UFC 3-580-01 Telecommunications Interior Infrastructure Planning

UFC 3-580-01 Telecommunications Interior Infrastructure Planning
UFC 3-580-01
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Change 1, 01 Jun 2016
UNIFIED FACILITIES CRITERIA (UFC)
TELECOMMUNICATIONS INTERIOR
INFRASTRUCTURE
PLANNING AND DESIGN
APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED
UNIFIED FACILITIES CRITERIA (UFC)
UFC 3-580-01
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Change 1, 01 Jun 2016
TELECOMMUNICATIONS
INTERIOR INFRASTRUCTURE
Any copyrighted material included in this UFC is identified at its point of use.
Use of the copyrighted material apart from this UFC must have the permission of the
copyright holder.
U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS (Preparing Activity)
NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING COMMAND
AIR FORCE CIVIL ENGINEER CENTER
Record of Changes (changes are indicated by \1\ ... /1/)
Change No.
1
Date
1 Jun 2016
Location
Updated references 2-2; defined fiber optic adapter and
connector requirements 2-6.1.3.1; defined CATV cabling
requirements 2-8.2; updated URL link 4-2.2; clarified
Army outside plant requirements 4-2.6.4. Modified
paragraphs 2-8.1 and 2-9.1.
This UFC supersedes MIL-HDBK-1012/3, dated MAY 1996, UFC 3-580-10, and UFC
3-580-01 dated June 2007.
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FOREWORD
The Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) system is prescribed by MIL-STD 3007 and provides
planning, design, construction, sustainment, restoration, and modernization criteria, and applies
to the Military Departments, the Defense Agencies, and the Department of Defense (DoD) Field
Activities in accordance with USD (AT&L) Memorandum dated 29 May 2002. UFC will be used
for all DoD projects and work for other customers where appropriate. All construction outside of
the United States is also governed by Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA), Host Nation
Funded Construction Agreements (HNFA), and in some instances, Bilateral Infrastructure
Agreements (BIA). Therefore, the acquisition team must ensure compliance with the most
stringent of the UFC, the SOFA, the HNFA, and the BIA, as applicable.
UFC are living documents and will be periodically reviewed, updated, and made available to
users as part of the Services’ responsibility for providing technical criteria for military
construction. Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (HQUSACE), Naval Facilities
Engineering Command (NAVFAC), and Air Force Civil Engineer Center (AFCEC) are
responsible for administration of the UFC system. Defense agencies should contact the
preparing service for document interpretation and improvements. Technical content of UFC is
the responsibility of the cognizant DoD working group. Recommended changes with supporting
rationale should be sent to the respective service proponent office by the following electronic
form: Criteria Change Request. The form is also accessible from the Internet sites listed below.
UFC are effective upon issuance and are distributed only in electronic media from the following
source:
• Whole Building Design Guide web site http://dod.wbdg.org/.
Hard copies of UFC printed from electronic media should be checked against the current
electronic version prior to use to ensure that they are current.
AUTHORIZED BY:
JAMES C. DALTON, P.E.
JOSEPH E. GOTT, P.E.
Chief, Engineering and Construction
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Chief Engineer
Naval Facilities Engineering Command
EDWIN H. OSHIBA, SES, DAF
MICHAEL McANDREW
Deputy Director of Civil Engineers
Director, Facilities Investment and Management
DCS/Logistics, Engineering & Force
Protection
Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense
(Installations and Environment)
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UNIFIED FACILITIES CRITERIA (UFC)
REVISION SUMMARY SHEET
Document: UFC 3-580-01, Telecommunications Interior Infrastructure
Superseding: UFC 3-580-01 Telecommunications Building Cabling Systems Planning
and Design, dated 22 June 2007; UFC 3-580-10 Design: Navy and Marine Corps
Intranet (NMCI) Standard Construction Practices dated 14 July 2004; Installation
Information Infrastructure Architecture (I3A) dated February 2010; Engineering
Technical Letter (ETL) 02-12 dated 27 June 2002; and MIL-HDBK-1012/3, dated May
1996.
Description: This UFC document provides requirements for designing and
implementing interior telecommunications infrastructure for military construction. This
infrastructure typically includes telecommunications spaces, pathways, cabling and
interconnecting components.
Reasons for Document:
The design of interior telecommunications infrastructure is a specialized technical area.
This UFC provides guidance to those parties tasked with implementing existing and
emerging interior telecommunications infrastructure requirements. The basic
requirements follow industry standards. Due to service specific unique operating
requirements and existing infrastructure and topology, this document includes a chapter
for each service.
Impact:
•
Creates a single source reference for the planning, design and
construction of interior telecommunications infrastructure which allows
planners, engineers and installers to standardize on requirements.
•
Promotes efficient use of available funds and resources for interior
telecommunications infrastructure.
Unification Issues
Service specific requirements are detailed in Chapters 3, 4, 5, and 6.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................... 1
1-1
PURPOSE AND SCOPE ........................................................................... 1
1-2
APPLICABILITY ........................................................................................ 1
1-3
GENERAL BUILDING REQUIREMENTS ................................................. 1
1-4
GOVERNING CRITERIA FOR ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS ......................... 1
1-5
MODERNIZATION WITHIN EXISTING FACILITIES ................................. 1
1-6
REFERENCES .......................................................................................... 1
1-7
ACTIVITY SPECIFIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS MANAGERS ............... 2
1-8
GLOSSARY. .............................................................................................. 2
CHAPTER 2 DESIGN REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................... 3
2-1
GENERAL GUIDANCE ............................................................................. 3
2-1.1
Government-Designed Projects ............................................................. 3
2-1.2
Small Scale Projects .............................................................................. 3
2-2
CLASSIFIED INFRASTRUCTURE ........................................................... 3
2-3
SYSTEM OVERVIEW ................................................................................ 3
2-4
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPACES ........................................................ 4
2-4.1
Types of Spaces .................................................................................... 4
2-4.2
Architectural Considerations .................................................................. 6
2-4.3
Utility Considerations ............................................................................. 7
2-4.4
Space Components ............................................................................... 8
2-5
TELECOMMUNICATIONS PATHWAYS................................................. 11
2-5.1
Backbone Pathways ............................................................................ 11
2-5.2
Horizontal Pathways ............................................................................ 11
2-5.3
Pathway Components .......................................................................... 12
2-6
TELECOMMUNICATIONS CABLING ..................................................... 14
2-6.1
Backbone Cabling................................................................................ 14
2-6.2
Horizontal Cabling ............................................................................... 15
2-7
WORK AREA .......................................................................................... 17
2-7.1
Work Area Outlets ............................................................................... 17
2-7.2
Telecommunications Faceplates ......................................................... 18
2-7.3
Modular Jacks, Connectors and Adapters ........................................... 19
2-7.4
Outlet Types and Density..................................................................... 19
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2-8
OTHER SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS ....................................................... 22
2-8.1
Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) System ........................................... 22
2-8.2
Community Antenna Television (CATV) System ................................. 22
2-8.3
Wireless Access Points (WAP) ............................................................ 23
2-9
GROUNDING, BONDING, AND STATIC PROTECTION........................ 24
2-9.1
Cable Entrance Grounding .................................................................. 25
2-9.2
Telecommunications Spaces Bonding and Grounding ........................ 26
2-9.3
Telecommunications Rack and Supporting Structure .......................... 26
2-10
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION ...................... 26
2-11
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM TESTING ...................................... 26
2-11.1
Unshielded Twisted Pair (CAT6) Cabling and Connecting Hardware .. 26
2-11.2
Fiber Optic Cabling and Connecting Hardware.................................... 26
2-11.3
Coaxial Cabling and Connecting Hardware ......................................... 27
2-11.4
Test Plan.............................................................................................. 27
CHAPTER 3 AIR FORCE SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS (RESERVED) ....................... 29
CHAPTER 4 ARMY SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS ....................................................... 31
4-1
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 31
4-1.1
Purpose ............................................................................................... 31
4-1.2
Army Technical Authority ..................................................................... 31
4-2
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS .................................................................. 31
4-2.1
Government-Designed Projects ........................................................... 31
4-2.2
Classified Infrastructure ....................................................................... 31
4-2.3
Telecommunications Spaces ............................................................... 31
4-2.4
Telecommunications Pathways ........................................................... 32
4-2.5
Fiber Optic Backbone Cable ................................................................ 32
4-2.6
Work Area ............................................................................................ 32
CHAPTER 5 NAVY SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS ........................................................ 35
5-1
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 35
5-1.1
Purpose ............................................................................................... 35
5-1.2
Order of Precedence ........................................................................... 35
5-1.3
Coordination ........................................................................................ 35
5-2
5-2.1
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR NMCI CONSTRUCTION .................. 37
Collocating Various Systems .............................................................. 37
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5-2.2
Bachelor Quarters Considerations ....................................................... 37
5-2.3
Fiber Optic Backbone Cabling ............................................................. 37
5-2.4
Navy-Specific Technical Authorities..................................................... 37
5-2.5
Barracks, Dormitory, Bachelor Quarters .............................................. 37
5-2.6
Utility Rooms........................................................................................ 37
5-3
OUTSIDE CABLE PLANT ....................................................................... 37
5-3.1
Pathways ............................................................................................. 38
5-3.2
Detection.............................................................................................. 38
5-3.3
Cabling................................................................................................. 38
CHAPTER 6 USMC SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS ....................................................... 39
6-1
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 39
6-1.1
Purpose ............................................................................................... 39
6-1.2
USMC Technical Authority ................................................................... 39
6-1.3
Coordination ........................................................................................ 39
6-2
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR USMC PROJECTS .......................... 41
6-2.1
Government-Designed Projects ........................................................... 41
6-2.5
Optical Splitters.................................................................................... 42
6-2.6
Patch Panels and Patch Cords ............................................................ 42
6-2.7
Telecommunications Pathways Interior Conduit .................................. 42
6-2.8
Work Area Outlets ............................................................................... 42
6-2.9
Installation Cabling Distribution System (ICDS) or Backbone Cabling. 46
APPENDIX A REFERENCES ....................................................................................... 47
GLOSSARY .................................................................................................................. 50
FIGURES
Figure 2-1 – Telecommunications Spaces and Cabling .................................................. 5
Figure 2-2 – Wall Mounted or Floor Mounted Cabinet Clearance ................................. 10
Figure 2-3 – Typical Faceplate Configuration................................................................ 18
Figure 2-4 – Telecommunications Grounding and Bonding Infrastructure .................... 25
Figure 5-1 – Navy Telecommunications Coordination Chart for Typical Design/Bid/Build
for Non-National Capital Region (NCR) Projects.................................................... 36
Figure 6-1 – USMC Telecommunications Coordination Chart for Typical Design-Build
and Design-Bid-Build Projects................................................................................ 40
Figure 6-2 Flush mounted ONT enclosure .................................................................... 45
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TABLES
Table 2-1 Outlet Types .................................................................................................. 20
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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
1-1
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This UFC provides requirements for the planning, design, and construction of interior
telecommunications infrastructure. Requirements common to all services are contained
in Chapters 1 and 2 of this document. Service specific requirements are identified in
Chapters 3, 4, 5, and 6.
The scope includes telecommunications spaces, pathways, cabling and
interconnecting components necessary to support the infrastructure for voice, data and
video systems. “Video systems” includes the necessary infrastructure for Closed Circuit
Television (CCTV), Community Antenna Television (CATV), generally referred to as
Cable TV, and Video Teleconferencing (VTC). This UFC does not address the design
and specifics of the technologies that utilize the telecommunications infrastructure.
1-2
APPLICABILITY
This UFC applies to all interior telecommunications infrastructure planning, design and
installation in new or existing facilities. Waivers and exemptions must comply with the
process identified in MIL-STD 3007.
1-3
GENERAL BUILDING REQUIREMENTS
Comply with UFC 1-200-01, General Building Requirements. UFC 1-200-01 provides
applicability of model building codes and government unique criteria for typical design
disciplines and building systems, as well as for accessibility, antiterrorism, security, high
performance and sustainability requirements, and safety. Use this UFC in addition to
UFC 1-200-01 and the UFCs and government criteria referenced therein.
1-4
GOVERNING CRITERIA FOR ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
UFC 3-501-01 provides the governing criteria for electrical systems, explains the
delineation between the different electrical-related UFCs, and refers to UFC 3-520-01
for interior electrical system requirements.
1-5
MODERNIZATION WITHIN EXISTING FACILITIES
Modernization of telecommunications systems within existing facilities solely for the
purpose of meeting design criteria in this UFC is not required.
1-6
REFERENCES
Appendix A contains a list of references used in this document. The publication date of
the code or standard is not included in this document. In general, the latest available
issuance of the reference is used.
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ACTIVITY SPECIFIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS MANAGERS
Throughout this document, the term “telecommunications manager” refers to the
following:
1-8
•
For Army, the Network Enterprise Center (NEC).
•
For Navy, refers to a group of individuals with responsibilities as shown in
Figure 5-1.
•
For Marine Corps, the G6.
•
For Air Force, the Base Communications Officer (BCO).
GLOSSARY.
The glossary at the end of this document contains acronyms, abbreviations, and terms.
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CHAPTER 2 DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
2-1
GENERAL GUIDANCE
Design interior telecommunications infrastructure to meet the needs of the activity and
supporting facilities in accordance with this document. A/E contractor generated final
drawings and specifications for design-bid-build and design-build projects must be stamped
by a BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD).
Note: Design and construction may be concurrent efforts in Design-Build
projects, and multiple phases of construction may be approved. Therefore, the final
documents for each construction phase must be stamped.
2-1.1
Government-Designed Projects
On government-designed projects (in-house design) the government designer must:
2-1.2
•
Obtain the approval of the service appointed telecommunications agent, prior
to bid, in accordance with regulations, policies, memorandums, and guidance.
•
Ensure that the bid documents require an RCDD stamp on the contractor’s
telecommunications shop drawings submitted for approval.
Small Scale Projects
Small scale projects limited to adding work area outlets from existing telecommunications
rooms do not require an RCDD stamp provided the work is being accomplished under the
technical authority of an RCDD or the government telecommunications manager.
2-2
CLASSIFIED INFRASTRUCTURE
Classified Infrastructure is any infrastructure that is used to transmit unencrypted classified
National Security Information (NSI). Examples would be the infrastructure to support
classified networks such as Secret Internet Protocol Router Network (SIPRNET) and Joint
Worldwide Intelligence Communications System (JWICS).
Coordinate the design of classified telecommunications infrastructure with the
telecommunications manager and the Certified Tempest Technical Authority (CTTA)
responsible for that area. The following documents may be applicable:
2-3
•
CNSSAM TEMPEST/1-13 (FOUO); defines the RED/BLACK installation guidance to
consider during design and installation, and provides potential solutions \1\
•
CNSSI 7003 (U); provides guidance on Protected Distribution Systems. /1/
SYSTEM OVERVIEW
Provide a complete, standards based, flexible telecommunications design including
telecommunications spaces, pathways, outlets, connectors, cabling, grounding, bonding,
and static protection in accordance with the following paragraphs.
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2-4
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPACES
2-4.1
Types of Spaces
Provide telecommunications spaces in accordance with Telecommunications Industry
Association TIA-569-C. Refer to Figure 2-1.
Note: This UFC utilizes commercial terminology for spaces in accordance with
the TIA-569-C Errata sheet (e.g. Telecommunications Room, Equipment Room versus
Distributor Room A and B, and Telecommunications Enclosure versus Distributor
Enclosure).
2-4.1.1
Telecommunications Entrance Facility (EF)
The entrance facility (EF) is defined as the space housing the point of entrance of the
telecommunications service. The EF is also the space where the inter-building backbone
and intra-building backbone facilities join. For this document, the term backbone refers to
intra-building backbone unless specifically designated otherwise. Telecommunicationrelated antenna entrances and electronic equipment may also be located in the EF. The
demarcation point between the outside plant (OSP) cabling and the inside plant distribution
cabling is known as the building entrance terminal (BET).
2-4.1.2
Telecommunications Room (TR)
A telecommunications room (TR) is defined as an architectural space designed to contain
telecommunications equipment, cable terminations, and cross connect cabling. It contains
the telecommunications equipment for connecting the horizontal cabling to the backbone
cabling system. The TR may also function as the telecommunications entrance facility.
2-4.1.3
Equipment Room (ER)
An equipment room (ER) is defined as an environmentally controlled, centralized space for
telecommunications equipment that usually houses a main or intermediate cross-connect.
Any or all of the functions of a telecommunications room or entrance facility may be
provided by an equipment room.
2-4.1.4
Telecommunications Enclosure (TE)
A telecommunications enclosure (TE) is defined as a case or housing for
telecommunications equipment, cable terminations, and cross-connect cabling.
Although TEs serve much in the same capacity as that of a TR, a TE must not
replace a TR. The TE is also referred to as a Distributor Enclosure in TIA-569-C. TEs must
meet the requirements for Distributor Enclosures in TIA-569-C.
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Figure 2-1 – Telecommunications Spaces and Cabling
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2-4.2
Architectural Considerations
2-4.2.1
Location and Access
Locate telecommunications spaces central to the areas they serve and in such a manner
that the maximum cable length from the patch panel through the structured cabling system
to the furthest outlet does not exceed 295 feet (90 m). Telecommunications spaces must
be dedicated spaces not shared with other non-telecommunications functions (i.e.,
electrical rooms, mechanical rooms, plumbing, etc.). When designing telecommunications
spaces, avoid locations that are restricted by building components that may limit expansion
such as elevators, outside walls, or other fixed building walls. Locate spaces in an
accessible area of the building (e.g. common hallway) but limit access to personnel having
a telecommunications requirement or mission. Accessibility for the delivery of equipment
such as network switches, equipment racks and cabinets must be provided. Locate the
telecommunications space away from sources of electromagnetic interference or design
the space to mitigate the effects of this interference. Give special attention to electrical
power supply transformers, motors and generators, X-ray equipment, and radio or radar
transmitters.
In renovation projects, avoid rooms containing transformers, air handling units,
and similar equipment types if at all possible. If shared facilities cannot be avoided, comply
with TIA-569-C and maintain proper electrical/telecommunications cable separations and
provide working clearances per the National Electrical Code (NEC).
2-4.2.2
Sizing and Quantity
Size ERs in accordance with TIA-568-C-1.1. Size each TR in accordance with TIA-568-C1.1, except that the minimum TR size for DoD buildings is 10 feet x 8 feet (3m x 2.4m).
Generally, the TR should be sized to approximately 1.1 percent of the area it serves. For
example, a 10,000 sq feet (929 sq m) area should be served by a minimum of one 10 ft x
11 feet (3 m x 3.4 m) TR. Divide large floor areas into “serving areas” with TRs for each
serving area. Each serving area can be no larger than 10,000 sq feet (929 sq m) as
stipulated in TIA-568-C-1.1. TR sizing, power, and HVAC requirements may be
substantially impacted if additional systems are required in the TR. Consult with the
architectural designer or facilities engineer when additional systems requirements (audio
visual systems, servers, disk storage arrays, etc.) are integrated into the TR. Consider
utilizing an ER for areas that exceed 10,000 sq feet (929 sq m) or buildings that house
substantial Information Technology (IT) electronics. Provide a minimum of one TR per
floor. Provide additional rooms when the floor area is greater than 10,000 sq feet (929 sq
m) and or the total cable distance to the outlet is over 295 feet (90 m).
Note: One TR may suffice for multi-story buildings in unique instances. Refer to
section on Multi-Story Buildings below.
Provide adequate space in TRs to facilitate tenant owned data and
telecommunications systems, and other low voltage systems such as fire alarm, CATV,
CCTV, and electronic security systems (ESS). Support equipment requirements in tenant
installed freestanding cabinets or racks. Total TR space as a percentage of the building’s
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area must be scaled upward, to reflect the increased number of circuits in buildings with
more than the standard number of circuits to each workspace.
2-4.2.3
Floors, Walls, and Ceilings
For floors, walls, and ceilings in telecommunications spaces, meet the requirements in TIA569-C. Do not install suspended ceilings in telecommunications spaces.
2-4.2.4
Doors and Windows
Doors must meet the requirements for TRs in TIA-569-C and NFPA 101.
Telecommunications spaces must not have windows or other architectural window
equivalents.
2-4.2.5
Multi-Story Buildings
Provide a minimum of one TR on each floor, sized in accordance with paragraph Sizing
and Quantity. Serve all telecommunications outlets from the TR located on that floor.
Vertically align TRs on successive floors. In the case of small and unique facilities one TR
may be sufficient for the entire facility. These facilities include but are not limited to air
traffic control towers, firing ranges, and range and weapons towers.
2-4.3
Utility Considerations
2-4.3.1
Lighting
Design lighting for telecommunications spaces in accordance with UFC 3-530-01.
2-4.3.2
Power
Provide a dedicated electrical branch circuit panelboard for each TR with the following
minimum requirements: 120/208 volt, 3-phase or 120/240 volt, 1-phase, 24-(or 20 for 1phase) space panel with a minimum 100 ampere (A) bus rated capacity. Feed all loads
within the TR, except lighting, from this dedicated TR panel. Loads must include, but are
not limited to, convenience receptacles, dedicated rack or cabinet receptacles, and HVAC
systems (including exterior units for split systems). Provide 125V, 20A duplex convenience
receptacles at 6 feet (1800mm) intervals on center around perimeter walls. When required
by the Activity, provide an additional dedicated 125V, 20A circuit on the wall above the
entry door for future electronic security system requirements. Coordinate with UFC 4-02102, Electronic Security Systems (ESS).
At a minimum, provide two multi-outlet power strips in each rack or cabinet. One
power strip must be 240 or 208V, 1-phase; the other must be 120V 1-phase. To minimize
accidental shut-off, equip power strips with indicator lights, but no integral on/off switch.
Provide matching (NEMA configured) twist-lock type receptacles fed from dedicated circuits
in the TR panel to power each power strip. Install twist-lock receptacles above rack or
cabinet, mounted to telecommunications cable tray or in ceiling space. As some rack or
cabinet mounted equipment may require larger quantities of electrical power, the designer
must consult with the local telecommunications group having jurisdiction to determine exact
electrical power requirements for each TR.
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2-4.3.3
Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
Design telecommunication spaces to meet the HVAC requirements of TIA-569-C, including
the Class B requirements for temperature and humidity as outlined in ASHRAE TC 9.9.
2-4.3.4
Room Climate Control
Provide each TR with its own independent thermostat for climate control, capable of
supporting year round ambient temperature control (24 hours/day, 365 days/year), to
protect all installed electronic equipment as defined in TIA-569-C and TIA-569-C-1. The
mechanical system designer of record must determine what type of system is necessary to
meet the temperature and humidity requirements (e.g. zoned, dedicated, split core). Do not
include heating and cooling systems on building time clocks or other temperature setback
means for telecommunications spaces. Provide rooms with positive atmospheric pressure
to minimize dust.
2-4.3.5
Room Contaminants
Do not install information systems equipment in spaces where moisture, liquid or gaseous
spillage, or other contaminants may be present as defined in TIA-569-C.
2-4.4
Space Components
For all information transport system (ITS) components, provide manufacturer’s standard
catalog products that conform to the latest published industry and technical society
standards at the date of contract award. Do not use shop or field fabricated components
that are not manufacturer’s standard catalog products or that do not conform to the industry
and technical society standards.
2-4.4.1
Plywood Backboards
Provide backboards in accordance with TIA-569-C. Backboards must be fire-retardanttreated wood, bearing the manufacturer’s stamp. If painted, the manufactures fire rated
stamp must remain visible. Cover a minimum of two adjacent walls with backboards.
When renovating an existing TR that does not have adequate space, size the backboard as
large as possible to accommodate wall mounted equipment.
2-4.4.2
Building Entrance Terminals
TIA-758 identifies two types of building entrance terminals (BET), protected and nonprotected. Provide protected terminals in accordance with TIA-758-B. Equip protected
terminals with modules to protect the inside plant cabling and equipment from power
surges. Provide 110-type Insulation Displacement Connector (IDC) terminal blocks or
cable stubs.
2-4.4.3
Equipment Racks
Provide 19 inch (475mm) floor mounted equipment racks located at or near the center of
the telecommunication spaces. A minimum of 36 inches (900 mm) space both in front and
in back of the rack, measured from the equipment, and a minimum side clearance of 24
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inches (600 mm) on at least one end of the rack or row of adjacent racks is required.
Coordinate with the telecommunications manager to determine the space requirements for
the government provided active equipment. Provide 25% spare capacity within each
utilized rack. Provide one spare rack for every four utilized racks with a minimum of one
spare rack per telecommunication space.
In existing facilities with narrow or crowded telecommunication spaces,
equipment racks may be wall-mounted with the approval of the telecommunications
manager. Refer to Figure 2-2.
2-4.4.4
Equipment Cabinets
Provide equipment cabinets in lieu of racks:
•
Where identified by service specific chapters.
•
Where physical security is required, such as to mount secure or mission
critical equipment.
•
In circumstances where separately controlled access is desired (when
multiple systems are collocated within the room).
Provide a minimum of 24 inch (600 mm) wide cabinets with cooling fans and
internal rails to support 19 inch (475 mm) equipment. Locate cabinets at or near the center
of the telecommunication spaces. A minimum space of 36 inches (900 mm), both in front
and in back of the cabinet, and a minimum side clearance of 24 inches (600 mm) on at
least one end of the cabinet or row of adjacent cabinets is required. Coordinate with the
telecommunications manager to determine the space requirements for the government
provided active equipment. Provide 25% spare capacity within each utilized cabinet.
Provide one spare cabinet for every four utilized cabinets with a minimum of one spare
cabinet per telecommunication space.
In existing facilities with narrow or crowded telecommunication spaces,
equipment cabinets may be wall-mounted with the approval of the telecommunications
manager. Where space is limited and clearances are affected, utilize swing out cabinets.
Refer to Figure 2-2.
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Figure 2-2 – Wall Mounted or Floor Mounted Cabinet Clearance
The workspace required around the cabinet/rack is still required
even if the cabinet is mounted 6.5 feet (2.0 m) off the floor
2-4.4.5
Horizontal and Vertical Cable Management
Install horizontal cable management panels above and below each patch panel. The
required ratio of horizontal cable management to patch panels is 1:1. Provide vertical cable
management between racks and at the end of racks when required to protect, manage, and
organize cables. Vertical cable management panels should be a minimum of 6-inch
(150mm) wide.
2-4.4.6
Ladder and Wire Cable Tray
Utilize ladder type or welded wire cable tray in the telecommunication spaces to provide
distribution between the plywood backboard, equipment racks, backbone conduits, and the
distribution cable tray. Bond all metallic cable tray sections, and bond the cable tray system
to the Telecommunications Grounding Busbar (TGB) or Telecommunications Main
Grounding Busbar (TMGB).
2-4.4.7
Unshielded Twisted Pair Patch Panels
For patch panels, use 8-position, 8-contact (8P8C) modular jacks, with rear mounted 110type IDC terminations, category rated for the Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) system being
installed, and arrange in rows or columns on 19-inch (475 mm) rack mounted panels. For
small projects (i.e., fewer than ten users) 19-inch (475 mm) TIA category-qualified wall
mounted block or backboard patch panels may be utilized. Provide T568A jack pin/pair
configuration per TIA-568-C.0. T568B jack pin/pair configuration may only be used if required
to maintain uniformity in an existing facility. Provide modular jacks that conform to the
requirements of TIA-568-C, and rated for use with the installed cable plant. Install UTP
patch panels in the same rack or in the rack immediately adjacent to the LAN equipment in
order to minimize patch cord lengths. Provide a minimum spare capacity of 25 percent.
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2-4.4.8
Fiber Optic Patch Panels
Utilize patch panel connectors and couplers of the same type and configuration as used
elsewhere in the system. Utilize duplex LC connectors on 19-inch (475 mm) rack mounted
panels, unless otherwise directed. Provide a 3-foot (1-meter) slack loop of fiber within each
panel, and include strain relief for cables within the panel. Provide proper termination,
splice storage, routing, radius limiting, cable fastening, storage, and cross-connection in all
patch panels. Install fiber optic patch panels in the same rack or in the rack immediately
adjacent to the LAN equipment in order to minimize patch cord lengths. Provide a minimum
spare capacity of 25 percent.
In existing facilities, other connector types may be used to match the current
infrastructure, with the approval of the telecommunications manager.
2-5
TELECOMMUNICATIONS PATHWAYS
A pathway is defined as a facility for the placement of telecommunications cable.
2-5.1
Backbone Pathways
Backbone pathways (sometimes referred to as “vertical” pathways) are defined as
structures that conceal, protect, support, and provide access to cables between
telecommunications spaces. Examples of backbone pathways consist of conduit, sleeves,
slots, cable tray, telecommunication spaces, and miscellaneous support facilities.
For intra-building backbone distribution, provide a minimum of two 4-inch (103
mm) conduits between TRs located on the same floor or pathway that provides equivalent
capacity (e.g. cable tray installed to support backbone and horizontal distribution). In
multistory buildings, provide a minimum of three 4-inch (103 mm) conduits, sleeves, or an
equivalent sized slot between stacked TRs on successive floors in accordance with TIA569-C.
2-5.2
Horizontal Pathways
Horizontal pathways are defined as structures that conceal, protect, support, and provide
access to cables between the telecommunications spaces and the work area outlet.
Examples of horizontal pathways consist of conduit, cable trays, ceiling distribution, access
floors, and non-continuous cable supports (J-hooks).
There are many methods to distribute cable from the telecommunications space
to the work area and many buildings may require a combination of two or more types of
pathway systems to meet all the distribution needs. The DoD required horizontal pathway is
a ceiling distribution system employing a centralized cable tray system originating in the
telecommunications space and continuing out into the serving areas. Utilize cable tray for
horizontal distribution to the maximum extent possible (80 to 90 percent of the horizontal
cable length). The remaining pathway to the work area outlet may be implemented in a
variety of ways combining conduit, non-continuous cable supports, and stub-ups/outs.
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2-5.2.1
Open Office Wiring
Open office wiring refers to work area spaces that are divided by modular furniture and
partitions rather than by fixed walls. The electrical designer, the architect, and the interior
designer must coordinate the layout of all furniture with electrical and telecommunications
outlets during the design process. Furniture is typically specified and ordered when
construction is nearing completion; therefore, if proper coordination has not occurred earlier
in the design process, field interface problems will occur.
2-5.2.1.1
Systems Furniture
Utilize architectural columns and perimeter walls to the maximum extent possible for
telecommunications distribution to systems furniture workstations. In the absence of
architectural columns or when systems furniture is located away from perimeter walls,
utilize utility columns where permitted. Only if no other alternative exists, utilize under-floor
conduits that are designed and installed in accordance with TIA-569-C. Include a spare
conduit to under-floor outlet boxes for future expansion. Design systems furniture wiring
connections in accordance with TIA-568-C and TIA-569-C.
2-5.2.1.2
Protection and Separation in Systems Furniture and Utility Columns
Ensure that the cable is protected at all transition points, and that metallic separation is
provided between telecommunication and power wiring in the utility columns and systems
furniture track in accordance with TIA-569-C and NFPA 70.
2-5.2.2
Horizontal Distribution in Small Facilities and Renovations
In new construction involving small, mixed use (non-administrative) facilities, or
construction projects involving renovation of existing buildings, use of J-hooks, flexible
cable tray, and alternative support systems specifically certified for Category 6 cable is
permissible, though not desirable. In renovation projects where access to the walls for
installation of conduit and outlet boxes is not possible, or where historical requirements
prohibit the alteration of the building structure, surface mounted non-metallic raceway may
be used.
2-5.3
Pathway Components
2-5.3.1
Cable Tray
Utilize solid bottom, slotted bottom, or welded wire cable tray to provide a centralized cable
management/distribution system.
•
Use the cable tray for horizontal distribution to the maximum extent possible
(80 percent to 90 percent of the horizontal cable length).
•
Design cable trays to accommodate an initial calculated fill ratio of 25 percent
(Note: This allows for future growth within the cable tray. Due to random
placement of cables and space between the cables, a 25 percent fill ratio
means that in reality the tray is half filled.)
•
The maximum fill ratio of any cable tray is 50%.
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•
The maximum fill depth of any cable tray is 6 inches (150 mm).
•
Do not use ladder cable trays for horizontal distribution due to possible cable
deformation with large cable quantities.
•
Provide and maintain a minimum of 12 inches (300 mm) access headroom
above a cable tray system or cable runway.
•
Coordinate with other disciplines to ensure that building components (e.g., air
conditioning ducts) do not restrict access and that proper clearances can be
achieved.
2-5.3.2
Conduit
Design conduit systems in accordance with TIA-569-C. Install electrical metallic tubing
(EMT) conduit from the cable backbone distribution system, whether cable tray or enclosed
duct, to each outlet unless a conduit-less system is approved by the telecommunications
manager. Provide a minimum of 1 inch (27 mm) EMT conduit for standard outlets. When
cable tray or enclosed duct is not used, install individual conduits from the TR to each
outlet. Coordinate conduit bend radii with cable bend radius. Arrange conduit entries at
outlet and junction boxes so that cables passing through the box enter and exit at opposite
sides of the box. Do not use flexible metal conduit for telecommunications wiring except
when installing floor-access boxes in a raised floor, where the floor-access box may be
relocated within a specified service area. In this case the length of the flexible metal conduit
\1\ must /1/ not exceed a length of 20 feet (6 m) for each run per TIA-569-C. Avoid using inslab and below grade conduit systems for interior telecommunications designs as these
systems provide the least flexible horizontal distribution system. If an in-slab or below grade
conduit system is utilized in the telecommunications design, comply with NFPA 70 and
utilize cables that are listed and rated for wet locations. Do not use plenum or riser rated
cable, gel-filled OSP, and unlisted cables in such an environment. Consider that cables
rated for a wet location typically have a larger outside diameter and this may affect conduit
fill rates and conduit sizing. Larger conduit sizing in the slab may affect the structural
integrity of the structure. For in-floor conduit systems, provide home runs back to the TR
serving that area. Serve all telecommunications outlets from the TR located on that floor.
Use an optimal conduit fill ratio of 40 percent for conduit sizing. Do not exceed a
fill ratio of 50 percent. Do not install more than four, four-pair cables in a 1 inch (27 mm)
conduit. Do not use conduit in family housing projects unless it is a high-rise apartment
building.
2-5.3.3
Non-continuous Cable Supports
Non-continuous cable supports are not allowed in the following locations:
•
In place of the cable tray system or as the sole distribution system in place of
home-run conduit. Design non-continuous cable supports to support the
category-rating of the cable. Supports must not exceed 20 cables or 50
percent of the fill capacity, whichever is less.
•
That exceed 50 feet (15 meters) total length through a non-continuous cable
support system.
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•
Ceilings in which Infection Control protocol affects ceiling tile removal
•
In areas where the cable must be protected.
When utilizing non-continuous cable supports, provide in accordance with TIA-569-C.
2-5.3.4
Pull and Splice Boxes
A pull box is defined as a housing located in a pathway run used to facilitate the placing of
wire or cables. A splice box is defined as a box located in a pathway run intended to house
a cable splice. Place pull and splice boxes in conduit runs in accordance with TIA-569-C.
2-6
TELECOMMUNICATIONS CABLING
Provide horizontal and backbone cabling in a hierarchical star configuration in accordance
with TIA-568-C.1. The paragraphs in this section pertain to copper and fiber optic backbone
and horizontal cabling. Cable to support Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) and Community
Antenna Television (CATV) is covered in the section titled Other System Requirements.
2-6.1
Backbone Cabling
The following subparagraphs pertain to copper and fiber optic intra-building backbone
cable. Use no more than two hierarchical levels of cross-connects (main and intermediate)
for the intra-building backbone. Use copper backbone cable only for voice circuits. Use
fiber optic cable for data backbone circuits.
2-6.1.1
Copper Backbone Cabling
Comply with the following:
•
Provide multi-pair voice backbone cable that meets the requirements of
Insulated Cable Engineers Association{ XE "ICEA:Insulated Cable Engineers
Association" } (ICEA) S-80-576 and TIA-568-C for riser-rated unshielded
twisted pair{ XE "UTP:unshielded twisted pair" } (UTP) cable.
•
Use solid untinned copper, 24 American Wire Gauge{ XE "AWG:American
Wire Gauge" } (AWG) conductors.
•
Coordinate the copper backbone design with the telecommunications
manager in order to minimize the amount of copper deployed.
•
Utilize minimal copper backbone to support traditional two-wire phones and
legacy systems as the transition to an all-fiber backbone occurs.
•
For facilities that will utilize unified communications (i.e., voice, video, and
data over Internet Protocol{ XE "IP:Internet Protocol" } (IP), provide a
minimum 25-pair copper backbone to each TR. Provide additional cable
counts to support actual legacy system requirements.
•
For facilities utilizing legacy systems, provide copper backbone cables sized
to support no more than 1.5 pairs for every outlet connected to the serving
TR.
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2-6.1.2
Copper Termination
Terminate outside plant (OSP) cable on a protected entrance terminal (PET). Terminate the
copper backbone cable originating in the main telecommunications room{ XE
"TR:telecommunications room" } (TR) or main cross-connect in each TR on 110-type,
insulation-displacement wiring blocks mounted on the backboard. Provide 110-type
terminal blocks on the same backboard as the PET and in each TR for copper backbone
distribution. Utilize intermediate cross-connects when required by the telecommunications
manager.
2-6.1.3
Fiber Optic Backbone Cable
Provide a minimum of 12 strands single mode fiber optic cable between the main
telecommunications room, or main cross connect and each TR. Where required by NFPA
70 or by local regulations, fiber optic cable must be plenum rated.
Indicate the proper color coding of optical fiber cabling on design drawings. Use
the TIA-598 jacket color coding scheme for fiber optic (FO) cable on military projects as
follows:
Single-mode (ranges between 8 and10um) (OS1)
Yellow
Multimode 62.5/125um (OM1)
Slate
Multimode 50/125um (OM2)
Orange
Multimode 50/125um Laser Optimized (OM3)
Aqua
2-6.1.3.1
Fiber Optic Termination
Terminate backbone FO cabling, at each end, on cabinet/rack-mounted patch panels with
LC type connectors. \1\ Do not use ST or MT-RJ fiber optic adapters and connectors for
new construction unless specifically required for interface with existing equipment reused
on installations. Provide fiber optic adapters and connectors in accordance with the
appropriate TIA-604 Fiber Optic Connector Intermateability Standard (FOCIS). Fusionsplice backbone fibers to factory produced pigtails. /1/
2-6.2
Horizontal Cabling
The following subparagraphs pertain to copper and fiber optic horizontal cabling.
2-6.2.1
Copper UTP Horizontal Cabling
2-6.2.1.1
Category 6 (CAT6) Cabling
Provide one CAT6 unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable to each standard 8-pin modular
jack. Use only cable that has passed the UL LAN certification program and is labeled with
UL acceptable markings. Provide plenum rated cables in accordance with NFPA 70, or
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when directed by the facility safety officer or UFC 3-600-01. Do not use Category 3, 5, or
5e rated cabling in new construction or rehabilitation projects.
Note: When specifically required by other criteria, Activities may utilize screened
or shielded twisted pair (ScTP or STP) cabling (such as in Europe or secure areas).
2-6.2.1.2
Category 6A (CAT6A) Cabling
Category 6A (CAT6A) and higher rated cabling is not adopted for general use in this UFC
due to the increase in cable diameter, weight, cost, and additional testing requirements.
The increased cable diameter and weight adversely affects the cable tray fill and loading for
larger projects. Selection of CAT6A and higher cable must be based upon validated user
requirements. Coordinate any use of CAT6A and higher rated cabling and associated cost
changes with all stakeholders, technical reviewing authority, telecommunications manager,
building occupants and other service specific authorities. Components used in a CAT6A
system (i.e. outlets, patch panels, and patch cables) must also be CAT6A rated. When the
requirements warrant the use of CAT6A and funding permits, activities may utilize shielded
twisted pair (STP) cabling as this reduces the probability of alien crosstalk.
2-6.2.1.3
CAT6 Termination
Perform terminations of the UTP cabling at the work area outlet and patch panel using an
8-pin, RJ45 type modular jack, rated for the category of the installed cable. Terminate
horizontal cables in the telecommunications spaces on Category 6 rack-mounted patch
panels. Facilities with minimal outlet requirements (normally less than 12) may use a small
cabinet or backboard mounted CAT6 patch panel. Terminate cables from the same outlet
on the same patch panel and individually identify the cables. Wire all terminations to the
TIA 568-C.0, T568A configuration. Do not use the T568B wiring configurations unless
specifically requested by the user and approved by the authority having jurisdiction. Do not
split copper cables between multiple modular connectors.
Note: Coordinate with telecommunications manager to determine if it is
necessary to separately identify and differentiate “voice” and “data” systems.
2-6.2.1.4
CAT6 UTP Patch Cables
Provide 4-pair, minimum size 24 AWG stranded UTP copper patch cables rated for
Category 6, with 8-pin modular plugs at each end. Due to performance and testing
requirements utilize factory manufactured pre-connectorized patch cords. Provide patch
cables of various lengths to terminate all required connections.
2-6.2.2
Fiber Optic Horizontal Cabling
2-6.2.2.1
Fiber Optic Cable
Provide fiber optic cable to each outlet only when required by the mission and approved by
the telecommunications manager. Provide 50/125-um diameter laser optimized (OM3)
multi-mode when the user requires fiber optic cable. When the telecommunications
manager requires it, single-mode fiber optic cable (OS1), 50/125-um diameter (OM2) or
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62.5/125-um diameter (OM1) multimode fiber may be substituted. Provide plenum cables in
accordance with NFPA 70, or when directed by facility safety officer or UFC 3-600-01.
For in-slab or below grade telecommunications conduit systems, comply with
NFPA 70 and provide cables listed and rated for wet locations. Do not use plenum or riser
rated cable, gel-filled OSP, and unlisted cables in such an environment.
2-6.2.2.2
Fiber Optic Termination
Terminate FO cable in cabinet/rack-mounted patch panels, and at the outlet using LC type
connectors in accordance with the appropriate TIA-604 series document. Do not use ST or
MT-RJ fiber optic adapters and connectors for new construction unless specifically required
for interface with existing equipment reused on installations. Provide fiber optic adapters
and connectors in accordance with the appropriate TIA-604 Fiber Optic Connector
Intermateability Standard (FOCIS). Provide individual patch panels and distribution panels
with 12 duplex LC, SC or MT-RJ adapters or 24 ST adapters maximum.
2-6.2.2.3
Fiber Optic Patch Cables
Utilize fiber optic patch cable types and connectors of the same type as the patch panels to
which they are interconnecting. Use duplex patch cables. Due to performance and testing
requirements utilize factory manufactured pre-connectorized patch cords. Provide sufficient
fiber optic patch cables, of various appropriate lengths, to terminate all fiber optic patch
panel appearances plus 25 percent spare.
2-6.2.3
Cable Length
In accordance with TIA 568-C.1, limit copper data cable length to 295 feet (90 m) from
patch panel termination in the TR to the data outlet termination. If permitted by the agency
specific chapters, system architectures such as collapsed backbones or passive optical
networks (PON) may exceed the 295 foot (90 m) length.
2-7
WORK AREA
A work area is defined as the building space where the occupants interact with the
telecommunications terminal equipment. In this UFC, consolidation points (CP) and a MultiUser Telecommunications Outlet Assemblies (MUTOA) are included within this area.
2-7.1
Work Area Outlets
The following requirements apply to telecommunications outlets in the work area.
2-7.1.1
Wall-mounted Outlet Box
Provide double gang electrical boxes, minimum standard size 4-11/16 inches (100mm)
square and 2-1/8 inches (54 mm) deep with plaster ring for connection of single gang
faceplate. Design outlet box for recess mounting with the faceplate flush with the wall
surface, at the same height as the electrical outlets. Locate a quadruplex electrical outlet
within 6 inches (152 mm) of all work area outlets to serve telecommunications loads
associated with that outlet.
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For the power outlet circuits, assume that each location of two duplex
receptacles will power one personal computer with a monitor along with typical office
appurtenances such as task lights, and assume that there will be no diversification of this
load.
2-7.1.2
In-floor Outlet Boxes
Use in-floor outlet boxes only if no other alternative exists for feeding systems furniture,
classroom desks, lecterns in lecture halls, and other free standing furniture. In some
instances an in-floor grid type system may be required to provide necessary flexibility.
2-7.2
Telecommunications Faceplates
2-7.2.1
Work Area Outlet Faceplate
Provide single gang, four position, modular faceplate for each work area outlet. Standard
configuration is two RJ-45 modular jacks and two blanks for future applications as shown in
Figure 2-3. Provide other copper and fiber optic configurations to support special or legacy
telecommunications systems when required.
Figure 2-3 – Typical Faceplate Configuration
Figure 2-3 represents a single gang faceplate with two CAT6 modules, two blanks,
and sample labeling. As the infrastructure converges to voice over internet protocol
(VoIP), there will be no difference or distinction between voice or data modules.
2-7.2.2
Wall-Mounted Telephone Faceplate
Provide single gang, single position modular faceplate with one wired modular jack and
mounting lugs for each wall-mounted phone.
2-7.2.3
Coaxial Faceplate
Provide single gang, single position modular faceplate with one F-type coaxial adapter.
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2-7.3
Modular Jacks, Connectors and Adapters
The following requirements pertain to copper, fiber optic and coaxial cable jacks,
connectors, and adapters. For copper systems, utilize the same category rating for cable,
jacks, and patch panels throughout the entire system.
2-7.3.1
Copper Modular Jack
Provide unkeyed Category 6 (CAT6) modular jacks in accordance with TIA-568-C.0,
terminated per T568A configuration. Telecommunications manager approval is required
for:
•
Use of T568B configuration to maintain existing system uniformity
•
Use of keyed modular jacks where required to maintain system uniformity,
security, or other user specified reasons.
2-7.3.2
Fiber Optic Connectors and Adapters
Provide unkeyed duplex LC connectors and adapters in accordance with TIA-568-C.3.
Terminate fiber optic cabling at both ends utilizing duplex LC connectors, and utilize
adapters at faceplates and patch panels to align and connect fiber optic cables.
Telecommunications manager approval is required for:
•
Use of other types of connectors and adapters such as SC, ST, and MT-RJ
that are required to support existing systems.
•
Use of small form factor connectors and adapters with high density patch
panels. This may offer a potential cost reduction in facilities with a high outlet
concentration.
2-7.3.3
Coaxial Connectors and Adapters
Provide F-type adapters and crimp on connectors in accordance with TIA-568-C.4.
Terminate coaxial cabling at both ends using threaded, crimp-on connectors for
CATV or other systems. The use of any other connectors, such as BNC, requires
telecommunications manager approval. Coordinate with the cable service provider where
franchise agreements are in place.
2-7.4
Outlet Types and Density
The number of work area outlets per square area (outlet density) required in a building
varies greatly depending on the type of facility. Table 2-1 identifies facility space categories,
work area outlet types, and densities commonly used in military construction projects. The
outlet configuration options identified in Table 2-1 must be selected by the proponent and
the telecommunications manager. The outlet types do not cover all possible user required
configurations. Provide user-defined outlets that have a corresponding valid requirement,
such as multiple levels of classification or dedicated systems. Provide outlet configurations
that comply with this UFC and the current versions of TIA-568 and TIA-569. Outlet
densities are provided for planning purposes when actual outlet locations are not known
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and cannot be determined with available information. Actual designs must include outlets in
work areas, office automation outlets, private office outlets, conference rooms, and wall or
access phones as necessary.
Outlet densities are based on gross area (i.e. overall building footprint without
deducting for areas such as hallways, equipment rooms, and restrooms). Outlet
configurations, densities, and locations for all special-purpose spaces not identified in Table
2-1 must be determined by the user and the telecommunications manager. The above
requirements can be modified if it is validated (documented in writing, signed and dated by
the telecommunications manager) that mission operations require a quantity, configuration
or design other than specified herein.
Table 2-1 Outlet Types
Facility Space Category
Administrative space, to include
private offices, conference rooms,
Classrooms, Medical/Clinics,
Headquarters and Special Users
Outlet Configuration
Planning Area
(SF(SM)) per
Outlet
Two 8-pin modular (RJ45 type)
80(7.5) with a
outlet/connector OR One 8-pin modular minimum of two
and one Duplex fiber optic connector (2) dual outlets on
OR Two duplex fiber optic connectors different walls for
private offices
in a single gang outlet faceplate.
Systems Furniture
Two 8-pin modular (RJ45 type)
See Systems
outlet/connector OR
Furniture
One 8-pin modular and one Duplex
paragraph below
fiber optic connector OR
Two duplex fiber optic connectors in a
modular furniture outlet faceplate with
outlet box extender.
Non-Admin Spaces (CDCs, Chapels,
Two 8-pin modular (RJ45 type)
500(46.5)
Rec-centers, etc.)
outlet/connector OR
One 8-pin modular and one Duplex
fiber optic connector OR
Two duplex fiber optic connectors in a
single gang outlet faceplate.
Barracks or Dormitory
Refer to Barracks, Dormitory, Bachelor See paragraph
Space/Bachelors Quarters
Quarters paragraph below
below
Warehouse space
Two 8-pin modular (RJ45 type)
5000(465)
outlet/connector OR
One 8-pin modular and one Duplex
fiber optic connector OR
Two duplex fiber optic connectors in a
single gang outlet faceplate.
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Wall and Pay Phone Outlet
One 8-pin modular (RJ45 type)
connector in a single gang outlet
faceplate with mounting lugs.
As needed
Family Housing units
Refer to Family Housing Units
paragraph below
See paragraph
below
2-7.4.1
Systems Furniture
Provide a minimum of one systems furniture work area outlet per single occupancy cubicle
and a minimum of two systems furniture outlets per cubicle designated for additional
scanners, printers, copiers or fax machines.
2-7.4.2
Barracks, Dormitory, Bachelor Quarters
Provide one CAT6 modular jack (RJ-45 type) in each bedroom and common area (living
room) of the suite configured per TIA-570-C.
2-7.4.3
Family Housing Units
Provide a complete structured telecommunications system throughout housing unit in
accordance with TIA-570-C. Provide Grade 1 wiring outlets (one telephone outlet and one
CATV outlet) as required by TIA-570-C and any other logical location deemed appropriate,
including attached garages. UTP cabling and modular jacks must be a minimum CAT6.
2-7.4.4
Utility Rooms
Provide at least one wall mounted telecommunications outlet in each utility room (e.g.
electrical, mechanical and telecommunications spaces) to accommodate energy
management systems.
2-7.4.5
Elevators
Provide a standard work area outlet to the elevator machine room for each elevator.
2-7.4.6
Safety, Courtesy, & Convenience
Provide wall-mounted telephone outlets at all logical locations to support safety, courtesy,
and convenience. Examples include the following:
a.
Safety: barracks hall, laundry room.
b.
Courtesy: building lobby/entrance.
c.
Convenience: break rooms, rear (unmanned) entrances.
2-7.4.7
Multi-user Telecommunications Outlet Assembly (MUTOA)
A Multi-user Telecommunications Outlet Assembly (MUTOA) is defined as a grouping in
one location of several telecommunications outlet/connectors. TIA-568-C.1 allows MUTOAs
in an open office environment. This option provides greater flexibility in an office that is
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frequently reconfigured. A MUTOA facilitates the termination of single or multiple horizontal
cables in a common location within a furniture cluster or similar open area. The cables from
MUTOAs to work stations in system furniture or open office are supported by the systems
furniture raceway and the length must be calculated in accordance with TIA-568-C.1 when
establishing the total channel length. MUTOAs do not include an additional connection, and
are limited to terminating a maximum of 12 users. Locate MUTOAs and route cables within
systems furniture in accordance with TIA-568-C.1.
2-7.4.8
Consolidation Point (CP)
A Consolidation Point (CP) is defined as an interconnection point within the horizontal
cabling using TIA-568-C.2 or TIA-568-C.3 compliant connecting hardware. It differs from
the MUTOA in that it requires an additional connection for each horizontal cable run. A CP
may be useful when reconfiguration is frequent, but not so frequent as to require the
flexibility of the MUTOA. CP’s are limited to terminating a maximum of 12 users. Locate
CPs in accordance with TIA-568-C.1.
2-8
OTHER SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
2-8.1
Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) System
When closed-circuit television requirements are identified, provide either a 75-ohm
broadband quad-shield coaxial cable, single-mode fiber optic cable, or a category rated
cable system. Refer to the paragraphs above for fiber optic and category rated cable.
Ensure the correct cable is used in CCTV systems. Provide plenum cables in accordance
with NFPA 70, UFC 3-600-01, or when directed by the facility technical reviewing authority.
CCTV cable distances are affected by multiple variables such as signal strength at the
source, signal loss of cable, and CCTV components.
For CCTV security systems coordinate with \1\ UFC 4-021-02. /1/
2-8.2
Community Antenna Television (CATV) System
Community Antenna Television Systems are generally referred to as Cable TV. Provide a
complete system to be owned and maintained by the government consisting of
backboards/cabinets, cable, conduit, and outlets with jacks in all offices and other user
required locations. Coordinate with the local CATV service provider.
Include amplifiers, splitters, combiners, line taps, cables, outlets, tilt compensators and all
other parts, components, and equipment necessary to provide a complete and usable
system. Include the headend amplifier as part of the system when required by the local
provider. Passive CATV devices must support 1 gigahertz bandwidth.
2-8.2.1
System Requirements
Provide a TIA-568-C.4 and NFPA 70 compliant system. Use a star topology distribution
system with each CATV outlet connected to a TR with a feeder cable or a drop cable and
each TR connected to the head end equipment with a trunk cable. Provide a high quality
signal to all outlets with a return path for interactive television and cable modem access.
System must operate within the 5 to 1000 Megahertz bandwidth using 1000 MHz passive
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devices and a minimum of 750 MHz active devices. Provide a minimum signal level of 0
decibel millivolts (dBmV) (1000 microvolts) and a maximum of 15 dBmV at 55 and 750 MHz
at each outlet.
2-8.2.2
Cabling
\1\ Utilize either a 75-ohm broadband quad-shield coaxial cable or single-mode fiber optic
cable system. For fiber optic cables, follow horizontal and backbone cabling requirements.
For coaxial systems less than 295 feet (90 m) from headend equipment to the TR, or from
TR to TR, provide RG-11 coaxial trunk cable. For systems exceeding 295 feet (90 m) from
the headend equipment to the TR or from TR to TR, consider utilizing 625 series cable to
reduce system losses. Utilize RG-6 coaxial cables for drops from the TR (or headend) to
the wall outlet. Do not use RG-59 for CATV projects. /1/
2-8.3
Wireless Access Points (WAP)
When a wireless local area network (WLAN) system or a wireless intrusion detection
system (WIDS) is required, design in accordance with TIA Telecommunications Systems
Bulletin 162-A (TSB-162-A) Telecommunications Cabling Guidelines for Wireless Access
Points. TSB-162-A recommends the use of category 6A (or higher) twisted-pair and OM3
(or higher) optical fiber cabling to support higher data rates and, in the case of twisted-pair
cabling, lower temperature rise when remote power is applied. However the determination
of whether a Category 6A (or higher) twisted-pair or OM3 (or higher) optical fiber cabling is
used must be based on the following:
•
Complexity of maintaining multiple cabling systems (Category 6 for work area
outlets and Category 6A or optical fiber for support of WAPs)
•
Funding constraints to procure and maintain multiple cabling systems and test
equipment.
•
Space to accommodate hardware associated with multiple cabling systems.
For example, a Category 6A cabling system installed to support a wireless
system must be terminated on Category 6A patch panels.
Provide two twisted-pair cables, Category 6 or 6A terminated on standard 8-pin
modular connectors or two fiber multimode optical fiber strands, OM3 or higher for each
wireless access point. Install the WAP cabling infrastructure in the same manner as other
telecommunications outlets required in this UFC. Include the cable tray and conduit or Jhooks to support the cable connected to the WAP. The use of “J” hooks, flexible cable
tray(s), and alternative support systems specifically certified for the cable utilized is
permissible to support the WAPs from the cable tray. Do not exceed a 50 percent fill ratio
for the “J” hooks. Support horizontal cabling to distribution areas in cable tray(s).
Note: When funding permits, activities may utilize shielded twisted pair (STP) cabling for
WAPs. Shielded cables reduce the probability of alien crosstalk and also help to dissipate
heat when the cable is used to provide power.
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2-9
GROUNDING, BONDING, AND STATIC PROTECTION
Comply with NFPA 70 for grounding and bonding requirements. Provide a
telecommunications bonding and grounding system in accordance with TIA-607-B. Refer to
Figure 2-4 below. Building grounding systems are covered in UFC 3-520-01 Interior
Electrical Systems.
Note: The TIA-607-B identifies a bonding conductor known as the
telecommunications bonding backbone (TBB) which is intended to equalize potentials
between TRs. It should be recognized that the impedance of the TBB increases with
length, thereby reducing its ability to equalize potentials between TRs. The ITS designer
must consider that the TBB for a large site may be very costly to achieve. As an alternative,
the TGB in each TR can be bonded to the electrical panel board in the TR and to structural
steel where applicable. Install bonding conductors in the shortest and most direct paths
feasible.
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Figure 2-4 – Telecommunications Grounding and Bonding Infrastructure
2-9.1
Cable Entrance Grounding
Connect all metallic shields and strength members for outside plant cable entering a
building to the electrical service grounding electrode system in accordance with NFPA 70,
Article 800. Bond the OSP cable shield, armor, and metallic strength member to the main
building ground as close as possible to the building point of entrance with a No. 6 AWG or
larger ground wire. Use a non-bonded splice case for the transition from OSP rated cable
to interior rated cable. If the designer extends the OSP cable past 50 feet (15 m), \1\ bond
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the metallic strength member /1/ to the TMGB with a No. 6 AWG or larger copper ground
wire, as close to the conduit egress point as possible.
2-9.1.1
Protected Entrance Terminals
Terminate all incoming OSP copper cables on UL-listed primary protector blocks, located
within the building entrance terminal cabinet. Provide protector blocks equipped with 5-pin
solid state, gas, or hybrid protector modules for the number of pairs terminated. Bond the
protector blocks to the main electrical service ground via the TMGB or TGB with a No. 6
AWG or larger copper ground wire.
2-9.2
Telecommunications Spaces Bonding and Grounding
Bond all telecommunications spaces and infrastructure in accordance with TIA 607-B
where applicable.
2-9.3
Telecommunications Rack and Supporting Structure
Bond all telecommunications racks and supporting metallic structures (cable trays, ladders,
conduits and baskets) in accordance with TIA-607-B. Non-continuous distribution systems
(i.e. stub-ups, J-hooks) do not require bonding.
2-10
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION
Provide administration for the complete telecommunications system in accordance with
TIA-606-B. Determine the minimum class of administration by evaluating the size and
complexity of the premise infrastructure. Ensure the format for identifiers is backwardscompatible with TIA-606-A for installations in existing facilities or per ISO/IEC TR4763-1 for
new facilities unless otherwise directed by telecommunications manager. Coordinate with
telecommunications manager and appendices at the end of this document for any
additional service-specific labeling or administration requirements. Color-coding of
telecommunications infrastructure and components is recommended, but not required.
2-11
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM TESTING
All installed backbone and horizontal telecommunications cabling and connecting hardware
must meet minimum performance requirements and be tested in accordance with TIA-568C. Provide report of all tests results and certifications to the proponent and
telecommunications manager upon completion.
2-11.1
Unshielded Twisted Pair (CAT6) Cabling and Connecting Hardware
Perform all required testing to insure minimum performance requirements are met in
accordance with ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-C.2.
2-11.2
Fiber Optic Cabling and Connecting Hardware
Perform all required testing to insure minimum performance requirements are met in
accordance with TIA-568-C.1 for cabling and TIA-568-C.3 for connecting hardware.
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2-11.3
Coaxial Cabling and Connecting Hardware
Perform all required testing to insure minimum performance requirements are met in
accordance with TIA-568-C.4.
2-11.4
Test Plan
The contractor must submit for Government review a draft test plan of all proposed cabling
and equipment being installed under the project. Upon the draft’s approval, the contractor
must prepare a finalized test plan to the Government. After the contractor has completed
the installation and testing of the ITS, the contractor must submit a test report for all fiber
and copper cabling. The contractor’s RCDD must approve both the test plan and the test
report before submitting to the government.
Note: Test plans for small scale projects as delineated in paragraph 2-1.2 do not require
RCDD approval.
The test plan must include, along with all testing system reports, a complete
project test summary spreadsheet with indexed room numbers, outlet labels, jack labels
and the pass/fail status, and causes for failures along with a total number of outlets
installed, jacks/cable runs installed and the total number of jacks/cable runs that passed
and failed the tests. All failed tests, require the contractor to correct the failures prior to
turnover of the system. Tier 2 testing, data, analysis is required by the government at the
contractors expense if Tier 1 testing does not prove adequate for identifying causes of
failures, and if the government is responsible for paying for any repairs not within the
original scope of contract.
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CHAPTER 3 AIR FORCE SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS (RESERVED)
This chapter reserved for future use. Current Air Force requirements are reflected in
chapters 1 and 2.
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CHAPTER 4 ARMY SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
4-1
INTRODUCTION
4-1.1
Purpose
This chapter provides additional requirements and guidance for Department of Army
projects.
4-1.2
Army Technical Authority
4-2
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
4-2.1
Government-Designed Projects
Government-designed (in-house) projects require the approval of the service appointed
telecommunications agent, prior to bid, IAW regulations, policies, memorandums, and
guidance.
4-2.2
Classified Infrastructure
Use the following documents for projects that include Secret Internet Protocol Router
Network (SIPRNET) requirements:
•
SIPRNET Technical Implementation Criteria, U.S. Army Information
Systems Engineering Command (AKO Login Required)
\1\ https://www.us.army.mil/suite/files/5744948 /1/
•
UFGS 27 05 29.00 10 Protective Distribution System (PDS) for SIPRNET
Communication Systems
www.wbdg.org
4-2.3
Telecommunications Spaces
4-2.3.1
Collocation of other telecommunication systems
It is permissible to collocate CATV, CCTV, fire alarm and electronic security systems
(ESS) inside the TR. Final decision authority is the US Army Network Enterprise
Technology Command (Army NETCOM).
4-2.3.2
Multi-Story Buildings
Approved Standard Designs may deviate from stacked TRs when no other solution is
feasible.
4-2.3.3
Barracks, Dormitory, and Bachelor Quarter TR Sizing Considerations
Standard TIA-569-C TRs are normally too large for these types of facilities. Provide an
8-foot by 10-foot main TR on the first floor, and provide a minimum of one 6-foot by 8foot TR on subsequent floors. Provision the TRs in these facilities in accordance with
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TIA-569-C. Telecommunication enclosures are acceptable in barracks with non-linear
designs. Treat floors, walls, and ceilings to eliminate dust as defined in TIA-569-C.
4-2.4
Telecommunications Pathways
4-2.4.1
Direct Connection of Systems Furniture
Figure 1, of Appendix B (future), shows two possible solutions for direct wiring to the
systems furniture. This concept is one of a continuous home run from the
telecommunications space to the furniture outlet. Continuous runs are not
recommended, and should only be used in open office environments that cannot be
readily reconfigured. Testing of the installed cable plant is simplified by providing an
end-to-end circuit, without an additional connection point.
Follow the guidance of TIA-569-B, section 6.3.2 for direct connection
application and design.
4-2.4.2
Conduit-less Systems
Where allowed by the Activity, local codes and the telecommunications manager, a
conduit-less system may be utilized from the centralized cable tray to the work area
outlet. In this type of horizontal distribution no conduit is installed from the cable tray to
the work area outlet. Use non-continuous supports (J-hooks) to support the cable from
the centralized cable tray to the top of the wall containing the work area outlet, then
install the cable in the wall cavity to a low voltage mounting bracket.
4-2.5
Fiber Optic Backbone Cable
The DISN Enterprise Network Installation and Campus Area Network (ICAN) Design
and Implementation Standards and Specifications dictates the use of single mode fiber
cables for building backbones on Army projects.
4-2.6
Work Area
4-2.6.1
Work Area Outlets
4-2.6.1.1
Wall-mounted Low Voltage Brackets
When utilizing a conduit-less system provide double gang low voltage brackets or
backless outlet boxes at the work area location. The backless low voltage outlet box
accommodates bend radius requirements of low voltage cabling.
4-2.6.2
Outlet Types and Density
4-2.6.2.1
Barracks, Dormitories, Bachelor Quarters
For Army Barracks, provide two CAT6 modular jacks (RJ-45 type) in a single gang
outlet faceplate. Provide CATV outlets with “F” type jacks. Located CATV outlets in the
kitchen, living room, family room, and all bedrooms adjacent to a duplex electrical
receptacle.
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4-2.6.3
General Range Information Infrastructure Design
Follow the general provisions of this UFC for telecommunications sections of new range
construction and renovation projects. Several distinct types of information networks are
present in a range environment: administrative, range control, and tactical. The
administrative networks support telephone and data requirements to the occupants of
the range buildings, and safety telephones. The special Range Control networks control
downrange targets, sensors, and monitors and transport this information to off-site
locations. The tactical networks support the unit training requirements in a field
environment. Security and alarm networks may also be present.
4-2.6.4
Inter-Building and Outside Plant Requirements
\1\ Comply with Chapter 3 of the I3ATechnical Criteria until UFC 3-580-02 is published.
/1/
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CHAPTER 5 NAVY SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
5-1
INTRODUCTION
5-1.1
Purpose
This chapter will be used by the Navy to provide additional guidance and planning
information for Department of Navy (DoN) projects that will require Navy Marine Corps
Intranet (NMCI) network connections. Navy Medical Facilities must comply with the
Defense Medical Facilities Office (DMFO) criteria, including UFC 4-510-01, Design:
Medical Military Facilities and are not normally part of NMCI.
Note: For the purpose of this document, the term “NMCI” will be used to reference the
network provided for use by the Navy and Marine Corps; Next Generation Enterprise
Network (NGEN) will be used to reference the contract between the government and
the contractor providing the NMCI network service.
All NAVFAC Facilities Engineering Commands (FEC), Public Works
Departments (PWD), Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC) offices, Base
Communications Officer (BCO), and other concerned parties in the process, must refer
to this document when designing, planning or preparing documentation for new projects
that will require operational NMCI support.
5-1.2
Order of Precedence
This document does not and cannot supersede or add to the requirements of the NMCI
Next Generation (NGEN) contract. If conflicts arise between this document and the
NGEN contract, the NGEN contract governs.
5-1.3
Coordination
Although this criteria document was written to be as inclusive as possible, Information
Technology (IT) installations may vary greatly from building to building. It is therefore
imperative that the government facilities team (Naval Enterprise Networks (NEN)
Program Office, Commander Navy Installations Command (CNIC), and Naval Facilities
Engineering Command (NAVFAC) components), facility design team, and construction
contractor coordinate closely at each stage of planning, design and construction. The
telecommunications system Designer of Record (DOR) must coordinate his efforts for
each design with the applicable entities identified in Figure 5-1.
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Figure 5-1 – Navy Telecommunications Coordination Chart for Typical
Design/Bid/Build for Non-National Capital Region (NCR) Projects
Telecommunications Designer DOR
End User – Customer
1. Establishes requirements for
voice and data systems in facility.
2. Discusses requirements with DOR
and BCO.
3. Provides DOR with quantity and
location of outlets.
1. Discusses telecommunications
requirements with customer and
BCO, initially at scoping meeting.
2. Obtains type, quantity and location of
work area outlets from customer.
3. Obtains physical space requirements
for active equipment from NMCI and
NCTAMS.
4. Provides design for physical
infrastructure throughout facility to
point of service.
5. Sends Appendix A, DD 1391, and
cost estimate to NCTAMS via
NAVFAC PM.
6. Sends design plans and specs at
each design submittal to NCTAMS,
BCO and NMCI/NGEN POC via
NAVFACPM.
7. Resolve and incorporate comments
appropriately.
8. Sends NMCI requirements to the
NMCI COTR via PM for user.
“Telecommunications Manager – TM”
Base Communications Office (BCO)
1. Discusses telecommunications
requirements (voice) with Customer
and DOR.
2. Designs and procures the voice
portion of telecommunications
system with assistance from
NCTAMS RC. BCO may not
procure systems with extend
beyond their delegation of authority
($50,000), nor can they procure
electronic key systems, central
office equipment, PBX systems or
trunk lines.
3. Provides DOR with physical space
requirements for active voice
equipment, point of service
connection for voice system, and
incoming voice service duct size
requirements.
NCTAMS Regional Coordinator –
(RC)
1. Provides design and procurement
assistance to BCO. NCTAMS RC is
responsible for procuring all voice
systems which extend beyond the
BCO’s delegation of authority ($50,000)
as well as all electronic key systems,
central office equipment, PBX systems
and trunk lines.
2. Receives Appendix A, DD 1391, and
parametric cost estimate from NAVFAC
PM for review and comment.
3. Receives final design plans and specs
for all projects being advertised for
construction, for information only.
NMCI/NGEN POC
1. Discusses telecommunications
requirements (data) with Customer
and DOR.
2. Provides DOR with physical space
requirements for active data
equipment, point of service
connection for data system, and
incoming data service duct size
requirements.
Note: The NMCI/NGEN contractor’s service
manager for installation is based on PSI
Codes. List is available at
https://nmcicustomerreporting/CTR_Lookup
/Index.asp
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5-2
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR NMCI CONSTRUCTION
5-2.1
Collocating Various Systems
Provide adequate space in TRs to facilitate tenant-owned telecommunications systems,
and other low-voltage systems such as fire alarm, CATV, CCTV, and ESS.
5-2.2
Bachelor Quarters Considerations
Standard TIA-569-C TRs are normally too large for these types of facilities. For multistory quarters, provide a minimum of one 8 ft (2.4 m) by 10 ft (3 m) main TR on the first
floor and a minimum of one 6 ft (1.8 m) by 8 ft (2.4 m) TR on subsequent floors. Provide
additional TRs on the main and subsequent floors as required to meet system
limitations.
5-2.3
Fiber Optic Backbone Cabling
Provide single mode fiber optic cabling (OS1) for building backbones on all projects to
future proof the network and standardize the backbone. Additionally, this permits the
option of flattening the network via direct connection to switches in TRs other than the
main TR. In existing Navy facilities with multimode cables and switches, coordinate with
the activity and the NMCI/NGEN contractor to determine whether the switch optics will
be changed to utilize the single mode backbone, or if multimode cable must also be
provided in addition to the single mode. If using multimode, OM3 (which permits data
rates up to 10 Gig) is first choice. OM2 and OM1 should only be used to supplement
existing systems.
5-2.4
Navy-Specific Technical Authorities
For the purposes of implementing fiber to the desktop, Designer of Record must have
justification in writing from the End User certifying that the 1391 supports this
requirement, and from the NMCI/NGEN point of contact certifying that this requirement
is included in their planned system.
5-2.5
Barracks, Dormitory, Bachelor Quarters
Provide a minimum of one standard telecommunications outlet in each bedroom and
common area (living room) of the suite. Comply with FC 4-721-10N, Navy and Marine
Corps Unaccompanied Housing.
5-2.6
Utility Rooms
Coordinate with other disciplines and the Activity to determine if a voice or data outlet is
needed in mechanical or electrical utility spaces, (for smart metering or automated
building control systems).
5-3
OUTSIDE CABLE PLANT
Outside Plant (OSP) requirements were in the UFC 3-580-10 which has now been
cancelled. The requirements are included here, until the UFC 3-580-02 is completed.
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5-3.1
Pathways
Coordinate with the NMCI Contractor to determine if the NMCI pathways can be routed
in the same duct bank with other telecommunication conduits. If so, conduits beyond
the 5 feet (1.5 m) line and manholes are MILCON funded to the closest manhole where
service exists. The location of underground structures and the necessary
interconnecting ducts must be explicitly described and identified in the contract
documents.
For new buildings, provide a minimum of one 4 inch (103 mm) conduit for
NMCI service. Provide a minimum of two conduits for multi-story buildings. Utilize
three innerducts (two 1.5 inch (41 mm) and one 1 inch (27 mm)) or three fabric mesh
innerducts in each conduit. Install a pull wire inside each of the innerducts. This is in
addition to the conduits required for other telecommunications services; i.e. telephone,
cable television, fire alarm and intrusion detection.
5-3.2
Detection
Provide electronic detection for each pathway in accordance with the following:
•
Utilize detectable warning tape or tracer wire above the duct back for new
installations.
•
Utilize tracer wire when pulling new cable in existing duct systems.
5-3.3
Cabling
Standard NMCI practice utilizes Single Mode (SM) fiber optic cable, with a minimum
core size of 8 microns as the transport medium between building EFs.
•
Install fiber underground in conduit.
•
A minimum of 12 strands of SM fiber is required; coordinate with the NMCI
contractor for additional requirements. Provide fiber with facility contract.
•
If classified seats are supported and unencrypted classified
communication occurs over the outside plant cabling, conduits are
required and must normally be encased in concrete. Comply with
applicable Protected Distribution Systems (PDS) requirements, including
IA PUB-5239-22, Protected Distribution System (PDS).
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CHAPTER 6 USMC SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
6-1
INTRODUCTION
6-1.1
Purpose
This chapter will be used by the United States Marine Corps (USMC) to provide
additional guidance and planning information for USMC projects that will require
telecommunications or information technology (IT) network connections.
6-1.2
•
All USMC projects must use an optical solution as the first course of action
when planning and designing new projects. Exceptions to this can only be
granted by the USMC installations advocate or where life safety is
concerned due to local building codes. Refer to Chapter 2 of this UFC for
non-optical solutions.
•
All NAVFAC Facilities Engineering Commands (FEC), Public Works
Departments (PWD), Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC)
offices, Installations’ G/S-6, and other concerned parties in the process
must refer to this document when designing, planning or preparing
documentation for new projects.
USMC Technical Authority
All telecommunications infrastructure must meet the needs of the activity and supporting
facilities in accordance with this document. A/E contractor-generated final drawings and
specifications for design-bid-build and design-build projects must be stamped by a
BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD). Design and
construction may be concurrent efforts in Design-Build projects, and multiple phases
may be approved. Therefore, each phase and/or project must be stamped.
Modernization of telecommunications systems within existing facilities solely
for the purpose of meeting design criteria in this UFC is not required.
6-1.3
Coordination
Although this criteria document was written to be as inclusive as possible, Information
Technology (IT) installations may vary greatly from building to building. It is therefore
imperative that the government facilities team as stated above, facility designer, and
construction contractor coordinate closely at each stage of planning, design and
construction. The Designer of Record (DOR) must coordinate his efforts for each
design with the applicable entities identified in Figure 6-1.
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Figure 6-1 – USMC Telecommunications Coordination Chart for Typical DesignBuild and Design-Bid-Build Projects
End User – Customer
Telecommunications Designer
- DOR
1. Establishes requirements for voice
and data systems in facility.
2. Discusses and defines
requirements with local G/S-6
Project Officer.
1. Awarded design contract for project.
2. Discusses telecommunications
requirements with G/S-6 and PWO,
initially at scoping meeting.
3. Obtains type, quantity and location
of work area outlets.
4. Obtains physical space requirements
for any IT equipment associated with
the project.
5. Provides design for physical
infrastructure throughout facility to
point of service.
6. Sends design plans and specs at
each design submittal to G/S-6 and
PWO.
7. Resolves any comments
appropriately. Final design accepted.
8. Sends final design package,
including cost estimate to PWO.
Base Communications Office
(G/S-6)
3. Discusses all telecommunications
requirements with the Customer
and DOR.
4. Coordinates with Program
Managers and Regional G-6 for all
telecommunications and IT
requirements for a specific project.
Changes to DoDIN Services are
coordinated with local NSC (and
project office). Changes to
commercial or Non-DoD Services
are coordinated with local POCs as
required by AHJ. Funding
requirements are coordinated
through appropriate requests and
programs.
5. Provides DOR with physical space
requirements for any IT equipment;
service point connection for
telecommunications; and local
telecommunications standards and
requirements.
6. Provides local project office (PWO)
with telecommunications and IT
requirements.
1. Solid lines represent customer coordination
requirements within installation staff and their tenants.
2. Dashed lines represent contractor to installation
communication.
Base Public Works Office –
PWO
40
1. Coordinates with all local
stakeholders for requirements and
design standards.
2. Approves design requirements for
overall project including
telecommunications.
3. Develops DD 1391 and associated
documentation for requested project.
4. Award design contract.
5. Receives final design package from
DOR.
6. Approves all design documentation
and coordinates any changes.
7. Design sent to acquisition for project
execution.
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6-2
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR USMC PROJECTS
6-2.1
Government-Designed Projects
Government-designed (in-house) projects require the approval of the service appointed
telecommunications agent, prior to bid, IAW regulations, policies, memorandums, and
guidance.
6-2.2
Classified Infrastructure
Classified work areas, rooms and facilities must comply with MCO 5530.14A - Marine
Corps Physical Security Program Manual.
6-2.3
Collocation Of Other Telecommunication Systems
It is permissible to collocate CATV, CCTV, control systems, fire alarm and electronic
security systems (ESS) inside the TR. Tenant owned systems, that are not considered
part of the facility are not accorded space within a TR. Planning for an equipment room
will be considered as required if there are no other hosting capabilities available. Final
decision authority is the local Installation Commander or AHJ.
6-2.4
Telecommunications Rooms (TR)
Follow the general requirements of Chapter 2 with the following additional requirements.
Minimum dimensions – 10 feet 8 inches (3.25 meter) by 12 feet (3.6 meter), meeting all
TIA-569-C standards with the below exceptions.
•
Base sizing of room on the additional systems requirements of the service
space such as BMS, ACMS, IDS, fire-alarm panels, and A/V equipment.
•
Provide a minimum of two standard 19 inch cabinets per TR. Equipment
racks will be used by exception due to physical security requirements and
other specific facility requirements.
•
In facilities or structures that only require the minimum infrastructure to the
EF, one cabinet may be used and the room resized appropriately.
•
Mount all cabinets to the permanent floor, centered in the TR to meet ADA
access requirements.
Treat floors, walls and ceilings to eliminate dust by providing eggshell or
semi-gloss paint finish, light in color to enhance room lighting. Provide one wall outlet
installed at or near the entry door for emergency or primary voice communications.
6-2.5
Cabinet Layout
The typical TR cabinet layout will include PETs, Patch Panels, ONTs and Optical
Splitters. Other cabinet components are defined in Chapter 2 of this UFC. Locate
OLTs at the Area Distribution Node and define in UFC 3-580-02 when published.
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6-2.4
ONT Placement
Do not place rack-mounted ONTs with more than 120 Gbe interfaces per PON port off
of the OLT. Current ONTs configured with 24-ports are grouped in multiples of five onto
a 1:8 or 2:8 (for pathway redundancy) passive optical splitter.
6-2.5
Optical Splitters
Locate splitter at a central aggregation point or EF when feeding a single ONT at a
remote location, EUB, or hybrid A/V rack area. This is the demarcation point of an EUB.
Place the optical splitter at the ADN if the facility will house four to five ONTs, and will
require only a single (or two for redundancy) strand(s) of OSP fiber to the OLT.
However, if this EUB requires dual homing or special redundancy, locate a secondary
2:1 splitter to connect the ONT and allow for two OLTs to be interfaced into the EUB 2:1
splitter.
It is important to ensure that the optical loss budget is taken into account. As
the common POL budget is from -8 to -28dB, there may be a requirement to attenuate
the optical signal via a splitter or attenuator to allow for proper ONT operation.
6-2.6
Patch Panels and Patch Cords
Provide patch panels to support locking or keyed patch cords for improved physical
security and the ability to meet fixed emergency communication location requirements.
Code or key patch cords in accordance with the type of service they are providing; i.e.
primary voice, data, video, or SCADA.
Provide bend-insensitive, pre-terminated patch cords capable of being locked
into place to avoid accidental disruption of services or tampering. For OLT to Fiber
Optic Patch Panel (FOPP) connections, provide SC-UPC to SC-APC patch cords.
Provide all other patch cables to match the patch panel they are connecting. LC-APC
connectors and patch panel adapter bulkheads are acceptable for increased density;
however they are not permissible at the information outlet faceplate.
6-2.7
Telecommunications Pathways Interior Conduit
Provide all wall-mounted work area outlets with rigid metal conduit stubbed up from the
outlet to the horizontal cable distribution system. Utilize cable trays or non-continuous
supports (J-hooks) to support the cable from the TR to the top of the wall containing the
work area outlet, then route the cable in the wall cavity to a low-voltage mounting
bracket.
6-2.8
Work Area Outlets
Connect work area outlet faceplates to a double-gang, 4 inch x 4 inch (100 mm x 100
mm) outlet box, at least 3.5 inch (89 mm) deep to accommodate fiber inserts, slack
management, and potential in-wall signal converters.
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6-2.8.1
Type 1 Outlet
Terminate Type I Horizontal fibers in a traditional faceplate. Because ONTs typically
allow multiple Ethernet interfaces, a single fiber interface per workstation/classification
is typically all that is required. This consists of a traditional wall plate equipped with two
single-port SC-APC connectors. This scenario provides flexibility in that any ONT type
can be utilized in the design, along with other traditional duplex send and receive fiber
pair technologies that may be required under special circumstances.
When utilizing fiber outlets for desktop or surface mounted ONTs, the outlet
connectors for the horizontal fiber drop must be an individual snap-in style and fit
securely into the faceplate housing. The connector must be compatible with singlemode SC-APC fiber. SC-APC is recommended throughout the installation to ensure
compatibility with RF video service and future 10GPON applications utilizing the 1577
nm wavelengths. Angled connectors or inserts with hinged dust covers are
recommended to minimize fiber end face contamination.
6-2.8.1.1
ONT COPPER ETHERNET INTERFACES
For ONTs equipped with Ethernet interfaces, provide a minimum of one (1) 10/100/1000
RJ-45 interface conforming to IEEE 802.3 standards. A quantity of two or four 1000
Base-T interfaces are recommended to comply with current industry best-practices.
10/100 Base-T interfaces and those not supporting PoE or PoE+ are not permissible
except in scenarios where RF video or POTS services are being provided.
6-2.8.1.2
ONT COPPER ANALOG INTERFACES
ONTs equipped with analog POTS provide various quantities (2, 4, or 24 depending on
the model) of RJ-11 or RJ-21 telephone jacks for connection of analog devices
(telephones, Faxes, modems, etc.). These interfaces may provide 600 or 900 Ohm
terminations and adhere to typical analog voice wire length specifications.
6-2.8.1.3
ONT COAXIAL OUTLET/CONNECTOR
ONTs equipped with RF video interfaces can provide broadcast television service or
any RF frequency up to 1 GHz. The coaxial outlet/connector integrated within the ONT
is a standard, male 75-Ohm “F” type connector. The designer must coordinate with the
cable service provider where franchise agreements are in place and additional headend components such as an RF combiner, laser modulator and fiber amplifier (EDFA)
will be required for POL distribution of RF services.
6-2.8.1.4
ONT DENSITY (PORT SHARING)
Consider the end user requirements with regard to the number of information outlets at
a workstation when designing a POL system layout. While some IP endpoints
(including printer locations, IP Surveillance, Access Control Entry Points, and building
automation systems) may require multiple ports for connectivity to various Ethernet
devices or multiple networks, there are many instances where a workstation or IP
endpoint need only connect to perhaps one or two network interfaces. In this scenario,
it is acceptable to allow for port sharing between ONTs to increase the operational and
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financial savings associated with the POL deployment. In the port sharing deployment,
adjacent cubicles or modular workstations can share the ports of a single ONT by
distributing copper Ethernet patch cables between the cubicles. The quantity depends
upon the number of required interfaces for each workstation and/or the forecasted
growth of the end user’s network requirements. In many cases, an IP telephone can be
installed in tandem with a user’s PC or workstation eliminating the need for a duplex
Ethernet jack per user. This allows for as many as four users to share a single, fourport ONT for example. Another scenario is one which provides two jacks per
workstation so that the ONT’s are shared at a 2:1 ratio. Regardless of port sharing, the
designer must provide a single WAO at each workstation for future growth and flexibility.
6-2.8.2
Type 2 Outlet
The Type 2 Outlet mirrors the approach of a Type 1 deployment with the exception of
the termination of the ONT at the end user workstation or IP endpoint. The Type II
deployment will provide protection of the ONT from tampering, disruption of service, and
environmental anomalies such as liquid spills, dust, or even vandalism. Enclosures are
also recommended in medical facilities, conference rooms, or common areas to conceal
cabling and ensure continuity of operation. All connectivity to the ONT (power, fiber
port, Ethernet, analog voice, and RF video) may be contained within the enclosure and
end user information outlets can either extend externally from the enclosure to a face
plate apparatus, or exit the enclosure via pass through devices. The location of the
information outlets is dependent upon end user requirements and whether the
enclosure is surface mounted or flush mounted. See Figure 6-2.
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Figure 6-2 Flush mounted ONT enclosure
6-2.8.3
Type 3 Outlet
Type 3 deployments allow for a hybrid approach to passive optical LATB infrastructures.
Type 3 deployments are appropriate where existing telecommunications rooms (TR)
exist and are not planned to be re-purposed after installation of the PON. Type 3
deployments are also appropriate where a viable copper cabling infrastructure exists
and is not in need of a technology refresh. Type 3 systems utilize high-density ONTs
(Typically 24 Ethernet ports) which are then patched to the horizontal copper cabling
drops as does a legacy system utilizing workgroup switches. Type 3 deployments allow
for a migration strategy to fiber-to-the-desktop architectures and can readily
accommodate technology refreshes where the legacy workgroup switches must be
replaced.
The workstation outlet utilized in a Type 3 architecture consists of standard
Category rated copper cabling per Chapter 2 of this UFC. The WAOs in this
architecture are commonly in place prior to the upgrade or replacement of the active
electronics to POL. A new copper plant is recommended, but not required to provide
flexibility in the types of networks patched into the POL or for special sources.
Note: Reference Chapter 2 of this UFC for additional outlet types and design
standards for copper or optical-based interior telecommunication wiring.
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6-2.9
Installation Cabling Distribution System (ICDS) or Backbone Cabling
Provide a minimum telecommunications service to all new facilities consisting of one
25pr copper cable and one 24 strand, single mode (OS1) fiber optic cable through a
minimum of two 4 inch (100 mm) ducts. Provide additional cable count in accordance
with maximum population and workspace requirements per facility type.
Previously, ICDS requirements for the USMC were included in UFC 3-580-10
and 3-580-02, which have been cancelled or are no longer applicable, respectively.
The current requirements are included here, until UFC 3-580-02 is completed.
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APPENDIX A REFERENCES
Note: The most recent edition of referenced publications applies, unless otherwise
specified.
INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS (IEEE)
C2-2012, National Electrical Safety Code
INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION AND
INTERNATIONAL ELECTROTECHNICAL COMMISSION
ISO/IEC 11801, Information Technology – Generic Cabling for Customer Premises
ISO/IEC 14763-1, Information Technology – Implementation and Operation of Customer
Premises Cabling, Part 1: Administration
ISO/IEC 14763-2, Information Technology – Implementation and Operation of Customer
Premises Cabling, Part 2: Planning and Installation
ISO/IEC 14763-3, Information Technology – Implementation and Operation of Customer
Premises Cabling, Part 3: Testing of Optical Fiber Cabling
NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION (NFPA)
NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, National Fire Protection Association, Inc.
Note: The NEC must be effective for new design projects awarded after January 1 of
the year following the issuance of a revised edition unless specifically identified
otherwise in contract documents
NFPA 780, Standard for the Installation of Lightning Protection Systems
TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION (TIA)
TIA-568-C.1, Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard.
TIA-568-C.2, Balanced Twisted-Pair Telecommunications Cabling and Components
Standards.
TIA-568-C.3, Optical Fiber Cabling Components Standard.
ANSI/TIA-568-B.2 –1 Addendum 1, Transmission Performance Specifications for 4-pair
100-ohm Category 6 Cabling.
ANSI/TIA-568-B.2–4 Addendum 4, Solderless Connection Reliability Requirements for
Copper Connecting Hardware.
ANSI/TIA-568-B.3-1 Addendum 1 – Additional Transmission Performance
Specifications for 50/125 Optical Fiber Cables.
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TIA-569-C Telecommunications Pathways and Spaces
TIA-570-C, Residential Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard.
TIA-526-7, Measurement of Optical Power Loss of Installed Single-Mode Fiber Cable
Plant.
TIA -526-14-B, Optical Power Loss Measurement of Installed Multimode Fiber Cable
Plant.
TIA-606-A, Administrative Standard for the Telecommunications Infrastructure.
TIA J-STD-607-B, Generic Telecommunications Bonding and Grounding (Earthing) for
Customer Premises.
TIA-758-B Customer-Owned Outside Plant Telecommunications Infrastructure
TIA-862, Building Automation Systems Cabling Standard
TSB-162-A, TIA Systems Bulletin Telecommunications Cabling Guidelines for Wireless
Access Points
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
MIL-STD-188-124B, Grounding, Bonding And Shielding for Common Long Haul/Tactical
Communication Systems Including Ground Based Communications- Electronics
Facilities and Equipments.
MIL-HDBK-419A
Facilities
Grounding, Bonding, and Shielding For Electronic Equipment and
CNSSAM TEMPEST/1-13
Red/Black Installation Guidance
ICD/ICS 705 (U)
Technical Specifications for Construction and Management of
Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities
ICS 705-1
Physical and Technical Security Standards for Sensitive
Compartmented Information Facilities
ICS 705-2
Standards for the Accreditation and Reciprocal Use of Sensitive
Compartmented Information
MCO 5530.14A
Marine Corps Physical Security Program Manual
NSTISSP 300 (U)
National Policy on Control of Compromising Emanations
UFC 1-300-01
Criteria Format Standard
UFC 3-580-10
Practices
Navy and Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) Standard Construction
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UFGS-27-10-00
Building Telecommunications Cabling System
UFC 1-200-01
General Building Requirements
UFC 4-010-05 Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities Planning, Design, and
ConstructionMIL-HDBK-1012/3 Telecommunications Premises Distribution Planning,
Design, and Estimating
ETL 02-12
Communications and Information System Criteria for Air Force Facilities
I3A
Army Installation Information Infrastructure Architecture
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GLOSSARY
Abbreviations and Acronyms:
10G
10GPON
AC
ADN
AFCESA
AFH
AHJ
ANSI
APC
A/V
AWG
BATB
BEQ
BET
BICSI
BOQ
CATV
CCB
CCTV
CP
CTTA
DAA
dBmV
DC
DCO
DDC
DOIM
DOIM
DoD
DODISS
DPW
EES
EF
EMT
ER
EUB
FO
FOCIS
FOPP
FOUO
Gbe
GE
GHz
10-Gigabit Ethernet
10-Gigabit Symmetrical Passive Optical Network
Alternating Current
Area Distribution Node
Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency
Army Family Housing
Authority Having Jurisdiction
American National Standards Institute
Angled Physical Contact
Audio Visual
American Wire Gauge
Base Area Transport Boundary
Bachelor Enlisted Quarters
Building Entrance Terminal
Building Industry Consulting Service, International, Inc.
Bachelor Officers Quarters
Community Antenna or Cable Television
Construction Criteria Base
Closed-Circuit Television
Consolidation Point
Certified TEMPEST Technical Authority
Designated Accreditation Authority
Decibel (reference to millivolt)
Direct Current
Dial/Digital Central Office
Direct Digital Controller
Directorate of Information Management
Directorate of Information Management
Department of Defense
Department of Defense Index of Specifications and Standards
Directorate of Public Works
Earth Electrode Subsystem
Entrance Facility
Electrical Metallic Tubing
Equipment Room
End User Building
Fiber Optic
Fiber Optic Connector Intermateability Standard
Fiber Optic Patch Panel
For Official Use Only
Gigabit Ethernet
Grounding Equalizer
Gigahertz
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GPON
HVAC
I3A
ICDS
IDF
IMA
IS
ISP
ITS
ITU
LAN
LATB
LC
MCEN
MCN
MDF
MHz
MILCON
MRI
MTBF
MUTOA
NAVFAC
NCTAMS
NEC
NESC
NFPA
NGEN
NMCI
NSI
ODN
OLT
ONT
OSP
PDS
PET
POL
PON
POTS
RCDD
RU
SEBQ
SFP
SIPRNET
SMF
TBB
TDMM
TE
TEF
Gigabit Passive Optical Network
Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning
Installation Information Infrastructure Architecture
Installation Communications Distribution System(s)
Intermediate Distribution Frame
Information Mission Area
Information System
Inside Plant Wiring
Information Transport System
International Telecommunications Union
Local Area Network
Local Area Transport Boundary(s)
Lucent Connector
Marine Corps Enterprise Network
Main Core Node
Main Distribution Frame
Megahertz
Military Construction
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mean Time Between Failures
Multi-User Telecommunication Outlet Assembly
Naval Facilities Engineering Command
Naval Computer and Telecommunications Area Master Station
National Electrical Code
National Electrical Safety Code
National Fire Protection Association, Inc.
Next Generation Enterprise Network
Navy and Marine Corps Intranet
National Security Information
Optical Distribution Network
Optical Line Terminal
Optical Network Terminal
Outside Plant
Protected Distribution System
Protected Entrance Terminal (sometimes referred to as BET)
Passive Optical LAN
Passive Optical Network
Plain Old Telephone Service
Registered Communications Distribution Designer
Rack Unit
Senior Enlisted Bachelor Quarters
Small Form Pluggable
Secret Internet Protocol Router Network
Single Mode Fiber
Telecommunications Bonding Backbone
BICSI Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual (Latest Edition)
Telecommunications Enclosure
Telecommunications Entrance Facility
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TGB
TIA
TMGB
TR
UCR
UFC
UL
UPC
USACE
UTP
VTC
WAO
WAP
Telecommunications Grounding Busbar
Telecommunications Industry Association
Telecommunications Main Grounding Busbar
Telecommunications Room
Unified Capabilities Requirements (Latest Edition)
Unified Facilities Criteria
Underwriters Laboratory, Inc.
Ultra Physical Contact
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Unshielded Twisted Pair
Video Teleconference
Work Area Outlet
Wireless Access Point
Terms
Intra-Building Backbone – Connectivity for the voice, video, and data networks
between the entrance facility or equipment room, to a telecommunications room.
Inter-Building Backbone - Connectivity between buildings, also referred to as part of
Outside Plant (OSP) and will be defined in UFC 3-580-02
52
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