Installing the Switch
Matrix V-Series
V2H124-24
FAST ETHERNET SWITCH
Hardware Installation Guide
P/N 9033924-01
Notice
ELECTRICAL HAZARD: Only qualified personnel should
perform installation procedures.
NOTICE
Enterasys Networks reserves the right to make changes in specifications and other information
contained in this document without prior notice. The reader should in all cases consult Enterasys
Networks to determine whether any such changes have been made.
The hardware, firmware, or software described in this manual is subject to change without notice.
IN NO EVENT SHALL ENTERASYS NETWORKS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL,
INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES WHATSOEVER (INCLUDING BUT
NOT LIMITED TO LOST PROFITS) ARISING OUT OF OR RELATED TO THIS MANUAL OR
THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN IT, EVEN IF ENTERASYS NETWORKS HAS BEEN
ADVISED OF, KNOWN, OR SHOULD HAVE KNOWN, THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH
DAMAGES.
Enterasys Networks, Inc.
35 Industrial Way
Rochester, NH 03866-5005
 2003 by Enterasys Networks, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Printed in Taiwan
Release Date: November 2003
LANVIEW is a registered trademark of Enterasys Networks. ENTERASYS NETWORKS,
NETSIGHT, MATRIX, WEBVIEW, and any logos associated therewith, are trademarks of Enterasys
Networks.
SPECTRUM is a registered trademark of Aprisma Management Technologies, Inc.
All other product names mentioned in this manual may be trademarks or registered trademarks of
their respective companies.
i
Notice
FCC NOTICE
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any
interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital
device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable
protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment.
This equipment uses, generates, and can radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed in
accordance with the operator’s manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference in which case the user
will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
WARNING: Changes or modifications made to this device which are not expressly approved by the
party responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
INDUSTRY CANADA NOTICE
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise emissions from digital
apparatus set out in the Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of
Communications.
Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques dépassant les limites applicables
aux appareils numériques de la class A prescrites dans le Règlement sur le brouillage radioélectrique
édicté par le ministère des Communications du Canada.
VCCI NOTICE
This is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for Interference by
Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this equipment is used in a domestic environment,
radio disturbance may arise. When such trouble occurs, the user may be required to take corrective
actions.
CLASS A ITE NOTICE
WARNING: This is a class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio
interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures.
ii
Notice
SAFETY INFORMATION
CLASS 1 LASER TRANSCEIVERS
THE SINGLE-MODE INTERFACE MODULES USE CLASS 1 LASER
TRANSCEIVERS. READ THE FOLLOWING SAFETY INFORMATION
BEFORE INSTALLING OR OPERATING THESE MODULES.
The Class 1 laser transceivers use an optical feedback loop to maintain Class 1 operation limits. This
control loop eliminates the need for maintenance checks or adjustments. The output is factory set, and
does not allow any user adjustment. Class 1 Laser transceivers comply with the following safety
standards:
• 21 CFR 1040.10 and 1040.11 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (FDA).
• IEC Publication 825 (International Electrotechnical Commission).
• CENELEC EN 60825 (European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization).
When operating within their performance limitations, laser transceiver output meets the Class 1
accessible emission limit of all three standards. Class 1 levels of laser radiation are not considered
hazardous.
When the connector is in place, all laser radiation remains within the fiber. The maximum amount of
radiant power exiting the fiber (under normal conditions) is -12.6 dBm or 55 x 10-6 watts.
Removing the optical connector from the transceiver allows laser radiation to emit directly from the
optical port. The maximum radiance from the optical port (under worst case conditions) is 0.8 W cm-2
or 8 x 103 W m2 sr-1.
Do not use optical instruments to view the laser output. The use of optical instruments to view
laser output increases eye hazard. When viewing the output optical port, power must be
removed from the network adapter.
WARNING: FIBER OPTIC PORT SAFETY
When using a fiber optic port, never look at the transmit laser while it is
powered on. Also, never look directly at the fiber TX port and fiber cable
ends when they are powered on.
AVERTISSMENT: PORTS POUR FIBRES OPTIQUES SÉCURITÉ SUR LE PLAN OPTIQUE
Ne regardez jamais le laser tant qu'il est sous tension. Ne regardez jamais
directement le port TX (Transmission) à fibres optiques et les embouts de
câbles à fibres optiques tant qu'ils sont sous tension.
iii
Notice
WARNHINWEIS: FASEROPTIKANSCHLÜSSE OPTISCHE SICHERHEIT
Niemals ein Übertragungslaser betrachten, während dieses eingeschaltet ist.
Niemals direkt auf den Faser-TX-Anschluß und auf die Faserkabelenden
schauen, während diese eingeschaltet sind.
SAFETY INFORMATION
UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES INC. (USA)
Important! Before making connections, make sure you have the correct Cord Set. Check it (read the
label on the cable) against the following specification list.
Operating Voltage
Cord Set Specifications
120 Volts
UL Listed/CSA Certified Cord Set
Minimum 18 AWG
Type SVT or SJT three conductor cord
Maximum length of 15 feet
Parallel blade, grounding type attachment plug rated
15 A, 125 V
240 Volts (Europe only)
Cord Set with H05VV-F cord having three conductors
with minimum diameter of 0.75 mm2
IEC-320 receptacle
Male plug rated 10 A, 250 V
SAFETY INFORMATION
WICHTIGE SICHERHEITSHINWEISE (GERMANY)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
iv
Bitte lesen Sie diese Hinweise sorgfältig durch.
Heben Sie diese Anleitung für den späteren Gebrauch auf.
Vor jedem Reinigen ist das Gerät vom Stromnetz zu trennen. Verwenden Sie keine Flüssigoder
Aerosolreiniger. Am besten eignet sich ein angefeuchtetes Tuch zur Reinigung.
Die Netzanschlu ßsteckdose soll nahe dem Gerät angebracht und leicht zugänglich sein.
Das Gerät ist vor Feuchtigkeit zu schützen.
Bei der Aufstellung des Gerätes ist auf sicheren Stand zu achten. Ein Kippen oder Fallen
könnte Beschädigungen hervorrufen.
Die Belüftungsöffnungen dienen der Luftzirkulation, die das Gerät vor Überhitzung schützt.
Sorgen Sie dafür, daß diese Öffnungen nicht abgedeckt werden.
Beachten Sie beim Anschluß an das Stromnetz die Anschlußwerte.
Verlegen Sie die Netzanschlußleitung so, daß niemand darüber fallen kann. Es sollte auch nichts
auf der Leitung abgestellt werden.
Alle Hinweise und Warnungen, die sich am Gerät befinden, sind zu beachten.
Notice
11.
12.
13.
14.
Wird das Gerät über einen längeren Zeitraum nicht benutzt, sollten Sie es vom Stromnetz
trennen. Somit wird im Falle einer Überspannung eine Beschädigung vermieden.
Durch die Lüftungsöffnungen dürfen niemals Gegenstände oder Flüssigkeiten in das Gerät
gelangen. Dies könnte einen Brand bzw. elektrischen Schlag auslösen.
Öffnen sie niemals das Gerät. Das Gerät darf aus Gründen der elektrischen Sicherheit nur von
authorisiertem Servicepersonal geöffnet werden.
Wenn folgende Situationen auftreten ist das Gerät vom Stromnetz zu trennen und von einer
qualifizierten Servicestelle zu überprüfen:
a. Netzkabel oder Netzstecker sind beschädigt.
b. Flüssigkeit ist in das Gerät eingedrungen.
c. Das Gerät war Feuchtigkeit ausgesetzt.
d. Wenn das Gerät nicht der Bedienungsanleitung entsprechend funktioniert oder Sie mit Hilfe
dieser Anleitung keine Verbesserung erzielen.
e. Das Gerät ist gefallen und/oder das Gehäuse ist beschädigt.
f. Wenn das Gerät deutliche Anzeichen eines Defektes aufweist.
15. Zum Netzanschluß dieses Gerätes ist eine geprüfte Leitung zu verwenden. Für einen Nennstrom
bis 6A und einem Gerätegewicht größer 3kg ist eine Leitung nicht leichter als H05VV-F, 3G,
0.75mm2 einzusetzen.
Der arbeitsplatzbezogene Schalldruckpegel nach DIN 45 635 Teil 1000 beträgt 70dB(A) oder
weniger.
v
Notice
ENENTERASYS NETWORKS, INC.
PROGRAM LICENSE AGREEMENT
BEFORE OPENING OR UTILIZING THE ENCLOSED PRODUCT,
CAREFULLY READ THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT.
This document is an agreement (“Agreement”) between You, the end user, and Enterasys Networks,
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TO THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT, RETURN THE UNOPENED PRODUCT TO
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IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT THIS AGREEMENT, CONTACT ENTERASYS
NETWORKS (603) 332-9400. Attn: Legal Department.
1.
LICENSE. You have the right to use only the one (1) copy of the Program provided in this
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You may not copy, reproduce or transmit any part of the Program except as permitted by the
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2.
OTHER RESTRICTIONS. You may not reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble the
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3.
APPLICABLE LAW. This License Agreement shall be interpreted and governed under the
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vi
Notice
component thereof, if such foreign produced direct product is subject to national security controls as
identified on the U.S. Commerce Control List or is subject to State Department controls under the
U.S. Munitions List.
5.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS. The enclosed Product (i) was
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Software-Restricted Rights Clause and its successors, and (iii) in all respects is proprietary data
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6.
EXCLUSION OF WARRANTY. Except as may be specifically provided by Enterasys in
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documentation and media).
ENTERASYS DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, OTHER THAN THOSE SUPPLIED TO
YOU BY ENTERASYS IN WRITING, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT
LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
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WRITTEN MATERIALS, AND ANY ACCOMPANYING HARDWARE.
7.
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ENTERASYS OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER
(INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF BUSINESS, PROFITS,
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NOT APPLY TO YOU.
vii
Notice
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
Application of Council Directive(s):
Manufacturer’s Name:
Manufacturer’s Address:
European Representative Address:
Conformance to Directive(s)/Product Standards:
Equipment Type/Environment:
89/336/EEC
73/23/EEC
Enterasys Networks, Inc.
35 Industrial Way
PO Box 5005
Rochester, NH 03867
Enterasys Networks Limited
Nexus House, Newbury Business Park
London Road, Newbury
Berkshire RG14 2PZ, England
EC Directive 89/336/EEC
EC Directive 73/23/EEC
EN 55022
EN 55024
EN 60950
EN 60825
Networking Equipment, for use in a
Commercial or Light Industrial
Environment.
Enterasys Networks, Inc. declares that the equipment packaged with this notice conforms to the
above directives.
viii
Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction
Overview
Switch Architecture
Network Management Options
Description of Hardware
10/100BASE-T Ports
Port and System Status LEDs
Stack Unit ID LCD
Power Supply Receptacles
Optional Media Extender Modules
Features and Benefits
Connectivity
Expandability
Performance
Management
Chapter 2: Network Planning
Introduction to Switching
Application Examples
Collapsed Backbone
Network Aggregation Plan
Remote Connections with Fiber Cable
Making VLAN Connections
Application Notes
Chapter 3: Installing the Switch
Selecting a Site
Ethernet Cabling
Equipment Checklist
Package Contents
Optional Rack-Mounting Equipment
Mounting
Rack Mounting
Desktop or Shelf Mounting
Installing an Optional Module into the Switch
Installing an SFP Transceiver
Connecting Switches in a Stack
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-3
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-8
1-8
1-8
1-8
1-9
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-6
ix
Contents
Connecting to a Power Source
Connecting to the Console Port
Wiring Map for Serial Cable
Chapter 4: Making Network Connections
Connecting Network Devices
Twisted-Pair Devices
Cabling Guidelines
Connecting to PCs, Servers, Hubs and Switches
Network Wiring Connections
Fiber Optic Devices
Connectivity Rules
1000BASE-T Cable Requirements
1000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet Collision Domain
100 Mbps Fast Ethernet Collision Domain
10 Mbps Ethernet Collision Domain
Cable Labeling and Connection Records
x
3-8
3-8
3-9
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-6
Contents
Appendix A: Troubleshooting A-1
Diagnosing Switch Indicators
Power and Cooling Problems
Installation
In-Band Access
A-1
A-1
A-1
A-2
Appendix B: Cables B-1
Twisted-Pair Cable and Pin Assignments
10/100BASE-TX Pin Assignments
Straight-Through Wiring
Crossover Wiring
1000BASE-T Pin Assignments
Fiber Standards
B-1
B-1
B-2
B-2
B-3
B-4
Appendix C: Specifications C-1
Switch Features
Management Features
Standards
Compliances
100BASE-FX Extender Modules
1000BASE-T Extender Module
1000BASE-T/SFP Module
Stacking Module
C-2
C-2
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-4
C-4
C-5
Glossary
Index
xi
Contents
xii
Tables
Table 1-1.
Table 1-2.
Table 3-1.
Table 4-1.
Table 4-2.
Table 4-4.
Table 4-5.
Table 4-6.
Table 4-3.
Table A-1.
Table B-1.
Table B-2.
Port Status LEDs
System Status LEDs
Serial Cable Wiring
Maximum 1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet Cable Length
Maximum 1000BASE-SX Gigabit Ethernet Cable Lengths
Maximum 1000BASE-LH Gigabit Ethernet Cable Length
Maximum Fast Ethernet Cable Lengths
Maximum Ethernet Cable Length
Maximum 1000BASE-LX Gigabit Ethernet Cable Length
Troubleshooting Chart
10/100BASE-TX MDI and MDI-X Port Pinouts
1000BASE-T MDI and MDI-X Port Pinouts
1-3
1-4
3-9
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-6
A-1
B-2
B-3
xiii
Tables
xiv
Figures
Figure 1-1.
Figure 1-2.
Figure 1-3.
Figure 1-4.
Figure 1-5.
Figure 1-6.
Figure 1-7.
Figure 1-8.
Figure 1-9.
Figure 1-10.
Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-2.
Figure 2-3.
Figure 2-4.
Figure 3-1.
Figure 3-2.
Figure 3-3.
Figure 3-4.
Figure 3-5.
Figure 3-6.
Figure 3-7.
Figure 3-8.
Figure 3-9.
Figure 4-1.
Figure 4-2.
Figure 4-3.
Figure B-1.
Figure B-2.
Figure B-3.
Front and Rear Panels
Port LEDs
System LEDs
Stack Unit LCD
Power Supply Receptacles
Single-Port 100BASE-FX Multimode Module
Single-Port 100BASE-FX Single-Mode Module
Single-Port 1000BASE-T Module
1000BASE-T/SFP Combination Module
Stacking Module
Collapsed Backbone
Network Aggregation Plan
Remote Connections with Fiber Cable
Making VLAN Connections
RJ-45 Connections
Attaching the Brackets
Installing the Switch in a Rack
Attaching the Adhesive Feet
Installing an Optional Module
Installing an SFP Transceiver
Connecting Switches in a Stack
Power Receptacles
Serial Port (DB-9 DTE) Pin-Out
Making Twisted-Pair Connections
Network Wiring Connections
Making Fiber Port Connections
RJ-45 Connector Pin Numbers
Straight-through Wiring
Crossover Wiring
1-1
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-6
1-6
1-7
1-7
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-8
4-2
4-3
4-4
B-1
B-2
B-3
xv
Figures
xvi
Chapter 1: Introduction
Overview
The Matrix V-Series V2H124-24 switch is a stackable Fast Ethernet switch with 24
10BASE-T / 100BASE-TX ports and two slots for 100BASE-FX, 1000BASE-T, or
combination 1000BASE-T/SFP uplink modules, or a stacking module. The
V2H124-24 also includes an SNMP-based management agent, which provides both
in-band and out-of-band access for managing the switch.
The V2H124-24 provides a broad range of powerful features for Layer 2 switching,
delivering reliability and consistent performance for your network traffic. It brings
order to poorly performing networks by segregating them into separate broadcast
domains with IEEE 802.3Q compliant VLANs, and empowers multimedia
applications with multicast switching and CoS services.
10/100M RJ-45 Ports
Stack Unit ID LCD
Port Indicators
Serial Console Port
System Indicators
Module Slots
Redundant Power Connector
Power Socket
Figure 1-1. Front and Rear Panels
Switch Architecture
The V2H124-24 employs a wire-speed, non-blocking switching fabric. This permits
simultaneous wire-speed transport of multiple packets at low latency on all ports.
The switch also features full-duplex capability on all ports, which effectively doubles
the bandwidth of each connection.
The V2H124-24 uses store-and-forward switching to ensure maximum data integrity.
With store-and-forward switching, the entire packet must be received into a buffer
and checked for validity before being forwarded. This prevents errors from being
propagated throughout the network.
The V2H124-24 includes two slots on the front panel for slide-in 100BASE-FX,
1000BASE-T, 1000BASE-T/SFP, or stacking modules. The stacking module allows
1-1
1
Introduction
up to eight units to be linked together and managed from a master unit using one IP
address.
Network Management Options
With a comprehensive arrange of LEDs, the V2H124-24 switch provides “at a
glance” monitoring of network and port status. The switch can be managed over the
network with a web browser or Telnet application, or via a direct connection to the
console port. The switch includes a built-in network management agent that allows it
to be managed in-band using SNMP or RMON (Groups 1, 2, 3, 9) protocols. It also
has an RS-232 serial port (DB-9 connector) on the front panel for out-of-band
management. A PC may be connected to this port for configuration and monitoring
out-of-band via a null-modem serial cable. (See Appendix B for wiring options.)
For a detailed description of the advanced features, refer to the Configuration Guide.
Description of Hardware
10/100BASE-T Ports
The V2H124-24 switch base unit contains 24 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX RJ-45 ports.
All ports support automatic MDI/MDI-X operation, so you can use straight-through
cables for all network connections to PCs or servers, or to other switches or hubs.
(See “10/100BASE-TX Pin Assignments” on page B-1.)
Each of these ports support auto-negotiation, so the optimum transmission mode
(half or full duplex), and data rate (10, or 100 Mbps) can be selected automatically. If
a device connected to one of these ports does not support auto-negotiation, the
communication mode of that port can be configured manually.
Each port also supports IEEE 802.3x auto-negotiation of flow control, so the switch
can automatically prevent port buffers from becoming saturated.
1-2
1
Description of Hardware
Port and System Status LEDs
The V2H124-24 base unit also includes a display panel for key system and port
indications that simplify installation and network troubleshooting. The LEDs, which
are located on the front panel for easy viewing, are shown below and described in
the following tables.
Port Status LEDs
Figure 1-2. Port LEDs
Table 1-1. Port Status LEDs
LED
Condition
Status
On/Flashing
Amber
Port has established a valid 10 Mbps network connection.
Flashing indicates activity.
Base Unit Ports
1~24
(Link/Activity)
On/Flashing Green Port has established a valid 100 Mbps network connection.
Flashing indicates activity.
Off
There is no valid link on the port.
1-3
1
Introduction
System Status LEDs
Figure 1-3. System LEDs
Table 1-2. System Status LEDs
LED
Condition
PWR
On Green
The unit’s internal power supply is operating normally.
On Amber
The unit’s internal power supply has failed.
Diag
Status
Off
The unit has no power connected.
On Green
The system diagnostic test has completed successfully.
Flashing Green
The system diagnostic test is in progress.
On Amber
The system diagnostic test has detected a fault.
RPU
Green
Lights steady to indicate that a redundant power unit is
attached and is in backup or active mode.
Off
There is no redundant power unit currently attached.
Stack
Flashing Amber
An initial state of stacking configuration upon powering
on.
Green
This switch is acting as the master unit in the stack.
Amber
This switch is acting as a slave unit in the stack.
Flashing Green
Indicates that the unit ID of each switch in the stack is
being displayed by port LEDs 1 to 8 (initiated by a CLI
command).
Link
N/A
This indicator is not currently implemented.
Duplex
N/A
This indicator is not currently implemented.
On/Flashing Amber
Port has established a valid 10/100 Mbps network
connection. Flashing indicates activity.
On/Flashing Green
Port has established a valid 1000 Mbps network
connection. Flashing indicates activity.
Off
There is no valid link on the port.
Module Ports
M1-M2
(Link/Activity)
1-4
1
Description of Hardware
Stack Unit ID LCD
The unit also includes a Stack Unit ID LCD that is shown in the following diagram.
Stack Unit ID LCD
Figure 1-4. Stack Unit LCD
If the Unit ID displays "1," it indicates that the switch is selected as the Master in the
stack, or that the switch is operating in a stand-alone configuration. Any other
number (2 to 8) indicates the switch is operating in slave mode in the stack.
Power Supply Receptacles
There are two power receptacles on the rear panel of the switch. The standard
power receptacle is for the AC power cord. The receptacle labeled “RPU” is for the
optional Redundant Power Unit (RPU).
Figure 1-5. Power Supply Receptacles
1-5
1
Introduction
Optional Media Extender Modules
100BASE-FX Multimode Module
100BASE-FX Multimode Module
V2H151-1M
Figure 1-6. Single-Port 100BASE-FX Multimode Module
Using multimode fiber optic cable, the 100BASE-FX port can be connected to a
remote site up to 2 km (1.24 miles) away. The 100BASE-FX module is fixed to
operate at 100 Mbps full duplex, and supports auto-negotiation for flow control. The
module is fitted with an SC connector.
100BASE-FX Single-Mode Module
100BASE-FX Singlemode Module
V2H151-1S
Figure 1-7. Single-Port 100BASE-FX Single-Mode Module
Using single-mode fiber optic cable, the 100BASE-FX port can be connected to a
remote site up to 20 km (12.4 miles) away. The 100BASE-FX module is fixed to
operate at 100 Mbps full duplex, and supports auto-negotiation for flow control. The
module is fitted with an SC connector.
1000BASE-T Module
1000BASE-T RJ45 Module
V2G121-1
Figure 1-8. Single-Port 1000BASE-T Module
1-6
1
Description of Hardware
Using Category 5, 5e, or 6 twisted-pair cable you can connect to another device up
to 100 m (328 ft) away. The 1000BASE-T module operates at 10, 100, and
1000 Mbps. At 1000 Mbps it operates at full duplex and supports auto-negotiation of
speed and flow control. At 10/100 Mbps it supports auto-negotiation of speed,
duplex mode (i.e., half or full duplex), and flow control. Note that you should first test
the cable installation for IEEE 802.3ab compliance. See “1000BASE-T Cable
Requirements” on page 4-5.
1000BASE-T/SFP Combination Module
V2G112-2
1000BASE Combo Module
Figure 1-9. 1000BASE-T/SFP Combination Module
This is a combination module, providing use of a Gigabit RJ-45 port or a Small Form
Factor Pluggable (SFP) transceiver slot. If an SFP transceiver (purchased
separately) is installed in the slot and has a valid link on the port, the shared RJ-45
port is disabled.
The 1000BASE-T RJ-45 port supports automatic MDI/MDI-X operation, so
straight-through cables can be used for all network connections to PCs or servers,
or to other switches or hubs. Using Category 5, 5e, or 6 twisted-pair cable you can
connect to another device up to 100 m (328 ft) away. The RJ-45 port operates at
1000 Mbps, with support for full-duplex mode and flow control.
SFP is a specification for compact, modular transceivers that are hot swappable.
The SFP slot supports 1000BASE-SX, 1000BASE-LX, or 1000BASE-LH
transceivers for fiber optic connections to remote devices. An SFP transceiver port
operates at 1000 Mbps, with support for full-duplex mode and flow control.
Stacking Module
V2STACK
Stacking Module
RX
TX
Figure 1-10. Stacking Module
1-7
1
Introduction
The module provides two 1 Gbps ports via USB Type-A connectors. The right port is
for transmit and the left port for receive. The module allows up to eight switches to
be linked together using stacking cables. The push button on the module enables
one switch in the stack to be selected as the master.
Features and Benefits
Connectivity
• 24 dual-speed ports for easy Fast Ethernet integration and for protection of your
investment in legacy LAN equipment.
• Auto-negotiation enables each RJ-45 port to automatically select the optimum
communication mode (half or full duplex) if this feature is supported by the
attached device; otherwise the port can be configured manually.
• Independent RJ-45 10/100BASE-TX ports with auto MDI/MDI-X.
• Unshielded (UTP) cable supported on all RJ-45 ports: Category 3 or better for
10 Mbps connections, Category 5 or better for 100 Mbps connections, and
Category 5, 5e or 6 for 1000 Mbps connections.
• IEEE 802.3 Ethernet, 802.3u Fast Ethernet, 802.3z and 802.3ab Gigabit Ethernet
compliance ensures compatibility with standards-based hubs, network cards and
switches from any vendor.
Expandability
• Optional single-port 100BASE-FX multimode and single-mode modules
• Optional single-port 1000BASE-T Gigabit module
• Optional combination 1000BASE-T/SFP Gigabit module, providing a choice of a
1000BASE-T UTP connection or an SFP transceiver fiber connection.
• Optional stacking module providing two USB ports for stacking up to 8 units.
Performance
•
•
•
•
•
•
Transparent bridging
Aggregate duplex bandwidth of up to 8.8 Gbps
Switching table with a total of 8K MAC address entries
Provides store-and-forward switching
Wire-speed filtering and forwarding
Supports flow control, using back pressure for half duplex and IEEE 802.3x for full
duplex
• Broadcast storm control
1-8
Features and Benefits
1
Management
• “At-a-glance” LEDs for easy troubleshooting
• Network management agent:
• Manages switch in-band or out-of-band
• Supports Telnet, SNMP/RMON and web-based interface
1-9
1
Introduction
1-10
Chapter 2: Network Planning
Introduction to Switching
A network switch allows simultaneous transmission of multiple packets via
non-crossbar switching. This means that it can partition a network more efficiently
than bridges or routers. The switch has, therefore, been recognized as one of the
most important building blocks for today’s networking technology.
When performance bottlenecks are caused by congestion at the network access
point (such as the network card for a high-volume file server), the device
experiencing congestion (server, power user, or hub) can be attached directly to a
switched port. And, by using full-duplex mode, the bandwidth of the dedicated
segment can be doubled to maximize throughput.
When networks are based on repeater (hub) technology, the maximum distance
between end stations is limited. For Ethernet, there may be up to four hubs between
any pair of stations; for Fast Ethernet, the maximum is two; and for Gigabit Ethernet
the maximum is one. This is known as the hop count. However, a switch turns the
hop count back to zero. So subdividing the network into smaller and more
manageable segments, and linking them to the larger network by means of a switch,
removes this limitation.
A switch can be easily configured in any network to significantly boost bandwidth
while using conventional cabling and network cards.
2-1
2
Network Planning
Application Examples
The V2H124-24 switch is not only designed to segment your network, but also to
provide a wide range of options in setting up network connections. Some typical
applications are described below.
Collapsed Backbone
The V2H124-24 is an excellent choice for mixed Ethernet and Fast Ethernet
installations where significant growth is expected in the near future. You can easily
build on this basic configuration, adding direct full-duplex connections to
workstations or servers. When the time comes for further expansion, just connect to
another hub or switch using one of the Fast Ethernet ports built into the front panel
or a Gigabit Ethernet port on a slide-in expansion module.
In the figure below, the switch is operating as a collapsed backbone for a small LAN.
It is providing dedicated 10 Mbps full-duplex connections to workstations and
100 Mbps full-duplex connections to power users and servers.
...
Servers
100 Mbps
Full Duplex
...
Workstations
100 Mbps
Full Duplex
Figure 2-1. Collapsed Backbone
2-2
...
Workstations
10 Mbps
Full Duplex
2
Application Examples
Network Aggregation Plan
With 24 parallel bridging ports (i.e., 24 distinct collision domains), the V2H124-24
can collapse a complex network down into a single efficient bridged node, increasing
overall bandwidth and throughput.
In the figure below, the 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX ports on the switch are providing
100 Mbps connectivity for up to 24 segments. In addition, the switch is also
connecting several servers at 1000 Mbps.
Server Farm
10/100 Mbps Segments
...
...
Figure 2-2. Network Aggregation Plan
2-3
2
Network Planning
Remote Connections with Fiber Cable
Fiber optic technology allows for longer cabling than any other media type. Using a
100BASE-FX multimode fiber (MMF) slide-in module, you can run a link up to 2 km.
A 100BASE-FX single-mode fiber (SMF) link can run up to 20 km. This allows the
switch to serve as a collapsed backbone, providing direct connectivity for a
widespread LAN.
A 100BASE-FX slide-in module can be used to interconnect remote network
segments. While an SFP transceiver in a 1000BASE-T/SFP module can be used for
a Gigabit fiber connection between floors in the same building, or can be used to
provide a link to other buildings in a campus setting.
The figure below illustrates this switch connecting multiple segments with fiber
cable.
Headquarters
100BASE-FX SMF
(20 kilometers)
Server Farm
Remote Switch
1000BASE-LX SMF
(5 kilometers)
Remote Switch
10/100 Mbps Segments
...
...
Figure 2-3. Remote Connections with Fiber Cable
2-4
Application Examples
2
Making VLAN Connections
VLANs can be based on port groups, or each data frame can be explicitly tagged to
identify the VLAN group to which it belongs. When using port-based VLANs, ports
can either be assigned to one specific group or to all groups. Port-based VLANs are
suitable for small networks. A single switch can be easily configured to support
several VLAN groups for various organizational entities (such as Finance and
Marketing).
When you expand port-based VLANs across several switches, you need to make a
separate connection for each VLAN group. This approach is, however, inconsistent
with the Spanning Tree Protocol, which can easily segregate ports that belong to the
same VLAN. When VLANs cross separate switches, you need to use VLAN tagging.
This allows you to assign multiple VLAN groups to the “trunk” ports (that is, tagged
ports) connecting different switches.
R&D
VLAN 1
Tagged
Ports
Tagged Port
Untagged Ports
Finance
VLAN 2
Testing
VLAN
aware
switch
VLAN
unaware
switch
R&D
Marketing
Finance
Testing
VLAN 3
VLAN 1
VLAN 2
VLAN 4
VLAN 3
Figure 2-4. Making VLAN Connections
Note: When connecting to a switch that does not support IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tags, use
untagged ports.
2-5
2
Network Planning
Application Notes
1.
Full-duplex operation only applies to point-to-point access (such as when a
switch is attached to a workstation, server or another switch). When the switch
is connected to a hub, both devices must operate in half-duplex mode.
2.
Avoid using flow control on a port connected to a hub unless it is actually
required to solve a problem. Otherwise back pressure jamming signals may
degrade overall performance for the segment attached to the hub.
3.
As a general rule the length of fiber optic cable for a single switched link should
not exceed:
• 1000BASE-SX/LX: 550 m (1805 ft) for multimode fiber or 5 km (3.2 miles) for
single-mode fiber.
• 100BASE-FX: 2 km (1.24 miles) for multimode fiber or 20 km (12.43 miles) for
single-mode fiber.
However, power budget constraints must also be considered when calculating
the maximum cable length for your specific environment.
2-6
Chapter 3: Installing the Switch
Selecting a Site
Switch units can be mounted in a standard 19-inch equipment rack or on a flat
surface. Be sure to follow the guidelines below when choosing a location.
• The site should:
• be at the center of all the devices you want to link and near a power outlet.
• be able to maintain its temperature within 0 to 40 °C (32 to 104 °F) and its
humidity within 5% to 95%, non-condensing
• provide adequate space (approximately two inches) on all sides for proper air
flow
• be accessible for installing, cabling and maintaining the devices
• allow the status LEDs to be clearly visible
• Make sure twisted-pair cable is always routed away from power lines, fluorescent
lighting fixtures and other sources of electrical interference, such as radios and
transmitters.
• Make sure that the unit is connected to a separate grounded power outlet that
provides 100 to 240 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz, is within 2.44 m (8 feet) of each device and
is powered from an independent circuit breaker. As with any equipment, using a
filter or surge suppressor is recommended.
Ethernet Cabling
To ensure proper operation when installing the switch into a network, make sure that
the current cables are suitable for 10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX operation. Check the
following criteria against the current installation of your network:
• Cable type: Unshielded twisted pair (UTP) or shielded twisted pair (STP) cables
with RJ-45 connectors; Category 3 or better for 10BASE-T and Category 5 or
better for 100BASE-TX.
• Protection from radio frequency interference emissions
• Electrical surge suppression
• Separation of electrical wires (switch related or other) and electromagnetic fields
from data based network wiring
• Safe connections with no damaged cables, connectors or shields
3-1
3
Installing the Switch
RJ-45 Connector
Figure 3-1. RJ-45 Connections
Equipment Checklist
After unpacking this switch, check the contents to be sure you have received all the
components. Then, before beginning the installation, be sure you have all other
necessary installation equipment.
Package Contents
• Maxtrix V-Series V2H124-24 switch
• Four adhesive foot pads
• Bracket Mounting Kit containing two brackets and eight screws for attaching the
brackets to the switch
• Power Cord—either US, Continental Europe or UK
• RS-232 console cable
• This Installation Guide
• Configuration Guide
Optional Rack-Mounting Equipment
If you plan to rack-mount the switch, be sure to have the following equipment
available:
• Four mounting screws for each device you plan to install in a rack—these are not
included
• A screwdriver (Phillips or flathead, depending on the type of screws used)
3-2
Mounting
3
Mounting
This switch can be mounted in a standard 19-inch equipment rack or on a desktop or
shelf. Mounting instructions for each type of site follow.
Installing Optional Modules: Before mounting the switch, you may want to install
optional modules. If you have purchased optional slide-in 100BASE-FX,
1000BASE-T, 1000BASE-T/SFP, or stacking modules, install these modules now,
following the instructions “Installing an Optional Module into the Switch” on page 3-5.
Rack Mounting
Before rack mounting the switch, pay particular attention to the following factors:
• Temperature: Since the temperature within a rack assembly may be higher than
the ambient room temperature, check that the rack-environment temperature is
within the specified operating temperature range. (See page C-1.)
• Mechanical Loading: Do not place any equipment on top of a rack-mounted unit.
• Circuit Overloading: Be sure that the supply circuit to the rack assembly is not
overloaded.
• Grounding: Rack-mounted equipment should be properly grounded. Particular
attention should be given to supply connections other than direct connections to
the mains.
To rack-mount devices:
1.
Attach the brackets to the device using the screws provided in the Bracket
Mounting Kit.
Figure 3-2. Attaching the Brackets
3-3
3
2.
Installing the Switch
Mount the device in the rack, using four rack-mounting screws (not provided).
Figure 3-3. Installing the Switch in a Rack
3.
If installing a single switch only, turn to “Connecting to a Power Source” at the
end of this chapter.
4.
If installing multiple switches, mount them in the rack, one below the other, in
any order.
Desktop or Shelf Mounting
1.
Attach the four adhesive feet to the bottom of the first switch.
Figure 3-4. Attaching the Adhesive Feet
3-4
3
Installing an Optional Module into the Switch
2.
Set the device on a flat surface near an AC power source, making sure there
are at least two inches of space on all sides for proper air flow.
3.
If installing a single switch only, go to “Connecting to a Power Source” at the
end of this chapter.
4.
If installing multiple switches, attach four adhesive feet to each one. Place each
device squarely on top of the one below, in any order.
Installing an Optional Module into the Switch
100BA
SE-FX
Single
mode
Modul
e
Figure 3-5. Installing an Optional Module
Caution: DO NOT install slide-in modules with the switch powered on. Be sure you
power off the switch before installing any module.
Note: The stacking module must only be installed in slot M1.
To install an optional module into the switch, do the following:
1.
Disconnect power to the switch.
2.
Remove the blank metal plate (or a previously installed module) from the
appropriate slot by removing the two screws with a flat-head screwdriver.
3.
With the module still in the anti-static bag, touch the metal frame of the switch to
prevent damage caused by static electricity discharge. Also, it is recommended
to use an ESD wrist strap during installation.
4.
Remove the module from the anti-static shielded bag.
5.
Holding the module level, guide it into the carrier rails on each side and gently
push it all the way into the slot, ensuring that it firmly engages with the
connector.
3-5
3
Installing the Switch
Installing an SFP Transceiver
1000
BASE
Com
bo M
odul
e
V2G1
12-2
Figure 3-6. Installing an SFP Transceiver
To install an SFP transceiver, perform the following steps:
1.
Consider your network and cabling requirements to select an appropriate SFP
transceiver type.
2.
Insert the transceiver with the optical connector facing outward and the slot
connector facing down. Note that SFP transceivers are keyed so they can only
be installed in one orientation.
3.
Slide the SFP transceiver into the slot until it clicks into place.
Note: SFP transceivers are hot-swappable. The switch does not need to be powered off
before installing or removing a transceiver. However, always first disconnect the
network cable before removing a transceiver.
Connecting Switches in a Stack
An optional Stacking Module ships with one stacking cable. Figure 2-2 shows how
the stack cables are cascaded between switches in a stack.
Note: The stacking module must only be installed in slot M1.
To connect up to eight switches in a stack, perform the following steps:
1.
Plug one end of a stack cable into the TX (right) port of the top unit
2.
Plug the other end of the stack cable into the RX (left) port of the next unit.
3.
Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each unit in the stack. Form a simple chain starting at
the TX port on the top unit and ending at the RX port on the bottom unit
(stacking up to 8 units).
3-6
3
Connecting Switches in a Stack
4.
Complete the stack connections by plugging one end of a stack cable into the
TX port on the bottom unit and the other end into the RX port on the top unit.
Receive
Transmit
Button pressed in
for Master mode
Stack Master
Slave
Slave
Top-to-bottom connection
Figure 3-7. Connecting Switches in a Stack
5.
Select the Master unit in the stack by pressing the push button in on only one of
the stacking modules. Only one switch in the stack can operate as the Master,
all other units operate in slave mode. If more than one switch in the stack is
selected as Master, or if no switches are selected, the stack will not function.
Note: The stacking feature requires that all stacking module ports be connected and the
switches powered on. If one stack link is not connected, or if a switch is powered
off, the stack will not function.
3-7
3
Installing the Switch
Connecting to a Power Source
To connect a switch to a power source:
1.
Insert the power cable plug directly into the AC receptacle located at the back
of the switch.
Figure 3-8. Power Receptacles
2.
Plug the other end of the cable into a grounded, 3-pin socket, AC power source.
Note: For International use, you may need to change the AC line cord. You must use a
line cord set that has been approved for the receptacle type in your country.
3.
Check the front-panel LEDs as the device is powered on to be sure the PWR
LED is lit. If not, check that the power cable is correctly plugged in.
4.
If you have purchased a Redundant Power Unit, connect it to the switch and to
an AC power source now, following the instructions included with the package.
Connecting to the Console Port
The DB-9 serial port on the switch’s front panel is used to connect to the switch for
out-of-band console configuration. The command-line-driven configuration program
can be accessed from a terminal or a PC running a terminal emulation program. The
pin assignments used to connect to the serial port are provided in the following table.
1
6
5
9
Figure 3-9. Serial Port (DB-9 DTE) Pin-Out
3-8
Connecting to the Console Port
3
Wiring Map for Serial Cable
Table 3-1. Serial Cable Wiring
Switch’s 9-Pin
Serial Port
Null Modem
PC’s 9-Pin
DTE Port
2 RXD (receive data)
<----------------------------
3 TXD (transmit data)
-----------------------------> 2 RXD (receive data)
5 SGND (signal ground) ------------------------------
3 TXD (transmit data)
5 SGND (signal ground)
No other pins are used.
The serial port’s configuration requirements are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Default Baud rate—9,600 bps
Character Size—8 Characters
Parity—None
Stop bit—One
Data bits—8
3-9
3
Installing the Switch
3-10
Chapter 4: Making Network Connections
Connecting Network Devices
The V2H124-24 switch is designed to be connected to 10 or 100 Mbps network
cards in PCs and servers, as well as to other switches and hubs. It may also be
connected to remote devices using the optional 100BASE-FX or 1000BASE-T/SFP
modules.
Twisted-Pair Devices
Each device requires an unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable with RJ-45 connectors
at both ends. Use Category 5, 5e or 6 cable for 1000BASE-T connections, Category
5 or better for 100BASE-TX connections, and Category 3 or better for 10BASE-T
connections.
Cabling Guidelines
The RJ-45 ports on the switch support automatic MDI/MDI-X pinout configuration, so
you can use standard straight-through twisted-pair cables to connect to any other
network device (PCs, servers, switches, routers, or hubs).
See Appendix B for further information on cabling.
Caution: Do not plug a phone jack connector into an RJ-45 port. This will damage the
switch. Use only twisted-pair cables with RJ-45 connectors that conform to
FCC standards.
4-1
4
Making Network Connections
Connecting to PCs, Servers, Hubs and Switches
1.
Attach one end of a twisted-pair cable segment to the device’s RJ-45
connector.
Figure 4-1. Making Twisted-Pair Connections
2.
If the device is a network card and the switch is in the wiring closet, attach the
other end of the cable segment to a modular wall outlet that is connected to the
wiring closet. (See the section “Network Wiring Connections.”) Otherwise,
attach the other end to an available port on the switch.
Make sure each twisted pair cable does not exceed 100 meters (328 ft) in
length.
Note: Avoid using flow control on a port connected to a hub unless it is actually required
to solve a problem. Otherwise back pressure jamming signals may degrade
overall performance for the segment attached to the hub.
3.
As each connection is made, the green Link LED (on the switch) corresponding
to each port will light to indicate that the connection is valid.
Network Wiring Connections
Today, the punch-down block is an integral part of many of the newer equipment
racks. It is actually part of the patch panel. Instructions for making connections in the
wiring closet with this type of equipment follows.
1.
Attach one end of a patch cable to an available port on the switch, and the other
end to the patch panel.
2.
If not already in place, attach one end of a cable segment to the back of the
patch panel where the punch-down block is located, and the other end to a
modular wall outlet.
3.
Label the cables to simplify future troubleshooting.
4-2
Twisted-Pair Devices
4
Equipment Rack
(side view)
Switch
Punch-Down Block
Patch Panel
Wall
Figure 4-2. Network Wiring Connections
4-3
4
Making Network Connections
Fiber Optic Devices
An optional slide-in 100BASE-FX module or 1000BASE-LX SFP transceiver may be
used for backbone or remote connections. A 1000BASE-SX or 100BASE-LX SFP
transceiver may also be for connecting to a high-speed server.
Each single-mode fiber optic port requires 9/125 micron single-mode fiber optic
cabling with an SC or LC connector at both ends. Each multimode fiber optic port
requires 50/125 or 62.5/125 micron multimode fiber optic cabling with an SC or LC
connector at both ends.
Warning: This switch uses lasers to transmit signals over fiber optic cable. The lasers are
compliant with the requirements of a Class 1 Laser Product and are inherently
eye safe in normal operation. However, you should never look directly at a
transmit port when it is powered on.
1.
Remove and keep the SC port’s rubber plug. When not connected to a fiber
cable, the rubber plug should be replaced to protect the optics.
2.
Check that the fiber terminators are clean. You can clean the cable plugs by
wiping them gently with a clean tissue or cotton ball moistened with a little
ethanol. Dirty fiber terminators on fiber optic cables will impair the quality of the
light transmitted through the cable and lead to degraded performance on the
port.
3.
Connect one end of the cable to the SC or LC port on the switch and the other
end to the port on the other device. Since SC and LC connectors are keyed, the
cable can be attached in only one orientation.
100B
ASEFX Sin
glemo
de
Modu
le
V2H1
51-1S
SC fiber connector
Figure 4-3. Making Fiber Port Connections
4.
As a connection is made, check the green Link LED on the switch
corresponding to the port to be sure that the connection is valid.
The 100BASE-FX fiber optic ports operate only at 100 Mbps, full duplex. You can
run a single-mode fiber link up to 20 kilometers (12.43 miles). However, note that
power budget constraints must also be considered when calculating the maximum
cable length for your specific environment.
4-4
4
Connectivity Rules
A 1000BASE-LX or 1000BASE-SX SFP fiber optic ports operate at 1000 Mbps full
duplex, with auto-negotiation of flow control. The maximum length for fiber optic
cable operating at Gigabit speed will depend on the fiber type as listed under
“1000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet Collision Domain” on page 4-5.
Connectivity Rules
When adding hubs (repeaters) to your network, please follow the connectivity rules
listed in the manuals for these products. However, note that because switches break
up the path for connected devices into separate collision domains, you should not
include the switch or connected cabling in your calculations for cascade length
involving other devices.
1000BASE-T Cable Requirements
All Category 5 UTP cables that are used for 100BASE-TX connections should also
work for 1000BASE-T, providing that all four wire pairs are connected. However, it is
recommended that for all critical connections, or any new cable installations,
Category 5e (enhanced Category 5) or Category 6 cable should be used. The
Category 5e and 6 specifications include test parameters that are only
recommendations for Category 5. Therefore, the first step in preparing existing
Category 5 cabling for running 1000BASE-T is a simple test of the cable installation
to be sure that it complies with the IEEE 802.3ab standards.
1000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet Collision Domain
Table 4-1. Maximum 1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet Cable Length
Cable Type
Maximum Cable Length
Category 5, 5e, or 6 100-ohm UTP or STP 100 m (328 ft)
Connector
RJ-45
Table 4-2. Maximum 1000BASE-SX Gigabit Ethernet Cable Lengths
Fiber Size
Fiber Bandwidth
Maximum Cable Length
Connector
62.5/125 micron
multimode fiber
160 MHz/km
2-220 m (7-722 ft)
LC
200 MHz/km
2-275 m (7-902 ft)
LC
50/125 micron multimode
fiber
400 MHz/km
2-500 m (7-1641 ft)
LC
500 MHz/km
2-550 m (7-1805 ft)
LC
4-5
4
Making Network Connections
Table 4-3. Maximum 1000BASE-LX Gigabit Ethernet Cable Length
Fiber Size
Fiber Bandwidth
Maximum Cable Length
Connector
9/125 micron
single-mode fiber
N/A
2 m - 5 km (7 ft - 3.2 miles)
LC
Table 4-4. Maximum 1000BASE-LH Gigabit Ethernet Cable Length
Fiber Size
Fiber Bandwidth
Maximum Cable Length
9/125 micron
single-mode fiber
N/A
2 m - 70 km (7 ft - 43.5 miles) LC
Connector
100 Mbps Fast Ethernet Collision Domain
Table 4-5. Maximum Fast Ethernet Cable Lengths
Type
Cable Type
Max. Cable Length
Connector
100BASE-TX Category 5 or better 100-ohm UTP or STP 100 m (328 ft)
RJ-45
100BASE-FX 50/125 or 62.5/125 micron core multimode 2 km (1.24 miles)
Multimode
fiber (MMF)
SC
100BASE-FX 9/125 micron core single-mode fiber (SMF) 20 km (12.43 miles)
Single-mode
SC
10 Mbps Ethernet Collision Domain
Table 4-6. Maximum Ethernet Cable Length
Cable Type
Maximum Length
Connector
Twisted Pair, Category 3 or better 100-ohm UTP
100 m (328 ft)
RJ-45
Cable Labeling and Connection Records
When planning a network installation, it is essential to label the opposing ends of
cables and to record where each cable is connected. Doing so will enable you to
easily locate inter-connected devices, isolate faults and change your topology
without need for unnecessary time consumption.
To best manage the physical implementations of your network, follow these
guidelines:
• Clearly label the opposing ends of each cable.
• Using your building’s floor plans, draw a map of the location of all
network-connected equipment. For each piece of equipment, identify the devices
to which it is connected.
• Note the length of each cable and the maximum cable length supported by the
switch ports.
4-6
Cable Labeling and Connection Records
4
• For ease of understanding, use a location-based key when assigning prefixes to
your cable labeling.
• Use sequential numbers for cables that originate from the same equipment.
• Differentiate between racks by naming accordingly.
• Label each separate piece of equipment.
• Display a copy of your equipment map, including keys to all abbreviations at each
equipment rack.
4-7
4
4-8
Making Network Connections
Appendix A: Troubleshooting
Diagnosing Switch Indicators
Table A-1. Troubleshooting Chart
Symptom
Action
PWR LED is Off
• Internal power supply may be disconnected. Check connections
between the switch, the power cord, the wall outlet.
PWR LED is Amber
• Internal power supply has failed. Contact your local dealer for
assistance.
Link LED is Off
• Verify that the switch and attached device are powered on.
• Be sure the cable is plugged into both the switch and corresponding
device.
• If the switch is installed in a rack, check the connections to the
punch-down block and patch panel.
• Verify that the proper cable type is used and its length does not exceed
specified limits.
• Check the adapter on the attached device and cable connections for
possible defects. Replace the defective adapter or cable if necessary.
Power and Cooling Problems
If the power indicator does not turn on when the power cord is plugged in, you may
have a problem with the power outlet, power cord, or internal power supply.
However, if the unit powers off after running for a while, check for loose power
connections, power losses or surges at the power outlet, and verify that the fans on
the unit are unobstructed and running prior to shutdown. If you still cannot isolate the
problem, the internal power supply may be defective.
Installation
Verify that all system components have been properly installed. If one or more
components appear to be malfunctioning (such as the power cord or network
cabling), test them in an alternate environment where you are sure that all the other
components are functioning properly.
A-1
A
Troubleshooting
In-Band Access
You can access the management agent in the switch from anywhere within the
attached network using Telnet, a web browser, or other network management
software tools. However, you must first configure the switch with a valid IP address,
subnet mask, and default gateway. If you have trouble establishing a link to the
management agent, check to see if you have a valid network connection. Then
verify that you entered the correct IP address. Also, be sure the port through which
you are connecting to the switch has not been disabled. If it has not been disabled,
then check the network cabling that runs between your remote location and the
switch.
Note:
A-2
The management agent accepts up to four simultaneous Telnet sessions. If the
maximum number of sessions already exists, an additional Telnet connection
will not be able to log into the system.
Appendix B: Cables
Twisted-Pair Cable and Pin Assignments
Caution:
DO NOT plug a phone jack connector into any RJ-45 port. Use only
twisted-pair cables with RJ-45 connectors that conform with FCC standards.
For 10/100BASE-TX connections, the twisted-pair cable must have two pairs of
wires. For 1000BASE-T connections the twisted-pair cable must have four pairs of
wires. Each wire pair is identified by two different colors. For example, one wire
might be green and the other, green with white stripes. Also, an RJ-45 connector
must be attached to both ends of the cable.
Caution:
Each wire pair must be attached to the RJ-45 connectors in a specific
orientation. (See “Cabling Guidelines” on page 4-1 for an explanation.)
The Figure B-1 illustrates how the pins on the RJ-45 connector are numbered. Be
sure to hold the connectors in the same orientation when attaching the wires to the
pins.
8
1
8
1
Figure B-1. RJ-45 Connector Pin Numbers
10/100BASE-TX Pin Assignments
Use unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) or shielded twisted-pair (STP) cable for RJ-45
connections: 100-ohm Category 3 or better cable for 10 Mbps connections, or
100-ohm Category 5 or better cable for 100 Mbps connections. Also be sure that the
length of any twisted-pair connection does not exceed 100 meters (328 feet).
The RJ-45 ports on the switch base unit support automatic MDI/MDI-X operation,
you can use straight-through cables for all network connections to PCs or servers, or
to other switches or hubs. In straight-through cable, pins 1, 2, 3, and 6, at one end of
the cable, are connected straight through to pins 1, 2, 3, and 6 at the other end of
the cable. When using any RJ-45 port on this switch, you can use either
straight-through or crossover cable.
B-1
B
Cables
Table B-1. 10/100BASE-TX MDI and MDI-X Port Pinouts
Pin
MDI-X Signal Name
MDI Signal Name
1
Receive Data plus (RD+)
Transmit Data plus (TD+)
2
Receive Data minus (RD-)
Transmit Data minus (TD-)
3
Transmit Data plus (TD+)
Receive Data plus (RD+)
6
Transmit Data minus (TD-)
Receive Data minus (RD-)
4,5,7,8
Not used
Not used
Note: The “+” and “-” signs represent the polarity of the wires that make
up each wire pair.
Straight-Through Wiring
If the twisted-pair cable is to join two ports and only one of the ports has an internal
crossover (MDI-X), the two pairs of wires must be straight-through. (When
auto-negotiation is enabled for any RJ-45 port on this switch, you can use either
straight-through or crossover cable to connect to any device type.)
EIA/TIA 568B RJ-45 Wiring Standard
10/100BASE-TX Straight-through Cable
White/Orange Stripe
Orange
End A
White/Green Stripe
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Green
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
End B
Figure B-2. Straight-through Wiring
Crossover Wiring
If the twisted-pair cable is to join two ports and either both ports are labeled with an
“X” (MDI-X) or neither port is labeled with an “X” (MDI), a crossover must be
implemented in the wiring. (When auto-negotiation is enabled for any RJ-45 port on
this switch, you can use either straight-through or crossover cable to connect to any
device type.)
B-2
Twisted-Pair Cable and Pin Assignments
B
EIA/TIA 568B RJ-45 Wiring Standard
10/100BASE-TX Crossover Cable
White/Orange Stripe
Orange
End A
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
White/Green Stripe
Green
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
End B
Figure B-3. Crossover Wiring
1000BASE-T Pin Assignments
All 1000BASE-T ports support automatic MDI/MDI-X operation, so you can use
straight-through cables for all network connections to PCs or servers, or to other
switches or hubs.
The table below shows the 1000BASE-T MDI and MDI-X port pinouts. These ports
require that all four pairs of wires be connected. Note that for 1000BASE-T
operation, all four pairs of wires are used for both transmit and receive.
Use 100-ohm Category 5, 5e or 6 unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) or shielded
twisted-pair (STP) cable for 1000BASE-T connections. Also be sure that the length
of any twisted-pair connection does not exceed 100 meters (328 feet).
Table B-2. 1000BASE-T MDI and MDI-X Port Pinouts
Pin
MDI Signal Name
MDI-X Signal Name
1
Bi-directional Data One Plus (BI_D1+)
Bi-directional Data Two Plus (BI_D2+)
2
Bi-directional Data One Minus (BI_D1-)
Bi-directional Data Two Minus (BI_D2-)
3
Bi-directional Data Two Plus (BI_D2+)
Bi-directional Data One Plus (BI_D1+)
4
Bi-directional Data Three Plus (BI_D3+)
Bi-directional Data Four Plus (BI_D4+)
5
Bi-directional Data Three Minus (BI_D3-)
Bi-directional Data Four Minus (BI_D4-)
6
Bi-directional Data Two Minus (BI_D2-)
Bi-directional Data One Minus (BI_D1-)
7
Bi-directional Data One Plus (BI_D4+)
Bi-directional Data One Plus (BI_D3+)
8
Bi-directional Data Four Minus (BI_D4-)
Bi-directional Data Three Minus (BI_D3-)
Cable Testing for Existing Category 5 Cable
Installed Category 5 cabling must pass tests for Attenuation, Near-End Crosstalk
(NEXT), and Far-End Crosstalk (FEXT). This cable testing information is specified in
the ANSI/TIA/EIA-TSB-67 standard. Additionally, cables must also pass test
parameters for Return Loss and Equal-Level Far-End Crosstalk (ELFEXT). These
B-3
B
Cables
tests are specified in the ANSI/TIA/EIA-TSB-95 Bulletin, “The Additional
Transmission Performance Guidelines for 100 Ohm 4-Pair Category 5 Cabling.”
Note that when testing your cable installation, be sure to include all patch cables
between switches and end devices.
Adjusting Existing Category 5 Cabling to Run 1000BASE-T
If your existing Category 5 installation does not meet one of the test parameters for
1000BASE-T, there are basically three measures that can be applied to try and
correct the problem:
1.
Replace any Category 5 patch cables with high-performance Category 5e or
Category 6 cables.
2.
Reduce the number of connectors used in the link.
3.
Reconnect some of the connectors in the link.
Fiber Standards
The current TIA (Telecommunications Industry Association) 568-A specification on
optical fiber cabling consists of one recognized cable type for horizontal subsytems
and two cable types for backbone subsystems.
Horizontal 62.5/125 micron multimode (two fibers per outlet).
Backbone 62.5/125 micron multimode or single-mode.
TIA 568-B will allow the use of 50/125 micron multimode optical fiber in both the
horizontal and backbone in addition to the types listed above. All optical fiber
components and installation practices must meet applicable building and safety
codes.
B-4
Appendix C: Specifications
Physical Characteristics
Ports
24 10/100BASE-TX, with auto-negotiation
Media Slots
2 slots for optional 100BASE-FX, 1000BASE-T, 1000BASE-T/SFP, or
stacking modules
Network Interface
Ports 1-24: RJ-45 connector, auto MDI/X
10BASE-T: RJ-45 (100-ohm, UTP cable; Categories 3 or better)
100BASE-TX: RJ-45 (100-ohm, UTP cable; Category 5 or better)
Buffer Architecture
8 Mbytes
Aggregate Bandwidth
8.8 Gbps
Switching Database
8K MAC address entries
LEDs
System: PWR, Diag
Ports: Link/Activity
Weight
3.08kg (6lbs 13oz)
Size
44.0 x 32.4 x 4.3 cm (17.32 x 12.8 x 1.69 in.)
Temperature
Operating: 0°C to 40°C (32°F to 104°F)
Storage: -40°C to 70°C (-40°F to 158°F)
Humidity
Operating: 5% to 95% (non-condensing)
C-1
C
Specifications
Power Supply
Internal, auto-ranging transformer: 100 to 240 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz
External, supports connection for redundant power supply
Power Consumption
70 Watts maximum
Maximum Current
1.2 A @ 110 VAC
0.6 A @ 240 VAC
Switch Features
Forwarding Mode
Store-and-forward
Throughput
Wire speed
Flow Control
Full Duplex: IEEE 802.3x
Half Duplex: Back pressure
Management Features
In-Band Management
Telnet, or SNMP manager
Out-of-Band Management
RS-232 DB-9 console port
Software Loading
TFTP in-band, or XModem out-of-band
MIB Support
MIB II (RFC1213), Bridge MIB (RFC 1493, without Static Table)
C-2
Standards
C
Standards
IEEE 802.3 Ethernet
IEEE 802.3u Fast Ethernet
IEEE 802.3z and 802.3ab Gigabit Ethernet
IEEE 802.1D (Bridging)
IEEE 802.3x full-duplex flow control
ISO/IEC 8802-3
Compliances
Emissions
Industry Canada Class A
EN55022 (CISPR 22) Class A
EN 61000-3-2/3
FCC Class A
VCCI Class A
C-Tick - AS/NZS 3548 (1995) Class A
Immunity
EN 61000-4-2/3/4/5/6/8/11
Safety
CSA/CUS (CSA 22.2.950 & UL 1950)
EN60950 (TÜV/GS)
IEC 60950 (CB)
100BASE-FX Extender Modules
Ports
1 100BASE-FX, SC connector
Communication Speed
100 Mbps
Communication Mode
Full duplex
C-3
C
Specifications
Network Interface
Single-mode transceiver: 9/125 micron single-mode fiber cable
Multimode transceiver: 50/125 or 62.5/125 micron multimode fiber cable
Standards
IEEE 802.3u Fast Ethernet
ISO/IEC 8802-3
1000BASE-T Extender Module
Ports
1 1000BASE-T, RJ-45 connector
Communication Speed
10, 100, and 1000 Mbps
Communication Mode
Full duplex only at 1000 Mbps
Full and half duplex at 10/100 Mbps
Network Interface
RJ-45 (100-ohm, UTP cable; Category 5, 5e, or 6)
Standards
IEEE 802.3ab Gigabit Ethernet
IEEE 802.3u Fast Ethernet
IEEE 802.3 Ethernet
1000BASE-T/SFP Module
Ports
1 1000BASE-T, RJ-45 connector
1 slot for SFP transceivers
Communication Speed
10, 100, and 1000 Mbps
Communication Mode
Full duplex only at 1000 Mbps
Full and half duplex at 10/100 Mbps
C-4
Stacking Module
C
Standards
IEEE 802.3z Gigabit Ethernet
IEEE 802.3ab Gigabit Ethernet
IEEE 802.3u Fast Ethernet
IEEE 802.3 Ethernet
Stacking Module
Ports
2 USB Type-A ports
C-5
C
C-6
Specifications
Glossary
10BASE-T
IEEE 802.3 specification for 10 Mbps Ethernet over two pairs of Category 3, 4, or 5
UTP cable.
100BASE-FX
IEEE 802.3 specification for 100 Mbps Ethernet over two strands of 50/125, 62.5/
125 micron, or 9/125 micron core fiber cable.
100BASE-TX
IEEE 802.3u specification for 100 Mbps Ethernet over two pairs of Category 5 UTP
cable.
1000BASE-LX
IEEE 802.3z specification for Gigabit Ethernet over two strands of 50/125, 62.5/125
or 9/125 micron core fiber cable.
1000BASE-T
IEEE 802.3ab specification for Gigabit Ethernet over 100-ohm Category 5, 5e or 6
twisted-pair cable (using all four wire pairs).
Auto-Negotiation
Signalling method allowing each node to select its optimum operational mode (e.g.,
speed and duplex mode) based on the capabilities of the node to which it is
connected.
Bandwidth
The difference between the highest and lowest frequencies available for network
signals. Also synonymous with wire speed, the actual speed of the data
transmission along the cable.
Collision
A condition in which packets transmitted over the cable interfere with each other.
Their interference makes both signals unintelligible.
Collision Domain
Single CSMA/CD LAN segment.
CSMA/CD
CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect) is the communication
method employed by Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, and Gigabit Ethernet.
Glossary-1
Glossary
End Station
A workstation, server, or other device that does not forward traffic.
Ethernet
A network communication system developed and standardized by DEC, Intel, and
Xerox, using baseband transmission, CSMA/CD access, logical bus topology, and
coaxial cable. The successor IEEE 802.3 standard provides for integration into the
OSI model and extends the physical layer and media with repeaters and
implementations that operate on fiber, thin coax and twisted-pair cable.
Fast Ethernet
A 100 Mbps network communication system based on Ethernet and the CSMA/CD
access method.
Gigabit Ethernet
A 1000 Mbps network communication system based on Ethernet and the CSMA/CD
access method.
Full Duplex
Transmission method that allows two network devices to transmit and receive
concurrently, effectively doubling the bandwidth of that link.
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers.
IEEE 802.3
Defines carrier sense multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD) access
method and physical layer specifications.
IEEE 802.3ab
Defines CSMA/CD access method and physical layer specifications for
1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet.
IEEE 802.3u
Defines CSMA/CD access method and physical layer specifications for
100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet.
IEEE 802.3x
Defines Ethernet frame start/stop requests and timers used for flow control on
full-duplex links.
Glossary-2
Glossary
IEEE 802.3z
Defines CSMA/CD access method and physical layer specifications for 1000BASE
Gigabit Ethernet.
LAN Segment
Separate LAN or collision domain.
LED
Light emitting diode used for monitoring a device or network condition.
Local Area Network (LAN)
A group of interconnected computer and support devices.
Modal Bandwidth
Bandwidth for multimode fiber is referred to as modal bandwidth because it varies
with the modal field (or core diameter) of the fiber. Modal bandwidth is specified in
units of MHz per km, which indicates the amount of bandwidth supported by the fiber
for a one km distance.
Media Access Control (MAC)
A portion of the networking protocol that governs access to the transmission
medium, facilitating the exchange of data between network nodes.
MIB
An acronym for Management Information Base. It is a set of database objects that
contains information about the device.
Network Diameter
Wire distance between two end stations in the same collision domain.
RJ-45 Connector
A connector for twisted-pair wiring.
Switched Ports
Ports that are on separate collision domains or LAN segments.
TIA
Telecommunications Industry Association
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
Protocol suite that includes TCP as the primary transport protocol, and IP as the
network layer protocol.
Glossary-3
Glossary
UTP
Unshielded twisted-pair cable.
Virtual LAN (VLAN)
A Virtual LAN is a collection of network nodes that share the same collision domain
regardless of their physical location or connection point in the network. A VLAN
serves as a logical workgroup with no physical barriers, allowing users to share
information and resources as though located on the same LAN.
Glossary-4
Index
Numerics
10 Mbps connectivity rules 4-6
100 Mbps connectivity rules 4-6
1000 Mbps connectivity rules 4-5
1000BASE-SX connections 4-4
1000BASE-T
modules 1-6, 1-7
100BASE cable lengths 4-6
100BASE-FX
modules 1-6
100BASE-TX ports 1-2
10BASE cable lengths 4-6
10BASE-T ports 1-2
A
adhesive feet, attaching 3-4
air flow requirements 3-1
applications
central wiring closet 2-3
collapsed backbone 2-2
layer 3 routing 2-5
remote connections with fiber 2-4
VLAN connections 2-5
B
console port 1-2
pin assignments 3-8
contents of package 3-2
cooling problems A-1
cord sets, international 3-8
D
desktop mounting 3-4
device connections 4-1
E
electrical interference, avoiding 3-1
equipment checklist 3-2
Ethernet connectivity rules 4-6
F
Fast Ethernet connectivity rules 4-6
features C-2
management 1-9
switch 1-8
fiber cables 4-4
flow control, IEEE 802.3x 1-2
front panel of switch 1-1
full duplex connectivity 2-1
brackets, attaching 3-3
buffer size C-1
buffers, saturation of 1-2
G
C
H
cable
Ethernet cable compatibility 3-1
fiber standards B-4
labeling and connection records 4-6
lengths 4-6
cleaning fiber terminators 4-4
compliances
EMC C-3
safety C-3
connectivity rules
10 Mbps 4-6
100 Mbps 4-6
1000 Mbps 4-5
Gigabit Ethernet cable lengths 4-5
grounding for racks 3-3
hot-swap, SFP 3-6
I
IEEE 802.3 Ethernet 1-8
IEEE 802.3u Fast Ethernet 1-8
IEEE 802.3x flow control 1-2
IEEE 802.3z Gigabit Ethernet 1-8
indicators, LED 1-3
installation
connecting devices to the switch 4-2
desktop or shelf mounting 3-4
installing optional modules 3-3
network wiring connections 4-2
Index-1
Index
port connections 4-1, 4-4
power requirements 3-1
problems A-1
rack mounting 3-3
SFP transceivers 3-6
site requirements 3-1
L
laser safety iii, 4-4
LED indicators
Diag 1-4
Duplex 1-4
Link 1-4
Power 1-4
problems A-1
Stack 1-4
location requirements 3-1
M
management
agent 1-2
features 1-9, C-2
out-of-band 1-2
SNMP 1-2
web-based 1-2
Maximum Fast Ethernet Cable
Distance 4-6
MIB support C-2
modules
1000BASE-T 1-6, 1-7, C-4
100BASE-FX 1-6, C-3
mounting the switch
in a rack 3-3
on a desktop or shelf 3-4
multimode fiber optic cables 4-4
N
network
connections 4-1, 4-4
O
optional modules
installation 3-3
out-of-band management 1-2
Index-2
P
package contents 3-2
pin assignments B-1
console port 3-8
DB-9 3-8
port saturation 1-2
port-based VLANs 2-5
ports, connecting to 4-1, 4-4
power, connecting to 3-8
problems, troubleshooting A-1
R
rack mounting 3-3
rear panel of switch 1-1
rear panel receptacles 1-5
RJ-45 port 1-2
connections 4-1
pinouts B-3
RMON 1-2
RS-232 port 1-2
rubber foot pads, attaching 3-4
S
SC port connections 4-4
screws for rack mounting 3-2
serial
cable 1-2
port 1-2
single-mode fiber optic cables 4-4
site selelction 3-1
SNMP agent 1-2
Spanning Tree Protocol 2-5
specifications
1000BASE-X GBIC module C-5
compliances C-2
environmental C-1
physical C-1
power C-2
Stack Unit ID LED 1-5
standards
compliance C-2
IEEE C-3
status LEDs 1-3
surge suppressor, using 3-1
switch architecture 1-1
Index
switching
introduction to 2-1
method 1-1
power and cooling problems A-1
switch indicators A-1
twisted-pair connections 4-1
T
V
tags
VLAN 2-5
Telnet A-2
temperature within a rack 3-3
troubleshooting
in-band access A-2
VLANs 2-5
tagging 2-5
W
web-based management 1-2
Index-3
Index
Index-4
150200039300A R01
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