A Guide to Troubleshooting QuarkXPress 9

A Guide to Troubleshooting QuarkXPress 9
A Guide to
Troubleshooting
QuarkXPress 9
LEGAL NOTICES
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6,081,262; 6,947,959 B1; 6,940,518 B2; 7,116, 843; and other patents pending.
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II
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LEGAL NOTICES
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III
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
1
2
About this book
vii
What we’re assuming about you
vii
What you’ll see
viii
What is troubleshooting?
The process of troubleshooting
1
How do I troubleshoot?
2
The three-world model
2
The binary method
3
Troubleshooting random problems
3
Crashing, quitting, and freezing
Reporting crash problems on Mac OS
4
Reporting crash problems on Windows
5
Project-level problems
5
Appending layouts into a different project
5
Dragging pages between projects in Thumbnails view 6
IV
|
Crashing while opening projects
8
Crashing while importing graphics (Mac OS)
8
Crashing while printing graphics
8
Fonts
10
Using font management utilities
11
QuarkXPress elements
11
PPDs
12
Application-level problems
12
Isolating QuarkXPress
12
Testing system-level files
14
Fonts
14
PPDs
14
System-level problems
15
Logging on as a different user on Mac OS X
15
TABLE OF CONTENTS
3
4
5
Printing
Changing the printer driver
16
Changing the printer driver on Mac OS X
16
Changing the printer on Windows
17
PostScript errors
17
Common PostScript errors
18
Common printing problems
19
Graphics print at low resolution
19
Orientation prints incorrectly to PostScript printers
19
Color projects print black and white
20
Slow printing to non-PostScript printers
20
Printing error checklist
22
Questions to ask
22
Fonts
Supported and unsupported fonts
24
Fonts not supported
24
Font families versus font instances
24
Font storage
25
Font management utilities
25
Font substitution in printed output
25
Font substitution when printing a project
with missing fonts
25
Courier substitution in EPS pictures
26
Courier substitution on Windows
26
Error messages
Messages associated with damaged projects
27
Bad File Format [-70]
27
Unexpected end of file encountered [-39]
28
Out of Memory [-108]
28
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V
TABLE OF CONTENTS
6
VI
|
Recovering damaged projects
28
Recovering a damaged project
29
Minor repairs
29
Other error messages and alerts
30
This project can’t be opened by this
version of QuarkXPress. [17]
30
Non-QuarkXPress document
30
“Some settings saved with this project are different
from those in the XPress Preferences file”
(Nonmatching Preferences alert)
31
Contacting Quark Technical Support
Creating a system profile report
33
Sending files to Quark Technical Support
34
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Introduction
Use this troubleshooting guide to solve problems you might encounter with
QuarkXPress® software. If you still need help after following these instructions
and researching Quark® Tech•Notes on www.quark.com, your next step
entails gathering information about your system before contacting Quark
Technical Support.
This guide assumes that you are familiar with the basic functionality of
QuarkXPress, as well as most Mac OS® X or Windows® operations, particularly
print issues and font management. Each section begins with general information,
followed by platform-specific information (if necessary).
ABOUT THIS BOOK
A Guide to Troubleshooting provides quick access to reference information, as
well as an overview of troubleshooting techniques.
WHAT WE’RE ASSUMING ABOUT YOU
You are familiar with your computer and know how to:
• Launch an application
• Open, save, and close files
• Use menus, dialog boxes, and palettes
• Use the mouse, keyboard commands, and modifier keys
• Print documents
• Manage fonts
• Use your operating system
If you need help in any of these areas, consult the documentation resources
provided with your computer, or refer to other resources.
INTRODUCTION
|
VII
ABOUT THIS BOOK
WHAT YOU’LL SEE
This book uses various conventions to help you find information quickly:
BOLD TYPE STYLE
The names of QuarkXPress menu commands, dialog boxes, and other controls
are set in bold type. For example: “Choose Print from the File menu.”
REFERENCES AND ARROWS
Whenever a feature is mentioned, a reference shows how to access that feature.
For example: “The Usage dialog box (Utilities menu) lets you view the fonts and
pictures used in the layout.” In some cases, arrows represent the menu path to a
feature. For example: “Choose Utilities > Usage > Fonts to view the fonts used
in the layout.”
NOTES
Notes provide helpful information about particular features.
VIII
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INTRODUCTION
THE PROCESS OF TROUBLESHOOTING
Chapter 1:
What is troubleshooting?
Troubleshooting is the process of systematically eliminating variables to
determine the cause of a problem.
THE PROCESS OF TROUBLESHOOTING
If you’ve never troubleshot a computer problem before, don’t be intimidated.
We often perform troubleshooting in our daily lives, and chances are you’ve
seen troubleshooting in action more often than you realize.
If you’ve ever had someone repair your home or car, you have experienced troubleshooting. Assume that you have a leaky sink. Your repair professional will
first ask where the leak is (from the faucet? from the handle?), how it leaks
(a drop or two? a flood?), how often it leaks (every day? only after you water the
garden?), and when it began to leak. Once you have answered these questions,
the repair professional may move on to a different series of questions based on
the information you have provided. If the leak began suddenly, he or she may
ask if you recently made any changes to your sink or pipes. Next, he or she will
probably perform a series of tests such as turning other faucets on, tightening or
loosening screws, or removing faucets. Using these questions and test results, the
repair professional can make a diagnosis of rotted packing around the faucet
threads or a problem with the pipes. He or she may perform or recommend further tests or prescribe specific remedies such as replacing the packing or changing
the pipe connectors. The leak may disappear forever or appear again later.
When you are testing a computer- or software-related problem, you assume the
role of the repair professional, performing tests to determine what the problem is,
narrowing your focus to find the probable cause, and then finding a temporary
or permanent solution.
CHAPTER 1: WHAT IS TROUBLESHOOTING?
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1
HOW DO I TROUBLESHOOT?
HOW DO I TROUBLESHOOT?
Troubleshooting is a very logical process that often requires asking and answering
questions. Below is a general overview of troubleshooting.
Before you can determine what causes the problem, you must get a clear understanding of what the problem is. If your layout prints poorly, what does “poorly”
mean? Is the color wrong or missing? Are the fonts incorrect? Are big black lines
appearing on the page?
Once you have identified the problem, you can begin systematically eliminating variables. If the problem is color, have you tried using a different printer?
Can you print from other applications? Can you print from other
QuarkXPress projects?
As you systematically eliminate variables, you begin to get meaningful results
and start to form a reasonably strong suspicion of what might be causing the
problem. Continue testing until you have proven your theory so you can find a
remedy. Once you have applied the remedy, you are usually done troubleshooting that problem. However, if you apply a workaround or a short-term solution,
you may end up troubleshooting the problem again.
THE THREE-WORLD MODEL
When you test problems related to QuarkXPress, you can accelerate the process
by following the “three-world” model, which divides testing into three areas —
project, application, and operating system. The three-world model works best
on problems that are reproducible.
Let’s say you have a chronic crashing problem. Try testing the project world first
by creating a new project and repeating the action that caused the problem. If
the problem does not occur in a new project, then the problem is unique to the
original project. You will need to further test the problem project.
If the problem occurs in a new project, move on to testing the application
world. Does the problem occur when the QuarkXPress application is isolated?
(Instructions for isolating QuarkXPress are located in “Application-level
problems” in Chapter 2, “Crashing, Quitting, and Freezing.”) If it does not, test
the XTensions® software and other auxiliary files in the QuarkXPress folder and
Quark Preferences folder. If the problem continues to occur, it’s time to test the
system world.
To test the system world, disable fonts, start-up items, and any other items
controlled by the system, such as video drivers. Log in as the default user or
boot the computer in safe mode. Does the problem happen now? If it does not,
a system-level component is contributing to your problem. If it continues to
happen, try testing the QuarkXPress application on another system.
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CHAPTER 1: WHAT IS TROUBLESHOOTING?
THE BINARY METHOD
THE BINARY METHOD
If you have called or written to technical support in the past, you may have
encountered the binary method, a common tactic for troubleshooting fonts
and XTensions software.
Let’s assume you have determined that a damaged font causes a problem but
you don’t know which font is responsible. Using the binary method, you would
disable half the fonts and repeat the action that caused the problem. This tells
you which half the problem font is in. If the problem happens again, the problem font is in the enabled set. If it does not, the problem font is in the disabled
set. Once you’ve identified the group that contains the problematic font, you
can disable fonts by smaller and smaller halves until you find the cause of
the problem.
TROUBLESHOOTING RANDOM PROBLEMS
Random problems are problems that have no discernible pattern. Because it’s
hard to tell what causes them, they can be very difficult to test.
Although the three-world model and binary method work very well for reproducible problems (that is, problems you can recreate by following the same
steps every time), random problems are more difficult to test. Because different
actions may cause the same result, isolating the cause may take much longer.
For example, if your computer frequently crashes or freezes in different documents while using different applications, it’s hard to know where to start. Begin
by testing to see if the problem is at all reproducible. If it is not, try noting
when a problem occurs, what project was open, what action you were performing, and what other applications were running at the time. You may begin to
see a pattern. Perhaps your computer freezes only when a specific application is
open in the background, or within a certain time frame. You may also discover
that all of the crashes are related to graphics or to fonts.
Take notes when you begin testing. These can be very valuable when you
conduct variations of your tests, and if you need to contact Quark Technical
Support, this information can help solve the problem as quickly as possible.
CHAPTER 1: WHAT IS TROUBLESHOOTING?
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3
REPORTING CRASH PROBLEMS ON MAC OS
Chapter 2:
Crashing, quitting, and freezing
Troubleshooting unexpected crashes, quits, and freezes requires a logical,
systematic process. First, determine if the problem can be reproduced and
note the steps required to reproduce the problem. Then troubleshoot the
source of the problem by systematically eliminating variables and repeating
the steps that reproduce the problem, until you isolate the cause.
Crashes, quits, and freezes can often be classified as a project-level, applicationlevel, or system-level issue. Sometimes, fixing a project solves the problem.
At the application level, a problem may be caused by related files, such as
XTensions software, the “XPress Preferences” file, or other supplementary
files. System-level problems may be caused by a resource at the system level,
such as a control panel or font.
REPORTING CRASH PROBLEMS ON MAC OS
Mac OS X includes the Console utility to create a crash report when an
application unexpectedly quits. If you are running Mac OS 10.4 or later, crash
reporting is always turned on by default.
If QuarkXPress unexpectedly quits, a crash log file is updated and available
for viewing in the Console utility, located via “/Applications/Utilities.” In the
Logs list, look for user application crash reports at the following location:
“~/Library/Logs/CrashReporter/QuarkXPress.crash.log.” System application
crashes are located in “/Library/Logs/CrashReporter.” Keep the report handy
when you call Quark Technical Support, and you can send the *.log file in an
e-mail message.
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CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
REPORTING CRASH PROBLEMS ON WINDOWS
REPORTING CRASH PROBLEMS ON WINDOWS
The crash log file is updated any time QuarkXPress unexpectedly quits. You
can view QuarkXPress crash logs — called “Error.log” — in the QuarkXPress
program folder. You can reference the logs when you call Quark Technical
Support, and you can also send the log file (or the text of the log file) in an
e-mail message.
When an application crashes on Windows, a dialog box gives you a chance to
send information to Microsoft®. Quark works closely with Microsoft to examine
these problems, so it helps future development if you send this information.
PROJECT-LEVEL PROBLEMS
Project-level crashing is specific to one project or a group of projects. Projectlevel problems can be caused by something in the project itself, such as a picture,
font, or QuarkXPress item. The first step in solving the problem is to determine
its category. To begin, return your computer to the state it was in before the
crash. Then repeat the actions performed when the last quit, crash, or freeze
occurred. If the problem can be reproduced, you will see a pattern and can
determine whether it occurs when opening or working in a project or
when printing.
Even if you solve the problem, if you can send the original project to Quark
Technical Support, Quark can gather information that will help the development
process for future versions of QuarkXPress. The project content is kept strictly
confidential. See “Contacting Quark Technical Support” for information about
sending files to Quark.
APPENDING LAYOUTS INTO A DIFFERENT PROJECT
Before you test individual pictures, fonts, QuarkXPress elements, and PPDs
to reveal the source of your problem, you may want to try appending the
problem layout into a different project. To do so:
1 Close the project containing the problem layout.
2 Create a new project.
3 Choose File > Append, select the project containing the problem layout, and
then click Open. The Append dialog box displays.
4 Click Layout in the list on the left, select the problem layout in the Available
list, and then click the right arrow button to move the layout into the list on
the right.
5 Click OK. The problem layout is added to the new project.
CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
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5
PROJECT-LEVEL PROBLEMS
DRAGGING PAGES BETWEEN PROJECTS IN THUMBNAILS VIEW
If the problem persists after you append a layout, you may want to try dragging
pages between projects in thumbnails view (also called a “thumbnail drag” or
“dragging thumbnails”).
Dragging thumbnails is helpful for recovering pages of damaged projects, as well
as copying master pages to a new project. Dragging thumbnails copies existing
elements and pages to a new project structure. The project you are dragging
pages from is referred to as the “source project.” The project to which you are
dragging pages is referred to as the “target project.”
***
You can display multiple views of layouts to drag pages between layouts in a
project (Window > New Window).
DRAGGING THUMBNAILS
To drag thumbnails:
1 Open the source project and take note of the layout setup
(Layout > Layout Properties).
2 Create a target project that is the same size or larger and has the same setup
(facing or nonfacing pages) as the source project.
***
An alert will display if you try to drag pages to a layout with a smaller page size
or if you try to drag facing pages to a nonfacing-page layout.
3 In both layouts, choose View > Thumbnails.
4 Choose Window > Tile (horizontal or vertical).
5 Select the page(s) you want to move in the source layout as follows:
• To select one page, click that page.
• To select a range of pages, click the first page, press Shift, and click on the last
page in the range.
• On Mac OS X, select nonsequential pages by pressing Command and clicking
each page.
• On Windows, select nonsequential pages by pressing Ctrl and clicking each page.
6 Drag the pages to the desired location in the target layout.
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CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
PROJECT-LEVEL PROBLEMS
***
When you drag thumbnails from the source layout to the target layout, the
arrow pointer will change at the point where you are able to place the pages.
If placing the new pages will not force existing pages to move, one of three
page icon pointers (single-sided, left-facing, or right-facing) will display. If
placing the new pages will force existing pages to move, one of three arrow
pointers (force left, force right, or force down) will be displayed. You will not
be able to drag the pages unless you see one of these icons.
7 If you are dragging thumbnails to recover pages from a damaged layout,
delete the blank page that was the original first page of the target layout
(Page > Delete), since this page is no longer needed.
8 Save the new layout and try to print, scroll, or work in it. If the layout no
longer crashes, the problem was in the original layout structure. However, the
page structure remains the same, so if your layout had damaged pages, it may
still crash.
***
Any style sheets, colors, dashes and stripes, or hyphenation and justification
specifications used in any items in the source project are added to the target
project. (Unused specifications are not included.) However, lists, hyperlinks,
font families, menus, meta tags, and cascading menus are not copied from the
source project to the target project. To copy these specifications from the source
project to the target project, choose File > Append in the target project.
If any of the source project’s specifications have the same name as the
specification in the target project, the target project’s specifications are used.
(For example, if a color has the same name but is defined differently, the item
will be the color specified in the target project.)
If the Nonmatching Preferences alert displays when you open the source project,
clicking Keep Project Settings may result in different preference settings in the
source and target projects, which may cause text reflow in the target project.
Master pages cannot be displayed in Thumbnails view. However, when you
drag project pages, any master pages applied to those project pages are copied
into the target project. (Unused master pages are not copied.) If a master page
in the source project has the same name as a master page in the target project,
the master page will be renamed after it is copied. To rename or delete a master
page, display the Page Layout palette if it is not already visible (Window >
Page Layout). To rename a master page, click the master page name and enter
the new name. To delete a master page, click the master page to select it and
then click the delete icon.
CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
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7
PROJECT-LEVEL PROBLEMS
CRASHING WHILE OPENING PROJECTS
If QuarkXPress crashes when you open a particular project, you can trigger
a project validation process that allows QuarkXPress to try to fix any
inconsistencies in the file.
1 Choose File > Open.
2 Select the problem project, and press Control+Shift+Option+Command
(Mac OS) or Ctrl+Alt+Shift (Windows) before clicking Open in the Open
dialog box. (Note that this may cause reflow.)
3 If the project opens successfully, use the thumbnail drag procedure to create
a new project.
CRASHING WHILE IMPORTING GRAPHICS (MAC OS)
If QuarkXPress crashes when you import a picture, you might check the
file extension to make sure it’s a supported file type. If a file has the wrong
extension, it might crash QuarkXPress during import.
CRASHING WHILE PRINTING GRAPHICS
Some pictures can cause crashes or freezes. If the problem occurs when printing,
try printing the project without pictures. To do so:
1 Choose File > Print. Click the Pictures pane.
2 In the Picture Options area, choose Rough from the Output drop-down menu.
If the project then prints, a damaged picture may be causing the crash.
If this is the case, continue with the next steps to determine which picture is
causing the problem:
3 Choose File > Print again. Click the Pictures pane, select the Output
drop-down menu, and choose Normal.
4 Click Capture Settings.
5 Choose Utilities > Usage and click the Pictures pane.
6 Press Shift and select all the picture names in the Name column. Click the
Print menu and select No to remove all the checkmarks; this suppresses the
printout of all pictures.
You can then check one picture at a time and try to print, or you can use the
binary method to test the pictures. When the print job unexpectedly quits, you
can pinpoint the cause within the last unsuppressed picture or group of pictures.
Once you locate the problem picture, first try reimporting it into a new project and printing. If the problem recurs, try opening the picture in its source
application and saving it with a new name or a new file format. Import the new
picture and try to print the project again. If this does not solve the problem, then
the picture may be damaged and you might need to re-create and reimport it.
8
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CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
PROJECT-LEVEL PROBLEMS
***
Before recreating the picture, you may want to open it in your image-editing
application, copy all its contents, paste them into a new file, save it, and then
import the new file into your QuarkXPress project.
The Full Res Preview feature can sometimes address damaged preview problems.
In the Application Preferences dialog box (QuarkXPress/Edit menu), click
Full Res Preview and specify a “Preview Cache” location for storing preview
files. When All Full Resolution Previews is selected in the Application
Preferences dialog box (the default setting), all pictures in the project that
are set to display at full resolution will be displayed at full resolution. Uncheck
Disable Full Resolution Previews on Open to make sure that pictures for
which View > Full Res Previews is checked will use the preview cache files
when opening your project.
CRASHING WHEN SCROLLING
If you notice that you are crashing or freezing when you scroll to a certain area
of a project, this could also be a symptom of a damaged picture. This problem
can also be caused by damaged picture previews. If you suspect that more than
one preview is damaged, choose File > Open and navigate to the project. While
clicking Open, press Command/Ctrl. This will build new previews for TIFFs
and JPEGs and reimport previews for the EPS files.
If reimporting the previews does not work, test for damaged pictures. To test
a project for damaged pictures, start by greeking all pictures in the project.
To do so:
1 Choose QuarkXPress/Edit > Preferences. In the Print Layout, General pane,
check Greek Pictures. This will prevent all the pictures in your project from
displaying until you click them. Instead of the picture preview, you will see a
gray box.
2 Once the pictures are greeked, continue scrolling or working in the project,
repeating the actions that preceded the crash or freeze. If you crash or freeze
with the pictures greeked, you may need to test the fonts or QuarkXPress
elements (see the “Fonts” and “QuarkXPress Elements” sections later in
this chapter).
If you are able to scroll or work in your project with the pictures greeked, the
source of your problem is probably a damaged picture preview or a picture
itself. It may also be a damaged picture box. Scroll through the project, clicking on each picture to display it. If you experience a crash immediately after
displaying a particular picture, that picture is probably the source of the
problem. You may need to delete the picture box and reimport the picture.
CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
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9
PROJECT-LEVEL PROBLEMS
WORKING WITH “UNDELETABLE” ITEMS
If you are unable to delete the picture or the picture box before crashing, you
may want to try the “palette trick.” Although this procedure works with any
QuarkXPress default palette, the most commonly used palettes are the Colors
palette and the Page Layout palette. The idea is to “hide” the page behind
the palette. If there is a damaged picture or picture preview that causes the
crash, it is not drawn on-screen and you should be able to delete the picture.
1 Make a copy of the project you are testing. (This ensures you can return to the
original project.)
2 Launch QuarkXPress without opening any projects.
3 Choose Window > Colors.
4 Move and resize the Colors palette so that it covers the entire screen.
5 Open the copy of the problematic project. The project and its pictures will
display behind the Colors palette. If the project continues to crash at this point,
it is probably not a display issue. If it doesn’t crash, continue to step 6.
6 Choose Utilities > Usage > Pictures to select the picture that you suspect is
the problem.
7 Click Show. This selects the picture without displaying it on-screen.
8 Close the Usage window. Select the Item tool and choose Item > Delete to
remove the picture and its box. If you want to delete the picture but keep the
box, select the Content tool and choose Edit > Clear/Edit > Delete.
9 Slowly resize or shrink the palette a small amount at a time; if you selected
the right item, the project will no longer crash. If not, you will have a better
idea of which picture to target when you repeat the steps.
FONTS
If pictures are not the cause of your problem, you can start testing fonts.
You can test fonts associated with a particular project, or you can test all of
the fonts associated with your system.
To test project-specific fonts, you can either disable the fonts before you launch
QuarkXPress or replace the fonts in the project.
To replace fonts in a QuarkXPress project:
1 Make a copy of the project you are testing. (This ensures you can return to the
original project.)
2 If you can, open the copy and choose Utilities > Usage > Fonts. Select all the
listed fonts and click Replace. Replace the fonts with a “standard” font, such as
Times, Helvetica, or Arial, or with any font that you know is working properly.
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CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
PROJECT-LEVEL PROBLEMS
***
When you replace all of the project fonts with your selected testing font, fonts
used in imported Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) pictures will not be affected.
3 Close the Usage dialog box. Try scrolling or printing the project again. If the
crash or freeze does not occur, there was probably a damaged font in the project.
If the project still exhibits the same problem, you may want to look at the
previous section on pictures or the next section on QuarkXPress elements.
Use the binary method to identify the damaged font. Either make a copy of the
original project or return to the previous copy. Change half of the fonts to the
fonts you were originally using and leave the other half in the test font. Then
print or scroll through the project again. If the problem occurs again, the
damaged font is in the unchanged font group. If it does not occur, the problem
is in the fonts you changed to the test font. Continue replacing fonts by halves
until you locate the damaged font.
Once you locate the damaged font, remove it from your system and reinstall it
from the original media.
***
Check More Information in the Usage dialog box to locate the font file, as
well as its version and PostScript and TrueType® names. When multiple users
share a system, a QuarkXPress project can contain multiple versions of a
font, particularly on Mac OS. More Information can help you identify the
correct font.
USING FONT MANAGEMENT UTILITIES
Font management tools for Mac OS and Windows can help you clean up font
caches and activate or deactivate partial font families. Different vendors provide
font management utilities for both platforms. See Chapter 4, “Fonts” for
more information.
QUARKXPRESS ELEMENTS
If you are having difficulty printing or working in a QuarkXPress project, and
you have determined that the pictures and fonts are not the issue, there may
be some element in the project that is causing the problem.
QuarkXPress elements include text boxes, text paths, picture boxes, Bézier boxes,
lines, frames, style sheets, hyphenation and justification specifications, tables,
and pages.
To test QuarkXPress elements, make a copy of the project. Working in the copy,
systematically delete elements or pages from the project until the problem
disappears. The binary method can assist you in finding the problem element.
CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
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11
APPLICATION-LEVEL PROBLEMS
PPDS
If a project continues to crash when you print and you have eliminated pictures,
fonts, and QuarkXPress elements, try changing the PPD (PostScript® Printer
Description) that the project uses. A PPD describes the capabilities of the printer
to the printer driver. For example, the PPD can describe the printer as having
color and tabloid capabilities. When the project is sent to the printer, the printer
driver will use this information to assist in outputting the project. If the PPD is
damaged, it can result in a crash during printing.
To change the PPD that a project uses:
1 Choose File > Print and click the Device pane.
2 Select the PPD drop-down menu and change your PPD to Generic B&W,
Generic Color, or Generic Imagesetter for testing. If the project prints with
the new PPD, there is a problem with the original PPD. You can reinstall it or
get an updated version from the printer manufacturer.
***
PPDs are created by printer manufacturers and are usually supplied
with PostScript printers. Contact the appropriate printer manufacturer
for information.
APPLICATION-LEVEL PROBLEMS
If you have determined that your crash, quit, or freeze is not project-related, you
can start testing the QuarkXPress application. Generally, if you crash when you
launch QuarkXPress and not when opening a specific project, the problem is
related to the application in some way. These types of crashes may be caused by
an item in the QuarkXPress folder, Preferences folder, Application Data folder, or
a system-level file.
ISOLATING QUARKXPRESS
If you are having difficulty launching the QuarkXPress application, perhaps an
auxiliary file is causing the problem. Auxiliary files can include (among others)
QuarkXTensions® software or third-party XTensions software, the “XPress
Dictionary” file, or the “XPress Preferences” file. You will need to isolate
QuarkXPress from auxiliary files.
TO “HIDE” XTENSIONS SOFTWARE FOR QUARKXPRESS:
1 Navigate to the “XTensions” folder in your QuarkXPress program folder.
The default location is “Hard Drive\Applications\QuarkXPress” (Mac OS)
and “C:\Program Files\Quark\QuarkXPress” (Windows).
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CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
APPLICATION-LEVEL PROBLEMS
2 Enter “z” before “XTensions” in the folder name. This will disable all the
active XTensions software modules while keeping the previously disabled
XTensions software modules within the “XTensions Disabled” folder.
***
If QuarkXPress fails to launch, you may need to run the “For System” installer
to reinstall the system files that QuarkXPress needs.
If you suspect that a required component is the cause of your problem, do not
remove it from its folder; instead, reinstall it from the QuarkXPress CD-ROM.
PREFERENCES
QuarkXPress maintains a number of files that contain program default settings
for style sheets, colors, hyphenation and justification specifications, hyphenation exceptions, dashes and stripes, print styles, and other settings. Preferences
may be stored in a number of locations, and QuarkXPress looks through locations in a certain order to find the files during launch. If QuarkXPress finds
preferences files from an earlier version of the software within the QuarkXPress
folder, the software will convert these specifications to QuarkXPress 7 format.
If QuarkXPress does not find preferences files in the application folder, it will
create them in the user’s profile (~/Library/Preferences/Quark on Mac OS or
Document and Settings/user/Application Data/Quark on Windows).
However, this automatically generated set of preferences will use default
settings, so any custom settings will be lost and you will need to reset them.
Once you reset your preferences, it’s a good idea to make a backup copy of
the preferences files for future use. To make a backup copy, simply copy the
files to any volume or drive, preferably not the same volume where your
QuarkXPress application is located. Also, you can write down specifications
as your personal guidebook in case you need to specify them again.
TO “HIDE” QUARKXPRESS PREFERENCES:
If you already have a “Preferences” folder within your QuarkXPress application
folder, rename it. Then create a new folder called “Preferences.” If you don’t
have a “Preferences” folder, simply create a new folder called “Preferences”
within your QuarkXPress application folder. QuarkXPress will look here first
when you launch the software, and new files will be generated. If this isn’t the
problem, you can simply delete the new folder and rename your old folder
“Preferences” again.
CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
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13
TESTING SYSTEM-LEVEL FILES
TESTING SYSTEM-LEVEL FILES
If isolating QuarkXPress does not solve your crash-at-launch problem, you
can start testing system-related files. Before testing, return your QuarkXPress
application to its original settings, and make sure the auxiliary files are back
in place.
FONTS
If a font is damaged or poorly constructed, it may cause QuarkXPress to crash
at launch. To test for a damaged font, disable the fonts through the system or
through any font utility you are using.
To disable fonts using the system:
1 Navigate to the “Fonts” folder:
• Mac OS: (Users > Library > Fonts) or the “Library” folder (Library > Fonts).
Only administrators can make changes to the “Library” folder.
• Windows: (Start > Settings > Control Panel > Fonts).
2 Create a new folder on your desktop and drag approximately half the font files
to this new folder.
3 Launch QuarkXPress.
4 Continue until you identify the problematic font.
PPDS
If your font tests do not reveal the source of the problem, you can also test the
PPDs (PostScript Printer Descriptions). When you launch QuarkXPress, it loads
the PPDs. If a PPD is damaged or conflicts with QuarkXPress, it can cause a crash.
To test the PPDs:
1 Open the “Printer Descriptions” folder
• Mac OS: (Users > Library > Printers > PPDs) or the “Library” folder
(Library > Printers > PPDs). Only administrators can make changes to
the “Library” folder.
• Windows: (C:\WINDOWS\system32\spool\drivers\w32x86\).
2 Move approximately half the items in the “Printer Descriptions” folder to the
desktop. If you can successfully launch QuarkXPress, one of the PPD files is
causing the problem. You can use the binary method to locate the problem PPD.
***
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PPDs are created by printer manufacturers and are usually supplied with
PostScript printers. Contact the printer manufacturer for more information.
CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
SYSTEM-LEVEL PROBLEMS
SYSTEM-LEVEL PROBLEMS
If testing projects and isolating QuarkXPress using the steps described above
has not solved your problem, there may be a system issue.
To verify that the problem is in the system, try performing the same test on
another system, preferably an identical system. One way to do this is to log on
to Mac OS X as a different user, or to start the computer from an alternative
system on Windows. Logging on as a different user on Mac OS X invokes
different system-related files, enabling you to confirm whether the problem
is in the system files assigned to a specific user or if the problem pervades the
entire system. On Windows, an alternative system generally contains only the
minimum files needed to run the operating system and has the advantage of
being “clean,” meaning that it does not contain damaged or conflicting files.
LOGGING ON AS A DIFFERENT USER ON MAC OS X
1 If you do not have multiple users set up, choose Apple Menu > System
Preferences > Accounts to create a new user. (For more information about
creating users, consult your Mac OS X documentation.)
2 Choose Apple Menu > Log Out.
3 Log on as another user and repeat the test. If the problem persists, it is related
to a root-level system file. If the problem does not recur, it is probably related
to a user-specific file; use the binary method to check the files in the User >
Library folder.
CHAPTER 2: CRASHING, QUITTING, AND FREEZING
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15
CHANGING THE PRINTER DRIVER
Chapter 3: Printing
If you are receiving unexpected output when you print, or perhaps an error
message (but not crashing), the information in this chapter will help you
determine the cause of the problem. Unexpected output may include pictures
printing at low resolutions, color projects printing in black and white, and fonts
printing incorrectly (see “Fonts” for information about font problems and
printing). This chapter also lists common printing problems and suggestions
for resolving them.
CHANGING THE PRINTER DRIVER
To test for a problem or conflict with the printer driver you are using, switch
to another printer driver. Different printer drivers may not have exactly the
same features as your current driver, but they should be adequate for testing.
CHANGING THE PRINTER DRIVER ON MAC OS X
To change the printer driver:
1 Open the System Preferences application (Applications > System Preferences).
2 Click Print & Fax.
3 Under the printer list, click the + button to add a different printer driver.
4 In Mac OS 10.4, choose the new printer’s name from the Selected Printer in
Print Dialog drop-down menu. In Mac OS 10.5, choose the printer’s name
from the Default Printer drop-down menu.
5 Close the System Preferences application and return to QuarkXPress. Repeat
the test. If the problem does not recur with the new printer driver, there may be
a conflict with the old driver or the old driver may be damaged. You should
be able to download or obtain a new or updated driver from the printer
manufacturer or from Apple®, or reinstall the driver.
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CHAPTER 3: PRINTING
CHANGING THE PRINTER DRIVER
CHANGING THE PRINTER ON WINDOWS
To change the printer on Windows:
1 Click the Start button on the Windows taskbar and choose Settings >
Printers and Faxes.
2 If necessary, choose File > Add Printer and use the wizard to select a
different printer.
3 Right-click the printer you want to use for testing and choose Set As Default.
Setting the printer as your default printer means that all applications will automatically print to this printer, so you may want to reset your default printer as
soon as you are finished testing.
4 Return to QuarkXPress. Repeat the test, verifying that the printer listed in the
Print dialog box (File > Print) is the one you just set as your default printer. If
the problem does not happen with the new printer driver, there may be a conflict with the old driver or the old driver may be damaged. You should be able
to download or obtain a new or updated driver from the printer manufacturer,
or reinstall the driver.
POSTSCRIPT ERRORS
A PostScript error is a message from your printer that indicates the project
cannot be printed in its current state. PostScript errors have two parts: The
error and the offending command (OFC). For example, a PostScript error
might be, “limitcheck; ofc: stroke.”
A PostScript error can be caused by a number of things, such as a font, a picture,
or a QuarkXPress element. A PostScript error does not necessarily mean that the
project or any of its components are damaged. The error might occur due to
memory conditions or driver problems.
Generally, the exact PostScript error is not crucial to troubleshooting; using
the steps for testing specific projects should identify the cause of the problem.
However, some PostScript errors are associated with fairly specific situations,
and knowing their causes can save you time when finding the problem.
You can use the PostScript Error Handler to quickly identify the problem.
To use the PostScript Error Handler:
1 Choose File > Print and click the Device pane.
2 Check PostScript Error Handler. If this is checked, your project will print
normally until it encounters a problem. The project stops printing immediately
before the problem element, but will print one more page that displays a
bounding box encompassing the problem element. The top of the page will
identify whether the error came from a picture box, a text box, a line, or another
element. This allows you to identify and determine how to deal with the element.
CHAPTER 3: PRINTING
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17
POSTSCRIPT ERRORS
COMMON POSTSCRIPT ERRORS
Below are some common PostScript errors and suggestions for preventing or
addressing them.
• “limitcheck; ofc: image or colorimage”
This error is generally caused by a TIFF picture. If the error occurs with a color
TIFF image, the error will be “ofc: colorimage.” Decrease the lpi (lines per inch)
using the Frequency drop-down menu (File > Print > Colors) or decrease the
TIFF’s dpi (dots per inch) in its source application or by using the Resolution
drop-down menu (File > Print > Device). You can also try unchecking Full
Resolution TIFF Output (File > Print > Pictures).
• “limitcheck; ofc: clip”
This error is usually caused by an EPS picture with an embedded clipping path.
Open the EPS file in the program that created it and simplify the path or
increase its flatness. If you have created a QuarkXPress clipping path using the
controls in the Item > Clipping tab, you can also increase the Smoothness
(Item > Clipping tab) of the clipping path, manually reduce its number of
points, or both.
• “limitcheck; ofc: stroke or fill”
This error is usually caused by a complex EPS file. Open the EPS file in its source
application and simplify it. Several applications allow you to increase the
flatness value of the EPS file or split long paths.
VMERRORS
Every PostScript output device has a built-in processor that translates PostScript
commands to the actual printed page. The processor in a printer relies on its
own internal RAM (Random Access Memory) to complete the translation.
Different PostScript printers have different amounts of installed RAM. If the
printer does not have enough RAM to render the page, a “VMerror” occurs.
Generally, the solution to a “VMerror” is to simplify the page, reduce the size
of the media (paper or film), or send the project to an output device with
more memory.
***
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Printing to non-PostScript printers can lower the quality of EPS picture output,
and many options in the Print dialog box will be unavailable.
CHAPTER 3: PRINTING
COMMON PRINTING PROBLEMS
COMMON PRINTING PROBLEMS
This section lists a number of common printing problems and offers suggestions
for addressing them. These solutions do not replace troubleshooting; rather,
they are steps to take before embarking on involved testing.
GRAPHICS PRINT AT LOW RESOLUTION
If you find that a particular picture is printing at lower resolution than expected,
or if several pictures are printing at low resolution, first try printing that picture
in a new project. If the picture prints correctly in a new project, try replacing the
picture in the original project.
If the picture does not print correctly in the new project:
1 Choose File > Print > Device tab.
2 Check the Resolution field. If the resolution is set correctly, you may want to
rescan the picture (if applicable) and reimport it into your QuarkXPress project.
***
Remember that the maximum resolution for printing is determined by the
resolution of the printer. If the printer’s maximum resolution is 600 dpi, you
cannot print at 1200 dpi.
If the picture is an EPS file:
1 Verify that the picture is printing to a PostScript printer.
2 Verify that you are using a PostScript driver. EPS pictures are intended for output to PostScript printers (using PostScript drivers). If you print an EPS file to
a non-PostScript printer, it may print at a resolution lower than the printer is
capable of.
3 If you are printing color separations, check the PostScript level setting for compatibility by choosing File > Print and then clicking the Advanced pane in the
Print dialog box. If your printer does not support PostScript level 3, change the
setting in the PostScript Level drop-down menu to PostScript Level 2.
***
Your LPI setting may also affect the apparent resolution of your printed graphics.
ORIENTATION PRINTS INCORRECTLY TO POSTSCRIPT PRINTERS
If a project is printing with an incorrect orientation, first try a new project
to see if the results can be reproduced in the new project. If the new project
prints correctly, check the settings in the original project by choosing File >
Print > Pages pane. Make sure the correct orientation is selected.
CHAPTER 3: PRINTING
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19
COMMON PRINTING PROBLEMS
If the settings are correct and the project still does not print correctly, try
changing the PPD. To change the PPD that a project uses:
1 Choose File > Print > Device tab.
2 In the Printer Description drop-down menu, change your PPD to Generic
B&W, Generic Color, or Generic Imagesetter for testing. If the project prints
with the new PPD, there may be a problem with the original PPD.
***
PPDs are created by printer manufacturers and are usually supplied with
PostScript printers. Contact the printer manufacturer for more information.
COLOR PROJECTS PRINT BLACK AND WHITE
This problem will often manifest itself as EPS files printing in color with
everything else in the project printing as black and white. This happens
because the contents of an EPS file cannot be manipulated by QuarkXPress,
but QuarkXPress can affect the contents of TIFFs in some ways. If you are
experiencing this problem:
1 Choose File > Print > Device tab.
2 Choose the PPD drop-down menu and make sure the PPD listed is a color PPD.
If the PPD listed is color, try changing to Generic Color as a test. If the Generic
Color PPD works, there may be a problem with the original PPD. You can
contact the printer manufacturer to obtain a new or updated copy of that PPD.
3 With QuarkXPress, PPDs do not control color output. Instead, users specify
output color settings through the Color pane of the Print dialog box, as well
as the Mode and Model settings in the Edit Output Setup dialog box (Edit >
Color Setups). If you continue to have output problems after adjusting your
PPD, adjust the output setup settings.
SLOW PRINTING TO NON-POSTSCRIPT PRINTERS
When QuarkXPress prints to a non-PostScript printer, it cannot use PostScript,
so it uses system components to rasterize the page for output. If there is not
enough memory to rasterize the page or enough drive space to store the resulting
raster file and send it to the printer, it can take a long time to print.
SLOW PRINTING ON MAC OS X
When you print QuarkXPress projects to a non-PostScript printer on Mac OS X,
QuarkXPress and Quartz (a screen language used by Mac OS X) each rasterize
certain elements. The resulting raster file must be stored (temporarily) on the
hard drive and sent to the printer.
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CHAPTER 3: PRINTING
COMMON PRINTING PROBLEMS
To help speed non-PostScript printing on Mac OS X:
1 Verify that as much drive space is available as possible, so that there is room
to store the raster file.
2 Make sure that other applications are not open, since open applications take up
RAM needed to send the file to the printer.
SLOW PRINTING ON WINDOWS
When an application is running on Windows, it creates a temporary file with
a .tmp (pronounced “temp”) extension. This file behaves almost as virtual
memory does, holding and shuffling changes as you work. When the application shuts down, the temporary files should be deleted automatically. However,
sometimes these files are not deleted. If there are many temporary files on your
system, it can significantly slow non-PostScript printing.
To remove temporary files:
1 Exit all open applications.
2 Click the Start button on your taskbar and choose Find Files or Folders. In the
Named field, enter *.tmp. This will locate all files with a “.tmp” file extension.
3 Click Find Now. If the number of temporary files found is large (more than 25),
select the found files in the Find window and delete them. However, you may
not want to delete any folders that may appear, as they may be the default
temporary directory.
If deleting the temporary files does not help, try defragmenting your hard
drive. When QuarkXPress rasterizes the pages, it may need a large amount
of continuous free space in order to create and send the raster file. If the drive
is fragmented, there may not be enough continuous free space to create the
files. Defragmenting the drive may create enough space for this to occur.
Additionally, defragmenting the drive is good maintenance.
To defragment your drive:
1 Exit all open applications. Click the Start button on the taskbar and choose
Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Defragmenter.
2 Select the drive you want to defragment, and click OK. You may receive an
alert stating that the drive is at a low level of fragmentation and doesn’t need
to be defragmented now. Continue defragmenting; even if the fragmentation
is low (5% or less) it could affect your printing.
Defragmentation may take some time, and it is not a good idea to run any
applications while the drive is being defragmented, so you may want to start
the process before a lunch break or meeting.
CHAPTER 3: PRINTING
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21
PRINTING ERROR CHECKLIST
PRINTING ERROR CHECKLIST
This section includes a sequence of checks for examining output results.
QUESTIONS TO ASK
1 Is the printer powered on?
2 Does the printer have paper and toner or ink?
3 Can the printer print a status page?
4 Is the printer connected to the local network and/or the computer
running QuarkXPress?
5 Can other computers print on the printer?
6 Can other applications on the computer running QuarkXPress print successfully?
7 Can QuarkXPress print any projects to the printer?
8 Can QuarkXPress print some pages in the problem project but not others?
9 Can QuarkXPress print the problem page or project when certain fonts, images,
PDFs, or EPS files are not included?
10 If a font, image, PDF, or EPS file is the problem, can the font, image, PDF,
or EPS print from other applications?
11 Can the problem project be printed with other output setups (for example,
composite RGB or CMYK)?
12 Can you print the problem project with a different printer?
13 If the printer is a PostScript printer, was a PostScript error reported?
14 If the problem generated a PostScript error, what is the name of the error and
what is the offending command (OFC)?
15 If the problem generated a PostScript error, is the error familiar? If so, what were
the conditions that generated the error in the past?
16 Can you print the problem project (or a similar project) with an earlier version
of QuarkXPress?
17 Can the problem project be printed to a PostScript file and converted to PDF
with Adobe® Distiller®?
18 If Adobe Distiller returns an error, what is the error name and
offending command?
19 If Adobe Distiller does not return an error, can you send the PostScript file
directly to the printer?
20 Can QuarkXPress export the problem project as a PDF file?
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CHAPTER 3: PRINTING
PRINTING ERROR CHECKLIST
21 If QuarkXPress can export the problem project as a PDF file, can the PDF be
viewed and printed from Acrobat?
22 Verify the following file sizes:
• the problem project
• related fonts, images, PDF, and EPS files
• the PostScript file generated from the problem project
• the PDF file generated from the problem project
23 Verify the timeframes for:
• opening the project in QuarkXPress
• printing the project (or, if it fails to print, the time elapsed before receiving
the error message)
• exporting the project as a PDF (or, if it fails to export, the time elapsed before
receiving the error message)
24 Was it possible to print an earlier version of the project without an error?
25 If so, what were the changes made to the project between successful output
and the time of the error message?
26 If the problem is not an error that prevents the project from being output, what
is the nature of the problem?
27 If the problem is a printing quality issue, what is the difference between
expected and actual output?
28 Does the problem happen consistently or intermittently?
29 Have you discovered any methods or techniques that seem to mitigate
the problem?
30 Does the problem happen only with a particular project or a class of projects?
31 Does the problem always happen the same way, or have there been multiple
quality problems and/or error messages?
CHAPTER 3: PRINTING
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23
SUPPORTED AND UNSUPPORTED FONTS
Chapter 4: Fonts
When fonts don’t work properly, it can affect screen display and printing
operations, and it’s not always clear which part of a font causes problems.
QuarkXPress provides font tracking functions, but since fonts are system-level
resources shared by separate applications, your success may hinge on your
font management abilities at the operating-system level. Mac OS and
Windows provide font controls, and many software vendors produce font
management utilities.
SUPPORTED AND UNSUPPORTED FONTS
As font manufacturers and technologies evolve, users enjoy more choices, but
they also have more variables to address when fonts cause problems.
FONTS NOT SUPPORTED
If you’re not sure of a font’s format, you can use a font management utility to
determine the font type. And on Mac OS, it’s more than a matter of format support. Some scripts are not supported by OS X Carbon font manager, such as
Devanagrai and Hebrew. If your font is a Mac Suitcase font and the FOND
resource ID is in this range of unsupported scripts, your font will not be loaded.
FONT FAMILIES VERSUS FONT INSTANCES
The fonts listed in the QuarkXPress font menus are font families, not font
instances. Most (but not all) font families typically have four font instances —
plain, bold, italic, and bold italic. Use the Style menu or type style button in
the Measurements palette to specify the correct font instance.
If a font instance is not available in a font family, QuarkXPress simulates that
instance. For example, if a font family does not include an italic font instance,
QuarkXPress simulates the italic instance by skewing the plain instance.
In some cases, a missing font instance is enough for QuarkXPress to display
alerts indicating that an entire font is unavailable.
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CHAPTER 4: FONTS
SUPPORTED AND UNSUPPORTED FONTS
FONT STORAGE
Particularly on Mac OS, storing fonts for multiple users on the same computer
can complicate the search for troubled fonts. You may find yourself asking
which version of a particular font is the root cause. One approach to simplify
font storage on Mac OS is to put all your fonts in the “Shared” folder within
the “Users” folder.
FONT MANAGEMENT UTILITIES
As the number of fonts and font management techniques continues to grow,
the options for font management utilities increase. These utilities can help
you identify and solve many font problems.
A corrupted font can cause QuarkXPress to crash. Using a font management tool
(or the binary search method), you can identify corrupted fonts. And many font
management utilities can repair damaged fonts.
If the text you type in a certain font does not display on-screen, it may indicate
a damaged font table or resource within a font. Again, a font management tool
may help identify and repair the damaged font.
FONT SUBSTITUTION IN PRINTED OUTPUT
When printing to a PostScript device, Type 1 PostScript fonts that are not
resident in the printer’s memory must be downloaded to the printer. If the
necessary Type 1 PostScript font is not downloaded, one of the following types
of font substitution — also known as Courier substitution — may occur:
FONT SUBSTITUTION WHEN PRINTING A PROJECT WITH
MISSING FONTS
When the alert “‘project_name’ uses fonts not installed on your system”
displays, you have two choices: List Fonts or Continue. Clicking the List Fonts
button allows you to replace any missing fonts with fonts installed on your
system. Clicking Continue preserves the missing font information in case the
project is transferred to another computer with the necessary fonts or you install
the fonts at a later time. However, if you print the project without replacing
the missing fonts, the printer-resident Courier font will print in its place.
If you do not click List Fonts when the alert displays, you can specify a font
replacement later by choosing Utilities > Usage > Fonts. Also, you can selectively download fonts through the Print, Save Page as EPS, and Export as
PDF dialog boxes.
CHAPTER 4: FONTS
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25
FONT SUBSTITUTION IN PRINTED OUTPUT
COURIER SUBSTITUTION IN EPS PICTURES
An Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file contains code that enables a PostScript
device to print the file at a high resolution. EPS files may also include information about the fonts used within the file. If a Type 1 PostScript font referenced
in the EPS cannot be located on either the computer or printer, Courier
substitution will occur.
When you import an EPS file into QuarkXPress, it is represented on-screen by a
low-resolution preview — you’re not actually viewing the PostScript information.
Even though your preview may display correctly on-screen, Courier substitution
can still occur when printing.
***
QuarkXPress automatically scans imported EPS pictures and will inform you
of missing fonts when printing the file.
COURIER SUBSTITUTION ON WINDOWS
If you are experiencing Courier substitution on Windows, start by generating
a list of fonts used within your project. To do so:
1 Open the problem project.
2 Choose File > Collect for Output. In the Collect for Output dialog box, check
Report Only. This will generate a report containing useful information about
the active layout. The report will be created as an XPress Tags file.
3 After generating the report, import the XPress Tags file into a new
QuarkXPress project.
4 Refer to the “Layout Fonts” section of the imported text file for a list of the fonts
used in your layout as well as in any imported EPS pictures.
***
If you are unfamiliar with the Collect for Output feature, please refer to
A Guide to QuarkXPress.
You also can determine the fonts used within a layout by choosing Utilities >
Usage > Fonts tab. All fonts used in the layout will be listed here. This list
includes fonts used in style sheets, even if the style sheets are not applied, but
it does not provide information about fonts used within EPS files.
Once you have a list, make sure all the fonts used in your layout are correctly
installed on your system. If you are using a font utility to manage your fonts,
consult the utility’s documentation for instructions on installing and
opening fonts.
If Courier substitution still occurs, the printer font files may be damaged.
You may need to reinstall the fonts from the manufacturer’s original disk(s)
or CD-ROMs.
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CHAPTER 4: FONTS
MESSAGES ASSOCIATED WITH DAMAGED PROJECTS
Chapter 5: Error messages
This chapter describes common error messages and suggestions for solutions.
If you are experiencing PostScript errors while printing, please see the
“PostScript errors” section in Chapter 3, “Printing.”
MESSAGES ASSOCIATED WITH DAMAGED PROJECTS
QuarkXPress projects, like any form of electronically stored data, can become
damaged. The damage can generate a wide variety of symptoms, but the
problem is the same: The data cannot be interpreted by the application or the
operating system.
All of the data that makes up a project is susceptible to damage, from objects the
file contains, such as the picture previews or QuarkXPress elements, to the file
structure itself, such as the header information or the Mac OS X resource fork.
Whether a file can be recovered depends on where the damage lies. If the
damage is to the essential project structure, chances are slim; if the damage
lies in an object within the file, the chances are better.
You can get an idea of what type of damage you’re dealing with by checking
the error message. Any of the following messages are usually an indication of
structure damage:
• Bad File Format [-70]
• Unexpected end of file encountered [-39]
• Out of Memory [-108]
BAD FILE FORMAT [-70]
This is a system-level error message that indicates a file header has become
damaged. Project damage at this level is very difficult to overcome.
As always, prevention is the best cure. Keep regular backups under a separate
name. Run a clean system, using only safe, commercially available extensions
and control panels. Allocate adequate memory to QuarkXPress. If a project
exhibits strange behavior, try to use the thumbnail drag procedure to move
pages to a separate project.
You can also try opening the project in QuarkXPress on another platform.
Since QuarkXPress for Mac OS X and QuarkXPress for Windows access the file
header differently, you may be able to open the project on one platform and
not the other.
CHAPTER 5: ERROR MESSAGES
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MESSAGES ASSOCIATED WITH DAMAGED PROJECTS
UNEXPECTED END OF FILE ENCOUNTERED [-39]
An unexpected end of file encountered [-39] means that either the end of file
marker is damaged or missing, or the end of file data does not reach the location
defined by the end of file marker.
Unfortunately, project damage at this level is very difficult to overcome. If the
file size after you receive the error message is dramatically lower than the original
size, the chances of recovery are minimal. You should use a backup copy if one
is available.
You can also try copying the file to a different volume. Also, try opening the
file on the other platform. This will sometimes rewrite the header information
on the new volume.
OUT OF MEMORY [-108]
Out of Memory [-108] can be somewhat deceptive. It may actually mean that
the application does not have enough memory to open the project. This could
occur if the application does not have enough memory allocated, there was
not enough system memory to allocate, or the computer simply does not have
the memory to accommodate the application or project.
This error message can also mean that the project is damaged. When
QuarkXPress identifies the file and begins to open the project, the application
encounters an error condition and cycles continuously through the project
until the available memory is used up. The error condition can occur in any
portion of the file: An item or its contents, the page level data, or in the
essential project structure itself.
This error message can sometimes be caused by a damaged font. Try disabling
the fonts and then opening the project.
RECOVERING DAMAGED PROJECTS
Files can become damaged if you save a project to damaged media or if the
media becomes damaged at a later time. Depending on the cause of the
damage or degree of damage, you may be able to recover the project.
To ensure that you do not lose valuable data, back up your projects at regular
intervals, preferably to external media or a different drive on your system.
You can also do the following to reduce the likelihood of file damage:
1 If a project exhibits strange behavior, try the thumbnail drag procedure to move
pages to a separate project.
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CHAPTER 5: ERROR MESSAGES
RECOVERING DAMAGED PROJECTS
2 Perform regular disk maintenance on your hard drive or other media using a
disk utility. Windows users should defragment their drive(s) regularly.
3 If you use the Auto Backup feature in QuarkXPress, one of the backup files may
be accessible. When this application preference is enabled (QuarkXPress/Edit >
Preferences > Save tab) and you have a damaged project, you can use the
backup file.
RECOVERING A DAMAGED PROJECT
If you do not have a backup copy of your project and want to try recovering the
project, try the steps below as well as the steps suggested for each error message.
1 Try isolating QuarkXPress. For instructions, see “Application-level problems”
in Chapter 2, “Crashing, quitting, and freezing.”
2 Try opening a copy of the project in a word processing application such as
Microsoft Word. This will strip out all project attributes and graphics, but it
may retain some usable text.
3 Try the steps outlined in “Project-level problems” in Chapter 2, “Crashing,
quitting, and freezing.” Not all steps may apply to your damaged project.
4 Try copying the project between volumes. By dragging the project to a different
disk or drive, you may be able to reopen the project after it is rewritten.
5 If you have access to QuarkXPress on another platform, try to open the project
on that platform. Sometimes, the project will open without any problem on a
different platform. Then, the project can be resaved and brought back to the
original platform.
MINOR REPAIRS
When you open a project, if you receive a message identifying damage that
requires minor repairs, QuarkXPress will attempt to remedy problems in the file
by addressing multiple issues. If a project opens successfully after QuarkXPress
repairs it, be sure to verify the following:
• The text flows as you expect, and the text attributes have not changed.
• The Colors dialog box displays all the colors in your project
• The H&Js dialog box includes all specifications (with the settings you specified).
• The Style Sheets dialog box also includes all style sheets as you specified them.
• All anchors in Web layouts retain their original content and position.
(An anchor is a marker attached to a specific place in a Web layout.)
CHAPTER 5: ERROR MESSAGES
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29
OTHER ERROR MESSAGES AND ALERTS
OTHER ERROR MESSAGES AND ALERTS
THIS PROJECT CAN’T BE OPENED BY THIS VERSION
OF QUARKXPRESS. [17]
The error message “This project can’t be opened by this version of
QuarkXPress. [17]” will display under one of the following circumstances. In
most cases, you can open the project with the proper version of QuarkXPress.
NON-QUARKXPRESS DOCUMENT
In QuarkXPress for Windows, you will receive the error message “This project
can’t be opened by this version of QuarkXPress. [17]” if you attempt to open a
non-QuarkXPress document using File > Open. You can also receive this error
message if you double-click a non-QuarkXPress document that was inadvertently
named with a QuarkXPress file extension, such as “.qxp” or “.qpt.”
See the File Type field in the File > Open dialog box to make sure the file you
are attempting to open is indeed a QuarkXPress project.
***
A project saved in QuarkXPress for Windows may not display in the File >
Open dialog box if it does not have the correct three-character extension.
A non-QuarkXPress document inadvertently saved on the Windows platform
with a QuarkXPress extension, such as “.qxp” or “.qpt,” may be assigned a
QuarkXPress project type and creator code when copied onto a Mac OS X computer or when copied to a Windows NT® server. When you attempt to open
this document in QuarkXPress for Mac OS X, you will receive the error message
“This project can’t be opened by this version of QuarkXPress. [17].”
COMPRESSED FILE
Files are often encoded or compressed for transmission over the Internet or to
conserve space. If you try to open a compressed or encoded file in QuarkXPress,
you will receive error message [17]. Be sure to decompress or decode files before
you attempt to open them in QuarkXPress.
DAMAGED PROJECT
Damaged projects can cause any number of error messages or alerts to display,
including the error message “This project can’t be opened by this version of
QuarkXPress. [17].” Try the steps in “Recovering damaged projects” to try to
recover the project.
DEMONSTRATION VERSION OF XTENSIONS SOFTWARE INSTALLED
A fully functional version of QuarkXPress may launch in demo mode if a
demonstration or evaluation copy of XTensions software is loaded. (An alert
will display if QuarkXPress is launched in demo mode.) Projects saved while
QuarkXPress is in demo mode will not open in a fully-functional version
of QuarkXPress. However, you can reopen the projects with the same
demonstration XTensions software loaded.
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CHAPTER 5: ERROR MESSAGES
OTHER ERROR MESSAGES AND ALERTS
For information about demonstration XTensions software functioning
with QuarkXPress, consult the manufacturer or the XTensions software
documentation.
PROJECTS SAVED IN NEWER VERSION OF QUARKXPRESS
Projects saved in newer versions of QuarkXPress cannot be opened using earlier
versions. However, this does not apply to minor revisions and patches made for
a particular version.
For example, a QuarkXPress 8.5 project could be opened in QuarkXPress 8.1
(or vice versa), but a QuarkXPress 9 project cannot be opened in QuarkXPress 8.
“SOME SETTINGS SAVED WITH THIS PROJECT ARE DIFFERENT
FROM THOSE IN THE XPRESS PREFERENCES FILE” (NONMATCHING
PREFERENCES ALERT)
When you open a project that contains kerning table or tracking table information, hyphenation exceptions, or frame data that does not match the current
settings in the QuarkXPress preferences files, QuarkXPress displays the
Nonmatching Preferences alert.
Settings in the following areas will trigger the Nonmatching Preferences alert
if they do not match the settings in the QuarkXPress preferences files:
• Customized kerning/tracking table information (Utilities > Kerning Table Edit
or Utilities > Tracking Edit)
• Customized hyphenation exceptions (Utilities > Hyphenation Exceptions)
• Customized dashes and stripes (Edit > Dashes & Stripes)
The top portion of the alert indicates which preference settings do not match
the current “XPress Preferences” file. For example, it may display “Some settings
saved with this project are different from those in the ‘XPress Preferences’ file.”
• Kerning/tracking does not match.
• Hyphenation exceptions do not match.
The lower portion of this dialog box offers two options:
• Use XPress Preferences. This option uses the information in the active
QuarkXPress preferences files. Any custom settings (including custom frames)
previously stored in the project will be discarded once the project is saved.
This may cause text within the project to reflow. Any changes made to the
kerning table, tracking table, and hyphenation exceptions will be saved to the
QuarkXPress preferences files and will be available for use with other projects.
• Keep Project Settings. This option uses the preference settings stored within
the project. All custom settings will be retained and text flow will remain the
same. In addition, any changes made to the kerning table, tracking table, and
hyphenation exceptions will be saved with that project only and not in the
QuarkXPress preferences files.
CHAPTER 5: ERROR MESSAGES
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31
OTHER ERROR MESSAGES AND ALERTS
If nonmatching preferences create a problem in your workflow, you might want
to create a master set of QuarkXPress preferences files and distribute it to
everyone in your group. Instruct all users not to modify the kerning or tracking
tables, the hyphenation exceptions, or the custom frame data. Also, keep a
backup copy of this master set of QuarkXPress preferences files.
QuarkXPress creates a set of QuarkXPress preferences files with default
settings if it can’t find a set of QuarkXPress preferences files file when the
application launches.
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CHAPTER 5: ERROR MESSAGES
CREATING A SYSTEM PROFILE REPORT
Chapter 6: Contacting Quark
Technical Support
After you try the troubleshooting techniques described in this guide, if
you still have a problem you can search the Technical Support Database on
www.quark.com for possible solutions. If you still require assistance, you should
gather information about your working environment in order to improve the
quality of your contact with Quark Technical Support and potentially provide a
quicker solution.
CREATING A SYSTEM PROFILE REPORT
You can generate a system profile report that lists key information about your
working environment with QuarkXPress.
You will need to identify the versions of key components — for example,
QuarkXPress, Mac OS, Windows, XTensions software, and printer files. You
will also need your serial number.
To generate a system profile report:
1 Display the QuarkXPress Environment dialog box by pressing Option before
choosing QuarkXPress > About QuarkXPress (Mac OS) or pressing Alt before
choosing Help > About QuarkXPress (Windows).
2 The QuarkXPress Environment dialog box displays the version number, patch
level, and build number for your copy of QuarkXPress, as well as your serial
number, the OS language, your default printer and printer driver, network
services, and a list of XTensions software modules.
To generate an operating system profile report for Mac OS:
1 Choose Apple menu > About This Mac. The About This Mac dialog
box displays.
2 Click More Info… in the About This Mac dialog box. The System Profiler
application launches with a window that displays detailed information about
your hardware, software, and network settings.
3 Choose File > Save As to create a separate file with this information. Format
options include XML, Rich Text Format (RTF), or plain text.
CHAPTER 6: CONTACTING QUARK TECHNICAL SUPPORT
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CREATING A SYSTEM PROFILE REPORT
To generate an operating system profile report for Windows:
1 Choose Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools > System Information.
The System Information window displays with information about your
hardware resources, components, software environment, Internet settings, and
Microsoft Office applications.
2 Choose File > Export. The Export As dialog box displays.
3 Choose a location for the text file.
SENDING FILES TO QUARK TECHNICAL SUPPORT
If your problem persists after using troubleshooting techniques on your
own, you’ll probably need to contact Quark Technical Support and send files.
Although you can send small files within e-mails to Quark Technical Support,
you will need to upload larger files.
1 Create a folder and copy your problem project to it.
2 Create a system profile, export it as a text file, and copy it to the folder created
in step 1.
3 If applicable, copy any crash log files to the folder.
4 Compress the file using one of the many file compression utilities for Mac OS
or Windows, for example, WinZip.
5 Upload the compressed file to the following location: euro.quark.com/en/
service/desktop/support/fileupload/.
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CHAPTER 6: CONTACTING QUARK TECHNICAL SUPPORT
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