window. Lights beyond this zone do not need
to be controlled by the daylight sensor.
The project also requires manual dimming, which can range from
dark up to the level set by the daylighting sensor for each zone.
Solution
• Circle shows range of sensing small motion for each fixturemounted sensor. Walking motion coverage pattern is larger
• Occupancy sensors are located in fixture run to cover open
office area completely
38
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
• Sensors S1 thru S8 provide coverage
Walking movement coverage pattern
is larger
• Occupancy sensing is positioned and
located so coverage of room is complete.
Sensors S1 thru S8 provide coverage
• Daylight sensing is provided by S2, which
provides a single reading of light provided
by daylight from long window on the
north wall. It is dual-function
• Signal from S2 controls dimming level
of all fixtures in Daylight Zone #1 with
networked zone response
• Embedded controllers are embedded in
fixture section next to sensors to provide
power, so C1 (Controller 1) is embedded in
fixture next to Sensor 1, C5 is next to S3,
as shown in plan
• Embedded controllers needed for each
independently controlled dimming zone,
so short run of 2 fixtures at C2 and C4
are needed to respond to dimming level
determined by S2
• Zone #2 dimming level can be independent
of daylight sensing. Each run of 6 fixtures
within fixture row is dimmed by a single
embedded controller in that run, here
shown as S4, S5, S6, S7 and S8. These
dim a partial row as well as power the
sensors. In this configuration, no additional
embedded controllers are needed
A well-designed lighting system includes both energy-efficient
fixtures and effective controls. The use of multiple energy-savings
strategies optimizes the system for the greatest energy saved.
Lumen management
Lumen management is a pre-set driver operation that starts a
new fixture with a dim level at 80% full light output, and over time
gradually increases both light output and input wattage as needed to
maintain a constant level of 80%. This counteracts the natural loss
of light output of the source over time (which occurs with all light
sources). Lumen management prevents the unnecessary problem
of initial over-lighting — this often occurs because most lighting
systems are designed to a “maintained” light level estimated to
occur at a point in the future. Given the long life of LEDs, a lumen
management setting could eliminate over-lighting for a period of
years, resulting in significant energy savings.
Savings with daylight sensing
The integrated daylight sensor provides
automatic dimming control for daylight
harvesting applications. The sensor works
by monitoring daylight conditions in a
room and then dimming the luminaire(s)
to ensure that adequate lighting levels
are maintained. The dimmed light levels
require less energy, which can result in
significant energy savings.
APPENDICES
Appendix 1 - Energy savings and system life benefits of dimming
Savings with manual dimming and overrides
The amount of light a space needs is
determined by it occupants’ personal
preferences. In some spaces, local control
could allow for further dimming of a nearby
zone of fixtures and the dimmed lights
will result in energy savings. Occupants
can dim the lights up to the level set by
the programmed sensors, but not override
them without programing.
The multiplier effect of savings from dimming
Each of these strategies reduce energy use
and extend the life of the LEDs. By using a
layered approach in the controls strategy,
we can accumulate the benefits of both.
In one case study, the multiplied effect of
the smart and integrated controls saved as
much as 68% of the lighting energy over
the base case.
Savings with occupancy sensing
The system saves energy by not having lights on when no
one is there. The integrated occupancy sensor checks for
the presence of people in the space, switches lights on
when someone enters, and keeps lights on as long as their
presence is sensed. An internal time delay, factory-set at 10
minutes, keeps the sensor in the occupied state during brief
periods of vacancy. The timer is reset every time occupancy is
re-detected. The timer can be programmed for the facility’s
preferences, or to meet codes or standards that dictate a
specific time delay for code compliance.
Extending LED fixture life due to dimming
The life expectancy of LEDs is estimated
to be a certain number of hours at full
light output. Like with other light sources,
dimming the LEDs extends their lives, and
could double the number of hours (and
years) the LEDs produce sufficient light.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
39
APPENDICES
Appendix 2 - Codes Standards
There are various energy codes and standards throughout the US and each has applicability in specific regions.
Check your local or state requirements to determine which are applicable for your project.
IECC and California’s Title 24 Building Energy Code.
ASHRAE 90.1
https://www.ashrae.org/standards-research--technology
Addresses requirements and criteria to establish minimum energy efficiency requirements of buildings (other than
low-rise residential buildings) for new buildings or portions of buildings and their systems, including lighting.
Title 24 2013 California Energy Code
(part of the Building Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential Buildings)
http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2013standards/
A periodically updated set of regulations designed to reduce California’s energy consumption in buildings,
including lighting.
The International Energy Conservation Code (2012)
http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/iecc/2012/
A model energy conservation code addressing the design of energy efficient building envelopes and systems,
including lighting through requirement emphasizing performance.
Acuity Controls nLight® Application Guides for ASHRAE, Title 24 and IECC
http://www.acuitybrands.com/products/controls/nlight
Resources to help you use nLight digital lighting control system to aid in code compliance.
Appendix 3 - Acuity Controls nLight Devices/Product Overview
The nLight devices are the building blocks
of an nLight network. The devices used with
Peerless linear fixtures include:
• Daylight Sensors
• Occupancy Sensors
• nLight Controllers
• Dimmers and WallPods
The functionality of these devices is described
below, along with the Peerless designation of
the part number and links to a full description
and/or spec sheet of the product.
Other products described here that are part
of Peerless linear fixtures are:
• EldoLED drivers
• CAT-5e cable and feeds
• Battery packs
• Splitters
40
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Daylight Sensing
• Specified as DSCN EZB (with standard driver) in a
non-networked system
• Specified as DSCNL ENNB (with networked driver)
in a networked system
• nLight device part number is nES ADCX
(example sensor picture in Figure 105)
• www.acuitybrands.com/nes-adcx
The automatic dimming
daylight sensor can be
embedded into Peerless
luminaires and can dim
an EldoLED driver to
0.1% light level. It works
by monitoring daylight
conditions in a room and
controlling the lighting so
that adequate light levels
Figure 105
Daylight sensing works entirely on light reflected from the work
surface. The photocell senses the illuminance reflected from beneath
the fixture, therefore it operates best when the surface immediately
beneath is a representative work surface, not dark colored or too
specular. Best placement of the fixture and the sensor is within 6’ –
15’ of the daylight source, and mounted so the fixture is positioned
near the center of the window(s). In this location the sensor is able to
see light reflected from the light fixtures, as well as the daylight - this
is called “closed loop” photocell control.
The daylight sensor controls dimming output to achieve maximum
daylight harvesting while maintaining a light level, known as
the “set-point”. When there is sufficient daylight, the lights will
dim as low as 0.1% light output. If desired, the photocell can be
programmed to also turn the fixture(s) entirely off (0% lumen
output), leveraging “sleep mode” in the driver, which eliminates
the need to switch power off to the driver with a relay. There is 20%
dead-band built into this setting to prevent the lights from cycling.
As the daylight level dips below the set-point, the fixture light level
raises to contribute light to maintain the level. When the daylight
level decreases to a point where there is no usable daylight, the
lights go to their full bright level.
There are additional settings available for the sensor, which can
be programmed from the push-button directly on the unit, or using
available SensorView software:
• Foot-Candle Set-Point – This setting is the desired light level
the sensor is maintaining (value is at the sensor, not at the
work surface).
• Automatic Set-Point Calibration – This setting runs the sensor
through an “auto-calibration” feature that will cycle the lights in
order to determine the optimal set-point for the space.
• ADC Photocell On/Off – This setting allows the user to
enable/disable the photocell’s ability to turn the lights off
when sufficient daylight is present, if the requirement is only
for the lights to dim.
• Photocell Transition On/Off Timers –
This setting is a programmable 45
second to 25 minute transition timer
before lights cycle on or off, so there
are fewer transitions with passing
conditions (e.g. clouds).
• Sunlight Discount Factor – This setting
is used to “discount” or “divide out” the
total sunlight present. Modifying this
setting assist in situations where there
is a disproportional amount of light
hitting the sensor that is not hitting the
work surface.
APPENDICES
are maintained. It is located at the end of a fixture (standard) or
fixture section (can be requested). It is always used with an nLight
controller, either embedded in the fixture or next to the driver
(in a remote driver scenario), and provides a signal to control the
dimming output of that controller. Networking multiple nLight
controllers together via CAT-5e allows for a single daylight sensor
to control multiple fixtures.
More information is available about the
SensorView software on the nLight website
- http://www.acuitybrands.com/products/
controls/nlight.
NOTE: Commissioning kit or Gateway
device required in order to utilize
SensorView software.
Occupancy Sensing
• Specified as MSD7NL DSCN EZB
(with standard driver) in a
non-networked system
• Specified as MSD7NL DSCNL ENNB
(with networked driver) in a
networked system
• nLight device is nES 7
www.acuitybrands.com/nES-7 or
nES PDT 7 www.acuitybrands.com/
nES-PDT-7
nLight occupancy sensors first detect
motion through passive infrared (PIR) 360º
line-of-sight sensing, therefore are typically
placed where entry points can be viewed.
Once occupancy is detected, the driver is
signaled to ramp up the light output from
“sleep mode” to On, which is the level that
is desired based on lumen compensation,
user, and photocell control.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
41
APPENDICES
Appendix 3 - nLight Devices/Product Overview
If the sensor includes the “PDT” option,
standing for “passive dual technology”,
a microphone exists in the sensor that
“listens” for sounds to indicate continued
occupancy. An initial PIR trigger is required
to turn the lights on and engage the second
technology, known as MicrophonicsTM.
This feature has a patented feature
called Automatic Gain Control (AGC) that
dynamically self-adjusts the sensor to filter
out constant background noise, and register
only noises typical of human activity. It is
more precise than the traditional ultrasonic,
which sends out “radio-waves” looking for
changes in frequency as responses, similar
to sonar. The sensitivity of MicrophonicsTM
eliminates false offs. An internal time delay
keeps the sensor in the occupied state
during brief periods of vacancy. The timer
is reset every time occupancy is detected,
and it is adjustable from the factory setting
of 10 minutes. This 10 minute value can be
changed directly from the push-button on
the sensor, or through SensorView software.
Occupancy Coverage Patterns
In Peerless suspended luminaires, initial
detection of walking (or any large scale)
motion occurs when the luminaire is
mounted at any height between 7.5 – 20 ft.
above finished floor (AFF), and is sensed
a full 360 degrees. To approximate the
circle in which walking is detected, use the
following approximations:
•A
ssume the radius is ~2 times the
mounting height up to 15 ft. AFF
•A
ssume the radius is ~1.75 times the
mounting height from 15-20ft
42
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Figure 102
7.5 FT MOUNTING HEIGHT
Lens rotates 15º to
enable adjustment
4.5
15
3.812.5
310
2.57
1.55
0.752.5
0 m
0 ft
0.752.5
1.55
2.57
310
3.812.5
4.515
COVERAGE PATTERNS for nES 7/nES PDT 7 occupancy sensor
Since detection occurs sooner when walking across the sensor’s
field of view rather than directly towards the sensor, the lens
assembly allows for a 15º rotation (see figure 102 above) to enable
coverage pattern adjustments after installation.
When you design with your radial coverage established for your
fixture mounting height, you want to assure complete coverage of
the space.
Combination Occupancy/Daylight Sensing
• Specified as MSD7NL DSCN EZB (with standard driver)
in a non-networked system
• Specified as MSD7NL DSCNL ENNB (with networked driver)
in a networked system
• nLight device is nES 7 ADCX or nES PDT 7 ADCX
• http://www.acuitybrands.com/products/detail/147187/
sensor-switch/nes-7/micro-360-embedded-low-volt-pir/
nLight sensors can be ordered as combination units that include
both occupancy and daylight sensing technology. This allows for
a single sensor to provide dimming/on/off signals to dim fixtures
in response to daylight (as described in the “Daylight Sensing”
section see above), as well as provide on/off signals in response to
occupancy detection (as described in the “Occupancy Detection”
section above). The sensor in Peerless fixtures that does both is
the MSD7NL DSCNL.
nLight Controller
nLight controllers have multiple form factors available. An nLight
controller can be embedded in the fixture with the LED driver; or,
if the LED driver is remotely mounted, a form factor is available to
mount via a knock-out next to the driver.
The nEPS 60 IO EZ LC (http://www.acuitybrands.com/products/
controls/nlight) is the device embedded within nLight enabled
Peerless linear luminaires that have 0 – 10V LED drivers from
EldoLED. It contains a power supply (powered off of 120-277
VAC line voltage) which is optimized to work with the EldoLED
Solodrive family of drivers that do not provide auxiliary DC power
and are used in many Peerless fixtures. The embedded controller
provides power to the embedded sensor and additional nLight
control, such as WallPods.
This smart device is digitally addressed and capable of communicating
with other nLight enabled controls as well. Information from sensors
and user controls (i.e. WallPods) allows the controller to set the
dimming level. It wires internally to the 0 – 10VDC inputs of the LED
driver, providing smooth continuous dimming. The actual controllable
dimming range is set to 1.5 - 9.1 VDC, and can also effectively
switch the luminaire off by lowering the control voltage to <0.3 VDC,
triggering “sleep mode” on the LED driver.
This embedded controller tracks actual run time, temperature and
the dim level of the fixture to determine an accumulated run-time
value. With this device, you have the option of using the Lumen
Management feature to keep the 80% lumen output constant over
the life of the fixture.
EldoLED driver
The EldoLED driver provides the power to the LEDs and flicker-free
dimming to dark.
https://www.eldoled.com/led-drivers/solodrive/
In Acuity Brands linear products, the signal is typically a 0-10V
input, operating with a dimming range of 1.5 – 9.1 VDC, as
described above. These drivers support “sleep mode”, which
effectively turn the fixture “off” without requiring a relay to
interrupt line voltage to the driver – instead, the 0 – 10 VDC must
be controlled to <0.3 VDC to trigger “sleep mode”.
CAT-5e cables
The CAT-5e cables provide system
connection between nLight embedded
controllers and all control devices. Like the
support cables and the line voltage feed,
CAT-5e runs can be custom-length specified
and provided by the factory. CAT-5e cable
connections between fixtures and additional
nLight devices (e.g. Wallpods) are provided by
the contractor or others.
APPENDICES
Appendix 3 - nLight Devices/Product Overview
CAT-5e cable connections are independent
of line voltage power drops and are usually
at the opposite end of the fixture section (see
Fixture Connection pages). They connect via
a single RJ45 plug connection located on
the top of the fixture, which then connects to
the embedded nLight controller. The CAT-5e
cable feed drop is needed at each embedded
controller, which are located:
• In each independent fixture
• In each fixture run up to a maximum
of 15 drivers (confirm specific
luminaire details)
• In each zone within a run of fixtures
needed to be controlled independently
If fixtures are daisy-chained together, then a
3-female splitter is added above the ceiling
or remotely to provide RJ-45 connections
for both the incoming and outgoing points of
the daisy-chain.
In a Peerless suspended fixture run, the
line voltage wires are plug-in electrical
connectors at the joints between one fixture
and another. So, too, the 0 – 10V signal wires
connect at joints between fixtures in a run.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
43
APPENDICES
Appendix 4 - Basic Wiring of Peerless Luminaires
In a single-circuit fixture run, the power feed is provided at the
end of the run with hot, neutral and ground wires (black, white,
green) and connect to the fixture driver.
When the driver is controlled with 0 – 10V signal only (no nLight),
the control wires (purple, grey) are attached to the driver.
When nLight controls are used, CAT-5e cables carry the control
signal between nLight devices, and the low voltage signal carries
the control information (the dimming level) internally to the driver.
When the drivers are controlled with a
0 – 10V signals only (no nLight), 2 sets of
control wires are needed to provide signals
to 2 independent drivers. One set is purple/
grey, and the second is blue/white striped
and blue. They are typically dropped to
the suspended fixture at the opposite end
of the fixture where the power enters the
fixture. (see Diagram #)
When the dual-circuit fixture is nLight enabled,
there is a single CAT-5e cable drop at the
opposite end of the fixture. (see Diagram #)
There is an internal connection between the
embedded controller for the first circuit and
the second.
DUAL CIRCUIT WIRING
Power
Circuit A
Hot 1
Control signals
Circuit A Purple/G
Circuit B
Hot 2
Circut B Blue-Stri
Neutral
Common
shared
drivers
UPLIGHT
DOWNLIGHT
SINGLE CIRCUIT WIRING
DUAL CIRCUIT WIRING
Hot
Power
Circuit A
Hot 1
Control signals
Circuit A Purple/Grey
Circuit B
Hot 2
Neutral
Ground
Control
Circut B Blue-Striped/Blue
Neutral
Common
D1
D2
D1
UPLIGHT
D2
DOWNLIGHT
Up and down light is controlled together
shared
shared
Ground
UPLIGHT
DOWNLIGHT
Up and down light is controlled separately
44
D1
D2
Up and down light is controlled separately
In a dual-circuit fixture run, the power feed is provided with hot
(black) for circuit #1 (downlight), a hot (red) for circuit #2 (uplight),
and shared neutral, ground (white, green) for both.
drivers
shared
Ground
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
Peerless Bruno/Staple luminaire (integrated driver) – nLight networked
APPENDICES
Appendix 5 - Basic Installation Components at the Ceiling F1/F2 Mounting
GUIDE-WIRES TO STRUCTURE
-BY OTHERS
NOTE:
STD ON-GRID MOUNTING DETAIL IS SHOWN.
SEE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS IF ANOTHER
CEILING SYSTEM IS BEING USED.
4" SQ. J-BOX & COVER AT FEED
-BY OTHERS
CAT-5e SPLITTER
-BY PEERLESS
MOUNTING BRACKETS
#10-24 X 5/8" SCREWS
10' CAT-5e CABLE
-BY PEERLESS
STRAIN RELIEF (HOG RING)
5/8" BLACK BUSHING
T-BAR CEILING GRID
-BY OTHERS
1/2" K.O. SCREW-IN CONNECTOR
3 1/2" DIA. CANOPY
-WHITE FINISH
7/8" WHITE BUSHING
1/2" WHITE BUSHING
#16/3
COND. WHITE STRAIGHT CORD
WITH CORD MANAGER
CEILING TILES
2" DIA. CANOPY
-WHITE FINISH
CABLE RETAINER AT CEILING
-CHROME FINISH
ADVISE
O.A. SUSPENSION
CAT-5e CABLE W/CORD MANAGER
1/16" DIA. AIRCRAFT CABLE
ADJUSTABLE CABLE GRIPPER
(MUST BE INSTALLED ON THE
FIXTURES PRIOR TO INSERTING
THE AIRCRAFT CABLES).
CAT-5e PLUG
CONNECT TO CAT-5e COUPLER
(PRE-INSTALLED ON FIXTURE)
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
45
APPENDICES
Appendix 5 - Basic Installation Components at the Ceiling F1/F2 Mounting
CAT-5e SPLITTER
GUIDE WIRES TO STRUCTURE
Peerless Vellum/Open luminaire (remote driver) – nLight
-BY PEERLESS networked-BY OTHERS
FLEX CONDUIT W/FITTING
-BY PEERLESS
CAT-5e SPLITTER
-BY PEERLESS
FLEX CONDUIT W/FITTING
-BY PEERLESS
GUIDE WIRES TO STRUCTURE
-BY OTHERS
MOUNTING BRACKETS
2 x 4 J-BOX & COVER AT FEED
-BY PEERLESS
#10-24 X 5/8" SCREWS
10' CAT-5e CABLE
-BY PEERLESS
LOW VOLTAGE QUICK CONNECT
MOUNTING BRACKETS
5/8" BLACK BUSHING
T-BAR CEILING GRID
#10-24 X 5/8" SCREWS
-BY OTHERS
2 x 4 J-BOX & COVER AT FEED
-BY PEERLESS
1/2" K.O. SCREW-IN CONNECTOR
5/8" BLACK BUSHING
T-BAR CEILING GRID
-BY
OTHERS
3 1/2"
DIA. CANOPY
-WHITE FINISH
3 1/2" DIA. CANOPY
1/2" K.O. SCREW-IN CONNECTOR
-WHITE FINISH
7/8" WHITE
BUSHING
7/8" WHITE BUSHING
3 1/2" DIA. CANOPY
-WHITE FINISH
24"
7/8" WHITE
BUSHING
7/8" WHITE BUSHING
LOW VOLTAGE WHITE CORD
WITH CORD MANAGER
3 1/2" DIA. CANOPY
-WHITE FINISH
O.A. SUSPENSION
CAT-5e CABLE
W/RJ45 PLUG
CEILING TILES
CABLE RETAINER AT CEILING
-CHROME FINISH
LOW VOLTAGE WHITE CORD
WITH CORD MANAGER
1/16" DIA. AIRCRAFT CABLE
CABLE RETAINER AT CEILING
-CHROME FINISH
24"
CABLE GRIPPER
(LIMITED ADJUSTABILITY)
(MUST BE INSTALLED ON THE
FIXTURES
INSERTING
1/16"PRIOR
DIA.TO
AIRCRAFT
CABLE
THE AIRCRAFT CABLES).
O.A. SUSPENSION
CAT-5e CABLE
W/RJ45 PLUG
CABLE GRIPPER
(LIMITED ADJUSTABILITY)
(MUST BE INSTALLED ON THE
FIXTURES PRIOR TO INSERTING
THE AIRCRAFT CABLES).
CAT-5e CABLE TO OTHER nLIGHT
DEVICE OR NETWORK BY OTHERS
ACCESS PLATE FOR LINE
VOLTAGE POWER TYPICAL
RECESSED MOUNT DRIVER
BOX - BY PEERLESS
CAT-5e CABLE TO OTHER nLIGHT
DEVICE OR NETWORK BY OTHERS
ACCESS PLATE FOR LINE
VOLTAGE POWER TYPICAL
nLIGHT CONTROLLER
(1) PER DRIVER BOX
CAT-5e CABLE TO OTHER nLIGHT
DEVICE OR NETWORKRECESSED
BY OTHERSMOUNT DRIVER
BOX - BY PEERLESS
FLEX CONDUIT - BY PEERLESS
nLIGHT CONTROLLER
(1) PER DRIVER BOX
CAT-5e CABLE TO OTHER nLIGHT
DEVICE OR NETWORK BY OTHERS
CAT-5e CABLE WITH SPLITTER FOR SENSOR
- BY PEERLESS
LOW VOLTAGE CORD
FOR LED BOARDS
46
CEILING TILES
10' CAT-5e CABLE
-BY PEERLESS
LOW VOLTAGE QUICK CONNECT
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
FLEX CONDUIT - BY PEERLESS
Connecting to the larger nLight system
When nLight sensors, WallPods or embedded controllers/
power packs are connected in any order via CAT-5e cabling,
an nLight zone is created. A networked nLight enabled fixture
communicates with up to 128 other networked devices in an
nLight zone. The zone can be linked to a Gateway, either directly
or via Bridges, and becomes capable of remote status monitoring
and control via SensorView software. The nLight gateway connect
up to 1500 devices. Multiple Gateways can communicate via a
LAN connection.
APPENDICES
Appendix 6 - Integration into an nLight building system
Network configuration
An nLight network backbone consists of one or more Bridges and
a Gateway (nGWY2 CTRL & nGWY2 GFX or nGWY) communicating
over CAT-5e wired connections. The architecture can be topologyfree, however wide branching networks are recommended over
linear runs. Any one or more RJ-45 ports on a Bridge may be
used to connect to other Bridge or Gateway devices.
Linear Systems Design Guide • 2015
47
2246 5th Street | Berkeley, CA 94710 | 510.845.2760 | PeerlessLighting.com
©2015 Acuity Brands Lighting, Inc. All rights reserved. | 12/15 | PER_1891
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising